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PREMEDLIFE

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New Medical Schools

Find out where they are located and what prospective students may need to know

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THE MAGAZINE FOR PREMEDICAL STUDENTS

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010

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Admission Insider Advice & Tips

1 r 1 0 2 me d t e Sum -M s Preram Li ! g ded o r P nclu I

Cool MCAT

Prep Website

FREE

Pre-med Events

 Log onto www.premedlife.com to view & download the digital edition of the current issue!


CONTENTS

PREMEDLIFE MAGAZINE

www.premedlife.com

September/October 2010

FEATURES

30

Medical Schools Galore | 14 New medical schools across the country are opening their doors to address the doctor shortage in the United States

Professors Decoded | 25 Understanding your professors may be the key to getting good grades in your courses

Early Decision Programs | 33 Find out if pursing early admission to medical school is the right decision for you

DEPARTMENTS

14 75

Ask The Experts | 12 Your questions answered by knowledgeable insiders who know a lot about the medical school admissions process School Spotlight| 30 Get a glimpse into what one medical school the has to offer prospective students Especially This Specialty | 32 Find out what being a Neurologist is all about and what it will take to pursue this specialty

IN EVERY ISSUE In The News| 6 The latest news & information relevant to students applying to medical school

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33

Gadgets & Gizmos| 67 Cool thingamajigs that are worth checking out In The Stacks| 70 Books that can inspire you or provide you with advice along your journey to medical school

2011

s u l p SUMMER PRE-MED

Better Life, Better You| 71 Energy foods to help you get through your days and nights in college

PROGRAM LIST

A listing of summer opportunities for pre-health students. The list includes opportunities nationwide in several different areas. Among the areas include are: California, Connecticut, Florida, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, AND MANY MORE! | 35

College 101| 75 Dorm room feng shui: Decorating your room to give better “vibes�

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 3


PREMEDLIFE the magazine for premedical students www.premedlife.com

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WANT TO SUBSCRIBE? Free copies of PreMedLife Magazine are limited and will get picked up fast, but don’t complain. If you subscribe, you can get your very own copy. If your school is not receiving free copies of PreMedLife Magazine, email us at info@premedlife.com to see if you school can be added to our list

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facebook.com/premedlifemagazine PreMedLife Magazine is published six times per year by Kisho Media, LLC. and copies are provided to selected colleges and universities free of charge. The information in PreMedLife Magazine is believed to be accurate, but in some instances, may represent opinion or judgment. Consult your pre-med advisor with any questions you may have about the medical school admission process and related topics. Unless otherwise noted, all photographs, artwork, and and may not be duplicated or reprinted without express written permission from Kisho Media, LLC. PreMedLife Magazine and Kisho Media, LLC. are not liable for typographical or production errors or the accuracy of information provided by advertisers. PreMedLife Magazine reserves the right to refuse any advertising. All inquires may be sent to: Kisho Media, LLC. P.O. Box 7049, New York, NY 10116. Or call (347) 231-6429 or email info@premedlife.com.

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Believe it or not, summer’s over. And whether you took the time to go to the beach or hit the books, it’s time to get back into the swing of things. One of my professors once told us students on the first day of classes that “Everyone starts with an ‘A’”. And if you really think about it - it’s true! It’s what you do from that point on, that first day in class, that matters. You then have do you what you have to do in order to keep that “A”. Whether it’s acing all of your tests, completing your recitation problems from chem, or making sure you make it to every class, you’ll have to put in work to keep your “A”. Try not to get caught up with how well everyone else is doing. If you want to outdo someone, start with yourself. Do better than you did on your last test. Breeze through those orgo problems like you’ve been identifying conjugation in dienes since you were born. Focus on becoming the best pre-med candidate you can. Don’t be afraid to push yourself. You’ll be surprised at how much potential you have if you just stick with it and give yourself a chance. Some may disagree but I’ve always believed that you are your best teacher. That doesn’t mean that you can afford to blow off whatever the professor is doing or think that you don’t have to go to class, it just means that you shouldn’t rely on your instructors for everything. Take time to figure out concepts and ideas in your head, using your way. Whether it’s a corny mnemonic you’ve made up or a cartoon you’ve drawn to help visualize a complicated mechanism, you might be surprised how much you can teach yourself. If you end up feeling that the instructor’s way is better, then do what works. Be productive this semester, be a go-getter. Ready for your first assignment? Take 30 seconds to think about a saying that will keep you motivated every time you read it. For me, the first one that comes to mind is “Don’t talk about it - be about it”. The saying is simple, but it’s effective. Whichever saying you choose, put it on a sticky note, or in a place where you’ll see it frequently. It will help you push yourself when you thought you couldn’t push any further.

Sheema Publisher

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 5


IN THE NEWS

>>> The latest news & information relevant to premedical students applying to medical school

School Announces 3-Year MD Program Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center education, but also provides scholarships to any (TTUHSC) School of Medicine has received incoming students who qualify. approval to develop the first ever three-year medical “The program design ensures that the educational degree program, according to a press release issued experience of each student will satisfy all by the institution. of the requirements for awarding a degree The new Family Medicine Accelerated of Doctor of Medicine,” said Dr. Williams. Track (FMAT) program was devel“The students will participate in additional oped as part of the school’s initiaactivities during the revised three-year curtive to address the shortage of riculum to acquire the necessary knowledge primary-care doctors in the United and skills to be fully qualified and excellent priStates. Students who are accepted mary-care physicians.” into the FMAT program can “I think Texas Tech has challenged complete their medical some assumptions and I think it’s degree in three years and good to challenge them. Others are at half the cost that tradigoing to be watching,” said John tional four-year medical doctor proPrescott, chief academic officer for the grams require. A m e r i c a n Simon Williams, PhD, associate dean Association of at TTUHSC School of Medicine, revealed Medical Colleges that for the Fall 2010, (AAMC). only 10 students The FMAT prowill be selected inigram received tially out of 140 approval from the incoming medical Liaison Committee students. on Medical “Normally, we Education (LCME), send 10 to 15 stuwhich is the accrediting authoritalogs t/Photoca dents each year ty for medical education programs leading to the ar lip C lassroom © 2006 C into a [primary care] MD degree in US and Canadian medical schools. career, and we anticipate that will increase,” Dr. The FMAT program will begin accepting students Williams explained. “Our primary goal is to make [a from the Summer 2010 incoming class. dent] on the shortage of family medicine physicians.” For more information about the FMAT three-year The FMAT program not only lowers the amount MD program, call (800) 743-2297 or visit of debt that medical students acquire to fund their www.ttuhsc.edu/com. „

Website Offers Free MCAT Prep Materials Founded by John Wetzel, a Stanford University graduate, WikiPremed, is a free course in undergraduatelevel general sciences designed to prepare college students as they prepare to apply to medical school. The MCAT course teaches the physical and biological sciences using method developed by Wetzel over many years of working closely with college students in small group settings. With this knowledge, he was able to figure out what worked and what didn’t. The website has no restricted access areas, you don’t have to provide your e-mail address, and you don’t have

to join as a member. The site is open access, so that means that everything is free and you can use the website to study for as long a your heart desires! Hey, when times are tough, college students usually love the sound of free, so take advantage of this rare opportunity. We bet that you’ll probably learn a lot and not have to spend a penny. If you think it’s too good to be true, check it out for yourself. For more information about WikiPremed or to try out the MCAT course for yourself, visit www.wikipremed.com. „

6 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010

UM-Flint Program to Assure Med School Slots Premedical students at the University of Michigan-Flint are getting their chance at gaining early admission to Michigan State University’s College of Human Medicine through a newly-developed Early Assurance Program (EAP). Students at the University of Michigan understand what they’re going to be exposed to should they decide to come back to their community,” said Jim Buterakos, academic officer at Hurley Medical Center. The University of MichiganFlint’s new EAP is designed to help both disadvantaged students and underserved areas of medicine. However, the program allows for only three slots for students who excel at the University of MichiganFlint to apply during their junior year and assure admission at Michigan State University's College of Human Medicine during their senior year of undergraduate studies. But wait - there’s a catch. Preference for the EAP will be reserved for: Students who are the first generation from their family to attend college, students who graduated from a low-income high school, students who are eligible for Pell grants, or students who express interest in a high need medical specialty area. “Entering into this program with a world-class College of Human Medicine will provide a unique and outstanding opportunity for those qualifying students to give back to their communities,” said Vahid Lotfi, of the University of Michigan-Flint. To obtain additional information about the University of MichiganFlint’s EAP, call (517) 432-0021 or visit the school’s website at www.humanmedicine.msu.edu. „


|IN THE NEWS

Med Students Without Traditional Premed Background Perform Well Students without the traditional premedical preparation perform at a level equivalent to their premedical classmates, according to a study published in Academic Medicine (2010;85(8):1378-83). The study, led by researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, was conducted to assess the medical school performance of humanities and social science majors who did not take organic chemistry, physics, calculus, or the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). Included in the study were participants of the Humanities and Medicine Program (HuMed), a program established at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in 1987 that offers qualified sophomores and juniors majoring in humanities or the social sciences guaranteed admission to the medical school on successful completion of a baccalaureate degree. Once accepted into the HuMed program, students are required to maintain a 3.5 GPA. In addition, while they forego organic chemistry, physics, calculus, and the MCAT, they must achieve a minimum B average in two semesters of biology and general chemistry. “Of course, they come in at a disadvantage. Despite that perceived disadvantage, it is certainly possible to catch up,” said David Muller, MD, study co-author and associate professor and dean of medical education at Mount Sinai. “These students can go on to be presumably very successful.” When the academic outcomes of 85 HuMed students were compared with 606 non-HuMed students with traditional premedical backgrounds,

researchers discovered little difference in students’ performance. Specifically, the two groups performed equally well on most measures, such as commencement and clerkship honors. Additionally, HuMed students were significantly more likely than non-HuMed students to dedicate a year to scholarly research. “Our data, collected over the course of six years, confirm earlier findings on the HuMed program and provide further evidence that a significant reduction in standard premed requirements does not limit students’ ability to assimilate the basic science knowledge necessary for promotion of the clinical clerkship year,” the authors wrote. “Nor does it limit their success in the clinical years in clerkships, electives, clinical skills exams, research endeavors, or residency selection.” The authors explained that HuMed students do not miss the essential preparatory ingredient by acquiring an extensive liberal arts college education at the expense of the traditional premed science requirements and the MCAT. “Medical schools in general have been encouraging students to get more humanities,” said J. Scott Wright, EdD, an undergraduate adviser and president-elect of the National Association of Advisors for the Health Professions Inc. “The Mount Sinai program takes that to what some might say is an extreme. The program really does deviate from the norm of what most applicants look like and what most medical schools would consider necessary.”„


Photo credit: FreeFoto.com

Photo courtesy of Texas Tech University

IN THE NEWS|

Rain Lowers Med School Chances

Texas Tech University’s New Dual JD/MD Degree Texas Tech University (TTU) has announced that it will offer students the opportunity to earn a JD/MD degree. The JD/MD program is designed specifically for individuals interested in the areas of health law, health care policy, bioterrorism, forensics, or biomedical compliance. While earning both degrees typically requires seven years of study, TTU’s new dual JD/MD degree program is a 6-year program in which students are required to complete 78 hours of the law school curriculum during the first two years of the program and spend the remaining four years following the school’s medical school curriculum. Students are evaluated separately by each school using their own specific admissions criteria and then are considered for admission to the dual degree program.

“The joint degree will appeal to students who are interested in integrating public policy with their medical work, working with foundations, and getting involved in organizations that provide and promote health care,” said Jennifer Bard, Alvin R. Allison Professor of Law and director of the JD/MD program. “The program will also be useful to students in their individual practices, such as forensic medicine.” TTU and the Health Sciences Center join about 20 American universities offering the combined degree. Baylor College and the University of Houston Law Center were first in Texas to offer the program, but TTU is the only university nationally to offer it at one institution. For more information about TTU’s JD/MD degree program call (806) 742-3990 x 255, or visit www.law.ttu.edu/acp/academics/jdp/md. „

Interviewing for medical school on a rainy day may lower your changes of getting into medical school, according to a study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (2009;181(12):933). For the study, led by Donald Redelmeier, MD from the Department of Medicine at the University of Toronto, researchers analyzed the results of consecutive medical school interviews at the University of Toronto between 2004 and 2009. The study included a total of 2,926 candidates who were interviewed over a 6year period. The study revealed that those interviewed on rainy days received about a 1% lower score than those interviewed on sunny days. The pattern was consistent for both senior interviewers and junior interviewers. The study’s authors explained that psychology research suggests that interviews are prone to subconscious biases from extraneous factors unrelated to the candidate. While the study examined only one extraneous influence on mood, many additional factors, including ambiance, deportment, humour, and scent, may also affect mood. “We found that such cognitive influences extend to candidate admission interviews at a Canadian medical school,” the authors concluded. “We suggest that an awareness of this fallibility might lead to more reasonable medical school admission practices.” „

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 9


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|IN THE NEWS

Medical School Set to Open in Singapore In partnership with the Nanyang Technological University (NTU) in Singapore, Imperial College has announced that it is establishing a new medical school and will admit its first 50 students in 2013. “This partnership gives us the chance to work with Singapore’s talented students and also provides a rare opportunity to pioneer a new medical curriculum,” said Dr. Su Guaning, President of NTU. “Singapore’s healthcare system will face a range of challenges in the future and we

aim to equip our students with the skills they will need to tackle them. I hope that this agreement will allow us to share new ideas and innovations for teaching medicine and will open the door to a range of collaborations across our disciplines.” The inaugural class will start a 5-year undergraduate course at Singapore’s third medical school. The school, for many, will provide more places for students interested in pursing medicine, especially for those who cannot afford to study abroad. „

Med School Interview Prep Website Launched ZoomInterviews has launched a website to help students applying to medical school prepare for their admissions interviews. The new website, Zoom Medical, provides users with full-length videos of interviews featuring students from top-tier medical schools. Students can get a sense of what types of questions they will be asked and have a more informed idea of the best ways to answer certain questions. By getting an insider look into what a strong interview is like, users will get the chance to see how students admitted to some of the best medical schools in the US craft their answers to questions. Moreover, students will get the opportunity to practice fundamental interviewing skills and utilize the interview techniques appropriate for a medical school interview. Throughout each interview video, users can view comments and tips pertaining to each specific interview. In addition, Zoom will offer expert analysis of each interview as well as a follow-up to the interview to discuss the ups and downs, highs and lows of each interview. “We’re giving applicants a chance to watch how actual top-tier med students answer the same interview questions that will likely be asked in their own interviews,” said Stefanie Parks, Marketing Director for

ZoomInterviews. “This is a valuable learning tool for prospective applicants that will significantly raise their preparedness going into their med school admissions interviews. Zoom is very pleased to be offering a resource to aspiring physicians that has never before been available. ” The website also provides answers to additional questions to give users a clearer understanding of why certain questions are asked and how to develop personal ideas in order to help formulate the best answer to questions. While ZoomInterviews does charge for use of its services, a free 30-day full access subscription is provided to any applicant who has received an admission fee waiver. ZoomInterviews is a website that is designed by medical students for students aspiring to become medical students. “As far as preparation for med school goes, there is nothing like this out there,” said Misha Medvedev, one of ZoomInterviews co-founders. “Zoom Medical provides applicants with a completely new way to prepare for their med school admissions interviews by allowing them to essentially sit in on an interview that could be very similar to their own.” For more information visit the website medical.zoominterviews.com. „

MEDICAL

SCHOOL PIPELINE

Here’s a list of institutions across the United States in the process of developing medical education programs

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, RIVERSIDE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Riverside, California Inaugural Class Anticipated Fall 2012

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FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Boca Raton, Florida Inaugural Class Anticipated Fall 2011

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PALM BEACH MEDICAL COLLEGE

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CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

Palm Beach, Florida Inaugural Class Anticipated Fall 2011

Mount Pleasant, Michigan Inaugural Class Anticipated Fall 2012

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WESTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Kalamazoo, Michigan Inaugural Class - TBD

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COOPER MEDICAL SCHOOL OF ROWAN UNIVERSITY Camden, New Jersey Inaugural Class Anticipated Fall 2012

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UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, GREENVILLE Greenville, South Carolina Inaugural Class Anticipated Fall 2012 UPDATED 8/10

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 11


ASK THE EXPERT

>>> Your questions answered by insiders who know about what it takes to get into medical school

GOT QUESTIONS? Get answers to your important premedical questions with the help of experts and insiders about the process. Our Ask the Expert section connects you with individuals who can answer questions on a wide variety of topics. Send them to info@premedlife.com. Remember, you can also visit your pre-health advisor to ask them any questions as well.

Q A

If I do not receive A’s and B’s in my science courses, can I still get into medical school?

Possibly. Medical schools look especially closely at your science GPA and the grades you received in required "premed" science classes, which in most cases closely track your science GPA. The admission committees know that the premed requirements are tough and they use them to gauge your ability to do "hard labor" in medical schools.There is no question that your chances are lowered for every C or D that you may receive in one of your courses. Poor grades are most easily forgiven during the freshman year. You will have to explain any poor grade in order to be considered. If you have a great deal of difficulty with your basic science courses, you should consider some alternative careers. Many medical schools use GPA is used to screen out candidates. Some use certain GPA cut-offs others use "secret" formulas that incorporate GPA and MCAT scores to initially screen out applicants before letting actual people to look at individual applications. If your GPA is not up to sniff, you might not get a "fair hearing" despite your all other accomplishments.

Q A

What is the difference between Osteopathic and Allopathic Medicine? This is a question that gets asked a lot by students as they begin to explore further about pursing a career in medicine. Allopathic and osteopathic medicine represent two different, but overlapping

philosophies for practicing medicine. The "traditional" medical schools in the U.S. are "Allopathic" which means that causes of disease are, for the most part, considered to be extrinsic (e.g. accident, pathogen, mutation etc.) and as a result, treatment relies heavily on pharmacology and surgery, as well as prevention. "Osteopathic" medicine assumes that causes of disease are, for the most part, intrinsic, and therefore there is much greater emphasis on prevention, diet, lifestyle, and non-pharmacological and non-surgical treatment. In practice, these two philosophies are becoming more similar in recent history. Allopathic physicians are more receptive to osteopathic approaches than they used to be, and osteopaths have always been fully licensed and trained to use pharmaceutical and surgical treatments. It's becoming more common for medical practices to include both types of physicians and for osteopaths and allopaths to work together. Admission to osteopathic schools is slightly less competitive, statistically, but their criteria for admission include a genuine commitment to osteopathic principles of medicine. MD qualification training is the most widely available and recognized type of medical training. Like the DO, it gives the option to practice in any of the medical specialties, but unlike the DO, the MD is internationally recognized as a medical degree. Thus, when practicing overseas, the MD is easier to negotiate with than is the DO, where the DO degree isn't always understood or recognized. Because they are a minority in American medicine, DOs are more likely than their MD counterparts to have to explain or even defend their training.

12 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010

Q A

What kind of extracurricular experiences should I seek so that my application will standout in the applicant pool?

Medical schools like to see that bright intelligent students with great test scores are doing so while also pursuing other interests, especially those who have been active contributors on campus, and who have a range of interests. You should choose a few things to do meaningfully and well, rather than dabble in a long list of activities. If you choose to do too much, you may well spread yourself too thin, resulting in your GPA suffering. Community service is an important way to demonstrate your concern and compassion for others. Pre-Medical students are strongly recommended to participate in extracurricular activities, such as clinical (i.e., health professions) experience, research, and non-clinical volunteer activities. Direct experience in the health professions is one of the best ways to gain a deeper understanding of the field and determine whether medicine is an appropriate career choice. Another choice, research opportunities, can help demonstrate synthetic thinking and analytical skills as well as a deeper understanding of the discipline under study. Lastly, volunteer work is essential in demonstrating empathy toward others and a desire to see that needs of others are attended to. Keep in mind that as you participate in these different experiences, you’ll be able to get a better feel of if medicine is right for you. „


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|COVER STORY

MEDICAL SCHOOLS GALORE 7 NEW MEDICAL SCHOOLS ACROSS THE US ARE OPENING THEIR DOORS TO STUDENTS ASPIRING TO BECOME DOCTORS

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s thousands of students reach the point in their pre-medical career to apply to medical school they will now have more options when making the decision on where to continue their studies as a student. In an effort to address the imbalance in American medicine that has been growing for over 20 years, there has been a proliferation of new medical schools in the US. The schools have implemented a variety of initiatives, both unique and innovative, that are aimed at introducing students to a curriculum that will prepare them to become doctors of the future. Many educators and physician leaders hope that the opening of new

14 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010

medical schools across the country will not only address the physician shortage but also help underserved areas and influence local economic growth at the same time. According to a report issued by the Center for Workforce Studies, the new schools and expansion at existing schools will increase first-year enrollment by 21% in 2013. Since 2007, over 20 medical schools have opened their doors, begun the accreditation process, or have started discussions to open. The following profiles are of some of the nation’s newest medical schools and will give prospective applicants a glimpse of what each institution has to offer.


New schools and expansion at existing schools will increase first-year enrollment by 21% in 2013.

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 15


|COVER STORY

FACTS >>> DEGREE(S) OFFERED: DOCTOR OF MEDICINE (MD)

Photo Credit: University of Central Florida College of Medicine

QUICK

Students at the University of Central Florida College of Medicine are exposed to clinical experiences throughout the first two years.

PRIVATE OR PUBLIC? PUBLIC # OF STUDENTS ACCEPTED 41 - INAUGURAL CLASS AVERAGE GPA 3.79 AVERAGE MCAT 32.2 TRANSFER STUDENTS NO. EARLY DECISION PROGRAM YES. TUITION IN-STATE - $20,600 OUT OF STATE - $30,871.40

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UCFCOM has become very attractive to applicants for its high-tech, cutting-edge integrated curriculum.

UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL FLORIDA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE Orlando, Florida

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OPENED FALL 2009

Already being called the most selective medical school in the nation, the University of Central Florida College of Medicine (UCFCOM) welcomed its inaugural class of 41 students in August 2009. As a new medical school, UCFCOM offers students opportunities that allow them to prepare for careers in every discipline of medicine, from patient care to research, and to focus on individualized areas of study. In addition to the individualized program, the basic sciences are integrated with the clinical sciences where each student can choose to train in many of the major specialty hospitals in the Orlando area. Students have to attend academic lectures just like traditional medical schools, but what's different is that students interact and practice hands-on from their very first year. In their first year students, experience training in both mock and live patient situations. In some exercises, the university uses paid actors to perform as patients who are taught how to act as if they are ill or injured. As part of an approach described by the Dean as "Keep the Dream Alive!", each student completes a focused individualized research project which is limited only by the student's imagination. Projects may include bench or clinical research, as well as studies of quality of care, hospitality in medicine, quality of life, legal aspects of medicine, and more. The core of UCFCOM's curriculum is built around the integration of the basic sciences with clinical cases and problem solving. Students are exposed to clinical experiences throughout the first two years From basic science concepts to clinical diagnoses and treatment, students use human patient mannequin simulators and online interactive virtual patients to enhance and complement their learning experience.

16 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010

UCFCOM has become very attractive to applicants for its high-tech, cutting-edge integrated curriculum. In fact, much of the technology is a first for a medical school in Florida, and in the case of the computer screens installed above dissection tables in their anatomy lab, a first-of-a-kind in the nation. In addition to seeking students with a "pioneering" spirit, the UCFCOM looks for candidates who have demonstrated perseverance or excellence in an activity (sports, research, or other endeavors) at a very high level. UCFCOM planned to offer financial support to students in its charter class that were not available at any other medical school. With that plan in place, UCFCOM matched each student with a benefactor who paid for each students full ride throughout medical school, including tuition, fees, and room and board $160,000 over a 4-year period. According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, this marked the first time in history that a college provided scholarships to its entire class. The UCFCOM is currently hosting an exhibit called "Harry Potter's World" Renaissance Science, Magic, and Medicine", that traces medical history from potions, herbs and mythical monsters to what is known in modern time. In August 2010, the school welcomed its second class of 60 medical and for a second consecutive year, drew more applicants to its medical school than any other public university in Florida. For more information about the University of Central Florida College of Medicine call (407) 266-1000 or visit www.med.ucf.edu.


Photo Credit: Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

COVER STORY|

QUICK

The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University opened its doors in Fall 2009 as South Florida's first public medical school.

FACTS >>> DEGREE(S) OFFERED: DOCTOR OF MEDICINE (MD) # OF APPLICANTS 3,606 # OF STUDENTS ACCEPTED 43 - CHARTER CLASS

HERBERT WERTHEIM COLLEGE OF MEDICINE AT FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY Miami, Florida OPENED FALL 2009

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The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at Florida International University (FIU) opened its doors in Fall 2009 as South Florida's first public medical school. The school was born from the need for a public medical school in South Florida, home to some of the nation's most medically underserved populations. Throughout their course of study, students will explore all areas of medicine from family and community medicine to specialty and sub-specialty training. While the 4year program involves training in all of the traditional areas of medical education, the school implements a specific focus on family and community medicine. The school is unique for offering its students the opportunity to observe and care for families who have little or no access to medical care. As a way to address issues relating to health care, FIU medical school developed NeighborhoodHELP (Health Education Learning Program), a unique real-life education program that is designed to bring greater access to health services, personalized health education, and a distinctly personalized touch to South Florida's most vulnerable communities. During the program, the college will send interdisciplinary teams of FIU students into underserved communities to track and monitor the health of families throughout the students' 4-year medical education. Each team, working with one or two households, will include a medical students and his or her counterparts in social work, nursing, and public health. Eventually, the teams will also include students studying business and law. The school says that the program will have a significant impact on

four targeted minority neighborhoods and the success of the students' work will be seen in healthier communities. "Our commitment to community is real as evidenced by our innovative NeighborhoodHELP which puts medical students in teams with students of other disciplines to address the complex medical, social, and ethical issues experienced by medically underserved families in South Florida," said John Rock, MD, Founding Dean of the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine. "This is practice. And it's happening now. Our students and our community are better for it." Admission to FIU's College of Medicine is competitive and the college has one of the highest number of applicants in the state. In 2008, the school received a total of 3,332 applications for the inaugural class of 43 students, giving the College of Medicine a 3.8% admissions rate. For Fall 2010, 3,606 students applied for admission, of which only 43 were accepted. FIU College of Medicine receives more applicants than any other medical school in Florida, and has the state's lowest admissions rate. The average undergraduate GPA was a 3.7. Students of the Class of 2014 came from Alaska, California, Florida, Maryland, and Michigan. 84% of students were from Florida, and 54% were Miamians. FIU offers students an educational option that is affordable and will make a medical education attainable for those who may be limited by finances. For more information about FIU's College of Medicine call (305) 348-0570 or visit medicine.fiu.edu.

MINIMUM GPA REQUIRED 3.0/3.7 EARLY DECISION 2010-11’ TUITION COSTS IN-STATE $21,000 OUT-OF-STATE $51,000 INSTITUTIONAL OBJECTIVES 3 MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE 3 PATIENT CARE 3 INTERPERSONAL AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS 3 RESEARCH

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The school was born from the need for a public medical school in South Florida, home to some of the nation's most medically underserved populations.

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 17


|COVER STORY

FACTS >>>

Photo Credit: Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine

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Every student at the William Beaumont School of Medicine engage in the Capstone project.

DEGREE(S) OFFERED: DOCTOR OF MEDICINE (MD) # OF APPLICANTS CURRENTLY RECRUITING FOR INAUGURAL CLASS EXPECTED # OF STUDENTS IN INAUGURAL CLASS 50 MINIMUM GPA REQUIRED 3.0 MINIMUM MCAT REQUIRED 26+ EARLY DECISION PROGRAM NO. TRANSFER STUDENTS NO.

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We have devoted tremendous time and effort to develop an innovative, high quality curriculum

OAKLAND UNIVERSITY WILLIAM BEAUMONT SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Rochester, Michigan

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OPENING FALL 2011

As the first new Michigan medical school launched in more than a generation, the William Beaumont School of Medicine (WBSOM) was developed through a partnership between Oakland University and Beaumont Hospitals. With more than 91 medical and surgical specialties, Beaumont's three regional hospitals offer medical students a robust learning environment that supports student-centered education, service to the community, and biomedical discovery. The school offers an innovative curriculum that threads the themes of the first and second years of medical school through the clinical years while engaging medical students in patient encounters from the start. Students will learn the art and have the opportunity to practice medicine in a state-of-the-art simulation center. And from the very first day, students receive career guidance though small faculty-guided mentoring teams. Every medical student at the WBSOM engages in what's called the Capstone project. What this means is that beginning in the first year of medical school, students are introduced to medical literature, the electronic medical record, and the clinical trial. These introductions are then followed by rotations through advanced research laboratories. Then, students select projects in one of the advanced research labs linked to more than 800 ongoing clinical trials at Beaumont Hospitals. If a student selects a project with high scientific or social impact, and the student make s substantial progress with the project by their third year, then the WBSOM will award supplemental scholarship support to these students for their fourth year of study as a reward for "doing the right thing" and "doing the right thing well". The schools states that they

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engage in the project because they believe that if their students spend four years of their medical education in vested in activities with high impact activities - and are rewarded for their engagement with supplemental scholarships - they will likely continue on these paths. Medical students will be trained according to competencies because the public demands that physicians not only have knowledge, they are skilled communicators, they are compassionate people, and they respect diversity when a patient comes in. The medical school seeks to admit applicants who possess personal and professional integrity, the ability to deliver compassionate care, a passion for lifelong learning, intellectual curiosity, educational excellence, ethical conduct, and an understanding that medicine is both art and science, open-mindedness and tolerance, and a service orientation to others. Like many other new schools, WBSOM will emphasize small-group instruction and an integrated learning experience. "We have devoted tremendous time and effort to develop an innovative, high quality curriculum and to recruit top-level faculty for the school," said Dr. Robert Folberg, the medical school's founding dean. "We are working to ensure that every detail is given full attention so that the medical education programs we offer will attract the best and brightest students." The OUWBSOM is currently accepting applicants for its 2011 inaugural class. For more information about William Beaumont School of Medicine call (248) 370-2769 or visit www.oakland.edu/medicine.


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Hofstra University School of Medicine will be New York State’s first allopathic medical school in nearly 40 years

FACTS >>>

Photo Credit: Hofstra University School of Medicine

DEGREE(S) OFFERED: DOCTOR OF MEDICINE (MD) TUITION: IN-STATE $42,000 OUT-OF-STATE $42,000 # OF APPLICANTS CURRENTLY RECRUITING FOR INAUGURAL CLASS

HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

MINIMUM GPA REQUIRED 3.0

Hempstead, New York OPENING SUMMER 2011

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As Hofstra University School of Medicine plans to welcome its inaugural class in Summer 2011, it will also mark the opening of New York State's first allopathic medical school in nearly 40 years. Just 25 miles from New York City, Hofstra University has set out to build a new medical school prepared to set a precedent for the future of medical training. Unlike many traditional programs in which the education of health professionals is carried out in "soiled" academic units, Hofstra University School of Medicine plans to integrate their medical education into a comprehensive program that is patient-centered, scientifically rigorous, dedicated to fostering discovery, and focused on the health care needs of the surrounding community. Once the training facility of the New York Jets, the Hofstra University School of Medicine’s newly renovated Medical Education Center will serve as the initial home for the School of Medicine with the permanent site is being constructed. Hofstra University School of Medicine will present information thematically - by analyzing the human body's systems and the diseases and conditions that affect them so that students learn scientific concepts in context and relate them directly to health, disease and illness. In addition to the MD program Hofstra University School of Medicine will offer a MD/PhD program and anticipates offering an MD/MPH program in conjunction with the Hofstra University School of Education, Health and Human Services. As part of its medical education curriculum, students at Hofstra University School of Medicine will start inter-

MINIMUM MCAT REQUIRED 24+

acting with patients during the first week of medical school. The entire curriculum is organized upon a framework that encompasses the School's ten core values, eight core competencies, institutional learning objectives, eleven guiding principles, and five curriculum drivers. MD/PhD students receive their PhD degree in The Molecular Basis of Medicine. The emphasis of this program is to train individuals to pursue scholarly activity in biomedical, translational and clinical research with the goal of transforming and improving medical care. The unique aspects of this program are the emphasis on the study of human disease and on application of that study to clinical practice. Applicants in all majors who possess a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution are encouraged to apply. The School of Medicine believes that the study of medicine is enriched by contact with other intellectual disciplines; therefore, it seeks students with a diverse blend of educational backgrounds. A background in liberal arts courses that have required a student to read broadly, write extensively, and present oral arguments on topics such as history, literature, philosophy, religion, political science, anthropology, psychology, and/or sociology is highly recommended. More important than the study of a specific subject is the candidate's ability to demonstrate both a passion for and success in his/her academic pursuits. For more information about Hofstra University School of Medicine call (516) 463-6600 or visit medicine.hofstra.edu

EARLY DECISION PROGRAM NO. TRANSFER STUDENTS NO.

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Students at Hofstra University School of Medicine will start interacting with patients during the first week of school.

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COVER STORY|

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Students from The Commonwealth Medical College’s Class of 2013.

FACTS >>>

Photo Credit: The Commonwealth Medical College

DEGREE(S) OFFERED: DOCTOR OF MEDICINE (MD) # OF APPLICANTS 1,250 # OF STUDENTS ACCEPTED 65 - CHARTER CLASS EARLY DECISION PROGRAM NO. ANTICIPATE OFFERING FOR CLASS OF 2015

THE COMMONWEALTH MEDICAL COLLEGE

TUITION COSTS IN-STATE: $35,000 OUT-OF-STATE: $40,000

Scranton, Pennsylvania OPENED FALL 2009

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The Commonwealth Medical College (TCMC) is one of the newest medical colleges in the US. In August 2009, TCMC welcomed its charter class of 65 medical students. During an interview about TCMC, Dr. Robert M. D’Alessandri, president and dean of TCMC, made it clear that while medicine is a vital part of the students education, it is also the hope that they come away with a sense of a better understanding of the entire health care system. Candidates accepted into TCMC’s MD program choose or are assigned to a regional campus for integration into that community. Students are assigned to a local, multigenerational family whom they follow for 4 years and begin their clinical experience during the first year. Each member of the school’s charter class received $80,000 in scholarships. And if that’s not enough of a perk, at orientation, each student at TCMC was supplied with a personal laptop, an external hard drive, a personal printer, and even a backpack. According to the school’s website, students live and work in the Scranton area for (3) one week community experiences during the first two years of medical education and stay in the Scranton community for the entire third and fourth years. As part of their medical education, students spend the first two years of their medical curriculum primarily in Scranton studying basic science.

During the first year, students focus on gaining a core understanding of the structure and function of the human body. For three weeks during the first year, students have the opportunity to experience real clinical practice in their regional campus community by shadowing a physician. The second year of medical school lays the foundation for the clinical experience of the third and fourth year. The education theme shifts to the study of illness, with a focus on the body’s 12 organ systems and processes. During the third year, students will build on the knowledge and skills of the coursework experienced during their first two years. Finally, the fourth year of medical education provides students with hospital-based experiences coupled with electives to broaden their clinical knowledge. TCMC also allows students to gain experience in its Clinical Skills and Simulation Center, a facility that is designed to bring simulated patient experiences to life. TCMC is structured to offered rolling admissions and interviewed candidates will receive and electronic notification of their status once the Admissions Committee has met and a final decision has been made. Once the class is filled, TCMC will maintain a waitlist to draw additional accepted candidates as spaces become available. For more information about The Commonwealth Medical College, call (570) 504-9068 or visit www.thecommonwealthmedical.com.

COURSES OFFERED 3 PHYSICIAN & SOCIETY 3 PROFESSION OF MEDICINE 3 ART & PRACTICE OF MEDICINE

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Students are assigned to a local, multi generational family whom they follow for 4 years

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|COVER STORY

FACTS >>> DEGREE(S) OFFERED: DOCTOR OF MEDICINE (MD) MD/MASTERS IN PUBLIC HEALTH (MPH) MD/JUDICIAL LAW DOCTOR (JD)

During the first two clinical science years, students at the Paul L. Foster School of Medicine take four core classes at the same time Photo Credit: Paul L. Foster School of Medicine

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# OF APPLICANTS 2500 2010 CLASS SIZE 60 AVERAGE GPA 3.64

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AVERAGE MCAT 28.9 UNDERGRADUATE SCHOOLS REPRESENTED 36

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The clinical presentation model of education slowly is catching on in medical schools throughout the country

PAUL L. FOSTER SCHOOL OF MEDICINE El Paso, Texas

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OPENING AUGUST 2010

As the tenth medical school to open in Texas, the Paul L. Foster School of Medicine at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center is centered on providing a unique medical education for future physicians. For the first 35 years of its existence, Texas Tech University Health Science Center (TTUHSC) only allowed third and fourth year medical students, and residents, to train in the campus’s eight accredited program. The opening of the Paul L. Foster School of Medicine marks the first time that TTUHSC will accept first and second year medical students into its postgraduate medical training. According to the school’s website, The Paul L. Foster School of Medicine’s mission is: "to provide exceptional opportunities for students, trainees, and physicians; to advance knowledge through innovative scholarship and research in medicine with a focus on international health and health care disparities; and to provide exemplary patient care and service to the entire El Paso Community and beyond." The school’s educational program is labeled as a “clinical presentation” curriculum that is designed to integrate both clinical and basic science information as the students learns each of the 120 clinical presentations set in place. Some of the basic clinical presentations include are a patient with a headache, with a fever, and with chest discomfort. The school’s curriculum is different from the traditional curriculum of most medical schools which requires students to create a link between basic science and clinical science on their own. While most traditional medical education program focus on studying microbiology and human

21 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010

anatomy, the Paul L. Foster School of Medicine’s curriculum is designed so that students learn about symptoms. "We do it in the context of what we call schemes, and it illustrates for a student how an experienced clinician would chunk their information together in order to create a coherent pattern in their reasoning process," said David Steele, senior associate dean of medical education and director curriculum at the school. “The clinical presentation model of education slowly is catching on in medical schools throughout the country.” During the first two clinical science years, students take four core classes at the same time: scientific principles of medicine, society, community, and individual, medical skills, and a master’s colloquium. In August 2010, Paul L. Foster School of Medicine announced a new dual MD/JD program specifically for individuals interested in the areas of health law, healthcare policy, bioterrorism, forensics or biomedical compliance. The Paul L. Foster School of Medicine exposes students to what is called the Clinical Skills and Clinical Simulation Center, a 10,000 square foot, stateof-the-art facility that employs the newest teaching technologies for effectively integrating the school’s medical education program. Each of the 40 students in the school's inaugural class received a laptop loaded with their medical school curriculum. For more information about the Paul L. Foster School of Medicine call (915) 783-1250 or visit www.ttuhsc.edu/fostersom


COVER STORY|

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Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine welcomed its inaugural class of 42 students Photo courtesy of Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine

FACTS >>> DEGREE(S) OFFERED: DOCTOR OF MEDICINE (MD) # OF APPLICANTS 1,654 # OF STUDENTS ACCEPTED 42 - CHARTER CLASS CHARTER CLASS MCAT SCORES 30-42

VIRGINIA TECH CARILION SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

2010-11’ TUITION COSTS $42,600

Roanoke, Virginia OPENED FALL 2010 In August 2010, the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine (VTC) opened its doors in Roanoke, Virginia. Becoming the 131st medical school in the United States and Canada, the school is the product of a boom of new medical schools to open across the country to address the national physician shortage. While more than 1,650 students applied to VTC, only 220 were invited for interviews and only 42 students were accepted to become the school's first charter class. With the small class size, the school hopes to provide individualized attention and encourage participation among its students moving through the school’s four-year medical education curriculum. Based on its mission to educate the next generation of physician thought leaders, VTC utilizes a patient-centered curriculum that is designed to address the increasing need for doctors who can apply the research conducted from the bench to the bedside of their patients. VTC’s innovative problem-based Patient-Centered Learning (PCL) curriculum utilizes real-life cases analyzed in a small-group discussion format by a facilitator, PCL maximizes students’ self-directed learning and minimizes the amount of passive learning (lectures). With many shifts away from the traditional medical school, VTC adopted a unique curriculum that integrates basic sciences, clinical sciences and skills, interprofessionalism, and research throughout four years of study. Of those value domains, interprofessional learning (IPL) sets VTC apart from other medical schools. The unique IPL program is designed to help aspiring physicians build their skills in the areas of teamwork, communication, and conflict resolution, in addition to exploring concepts such as roles of the health professions, public

health, acute and chronic disease management, system changes, and patient safety. “I love the patient-centered learning model,” said Matthew Joy one of VTC’s students. “From day one we have been working on real cases which has allowed us to incorporate our basic science curriculum into practical settings.” "Our medical curriculum will equip doctors with the tools to not only thrive, but to flourish in the kaleidoscope that is today's modern health care," said Cynda Ann Johnson, MD, MBA, the school's president and founding dean. Dr. Johnson personally presented the first case study to the charter class. VTC instills a rigorous admission process that is designed to select students with the determination and resilience to thrive in a challenging environment. Rather than a traditional standardized interview with a single primary interviewer who becomes an advocate for the applicant, VTC has adapted a method developed and implemented by McMaster University in Ontario for their M.D. program. Applicants rotate through nine interview stations that lasts eight minutes each and one traditional interview that lasts 18 minutes. No prior medical knowledge is required for the Multiple-Mini Interview (MMI). The MMI interviewers are a mix of Carilion clinicians, Carilion Clinic administrators, and members of the Roanoke community who have been trained in the MMI interview technique. VTC began interviewing for its next group of students in late August 2010. For more information about VTCSOM call (540) 526-2560 or visit www.vtc.vt.edu.

VALUE DOMAINS 3 BASIC SCIENCES 3 CLINICAL SCIENCE AND SKILLS 3 INTERPROFESSIONALISM 3 RESEARCH

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Our medical curriculum will equip doctors with the tools to not only thrive, but to flourish in the kaleidoscope that is today's modern health care

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 22


CHALLENGE

YOURSELF. www.healthandwellness.weebly.com


|PREMEDLIFE MAGAZINE

PROFESSORS

(DE)CODED GETTING TO KNOW YOUR PROFESSOR CAN MAKE A WORLD OF DIFFERENCE FOR YOUR COLLEGE LIFE AND PROFESSIONAL FUTURE

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s classes begin to get rolling, you start to "feel out" your professors and you begin to get a sense of the individual that you are going to be dealing with for the semester. It is crucial during the first few weeks to begin to establish a connection with your professor. All too often students fall into the trap of not talking to their professor because they are afraid of the person who stands in front of them lecturing about a subject he/she basically lives for. But sooner or later, if you know what is good for you, you are going to have to muster up the courage to talk to him/her. While at times it may be hard to phantom, professors are people too! They are more than lecturers and researchers and yes they are human. So don't be intimidated by them. If your professor comes across as "intimidating", chances are that it is just their teaching style. And if a professor appears annoyed when you approach him or her, don't take it personal. Chances are it has nothing to do with you. Believe it or not, they do have lives off campus. They are raising families, writing books, and might be even struggling to make due financially. They won't bite. Say hello when you pass them walking on campus. They have a life outside of the classroom. They like spending time doing things that they find fun. Like students, professors have a diverse range of personalities; some are welcoming from the minute they enter the classroom, while others will at first seem reserved. Many are unaware that their students might feel uncomfortable approaching them, but none of them wish to make their students feel unwelcome.

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September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 26


You may discover that you have common interests that can be the basis for a good relationship long after you have finished the course. If you think about it, what is the worse that could happen if you take the initiative to go to your professor. It can't hurt your grade. Take the time to get to know them as people and not just a professor. Show your interest in their field - didn't you know people like talking about themselves. Ask what research projects they're working on or what books they're writing, and you might be surprised at how accomplished some of your professors are and you may even learn that they are actually really interesting people with a personality. However, don’t come off like you're trying to become their best friend. You'll really want to actively pursue forming relationships with your professor because they can help you succeed academically and prepare you for your future. Studies have shown that students who make an effort to get to know their professor outside of the classroom setting are more likely to succeed in college. SETTING YOURSELF UP When the time comes to apply for internships, jobs, and most importantly medical school, you'll need professors to write you a letter of recommendation. They'll be able to write a much better letter if they know you more than just a face in the crowd. The relationship that you've been working on since the beginning of the semester will be developed and your professor’s ability to write a truthful and thorough letter will clearly show in his or her writing. It will have a little more “umph” in it and admissions committee members will be able to tell whether or not the professor’s letter is truly genuine and if he or she really knows you well as both a student and a person. WORKING YOUR NETWORK Your professors may be able to help you get your foot into the professional community or even give you the inside scoop on a job or internship that you might be interested in. Many professors have expansive

27 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010

recourses for you to connect with many other distinguished people in the subject area that you're interested in. Professors can serve as mentors, or help you locate someone else who could be. Professors can serve as a source for an on-campus job, summer internship or co-op, or research opportunity. After talking to your professor, you may discover that a particular field is much more interesting to you than you previously thought. Granted, some professors may be more approachable than others. If you are worried about making the first trip to an office hour, you can start by just going up after class and introducing yourself. As stated before, professors are not scary people and you should not be intimidated by them, even if you're studying from a book that they penned themselves. Getting to know your professor is something that happens over time. Since you are planning to go to medical school, it is a very good idea to start working more closely with the professors who are in the field in which you are interested. This will mean taking multiple courses with the same professors, visiting them during office hours, and perhaps doing a research project under their guidance. A single office visit won't change your life, but it could eventually lead to many "periphery" benefits that wouldn't have come your way if you hadn't gotten to know your professors. The relationship you form with your professors can play a significant role in your success. PREPARING FOR THE APPROACH When you finally gather up the courage to approach your professor, it’s always important to be polite and respectful. Although you don’t want the initial conversation with your professor to seem unnatural and awkward, try to be as relaxed as possible. Pull your thoughts together beforehand so that you don’t make a fool of yourself. And if you are feeling a little nervous about meeting with your professor, it might be a good idea to prepare a list of questions. Just remember that when you’re ready talk to your professor make sure you are fully prepared. „


SCHOOL SPOTLIGHT

A look into what medical schools across the US have to offer prospective students>>>

STONY BROOK UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Stony Brook, New York www.stonybrookmedicalcenter.org Stony Brook School of Medicine emphasizes individualization of instruction and development of the complete professional. The curriculum enables students to come in contact with patient cases early in their studies and Stony Brook faculties are among the top in their fields. The schools commitment to research and excellence has led to many ground-breaking discoveries, including: the cause of Lyme disease, the Nobel prize-winning research that led to MRI technology, the link between smoking and emphysema, and ultrasound that speeds up the healing of bone fractures Stony Brook School of Medicine admissions committee considers a student's intellectual and academic qualifications as well as qualities such as motivation, integrity, social consciousness, maturity, interpersonal skills and other evidence of promise for the field of medicine are what they seek to evaluate. In addition, students applying to the School of Medicine can apply for the Medical Scientist Training Program, (a combined M.D./PhD program) a program in which students will be equip to study major medical problems at the basic

level and at the same time, recognize the clinical significance of their pursuits and discoveries. Stony Brook School of Medicine is usually a very popular choice among many premed students because one of the upsides of Stony Brook School of Medicine is that the tuition is considerably less than the cost of attending a private institution. The first year curriculum consists of basic science courses and introductory courses related to patient care. The basic science courses are Molecules, Genes and Cells; The Body (anatomical sciences and embryology); Neurosciences; Medical Physiology; and Pathology. Another required course is Foundations of Medical Practice, a recent integration of five previously separate courses: Medicine in Contemporary Society (social sciences & humanities in medicine); Introduction to Preventive Medicine; Introduction to Human Behavior; Introduction to Clinical Medicine; and the first segments of Nutrition. The first year Introduction to Clinical Medicine occurs through the year and teaches basic skills in taking a patient history and doing a physical examination. „

quick facts DEGREE(S) OFFERED: MD MD/PhD MD/MBA

Private or Public? Public

LENGTH OF PROGRAM 4 Years

# OF APPLICANTS 2,755

NUMBER OF APPLICANTS INTERVIEWED 573

STUDENTS WHO ACTUALLY ENROLLED 101

Photo Credit: Paul L. Foster School of Medicine

TUITION In-State $24,850 Out-of-State $48,770

Early Decision Program Yes.

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 30


ESPECIALLY THIS SPECIALTY

Learn more about various specialties and what it will take to pursue a certain specialty<<<

NEUROLOGIST: According to the American Board of Medical Specialties, a neurologist specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of types of disease or impaired function of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves, muscles and autonomic nervous system, as well as the blood vessels that relate to these structures. A neurologist is trained to perform a detailed examination of all the important neurological structures in the body: the nerves of the head and neck, the muscular strength and movement, sensation, balance testing, ambulation and reflex testing. Pediatric neurologists treat neurological disease in children. Of recent, one of the most ground-breaking developments within the field of neurology has been the growth in therapeutic opportunities. According to the experts, this trend is likely to continue and may even grow larger over the next decade. Among the most significant breakthroughs in neurology deals with the most prevalent neurological condition in the world - headaches. A condition experienced by many, headaches - once a challenge to treat - can now be treated through effective remedies. Another condition, multiple sclerosis (MS), once had no FDAapproved treatments suitable for routine use by MS patients. However, through years of research development physicians now have a clearer understanding of the mechanisms of the disease and pharmaceutical research has better equipped them to treat it. Many neurologist concede that one of the greatest challenges that they face is neuroanatomy because the brain is so complex compared to the organs. And for this reason, there aren’t that many students who consider a future within this specialty. According to the Occupation Outlook Handbook 2010-11 Edition, "Increasingly, physicians are practicing in groups or health care organizations that provide backup coverage and allow for more time off. These physicians often work as part of a team coordinating care for a population of patients; they are less independent than solo practitioners of the past. Over one-third of full-time physicians and surgeons worked 60 hours or more a week in 2008. Physicians and surgeons must travel frequently between office and hospital to care for their patients. Those who are on call deal with many patients’ concerns over the phone and may make emergency visits to hospitals or nursing homes. " „

Photo Credit: Sxc.hu

a medical doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating, and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system. They work alongside primary care providers, neurosurgeons and other physicians to manage and treat various conditions, from migraines to multiple sclerosis, spinal injuries to brain tumors.

WHAT SKILLS SHOULD YOU HAVE? Ability to persuade others to approach things differently Ability to actively look for ways to help people Ability to solve novel problems in complex, real-world settings Ability to talk to others to effectively convey information Ability to teach others how to do something Ability to manage one's own time and the time of others.

WHAT DOES IT TAKE? Bachelor’s degree MD or DO degree Three-year neurology residency program + one year of training in internal medicine, or a four-year neurology training program State medical licensure

WHERE CAN YOU PRACTICE? Hospitals Universities Neuroscience Institutes Laboratories and Research Centers Private Practice

ACCORDING TO THE OCCUPATION OUTLOOK HANDBOOK 2010-11 EDITION: "Employment of physicians and surgeons is projected to grow faster than average for all occupations through the year 2018 due to continued expansion of health care industries.

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 32


|PREMEDLIFE MAGAZINE

EARLY DECISION PROGRAMS IS THIS PATH TO MEDICAL SCHOOL AN OPTION FOR YOU?

W

hen you decide to apply to a school through the Early Decision Program, you are committing yourself to going to that school. Early Decision Programs are for those early-bird students who already have their hearts set on one particular school. You agree that if the medical school accepts you, you'll attend. Under the Early Decision Program (EDP), a student can only apply to one U.S. medical school by the stated deadline date (August 1 for schools that participate in AMCAS) and attend only this school if offered a place under the Early Decision Program. You cannot apply for regular admission and early decision at the same time! Applying to medical school through an early decision program doesn't give you the same advantage as it does if you were applying through early admission for undergraduate admissions. If a student is not accepted under the EDP, applicants will automatically be placed in the regular applicant pool by the school and may then apply to additional schools. Since most participating schools admit only a small portion of their entering class through the program, only applicants with an excellent chance of admission to a particular school should apply under the Early Decision Program. Don't forget, you will be prohibited from applying to any other schools until the school you've applied to has rendered a decision and if you're accepted then you must attend. Early decision programs are appropriate only for very competitive applicants who have a strong preference for one particular school. These applicants benefit in that they save considerable money on applications, interviews, and travel. Additionally, they know where they're going to medical school by October of that year. Some students

think Early Admission applicants have a better chance of getting into some of the most selective medical schools. According to most advisors, the only good reason to apply to an early decision program is if you're 100 percent sure you want to attend that medical school. THE PROS Students that apply to medical school through an Early Decision Program save considerable money on applications, interviews, and travel. They will also know where they're going to med school by October of that year. THE CONS If you apply to medical school through an Early Decision Program and you're not accepted, you'll be behind your peers in the application process. If you are turned down, you have a very short amount of time to get everything together for your other applications. So it's not a decision to be taken lightly. Before you make a decision on an early decision program, meet with your pre-med advisor and decide if this option is appropriate for you. You may also want to check out a pre-med blog and read about the experiences that students have had with Early Decision Program. It's sometimes good to chat with someone who has been where you're going. Some advisors suggest that students go the regular application route unless they have a very, very, strong record, a very high MCAT score, and special reasons for wanting to attend one particular medical school. Â&#x201E;

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QUESTIONS TO ASK YOURSELF Have I thoroughly researched this medical school and other medical schools that may interest me? Have I visited this medical school while classes are in session and met with someone at the admissions office? Have I explored my academic, extracurricular and social options at this medical school? Have I discussed this decision with my family and/or pre-med advisor? Is this a true first choice or are there other medical schools that still interest me? Will you be able to stick to the condition that if you are accepted you must attend that particular school?


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2011

PRE-MED SUMMER PROGRAM LIST

PROGRAM NAME

LOCATION

DATE

DURATION

Arizona Heart Foundation Cardiovascular Summer Students Program

Phoenix, Arizona

June/July 2011

6-Week commitment

Summer Research Fellowship at the University of Arkansas

Little Rock, Arkansas

TBA

TBA

David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA Summer Medical and Dental Education Program (SMDEP)

Los Angeles, California

June-August 2011

6 Weeks

Seaver Undergraduate Research in Biology at Pepperdine University

Malibu,, California

May 16-August 1, 2011

11 Weeks

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Summer research and academic enrichment geared toward pre-medical students are a great way to strengthen your medical school application. Most students who get accepted to medical school have participated in one or more summer pre-med programs during the course of their undergraduate studies. The following is a list of summer programs available to students aspiring to become doctors. There are various opportunities available in a number of institutions across the US. If you want to participate in academic enrichment programs, test preparation courses, research projects, or hospital internships, check out the following list of opportunities for Summer 2011. Be sure to check individual websites for application deadlines! The list includes opportunities nationwide in several different areas. Among the areas include are: California, Connecticut, Florida, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, and more.

DESCRIPTION

PERKS

A, pro bono, six-week program designed to motivate and inspire students considering a career in medicine. Students attend didactic (designed or intended to teach) lectures and participate in clinical rotations at both the Arizona Heart Institute and Arizona Heart Hospital.

PROGRAM INFO

APPLICATION DEADLINE

Phone(602) 200-0437 Email foundation@azheart.com

MARCH 2011

Phone(501) 526-6503

FEBRUARY, 28 2011

Paid summer research fellowships are available for undergraduate students who will be juniors or seniors by the fall semester. Selected students will work on a project relevant to human health in a laboratory of a faculty member at either the University of Arkansas, the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, or the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. The Biomedical Research fellowships are designed for students with a solid background in science who wish to be part of an ongoing research project, develop their technical skills and are interested in pursuing a research career.

$3200 Stipend Living Allowance

The UCLA SMDEP will serve as a model learning community in which students examine health care issues in medically underserved communities. Through a research project, problem-based learning cases, lectures, clinical experiences, and small-group discussions, students will also improve their learning skills and increase their science knowledge. The program targets educationally and financially disadvantaged community college students.

Meals Stipend Housing

Phone(310) 825-9573 Email uclasmdep@mednet.ucla.edu

MARCH 15, 2011

Summer research program geared specifically to undergraduate students who are interested in pursing a career in biological research, science education, environmental science or biotechnology. Over the summer, students will pursue individual research seminars in one of five research areas students may elect to study.

Stipend Room & Board

jay.brewster@pepperdine.edu

FEBRUARY 14, 2011

Website brin.uams.edu/students2.asp

Website seaver.pepperdine.edu/surb

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 36


2011 PREMED SUMMER PROGRAM LIST PROGRAM NAME

LOCATION

DATE

DURATION

Stanford Summer Research Program (SSRP)

Stanford, California

June 19-August 13, 2011

8 Weeks

UCLA Pre-Medical Enrichment Program (PREP)

Los Angeles, CA

June-July 2011

7 Weeks

UCLA Re-Application Program (RAP)

Los Angeles, California

June-July 2011

11 Months Summer Session 7 Weeks + Academic Session 9 Months

Eugene and Ruth Roberts Summer Student Academy

Duarte, California

May-July 2011 or June-August 2011

10 Weeks

National Cancer Institute (NCI) Continuing Umbrella of Research Experience (CURE) Program

Duarte, California

May-August 2011 June-August 2011 June-September 2011

12 Weeks

UCSD Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF)

San Diego, California

TBA

8 Weeks

37 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010


PREMEDLIFE MAGAZINE DESCRIPTION

PERKS

PROGRAM INFO Email: ssrpmail@stanford.edu

Program offers undergraduates who want to prepare for and enter Ph.D programs in the sciences an opportunity to work with Stanford's distinguished faculty and work in one of Stanford's state-of-the-art research facilities. Participants will work with a faculty member and a lab mentor to craft a research project. The program culminates with a research symposium, where students present individual talks and posters on their summer projects in front of the faculty, lab mentors, and University administrators.

APPLICATION DEADLINE CONTACT PROGRAM

Website ssrp.stanford.edu

Program designed to provide premedical and predental students from disadvantaged background with a means of strengthening their ability and readiness to study medicine or dentistry. Students will work at a rigorous pace with a highly focused scope to prepare for the MCAT and DAT. Participants will engage in an extensive and lively classroom review of Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Verbal Reasoning. Participants are also assigned to observe practicing physicians, dentists, and medical researchers performing the typical functions of their professions.

Travel allowance for eligible participants

Phone(310) 825-3575

Comprehensive, structured re-application program designed to assist students from disadvantaged background who have been unsuccessful in gaining admission to any U.S. medical school. The program begins with an intensive 8-week summer session, focused upon prerequisite science review and MCAT preparation. An individualized academic-year program that consists of a science curriculum will follow.

Stipend (Depending on availability)

Phone(310) 825-3575

Program gives promising students with an interest in research and health science careers practical experience and helps them develop important skills for their futures. Our instructors are world-renowned physicians and scientists who guide students in their research, while helping them develop their critical thinking skills. Weekly seminars allow students to present research findings to their peers, a good primer for what graduate and postdoctoral students do.

$4000 Stipend

Email: psalv@coh.org

Program is designed to engage the scientific curiosity of promising young high school and undergraduate students from underrepresented populations who are interested in cancer research as a career.

$4800 Stipend

Website www.cityofhop.org/education/summer-studentacademy/Pages/CUREprogram.aspx

CONTACT PROGRAM

Program for motivated undergraduate students interested in seeking future training in a combined MD/PhD program. Principle focus is an 8-week research project conducted in the laboratory of a faculty member in the biomedical sciences.

$1600/Month Stipend Housing Travel Allowance

Email: (800) 925-8704

FEBRUARY 2011

MARCH 2011

Website www.medstudent.ucla.edu/prospec tive/?pgID=181

MAY 2011

Website www.medstudent.ucla.edu/prospec tive/?pgID=183

MARCH 2011

Website www.cityofhope.org/education/summer-student-academy/Pages/default.aspx

Website mstp.ucsd.edu/surf/Pages/default.aspx

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 38


2011 PREMED SUMMER PROGRAM LIST PROGRAM NAME

LOCATION

DATE

DURATION

Graduate Experience for Multicultural Students (GEMS) at the University of Colorado - Denver School of Medicine

Denver, Colorado

June - August 2011

10 Weeks

Summer Student Research Fellowship at Hartford Hospital

Hartford, Connecticut

June-August 2011

10 Weeks

Yale University Summer Medical/Dental Education Program (SMDEP) New Haven, Connecticut

June-July 2011

6 Weeks

Boehringer Ingelheim Corporation Internship Program

Ridgefield, Connecticut

TBA

TBA

College Enrichment Program (CEP) at the University of Connecticut

Storrs, Connecticut

June - July 2011

6 Weeks

College Summer Fellowship Program at UConn School of Medicine

Farmington, Connecticut

TBA

10 Weeks

39 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010


PREMEDLIFE MAGAZINE DESCRIPTION

PERKS

PROGRAM INFO

APPLICATION DEADLINE

Selected GEMS interns will enroll in a research internship course, Topics in Biomedical Science and Research. The course will be conducted by distinguished research faculty and will consist of lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory research assignments with a mentor.

$3400 stipend Travel Allowance

(303) 724-6084 Email: GEMS@ucdenver.edu

MARCH 2011

Program offers a unique clinical research opportunity for college students pursuing careers in medicine. Fellowship is designed exclusively for pre-medical students completing either their junior or senior year in college. It offers the student an introduction to research methodology, patient treatment, and ethical issues in medicine as well as exposure to a broad spectrum of health care providers within a large community teaching hospital.

$1500 Award

Program for highly motivated college students who are considering a career in medicine. The Program exposes students to a problem-based learning model of science education that is similar to that used in medical school

Stipend Food Housing Travel Allowance

Website www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/medicine/departments/GEMS/Pages/default.aspx

Rportal@harthosp.org

FEBRUARY 2011

Website www.harthosp.org/ResidenciesFellowsh ips/default.aspx

(203) 785-7545 Email: Linda.jackson@yale.edu Website www.smdep.org/progsites/yale.htm (202) 798-9988

Research & Development: Throughout the summer, interns will have the opportunity to work side-by-side with top researchers in their field. Medical: Interns within the medical department have the opportunity to assist on both early and late phase clinical trails. Whether the project entails enrolling participants into a clinical trail or measuring and analyzing trail results, interns work with leading doctors and researchers to assure that all Boehringer Ingelheim products meet all requirements set forth by the Food and Drug Administration.

MARCH 1, 2011

CONTACT PROGRAM

Website us.boehringer-ingelheim.com/career/internship

The program addresses the needs of University of Connecticut freshmen and sophomores. The program is designed to provide sound development of scientific and mathematical skills. The program consists of courses in individual programs of study in: Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry, Calculus, and Physics. The program will consist of 30 hours per week of formal lecture, laboratory, directed study, and clinical experiences addressing the needs of college freshman or sophomores.

$800 Stipend Room & Board

The program is designed to offer undergraduates who are completing their sophomore, or preferably their junior year of college, and plant to purse a career as a MD, DMD, MD/PhD, or DMD/PhD. Once a student is accepted to the program and has selected and found a faculty sponsor in which to do research, the student will meet with the faculty sponsor in June and develop a research protocol and suitable project description. The student will commit approximately 30+ hours per week for the project and will work with the faculty sponsor or his/her designates.

$2500-$3000 Stipend Housing

(860) 468-3574 Email: leo.lachut@uconn.edu

APRIL 2011

Website medicine.uchc.edu/prospective

(860) 679-2487 Email: dieli@uchu.edu

FEBRUARY 2011

Website medicine.uchc.edu/prospective/enrichment/collegefellow/index.html

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 40


2011 PREMED SUMMER PROGRAM LIST PROGRAM NAME

LOCATION

DATE

DURATION

Summer Medical/Dental Education Program (SMDEP) at Howard University

Washington, DC

June-July 2011

6 Weeks

Georgetown Summer Medical Institute (GSMI)

Washington, DC

June/July 2011

Varies

STEP-UP/BSURE Program at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Baltimore, Maryland

June - August 2011

8 Weeks

Pre-Medical Summer Enrichment Program (PSEP) at The University of South Florida

Tampa, Florida

TBA

6 Weeks

Minority Students Health Careers Motivation Program

Miami, Florida

June-July 2011

7 Weeks

41 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010


PREMEDLIFE MAGAZINE DESCRIPTION The program is designed to provide an educational experience of exceptional quality that will strengthen the overall academic preparation of underrepresented minority, disadvantaged, and low-income students who express interest in admission to medical or dental school.

PERKS

PROGRAM INFO

APPLICATION DEADLINE

Stipend Housing Meals

(202) 806-0378 Email: hu_smdep@yahoo.com

MARCH 1, 2011

Website www.smdep.org/progsites/howard.htm Email: gsmi@georgetown.edu

The program, combined with the informative and supportive environment at Georgetown University School of Medicine, will provide preparation and insight for individuals exploring the calling of medicine as a career, and those making-up medical school course.

:

JUNE 2011

Website som.georgetown.edu/prospe ctivestudents/specialprograms/summer

Tuition: $3,862 (5 Credits) for Human Gross Anatomy and Human Physiology; $3,090 (4 Credits) for Medical Histology (Microscopic Anatomy) and Medical Biochemistry. Tuition includes the use of course textbooks and lab fees (for Anatomy). Summer research program for talented students who are dedicated to the advancement of underrepresented groups in the sciences and mathematics. Students selected for this internship will experience state-of-the-art scientific research and are encouraged to consider and pursue biomedical research careers in areas of specific interest to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK).

$4,000 Stipend Travel Allowance

The program is designed for highly motivated students who are preparing for medical school or physical therapy school. The program is designed to enhance the competitiveness of talented minority and disadvantaged students for admission into medical school and serves as a recruitment tool to USF COM Medicine. The program includes a review of concepts in biology, general and organic chemistry, and physics. Participants will work closely with faculty in areas of reading skills, test taking skills, etc. Participants are also pared with physicians in the local community to have an opportunity to develop an appreciation of the "real world of medicine" through weekly clinical experiences.

$1500 Grant

The program is designed to be a mini first-year medical education experience that exposes participants to classroom instruction in select basic science courses in the medical education curriculum and offers physician-shadowing opportunities. Great attention is placed on identifying and removing any barriers that may prevent a participant from being a competitive medical school applicant. Workshops develop skills for preparing strong admissions and financial aid applications.

$400 Stipend Housing Meals Travel Allowance

(410) 455-2271 Email: sutphin@umbc.edu

FEBRUARY 2011 OR UNTIL THE PROGRAM IS FILLED

Website www.umbc.edu/bsure

(813) 974-4707 Email:pamattoe@health.usf.edu

CONTACT PROGRAM

Website health.usf.edu/medicine/osde/p sep.htm

(305) 284-3187

LATE MARCH 2011

Website www6.miami.edu/provost/oae/ motivationprogram.html

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 42


2011 PREMED SUMMER PROGRAM LIST PROGRAM NAME

LOCATION

DATE

DURATION

Health P.A.S.S. Program

Des Moines, Iowa

July 2011

4 Weeks

Professional Education Preparation Program (PEPP at The University of Kentucky

Lexington, Kentucky

TBA

TBA

MCAT-DAT Review Summer Workshop at the University of Louisville School of Medicine

Louisville, Kentucky

July-August 2011

4 Weeks

Buck for Brains Summer Research Program at the University of Kentucky

Lexington, Kentucky

Varies

8 Weeks

Frontier Nursing Service Courier Program

Wendover, Kentucky

TBA

Up to 12 weeks

Summer Internship Program in Biomedical Research National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Bethesda, Maryland Baltimore, Maryland Frederick, Maryland

mid-May-June 2011

8 Weeks

Summer Internship Program at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Baltimore, Maryland

June-August 2011

9-10 Weeks

43 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010


PREMEDLIFE MAGAZINE DESCRIPTION

PERKS

PROGRAM INFO

APPLICATION DEADLINE

The program is for promising college sophomores and juniors to prepare for and enhance their chances of getting into medical school and other health professions programs. Health P.A.S.S. will provide participants with wellrounded perspectives on what it's like to be a medical school student in osteopathic medicine, podiatric medicine and surgery, physical therapy, and physician assistant studies. In the program's courses, clinical opportunities and practical exposure, students will gain the confidence that they can achieve a degree and career in any of Des Moines University's four clinical areasand the knowledge they need to get started.

Travel stipend Meals Materials Housing

(800) 240-2767 x 1709

FEBRUARY 2011

Website www.dmu.edu/healthpass

The program provides academic enrichment in chemistry and biology, as well as clinical experiences, medical and dental experiential activities, laboratory experiences, seminars, demonstrations, and clinical site visits.

Housing Meals

(859) 257-1968; Email: ctsnyd0@email.uky.edu

Website www.uky.edu/pimser/programs/peppbrochure.pdf

Free MCAT-DAT review workshop for eligible students

(502) 852-8109; Email klfarm02@louisville.edu

CONTACT PROGRAM

(859) 257-6322 Email bguer00@email.uky.edu

APRIL 15, 2011

The program provides undergraduates at the University of Kentucky with hands-on experience in academic research, working alongside "Bucks for Brains" faculty. Students are placed in research settings ranging from plant biochemistry to computer science to American history.

$3500 Stipend

The program provides a type of internship for young women and men who had a desire to go into the medical field. For young women and men who are interested in the healthcare field, the Courier Program provides limited opportunities to shadow healthcare professionals including: family nurse practitioners, physicians, nurse-midwives at FNS rural healthcare centers, at Mary Breckinridge Hospital and Home Health Agency.

$42/week for room and board and for the complete 12 weeks $500.

(606) 672-2317 Email information@frontiernursing.org

The program is designed to provide an independent research experience in biomedical and/or public health research to undergraduate students under the direct mentoring of established Johns Hopkins researchers. During the program interns work one-on-one with faculty on research projects in their field of interest and attend a health science seminar series.

Stipend

cohend@mail.nih.gov

The program provides experience in research laboratories to students of diverse backgrounds, including underrepresented minority students and students from economically disadvantaged and underserved backgrounds. The purpose of this exposure to biomedical and/or public health research is to encourage students to consider careers in science, medicine and public health.

CONTACT PROGRAM

Website www.research.uky.edu/students/rctf.html

CONTACT PROGRAM

Website www.frontiernursing.org/Courier/TodayCourier.shtm

MARCH 1, 2011

Website www.jhsph.edu/student_affairs/diversity/DSIPFactSheet.pdf

$3,000 Stipend Housing

Email cwill@jhmi.edu

FEBRUARY 1, 2011

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 44


2011 PREMED SUMMER PROGRAM LIST PROGRAM NAME

LOCATION

DATE

DURATION

College Summer Enrichment Program at the University of Massachusetts Medical School

Worcester, Massachusetts

May-June 2011

4 Weeks

Four Directions Summer Research Program at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital

Boston, Massachusetts

June - August 2011

8 Weeks

Siteman Cancer Center Summer Opportunity Program

St. Louis, Missouri

June - August 2011

10 Weeks

Biomedical Research Apprenticeship Program (BioMed RAP) at Washington University in St. Louis

St. Louis, Missouri

TBA

10 Weeks

45 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010


PREMEDLIFE MAGAZINE DESCRIPTION

PERKS

PROGRAM INFO

APPLICATION DEADLINE

A tuition-free four-week residential program for undergraduate sophomores and juniors interested in entering the health professions. The goals of the program are to help participants improve their qualifications and competitive standing for admission to professional, graduate and/or medical school. The program includes enrichment activities to enhance participants' academic and communication skills. Sessions include the professional school application process with emphasis on medical school admissions and financing professional school. Seminars on biomedical research and cultural contemporary health issues are also provided. Additionally, the SEP offers participants the opportunity to interact with medical students, scientists, physicians, and other health care professionals

Stipend Housing Travel Allowance

(508) 856-2707

MARCH 15, 2011

The focus of activity during the summer is participation in a basic science research project. Students are assigned a medical school faculty mentor who will work closely with the student to ensure completion of a project over the 8-week summer period. Additional program goals include: Experience cutting edge research at a leading medical school, understand the medical school application process, exposure to Native American health care issues, integrate Native traditions including talking circles, networking with Native American students and faculty

Travel Allowance Housing Living stipend for food and other necessities

(617) 525-7644 FourDirections@partners.org

Program provides opportunities for undergraduate, pre-med and medical students enrolled at Washington University or other accredited universities to work on cancer research projects during the summer. Opportunities range from basic laboratory research to clinical research to prevention/control and population research.

$3500 Stipend

(314) 454-8439 Email waldhofft@siteman.wustl.edu

As a BioMedRAP/CD-BioRAP participant, students will conduct independent research with outstanding faculty mentors, work in a cutting edge science and technology environment, gain exposure to some of the nation's finest biomedical investigators and an extensive variety of research topics, receive individualized career counseling and develop your career interests, participate in workshops, seminars and journal clubs, build a social network with student peers and faculty, and prepare to apply to the best Ph.D. and M.D. /Ph.D. programs in the United States

Stipend Travel Allowance Housing

Website www.umassmed.edu/outreach/sep.aspx

FEBRUARY 12, 2011

Website www.fdsrp.org

MARCH 1, 2011

Website www.siteman.wustl.edu/internal.aspx?id=254

(314) 362-7963 Biomedrap@msnotes.wustl.edu

JANUARY 31, 2011

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 46


2011 PREMED SUMMER PROGRAM LIST PROGRAM NAME

LOCATION

DATE

DURATION

Premedical Achievement Program (PMAP) at Michigan State University

East Lansing, Michigan

June - July 2011

6 Weeks

Summer MCAT Review Program at Michigan State University

East Lansing, Michigan

May 23 -27 2011

1 Week

University of Nebraska Medical Center Summer Medical and Dental Education Program (SMDEP)

Omaha, Nebraska

June - July 2011

8 Weeks

Summer Undergraduate Fellowship Program at the Eppley Cancer Research Institute

Newark, New Jersey

TBA

10 Weeks

47 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010


PREMEDLIFE MAGAZINE DESCRIPTION The program is an intensive MCAT and medical school admissions preparation program is open to disadvantaged students who will be applying to medical school.

PERKS

PROGRAM INFO

APPLICATION DEADLINE

Stipend may be available for eligible students

Email: MDadmissions@msu.edu (517) 432-6589

MARCH 2011

Website www.mdadmissions.msu.edu (517) 355-2363

The program is designed to help students prepare for the MCAT by building upon their undergraduate learning by helping them to synthesize a stronger overall command of related scientific and biological principles. The program will help students solidify the knowledge and skills students they have already developed in their undergraduate work and show them how to tap the critical thinking skills necessary for success in the MCAT. Instructors explain concept overviews, then provide guided practice through problem sets, followed by close analysis with an eye to understanding MCAT philosophies and mechanics, and while instructors are available outside of class time for consultation, this approach may not be suited to every student's learning style.

MAY 1, 2011

Website lrc.msu.edu/gre/CLIMB.php

Tuition: $800 (includes all materials, pre- and post-testing and follow-up advising). The program is designed to identify, recruit, and assist future dentists and doctors through a comprehensive six-week summer experience for talented freshman and sophomores. The overall goal of the program is to provide each scholar the navigation tools necessary to reach their current and future goals. NMC's primary focus on core academics is a springboard for students in their pursuit of a career as a physician or dentist. What makes this program unique is its emphasis on small-group learning. Instruction includes areas, such as health disparities, medical ethics, and public health. Various clinical shadowing experiences will help students build a strong foundation in their chosen discipline as well as potentially spark new passions in the medical and dentistry field.

Meals Travel Assistance Stipend Housing

(800) 701-9665 Email smdep@unmc.edu

Students in the summer program work for 10 weeks doing hands-on cancer research in Eppley Institute laboratories. Students get to try research, learn techniques and new concepts, and work with professional researchers, all while earning a competitive summer salary. Virtually all of our former summer students have been successful in gaining acceptance to graduate and professional schools. Students gain hands-on laboratory experience in cancer research labs, daily interactions with research faculty, staff, and students, weekly seminar program, and present your own research at a poster session.

$4000 Stipend Housing

crgp_info@eppleyits.comundefined

MARCH 1, 2011

Website www.smdep.org/progsites/nebraska.htm

FEBRUARY 10, 2011

Website http://www.unmc.edu/eppley/summer.htm

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 48


2011 PREMED SUMMER PROGRAM LIST PROGRAM NAME

LOCATION

DATE

DURATION

UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical and New Jersey Dental Schools Summer Medical and Dental Education Program (SMDEP)

Newark, New Jersey

June-July 2011

6 Weeks

Biomedical Careers Program (BCP) at Robert Wood Medical School

Piscataway, New Jersey

June - July 2011

6 Weeks

Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons Summer Medical and Dental Education Program (SMDEP)

New York, New York

June-July 2011

6 Weeks

Gateways to the Laboratory Summer Program at Weill Cornell/Rockefeller/Sloan-Kettering

New York, New York

June - August 2011

10 Weeks

49 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010


PREMEDLIFE MAGAZINE DESCRIPTION

PERKS

PROGRAM INFO

APPLICATION DEADLINE

Program serves to advance our institution's core mission of meeting society's current and future health care needs by preparing individuals underrepresented in medicine and dentistry, and doing so while championing cultural competency and humanism in all aspects of education. SMDEP reaffirms our continued commitment to and involvement in pipeline initiatives and will allow our two institutions to attain even greater diversity. SMDEP will also allow us to continue strengthening the academic portfolios of these college students so that they are competitive candidates for medicine and dentistry.

Stipend Housing Meals

(973) 972-3762 anthondd@umdnj.edu

MARCH 1, 2011

Academic enrichment program for undergraduate students interested in careers in the health professions. The program targets undergraduates who are economically and/or educationally disadvantaged. BCP offers an intensive six-week summer program to serve students at all stages of undergraduate education. Students take part in a variety of science enrichment and healthcare-oriented activities.

Tuition Free

(732) 235-4558 summerprogram@umdnj.edu

The program provides students seriously interested in applying to medical or dental school with a well-defined, integrated approach to learning, focusing on the basic science curriculum needed to apply to medical or dental school. Students engage in intense labs, learning-skills, and career development courses during the six weeks of the program, while attending weekly clinical rotations and seminars. The program strives to help students enhance and improve their chances of becoming successful applicants and students at the medical/dental schools of their choice.

Meals Travel Assistance Stipend Housing

(212) 305-4157 Email smdep-ps@columbia.edu

The program was established for underrepresented minority and disadvantaged college students who wish to pursue the combined MDPhD degree. Over the summer, students will: Work independently on a research project. Students will present and participate in weekly journal clubs. Participate in a hands-on tour of the Gross Anatomy Lab. Sit for a Mock MCAT exam. Partake in a Lab Techniques Workshop and Clinical Skills Workshop. Participate in Career Development Workshops. Scrub into surgeries at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Give an oral, written and poster presentation of your research in front of your family, friends and colleagues. Have on going mentorship by your "Big Sib" (a current MD-PhD student) as well as weekly meetings with the Program's leadership.

$4300 Stipend Travel expenses

(212) 746-6023 Email mdphd@med.cornell.edu

Website www.smdep.org/progsites/newjersey.htm

MARCH 15, 2011

Website rwjms.umdnj.edu/osap/bcp.html

MARCH 1, 2011

Website www.smdep.org/progsites/columbia.htm

FEBRUARY 1, 2011

www.med.cornell.edu/mdphd/summerprogram

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 50


2011 PREMED SUMMER PROGRAM LIST PROGRAM NAME

LOCATION

DATE

DURATION

Summer Undergraduate Mentorship Program at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University

Bronx, New York

June-July 2011

6 weeks

Montefiore Medical Center's Health Opportunities Program (Monte-HOP)

Bronx, New York

July - August 2011

6 Weeks

Project Asian Health Education and Development (AHEAD)

New York, New York

June - August 2011

8 Weeks

The Travelers Summer Research Fellowship Program for Premedical Students at Weill Cornell Medical College

New York, New York

June - August 2011

8 Weeks

Project Healthcare at NYU Langone Medical Center

New York, New York

51 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010

June - August 2011

10 Weeks


PREMEDLIFE MAGAZINE DESCRIPTION The program will be comprised of a six-hour per week commitment to a shadowing experience with an assigned mentor and fourteen hours per week of lecture attendance. These fourteen hours will be distributed into the following three core curriculum components: six hours clinical didactic, six hours medical informatics, and two hours of MCAT preparation and test taking strategies. Students are also expected to conduct a research project while in the program.

PERKS

PROGRAM INFO

APPLICATION DEADLINE

$1000 Stipend Transportation Meals

(718) 430-2792 hcoe@einstein.yu.edu

MARCH 2011

(718) 920-4678 cwhittak@montefiore.org

The program is designed to promote, educate, and encourage underserved youth to purse careers within the health fields. Students will gain valuable knowledge and professional skills through interactive workshops, mentorship by physicians, observation of physician-patient interactions, lecture activities and independent learning.

APRIL 2011

Website www.einstein.yu.edu/hcoe

The program is designed to provide training and experience for college students who are interested in pursuing a career in the health care field. The program consists of a practical field placement, seminars and workshops, and participation in the development and completion of a community health project. Students explore various health careers, and gain an understanding of the dynamics of the New York Asian American community and of current health issues impacting the health status of Asian Americans in the United States.

Meals Travel Assistance Stipend Housing

The program is designed to give 25 premedical students deeper insights into the field of medicine, including issues that greatly affect the health of traditionally underserved groups. Through the experiences of laboratory or clinical research, the students learn how one purses a specific research problem under the supervision of a faculty member, thus providing an early education into basic research techniques that could be applicable to any area of medicine.

$140/Week Stipend Housing Travel expenses are paid for students that live some distance from Ne w York

Project Healthcare is an innovative volunteer program for enthusiastic and inspired college and post-baccalaureate students. Created by the Bellevue Hospital Center Emergency Department, PHC allows students an opportunity to experience and observe many different aspects of healthcare. The program is comprised of several weekly rotations which are based in the Emergency Department. It offers the committed student a unique healthcare experience, which is intended to furnish a wealth of knowledge about the numerous options for a career in healthcare.

Website www.einstein.yu.edu/hcoe

(212) 379-6988 ext. 619

FEBRUARY 2011

Website www.cbwchc.org/job/ahead/ahead.html

(212) 746-1057

FEBRUARY 1 2011

Website www.med.cornell.edu/education/programs

(212) 562-3041 Email bellevuepavers@nyumc.org

JANUARY 2011

Website emergency.med.nyu.edu/electives/college-students

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 52


2011 PREMED SUMMER PROGRAM LIST PROGRAM NAME

LOCATION

DATE

DURATION

Summer Scientific Work Program (SSWP) at Franklin Hospital

Valley Stream, New York

TBA

4 weeks

ACCESS Summer Research Program at Cornell University

New York, New York

TBA

10 weeks

AGEP Summer Research Institute (SRI) at SUNY Stony Brook University

Stony Brook, New York

TBA

10 Weeks

Bronx-Westchester Area Health Education Center

Bronx, New York

May/July 2011

Varies

53 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010


PREMEDLIFE MAGAZINE DESCRIPTION

PERKS

The program is designed to help college students decide whether or not a career in medicine is right for them. This renowned program offers students the opportunity to complete a four-week summer internship where they have the chance to observe and ask questions in order to learn more about the medical field. Throughout these four weeks, accepted students rotate through various departments in order to gain a well rounded experience of the hospital. Some of these departments include the operating room, emergency room, radiology, geriatrics, laboratory, psychiatry as well as the rehabilitation unit. Participants also have numerous opportunities to go on rounds with doctors, observe physicians in their private offices and attend hospital conferences. The Access program of Weill Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences is a summer internship program that trains underserved college students in the biomedical sciences. Interns gain hands-on experience in a biomedical research laboratory and are encouraged to apply to PhD programs. Selected students are placed in laboratories at the Weill Cornell Medical College under the mentorship of experienced faculty members. n addition to the laboratory experience, students attend lectures and discussions aimed at enhancing their understanding of the current status of biomedical research, the pathways available for entering research careers, and the range of available career opportunities. Students also participate in weekly journal clubs, attend workshops that teach them how to prepare for interviews and seminars, and take part in social activities. The program is an intensive residential research internship program for underrepresented minority undergraduates majoring in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics. Students will get a unique opportunity to work on independent research projects in cuttingedge laboratories under the direction of Stony Brook University faculty. Health Careers Internship Program (HCIP): This program allows students aspiring toward a career in the health professions the opportunity to work in a health care setting and interact regularly with health professionals. Students must be Junior or Senior in college. Summer Health Internship Program (SHIP): The program provides a six-week summer placement opportunity for junior/senior high school, and freshman/sophomore college students who have expressed an interest in the health field. Students are exposed to a variety of careers in the health fields as well as to health issues affecting their communities.

PROGRAM INFO

APPLICATION DEADLINE

MFalzone@nshs.edu

FEBRUARY 15, 2011

Website www.northshorelij.com/NSLIJ

$3000 Stipend Up to $300 for travel expenses Housing

(212) 746-6565 ffreyre@med.cornell.edu

FEBRUARY 1, 2011

Website weill.cornell.edu/gradschool/summer/index.html

(631) 632-1387 sunyagep@notes.cc.sunysb.edu Website www.stonybrook.edu/agep

$3500 Stipend (631) 632-1387 Round-trip airfare sunyagep@notes.cc.sunysb.edu Housing Meals Website www.stonybrook.edu/agep/undergrad.shtml#sri

(718) 590-1110

FEBRUARY 2011

VARIES

Website www.bwahec.org/programs

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 54


2011 PREMED SUMMER PROGRAM LIST PROGRAM NAME

LOCATION

DATE

DURATION

MD/PhD Summer Undergraduate Research Program at University of Nebraska Medical Center

Omaha, Nebraska

TBA

10 Weeks

Summer Program for Future Doctors at East Carolina University

Greenville, North Carolina

TBA

8 Weeks

Science Enrichment Preparation (SEP) Program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Chapel Hill, North Carolina

TBA

8 Weeks

Indians into Medicine Program at the University of North Dakota

55 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010

Grand Forks, North Dakota

TBA

6 Weeks


PREMEDLIFE MAGAZINE DESCRIPTION

PERKS

PROGRAM INFO

APPLICATION DEADLINE

The program is designed to provide appropriate experience and training to enable students to become competitive for admission to the school's MD/PhD Scholars Program. Benefits of the program include, gaining research training and experience that will make them more competitive for medical school, graduate school, other summer research programs, and MD/PhD program, exploring personal motivation for a career in medicine and biomedical research, meeting the UNMC faculty, participating in a student poster session.

$3000 Stipend

(402) 559-8242 sacox@unmc.edu

MARCH 1, 2011

The program is an intensive, challenging, educational summer program that allows participants to experience the pedagogical style and demands of the medical school curriculum. The Summer Program for Future Doctors is a great opportunity for participants to strengthen their basic science knowledge base, enhance their critical thinking skills, gain a better understanding of the application and admissions process, and exhibit their abilities to successfully handle the academic, social, and emotional demands of medical school.

Housing and Travel Stipend

Website www.unmc.edu/com/summer/9.htm

CONTACT PROGRAM

Website www.ecu.edu/cs-dhs/ascc/SPFD.cfm

(919) 966-2264

The SEP Program is an honors-level academic enrichment program for disadvantaged undergraduate students (rising sophomores and juniors) who seek admissions into graduate/health professional programs. Students will engage in more than 150 hours of classroom instruction in physics, organic chemistry, human physiology and quantitative skills/biostatistics, attend classes and seminars in reading speed and comprehension, test-taking strategies, essay writing, and interview techniques, visit local health facilities and network with health care professionals, and shadow a working professional in your health field of interest. 2 programs. Pathway at UND: This program is for tribal community college students planning to transfer to UND in health care or pre-health curricula. Pathway courses are taught by University instructors, and are designed to prepare participants for advanced courses in the areas of anatomy, physiology, biology and physics. Pathway also includes a learning skills component to promote successful learning styles and study habits. Pathway students are eligible to apply for one-year tuition waivers at UND. Med Prep at UND: This program is for American Indian college upperclassmen and graduates who are preparing for medical school coursework. The program is divided into two major components: pre-medical students preparing to take or retake the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) and students entering medical school.

(252) 744-2500 ascc@mail.ecu.edu

FEBRUARY 15, 2011

Website nchcap.unc.edu/sep.php

Stipend Travel Stipend

(701) 777-3037

APRIL 2011

Website www.med.und.edu/inmed/summerprograms.html

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 56


2011 PREMED SUMMER PROGRAM LIST PROGRAM NAME

LOCATION

DATE

DURATION

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine Summer Medical and Dental Education Program (SMDEP)

Cleveland, Ohio

June - July 2011

6 Weeks

Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine Summer Scholars Program

Athens, Ohio

June - July 2011

6 Weeks

MedStarz Program at the University of Toledo College of Medicine

Toldeo, OH

July 2011

1 Week

Research, Observation, Service, and Education (R.O.S.E) Program at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

Cincinnati, Ohio

Mid June - Early August 2011 8-10 Weeks

Chester Summer Scholars Program

Cleveland, Ohio

TBA

Pre-Professional Internship Program at Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine

57 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010

Cincinnati, Ohio

January 4-7, 2011 January 10-14, 2011 June 6-10, 2011 June 13-17, 2011 July 11-15, 2011 July 18-22, 2011

10 Weeks

1- 2 Weeks


PREMEDLIFE MAGAZINE DESCRIPTION

PERKS

PROGRAM INFO

APPLICATION DEADLINE

The program is designed to identify, recruit, and assist in preparing as many highly talented, committed, and hard-working minority and economically disadvantaged students as possible for careers in dentistry and medicine. We hope to imbue our students with the confidence and skills necessary to allow them to return to school better prepared to perform well in more rigorous basic science and math classes.

Meals Travel Assistance Stipend Housing

(216) 368-0529 smdep@case.edu

MARCH 1, 2011

Summer Scholars participants prepare for the challenges and rewards of medical school. Twenty-five applicants are selected each year to participate in this rigorous six-week program designed to give you an intensive and realistic introduction to the first-year curriculum at OU-COM. In addition to traditional medical school curricula taught by medical college faculty, graduate students and upperclass medical students, the program focuses on case-based problem solving and smallgroup/team work.

Room and board Stipend Program materials Round-trip travel expenses

(800) 345-1560 schriner@ohio.edu

The program provides students exposure to medicine and will include experiences that encompass sessions on navigating the medical school application process, introduction to the Problem Based Learning (PBL) model in small group sessions, hands on experience in the gross anatomy lab, clinical lectures on medical topics, diversity and cultural competency exercises, and contact with physicians in the clinical setting.

Housing Travel allowance

(419) 383-4229 medadmissions@utnet.utoledo.edu

The R.O.S.E. program is part internship, part early acceptance to medical school, and part mentorship program. The purpose of the program is to provide stimulating experiences and contact with academic medical faculty for high ability, intellectually curious pre-medical college students.

ROSE students have conditional acceptance to the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine; $3000 Stipend

(513) 558-5581 ROSEProgram@uc.edu

The program awards 15 collegiate undergraduate students the opportunity to spend the summer in clinical laboratory research at MetroHealth Medical Center. The program is an opportunity for pre-medical and scientifically-oriented students to explore the potential for a career in medical research or academic medicine.

$2000 Stipend Free Parking Supplies and equipment are provided

(216) 778-5940 jmoore@metrohealth.org

The Pre-Professional Internship Program at the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine (OCPM) is designed to provide insight into the many facets of podiatric medicine and the education involved with obtaining the Doctor of Podiatric Medicine Degree.

Website www.smdep.org/progsites/casewestern.htm

MARCH 1, 2011

Website www.oucom.ohiou.edu/summerscholars

MARCH 1, 2011

Website www.utoledo.edu/med/md/admissions/medstarz.html

FEBRUARY 15, 2011

Website www.med.uc.edu/rose/index.html

FEBRUARY 2011

Website www.metrohealth.org/body.cfm?id=289

(216) 916-7488 lfranck@ocpm.edu

VARIES

Website www.ocpm.edu/?page=admission-internships

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 58


2011 PREMED SUMMER PROGRAM LIST PROGRAM NAME

LOCATION

DATE

DURATION

Summer Premedical Enrichment Program (SPEP) at the University of Cincinnati

Cincinnati, Ohio

June - July 2011

6 Weeks

Summer Premedical Academic Enrichment Program (SPAEP) at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

June - July 2011

8 Weeks

Pre-med Enrichment Program at the University of Pennsylvania Health System

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

May - August 2011

10 Weeks

Pre-Med Program at St. Mary Healthcare Center

Langhorne, Pennsylvania

Begins May 2011

TBA

Summer Pre-Med Program at Doylestown Hospital

Doylestown, Pennsylvania

Late-May - August 2011

10 Weeks

59 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010


PREMEDLIFE MAGAZINE DESCRIPTION

PERKS

Residential program for 18 college juniors, seniors, and postbaccalaureate premedical students. Students receive intensive exposure to medicine as a career through t ours, speakers, seminars, and shadowing. Students are exposed to the medical school experience and the academic curriculum through a noncredit course in cardiophysiology, extensive interaction with medical students and faculty, and detailed guidance through the medical school application process. Emphasis is on strengthening critical thinking/problem solving skills, increasing selfawareness, and making each participant a competitive medical school applicant.

PROGRAM INFO

APPLICATION DEADLINE

(513) 558-7212 lathel.bryant@uc.edu

MARCH 1, 2011

Website comdo-wcnlb.uc.edu

This program, open to high school graduates and college students, is designed specifically to prepare and support students who wish to pursue careers in the field of medicine. Spend seven weeks in Level I, strengthening your academic skills and learning more about careers in medicine. Or, spend eight weeks immersed and engaged in the work of physician-scientists including laboratory research and MCAT preparation through Level II. Both programs will enhance your skills and knowledge in science, writing and public speaking. You'll discover a challenging and stimulating program in the environment of a major academic medical center.

$1000 Stipend Transportation Housing Meals

(412) 648-8987

The aim of this program is to prepare minority students for careers in academic medicine or other positions of leadership in medicine. Students will be engaged in a program of research, clinical observations, classroom exercises and teaching observations, designed to stimulate their interest in academic medicine. In addition, the students will be engaged in the following: activities pertaining to the medical school application process and medical school admissions; classroom instructions and simulated testing to prepare the students for the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT).

$2500 Stipend

(215) 898-3980 jcraig@mail.med.upenn.edu

This program is for students who have complete their second year of college with a GPA of at least 3.2 in a course of study that qualifies them for medical school entrance.

The program is designed for college students who have complete their junior year and are pursing academic programs leading to medical school. Doylestown Hospital physicians assist with the program, which includes lectures and "hands-on" volunteer work on patient floors and in many departments.

CONTACT PROGRAM

Website www.medschool.pitt.edu/future/future_03_spaep.asp

CONTACT PROGRAM

Website www.uphs.upenn.edu/coeomh/premed.html

Conditional acceptance to the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine; $3000 Stipend

(215) 710-2096 lschonewolf@stmaryhealthcare.org

CONTACT PROGRAM

Website www.stmaryhealthcare.org/body.cfm?id=132 CONTACT PROGRAM

(215) 354-2204 Website www.dh.org/body.cfm?id=616

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 60


2011 PREMED SUMMER PROGRAM LIST PROGRAM NAME

LOCATION

DATE

DURATION

Mini-Med Spring Break at Drexel University College of Medicine

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

March/April 2011

Choose from 7 1-week sessions

Vanderbilt Summer Science Academy (VSSA)

Nashville, Tennessee

June - August 2011

TBA

Oncology Education (POE) Program

Memphis, Tennessee

Mid-June - August 2011

Varies

Dialysis Clinic, Inc. Collegiate Medical Summer Internship Program

Nashville, Tennessee

June 1 - July 30, 2011

8 Weeks

61 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010


PREMEDLIFE MAGAZINE DESCRIPTION

PERKS

Participants will experience a medical education as seen through the eyes of 3rd and 4th year medical students during their clinical rotations in the hospital and clinical practices. The experience can enlighten participants about a career in medicine, whether they're about to enter medical school or are just beginning the application process. Participants will accompany the teaching team and 3rd and 4th year medical students on hospital rounds and be part of discussions between physician, patient, and medical students. Throughout the five-day program, participants will also see patients in clinical practice, attend department lectures, or go into the operating room. Participants will have the opportunity to talk with 3rd and 4th year medical students about their experiences preparing for medical school, what their first two years were like and what it's like now that they're out of the classroom and in the hospital.

PROGRAM INFO

APPLICATION DEADLINE

(215) 762-6800 minimed@drexelmed.edu

MARCH 2011

Website www.drexelmed.edu/Home/OtherPrograms/MiniMedSchool

Tuition: $1500 The program offers biomedical research opportunities to undergraduates who want to pursue a career in biomedical sciences. There are two major tracks within the VSSA; the Basic Science Programs for undergraduates interested in careers in research, and the Undergraduate Clinical Research Internship Program for undergraduates who wish to pursue a career in medicine. Participation in any one of the Summer Science Academy programs is a valuable learning experience that enhances a student's skills and makes him or her more competitive for acceptance to frontline graduate programs.

$2500-$4000 Stipend

The POE program offers a unique opportunity for students preparing for careers in the biomedical sciences, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, psychology, or public health to gain biomedical and oncology research experience. The POE program provides a short-term training experience (internship) in either laboratory research or clinical research. Students participating in the Pediatric Oncology Education program will receive training in a superb academic environment created by the interaction of committed basic scientists, research-oriented physicians, and postdoctoral fellows.

$4000 Stipend Housing

This program is a summer internship for premedical students in the clinical area of organ transplantation. The internship includes shadowing physicians on rounds in the hospital, observing and assisting in an outpatient/clinic facility, and observing transplant and transplant-related surgical operations.

(615) 343-2573 michelle.grundy@vanderbilt.edu

CONTACT PROGRAM

Website medschool.mc.vanderbilt.edu/ssa/

(901) 595-2488 Suzanne.gronemeyer@stjude.org

FEBRUARY 1, 2011

Website www.stjude.org/poe

(615) 327-8814

FEBRUARY 25, 2011

Website www.dciinc.org/camp/Internship.htm

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 62


2011 PREMED SUMMER PROGRAM LIST PROGRAM NAME

LOCATION

DATE

DURATION

Michael E. DeBakey Summer Surgery Program at Baylor College of Medicine

Houston, Texas

Mid-June- August 2011

8 Weeks

The University of Texas Dental Branch and Medical School at Houston Houston, Texas Weeks Summer Medical and Dental Education Program (SMDEP)

May-June 2011

Health Career Opportunities Program (HCOP) at The University of Houston College of Optometry

Houston, Texas

TBA

6 Weeks

Physiology Undergraduate Research Experience (PURE)

San Antonio, Texas

June 6 - July 29, 2011

8 Weeks

Scholars Program in Organic Chemistry at University of Texas - Southwestern Medical Center

Dallas, Texas

June - August 1011

10 Weeks

63 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010

6


PREMEDLIFE MAGAZINE DESCRIPTION

PERKS

The Michael E. DeBakey Summer Surgery Program offers the pre-medical student a glimpse of a career in surgery long before they will ever pick up a scalpel for the first time. During the eight weeks, students become familiar with the hospital environment, the operating room, and the lifestyle of a surgeon. They are expected to become an integral part of their surgical teams by participating in rounds, surgery, and conferences.

PROGRAM INFO

APPLICATION DEADLINE

studentprograms@bcm.tmc.edu

JANUARY 15, 2011

Website www.debakeydepartmentofsurgery.org

The program seeks motivated students from a variety of backgrounds including those who are underrepresented or underserved that are interested in pursuing a career in dentistry and medicine, including those who have an interest in serving the underserved. The mission of SMDEP is to assist students in enhancing their knowledge, skills, and attitudes to make them more competitive and to improve their chances of becoming successful applicants to a medical or dental school of their choice. SMDEP scholars will experience academic enrichment in five core areas: microbiology, anatomy and physiology, pre-calculus/calculus, physics, and organic chemistry. Students will have clinical experiences in such areas as emergency medicine, family practice, internal medicine, restorative dentistry, and oral surgery.

Meals Travel Assistance Stipend Housing

(713) 500-4532 Rebecca.L.Lopez@uth.tmc.edu

The program involves specific activities designed to enhance qualifications for entry to the professional program including preparation for the Optometry Admission Test (OAT), counseling regarding the admission and application process, academic counseling, time management training, and test-taking/skills.

Financial aid assistance information is given to all students

(713) 743-2047 rboykins@optometry.uh.edu

This research program designed for highly motivated college undergraduate students with a genuine interest in experimental research careers in biomedical science. Undergraduates will have the opportunity to receive hands-on experience in on-going research projects under the direction of a faculty member as well as work with postdoctoral fellows and graduate students.

$3000 Stipend

The goals of the program are to improve college students' performance in organic chemistry and to provide these students with exposure to clinical medicine. The SPOC program will be conducted on the UT Southwestern campus in Dallas and has two components: 1) a 10 week course in Organic Chemistry and 2) clinical preceptorships with practicing physicians at UT Southwestern or in one of our affiliated clinical sites.

$1000 Stipend

MARCH 1, 2010

Website www.smdep.org/progsites/houston.htm

CONTACT PROGRAM

Website www.opt.uh.edu/students/undergrad/

(210) 567-4324 physiologygrad@uthscsa.edu

MARCH 11, 2011

Website physiology.uthscsa.edu

(214) 648-7517 SPOCPrograms@UTSiuthwestern.edu

JANUARY 2011

Website www.utsouthwestern.edu/utsw

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 64


2011 PREMED SUMMER PROGRAM LIST PROGRAM NAME

LOCATION

DATE

DURATION

Virginia-Nebraska Alliance Summer MCAT Preparatory Program

Richmond, Virginia

TBA

5 Weeks

Integrated Biological Sciences Summer Research Program (IBS-SRP)

Madison, Wisconsin

June - August 2011

10 Weeks

Study and Treatment of Human Disease in Mwandi, Zambia

Mwandi, Zambia

Early July - August 2011

4 Weeks

Physiology Undergraduate Research Experience (PURE)

65 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010

San Antonio, Texas

June 6 - July 29, 2011

8 Weeks


PREMEDLIFE MAGAZINE DESCRIPTION The program offers a summer MCAT Preparatory Program to students enrolled in Virginia's historically black colleges and universities and other Alliance schools. The program provides students the opportunity to advance their skills through an intensive course.

PERKS

PROGRAM INFO

APPLICATION DEADLINE

$1500 Stipend Housing Meals

(804) 287-6484 jvaugha2@richmond.edu

APRIL 2011

(608) 262-5267 beasen@wisc.edu

In the program students do independent research projects with faculty mentors for ten weeks in one of seven research areas: Bioenergy Cellular and Molecular Biology Computational Biology & Biostatistics Environmental Biology Neurobiology Plant Development, Breeding and Genetics Virology. These seven disciplinary clusters are intellectually woven together at weekly meetings in an interdisciplinary learning community through evolutionary theory and the research process. In addition to meeting with the interdisciplinary group, students prepare research proposals, final papers, and oral presentations summarizing their work. The summer program in Mwandi, Zambia offers students an opportunity to work or various research & service projects at the United Church of Zambia's mission hospital, primary school or preschool. UCZ's mission hospital compound is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).Immediately following the spring semester, students will travel to Mwandi to conclude their course work which will consist of an independent project and a medical experience at the UCZ hospital compound. Students will spend approximately 3 weeks on-site in Mwandi and will write a final research paper based on their independent project.

Website prehealth.richmond.edu/mcat-preparation/virginia-nebraska-alliance FEBRUARY 2011

Website cbe.wisc.edu/srp-bio/

Housing

vecase@davidson.edu

CONTACT PROGRAM

Website www.bio.davidson.edu/people/vecase/mwandi/index.html

ELIGIBILITY: Students in good standing Davidson students enrolled in a pre-med spring course This research program designed for highly motivated college undergraduate students with a genuine interest in experimental research careers in biomedical science. Undergraduates will have the opportunity to receive hands-on experience in on-going research projects under the direction of a faculty member as well as work with postdoctoral fellows and graduate students.

$3000 Stipend

vecase@davidson.edu

CONTACT PROGRAM

Website www.bio.davidson.edu/people/vecase/mwandi/index.html

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 66


GADGETS & GIZMOS

>>>Our pick of cool and unusual items that we thought our readers might be interested in

Y X [ Z 1. iPad. The iPad is a tablet computer developed by Apple and designed to function like a smartphone and laptop computer. $499 - apple.com. 2. Clocky Alarm Clock. Alarm clock that rolls away when you hit the snooze button and it continues to emit a random pattern of beeps and flashes, encouraging drowsy sleepers to seek it out and turn it off. $49.95 - hammacherschlemmer.com. 3. Roll Up Keyboard. USB flexible keyboard is flexible and foldable and so soft that it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make any sound while typing. $26 - usbgeek.com. 4. College Survival Kit. Any college student will be happy to gain this collection of 15 must-have items. $49-msandmrs.com. 5. Mr. P Tape Dispenser. A regular old tape dispenser with a cool factor. $25 - wishingfirsh.com. 6. Floating Book Shelf. This powered coated steel floating bookshelf becomes invisible behind a stack of books. $9.95 - barnesandnoble.com. 7. Mind Trainer Toilet Roll. Each sheet of paper has a puzzle and the answers are printed too, upsidedown. $9 - amazon.com. 8. Mind Your Own Business Paper Shredder. This mini shredder lets you quickly shred receipts or any other small item that is for your eyes only. $11.50 - spoonsisters.com. 9. Oishi Dolls. These talking dolls are audible alarm clocks, minus the bright lights. $29.95 www.oishidolls.com.

67 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010


GADGETS & GIZMOS|

]

\ ^

_ ` September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 68


ANATOMY OF THE MCAT Attend this free event and learn the ins and outs of all the areas of the MCAT. Meet expert instructors who will break down all the areas of the test, what to expect and what you need to know in order to be ready on test day. Get in the MCAT mindset! Join Princeton Review for an intensive (and FREE) look at each subject. A team of specialist instructors will dissect the MCAT subject by subject and share strategies designed to improve your score on each section of the exam. Students can attend one or all workshops.

STRATEGY SESSION FOR THE MCAT The MCAT is now a computer-based exam. Attend this MCAT free event to learn everything there is to know about the MCAT CBT. You'll meet an expert Princeton Review instructor who will walk you through some questions and teach you some of our proven strategies that you can use on test day. Photo Credit: sxc.hu - julosstock

Free events and programs across the nation are being offered to premedical students . From MCAT preparation to learning more about the medical school admission process, students can take advantage of the many upcoming events. For more information about free programs being offered in your area, visit www.princetonreview.com/events.

FREE EVENTS

|PREMEDLIFE MAGAZINE

MCAT AND MED SCHOOL ADMISSIONS FORUM In this free seminar, students will gain an in-depth knowledge of the MCAT and demystify the medical school admissions process. At the end of the session, you'll know the MCAT and how to put together an application that will impress any admissions committee.

MCAT & MED SCHOOL SEMINAR Get an introduction to med school, the MCAT, and the application process. getting into medical school keeps you up at night, you should take advantage of this free seminar. Students will gain an in-depth knowledge of the MCAT and demystify the medical school admissions process. At the end of the session, you'll know the MCAT and how to put together an application that will impress any admissions committee.

FREE HYPERLEARNING MCAT CLASS At the Hyperlearning MCAT Free Class, you will experience the most thorough, demanding, and effective MCAT prep course around. An instructor will teach you some of our most effective test-taking strategies and lead you through several MCAT sample problems.

ANATOMY OF THE MCAT

PRE-MED JUMPSTART

Attend this free event and learn the ins and outs of all the areas of the MCAT. Meet expert instructors who will break down all the areas of the test, what to expect and what you need to know in order to be ready on test day. Get in the MCAT mindset! Join other students for an intensive (and FREE) look at each subject. A team of specialist instructors will dissect the MCAT subject by subject and share strategies designed to improve your score on each section of the exam. You can attend one or all workshops.

Admissions and MCAT test experts to come together for this free workshop. Find out what you need to know about Medical School Admissions and the strategies you will need for the MCAT.

To find information about the programs being offered in you area log-on to: www.princetonreview.com/events.

TEST FEST 2010 FREE PRACTICE TEST Join thousands across the country and put your skills to the test by taking a FREE practice exam. Participants also receive a detailed analysis of their results.

69 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010


IN THE STACKS

Books we thought that aspiring doctors might be interested in reading<<< EVERY PATIENT TELLS A STORY

by Lisa Sanders Internist and New York Times columnist Lisa Sanders discusses how doctors deal the diagnostic dilemmas. Through a collection of medical cases, Sanders reflects on what the experience means for both patient and the physician. In one case, a patient who becomes frustrated by her doctor's failure to diagnose her fever and rash, turns to Google in search of answer to her symptoms and finds the correct answer. Sanders uses the cases to demonstrate how the world wide web of information can help in diagnoses. Readers will come away with a new appreciation for the overwhelming complexity of the human body and the doctors who face its challenges. INTERN: A DOCTOR'S INITIATION by Sandeep Jauhar In a memoir of his pursuit to become a doctor, Dr. Sandeep Jauhar tells his story of his days and nights during his residence at New YorkPresbyterian Hospital. In his account, Dr. Jauhar discusses his unique journey from graduate work in physics to medical school, questioning his decision to become a doctor, and his struggles with his family during this process. In the book, Dr. Jauhar admits that he struggled to find a place among squadrons of cocky residents and doctors. Dr. Jauhar provides readers with a glimpse into the world of the resident physician that can give aspiring doctors important insight into the difficulties of training and how trying it can become. MED SCHOOL RX: GETTING IN, GETTING THROUGH, GETTING ON WITH DOCTORING by Walter Hartwig Written as a reference for the complete medical experience, readers will understand what admissions committees, professors, examiners, and educators are looking for in a medical school applicant. The book also provides insight into what prospective medical students can expect of them as future physicians and how they can get the most out of the programs offered by their institution. YOUR RX FOR THE MCAT by Susan Van Arnum, PhD. This test prep reference was authored to give pre-med students an in-depth review of every must-know topic covered on the MCAT, including Verbal Reasoning, Writing, Biology, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, and Organic Chemistry. In addition to practice questions ending each chapter, six full-length practice tests based on official MCAT CBT exams are featured in the book. The book also provides readers with a progressive 12-week study schedule and expert test tips and strategies.

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 70


BETTER LIFE, BETTER YOU

>>> Information on taking care of yourself as a student living a busy life

ENERGY FOODS Not many students know about the plethora of natural foods packed with energizing elements. And while vitamins and minerals donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t generate energy in a direct way, they do play a very big role in processing energy at a whole. Here are just a few to get you started:

Vitamin C Studies show that the link between vitamin C and oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s energy level has to do with its role in producing a molecule that helps your body burn fat for energy. You can get an adequate amount of vitamin C from a single 8-ounce glass of orange juice. Other vitamin C-rich foods include: kiwi fruit, red or green pepper, broccoli, strawberries, brussel sprouts, and cantaloupe.

1

For more information about health, wellness,and fitness visit The Fitness Group online at: www.healthandwellness.weebly.com 71 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010


2

Vitamin B12 A vitamin B12 deficiency can lead to anemia which can lead to bouts of fatigue and other feelings of depleted energy. The most simple way to get this vitamin is to eat B12 enriched foods, which mainly includes, breakfast cereals. Other sources include milk, eggs, cheese, liver, tuna, and yogurt. But remember, everything in moderation - too much of anything isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t good.

Oatmeal

This simple and quick breakfast option is loaded with soluble (you know what that means right?) fiber, a key to slowing down carbohydrate absorption and keeping blood sugar levels steady. A lot of nutritionists recommend this fiber-filled cereal as a good choice if someone is looking for long-lasting energy.

3

September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 72


|PREMEDLIFE MAGAZINE

Iron Iron is a mineral essential to transporting oxygen via the red blood cells to wherever it is needed within the body. Not having enough iron can lead to a slue of problems that will lower metabolic rates and ultimately oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s energy level. Here are a few foods that contain a good amount of iron: soybeans, baked beans, spinach, oysters, tofu, and steamed clams.

5

4

Bananas

73 | PreMedLife Magazine | September/October 2010

Bananas provide a lot of potassium and the sugar in bananas is easily digested. Because potassium isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stored in the body for long periods of time, your potassium level can drop significantly without you being aware of it.


6

Peanut Butter

When you make your PB&J sandwich, it would be a good idea to use wheat bread if possible. While the peanut butter is good for you, bleached white bread isn’t! The fiber in whole wheat bread and the protein from the peanut butter will disperse a flow of energy over time.

GOT QUESTIONS? SEND US YOUR QUESTIONS ABOUT GETTING IN SHAPE AS A BUSY PREMED STUDENT. EMAIL YOUR QUESTIONS TO INFO@PREMEDLIFE.COM

Try different things and see what works best for you. Although caffeine is pretty much the universal staple for college students, try to cut back on your caffeine intake. In addition, even though your schedule will get hectic as a premedical student, try to implement a regular exercise routine into your schedule. And don’t underestimate the power of sleep! Make an effort to get the proper rest at night because feeling energized

entails doing a combination of things. Give your modified eating habits and changed activity routine some time to sink in and get into the habit of making it permanent part of your life. Don’t forget - everything in moderation Remember, it’s always best to consult your doctor about any changes that you experience with you body and any changes you may want to make to your diet. „ September/October 2010 | PreMedLife Magazine | 74


COLLEGE 101

>>> Information students could use to manage and deal with life as a college student

Dorm Room

FENG SHUI Follow these simple Feng Shui tips for a Feng Shui dorm room makeover

Feng shui is all about improving the flow of energy through your personal space. Although you may find it difficult to arrange your items in a small space of your dorm room, it is possible. From the way you position your desk to the color of your sheets, there are many ways you can make your dorm room space feng shui-friendly..

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COLOR, COLOR, COLOR Although you are probably allowed to change the color of the paint on your dorm room wall, you can accessorize . Most feng shui designers advise against using muted tones of soft browns or yellows because they can â&#x20AC;&#x153;slowâ&#x20AC;? energies that surround you. Use greens to encourage growth, prosperity, clear-mindedness, and energy. Reds represent energy, fame, & reputation. White, Grey, and Metallic colors are used for intelligence and learning. Lastly, Blues and Blacks are suggested colors for personal wisdom and career.

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SLEEP THE “RIGHT” WAY One of the most recommended changes for anyone who wants to improve the “vibes” in their space has to do with sleeping. Many designers suggest not placing the foot of your bed so that it directly faces the door. This is known as the death position. If you have no control over how your bed is positioned then see if you can place something between your bed and the door. And if you can put the headboard (if you even have that luxury) up against a sturdy wall, this makes for an even better aura. You may also want to keep mirrors away from the bed as this can take energy away from you when you are sleeping. Although you’ll be surrounded by plenty of books in your room, try not to place them so that they are facing your body or head as you sleep. According to feng shui beliefs, books are considered cutting instruments as they can “cut” into your sleep as your mind and body are recharging. And speaking of interrupting your sleep, plants should also be kept away from the head or foot of your bed to avoid taking chi from you. Lastly, one very important feng shui recommendation is to keep the computer away from your head. Keep the bottom of your bed free from clutter to erase any blockade to the flow of energy. The worst kind of mess you could have stashed away under your bed is frustrating school papers, or class related jumbles. These items only aggravate your mental poise.

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Some feng shui designers say that keeping a small bamboo in water at your desk will bring you “luck” and the water will bring energy and provide calmness. But don’t forget to water. it .Dead plants weaken the energy in your room..

POWER OF THE DESK When you’re in a small space like a dorm room, your options for decorating and organizing are limited. So this means that you’ll have to pay attention to the key items in you space. One important area in your room is you desk. To promote

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ELEMENTS 101

Many people who are trying to feng shui their space focus on the five elements: water, fire, wood, metal and earth. You can use plants, flowers, stripes, or photos of trees to represent wood which repre-

knowledge, keep dictionaries and other reference books at the left side of your desk. Keep the cords underneath your desk untangled because tangled cords can inhibit the flow of chi.. You may also want to make sure that your desk is always organized. Keeping a neat desk will help you stay focused and relaxed as you study.. And don’t forget to neatly stack your papers when your finished studying because clutter breeds clutter.

sents personal growth. For fire you can use lamps, images of summer, and triangles. Fire represents the idea of expansion and transformation of life. Now when you want to bring the Earth into your space, you can use stones and square-shaped objects in. These will help you represent the slowing and

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grounding energy of earth. Gold, silver, or brass can be used for metal which represents creativity and intelligence. Finally, for water, you can use glass or mirrors to send out vibes of renewal and personal wisdom. If you’re allowed to have a small water fountain in your room this can be used as well.


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quit messing with the radio or pay attention to the road.

Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Only You. Speak Up.


PreMedLife Magazine - September/October 2010