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Sample Report

4 Bedroom Semi-Detached Property version 1.0 25 October 2012

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2 6XPPDU\RI%HVSRNH5HFRPPHQGHG3DFNDJHV Based on your budget, ambitions and timescales we group different measures that we evaluate into bespoke recommended packages in order to show their net effect. This is a high level summary of what could be achieved with the packages we have put together for you and your home. The rest of the report gives you all the detail behind these (and more...)

No Brainer Annual saving: Total cost: Payback:

£328 £75 0.2 years

Some Consideration Annual saving: Total cost: Payback:

£435 £1,285 2.9 years

Green Halo Annual saving: Total cost: Payback:

£769 £13,325 17 years

Green Halo + PV Annual saving: Total cost: Payback:

£1,228 £20,325 16 years

Annual CO2 saving

Annual CO2 saving

Annual CO2 saving

Annual CO2 saving

Measures that have paybacks shorter than 5 years and cost less than £500 each:

Measures that have paybacks shorter than 15 years and cost less than £2,000 each.

Measures that have paybacks shorter than 25 years and cost less than £12,500 each.

Measures that have paybacks shorter than 25 years and cost less than £12,500 each.

x Install an ultra low flow showerhead

$OOµNo Brainer¶ measures PLUS:

All µSome Consideration¶measures PLUS:

All µGreen Halo¶ measures PLUS:

x Replace fridge freezer with a new A++ rated alternative x + 2 other measures

x Install a biomass batch boiler and connect to the existing radiator system except in the extension where wet underfloor heating will be installed - supplemented by the wood burners x + 1 other measure

x Install a 2kWp solar PV array on the southeast facing front roof, based on a Feed In Tariff (FIT) rate of 16p per kWh

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3

Automated Green Halo + PV Annual saving: Total cost: Payback:

£1,076 £28,325 26 years

Annual CO2 saving

Measures that have paybacks shorter than 50 years and cost less than £20,000 each. All µGreen Halo + PV¶ measures except replacing the biomass boiler with: x Install a ground to water Ground Source Heat Pump and connect to the existing radiator system except in the extension where wet underfloor heating will be installed supplemented by the wood burners

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4 ABOUT PARITY Parity is an award-winning provider of environmental and energy solutions to the residential building sector. We help our customers identify the most effective ways to reduce the running costs and environmental impact of their properties.

SURVEY AND ANALYSIS COMPLETED BY:

Survey Analysis

Version 1.0

Parity also provides a number of other related services such as eco-renovation project management, training installers and consulting services to local government, housing associations and other organisations. Tel:+44 (0) 208 874 6433 Email: info@parityprojects.com Website: www.parityprojects.com

Company Registered in England & Wales No. 5557883

PARITY AWARDS, PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIP

26 Jul 12 01 Aug 12

DU GWH

01 Aug 12

CJN

Approval

The backbone of our work is the Parity Home Energy Master Plan which identifies the most appropriate measure for specific properties based on impartial physics.

Parity Projects Ltd. Block A Unit 230/231 Riverside Business Centre London SW18 4UQ

DOCUMENT HISTORY

Distribution Client Parity

01 Aug 12 01 Aug 12

Graham Hunter Graham is a keen rock climber, although he spends most of his time bouldering indoors when the weather's not very good outside. He's currently studying for his masters degree in Renewable Energy and the Built Environment as well as working with Parity Projects.

AECB, The Sustainable Building Association (member)

Federation of Master Builders (associate member)

UK Green Building Council (member)

Winner in three categories at the Sustainable Housing Awards 2011 DIY category at the Observer Ethical Awards 2008 Award for Sustainable Refurbishment

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5 Table of contents SUMMARY OF BESPOKE RECOMMENDED PACKAGES

2!

HOW TO USE THIS PLAN

6!

1!

7!

INTRODUCTION 1.1! 1.2! 1.3!

7! 7! 8!

PURPOSE OF THIS DOCUMENT DOCUMENT OUTLINE METHODOLOGY

2!

ENERGY USE AND CO2 EMISSIONS OF YOUR HOUSE

3!

MEASURES EVALUATED 3.1! 3.2! 3.3! 3.4! 3.5! 3.6! 3.7! 3.8! 3.9! 3.11! 3.12!

4!

WINDOWS AND DOORS DRAUGHTS ROOF WALLS FLOOR LIGHTING APPLIANCES AND OTHER ELECTRICAL USE SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULE (PV) SOLAR HOT WATER

BESPOKE RECOMMENDATIONS WHAT IS IN THIS SECTION? WHAT IS IMPORTANT TO YOU? SUMMARY

4.1! 4.2! 4.3! 4.4! 4.5! 5!

NO BRAINER SOME CONSIDERATION GREEN HALO GREEN HALO + PV AUTOMATED GREEN HALO + PV

GENERAL INFORMATION

9! 14!

THE HOUSE BASIC INFORMATION

HEATING AND HOT WATER

5.1! SEQUENCING OF WORK ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.! 5.1! ADDING VALUE TO THE HOUSE ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.! 5.2! BUILDING REGULATIONS ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.! 5.3! FINANCES ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.! 5.4! PLANNING PERMISSION AND RENEWABLES ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.! 5.5! POSSIBLE ALTERNATIVE OPTIONS TO THOSE RECOMMENDED ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.! 5.6! MEASURES THAT HAVE BEEN RULED OUT ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.! 5.7! IMPORTANT NOTE ON INSULATION AND CONDENSATION ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.! 5.8! IMEASURE ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.! 5.9! PRICES USED ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.!

14! 15! 17! 18! 19! 20! 21! 22! 23! 25! 26! 27! 27! 27! 27! 28! 29! 30! 31! 32!

6!

6.1! 6.2! 6.3! 6.4! 6.5! 7!

42!

DETAILED ANALYSIS

42! 44! 45! 46! 46!

RANKED BY ANNUAL SAVINGS RANKED BY CO2 SAVINGS RANKED BY INSTALLATION COSTS RANKED BY PAYBACK PERIOD RANKED BY £ PER KG CO2 SAVED

48!

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 7.1! 7.2! 7.3! 7.4! 7.5! 7.6!

SEQUENCING - DEPENDENCIES, CONCURRENT AND SUBSEQUENT WORK OPPORTUNITES FOR CONCURRENT ECO-RENOVATION INITIATIVES TRADESMEN AND DIY ± OPPORTUNITES AND POTENTIAL PROBLEMS ROOM BY ROOM ACTIVITIES SHORT GLOSSARY MASTERPLAN SCOPE

48! 52! 53! 55! 57! 57!

ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.!

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6 +RZ7R8VH7KLV3ODQ Quickly read through the report to understand its layout. Then come back to this page and move onto the below. UNDERSTAND YOUR HOME

Go to Q Section 2 to understand how your home is currently performing and where the energy to heat and run it is being used. UNDERSTAND YOUR OPTIONS

Read through Q Section 3 to understand the different elements of your home and the options that are available for each area. SEE WHAT WE RECOMMEND

Go through the bespoke recommendations in Q Section 4 and look at the total costs, savings, paybacks and potential CO2 reductions. GET THE RED PEN OUT

Work through the Appendix Tables in Q Section 6 with a red pen and circle items that you are interested in. Those included in the bespoke suites of recommendations are marked but you may find others that you prefer. MAKE A PLAN OF ACTION

Work out a plan of action for installing your chosen solutions taking care to do WKLQJVLQDQRUGHUWKDWGRHVQ¶WPake things harder down the line ± see Q Section 5 for some guidance on things to think about. Parity Projects is available to help with project managing larger works. CONTACT US FOR A 30MINUTE REPORT CONSULTATION

Included in the cost of the report is a half hour telephone consultation where we can go into more detail about any aspect of the report. Please do contact us to arrange a time.

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7 1 ,QWURGXFWLRQ PURPOSE OF THIS DOCUMENT

1.2

DOCUMENT OUTLINE

Q Section 1 ± Introduction TO BE STRATEGIC AND USEFUL FOR YEARS

TO GIVE YOU OPTIONS

Q Section 2 ± Current Energy Use outlines the energy profile of your home in its current condition and use and compares it to national averages. Q Section 3 ± Measures Evaluated describes the factors that shape your energy profile and describes the measures that we have chosen to evaluate. Q Section 4 ± Bespoke Combinations we group selected measures into our bespoke combinations (No Brainer, Some Consideration, Green Halo) to show their collective effect.

TO EVALUATE THE OPTIONS IN TERMS OF COST, FINANCIAL BENEFIT AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

TO HELP YOU DECIDE WHAT IS BEST FOR YOU AND YOUR HOME

Q Section 5 ± General Information we provide some useful background information such as available grants, and potential changes to regulations. In this section we have also outlined measures that we do not deem appropriate to your situation. Q Section 6 ± Detailed Analysis is an appendix containing full details of all the measures that we have evaluated and ranked them in different ways so you can compare them depending on your priorities. Q Section 7 ± Additional Information is an appendix containing general guidance that may be useful throughout the life of the building, its upgrade and use.

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INTRODUCTION

1.1


8 1.3

METHODOLOGY

This appraisal has evaluated the fabric of the building alongside the environment in which it sits together with the lifestyle of the occupants using it. The final recommendations were arrived at with the following actions:

GATHER DATA BUILDING SURVEY

CLIENT INTERVIEW

GATHER DATA:

Perform a detailed survey of the property, interview the owner about their use of the building and preferences and collect data from energy bills.

ECO MEASURES

Identification of all appropriate energy saving/eco measures for the property. The DSSURSULDWHPHDVXUHVDUHEDVHGDURXQGWKHRZQHUÂśVVSHFLILFDLPVIor the future of the property.

COMPUTER MODEL

MASTERPLAN:

Use of the parity computer model to x Determine the current energy profile of the building x Evaluate each individual measure x Group measures into recommended suites of measures

CURRENT ENERGY PROFILE

DETAILED EVALUATION OF MEASURES

BESPOKE RECOMMENDATIONS

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INTRODUCTION

ECO MEASURES:


9 2 (QHUJ\8VHDQG&2(PLVVLRQV2I<RXU+RXVH

Using the Parity computer model, the energy cost and CO2 emissions can be broken down so that we can see where it is used in the house. The model has been calibrated against electricity bills as a whole year of data was provided. The graphs below are different ways of representing the proportions of fuel costs, energy use, CO2 emissions and heating burden.

£££

FUEL COSTS USED IN ANALYSIS

£££

ANNUAL FUEL COSTS

OIL

6.2 pence/kWh

FUEL COSTS

YOUR HOUSE

UK AVERAGE

ON PEAK ELECTRICITY

13.7 pence/kWh

ANNUAL

£2,129

£1,110

WOOD (LOGS)

3.0 pence/kWh

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CURRENT ENERGY USE

[N.B. Throughout the report we refer to energy savings, CO2 savings, and cost savings separately as electricity is more CO2 intensive per unit than gas, as well as costing 12 18p per unit where gas costs 3 - 4.5p.]


10 ENERGY

ENERGY

YOUR HOUSE

UK AVERAGE

ANNUAL CO2

6,781 kg

4,977 kg

HOUSEHOLD CO2 PER PERSON

1,695 kg

2,127 kg

WOOD (LOGS)

YOUR HOUSE

UK AVERAGE

OIL OR GAS

11,282 kWh

13,800 kWh

ON PEAK ELECTRICITY

5,608 kWh

4,370 kWh

22,045 kWh

0 kWh

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We have compared the total household CO2 and the household CO2 per person to the UK average. The UK Government target is to reduce CO2 emissions across the board by 80% by 2050.

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Household energy can be split into electricity which is usually generated at a power station and fossil fuels e.g. gas or oil which is usually burned on site. Electricity usually has a higher CO2 content per kWh than gas or oil due to inefficiencies at the power station and losses in transmission.

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CURRENT ENERGY USE

CO2 EMISSIONS

CO2


11

YOUR HOUSE YOUR HOUSE 2

2

:+$7¶6&267,1*<28"

£££

UK AVERAGE

CO2 PER m (kg/m )

37

57

TOTAL ENERGY PER m2 (kWh/m2)

213

209

YOUR HOUSE

UK AVERAGE

£2,129 (£532 per person)

£1,110

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2

Viewing CO2 emissions and energy per m is another way of comparing your property. Passiv Haus standard requires a maximum of 42 kWh/m² per year for certification as a comparison.

Key (labelled clockwise from top in numbered order)

6/++;

1 2 3 4 5

Heating Inefficiency R4/F:@3;

Hot Water Walls Appliances Draughts Windows / Doors

6 7 8 9

J>>+*/,2.; Roof

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These charts show the contributions of different elements of your house to your energy bills and this is a good start in telling you where the savings are most likely.

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CURRENT ENERGY USE

CO2 AND ENERGY PER m2

ENERGY

CO2


12

YOUR HOUSE

UK AVERAGE

38,936 kWh (9,734 per person)

18,639 kWh (7,965 per person)

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Key (large pie charts) (labelled clockwise in numbered order) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Space Heating Hot Water Cooking Consumer Electronics Computing Cold Appliances Wet Appliances Lighting Miscellaneous

These charts are different from the previous charts as they compare energy SURSRUWLRQVUDWKHUWKDQSULFH:H¶YHDOVRVSOLWRXWWKHDSSOLDQFHVGHWDLO

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Key (small pie charts) (labelled clockwise in numbered order) 1 2 3 4 5 6

Windows Doors External Walls Ground Floors Roof Draughts

Focusing on heat loss can help identify the different building elements where most energy is being lost.

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CURRENT ENERGY USE

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ENERGY


13 CO2

:+$7¶60$.,1*UP YOUR CO2 EMISSIONS

YOUR HOUSE

PEOPLE LIKE YOU AVERAGE PRE 1930 SEMI DETACHED PROPERTY, WITH 4 BEDROOMS IN A RURAL LOCATION WITH OIL HEATING AND 4

(6.8 tonnes)

(7.3 tonnes)

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Here we compare your CO2 HPLVVLRQVE\SHUFHQWDJHVDVZHOODVLQWRQQHVWRSHRSOHWKDWDUHVLPLODUWR\RX7KHGDWDIRUWKH³3HRSOH/LNH<RX´FRPHVIURm hundreds of thousands of properties data and energy bills collected by the Department of Energy and Climate Change.

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CURRENT ENERGY USE

RESIDENTS


14 3 0HDVXUHV(YDOXDWHG THE HOUSE BASIC INFORMATION

BUILDING TYPE

CLIENT AIMS FOR THE PROPERTY

2 storey semi-detached

Recommendations will be made with reference to the following client priorities:

AGE

1927

x

BEDROOMS

x

4 COMMUNAL ROOMS

4

x

Recommendations should be focussed on cost effective fuel bill savings The property is hard to heat, and improving the warmth of the property is a key priority Recommendations that result in reduced carbon emissions at the property would be of particular interest

BATHROOMS

1 DESCRIPTION OF LOCALITY

Rural ORIENTATION

KEY TO OPTIONS

We evaluate a wide range of options and provide you with all the results. Some will be better than others (some may even be detrimental). We aim to give you the information to make informed decisions.

Front of house faces approximately South East SURROUNDING LAND

Large garden TENURE

To help with this we select those measures that we deem to be most beneficial to your property and situation and group them into suites. Options that are selected are indicated by different leaf symbols depending on the suites in which they are included.

Owner Occupier SPECIAL PROTECTION

No Brainer

None

Some Consideration

GENERAL COMMENTS ON CONDITION

Green Halo

The house is in good general condition

Green Halo + PV Automated Green Halo + PV

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MEASURES EVALUATED

3.1


15 3.2

WINDOWS AND DOORS

COMMENTS AND OBSERVATIONS

Most of the windows in the property are double glazed windows with moderate efficiency in good condition. Although minor savings would result from replacing them with more modern units, this saving would be very small indeed compared with the cost of replacement.

thermal comfort by reducing radiation losses from people ± that chill you get when next to a window.

MEASURES EVALUATED

Two of the windows in the property are single glazed windows in reasonable condition. Although these are inefficient, they do not have a large area compared with other elements such as walls or roof, so are probably losing comparatively little energy compared with the cost of replacement. For this reason they are not necessarily cost effective to replace compared with other cheaper and more effective measures possible at the property. The front door is solid wood, while the kitchen door is a wooden stable style door. The utility door is double glazed. DISCUSSION OF OPTIONS

Although replacement or refurbishment of windows might allow other benefits beyond energy savings such as avoidance of condensation and improved security, windows are generally expensive to improve, and generate relatively modest benefits. ENERGY PROPORTIONS*

7.8% of energy bills - £167 CO2 EMISSIONS PROPORTIONS*

5.7% of the CO2 emissions - 390 kg *These are for conduction losses only. Losses due to window and door draughts are included in the next section µDraughts¶

If substantial upgrades are being planned to most of the other building fabric elements i.e. the walls, then it will probably be necessary to improve the windows to reduce condensation. In addition, improving the controlled ventilation may also be necessary. The reason being is that upgraded walls will have less water condensing on them (usually in small enough amount to not be noticed) and so the condensing of the water in the air is concentrated on the remaining cold surfaces i.e. The windows. Well fitting thick curtains can reduce the losses through windows by 10%. They can also increase

SAMPLE REPORT


16 OPTIONS EVALUATED

KEY TO OPTIONS

x

The symbols indicate whether they are included in a recommendation suite (see Section 4)

x

x x

x x

x x

x

List of measures appears here

No Brainer Some Consideration Green Halo Green Halo + PV

MEASURES EVALUATED

x

Install secondary glazing to both single glazed metal upstairs windows (Professional Measure) Replace both single glazed metal upstairs windows with triple glazed units (Professional Measure) Replace both single glazed metal upstairs windows with ones which comply to current building regulations standard (Professional Measure) Replace the four 6mm double glazed rear windows with triple glazed units (Professional Measure) Replace the four 6mm double glazed rear windows with ones which comply to current building regulations standard (Professional Measure) Replace the nine 12mm standard double glazed casement windows with triple glazed units (Professional Measure) Replace the nine 12mm standard double glazed casement windows with ones which comply to current building regulations standard (Professional Measure) Replace the standard double glazed Velux window in the master bedroom with a triple glazed Velux window (Professional Measure) Replace the solid wooden front door and stable style kitchen door with ones which comply to current building regulations standard (Professional Measure) Replace the half glazed utility door with one which complies to current building regulations standard (Professional Measure)

Automated Green Halo + PV

List of measures appears here

List of measures appears here

List of measures appears here SAMPLE REPORT


17 DRAUGHTS

COMMENTS AND OBSERVATIONS

OPTIONS EVALUATED

The external doors are loose.

x

The single glazed external windows are loose.

x

There is a small kitchen hood extractor fan which actively expels warm air when on and will allow warm air to escape when off.

x

There is no extractor fan in the upstairs bathroom so the window is opened when showering to reduce condensation. DISCUSSION OF OPTIONS

ENERGY PROPORTIONS

10.2% of energy bills - ÂŁ217 CO2 EMISSIONS PROPORTIONS

7.5% of the CO2 emissions - 506 kg

Doors and windows can be easily draught-proofed by DIY, e.g. using tape or at a higher cost by professionals, e.g. using a rebating system. Very loose doors may need to be built up slightly with wooden strips first to enable a tight fit with the draughtproof system. The bathroom does not currently have any extractor fans. If the house is upgraded in terms of insulation and draughtproofing it may be necessary to add some mechanical ventilation to the damper areas of the house. Whilst any extractor fans will add use additional electricity and also expel warm air there are alternatives that run at low background wattages and also exchange up to 85% of the heat with air drawn in at the same time.

x

Replace the kitchen hood with a heat recovery kitchen hood (Professional Measure) Install heat recovery fans in the kitchen and bathroom (Professional Measure)

List of measures Professionally draughtproof all three external doors (Professional Measure) appears here Professionally draughtproof the loose single glazed windows upstairs (Professional Measure)

KEY TO OPTIONS

List of measures appears here No Brainer

The symbols indicate whether they are included in a recommendation suite (see Section 4)

Some Consideration Green Halo Green Halo + PV Automated Green Halo + PV

List of measures appears here

List of measures appears here SAMPLE REPORT

MEASURES EVALUATED

3.3


18 ROOF

COMMENTS AND OBSERVATIONS

OPTIONS EVALUATED

The main loft space currently has about 200mm of mineral wool insulation.

x

There are various areas of roof with no accessible loft space above. An assumption of the insulation present in these roofs has been made based on the type and year of construction. DISCUSSION OF OPTIONS

As it is recommended that between 270mm and 300mm of mineral wool insulation is installed in pitched roofs, we have modelled the effect of topping up the insulation in the main loft space to 300mm.

ENERGY PROPORTIONS

5.5%of energy bills - ÂŁ118 CO2 EMISSIONS PROPORTIONS

4% of the CO2 emissions Âą 274 kg

Similar to wall insulation, ceilings can be insulated from the inside and replastered. This may be the preferred option where there is no or little roof void or the roof void is inaccessible. We have looked at doing this to the sloping and flat roofs throughout the house.

x x

x x x x x x x x x

Top up the 200mm mineral wool insulation in the main loft space to 300mm (DIY) Top up the 200mm mineral wool insulation in the main loft space to 300mm (Professional Measure) Add 50mm PIR internally to all ceilings with no accessible loft space above (Professional Measure)

List of measures appears here

Add 100mm PIR internally to all ceilings with no accessible loft space above (Professional Measure) Add 50mm PIR internally to the ceiling of the front dormer (Professional Measure) Add 100mm PIR internally to the ceiling of the front dormer (Professional Measure) Add 50mm PIR internally to the ceiling of the rear dormer (Professional Measure) Add 100mm PIR internally to the ceiling of the rear dormer (Professional Measure) Add 50mm PIR internally to the ceiling of the study (Professional Measure) Add 100mm PIR internally to the ceiling of the study (Professional Measure) Add 50mm PIR internally to the sloping roofs upstairs (Professional Measure) Add 100mm PIR internally to the sloping roofs upstairs (Professional Measure)

List of measures appears here

List of measures appears here

KEY TO OPTIONS

The symbols indicate whether they are included in a recommendation suite (see Section 4) No Brainer Some Consideration

List of measures Green Halo Green Halo + PV appears here Automated Green Halo + PV

SAMPLE REPORT

MEASURES EVALUATED

3.4


19

3.5

WALLS

All the walls of the original building and playroom extension are insulated cavities. As such they will be losing heat around a third as quickly as an uninsulated cavity but still twice as quickly as a new wall built to current Building Regulations.

11.3% of energy bills - ÂŁ240 CO2 EMISSIONS PROPORTIONS

8.3% of the CO2 emissions Âą 560 kg

x x

The timber frame walls of the rear extension have been modelled based on the wall type and year of construction.

x

DISCUSSION OF OPTIONS

x

A variety of internal wall insulation options are available and in varying thicknesses. For any given material the thicker the insulation the greater the heat loss reduction, albeit with diminishing returns for each addition of thickness. As such there is a decision to be made with regards to balancing cost, reduction of room space and reduction of heating bills and CO2 emissions. ENERGY PROPORTIONS

x

Internal insulation can be installed either throughout the property or on a room by room basis as they are redecorated over a number of years. Where space is restricted, e.g. dormer windows, corridors and staircases, bay windows and small rooms, higher performance but more expensive insulation can be used. Also in these instances the relative benefits of external insulation may outweigh the additional costs over internal insulation. OPTIONS EVALUATED

x x x x

Add 25mm PIR internally to the walls of the rear dormer (Professional Measure) Add 25mm PIR internally to the walls of the playroom extension (Professional Measure) Add 25mm PIR internally to the rear timber frame walls (Professional Measure) Add 25mm PIR internally to the walls of the original building (Professional Measure)

List of measures appears here List of measures appears here

x

x x x x

Add 50mm PIR internally to the walls of the rear dormer (Professional Measure) Add 50mm PIR internally to the walls of the playroom extension (Professional Measure)

List of measures Add 50mm PIR internally to the appears hereMeasure) rear timber frame walls (Professional Add 50mm PIR internally to the walls of the original building (Professional Measure) Add 100mm PIR internally to the walls of the playroom extension (Professional Measure) Add 100mm PIR internally to the rear timber frame walls (Professional Measure) Add 100mm PIR internally to the walls of the original building (Professional Measure) Add 75mm PIR internally to the walls of the playroom extension (Professional Measure) Add 75mm PIR internally to the rear timber frame walls (Professional Measure) Add 75mm PIR internally to the walls of the original building (Professional Measure)

List of measures appears here

List of measures appears here

KEY TO OPTIONS

The symbols indicate whether they are included in a recommendation suite (see Section 4)

No Brainer Some Consideration Green Halo Green Halo + PV Automated Green Halo + PV

List of measures appears here

SAMPLE REPORT

MEASURES EVALUATED

COMMENTS AND OBSERVATIONS


20 FLOOR

COMMENTS AND OBSERVATIONS

OPTIONS EVALUATED

The floors in the property are suspended floorboards, which will be losing heat to the cold void beneath.

x

DISCUSSION OF OPTIONS

The easiest method for insulating suspended wooden floors is underneath the floorboards between the joists. The most difficult aspect is raising the floorboards and so it is worth carrying out any other under floor remediation work at the same time, such as lagging pipes, rewiring etc. When replacing the floorboard they should be pushed together tight and sealed. It is not usually necessary to insulate intermediate floors for heat loss unless there is a large difference in the heating requirements between the floors. Intermediate floor insulation may however be carried out for noise reduction purposes.

Add 100mm mineral wool below floorboards to all suspended ground floors (Professional Measure)

List of measures appears here List of measures appears here

KEY TO OPTIONS

The symbols indicate whether they are included in a recommendation suite (see Section 4) No Brainer Some Consideration Green Halo Green Halo + PV Automated Halo + PV List ofGreen measures appears here

ENERGY PROPORTIONS

3.6% of energy bills - £77 CO2 EMISSIONS PROPORTIONS

2.7% of the CO2 emissions ± 181 kg *These are for conduction losses only. Losses due to floor draughts are included in the previous VHFWLRQµDraughts¶

List of measures appears here SAMPLE REPORT

MEASURES EVALUATED

3.6


21 LIGHTING

COMMENTS AND OBSERVATIONS

OPTIONS EVALUATED

All the lights and their usages were noted during the survey and the analysis results are based on these actual figures.

x

All of the lighting fixtures in the property are fitted with compact fluorescent lamps. DISCUSSION OF OPTIONS

We have not looked at replacing any of the light fittings as Compact Fluorescent Lamps are being used throughout the property.

(none)

KEY TO OPTIONS

The symbols indicate whether they are included in a recommendation suite (see Section 4)

No Brainer Some Consideration Green Halo Green Halo + PV Automated Green Halo + PV

ENERGY PROPORTIONS

2.7% of energy bills - £58 CO2 EMISSIONS PROPORTIONS

3.4% of the CO2 emissions ± 232 kg

SAMPLE REPORT

MEASURES EVALUATED

3.7


22 APPLIANCES AND OTHER ELECTRICAL USE

COMMENTS AND OBSERVATIONS

OPTIONS EVALUATED

All appliances and their usages were noted during the survey in order to determine whether there are any more efficient alternatives available. Taking note of their use also allows us to determine if there is a more efficient way to use them.

x

DISCUSSION OF OPTIONS

Due to the embedded energy costs of appliances, i.e. the energy used to make them, we normally only recommend immediate replacement for very inefficient older items. We recommend that any replacements are always of the top energy efficiency rating. As a short term measure before replacing the cold appliances it is worth cleaning the back of them all as this will increase efficiencies significantly.

ENERGY PROPORTIONS

15.1% of energy bills - ÂŁ321 CO2 EMISSIONS PROPORTIONS

18.9% of the CO2 emissions Âą 1283 kg

We have evaluated the effect of a Voltage Optimisation 'Vphase' or 'VO4' device. This reduces the voltage of your mains electricity (to a level well within limits set by the EU and UK government). This allows savings on most electrical devices in your house without affecting their performance. Our analysis has been performed against your actual modelled baseline appliances using data published by manufactures about the expected savings for each type and age of appliance. Should appliances be upgraded (especially refrigeration appliances) then the savings expected may be less.

x x x x x

Replace the dishwasher with an A+ rated model and only use eco setting (Professional Measure) Replace electric oven with a new top rated version (DIY) Replace electric oven with a new top rated version (Professional Measure)

List of measures appears here

Replace fridge freezer with a new A++ rated alternative (DIY) Install a voltage optimisation device to drop the mains voltage to 220V (Professional Measure) Replace the electric oven and hob with a butane oven and hob (Professional Measure)

List of measures KEY TO OPTIONS appears here The symbols indicate whether they are included in a recommendation suite (see Section 4) No Brainer Some Consideration Green Halo

List of measures Automated Green Halo here + PV appears Green Halo + PV

Cold appliances tend to be the appliance type that results in the largest savings from replacement as they are on all the time. As a result savings possible through improved efficiency can be cost effective, even with fridges and freezers that are only 5-10 years old.

List of measures appears here SAMPLE REPORT

MEASURES EVALUATED

3.8


23 HEATING AND HOT WATER

COMMENTS AND OBSERVATIONS

The property is currently heated by two wood burning stoves on the ground floor. This is supplemented by the use of a portable electric heater. There is an oil boiler which is only used for hot water. Hot water is also supplemented by evacuated tube solar hot water collectors on the front roof. DISCUSSION OF OPTIONS

Modern condensing oil boilers are up to 95% efficient and the effects of replacing the boiler have been evaluated. An ultra low flow showerhead reduces the amount of water that needs to be heated. They work by aerating the water droplets so that you get just as wet but with less water.

ENERGY PROPORTIONS

43.7% of energy bills - £931 CO2 EMISSIONS PROPORTIONS

49.5% of the CO2 emissions ± 3,357 kg

A ground source heat pump extracts the low grade heat from the ground and concentrates it to higher grade heat inside. It does this by essentially the reverse of how a refrigerator works. As the electricity is used to upgrade the heat rather than generate the heat they can actually have notional efficiencies of greater than 300%. What this means is that for every unit of electricity they use, you get more than three units of heat. Ground source heat pumps require pipes to be laid a few feet under the ground in coils. Ground source heat pumps are most efficient when installed with a underfloor heating system. Similarly an air source heat pump extracts low grade heat but from the outside air. They can actually have notional efficiencies of greater than 200% or two units of heat for each unit of electricity. They look like air conditioning units.

average efficiencies found during extensive recent Energy Saving Trust field trials. Biomass heaters can range from a room heating wood burning stove to self filling units with hoppers. Room heaters can still be pellet run for easy of loading and control of heat output. They can be linked to radiator systems and hot water systems. Log batch boilers are best linked to a larger thermal store or accumulator tank for two reasons. The first is that they take a while to setup and get going so storing hot water allows for it to be on demand. The second is that they burn more efficiently in short intensive bursts. Prices for logs and pellets can vary significantly from place to place and time to time. You should compare any locally available prices with those shown in the graphs section of the report. 3OHDVH1RWH:HKDYHPRGHOOHGWKHKHDWLQJµEDVH FDVH¶ZLWK:RRG%XUQLQJ6WRYHVSURYLGLQJPRVWRf the space heating. Our model regards logs as a low carbon and comparatively inexpensive fuel source. This has resulted in higher payback periods than we would normally expect to see for alternative heating systems. Another way to assess the paybacks of biomass boilers and air and ground source heat pumps could be to compare their annual savings to WKHPHDVXUHµ8VHWKHRLOERLOHUWRKHDWWKHHQWLUH SURSHUW\ 3URIHVVLRQDO0HDVXUH ¶ N.B. The Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) , when it is launched for domestic, is expected to be applicable to ground source heat pumps and biomass boilers but not air source or wood burning stoves. More information on the RHI later in the report.

We have evaluated both air and ground source with standard published efficiencies and also the

SAMPLE REPORT

MEASURES EVALUATED

3.9


24 x x x

x

x

x

x

x

x

Install an ultra low flow showerhead (Professional Measure) Use the oil boiler to heat the entire property (Professional Measure) Install a new top specification condensing oil boiler and use to heat the entire property (Professional Measure)

List of measures appears here

Install a biomass batch boiler and connect to the existing radiator system except in the extension where wet underfloor heating will be installed - supplemented by the wood burners (Professional Measure) Install a biomass pellet boiler and connect to the existing radiator system except in the extension where wet underfloor heating will be installed - supplemented by the wood burners (Professional Measure) Install an air to water Air Source Heat Pump and connect to the existing radiator system except in the extension where wet underfloor heating will be installed - supplemented by the wood burners (Professional Measure) Install an air to water Air Source Heat Pump and connect to the existing radiator system except in the extension where wet underfloor heating will be installed - supplemented by the wood burners - using EST field trials average COP (Professional Measure) Install a ground to water Ground Source Heat Pump and connect to the existing radiator system except in the extension where wet underfloor heating will be installed supplemented by the wood burners (Professional Measure)

List of measures appears here

List of measures appears here

List of measures appears here

Install a ground to water Ground Source Heat Pump and connect to the existing radiator system except in the extension where wet underfloor heating will be installed -

x

x

x

supplemented by the wood burners - using EST field trials average COP (Professional Measure) Install a ground to water Ground Source Heat Pump and wet underfloor heating under the suspended ground floor - supplemented by the wood burners - using EST average field trials COP (Professional Measure) Install an air to water Air Source Heat Pump and wet underfloor heating under the suspended ground floor - supplemented by the wood burners - using EST field trials average COP (Professional Measure) Install an air to water Air Source Heat Pump and connect to the existing radiator system supplemented by the wood burners - using EST field trials average COP (Professional Measure)

List of measures appears here List of measures appears here

MEASURES EVALUATED

OPTIONS EVALUATED

KEY TO OPTIONS

The symbols indicate whether they are included in a recommendation suite (see Section 4) No Brainer

List of measures Some Consideration Green Halo appears here Green Halo + PV Automated Green Halo + PV

List of measures appears here

SAMPLE REPORT


25 SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULE (PV)

COMMENTS AND OBSERVATIONS

There is a south-east facing roof of reasonable size which is not shaded, so solar panels are a good possible option for the property. DISCUSSION OF OPTIONS

PV modules can be installed on sloping roofs, flat roofs and even vertical walls.

ENERGY PROPORTIONS

n/a CO2 EMISSIONS PROPORTIONS

n/a

With a property connected to the National Grid, the electricity provided by PV modules is either used by the appliances and lighting in the property or when it exceeds usage can be sold to the National Grid. The recently introduced Feed In Tariff (FIT), a government initiative, provides a significant incentive for solar PV panels by requiring suppliers to buy PV generated electricity from householders for about 1.2 times more than the standard supply rate of electricity, even if the generated electricity is used by the householder before it can be exported. Estimating the exact contribution PV modules can offer is difficult to assess. There are a variety of different estimates ranging from pessimistic to those which may be overly optimistic provided by some manufacturers and installers. Our model is based on WKH*RYHUQPHQWÂśV6WDQGDUG$VVHVVPHQW3URFHGXUH for Energy Rating of Dwellings (SAP) and so is independent of manufactures or installers.

OPTIONS EVALUATED

x

x

Install a 2kWp solar PV array on the south-east facing front roof, based on a Feed In Tariff (FIT) rate of 16p per kWh (Professional Measure) Install a 1kWp solar PV array on the south-east facing front roof, based on a Feed In Tariff (FIT) rate of 16p per kWh (Professional Measure)

List of measures appears here

KEY TO OPTIONS

The symbols indicate whether they are included in a recommendation suite (see Section 4)

List of measures No Brainer appears here Some Consideration Green Halo Green Halo + PV Automated Green Halo + PV

List of measures appears here

In most cases solar PV installations in England and Scotland will not require planning permission as they qualify as permitted development (see section 5.5 for details). We always recommend that you check with your local authority to ensure that planning permission is not required. Please see section 5.4 for more information on the *RYHUQPHQWÂśV)HHG-in-Tariffs (FITS).

List of measures appears here SAMPLE REPORT

MEASURES EVALUATED

3.11


26 SOLAR HOT WATER

COMMENTS AND OBSERVATIONS

OPTIONS EVALUATED

There are evacuated tube solar hot water collectors on the south-east facing front roof. These are used to supplement the hot water provided by an oil boiler.

x

DISCUSSION OF OPTIONS

We have not looked at adding to the existing collectors as there is no obvious demand for this.

(none)

KEY TO OPTIONS

The symbols indicate whether they are included in a recommendation suite (see Section 4) No Brainer Some Consideration Green Halo Green Halo + PV Automated Green Halo + PV

ENERGY PROPORTIONS

n/a CO2 EMISSIONS PROPORTIONS

n/a

SAMPLE REPORT

MEASURES EVALUATED

3.12


27 4 %HVSRNH5HFRPPHQGDWLRQV WHAT IS IN THIS SECTION? No Brainer Some Consideration Green Halo Green Halo + PV Automated Green Halo + PV The costs and benefits presented are indicative but have been calculated accurately using the physics in the Parity computer model; each element is calculated for the given situation as follows: x Benefits ± Our model calculates the improvements in the running costs for the house in both energy and CO 2 terms. x Costs ± Our costs are taken from the installation work that we carry out. Where appropriate these costs are averaged out per unit area and then multiplied up for this building, e.g. internal wall insulation. Please also be aware that the costs presented are for the energy efficiency measure itself to enable fair comparison. It will not include the cost of any regular building work that may have to be carried out at the same time. N.B. It must be recognised that benefit of a combination of measures may not be as great as the sum of their individually evaluated benefits. This is because each measure will reduce the overall energy losses of the house and so will reduce the losses through other areas too. A full listing of options is provided later in the report and in Appendix A and you should go through these in detail.

WHAT IS IMPORTANT TO YOU? ‡

Improving the warmth of the property

‡

Reducing CO2 emissions

‡

Reducing energy bills

SUMMARY ‡

UK Government CO2 Target: 80% reduction by 2050

‡

Predicted effect of the recommended measures below (including microgeneration): 81% reduction (Green Halo + PV suite below)

SAMPLE REPORT

BESPOKE COMBINATIONS

This section of the Masterplan sets out recommended suites of measures that complement each other. It has been split into different sections based on a combination of their projected costs, financial payback and potential CO2 reduction:


28 4.1

NO BRAINER

ANNUAL CO2 ± BEFORE AND AFTER (kg)

RECOMMENDED MEASURES DIY/Professional

List of measures appears here

Install an ultra low flow showerhead

Pro

List of measures appears here STATISTICS Key (labelled top to bottom in numbered order)

Estimated annual saving

£329

Estimated cost of measures

£75

List of measures Estimated annual fuel bill reduction appears here Estimated Payback Period Estimated annual CO2 saving

List of measures appears here

23% - 1.56 tonnes 15% 0.2 years

Electricity and Cooking Miscellaneous Computing Wet Appliances Lighting Cooking &RQVXPHU(OHFWU¶V Cold Appliances Heating and Hot Water 8 Hot Water 9 Boiler inefficiency 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Fabric 10 11 12 13 14

Draughts Roof Ground Floors External Walls Windows / Doors Renewables

15

Renewables

SAMPLE REPORT

BESPOKE COMBINATIONS

)RUWKLV0DVWHUSODQWKHµNo Brainer¶WKUHVKROGIRULQGLYLGXDOPHDVXUHVKDVEHHQVHWDW£500 and a payback of 5 years.


29 4.2

SOME CONSIDERATION

ANNUAL CO2 ± BEFORE AND AFTER (kg)

RECOMMENDED MEASURES DIY/Professional

List of measures appears here

Replace fridge freezer with a new A++ rated alternative Professionally draughtproof all three external doors Add 50mm PIR internally to the rear timber frame walls

DIY Pro Pro

List of measures appears here STATISTICS

Estimated annual saving

List of measures appears Estimated annual CO saving Estimated annual fuel billhere reduction Estimated cost of measures 2

Estimated Payback Period

List of measures appears here

Key (labelled top to bottom in numbered order) £436 £1,285 28% - 1.89 tonnes 20% 2.9 years

Electricity and Cooking Miscellaneous Computing Wet Appliances Lighting Cooking &RQVXPHU(OHFWU¶V Cold Appliances Heating and Hot Water 8 Hot Water 9 Boiler inefficiency 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Fabric 10 11 12 13 14

Draughts Roof Ground Floors External Walls Windows / Doors Renewables

15

Renewables

SAMPLE REPORT

BESPOKE COMBINATIONS

)RUWKLV0DVWHUSODQWKHµSome Consideration¶WKUHVKROGIRULQGLYLGXDOPHDVXUHVKDVbeen set at £2,000 and a payback of 15 years. In addition to the recommendations listed below, this set of recommendations also includes all recommendations from the previous suite 'No Brainer'.


30 4.3

GREEN HALO

ANNUAL CO2 ± BEFORE AND AFTER (kg)

RECOMMENDED MEASURES DIY/Professional

Install a biomass batch boiler and connect to the existing radiator system except in the extension where wet underfloor heating will be installed - supplemented by the wood burners Add 100mm PIR internally to all ceilings with no accessible loft space above

List of measures appears here

Pro

Pro

List of measures appears here STATISTICS

Estimated annual saving Estimated cost of measures

List of measures appears here Estimated Payback Period Estimated annual CO2 saving

Estimated annual fuel bill reduction

List of measures appears

Key (labelled top to bottom in numbered order) £769 £13,325 68% - 4.63 tonnes 36% 17 years

Electricity and Cooking Miscellaneous Computing Wet Appliances Lighting Cooking &RQVXPHU(OHFWU¶V Cold Appliances Heating and Hot Water 8 Hot Water 9 Boiler inefficiency 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Fabric 10 11 12 13 14

Draughts Roof Ground Floors External Walls Windows / Doors Renewables

15

Renewables

SAMPLE REPORT

BESPOKE COMBINATIONS

)RUWKLV0DVWHUSODQWKHµGreen Halo¶WKUHVKROGIRULQGLYLGXDOPHDVXUHVKDVEHHQVHWDW£12,500 and a payback of 25 years. In addition to the recommendations listed below, this set of recommendations also includes all recommendations from the previous suite 'Some Consideration'.


31 4.4

GREEN HALO + PV

ANNUAL CO2 ± BEFORE AND AFTER (kg)

RECOMMENDED MEASURES DIY/Professional

List of measures appears here

Install a 2kWp solar PV array on the south-east facing front roof, based on a Feed In Tariff (FIT) rate of 16p per kWh

Pro

List of measures appears here STATISTICS Key (labelled top to bottom in numbered order)

Estimated annual saving

£1,228

Estimated cost of measures

£20,325

Estimated annual CO2 saving

Listannual of measures appears Estimated fuel bill reduction Estimated Payback Periodhere

List of measures appears

81% - 5.49 tonnes 58% 16 years

Electricity and Cooking Miscellaneous Computing Wet Appliances Lighting Cooking &RQVXPHU(OHFWU¶V Cold Appliances Heating and Hot Water 8 Hot Water 9 Boiler inefficiency 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Fabric 10 11 12 13 14

Draughts Roof Ground Floors External Walls Windows / Doors Renewables

15

Renewables

SAMPLE REPORT

BESPOKE COMBINATIONS

)RUWKLV0DVWHUSODQWKHµGreen Halo + PV¶WKUHVKROGIRULQGLYLGXDOPHDVXUHVKDVEHHQVHWDW£12,500 and a payback of 25 years. In addition to the recommendations listed below, this set of recommendations also includes all recommendations from the previous suite 'Green Halo'.


32 4.5

AUTOMATED GREEN HALO + PV

ANNUAL CO2 Âą BEFORE AND AFTER (kg)

RECOMMENDED MEASURES DIY/Professional

Install a ground to water Ground Source Heat Pump and connect to the existing radiator system except in the extension where wet underfloor heating will be installed supplemented by the wood burners - using EST field trials average COP

List of measures appears here

Pro

List of measures appears here STATISTICS Key (labelled top to bottom in numbered order)

Estimated annual saving Estimated cost of measures Estimated annual CO2 saving

List of measures appears Estimated Payback Period here Estimated annual fuel bill reduction

ÂŁ1,076 ÂŁ28,325 28% - 1.93 tonnes 50% 26 years

Electricity and Cooking Miscellaneous Computing Wet Appliances Lighting Cooking &RQVXPHU(OHFWUÂśV Cold Appliances Heating and Hot Water 8 Hot Water 9 Boiler inefficiency 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Fabric 10 11 12 13 14

Draughts Roof Ground Floors External Walls Windows / Doors Renewables

15

Renewables

SAMPLE REPORT

List of measures appears

BESPOKE COMBINATIONS

)RUWKLV0DVWHUSODQWKHÂľAutomated Green Halo + PVÂśWKUHVKROGIRULQGLYLGXDOPHDVXUHVKDVEHHQVHWDWÂŁ20,000 and a payback of 50 years. In addition to the recommendations listed below, this set of recommendations also includes all recommendations from the previous suite 'Green Halo + PV', except ÂľInstall a biomass batch boiler and connect to the existing radiator system except in the extension where wet underfloor heating will be installed - supplemented by the wood burnersÂś This suite has been created to offer an automated alternative to Âľ*UHHQ+DOR39Âś


33 5 *HQHUDO,QIRUPDWLRQ3XWWLQJ\RXU0DVWHUSODQLQWR$FWLRQ The preceding sections have hopefully given you the tools you need to decide which measures are most appropriate for your home and your budget. The next step, therefore, is to start putting your plans into action. This section offers some general information and advice that should help you with your project.

A QUICK GUIDE TO RETROFIT

The following is a quick reference step-by-step guide to the retrofit process. More detailed information on some individual elements is included later on in the section. 1.

Read your report again and decide on what you are trying to achieve

2.

See what others have done Examples include the Superhomes Network (www.superhomes.org.uk) and the Great British Refurb (www.greatbritishrefurb.co.uk) websites. Also see: http://www.parityprojects.com/chrisblog.html

3.

Select your measures

4.

Think about timing as sequencing can be tremendously important

5.

What else needs doing? You can keep costs down by doing lots of things at once

6.

Check out your local installer options Ask around for recommendations or use websites that rate different tradespeople.

7.

Get a project manager For more complex jobs, it may be helpful to hire a project manager. They will usually charge a percentage fee or a day rate. This may seem costly, but they can be worth their weight in gold if you have a busy lifestyle. Their primary role will be to make sure the job is done on time, to budget and to the required standard, but can also help you specify the work and pick installers. (for more information on project management and the services that Parity Projects offer, see section 5.5).

8.

Specify the work If you are clear from the word go about what you want, you are more likely to get accurate quotes, better work and avoid misunderstandings with your installers. Your project manager, an architect or other experts can help you with this work (for more information on specification, see section 5.5).

SAMPLE REPORT

GENERALINFORMATION INFORMATION GENERAL

5.1


34 9.

Obtain quotes Try and send details of your job to at least three different suppliers/installers so that you can compare their prices and credentials.

GENERALINFORMATION INFORMATION GENERAL

10. Commission the work Carefully examine your quotes. Remember that you can use the client worksheet we sent you to look at the quotes you receive and check out the payback specific to your quotes. 11. Keep a close eye on time, quality and costs As your project goes on, try to keep a close eye on these things. Building projects are notorious for spiralling costs and late completion, but this is often due to customers assuming that all is going to plan without checking that it is.

SAMPLE REPORT


35 5.2

FINANCING YOUR RETROFIT

5.2.1 The Green Deal and the Energy Company Obligation (ECO)

ECO is an obligation on the six big energy companies to fund installations under three categories: Affordable Warmth (means tested), Carbon Saving (aimed at solid walled properties and hard to treat cavities), Carbon Savings Communities (subsidised measures for the bottom 15% of tKH8.ÂśVPRVWGHSULYHGDUHDV  The subsidy of solid wall insulation is possibly the most applicable. How does this fit with your Home Energy Masterplan? <RXU0DVWHUSODQZLOOQRW DWWLPHRIZULWLQJ DOORZ\RXWRDFFHVVWKHVFKHPHÂśVILQDQFHPHFKDQLVPDQG if you wish to go down the GD route, you will need an additional assessment (which we may be able to offer too if all goes to plan!). However, our assessment methodology uses much greater detail than that due to be used in the scheme and your report could play a very helpful role in ensuring that, when taking up your GD, the measures you choose genuinely are the right ones for you and the way you use your home (and will achieve the Golden Rule in practice). Your Masterplan could also help you decide whether the GD is a sensible choice for you, or whether you might be better off financing your refurbishment using another source of finance. In due course, we will seek to ensure that our Home Energy Masterplans are compliant with the scheme, and allow our customers to access the finance mechanism where appropriate. If keen to know more, please ask us about the GD when you have your free 30 minute follow-up call with us.

SAMPLE REPORT

GENERAL GENERALINFORMATION INFORMATION

The Green Deal (GD) is a Government scheme, due to start in the autumn of 2012, which will allow you to install energy-saving measures at reduced up-front cost Âą the install cost and ILQDQFHFKDUJHVDUHUHSDLGWKURXJK\RXUHOHFWULFLW\ELOOV,WÂśVDUHJXODWHGDQGIRUPDOSURFHVVDQGPRUHGHWDLOVDUHDYDLODEOe from the DECC (Department of Energy and Climate Change). The following diagram shows the key stages


36 The Feed-in Tariff (FIT) scheme is designed to support the take-up of renewable, electricity-generating technologies. Under the scheme, if you install solar PV panels, a wind turbine, a micro combined heat and power (CHP) system or other such technology, you can claim payment for the electricity you generate, with an additional amount paid for any surplus that you export to the grid. On top of this, you save money through not having to pay for the electricity that you actually use. To be eligible for the scheme, systems must be installed by an MCS accredited installer. The scheme has been enormously successful, with a generous FIT meaning it was a good investment for many households. Recent reductions in the rates paid have made the case for investment much more uncertain, and it sensible to crunch the numbers before you go ahead, assuming you are concerned about the payback on an installation. In the preceding analysis, we factored in the export rate, the current FIT, and the savings you would make on your bill in order to provide with an estimated payback period that is specific to your home and the way you use it (see section 3.11 and 3.12). You should also note that, in order to qualify for the FIT, your house must have attained an EPC rating (see section 5.3) of a D or higher. The cost of achieving this rating has not been included in the payback analysis in your report

Technology Hydro Hydro PV PV PV Wind Wind Wind

Scale <15kW 15±100kW <4kW (new build) <4kW (retrofit) 4-10kW <1.5kW 1.5±15kW 15±100kW

Available now

Annual Digression (%)

From 1st Nov

21.9 19.6

0 0

n/a n/a

16/14.4/7.1

7

15.44/13.9/7.1

16/14.4/7.1 14.5/13.05.7.1 35.8 28 25.4

7 7 4 3 3

15.44/13.9/7.1 13.99/12.59/7.1 n/a n/a n/a

More information can be found on the DECC website - www.decc.gov.uk. Degression is where tariffs for new projects are reduced annually to reflect, and to some extent encourage, expected decreases in technology costs, and is a feature of international best practice. Degression applies only to new projects: existing projects remain on the tariffs that they have been previously assigned and are unaffected by degression.

SAMPLE REPORT

GENERAL GENERALINFORMATION INFORMATION

5.2.2 Feed-in Tariffs (FITs)


37 5.2.3 Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI)

x x x

RHI tariff payments will start for homes alongside the Green Deal from 2013 to allow a more whole-house approach to heat production and energy saving. In order to qualify for the RHI it is proposed that homeowners will first need to apply all appropriate Green Deal measures (with the exception of solid wall insulation). Payments will be based on deemed as opposed to metered use. This means you will receive payments based on your predicted annual heating demand in kWh over the next 20 years (from rdSAP). In order to encourage uptake of the scheme these paymHQWVZLOOEHÂľIURQWORDGHGÂśPHDQLQJDIWHUWKHILUVW\HDUV\RXZLOOKDYH received all the payments you would have been due over a 20 year period.

x

x

7KHJRYHUQPHQWÂśVSURSRVHG5+,WDULIIOHYHOVDUHDVIROORZV Technology

Proposed RHI rate (per kWh deemed)

Biomass

5.2p Âą 8.7p

Air Source Heat Pump

6.9p Âą 11.5p

Ground Source Heat Pump

12.5p Âą 17.3p

Solar Thermal

17.3p

In the meantime, up to 25,000 installations ZLOOEHVXSSRUWHGE\D³5+,3UHPLXP3D\PHQW´WRKHOSSHRSOHFRYHUWKHSXUFKDVHSULFHRIJUHHQ heating systems. Those taking up the Premium will then be eligible for a RHI tariff when it launches in 2013.

x

There is clear eligibility criteria in order to qualify for a Premium payment, including:

Â&#x192; Â&#x192; x

a well insulated home based on its energy performance certificate; agreeing to give feedback on how the equipment performs

A key focus of both RHI and RHIPP is on people living off the gas grid, where fossil fuels like heating oil are both more expensive and have higher carbon content.

Published levels of support for RHI Premium Payments: Â&#x192; Solar Thermal - ÂŁ300/unit Â&#x192; Air Source Heat Pumps - ÂŁ850/unit Â&#x192; Biomass boilers - ÂŁ950/unit Â&#x192; Ground Source Heat Pumps - ÂŁ1250/unit

SAMPLE REPORT

GENERAL INFORMATION

The Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI), like the FIT, is due to provide a payment to those that are generating their own renewable heat. It is expected to cover technologies such as solar thermal systems, heat pumps and biomass boilers. Details of how the scheme will work are still under review, with the scheme not due to start for domestic properties until the summer of 2013. In the meantime, the Renewable Heat Premium Payment scheme offers a one-off (subsidy) payment, ranging from ÂŁ300 to ÂŁ1200 depending on the technology, to help encourage the installation of such measures. Phase I of this scheme has now closed, with Phase II open for pre-registration. There are some restrictions on who is eligibOHIRUWKH3UHPLXP3D\PHQWVFKHPHSDUWLFXODUO\LQUHODWLRQWRKRXVHKROGVÂśFXUUHQWKHDWLQJV\VWHPVDQGHQHUJ\VXSSO\)RUPRUe information, ask about the scheme in your 30 minute consultation call.


38 5.2.4 Grants Grants used to be commonplace in this area of construction, but are now few and far betwHHQDQGWHQGWRIRFXVRQIXHOSRRUDQG³YXOQHUDEOH´KRXVHKROGV+RZHYHUWKHUHDUH occasional exceptions at both central and local government. It is often worth a quick web search, and/or a call to your local council. We can also offer help and advice during your telephone consultation, or as part of our specification/project management services (see section 5.6)

As an alternative to the Green Deal, and depending on your personal finances, you may wish to use your savings, a loan, or an extension of your mortgage to finance your renovations. Some banks and building societies offer discounts on their loan/mortgage rates where the funds are being used for home energy efficiency improvements. We suggest that you speak to a financial advisor to discuss your options if using your own money or a loan to finance a retrofit project.

5.3

PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND SPECIFICATION

As highlighted in section 5.1, SURMHFWPDQDJHPHQWLVDYLWDOSDUWRIWKHUHWURILWSURFHVVSDUWLFXODUO\ZKHUH\RXDUHWKLQNLQJRID³ZKROHKRXVH´DSSURDFKIn any construction SURMHFWWKHSURMHFWPDQDJHUœVUROHLVWRPDNHVXUHWKDWWKHZRUNVDUHGHOLYHUHGRQWLPHDQGRQEXGJHWDQGWKat they achieve the anticipated outcome. Some are confident taking on this role themselves, whereas others choose to employ a professional to take on this role. Key tasks that may be performed by a project manager include: x x x x x x x x x

Identifying the key tasks involved in the project, their sequencing and deadlines Specifying the work required within each task Liaising with the planning department and building control officers where required Identifying the best people to carry out the work Putting together tender documents, and reviewing responses Selecting and appointing the final team Co-ordinating the activities of the various contractors Monitoring progress against the plan and budget Signing off the completed work, including the quality and technical sufficiency

None of these tasks need be difficult, but they can require patience and care, and can be quite time consuming. A good project manager can be worth their weight in gold Âą ensuring that costs and disruption are minimised. Here at Parity Projects we offer a Project Management service that benefits from many years of experience in the sector. Our expertise in sustainable retrofit means that we are ideally placed to make sure that your project is a success. We offer end-to-end project management, as well ad-hoc project management consultancy (on a day rate). We also offer a specification service that focusses on the up-front tasks: from specifying the works through to helping you appoint your team. For more information on these services, ask during your telephone consultation or call us on 0208 874 6433.

SAMPLE REPORT

GENERAL INFORMATION

5.2.5 Self-Financing your Retrofit


39 5.4

PLANNING PERMISSION AND RENEWABLES

In England and Scotland, changes to permitted development rights for renewable technologies introduced on 6th April 2008 and 12th March 2009 respectively, have lifted the requirements for planning permission for most domestic microgeneration technologies. The General Permitted Development Order (GPDO), or the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development) (Domestic Microgeneration) (Scotland) Amendment Order 2009 grants rights to carry out certain limited forms of development on the home, without the need to apply for planning permission. The scope of the GPDO in England and the TCP (GPD) in Scotland now extends to the following technologies: Always check with your local authority to find out if you require planning permission or not, the information on this page is for guidance only.

Permitted unless: x panels protrude more than 200mm when installed.

! Additionally in Scotland only: ! x installed on any part of the external walls of the building if the building contains a flat x panels when installed on a flat roof are situated within 1 metre from the edge of the roof or protrude more than 1 metre above the plane of the roof x panels when installed project higher than the highest point of the roof (excluding the chimney) x the building is within a conservation area or World Heritage Site and the solar PV or solar thermal equipment is installed on a roof which forms the front of the building and is visible from the road. Note additionally in Scotland only: The solar PV or solar thermal equipment must, as far as is reasonably practical, minimise its effect on the amenity of the area and be removed when it is no longer needed or used for domestic microgeneration.

5.4.2 Solar photovoltaics and solar thermal (stand alone): Permitted unless: x more than 4 metres in height x above a maximum area of array of 9m2 x installed less than 5 metres away from any boundary (England Only) x situated on a wall within any part of the curtilage of the dwelling house and would be visible from a highway in Conservations Areas and World Heritage Sites. (England Only) Additionally in Scotland only: x installed a distance from the boundary of the curtilage of the dwelling house which is less than the height of the array x within the curtilage of a listed building ! ! x results in more than one free standing solar x the building is within a conservation area or World Heritage Site and the solar PV or solar thermal equipment is installed on a wall or roof which forms the front of the building and is visible from the road. x the solar PV or solar thermal equipment must, as far as is reasonably practical, minimise its effect on the amenity of the area and be removed when it is no longer needed or used for domestic microgeneration.

SAMPLE REPORT

GENERAL INFORMATION

5.4.1 Solar photovoltaics and solar thermal (roof mounted):


40 5.4.3 Wood burning boilers and stoves, and CHP: Permitted unless: x flue exceeds 1m above the roof height (excluding the chimney) x installed on the principal elevation and visible from a road in buildings in Conservation Areas and World Heritage Sites. Additionally in Scotland: x flue situated within an Air Quality Management Area (when CHP is wood fuelled)

Permitted

5.4.5 Water source heat pumps: Permitted

5.4.6 Micro, small wind, and air source heat pumps Due to legal technicalities the current statutory instrument (SI) does not cover micro or small wind, or air source heat pumps. Once these issues have been resolved, it is expected that roof mounted and free standing wind turbines will be permitted at detached properties that are not in conservation areas. Further legislation is expected later this year. Until then, you must consult with your local authority regarding planning permission.

5.4.7 Listed Buildings Note that the permitted development rights are not extended to Listed Buildings which are covered by other planning regulations.

5.4.8 Wales and Northern Ireland Permitted Development and planning policy in general is a devolved responsibility. The Welsh Assembly Government and Northern Ireland Government are currently all considering changes to their legislation on permitted developments, to facilitate installations of microgeneration technologies. Legislation is expected in both countries later this year. Until then, householders in Wales and Northern Ireland must consult with their local authority regarding planning permission.

SAMPLE REPORT

GENERAL INFORMATION

5.4.4 Ground source heat pumps:


41 5.5

IMPORTANT NOTE ON INSULATION AND CONDENSATION Some notes on ensuring insulation is properly installed

Typically this is not a problem in a conventional house, because lofts and underfloor spaces are well ventilated (so moisture can escape), and when condensation does occur in brick walls it is unlikely to lead to problems. 7KLVLVZK\ORIWLQVXODWLRQVKRXOGQ¶WEHFRYHUHGE\SODVWLFVKHHWLQJDQGZK\WKHHDYHVRI\RXUORIWVKRXOGEH left open when you install loft insulation). When you install insulation it is in most cases very important to ensure that a vapour barrier is installed ± to stop the moisture getting to places where it might condense ± if there is any risk of interstitial condensation. A dew point analysis is a very straightforward method of assessing this risk, and any installer should be able to do this for you (or you may be able to find instruction online or in a technical manual). The risk is likely to be greater for wall insulation if it is installed internally, and in general the vapour barrier is installed near the internal surface of the wall. A further potential issue with insulation is cold bridging. If you were to insulate most (rather than all) of your home, the moisture in the air would tend to condense on the remaining cold surfaces. A particular example of where this can be a problem is where the spaces between the floor of an upstairs room and the ceiling of the room below remain uninsulated and unsealed when the external walls of the rooms are internally insulated. In this case we do not recommend insulation of these spaces (as even if you insulate round the floor timbers, the insulation will be penetrated by the timbers which will be the coldest surfaces available and can therefore become a focus for condensation which might lead to rot). Instead we recommend that the relevant floors and ceilings are sealed with vapour barriers, and care is taken to add appropriate ventilation to the intra floor spaces. This is not a difficult procedure. Your installer will know of similar standard procedures available to ensure that other types of cold bridging (eg under floors) do not cause problems.

!"

DETAILED ANALYSIS

Most normal walls, ceilings and floors let through a small amount of air. So called interstitial condensation can occur when warm, moist air from inside a building penetrates into a wall, roof or floor construction and meets a cold surface. This may be a problem if there is wood present.

IN SUMMARY Before any insulation is installed in your home (apart from conventional loft insulation or cavity wall insulation) x

seek reassurance from your installer that they have considered the risk of resultant condensation

OR x

conduct a dew point / cold bridging analysis and ensure that vapour barriers are installed wherever necessary.

SAMPLE REPORT


42 6 'HWDLOHGDQDO\VLV It should be noted that payback periods are based purely on the internal payback that the measures provide against not doing the work and so do not take into account any capital gain due to the increased capital value that they add. For example by comparison if the similar payback period for an extension, cost around £30,000 was calculated using the same model it would be infinite, and for a Prius, cost around £20,000, may have a payback period upward of 35 years using UK government data.

6.1

RANKED BY ANNUAL SAVINGS INITIATIVE AREA

DETAILS

HEATING

DIY / PROFESSIONAL INSTALL

ANNUAL FUEL COST SAVING

INSTALL COST

PAYBACK PERIOD (yrs)

Install a ground to water Ground Source Heat Pump and connect to the existing radiator system except in the extension where wet underfloor heating will be installed supplemented by the wood burners

Pro

£761

£19,000

25

HEATING

Install a biomass batch boiler and connect to the existing radiator system except in the extension where wet underfloor heating will be installed - supplemented by the wood burners

Pro

£503

£11,000

21.8

HEATING

Install an air to water Air Source Heat Pump and connect to the existing radiator system except in the extension where wet underfloor heating will be installed - supplemented by the wood burners

Pro

£489

£15,000

30.7

RENEWABLES

Install a 2kWp solar PV array on the south-east facing front roof, based on a Feed In Tariff (FIT) rate of 16p per kWh

Pro

£459

£7,000

15.2

HEATING

Install a ground to water Ground Source Heat Pump and connect to the existing radiator system except in the extension where wet underfloor heating will be installed supplemented by the wood burners - using EST field trials average COP (Professional Mea

Pro

£395

£19,000

48.1

HOT WATER

Install an ultra low flow showerhead

Pro

£329

£75

0.2

RENEWABLES

Install a 1kWp solar PV array on the south-east facing front roof, based on a Feed In Tariff (FIT) rate of 16p per kWh

Pro

£230

£5,000

21.8

HEATING

Install a biomass pellet boiler and connect to the existing radiator system except in the extension where wet underfloor heating will be installed - supplemented by the wood burners

Pro

£115

£14,000

121.5

HEATING

Install an air to water Air Source Heat Pump and connect to the existing radiator system except in the extension where wet underfloor heating will be installed - supplemented by the wood burners - using EST field trials average COP

Pro

£110

£15,000

136.3

HEATING

Install an air to water Air Source Heat Pump and wet underfloor heating under the suspended ground floor - supplemented by the wood burners - using EST field trials

Pro

£110

£18,000

163.5

List of measures appears here

List of measures appears here

List of measures appears here

SAMPLE REPORT

List of measures appears here

DETAILED ANALYSIS

This is a listing of the savings that could be made if each initiative were to be carried out individually.


43 INITIATIVE AREA

DETAILS

DIY / PROFESSIONAL INSTALL

ANNUAL FUEL COST SAVING

INSTALL COST

PAYBACK PERIOD (yrs)

List of measures appears here

HEATING

Install an air to water Air Source Heat Pump and connect to the existing radiator system - supplemented by the wood burners - using EST field trials average COP

Pro

£110

£11,000

99.9

WALLS

Add 100mm PIR internally to the walls of the original building

Pro

£97

£5,100

52.5

WALLS

Add 75mm PIR internally to the walls of the original building

Pro

£87

£4,600

52.7

WALLS

Add 50mm PIR internally to the walls of the original building

Pro

£72

£4,000

55.2

FLOORS

Add 100mm mineral wool below floorboards to all suspended ground floors

Pro

£70

£4,500

64.7

WALLS

Add 100mm PIR internally to the rear timber frame walls

Pro

£50

£830

16.4

WALLS

Add 75mm PIR internally to the rear timber frame walls

Pro

£49

£760

15.6

WALLS

Add 25mm PIR internally to the walls of the original building

Pro

£48

£3,100

64.5

ROOFS

Add 100mm PIR internally to all ceilings with no accessible loft space above

Pro

£46

£1,040

22.8

WALLS

Add 50mm PIR internally to the rear timber frame walls

Pro

£45

£670

14.9

List of measures appears here &RQWLQXHVDVDERYH««

List of measures appears here

List of measures appears here

SAMPLE REPORT

DETAILED ANALYSIS

average COP


44 RANKED BY CO2 SAVINGS INITIATIVE AREA

DETAILS

DIY / PROFESSIONAL INSTALL

ANNUAL CO2 SAVING

£ per kg CO2

INSTALL COST

(kg CO2)

HEATING

Install a biomass pellet boiler and connect to the existing radiator system except in the extension where wet underfloor heating will be installed supplemented by the wood burners

Pro

4413.2

£3.17

£14,000

HEATING

Install a biomass batch boiler and connect to the existing radiator system except in the extension where wet underfloor heating will be installed supplemented by the wood burners

Pro

4228.6

£2.6

£11,000

HEATING

Install a ground to water Ground Source Heat Pump and connect to the existing radiator system except in the extension where wet underfloor heating will be installed - supplemented by the wood burners

Pro

1679.3

£11.31

£19,000

HOT WATER

Install an ultra low flow showerhead

Pro

1563.8

£0.05

£75

RENEWABLE S

Install a 2kWp solar PV array on the south-east facing front roof, based on a Feed In Tariff (FIT) rate of 16p per kWh

Pro

859.9

£8.14

£7,000

HEATING

Install an air to water Air Source Heat Pump and connect to the existing radiator system except in the extension where wet underfloor heating will be installed - supplemented by the wood burners

Pro

590.8

£25.39

£15,000

List of measures appears here

List of measures appears here &RQWLQXHVDVDERYH««

List of measures appears here

List of measures appears here SAMPLE REPORT

DETAILED ANALYSIS

6.2


45 RANKED BY INSTALLATION COSTS INITIATIVE AREA

DETAILS

HEATING

Use the oil boiler to heat the entire property

DIY / PROFESSIONAL INSTALL

INSTALL COST

ANNUAL FUEL COST SAVING

PAYBACK PERIOD (yrs)

Pro

£0

£-1032.86

0

HOT WATER

List measures appears here Install an ultraof low flow showerhead

Pro

£75

£328

0.2

ROOFS

Add 50mm PIR internally to the ceiling of the front dormer

Pro

£130

£1.67

77.9

WINDOW DRAUGHTS

Professionally draughtproof the loose single glazed windows upstairs

Pro

£130

£3.54

36.7

ROOFS

Add 100mm PIR internally to the ceiling of the front dormer

Pro

£140

£1.87

74.8

ROOFS

Add 50mm PIR internally to the ceiling of the rear dormer

Pro

£150

£2.39

62.8

ROOFS

Add 100mm PIR internally to the ceiling of the rear dormer

Pro

£160

£2.68

59.7

DOOR DRAUGHTS

Professionally draughtproof all three external doors

Pro

£160

£20

7.8

ROOFS

Top up the 200mm mineral wool insulation in the main loft space to 300mm

DIY

£240

£3.63

66.1

List of measures appears here &RQWLQXHVDVDERYH«««

List of measures appears here

List of measures appears here

SAMPLE REPORT

DETAILED ANALYSIS

6.3


46 RANKED BY PAYBACK PERIOD INITIATIVE AREA

DETAILS

WINDOWS

Replace the standard double glazed Velux window in the master bedroom with a triple glazed Velux window

Pro

£0

£700

-12939

HEATING

Install a ground to water Ground Source Heat Pump and wet underfloor heating under the suspended ground floor - supplemented by the wood burners - using EST average field trials COP

Pro

£-98

£23,000

-235.7

HEATING

Install a new top specification condensing oil boiler and use to heat the entire property

Pro

£-54

£2,100

-39

APPLIANCES

Replace the electric oven and hob with a butane oven and hob

Pro

£-63

£500

-7.9

HEATING

Use the oil boiler to heat the entire property

Pro

£-1033

£0

0

HOT WATER

Install an ultra low flow showerhead

Pro

£329

£75

0.2

DOOR DRAUGHTS

Professionally draughtproof all three external doors

Pro

£21

£160

7.8

APPLIANCES

Replace fridge freezer with a new A++ rated alternative

DIY

£42

£380

9

WALLS

Add 50mm PIR internally to the rear timber frame walls

Pro

£45

£670

14.9

DIY / PROFESSIONAL INSTALL

List of measures appears here

List of measures appears here

ANNUAL FUEL COST SAVING

INSTALL COST

PAYBACK PERIOD (yrs)

&RQWLQXHVDVDERYH«

List of measures appears here

List of measures appears here SAMPLE REPORT

DETAILED ANALYSIS

6.4


47 RANKED BY £ PER kg CO2 SAVED INITIATIVE AREA WINDOWS HEATING

DETAILS

DIY / PROFESSIONAL INSTALL

Replace the standard double glazed Velux window in the master bedroom with a triple glazed Velux window

List of measures appears here Install an air to water Air Source Heat Pump and wet underfloor heating under

ANNUAL CO2 SAVING

INSTALL COST

£ per kg CO2

(kg CO2)

Pro

-0

£700

-6017.75

Pro

-920

£18,000

-19.55

the suspended ground floor - supplemented by the wood burners - using EST field trials average COP HEATING

Install an air to water Air Source Heat Pump and connect to the existing radiator system except in the extension where wet underfloor heating will be installed - supplemented by the wood burners - using EST field trials average COP

Pro

-920

£15,000

-16.29

HEATING

Install an air to water Air Source Heat Pump and connect to the existing radiator system - supplemented by the wood burners - using EST field trials average COP

Pro

-920

£11,000

-11.95

HEATING

Install a ground to water Ground Source Heat Pump and wet underfloor heating under the suspended ground floor - supplemented by the wood burners - using EST average field trials COP

Pro

-2,132

£23,000

-10.79

HEATING

Install a new top specification condensing oil boiler and use to heat the entire property

Pro

-2,891

£2,100

-0.73

List of measures appears here &RQWLQXHVDVDERYH««

List of measures appears here

List of measures appears here

SAMPLE REPORT

DETAILED ANALYSIS

6.5


48 7 $GGLWLRQDO,QIRUPDWLRQ SEQUENCING - DEPENDENCIES, CONCURRENT AND SUBSEQUENT WORK

POTENTIAL PRECEDING ACTIVITIES, CONCURRENT ACTIVITIES AND DEPENDENCIES

INITIATIVE

POTENTIAL FOLLOWING ON ACTIVITIES

Concurrent:

Replacing kitchen appliances

x

Periodically defrost freezer to improve its efficiency

Systematically replace all inefficient lamps with energy efficient alternatives

x

None

Upgrading glazing and doors

x

Add internal wall insulation

x

Add external wall insulation

x

Add Heat Exchange Extractor Fan

x

Adding boarding to the loft or attic. Conventional loft LQVXODWLRQ PPPLQHUDOZRRO GRHVQÂśWDOORZVWRUDJHVR if the loft is to be boarded consider extending joists before insulation is installed or using some form of insulated boarding solution for portion of insulation above existing joists.

x

Lag primary hot water pipes behind appliances

x

Install internal wall insulation behind appliances

x

Add Heat Exchange Extractor Fan

Potentially preceding activities: x

Changing light fixtures and fittings

Concurrent: x

Accessing roof or floor voids

Potentially proceeding activities: x

Installing underfloor insulation or heating that may affect floor heights

Concurrent: x

Add Heat Exchange Extractor Fan

Potentially proceeding activities: x

Changing light fixtures and fittings

x

Clearing out the loft or attic

x

Treating rafters and joists for disease or pests

x

Removing vermin and pests from the attic

Adding insulation to the loft or attic

Concurrent: x

Adding piping for solar thermal or wiring for solar pv

x

Maintenance on water tank

x

Draught-proofing loft hatch

SAMPLE REPORT

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

7.1


49 POTENTIAL PRECEDING ACTIVITIES, CONCURRENT ACTIVITIES AND DEPENDENCIES

INITIATIVE

POTENTIAL FOLLOWING ON ACTIVITIES

Dependencies:

Adding internal wall insulation

x

Upgrading and potentially re-sizing boiler

Adding external wall insulation

x

Upgrading and potentially re-sizing boiler

Adding floor insulation

x

Add internal wall insulation

x

Changing or upgrading doors

x

Decide on any biomass/gas room heaters to enable ventilation requirements to be met

x

Adding floor insulation or underfloor heating

x

Adding wall insulation to floor void

x

Moving and potentially re-sizing radiators

Concurrent: x

Rewiring or plumbing works

x

Changes to fans and vents

Dependencies: x

Decide on any biomass/gas room heaters to enable ventilation requirements to be met

Potentially proceeding activities: x

Extending the roof eaves

x

Upgrading glazing and doors

Concurrent: x

Re-rendering, re-pointing, repainting walls

x

Re-painting windows

x

Guttering maintenance

x

Roofing and external chimney works

x

Addition of solar PV or solar thermal to roof

x

Adding drainage ditch around house

x

Changes to fans and vents

Dependencies: x

Decide on any biomass/gas room heaters to enable ventilation requirements to be met

Concurrent: x

Upgrading the boiler or changing the hot water and central heating system.

x

Rewiring or plumbing works

x

Replacing floorboards

x

Lagging hot water pipes

x

Carpeting or floor tiling

SAMPLE REPORT

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Potentially proceeding activities:


50 POTENTIAL PRECEDING ACTIVITIES, CONCURRENT ACTIVITIES AND DEPENDENCIES

INITIATIVE

POTENTIAL FOLLOWING ON ACTIVITIES

Dependencies:

Adding under floor heating

x

Add internal wall insulation

Low flow showerheads on all showers and take showers instead of baths

x

None

Lag primary hot water pipes

x

Decide on any biomass/gas room heaters to enable ventilation requirements to be met

x

Upgrading the boiler or changing the hot water and central heating system.

x

Rewiring or plumbing works

Potential proceeding activities: Check compatibility of shower with an ultra low flow showerhead

x

Adding internal wall insulation

x

Carrying out any plumbing works

x

Adding under floor heating

x

Emptying cupboards

x

Adding under floor insulation

x

Lifting floorboards

x

Moving radiators

x

Correctly balancing the system using TRVs

x

Setting up the timings to meet needs

x

None

Potentially proceeding activities:

Concurrent: x

Add insulation jacket to hot water tank

Potential proceeding activities: x

Deciding on whether a solar thermal system will be installed in the future

x

Deciding on a hot water cylinder or combi

x

Re-sizing the boiler if extensive works have been carried out

Upgrading the boiler

Concurrent: x

Powerflushing the radiators

x

Installing thermostatic radiator valves (TRVs) whilst the system is drained

x

Adding weather or load compensators

x

Adding internal wall insulation behind the boiler whilst it is off the wall

x

Changing the hot water cylinder, potentially to one that is solar thermal ready

x

Installing underfloor heating

Concurrent: x

Add insulation jacket to hot water tank

Lag primary hot water pipes

SAMPLE REPORT

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Concurrent:


POTENTIAL PRECEDING ACTIVITIES, CONCURRENT ACTIVITIES AND DEPENDENCIES

INITIATIVE

POTENTIAL FOLLOWING ON ACTIVITIES

Concurrent:

Adding solar thermal collectors

x

Adding or re-fitting insulation to loft space

x

Modifying washing behaviour to make the most of the solar thermal

x

Adding or re-fitting insulation to loft space.

x

Changing the boiler and the hot water tank

x

Adding underfloor heating

Concurrent: x

Adding external wall insulation

x

Re-rendering, re-pointing, repainting walls

x

Re-painting windows

x

Guttering maintenance

x

Roofing and external chimney works

Adding a solar photovoltaic array

SAMPLE REPORT

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

51


52 OPPORTUNITES FOR CONCURRENT ECO-RENOVATION INITIATIVES

BUILDING ACTIVITY

POTENTIAL CONCURRENT ECO-INITIATIVES

BUILDING ACTIVITY

POTENTIAL CONCURRENT ECO-INITIATIVES

External render

x

External wall insulation

Re-wire house

x

See All rooms

x

Solar PV on roof

x

x

Solar Thermal on roof

Add wires to enable house monitoring and control

x

Insulation in rafters

x

See All rooms

x

Cavity wall top-up

x

Upgrade heating and hot water system

x

Solar PV on roof

x

See All Rooms

x

Solar Thermal on roof

Repair floor/ceiling flood damage

x

Internal Wall Insulation

Insulate loft

x

x

Install conduits for solar PV or pipe work for solar thermal

Change light fixtures and fittings

x

x

Install under floor insulation/heating pipes

Cover ceiling spot holes with draught and fire proof covers

x

Pipe lagging

x

Draught proof loft hatch

x

Seal holes in floorboards, skirting boards and building fabric

Convert basement

x

See All rooms

x

See All rooms

Convert loft

x

See All rooms

Add extension

x

See All rooms

Wood Treatment activities

x

See Insulate loft

Re-roof

Re-decorate - All rooms

Re-decorate kitchen

x Refit Bathroom

Add heat exchange extractor fan

x

Changing electric oven to gas oven

x

See All rooms

x

Add heat exchange extractor fan

x

Install ultra-low flow showerheads, taps and toilet

Re-plumb house

SAMPLE REPORT

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

7.2


53 TRADESMEN AND DIY ± OPPORTUNITES AND POTENTIAL PROBLEMS

TRADESMEN / DIY TYPE

OPPORTUNITIES

POTENTIAL PROBLEMS

Electrician

x

Install internal wall insulation concurrently

x

Unfilled holes in the building fabric, especially top floor rooms

x

Difficult to change light fixtures and fittings

x

x

Install timer switches

Any new fixtures to be securely fastened right through the internal wall insulation to the outside brick work

x

Whole house on/off switches

x

Installing new appliances e.g. more efficient electric oven

x

Install under floor insulation/heating pipe work if floorboards are taken up

x

Removal of electric room heaters

x

Install spot light draught covers in top floor rooms

x

Install loft or ceiling insulation

x

Upgrading boiler and insulating behind it

x

Over sizing of boiler if the house has been eco-renovated

x

Install under floor insulation/heating pipe work if floorboards are taken up

x

Unfilled holes in the building fabric

x

Add pipe work for solar thermal even if not installing at this time

x

Installation of low flow toilets, tap and shower fittings

x

Upgrading boiler and insulating behind it

x

Over sizing of boiler if the house has been eco-renovated

x

Removal of gas room heaters

x

Install internal wall insulation concurrently

x

None

x

Seal holes in building fabric

Plumber

Gas engineer Plasterer

x

Change light fixtures and fittings concurrently

Rendering

x

Install external wall insulation concurrently

x

None

Carpenter

x

Install internal wall insulation concurrently

x

Unfilled holes in the building fabric, especially top floor rooms

x

Add easy to reach plug switches

x

Any new fixtures to be securely fastened right through the internal wall insulation to the outside brick work

x

None

x

Need to fill newly created hole with expanding foam or other sealant

x

Any new fixtures to be securely fastened right through the internal wall insulation to the outside brick work

x

Unfilled holes in the building fabric, especially top floor rooms

x

Any new fixtures to be securely fastened right through the internal wall insulation to the outside brick work

x

Building regulations are not met

Satellite TV installer

Builder ± general

x

Improving building air tightness ± floorboards, skirting boards, fixtures and fittings

x

Adding internal insulation

x

Lag pipe work

SAMPLE REPORT

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

7.3


TRADESMEN / DIY TYPE

OPPORTUNITIES

POTENTIAL PROBLEMS

Builder Âą conservatory/sunroom

x

Add door between conservatory and sitting room to enable it to be sealed off in winter

x

Heated conservatories generally lead to much higher energy bills

x

x

Unfilled holes in the building fabric

Additional internal wall insulation

x

x

Building regulations are not met

Upgrading of glazing

x

Additional internal wall and ceiling insulation, including around dormer windows

x

Unsealed spot lights and ceiling light fittings

x

x

Building regulations are not met

Upgrading of glazing

x

Lag pipe work

x

Install internal wall insulation concurrently

x

Unfilled holes in the building fabric

x

Install heat exchange extractor fan

x

x

Lag pipe work

Any new fixtures to be securely fastened right through the internal wall insulation to the outside brick work

x

Changing electric oven to gas oven

x

Change light fixtures and fittings

x

Install under floor insulation/heating pipe work if floorboards are taken up

x

Install internal wall insulation concurrently

x

Unfilled holes in the building fabric

x

Install heat exchange extractor fan

x

x

Lag pipe work

Any new fixtures to be securely fastened right through the internal wall insulation to the outside brick work

x

Install low flow toilet, showerhead and taps

x

Change light fixtures and fittings

x

Install under floor insulation/heating pipe work if floorboards are taken up

x

Determine where there are holes in building fabric

x

None

x

Determine opportunities for installing wood burning stoves

x

Seal chimney with removable chimney balloon

x

Add or top up loft insulation

x

Loft insulation could be moved or damaged

x

Install pipe work for solar thermal or conduits for solar photovoltaic

x

Additional fabric holes could be made

Builder Âą loft extension

Kitchen fitter

Bathroom fitter

Chimney sweep

Wood treatment

SAMPLE REPORT

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

54


55 7.4

ROOM BY ROOM ACTIVITIES

ROOM

POTENTIAL ACTIVITIES

Kitchen

x

Change light fixtures and fittings

x

Install internal wall insulation

x

Upgrade appliances

x

Install under floor insulation

x

Change electric oven to a gas oven

x

Install piping for under floor heating

x

Install heat recovery extractor fan

x

Internal insulate external ceilings

x

Upgrade boiler

x

Draught proof windows and doors

x

Insulate behind boiler

x

Upgrade glazing

x

Lag pipes

x

Seal building fabric holes

x

Add thermostatic radiator valves

x

Change light fixtures and fittings

x

Install internal wall insulation

x

Add easy to reach plug switches

x

Install under floor insulation

x

Lag pipes

x

Install piping for under floor heating

x

Draught proof windows and doors

x

Internal insulate external ceilings

x

Upgrade glazing

x

Seal building fabric holes

x

Add thermostatic radiator valves

x

Change light fixtures and fittings

x

Install internal wall insulation

x

Lag pipes

x

Install under floor insulation

x

Draught proof windows and doors

x

Install piping for under floor heating

x

Upgrade glazing

x

Internal insulate external ceilings

x

Add thermostatic radiator valves

x

Seal building fabric holes

x

Lag pipes

x

Add thermostatic radiator valves

x

Add insulation jacket to boiler

x

Install under floor insulation

x

Change hot water cylinder to be solar thermal compatible

x

Seal building fabric holes

x

Install heat recovery extractor fan

x

Upgrade glazing

x

Install ultra low flow showerheads and tap fixtures

x

Add thermostatic radiator valves

x

x

Install internal wall insulation

Install a low flow toilet

x

x

Install under floor insulation

Change light fixtures and fittings

x

x

Install piping for under floor heating

Lag pipes

x

x

Internal insulate external ceilings

Draught proof windows and doors

x

Seal building fabric holes

Communal rooms

Bedrooms

Airing cupboard

Bathrooms

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

This table will be useful if you are tackling each room at a time e.g. as you redecorate.

SAMPLE REPORT


ROOM

POTENTIAL ACTIVITIES

Halls, corridors and landings

x

Change light fixtures and fittings

x

Install internal wall insulation

x

Install timer light switches

x

Install under floor insulation

x

Lag pipes

x

Install piping for under floor heating

x

Draught proof windows and doors

x

Internal insulate external ceilings

x

Upgrade glazing

x

Seal building fabric holes

x

Add thermostatic radiator valves

x

Change light fixtures and fittings

x

Draught proof basement door

x

Upgrade appliances

x

Add insulation to ceiling

x

Lag pipes

x

Seal building fabric holes

x

Upgrade boiler

x

Add doors to be able to close off in winter

x

Add thermostatic radiator valves

x

Change light fixtures and fittings

x

Install internal wall insulation

x

Lag pipes

x

Install under floor insulation

x

Draught proof windows and doors

x

Internal insulate external ceilings

x

Upgrade glazing

x

Seal building fabric holes

x

Change light fixtures and fittings

x

x

Lag pipes

Install internal wall insulation including around dormer windows

x

Draught proof windows and doors

x

Install under floor insulation

x

Upgrade glazing

x

Install piping for under floor heating

x

Add thermostatic radiator valves

x

Internal insulate external ceilings

x

Seal building fabric holes, especially around light fixtures and fittings

Basement and cellars

Conservatories and sun rooms

Loft rooms

Lofts and attics

x

Seal building fabric holes, especially around light fixtures and fittings

x

Add additional insulation between or over joists or in rafters

x

Check current insulation for disturbance or damage

x

Add pipe work for solar thermal even if not installing at this stage.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

56

SAMPLE REPORT


57 7.5

SHORT GLOSSARY

Blower Door ± a diagnostic tool designed to measure the airtightness for buildings and help locate air leakage sites. They work by sealing a large calibrated fan to a door which increases the air pressure inside the house. Smoke sticks can then be used to identify where air is leaking out of the building.

Combination Boiler ± a boiler that produces hot water on demand. This kind of boilers does not need a hot water storage tank (cylinder). As there is no hot water being stored these boilers tend to result in fuel bill savings compared with conventional boilers. Condensing Boiler ± a boiler that runs at higher efficiency than a conventional boiler by extracting additional heat by condensing water vapour from the waste gases before it passes through the flue. LED ± Light Emitting Diode ± an emerging technology with regards to domestic lighting that reduce energy use even more then CFLs. PIR ± polyisocyanurate, polyiso or ISO. Typically used as a foil backed rigid foam board, with or without plasterboard attached. We quote this material, unbranded, as it comes in variants that can be used on floors, walls and ceilings. In addition, if you decide to use other insulation materials can it makes it fairly easy for an Architect or installer to work out what depth would be required to achieve the same thermal resistance. Phenolic ± Another rigid board offering slightly better insulative value per unit thickness than PIR but usually slightly more expensive. Can come with plasterboard attached. TRV ± thermostatic radiator valve U Value ± this is a standard measure of the rate of heat energy movement through a unit area of a fabric per degree difference in temperature between one side and the other. 2 2 2 It is measured in W/(m K). A solid wall is usually just over 2 W/(m K) and a Building Regulations wall is 0.3 W/(m K) i.e. heat will pass through a solid wall about seven times faster. Zoning ± keeping different rooms or areas of a property at different temperatures. The effectiveness of zoning is increased by restricting air movements by closing doors, installing curtains across stairwells and corridors etc. 1 kWh ± The amount of energy consumed by ten 100Watt lightbulbs in one hour.

7.6

MASTERPLAN SCOPE

This report is not meant to be a detailed specification or design document for your property. It has been devised to help you make strategic decisions about which measures to investigate further in order to maximise your savings for the least effort, disruption and capital investment. Whilst we endeavour to only include measure that are appropriate, in some circumstances some of the measures evaluated may be found not be possible following subsequent investigation. We will always err on the side of including too much to make sure you have the fullest range of potential options. In addition we may also include items which do not have much effect or have negative effects in order to highlight them and allow you to see quantifiable evidence of why you may not want to pursue them any further.

SAMPLE REPORT

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

CFL ± Compact Fluorescent Lamp i.e. common energy saving bulbs


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