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Welcome to our fourth PDF issue. Inside this issue are two finished tutorials; Tokyo Rose’s entire Deciphering Fractals series and Silver’s entire Color Basics series. We’ve also have two interviews, two reviews, two top ten tags articles, two articles one style, one digital, one fashion, two getting to know the mentors articles, a history of woad, and finally a history of beer. We sincerely hope you enjoy this issue. Remember, there’s always an open spot for blog contributors and we’d be happy to have you! -

The Blog Contributors


Welcome From the Team Intro. to the Contributors #1 Name: Jay Alias: Sorrow

Featured Articles N/A

#2 Name: Janne Alias: Divi Featured Articles N/A

#3 Alias: Anything Pink

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#4 Name: Tim Alias: Fury

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N/A

#5 Name: Rav Alias: Rav

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#6 Name: Mikey Alias: Mikey/Bootz

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#7 Name: Sentiment Alias: Sentiment Featured Articles N/A

#8 Name: Matt Alias: Tormenter Featured Articles N/A


#9 Name: Sean Alias: Scorcho

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#10 Name: UBA Fatman UBA Alias: UBA Fatman UBA Featured Articles N/A

#11 Name: NarutoGoku Alias: NarutoGoku

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#12 Name: Stuart Alias: Torak Firenze


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#13 Name: P-jay Alias: flayr ♡

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#14 Name: TTRibal Alias: TTRibal

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#15 Name: Alex Alias: AgainstAll


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#16 Name: Vanish Alias: Vanish N/A Featured Articles N/A


CONTENTS

Page 1- Front Cover by Tokyo Rose Page 2- A Note From the Team by the Blog Contributors Page 3- Writer's Introduction Page 8- Contents Page

SECTION: TTRIBAL

Page - 11 Interview: CK!

SECTION: DRAGONITE.

Page 13 - My Thoughts on GNOME 3 Page 17 - Flux Pavilion and Doctor P - Circus One

SECTION: VASHN

Page 21 - Top 10 Tags Page 27 - Top 5 Resource Packs

SECTION: CK?

Page 28 - Defining Your Style


SECTION: MATT AND AGAINSTALL

Page 31 - A Quick Guide on how to Become a Better Dressed Fella

SECTION: SILVER

Page 35 - Getting to know the Mentors Page 38 - Getting to know the Mentors Page 43 - Color Basics Part One Page 44 - Color Basics Part Two Page 45 - Color Basics Part Three

SECTION: TOKYO ROSE

Page 46 - Artist Interviews: MKULTRA Page 52 - The Artist's Palette: Woad Page 55 - The History of Beer Page 60 - AUGUST TOP 10 Page 65 - CORONAE BOREALIS Page 83 - SIGNUM Page 95 - VESPER Page 114 - AMALTHEA Page 138 - CELTIC KNOT Page 153 - AERIS Page 173 – LIBERTAS


Page 191 - AUREUS Page 214 - ORBIS Page 268 - MARE SOMNIUM Page 300 - EMANIO Page 328 - BREAKING PAST THE MAXIMA Page 382 - Deciphering Fractals: A Beginner's Guide to Understanding Apophysis Gradient Pack Page 383 - Deciphering Fractals: A Beginner's Guide to Understanding Apophysis Flame Pack THE END

Page 384 - Closing Note


INTERVIEW: CK! 1. How did you first stumble upon PR? - I was a member of a few forums before this one and saw people mention Planet Renders from time to time, but GIMP Talk really inspired me to join this site. Members would always ask each other: "Where did you get that render?" They'd reply: "Planet Renders." So I figured I'd check out the site to see what they had. 2. Give us a brief description of your time on the site. When I initially joined, I didn't stay for too long -- maybe a month or two tops? I really didn't have much interest in the site. I guess it's because I was terrible and people told me (in a nice way) that my work sucked. I eventually returned to the site 6 months later to join Team Haze and eventually move on to Team Hollow, The Mansion, and so on. That's what helped me stick around for as long as I have. 3. What is it like to administrate/moderate a website with a userbase as large as PR's? I think overall, it's rather fun, but it has its times of stress. As long as you're willing to be patient and understanding of others, you can still enjoy what you do. 4. What would you say is the most fun/least fun parts of your responsibility as staff? I really enjoy helping out with competitions, which includes setting them up and running them. That's probably my favorite aspect of being staff. My least favorite? I'm not sure if I have any. I make sure I don't do things that I don't find enjoyable. (Sometimes if you do something you don't enjoy, it really shows. So I think that it's important that you do what you like so that others don't find themselves discouraged.) 5. What's your most memorable moment on PR? The most-memorable moment in my opinion is the first year staff pulled an April Fools' joke, which was when Dies Irae pretended to hack the site and go crazy. 6. Would you say that management/moderation has taken more of a priority than Art/Design for you on PlanetRenders? To some degree, yes. I also don't have as much time these days to create graphics as I did back in the day. University has consumed a significant amount of my time since I've started. 7. Which staff member do you think deserves more credit for what they do? I think Silver and Tokyo Rose. They do a lot of "background" work that most members don't see. They're always thinking of new ways to improve the site while trying to keep staff happy. So a lot of what they do pretty much goes unnoticed by the public eye. There are other staff members like Warp, Uru, Darkrai, etc. who definitely do background work that most people don't see. They also deserve more credit than what they're getting. 8. What in your view separates PR from all the other GFX based forums out there? The community, as cliche as it sounds.


A lot of other graphics-based forums focus on tags more than anything else, whereas we put emphasis on all styles of art, ranging from LPs to fractals to C4D renders and so on. At first, we definitely focused more on tags than anything else (including renders), but we have evolved over time, and many members have moved on to other types of art.


MY THOUGHTS ON GNOME 3 Being a Linux user a good portion of the time (read: whenever I'm not forced to be a Windows user), I'm always interested in new desktop environments, so when Fedora 15 was released last week, I was interested in seeing how I feel about it. Will it suck less than Unity? Will people have something to laugh at in place of my beloved KDE 4? Let's find out. The installation process was fairly complicated, but that was mostly due to me doing it in VirtualBox rather than on the spare tower I don't have. Generally the only complaint I have about the install is where the install link is in the live CD. For most OSes, they have a desktop icon to install. Since that isn't an option in GNOME 3 (we'll get to why later), the logical choice would have been to have a prominent menu option, but instead it was hidden in one of the settings menus. I was using the fallback option because I needed to do some fiddling before GNOME 3 would work, so I don't know how it is usually handled.

Onto the interface itself. As much as I want to fight it and deny it, the future of OS interfaces is heading towards the "App" model. Gone are menus with convenient sub-menus that organize things, replaced by large clickable icons that take up the entire screen. Launching activities takes the form of a screen overlay that reminds me why I still use a bash shell for most things on Linux machines. It's better than Unity's "I want to be OSX" thing to the extent where I would find it somewhat convenient if not for the ridiculously large icons.


One of the more controversial features of GNOME is the lack shutdown options. See, the only action available at first sight is to suspend to RAM. If you press the Alt key while in the user menu, "Suspend.." will change to "Shut Down...". The OS doesn't tell you that by the way, I had to look up how to shut the damn thing off. Also, if you like restarting your computer, you're shit out of luck with GNOME 3, as the option to restart only appears when you have installed an update that would require a restart (a kernal update or something of the sort). Now if you're wondering why they would do this, the developers logic behind the move is that "users shouldn't turn off their computers, they should suspend them" and that obfuscating the option to do so will promote users to do this. My opinion of this is...somewhat mixed. If this were Ubuntu I would be totally against this, but it's Fedora, and that's a different user base. Let me explain. Fedora get's it's financial backing from Red Hat Linux, and generally speaking, Fedora has been the testing ground for anything that RHL wants tested. This has led to Fedora becoming known as more of a "techie" distro, as opposed to a distro geared towards being accessible to new users, such as the *buntus. That said, there are still some issues. While I personally run a 2 year old Windows 7 machine that takes the better part of an hour to start up, many people run systems that do allow easy multi-booting, something that is generally made easier by being able to restart at will (as opposed to shutting down every time then restarting). Furthermore, many people with a good knowledge of modern power scaling and power managements technology simply forgo turning off/suspending computers in the first, making shut down the more useful option over suspension. Now, to curtail comments on the matter, yes I know there is a fix for this little issue, but that isn't really the point, is it? I'd judging this on how it is vanilla, without me doing too much in the way of fiddling with it.


Windows in GNOME 3 only have a close button on top, no minimize, no maximize. Ideally, you're supposed to keep things maximized at all times and then move unused programs to other desktops. (for Windows/Mac users reading this, most modern Linux distros have multiple "desktops") As someone used to the netbook versions of Kubuntu/Ubuntu, this isn't deal breaking for me, but I personally like using as much space as possible on the screen without having to do anything fiddly, such as switch between desktops. There's one last quirk to discuss about GNOME 3, that is the desktop. Your desktop is there to be pretty and nothing else. You remember when I said that a desktop icon to install wasn't an option before? That's because in GNOME 3, there are no such things as desktop icons. Your desktop is literally to be there as to fill a space for where applications are going to be. With the applicationlauncher interface it uses for application launching this means that you more or less use the 100 pixel strip at the top of the screen for everything while the remaining 97% of your screen isn't really used for anything outside of applications.

Now, I personally don't use my desktop for any serious file management, but I do keep files I am currently working on (say for instance, this word document) on the desktop, as it's the first thing you generally see on startup of a computer. I do like the ability to just click something on my desktop upon the computer loading rather than starting up the file browser to open a word


document. This isn't belittling the file browser (Nautilus), it does work, it's just that desktop icons still serve some purpose. I imagine future released of GNOME will incorporate some sort of app-friendly type of file management, but at the moment just removing something that a lot of people use simply because it doesn't fit the vision of the future of the developers might just drive people from GNOME to other environments such as KDE or Xfce. And that's about all there is to say about GNOME 3, as for my final thoughts on the environment...well, it's better than Unity, but that's not saying much, and I still prefer my KDE over it. But all in all, it's by no means a bad environment. Unfortunately, the "app" model of user interfaces (which from what I can tell involves making things bigger/touch screen friendly and calling programs apps) is here to stay, and hell, it's not trying as hard as Unity to be OSX, so that's about as glowing of praise as I'm gonna give an app-GUI.


FLUX PAVILION AND DOCTOR P - CIRCUS ONE

Being that this is the start of a two week vacation(writing this on the plane), I decided that it would be a good time to diversify my music for the trip, so I don't need to listen to the amazing people you get on a flight from Long Island to Orlando. Having recently gotten into dubstep and noticing that my library was distinctly lacking in that genre aside from some Nero singles, I decided to pick up a compilation album called Circus One. Featuring tracks from 6 artists/groups (Doctor P, Flux Pavilion, Slum Dogz, Funtcase, Roksonix,and Cookie Monsta), Circus One contains 16 songs and one containing one continuous mix, the album clocks in at about 50 minutes without the mix, and 100 minutes with it. Well, that's enough about the album, let's get the track list.


(Artist - Track Run-time) 1. Flux Pavilion - Bass Cannon: 5:08 2. Cookie Monsta - Blurgh! 4:30 3. Slum Dogz - In The Hood 4:41 4. Funtcase - Mattress Punch 4:40 5. Flux Pavilion - I Can't Stop 5:03 6. Cookie Monsta - Bubble Trouble 4:03 7. Flux Pavilion - Voscillate (Roksonix Remix) 6:01 8. Cookie Monsta - Mosh Pit 5:02 9. Doctor P - Sweet Shop 4:35 10. Roksonix - 2 Bad 4:38 11. Flux Pavilion - Lines In Wax 5:17 12. Doctor P - Watch Out 4:37 13. Funtcase - 50 Calibre 3:47 14. Doctor P - Big Boss 5:03 15. Flux Pavilion - Got 2 Know 5:54 16. Slum Dogz - For All Time 4:30 17. Various Artists - Circus One (Continuous DJ Mix) 49:45 With the track list done, let's get down to business and talk about the tracks individually. Keep in mind that all opinions expressed in this article are my own and that I make no claims to having good music taste or Bass Cannon Eh, this isn't one of my favorite songs from Flux Pavilion, but it's not bad. The buildup is different from the usual "kick, snare, kick, snare, drop", but that said, the buildup is short, as the drop is at about the 25 second mark. The drop itself isn't anything mind blowing, but it does it's job, and the name "Bass Cannon" is indeed appropriate. A decent song to start off the album with high energy, but overall average. Blurgh! Onomatopoeic names are so pragmatic. This song does the job of slowing down the energy built in the opening, despite having just as short of a buildup, the drop is pretty subtle as well, but the fact remains that this is four and a half minutes of someone making puking sounds with dubstep track put in behind it and is still listenable, and that's an achievement. Average track. In The Hood I hate the buildup to this song. It features a long "talking segment", which really annoys me. Using samples of words don't bother me, nor does actual singing, and neither does rapping, but having words spoken slowly to me in a song is annoying. The drop kept me from hating this song though. Overall, it's forgettable. Mattress Punch There are a lot of songs with short buildups on this album. This song is average but forgettable. It breaks the pace of the previous song, which was more high energy bu being a slower song focused on the bass rather than synth leads/pads. That's all I can think to say of this song. I Can't Stop


This is one of my favorite Flux Pavilion songs, but it's a flawed love. The buildup is nothing special, and the drop is very Flux Pavilion-y, but it's very repetitive, even for a dubstep track, but I still love this track for some reason. This, and two other songs (both by Flux Pavilion) are the reasons that I immediately bought this album. Bubble Trouble If the plane wasn't hitting turbulence, I would be asleep now. This is a boring track, and it once again follows the pattern of this album of following a high energy song with a slow song. It's not aurally offending, and I can make it through listening to it, but it's just boring. Voscillate(Rocsonix Remix) This is the only remix on the album, and the first one with a longish buildup of 50 seconds. It has a vocal buildup like In the Hood did, but uses singing rather than talking. This is an example of how you're supposed to do a good low-energy track. Enjoyable enough for me to forget to type about it as I'm listening to it. Mosh Pit The word I think of when I listen to this song is the one word I forbid myself from using in these articles. Suffice to say, the word is three letters long, starts with a "M" and ends with a "h". A good buildup and breakdown is ruined by a mediocre drop and beatdown. The "groaning" sound they use as samples during the song don't help either. This is the third low-energy song in a row for this album. Sweet Shop Well, here's one of Doctor P's more popular songs, and one of the songs I'm most conflicted about, as it features one of my favorite buildups of any dubstep songs I've heard (and hell, most of the D&B songs I've heard.) The drop, bassline, and breakdown are also pretty good as well (well, the breakdown is just a repeat of the buildup), but...to be blunt, the buildup and drop feel like they're for completely different songs, and the first time I heard the drop was quite jarring. If someone were to expand on either of these parts, adding a more fitting buildup to the bassline or a more fitting bassline to the buildup, these could be two excellent songs, but as it is now, this is one okay song. 2 Bad What Sub Focus' Rock It is to Drum and Bass, this song is to Dubstep, what I mean by that is that this song is one of those songs that sounds good in a mix as a bridge track between two other tracks, but isn't that thrilling to listen to on it's own. Repetitive but catchy and fairly short, this song is overall harmless but should be listened to in a mix, such as the one at the end of the album. Lines in Wax One of Flux Pavilions popular songs, and it's okay, but not Flux Pavilions best song in my opinion. The buildup is a somewhat long rap sequence lasting 50 seconds, leading into a down-tempo-ish drop. The breakdowns (plural) are catchy as well, both being rap segments. It's still a good song, but not the best of the album, also, the last track was high energy, so this one keeps to the pattern of low-energy after high energy. Watch Out I really like this song, another song where the buildup is better than the drop, and by a large margin. Not that the drop is bad, it's just that the buildup is a lot more interesting to me. The breakdown is similar to the buildup and as such is also good. It's average.


50 Calibre This is probably the worst song on the album, by far. Remember that thing I said before about disliking talking in my songs? Well, have that, plus make the talking annoying and repeat the same things over and over again. Did you know that the .308 is the standard ammo for the AK-47? I do now, and I still don't care, since the closest thing I've had to an AK is a super-soaker. What doesn't help matters is that the music sucks as well. This song thoroughly pisses me off. Big Boss Eh, this is forgettable as well, the bassline is pretty interesting though. That's all I can think to say. Got 2 Know The last Flux Pavilion song of the album, and it's...Flux Pavilon-y. It's another song where the drop happens almost a minute in. The buildup is utilitarian, and the drop is catchy, it's a fairly standard Flux Pavilion song. The breakdown is a bit weak though, but overall an enjoyable song. For All Time This song gives me the feeling that they simply put it on the album for the sake of having something to close the continuous mix out with, it's another one of those songs that doesn't really work outside of a DJ mix, there are parts of it that are catchy, but the repetition really kills the song, the sample used for the title, the “for all time� line is repeated far too many times. It's okay to close out the album I suppose, as it does do well in the DJ mix at the end. Circus One Speaking of the DJ mix, I wasn't going to write anything about the mix on this album, since it would just be a mix of the songs on the album, then I heard something that intrigued me. While listing to the mix, I noticed that there was a song mixed in that wasn't on the album (Flux Pavilion's Hold Me Close). I didn't notice any other songs I knew, but that was interesting.

And that's Circus One. My final thoughts on the album? If you like modern dubstep, this album will be satisfying to you. Is it a good introduction to the genre? That's a bit less clear. I personally enjoyed it, but I got into dubstep before this album, and it probably wouldn't have drawn me in if I didn't like dubstep. Circus One can be bought off of Amazon for $9.99 USD, a link is below: Circus One presented by Doctor P and Flux Pavilion


TOP 10 TAGS

Stronger. Lovely composition and stunning colors and effects.

Finn Amazing landscape model, great atmosphere and great lush looking forest.


Quert This is stunning, the pentooling and coloring is great overall feel to it.

Danilo Great fractal work, the color is great and look to it is warming.


mk Breath taking piece, the smudging is amazing and the bits of detail is mind blowing.

Pochy Another great smudge tag, the effects and smudging is very appealing to the eye.


Csky This piece will have you starring for moments, the colors, smudging and composition is very interesting.

Godzilla! This is a great photo manip, the warm color to it, is very lovely. The atmosphere is sensational.


fankes Great pentooling from this piece, it has some humor to it and is very fun and cute.


Andro Great drawing, love the dark look to it and the old vintage look to it.


TOP 5 RESOURCE PACKS 1. Smudger's Paradise pack - Summer Volume by Pochy http://planetrenders...howtopic=290959 This is a great pack for all smudgers and you will definitely will learn some stuff from it! 2. +ink kiki stock 18 by kikiKANNIBAL http://planetrenders...howtopic=290402 This pack has great handpicked stocks and they will look great in your tags! 3. MEGA UBER PACK by Pochy http://planetrenders...howtopic=289823 This is the pack to download when starting graphics, it has everything you will ever need! 4. Depthcore C4Ds by finnzorz http://planetrenders...howtopic=290670 Wow, these c4ds are stunning and will look great on anything! 5. C4D 70 by Koepaard Again http://planetrenders...howtopic=286518 C4Ds for everyone! These c4ds are great for using in tags!


Article written by CK!

Establishing your own graphics style takes time, effort, and patience. More importantly, it requires you to understand the fundamentals of art and be able to effectively execute fresh ideas on the fly. (You can't call yourself a successful artist if you rely on others to do the work for you - so be creative!)

While a good chunk of our ideas come from inspiration, we can always add our own twists to make those ideas unique. That's what good artists do. When we recreate another individual's ideas on a blank canvas in Photoshop, we merely demonstrate that we have the ability to imitate their work. However, if we want to develop our own style, we must use our own ideas or tweak existing ones to make our style at least partially original. (Image credit: Gasoline.) If we look at sprite tags, we can eye a few similarities between the lot of them, such as the types of effects they contain. In fact, we often see sprite tags today with an abundance of C4Ds and smudge effects. Many of them also incorporate Photoshop's pre-loaded shapes or commonlydownloaded shapes off the internet. However, the more creative artists have found clever ways to use the same resources while keeping their styles unique. As you can rightfully guess, the key to a one-of-a-kind piece is execution. In other words, how we ultimately decide to lay out and manipulate our effects on the canvas determines the


originality and creativeness of our work. Just to reiterate: whether or not we use the same resources as other artists, we can still create something completely unique.

(Image credit, from left to right: Elliptical, Shinji Hirako)

Once we know the basics for developing our own style, we can begin by viewing inspirational art pieces. This allows us to form ideas of what we would like to see in our artwork. We can also experiment in Photoshop with different resources and tools to develop new, unseen effects. These two methods combined are most effective when developing a style. Just remember: this all takes time and patience. A common misconception about "styles" is that every piece of artwork under a certain style must use the same types of resources and look almost equivalent in terms of structure. This is untrue. We can still create artwork that looks similar without going to the extremes of making everything look nearly identical. In fact, we want to be cautious as to not use the same color schemes and text too many times. Otherwise, our style looks boring and people lose interest in it, no matter how "intricate and elegant" our work may be. The trick to maintaining an interesting style is balance. We want people to recognize our work when they see it, but we also want to make every tag unique in its own way. As I briefly implied before, changing up your color schemes in your work can really make a difference. At the same time, we also want to alter a little more than that. As a matter of fact, we can slightly alter the structures of our work so that they are still recognizable and fit in the style but have slight differences. (Images credit: Shinji Hirako (above) and Dyst (below))


A QUICK GUIDE ON HOW TO BECOME A BETTER DRESSED FELLA If you're like how I was then you're probably sitting in your computer chair, wearing a graphic tshirt, a band shirt or some other name brand tshirt with their brand name plastered over the front with an ugly logo that just screams LOSER. Why do you dress like that? Why do you subject yourself to being like everybody else, fitting in with the crowd, a crowd full of the badly dressed? This will be a quick over view of the ESSENTIALS for those who want to stand out, those who want to be complimented on their looks, and reap the profit of dressing in a way that shows your body in the best way possible.

Socks Socks are an important staple in your every day life. Without them, your little piggies freeze, if your feet sweat then all that nasty sweat drips into the insides of your shoes, causing them to smell. Get a few pairs of nice black socks, and a few white socks. Here's another rule for socks: NO WHITE SOCKS WITH BLACK PANTS.

Jeans Invest in good quality dark jeans. Levi 511's are a great, inexpensive starting pair. Levi's makes many more different fits. 510's are slightly slimmer than 511's and 514's are better for heavier folks. Levi's have great places for great quality jeans.

Button-down Shirts These can come in every color, but I strongly recommend you buy at the very least, one white shirt. Get them as slim as they can fit on you without looking stretched. Stick to more neutral, earthy colors. These shirts can be paired with almost anything.

Oxford Shoes The preferred color is black, but brown also works. When buying shoes, never, and I mean NEVER buy square toes. Always go for a round toe. Go for a really slim fit, as slim as you can feel comfortable. Never wear white socks with these, however.

Slim Trousers Go for anything you like, as long as it's not too far out there. These go well with button down shirts. Grab a few pairs.

Leather Belts


Once again, the preferred color is black, but any neutral color is fine. Wear belts with your jeans or pants, but NEVER with a suit.

The Suit Go for a slim fit. Two buttons is preferred. Black is a very formal color, so I would go for a Navy blue or charcoal grey. The brand doesn't matter too much at this point. But remember, the slimmer the better. A few things to remember: NOWHERE IS OFF LIMITS Shop everywhere, search high and low. Try everything on. If it's a Korean/Chinese dealer, get the hell out of there. BE HUMAN You're not Cloud, Sephiroth or some other video game character. You don't need to dress like some flashy Asian character. Even if they make those clothes, they look nothing in person like they do online. GET TAILORED Get your clothes fitted to YOUR body. This is very, VERY important. You can roll out $500 on an outfit, but you still look like a complete douche if your clothes aren't well fit.

Here are two outfits that can easily be put together from stores such as: Urbanoutfitters, American Apparel and H&M


GETTING TO KNOW THE MENTORS I decided since I was doing Team Battles for the regular teams that the Novice teams needed something also. Instead of doing team battles with them I decided we learn more about who are teaching our members. This article will feature a couple mentors who I feel aren't noticed and possibly a mentor that is well known in the gfx area. With that being said here are the featured mentors:

TimTim

- Leader of Demented Ninjas and Pie.

+ Why did you pick the name Pie for your Novice Team "I don't really know how it came about, it was just something we agreed on with Lala. We wanted something that didn't sound pretentious like so many other GFX related names. Just something simple and kind of fun. Creating Pie was actually something Uru and Lala discussed first but somehow it ended up being me and Lala. I even think Uru was the one who originally came up with the name and we just went with it. What was it we called her... the "Alma Mater" of Pie? It's kind of funny actually, Uru still claims we stole it from her but we know she loves us and we love her too. <3"

+ Some of your favorite pieces you've made Personally I really like these, even though people may prefer others 8)


LPs: http://timster91.dev...llery/#/d2tomen http://timster91.dev...fset=0#/d300kqa See more LPs on TimTim's dA page.

+ Something about you


"I'm not a perv! Nah, I'm just a med student doing gfx as a hobby and to relax (procrastinate). Nothing special really, I guess. I'm not really popular or seen as that great of an artist, but in the end I realised it's more about having fun and liking what you do (since it's not a career for me) and I'm happy with that. I'm just glad I met so many awesome people through gfx =) Shoutouts to everyone in Pie (kricket; brofist!, Lala; mandelbulbasaur!), DN (Bess, joey and Sz my old bros, you rock) and of course Silver, Uru, Tokyo (the three special ladies ;D) and other people who're not in the teams! =D I'd do more individual names for Pie and DN but the list would be too long, since you know I love you all <3"


GETTING TO KNOW THE MENTORS Cute Pony Ears Goldy + How did you and Fabric decide the name of the team? - Well to tell you the truth, Naomi pm'ed me a list of around 15 names for the team. I picked out two myself, one being Traceless, and the other being Wishbone. Turns out she favored Wishbone

too, so we went for that. There was really no secret motive behind the name + What are some of your favorite pieces you've made? - Ha, I'm probably one of those people that are guilty of scrapping almost everything they make.

I haven't made anything serious in ages But here you go.


:$

I also quite enjoy just doing a whole lot of random pen tooling in Illustrator


But to tell you the truth, my favorite thing to do is sketch. I don't have a whole lot of pictures of my sketches, but I took one right now just so you guys can see (it's not done ) :3

+ Something about yourself that PR doesn't know - Some people already know this but what the heck. I'm actually in my first year of medical school, but I've been able to take it a bit easier than other students because I've already done most of the stuff they're teaching us in my A levels last year. So yeah, not really looking forward to how hectic next year is going to be :$

What else... umm... I play bass, and was in a band between grades 10 and 11. My grades were suffering though, so I decided to stop that. I still play bass though, when I get the time, its quite soothing to me For anyone interested I've got a Fender Mark Hoppus Jazz Bass, and a Firebird V


Artist Interviews: MKULTRA Before you start reading this interview, MKULTRA wants to give you a gift! MKULTRA: Here is the PSD. file for my Reach tag. A little treat for everyone. http://www.mediafire...tbz5nv2bm5ejv0w Wendy: Thank you for letting me conduct this interview. Let's start out simple. Can you tell me something about yourself? MKULTRA: Hey my name is Chris. I've been tagging since 05 on RuneHQ forums. Most people know me by my old alias which was a variation of Midgit Wendy: What were the RuneHQ forums like? MKULTRA: It was just a huge Runescape forum. Basically a bunch of noobs. For those that remember VeeZee, he started there Wendy: Who is VeeZee? MKULTRA: VeeZee was a good tagger here at PR back in the day. If my memory is correct he started Avant Garde. Although that’s probably wrong. Wendy: What makes you remember someone like VeeZee so well? MKULTRA: I really don't remember him that well. I just know he was from RHQ haha. Wendy: What is Runescape? MKULTRA: Stupid MMORPG I used to play Wendy: What is a MMORPG? MKULTRA: Many Men Online Roleplaying Girls (lol jk Massive Multiplayer Online Roleplaying Game Wendy: Why did you begin tagging? MKULTRA: I honestly can't remember. It was waaay back in '05. Just to have something pretty in my sigspace I guess. Wendy: How do you describe your art style? MKULTRA: Well I rarely make tags anymore. But my style hasn't really evolved from what it used to be. Spam C4Ds haha. Actually around '08 I learned how to use the pentool I don't make LPs or anything although I was involved in an artpack at Act One Art in '08. But I really don’t tag all that much.


Wendy: Do you have a particular process you go through in your art? MKULTRA: Open new canvas (400x150) > Find stock > Find c4d > ctrl + C, ctrl + V > ctrl T Rinse and repeat, with some gradients and other coloring shit. Wendy: How did you evolve your art as time went on? MKULTRA: I really didn't I'm not much better than I was back in the day Wendy: Can you show me some of your own favorite work?

MKULTRA:


Wendy: What has changed over the years when it comes to tagging? MKULTRA: Everything! The styles have changed so much over the years. Everyone has gotten waaaay better. No one really used Illustrator back then. LP crops were non-existent. I remember when GLORIOUS and Naito first started smudging. I remember when Volture was like the god of tagging at PR. It was also like way more serious back then. People were serious about winning battles and everything. Me and stphn are notorious for always complaining how oldschool was so much better than newschool. Wendy: How did you find Planetrenders? MKULTRA: My friend in real life showed me and got me to join. I was a total noob but somehow got into Team Toxic that was in '07 when we won the team tourney Wendy: How did your real life friend hear about PR if you remember? MKULTRA: No clue haha. Wendy: So how does it feel to be involved in something so long? MKULTRA: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty crazy. I never thought I would still be in the community 5 years later. Wendy: What has your experience been like on the site? MKULTRA: Right now it's fine. I don't care that much about features itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the people. It sucks that all the old school cool people are gone. But still I like the site. I miss colored usernames. Oh and I think maybe the site owner should be a bit more active too put it in a nice term. Wendy: What would you improve about the site if you could? MKULTRA: Colored usernames, the old skin (the bluish one).


Wendy: Who are some of your favorite tag artists? MKULTRA: Everyone at Act One Art. Such a chill site and group of guys but, GLORIOUS, skybringdeath, Gasoline, BLANE, roof, 2shae, Vo1tu2e, City, Smiling Demon, INXS, constantine, ccs, Dorilla, OCHO, Mr. K, Tom, effekt, Ecstatic, Di5a573r, toolpunk, roundintriangles, Bmat, Bramble, Naito, ABA, Balerion. There are a ton more but their names slip me. Wendy: What draws you to their artwork? MKULTRA: All their cool styles. Back in the day they were so amazing compared to everyone else. Even nowadays their tags are better than anything that isn't an LP crop. Wendy: What do you think was the best period for tagging? MKULTRA: '07-'08. That’s when everyone got really good and LP crops still weren't the only way to get classed pro. (By the way I HATE classing.) Wendy: Why did that period stand out? MKULTRA: Everyone just got soooo good at tagging it was insane. There were no LP crops. Those were the golden days. Wendy: Why do you hate classing? MKULTRA: It stops creativity and is biased. At Act One Art we didn't have classing. We gave good critique and inspiration. We pushed artists to be creative, not follow the status quo. By accepting the art for what it is, not for whether it’s "professional" or not people improved quicker. Now look where the AO artists are now. Smiling Demon, founder of The Luminarium, GLORIOUS, founder of Intrinsic Nature. Departed is a member of a couple art groups. We all improved sooo much more because of the noclassing environment. stphn developed his drawing style there, Gasoline developed his Goa/Psytrance influenced style there (check their dA's gasolin3.deviantart.com and skybringdeath.deviantart.com for some of their work) The no-classing atmosphere there helped us all immensely to become creative and better artists. Wendy: Why do you think classing stop creativity? MKULTRA: People always idea rip to get a good class. People do this even though it doesn't work. If someone makes a tag that looks like something BLANE made they would get a low class just because their name isn't BLANE. I would be willing to bet f he made a new account with 5 new tags he would get moderate because his name isn't BLANE. People always wanna do someone else’s style to try to get a high class. Wendy: What's wrong with LP crops? MKULTRA: It ruins the point of tagging. I don't know how else I can explain it. I just think tagging should be on a small canvas. I guess it's just my opinion, LP crops just doesn't feel like tagging to me.


Wendy: What is your favorite piece of art ever? MKULTRA: Abbey Road by the Beatles Wendy: Why is Abbey Road your favorite album? MKULTRA: It is amazing. I don't know how else to explain it haha but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just like nothing else ever. So beautiful. Wendy: I was meaning image art, not music art MKULTRA: Haha. Well I don't really like traditional art, shit bores me. Idk like I have sooo many favorites. I'll post a few. http://fc05.devianta...008_by_NKeo.jpg http://freshisrael.d...885946#/d1bhv1m http://jaxenl.devian...Motion-96990711 http://strangeprogra...set=24#/d2ghqf5 There is this other one that I saw a long time ago. It was this photomanipulation with like a skeleton zebra thing and it was in a valley. It was sick as hell. But anyways, there are a ton more favorites for me. I just posted a few. Wendy: What draws you to each of those images? MKULTRA: They look cool haha? Idk nothing specific I just think that they look really sweet. Wendy: What inspires you? MKULTRA: All those people I mentioned and the Inspirational Signature Thread Wendy: Any last words? MKULTRA: Thanks for interviewing me! This has been fun!


THE ARTIST'S PALETTE: WOAD Today we're returning to the artist's palette, for new comers this is a series about obscure things in art. Today's article is about woad. Woad is a plant that dyers use to make blue dye; it was extremely common to use this plant from Neolithic times till 1932.

The actual plant. Source: The German Wikipedia. Woad was first recorded use goes back to Neolithic times, almost 10,000 years ago. It took a long time to reach Europe though because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s actually a Middle Eastern plant. It was used in paint pigments, for textiles, and to make pretty impressions on pottery. The ancient Egyptians also used it, though mainly for textiles. Later on in their history they used it for mummy wrappings though. Like I said, woad was not fully common in Europe till much later on in history. By the time of Charlemagne's reign it was being cultivated commonly in upper Western Europe, mainly around where France and Germany is today. Some of the first accounts of woad being used in Britain were amongst the Iceni (Boudicca's people). They really did cover their bodies with woad before battle. Woad you see can be used as an antiseptic, so not only did they look fearful they were also protecting themselves from infections and doing preventive care for battle wounds.


The Hunt of the Unicorn, the blues in this tapestry are woad dye. Source: Wikipedia. By the early Middle Ages woad trading was extensive in Europe, so much so that the richest merchants in Germany were called waid herren, which means gentlemen of woad. Now, this is important to remember, woad cultivation was a way of easily making money. When you have something that holds blue steadfast in clothes and tapestries then itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to make money off of it. Especially if there's really not another dye in the area that works as well to produce the color blue. Thus, as one can imagine there were issues with indigo when it was introduced to Europe in 1140. Woad growers actually rallied to prohibit its sale. It was not available very much though until the beginning of the Renaissance when trade with India was becoming easier (this was due to there being a sea route when before they had to take dangerous land routes). By 1577 the German government had to prohibit the sale of Indigo, they did this by calling it the Devil's dye, and saying it rotted the yarns when they were dyed with it. By 1609 France prohibited the sale; this was actually an execution level offense.


A woad ball. Source: www.woad.org.uk. Though, woad itself was causing issues. Woad by its very nature exhausts soil quality extremely quickly. Once the soil is exhausted it takes time and crop rotation to get back to its former state. By the time of Queen Elizabeth I, the mass cultivation of woad was helping along a food shortage that was already in progress. The farmers would grow woad field to field, leaving behind soil that was not good for much. Thus, there was less land available to grow crops. This caused the queen to prohibit its growth in certain areas for many a year. So what caused woad and indigo to go out of fashion? The answer is synthetic pigments. They are cheaper to produce than to deal with plant growth. Thus, while indigo is still used today mainly by the denim industry, woad stopped being used in 1932. So what is woad used for today? It’s currently being revived in Britain for limited use in dyeing. BUT, its main use is in cancer studies. It’s a natural cancer fighting agent, it’s also an antiseptic. It is also used in Chinese medicine, they cultivate woad for its roots, and they call it indigowoad root. They harvest the root, and then dry it. Then it is processed into granules that are to be dissolved in a hot liquid. Supposedly it can remove disease from the body. As you can see, woad has an extensive history, not only in art, but also in textile, and is now being revived as a medicine. It’s sort of amazing what one little plant can do, isn't it?

Sources: http://en.wikipedia....satis_tinctoria http://www.woad.org....tml/europe.html


The History of Beer Alright guys, this article is just for you... Especially when you consider that I think beer smells like pig swill.

How the Egyptians made it. Source: Wikipedia. It is not certain when beer originated, but historians are certain it was not before 10,000 BCE. Before that time conditions were not conductive to grain growth due to the last ice age still being in progress. Yet, by 4,000 BCE beer production was common place. So what happened in those 6,000 years? The first thing that happened was that the ice age ended; this led the Fertile Crescent to well... Becoming fertile. The uplands of this region tended to have natural occurring areas of wild wheat and barley after the climate settled. This happened a little after 10,000 BCE. So, how did this change influence our ancestors? Before 10,000 BCE our ancestors were hunter-gatherers. This means that they were nomads, they were traveling the land hunting wild game, and gathering whatever edible vegetation they could find. After the climate changed, there were dense areas of wild cereal grains to be found. Naturally, they took advantage of this. An archaeologist in the 60s did an experiment, he found out using a simple Stone Age tool that he could gather about 16 pounds of grain in a day. He figured out a family working 8 hours per day for three weeks could gather a year's worth of grain. Why does this matter though? This matters because A. You would guard a year's worth of food wouldn't you? B. This led to the first permanent settlements. Though, why would they be gathering cereal grains in the first place? The first usage of them was not for beer. It was for soup thickener, or gruel. But still, this supplemented their food supply. They could still


hunt in a localized area, and still gather wild vegetation; but the risk of dying from starvation was a lot lower. By a little after 10,000 BCE there were sickles for harvesting, stone hearths for drying the grains, underground pits for storage, and even grindstones for processing! So what all does this have to do with beer? Let's just say beer was not invented, but discovered.

Barley. Source: Wikipedia. How was beer discovered though? Before I answer that question, let's explore two weird properties wheat has. First off, it can develop a sweet taste if you expose it to water. It'll start to sprout, and then will start the conversion of starch into malt. Now this was of high value in the ancient world because there were not that many sweet things. Another weird thing about wheat is that if you leave a bowl of gruel out for a couple of days, it'll begin to ferment. You see, yeast is a fungus, they're everywhere, even floating in the air around you right now. When that gruel was left sitting out, a bunch of wild yeasts took residence in the bowl and started to ferment the sugar from the malt into alcohol. Yes, primitive beer. This was not the first alcohol though; wine and mead were probably already discovered. But those were both probably rare, there was no way to properly store wine, and the fruits it was made from were seasonal. Mead was made from honey, but wild honey occurs only in limited quantities. This new drink though was abundant; this was due to all of the wild grains growing in the area. Beer could also be easily stored without going bad. Brewing became more advanced rather quickly. Brewers learned early on that they could get more reliable results by using the same mash tubs over and over again. They did not realize why, but the reason behind this was that yeast cultures had taken up residence in these containers. Thus, beer was becoming easier to produce. They also added in things like berries, herbs, and spices to produced flavored beer. So how many beers could be produced using these methods? Egyptian alone had 17 different beers, Mesopotamia had 20. They also had some of the first light beer and dark beers, thus beginning that eternal debate.


Dark beer. Good or not? Source: Wikipedia. So now let's look at how beer influenced society. Beer was drunk originally from a shared pot. They used reed straws to do so; this was because beer at first had floating debris on top. Even after they learned how to filter the beer they still retained this drinking method. This is where our custom of sharing a drink with a friend came from, to buy a drink for someone is the same thing as this. Back then it meant that you could trust the fellow because he hadn't fucked with your drink, i.e. not poisoned you. It was also seen as magical; this was due to the effects of intoxication and altered consciousness. They also viewed fermentation itself as magical. Beer to them was a gift from the gods; there were various myths on how the gods invented beer. One such myth was that of Osiris. Apparently he left some sprouted grain gruel out one day and forget in the sun, it fermented, and he found it like that. He shrugged his shoulders and just drank it; he liked it so much he passed the knowledge to mankind. It was also obviously a religious offering, commonly used in ceremonies, agricultural fertility rites, and funerals. So where did the idea of raising your glass to wish someone well come from then? Native Americans invented that one; they raised their glasses to the rising sun, or to their goddesses. Thus, today's custom is actually a modern echo of the idea that alcohol can invoke supernatural forces.


This is how maybe the brew looked like, but not how it was brewed. See the debris? Source: Wikipedia. So what did beer have to do with civilization itself? Some anthropologists actually think it played a central role in the ancients adapting agriculture. Now let's think about their argument. Beer, in this theory, led to permanent settlements right? This was to guard food storage, and eventually lead to the rise of agriculture, which in turn led to food surpluses. Which later lead to some members of these societies being able to do activities that did not involve them trying to find food. Farming according to these anthropologists fully developed to maintain a steady supply of beer. Though, it was probably one factor of many. Though it was quite the accomplishment, think about it, farming to fully develop took just a few thousand years. Before this there had been humanoid species on this planet for close to seven million years. The most they'd advanced to was hunter-gatherer societies. Yet in just a few thousand here was a complete civilization sprouting up due the complete adoption of agriculture. So what benefits did beer give the ancients? Well, for one it made them settle down. As permanent settlements grew it grew harder and harder to return to the old ways. This was because a large civilization cannot be supplied via hunter-gatherer practices. Thus, they could not go back to the old ways. Another advantage of beer was that at first beer storage was not great. They had to drink it often times before it was fully fermented, otherwise the pot would not hold it. Now beer that's not fully fermented is low in alcohol content, but its rich in suspended yeast. This meant that the drink was very nutritious; it had high levels of protein, and vitamin B. This helped compensate for the decline of meat in the diet. Beer, I can't believe I'm fricken saying this, was also safer to drink. The water portion of beer had to be boiled after all. Water was usually not safe due to human waste contamination. The ancients were wary of water supplies and for good reason too! Any time you had a settlement near a water


supply the waters would become foul (you can figure out what it became foul with canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you?). It was a great way to get sick; thankfully they learned quickly not to drink the water and to stick to beer. Well, that's it for now. I hope you've enjoyed this brief article.

Source: A History of The World in 6 Glasses by Tom Standage


AUGUST TOP 10

By: Vashn The colors play well together in this tag. Also, excellent stock choice, her hair helps add movement.

By: nichil Once more my favorite part of this tag is the colors. Beautiful choice. I also love the drip effect off of the smudge. Lovely job all around!


By: Humac The scattered look works well on this, and the lack of color makes it look far more dramatic.

By: clyzm I love all of the details in this tag. Excellent choices, especially the plants. The soft muted colors are also perfect.


By: Pringle Is this the same lady as the first tag? It certainly looks like her, still excellent stock choice. It definitely helps build flow right off the bat. I especially love the right side of this tag, absolutely lovely color choice.

By: Pringle I enjoy the water color splotched look that makes up this tag. Nice color choice and nice drawing. It all seems to work together nicely.


By: Koe Once more I really like the color choice. Very nicely done. I love the interesting composition as well.

By: R3volver I love the dramatic lighting and flow of this tag. I love how itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bathed more in shadow than light. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perfect.

By: Dr.Acula I rarely see a dark sea green anymore on this site. Unusual color choice, but great job. It really works well.


By: R3volver The effects are just lovely; I also love the subtle colors. So much is grayscaled except for the lighting and the hair. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like a drawing coming to life.


Deciphering Fractals: A Beginner's Guide to Understanding Apophysis


Welcome to my tutorial series. Over the past year I have written a series of tutorials for Planet Renders Magazine. I have decided to compile my work together and release them in their complete form here on Deviantart . I do not require any credit mentions in deviations, though it would be nice. I am also releasing flame files. I request that you do no not just change the gradient, render, and claim the image as your own. Please. I feel that these are very humble requests. I hope you enjoy this series. The fractals in here range from some of my earliest fractals, to some of my favorites. Good luck. If you have any questions feel free to send me a note. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll immediately answer. One more note before we begin. This guide will not be as detailed as my other tutorial, Exploring Apophysis 3D. I figured my sanity needed to be kept this time around, so I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go into that level of detail. Also, the style of the tutorials changes as the tutorial goes on. This is due to it being a year in the making. I have tried to keep relatively consistent though. I have several people to thank, wi6791lly, Lupus-deus-es, FracFx, n8iveattitude1, and AmieJ for their help in the testing of this tutorial. Also, special thanks to FracFx and deepbluerenegade for helping me troubleshoot some program issues. Finally, thank you Xcereal-Killerx, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve helped me more than anyone else with this tutorial.


CORONAE BOREALIS Occasionally, I will write short tutorials for the PR magazine, so welcome to my first tutorial article! Today we will learn how to make the fractal above, Coronae Borealis. This tutorial is easy enough that any beginning Apophysis user should be able to recreate the final product seen here. If you have any questions, feel free to contact me through notes.


Our first step is to create a new blank flame. To do this, go to the transform editor and hit the white icon with the triangle on it. This will create a new blank flame.

To create a new blank flame, click the white icon Lll

llllllll

llllllllthe arrow is aimed at.

For the first triangle, set linear 3D to zero and blur3D to 1. (Blur3D forms our foundation for this fractal.) You can also use other variations, such as crackle, to give from to your fractal.


What transform one should look like. Add another triangle, set its linear 3D variation to zero, and set rectangles to 0.9. Duplicate this triangle three times. This rectangle provides our framework. You can use other variations for different effects here as well.


What transform two should look like. To duplicate a triangle, click on the blue icon the arrow is aimed at.

You should have five transforms, and it should look like this.

Before we go any further, right click on the black portion of the transform editor. Choose the show variation preview option. This enables you to see the effects of your variations on your fractal. This will greatly help you on a pattern fractal like this since you can see what the variation will twist your fractal into.


This is how you enable the show variation preview function. Now it is time to enable the final transform! Final transforms are powerful things in pattern based fractals like this. They can warp an entire fractal into one uniform pattern. The image below shows how to enable a final transform.


To enable a final transform click on the icon labeled FX with a green plus sign over it, the arrow above is aimed at the icon. On the final transform set linear3D to zero; set Julia3D and Julia3Dz to 0.5.

What the final transform should look like. Now go to the variables; set Julia3D_power to 4 and Julia3Dz_power to -6. This is the most versatile area of the fractal. You can get several different fractals here by experimenting!


How to set the final transform’s variables. That’s it! Your fractal should now look like this:

Okay, now let’s explore some alternative fractals that you can make with this tutorial! Let’s start with transform one’s alternatives!

Blur 3D 0.1

Blur 3D 0.5


Blur 3D 1

Blur 3D 1.5

Blur 3D 2 The first fractal has the blur 3d variation set to 0.1. It looks bare boned, has a form, but does not have any body to it. The second image has blur3d set to 0.5. It has more of a body unlike the first, but is still quite bare. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also somewhat sharper looking than the usual setting (the next image). The fourth image has blur3d set to 1.5. In this one, the small squares start forming on the outside of the fractal. (While this is not entirely unpleasant looking, do not go much above 1.5.) Finally, look at the fifth image; blur3d is now set to 2. As expected, the fractal looks busy and the square now distracts from the main portion of it. Thus, we can deduce from these images that more blur will give your fractal more body. Beyond Blur3d, you can use variations like crackle and hexes. Below is an image of what you can possibly create with them.

Crackle 1

Crackle 1, crackle_cellsize 0.5


Crackle 1, crackle_cellsize 1, distort 1

Hexes 1

Hexes 1, hexes_cellsize 0.5 The first image has a simple setting of 1 on crackle; notice its elaborate details? (It does not have as much body as blur3d, though.) The second image still has crackle set to 1, but I went to the variable tab and changed the crackle_cellsize to 0.5. This makes the details appear smaller, allowing more of them to display. Now the third image is also crackle 1, but I set the variable cellsize to 1 and the variable distort to 1. This twists the fractal around, simultaneously forming more variation and body. As you can see, these twists make the fractal more intriguing. Now the fourth image is amoeba like. Here, I just replaced blur3d with hexes, which I set to 1. I then refined the hexes setting in image five by keeping hexes set to 1 and changing the hexes_cellsize variable to 0.5. This created a focal point and more observable details. As you can see, the result is much better controlled. Here are transforms 2-5â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s alternatives:

The four transforms set at rectangles 0.5

The four transforms set at rectangles 1.5


The four transforms set at rectangles 1.25 The first three transforms are set at hexes 0.9, lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll lllllllllllllllllthe fourth transform was set at rectangles 0.9 For example, one of the easiest things you can do is change the rectangle setting to some other number. Image one is a setting of 0.5. It is bare. It barely looks decent. Image two is quite different though, I changed the setting to 1.5. Its elaborate, it also expands the fractal out all the way to the screenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s edge, almost like the image has been tiled. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost too much, also the center while appealing, is not very elaborate. The third image is a setting of 1.25. It calms down the tiling appearance a tad, and also makes the center portion far more pleasing to the eye. The fourth image was created in a far different manner. On the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th transform I set the variations to hexes 0.9. On the 5th transform I set the variation to rectangles 0.9. As you can see, it takes quite an organic look, with both form and body. Here are the alternatives for the final transform: Now let's look at some more variations for the fractal; we shall produce these variations in the final transform. In the table below the first image is a setting of Juliascope 0.5 and Julia3D set at 0.5. The variables are set at juliascope_power -12, and Julia3D_power -4. As you can see it shapes a flowing fractal with some power to it. The center is elaborate, and the outside areas have formed into a flower shape. The second image is set to Julian 0.5, bipolar -1, and foci 0.1. The variables are set at julian_power 5, and julian_dist 2. As you can see the image has a sci-fi layered look. The third image is the same as the second image, but with one change; julian_power is set at -5. As you can one change can make a drastic difference. It is now formed into a cross like shape. The fourth image is set at Julian 0.5, bipolar -0.75, and Escher 1. The variables are set at julian_power 5, and julian_dist 2. This image shows its many layers while forming a diamond like center. The fifth image is set at Julian 0.5, Escher 0.05, foci -0.1, and hypersphere 1. The variables are set at julian_power 5, and julian_dist 2. This forms a lotus like fractal that appears to be blooming. The sixth image is formed in the same way except for one minor change; julian_power is set at -5.


The next thing we shall examine is how different locations and how scaling up a transform can change the fractal. The first thing you need to do is look at the transform editor, you see the black grid? When the grid is normal sized each square will stand for one unit. (This pictureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grid is not normal sized; each square stands for two units.)


To move a triangle up click on the icon of the arrow pointing upwards, my pink arrow is pointing at it. You can also move a transform downwards, left, or right.

To scale a triangle up click on the icon of the large triangle, my arrow is aimed at the icon. You can also scale the triangle down by clicking the smaller triangle. You can also input how much you want to scale the image up or down. A scaled up triangle is on the grid, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the white one. The first image is a classic tiled image; tiling makes an extremely repetitive pattern happen. To tile an image you take four of the transforms and move them into a diamond shape. You achieve this in this fractal by moving triangle 2 up 1 unit, and then moving triangle 3 down 1 unit. Move triangle 4 left 1


unit, and triangle 5 rightwards 1 unit. Change Julia3D_power to -5 and Julia3Dz_power to -3. This will form a diamond like shape on the transform editor. Remember this fractal is derived from our original fractal. This forms a center with two main parts, and a far more detailed image. The second image is somewhat different looking, but the changes are very small. I went to the final transform and change the Julia3D_power variable to -7. As you can see this fills out the fractal a lot more, and the center is extremely detailed. The third image once more is formed by changing the Julia3D_power to -9. Now the fractalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s center is flower-like and very elaborate. It is a far better looking fractal now. The fourth image is the original fractal once more, but with one change. The final transform is moved 0.5 units to the right. As you can see this makes the image far sharper looking. The fifth image is far different, triangle 2 is moved up by 2 units. Triangle three is moved down by 2 units, triangle four is moved to the left by 2 units, and triangle five is moved to the right by 2 units. On the final transform Julia3D_power is set to -9, and Julia3Dz_power is set to -3. The resulting fractal has a defined flower shape in the middle and has lots of details. The sixth image is almost the same as the fifth, with one small change. The final transform has been moved to the right by 4 units. This causes a drastic change in the fractalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s appearance, instead of a completely circular image you start to get details around the main fractal. The center now has dark and light areas, and is far more dramatic looking. It looks like a completely different fractal. The seventh image is exactly the same as the sixth, with one small difference. The final transform has been scaled up by 300. This causes the outer areas to become more uniform in nature, and for circles to appear around the main circle. The inside areas of the fractal are extremely detailed, with a triangle, and three circles forming the main pattern. As you can see just by moving the triangles, or scaling them up you can achieve drastic results.


To finish the alternative fractal, we shall now play with the weights. But first you must change these settings on the final transform: Set Juliascope to 0.5 and set Julia3D to 0.5, remove Julia3Dz entirely. The variables are set to juliascope_power -12, Juliascope_dist 1, and Julia3D_power -4. There is a difference between Apophysis 2.08, and Apophysis 7x in how you set weights. Below are two images showing you how to set weights in each program.

In Apophysis 2.08, you set weights by going to the transform tab. My arrow is aimed at where you input the weight.


In Apophysis 7x, on each transform area there is the option to set the weight. My arrow is aimed where you input the weight.

Set each transform's weight to the settings below: Transform 1: 0.25 Transform 2: 5 Transform 3: 2.5 Transform 4: 1 Transform 5: 1 You should now have the image below:

If you have any questions note me, I hope you enjoyed this tutorial!


SIGNUM


Today we are going to learn how to create this fractal:

One of the fractals we will be making today. This is an extremely easy fractal to make. It is made using a method that is not commonly used, though this method produces extremely interesting fractals. Remember to start with a new flame. This flame should already have a transform. Duplicate this transform FOUR times. Make sure to leave the linear setting alone otherwise this will not work.


Click on the blue triangle to duplicate a transform, the arrow is aimed at it. Find transform two, move it down 1 unit.

On the triangle tab youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find a set of four arrows with an input box in between them, this is how you move the triangles on the grid accurately. The arrow is aimed at the section Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m talking about. On transform three, move it up 1 unit. On transform four, move it to the left 1 unit. On transform five, move it to the right 1 unit. The transforms should be in a diamond pattern, like this:


Your transform should look this. You can create all sorts of patterns using this method; this is just the most basic of patterns. This is called tiling; this enables your fractal to form repetitive patterns. This is an extremely powerful set up. Add a new transform, set linear3D to zero, set polar to -0.25, and blur3D 0.05.

This is how transform six should look. See the pattern? Make sure to keep transform six in its default position.

As you can see, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a continuous pattern without any fade out.


You can try other variations that will produce interesting effects, like bubble set on 0.5 or bipolar set on 1. Now enable a final transform. Set linear3D to zero; also set julia3D and julia3Dz to 1.

This is how the fractal should look so far. Go to variables and set julia3D_power to -12, set julia3Dz_power to -4.


Final transform variables.


You should have this result:


Here are some alternative fractals for transform six:

Bubble and Bipolar are just a couple of the possible options. Transform six is the MOST powerful transform on this fractal. The possibilities just on this transform alone are endless. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s examine some of the possibilities of JUST transform six. The following three fractals share one setting, Blur3D 0.05. The first image has a setting of Bipolar 1. This creates a very flowing look; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost ribbon-like. The second image has a setting of Xtrb 0.5; this creates small circles everywhere in the image. The third image has a setting of Flower 1, and a variable setting of flower_petals 5. This creates a sharp looking image with a much built up look. All three images are intricately detailed. As you can see transform six is truly powerful.

Blur3D 0.05, Bipolar 1

Blur3D 0.05, Xtrb 0.5

Blur3d 0.05, flower 1, flower_petals 5


You can do even more with this fractal! For example, you can play with the weights. As you can see with the image below, changing the weights of the transforms can provide drastic changes. Set the transformâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weights to: Transform 1: 5 Transform 2: 2.5 Transform 3: 5 Transform 4: 2.5 Transform 5: 5 Transform 6: 2.5


Our fractal with weights applied to it. Locations are also a way of changing a fractal drastically. The following individual instructions show what each setting will do to the original fractal. Location 1: Triangles 2, 3, 4, and 5 should only be moved 0.5 units instead of 1. This makes the image have a much softer look. Location 2: Triangles 2 and 3 should be shifted another additional unit in their directions. This gives the image more of a shell like look. Triangles 4 and 5 should have been shifted by only 0.5 units on the original fractal. Location 3: Triangles 2 and 3 should have been shifted by only 0.5 units on the original fractal. Triangles 4 and 5 should be shifted an additional 0.5 in their directions. This makes the image more bare boned, but much more defined. Location 4: Triangles 2, 4, and 5 should be shifted an additional 0.5 in their directions. Triangle 3 should have only been moved by 0.5 units. This increases the bare boned look. Location 5: Triangles 2, 3, 4, and 5 should all be shifted an additional 0.5 units. The images gains more details now, while being somewhat defined looking in appearance. Location 6: Triangles 2, 3, 4, and 5 should remain in their original positions. Triangle 6 should be shifted 0.5 units to the right, and 0.5 units upwards. The final transform should be shifted 1 unit to the right, and 1 unit upwards. This change makes the image further defined, and also changes the colors. The center is very interesting looking as well.


As promised, here is how to make the cover image. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very little changed actually! On transform six, use these settings: Polar -0.25, Blur3D 0.05, and Bipolar -0.5. The only variable change should be a setting of bipolar_shift -1. As you can see, the fractal has drastically changed, and the details are far more intricate than what they were before.


If you have any questions; please note me. I hope you enjoyed this tutorial!


VESPER

W

elcome to my third fractal tutorial in this series! Today we're going to explore the 3D aspects

of Apophysis. The fractal we're covering today is an offshoot of my main fractal tutorial Exploring Apophysis 3D. This fractal is for moderate to intermediate users of Apophysis. Thus, I will not cover every little step; you guys should know how to create a blank flame, and how to enable a final transform. Now let us begin!


Go to the adjust window and set the pitch to 75. Set the x position to 0.9, and the y position to 0.74.

The adjust window is a grand thing; you can zoom, rotate, use some depth of field, and even change the pitch of the fractal all in one place! You can also do several more things like changing the gradient. On your first transform set linear3d to 0, and set crackle to 0.5. Go to variables and set crackle_cellsize to 0.5, and crackle_distort to 1.

Transform Oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s variations.


Transform Oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Variables Your image should look like this:

Transform one should look like this, see how clear the crackle is? This is also the most versatile of the transforms; you can change the fractal quite a lot with this transform by your choice of variations.


Create the second transform, set it to the following: Linear3d: 0 Pre_blur: 0.001 Pre_ztranslate: -0.456 Zscale: 1 Julian: 5

Transform Twoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s variations On the variables make sure they are set to julian_power 3, and julian_dist 1.


Transform Twoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s variables Go the triangle tab, set the rotation angle to 45, and rotate the transform counter clockwise. Make sure the triangle scale is set to 125, now click the small triangle icon FOUR times in order to downscale this transform. Now move the transform upwards by 0.23 units and then move it to the right by 0.2 units.

This is how the transforms should be set up. The pink arrow is aimed at the rotation area, the blue arrow is aimed at where you downscale the triangle. Your image should look like the following:


This is what your fractal should look like so far, do you still see the crackle? Create the third transform and set it to the following: Linear3d: 0 Zscale: 0.421 Julian: 0.5

Transform Threeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s variations


The variables should be set as julian_power 2, and julian_dist 1.25.

Transform Threeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s variables Go to the triangle tab; once more make sure your rotation angle is set to 45. Click the counter clockwise button THREE times.

What transform threeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s set up should look like. Your image should look like this:


This is what your fractal should look like so far. As you can see, the crackle is now topping the towers. Your fractal is also starting to take shape. You can stop here now and have a basic fractal, but why not go even further? On the fourth transform set the variables to the following settings: Linear3d: 0 Bubble: 0.01 Pre_blur: 1 Pre_zscale: 1 Curl3d: -5


Transform Fourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s variations (the bubble setting is not shown.) Double check that the following variables are set correctly: Curl3D_cx: -0.48750 Curl3D_cy: 0 Curl3D_cz: 0


Transform Fourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s variables Go to the triangle tab once more; rotate the triangle 45 degrees counterclockwise. Move transform four down by 1.2 units.

Transform fourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s set up should look like this.


Your image should look like this:

Your fractal should look like this now. The crackle is still there! Enable a final transform and set it to the following: Zscale: 1 Julian: 0.75


Final Transformâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s variations The variables should be set to Julian_power 1, and Julian_dist 2.

Final Transformâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s variables Go to the triangle tab once more; rotate the triangle 45 degrees counterclockwise. Move the final transform down by 1.2 units. It should be directly positioned over transform four.


The final transformâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s set up should look like this. Your fractal should look like this:

What your final fractal should look like! Do you see the crackle? If you use other variations on transform one and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re lucky, you should be able to see them in the final fractal. Here is how you make the alternative fractal for this tutorial:


Our alternative fractal!

Before we begin, make sure if you’re using Apophysis7x to mess with the yaw setting in the adjustment window till it looks correct. I can't give you an exact setting. The alternative fractal is actually quite simple to make, and requires just a couple of changes. Here are the only changes: On transform 1 set crackle to zero and set xtrb to 0.25. On transform 2 only change the Julian setting to 3. On transform 3 only change the julian_power to 3. On transform 4 change the curl3D to -15. On the final transform change julian_dist to 1. See? Easy changes can produce grand results. Now let’s look at other alternative fractals you can create just from the main alternative fractal. Remember, we are modifying the alternative version of this fractal. If you use the main one when changing things up the results will not be the same as the one’s shown below. Let’s begin by exploring the first transform. The first image shows a setting of hexes 0.1. This results in an interesting image that shows more motion. The second image shows a setting of pyramid 0.25. This of course places pyramids as the main focal point of the towers.


The third image shows a setting of rings2 0.25. This creates an extremely elaborate snowflake like pattern as the main focal point. As you can see experimenting with the first transform can give you grand results!

Here are transform twoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s alternatives. Before we start these alternatives make sure not to touch any of the settings other than Julian unless I say so, otherwise youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll end up with a flat fractal: The first image is set to curl 3, which means Julian is set to 0. Set curl_c1 to 0.444 and curl_c2 to. 0.155939. Curl 3 produces a stair like effect. The second image is set to Julian 2, julian_power -3, and a julian_dist of 1. This forms more of a natural looking city effect, with the image looking more random. The third image is set to Julian 2, julian_power -5, and a julian_dist 1. This produces a center centric image but with far more interest, it looks a bit fuller. The fourth image is set to Julian 5, julian_power -2, and julian_dist -1. This produces once more a center centric image, and it is very full. The fifth image is set to xtrb 3, xtrb_power 2, xtrb_radius 1, and xtrb_width 0.5. This image is extremely center focused. It also has lots of motion. The sixth image is set to zscale 0.25, julia3Dz 2, and julia3Dz_power 10. This image has lots of motion, and produces a unique look.


Here are the alternatives for transform three: The first image is set to curl3D 0.5, and curl_c1 0.86. This produces a chaotic image that is oddly enough organic looking. This is by far my favorite alternative fractal. The second image is set to Julian 0.5, julian_power 10, and julian_dist 1.25. This produces an image somewhat similar to the original alternative fractal, though itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highly uniform looking. The third image is set to Julian 0.5, julian_power 10, and julian_dist 5. This image while uniform also has a range of motion. It is one of the better results.


Now let's look at the fourth transform. Remember, unless I say so; do not fiddle with any setting but curl3D. The first image is a setting of curl3D 15. This produces a more solid looking fractal. The second image is a setting of ngon 1. This produces a sort of sharper, but emptier image. It also produces an interesting halo effect. The third image is a setting of pyramid 0.25. This setting of course produces pyramids. This setting also produces a bare bones look.


We have finally arrived at the final transform; this transform is incredibly powerful and can change the very nature of your fractal. So be careful with what you change! Remember, unless I say so leave the zscale setting alone! If you mess with that you can make your fractal flatter than a pancake! The first image has a setting of curl3D 1, curl3D_cx 0, curl3D_cy -0.03518, and curl3D_cz 0. This produces an image that drifts towards the left side and gently tappers off. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lovely. The second image has a setting of bipolar 4. This produces an image that is somewhat in two parts, one area is an intense tower. The second tower allows some depth to come into the image. The third image has a setting of bipolar -2.5. This produces an intense tower that is concentrated in the left side of the image once more. This tower is thin. The fourth image has a setting of julia3Dz 1, and julia3Dz_power 1. This produces an image that is once more heavy on the left side of the image; once more it tappers off. The fifth image has a setting of julia3Dz 1, and julia3Dz_power 2. As you can see the image is now in two parts, one part seems to flow right into the other. The motion of this fractal is not entirely straight, but curved. It is not a pleasing result to my own eye. As you can see a simple change in the julia3Dz_power can produce drastic differences in fractals. The sixth image has a setting of zscale 0.5, Juliascope 1, juliascope_power 1, and Juliascope_dist 1. This produces an image that is very interesting. There are several towers, none of which appear to be the same exact size. This image is really visually appealing. The towers are more broad and shorter due to the smaller zscale setting. The seventh image has a setting of zscale 1, Juliascope 1, juliascope_power 1, and juliascope_dist 1. This is exactly like the previous image except not as short, its less visually appealing, but still a decent result.


I hope you enjoyed reading this tutorial. If you have any questions please send me a note.


AMALTHEA Welcome to my fourth fractal tutorial in this series. Today we are going to make this image:


This type of fractal is called a Mobius. If you don't know exactly what you're doing its difficult to create this type of fractal from scratch. Thus, most people use baseforms. If you want to, you can use baseforms. I'm not sure if I used a baseform or not in this fractal since itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s from a year and a half ago. I'm going to give you instructions on how to make it on your own.


Anyways, I'm going to trust that most of you are not basic Apophysis users. If you are a basic user, please read my first tutorial in this series. If you wish to download the best baseform's pack, download Penny5775's Mobius Design Pack located here: Penny5775's Mobius Design Pack

Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re also going to need the Mobius plugin, and the spherical3D plugin. The plugin pack is downloadable at The Aposhack Plugin Pack The first step is to create a new blank transform.

Set linear3D to zero, and set Mobius to 1. When you go the variables tab and look at the variables for Mobius you will see a series of odd letters: Re_A Im_A Re_B Im_B Re_C


Im_C Re_D Im_D

Don't ask me what they mean. Most of them will be set to zero, here are the three that will be set differently.

Set Re_A to 1, Im_C to -1.1, and Re_D to 1.


Now go to the weights area and set the weight of transform 1 to 50.

The last thing you need to do is to change the location of transform 1. This will only be a slight change, go to the triangle tab. Move the triangle up by 0.1. Move the triangle right by 0.05.


The fractal should look like:


Create a second transform, set linear3D to 0, and set linear to 1.

Set the weight to 40.


Transform 2 will remain in its default position. Go to the transform tab, under where it says Reset post-transform enter in these coordinates: X: -1, 0 Y: 0, -1 O: -0.05, -0.1 This is how your fractal should look:

Transform 3 is an extremely adaptable transform; you can get plenty of different effects just by changing this transform just slightly.


On transform three set linear3D to 0, linear to 1, spherical to 2, disc to 1, blur to 1, and spherical3D to 5.


Set the weight to 6. Move the fractal to the right by one unit. This is how the fractal should look so far:


Create a new transform, set linear3D to 0, set linear to 1.


Set the weight to 6.

Move the triangle to the left by one unit. This is how the fractal should look so far:


Create a new transform. Set linear3D to 0. Set linear to 1.

Set the weight to 2.5


Flip the Triangle vertically.


Go to the transform tab and under where it says Reset post-transform set its coordinates to: X: 1, 0 Y: 0, 1 O: 0, 3 This is how the fractal should look so far:


Enable a final transform. Leave linear3D set to 1, set curl3D to 1, Curl3D_cx 0.554938, Curl3D_cy 0, and Curl3D_cz 0. . Here is what it should look like:


The final thing is to set the colors. The gradient I used was the 99th gradient in my gradient pack titled Silvers. Downloadable Here: Silvers a Gradient Pack


If you want the same colors go to the color tab. You see the word symmetry? Each transform has their own symmetry setting for this gradient, here are the settings: Transform 1: 0.9 Transform 2: 0.9 Transform 3: 1 Transform 4: 1 Transform 5: 0 Final Transform: 1


Now go to Flame, and hit Randomize Color Values (or hit ctrl + n). The colors are still not the same, but they are balanced appropriately due to the symmetry setting.

Now go to the gradient window. Pull the gradient bar around slowly until you see the correct color scheme in the small preview window. Now you're done!!! We shall now learn how to make an alternative fractal, and several other alternative fractals! Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s begin with examining some different alternatives, each of these groups are different changes to one transform.


Transform 2 is mainly changed by moving the fractal around on the grid. For example, the first image is a simple change of moving transform 2 down by 0.1 units. The second image was made by moving the transform to the left by 1 unit. The third image was made by moving the transform to the right by 1 unit. As you can see this can produce shocking changes. The third image shows my favorite change, the Mobius swirls are lovely and echo a stylized wave structure.


Transform 3 is able to be changed drastically, in fact other than the final transform it is the most adaptable transform in the entire fractal. The first image is set to linear 1, blur 1, and spehrical3D 1. The second image is set to linear 1 and curl 1. The third image is a setting of linear 1 and curl3D 1, set the variables to curl3D_cx 0, curl3D_cy 0, and curl3D_cz -0.0997868.


The fourth image is set to linear 1 and rectangles 0.25. The fifth image is set to linear 1 and bipolar 1. The last image is set to linear 1, spherical 2, disc 1, blur 1, and sphereical3D 5, this is followed by moving the third transform 1 unit to the right and 1 unit upwards. The fourth image is my favorite; it produces sharp angles and brings lots of interest to the piece.

Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s explore transform five. Once more we have a transform changed by movement. The first image was created by moving transform five 1.5 units downwards. The second image was made by moving transform five by 2 units upwards. My favorite is the first image, the little concise glowing orbs and details are lovely together.


The final transform provides many different ways of changing the fractal. The first image is only a setting of foci 0.15. The second image is only a setting of juliac 1. The third image is a setting of ngon 0.5. The fourth image is a setting of polar2 4.


The fifth image is a setting of scry 3. The sixth image is a setting of sigmoid 3. Linear on all of these alternatives is set to 0. My favorite of these images is the first, the flow of this image and the details create intense interest. The final alternative fractal is the one I promised you. This is how you get it. Leave the first two triangles alone. On transform 3 remove the original variation settings and instead place these settings: bubble 3, blur 1, and julia3D 6. In the variable settings, set Julia3D_power to -2. Move transform three an additional unit to the right. Change the weight of transform 3 to 3. The last change is on the final transform, set linear3d to 0, and bipolar to 1. You should get this image:

Remember, if you have any issues send me a note! I hope you enjoyed this tutorial!!!


CELTIC KNOT


Welcome to my fifth tutorial in this series! Today we're going to make this fractal:

As you can see it has very elaborate details, I call this one Celtic knot because it somewhat reminds me of one of the knots. Anyways, refer to the earlier sections of this tutorial for basic information. Before we begin, your transforms will not look exactly like mine till you finish the entire fractal. I have messed with the xaos settings in the images below. I won't cover the xaos settings till the rest of the fractal is formed.


The first step is to create a new blank flame. On the first transform set linear to 0, and Mobius to 1. Make sure the Mobius variables are set on Re_A 1, Im_C -1, and Re_D 1, the rest of the variables are set to zero. (The Mobius variations should be set to that on each Mobius transform of this fractal). That's it. As you can see the fractal looks like nothing so far, this wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really change until the fourth transform.


Create a second transform, and leave the linear setting alone.

What you need to do here is go to the triangle tab, and scale the triangle down three times on a setting of 125. Move the now small triangle to the left by one unit. This is how it should look so far:


Duplicate transform 2. Now move this new triangle to the right two times. This is how it should look so far:


On transform four set linear to 0, blur to 0.05, and squarical to 1.

Flip this triangle vertically. As you can see the fractal is finally becoming complicated looking:


On transform five set Mobius to 1 and linear to 0.

First flip the triangle horizontally, and then flip it vertically.


Set the weight to 1. Here is how the transform should look:


For transform six set linear to 0, and rectangles to 1.5.


Flip the transform horizontally. Here is what it should look like:


Now for the last transform set linear to -100. Now the next step is to mess with the xaos tab . I really can't explain to you what xaos does because I really don't fully understand it myself. I occasionally fiddle with it until I'm happy with the result.

Only transforms 1, 4, 5, and 6 will have changes made to their xaos settings. Refer to the images above for the correct settings.


Your fractal should look like this:

Now, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s explore some alternative fractals!


Leave the first three transforms alone, if you make major changes it will change the structure of the fractal dramatically. This collection of images highlights some different alternatives for the fourth transform. The first image is just a setting of linear 1. The second image is a setting of spherical 1. The third image is a setting of diamond 0.5. The fourth image is a setting of julia3D 1, julia3Dz 1, julia3D_power -12, and julia3Dz_power 16. The fifth image is a setting of rectangles 1. The sixth image is a setting of bipolar 1. The seventh image is a setting of juliac 1. The eighth image is a setting of ngon 1. As you can see it can become highly detailed, and even somewhat simplistic. I suggest messing with the contrast or the weights to make this fractal seem more powerful.


Leave the fifth transform alone as well, you can change it, but keep in mind; any major differences will change the structure of the fractal. The sixth transform is my favorite transform in this fractal to change. As you can see the changes are highly detailed, and make the fractal seem much more powerful. The first image is a setting of linear 1. The second image is a setting of sinusoidal 1. The third image is a setting of cylinder 1. The fourth image is a setting of Julian 1, julian_power 2, and julian_dist 3. The fifth image is a setting of julia3D 1, julia3Dz 1, julia3D_power -6, and julia3Dz_power 6. The sixth image is a setting of curl 1. The seventh image is a setting of bipolar 1. The eighth image is a setting of block 1. The ninth image is a setting of ngon 0.5 I have two favorites in this set, the seventh image and the ninth. They have a more finished look. Also, by messing with the seventh transform you can make major changes to the fractal. If you enable a final transform you can make even more changes! Now, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s examine the main alternative fractal as I promised. Keep the first three transforms entirely the same as the main fractal. On transform four change the blur setting to 0.01 and lower the weight to 0.1. The fifth transform remains the same as the main fractal. The sixth transform is a setting of spherical 1. The seventh transform is a setting of linear -1. Enable a final transform; linear should be set to 0. Set bipolar to 1, and go to variables and set bipolar_shift to 1. Now rotate the fractal on a setting of -180. You should have this fractal:


I hope you enjoyed this tutorial! If you have any questions please send me a note, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll try to get back to you as soon as possible!


AERIS


Alright, to begin this fractal make a new blank flame. Now go to the adjust window and set the zoom to 3, also set the pitch to 75 while youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re there. The scale of this fractal is HUGE. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also going to use three things that add to the image preview time; crackle, hexes, and a final transform. If you have a slow laptop like mine, then you're in for a long wait between changes if you don't do this. You can adjust this once you've finished, but to speed everything up, I suggest you use the -3 setting until you've finished making the fractal. If you are using Apophysis 7x and the fractal does not turn out correctly, set yaw to around 25. It should help correct the issue. This is the fractal we're going to make today:

On transform one; set ztranslate to 2 and set crackle to 1. Remember to remove the linear setting.

(Ztranslate setting not shown)


Go to the variable tab, input the following: crackle_cellsize: 0.5 crackle_power: 0.5 crackle_distort: 1 crackle_scale: 0.5 crackle_z: 0

The location and weight of this transform remains at their automatic settings. Here is what the fractal should look like so far:


Create a second transform; remember set linear to 0. Set pre_blur to 0.001, pre_ztranslate to -0.456, zscale to 1, and Julian to 3.


You see, the first three settings help to create a 3D effect. Because Julian is able to become 3D this creates the tower appearance. The circular appearance of this transform is given through the Julian setting.

Double check your variables, julian_power should be set at 3, and julian_dist should be set at 1. The weight should remain at 0.5. Now, as you can see from the screenshots accompanying this tutorial, there are a lot of odd positions going on here. So pay CLOSE attention on what I'm going to say to do, rotate the second transform at 45 degrees counterclockwise. Move the triangle to the right 0.2 units, now move the triangle upwards 0.2 units as well.


If you play with the where you position the transform you can make the towers appear in different locations once you have your finished product. This is what it should look like so far:


Create a third transform; remember to remove the linear setting.

Set zscale to 0.421 and Julian to 0.25. Now go to the variables tab, julian_power should be set to 2, and julian_dist should be set to 1. Messing with these settings can change a lot of things by the way. I suggest you experiment with them once you've finished the basic tutorial.


Transform three's weight should be set at 2.5.


Now, once more there's an odd positioning for a transform. Rotate the triangle 45 degree counter clockwise three times.

Now, this is how your finished product should look:

Create a fourth transform; we're almost finished, I promise!


Set linear to zero once more, bubble should be set at 0.01, set pre_blur 1, Pre_Zscale to 1, curl3D to 1, and hexes to 5. There are no variable changes on this transform, but make sure that the following variables are set correctly curl3D_cx 0, curl3D_cy 0, and curl3D_cz -0.24448.

The weight should be set at 0.05.


Once more the position is odd, so make sure to pay attention and double check against the screenshot. Rotate the transform at 45 degrees counterclockwise. Move the triangle downwards by 1 unit.


This is what it should like so far:

Now enable a final transform, (yes this is the last step for the main fractal)!


Remember to rid yourself of the linear setting. Set zscale to 2, and Julian to 0.75.

On the variables change the julian_power to 1, and set julian_dist to 1.

You can change the fractal by playing around with the final transform, and also by messing with the Julian variable settings.


Now, the position is odd once more; rotate the triangle 45 degrees counterclockwise. Move it downwards by 1 unit. Now, grab a hold of the top part of the triangle and stretch it all the way till it meets the top part of the second transform. Refer to the screenshot to make sure you position it correctly.

This is what the final transform should look like:


Now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to learn how to make the alternative fractal! This is what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to make with just a few simple changes to our main fractal:

If you are using Apophysis 7x you might want to change yaw to 5. On transform one, change the crackle variation setting to 5. On transform two change Julian to 1 and julian_power to 2. Transform three does not have any changes.


On transform four, take off the curl3D setting. Instead, set curl to 1. On the final transform there is a drastic difference; set zscale to 5, and bipolar to 15. There will not be a Julian setting. Now, the main fractal should look like the alternative one shown above. The last part of this tutorial will be spent on examining some changes you can make by playing with the transform individually. You can make these changes to your completed fractal by just changing the one suggestion that is shown with each example. The first transform really controls what you're going to be dealing with as your foundation for the fractal. For these examples I have replaced the crackle setting with something else to give you an idea of what you can do. You can have crackly shapes, flowers, pyramids, etc. The first image shows a basic setting of blur 0.5. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s somewhat basic, but lovely still. The second image shows a setting of flower 0.5. As you can see, we're now dealing with lovely flowers and the image is much more interesting. The third image shows a setting of spherical3D 0.1. It seems like itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s constructed a bit differently and seems a bit more whimsical. The fourth image is a setting of pyramid 0.5. Instead of pyramids though, it looks like there's jellyfish floating around the fractal city.

The first three of these images are changes made to the second transform, the last image is a change made to the third transform. Remember, these examples were made by either playing with the Julian setting or taking it away altogether and replacing it with something else.


The first image shows a setting of Julian 1, it’s far more compact. The second shows a setting of Julia 5, it’s more spread out and looks to be a bit better constructed. (You’ll need to add this variation). The third image shows a setting of xtrb 1. The fractal seems a bit slanted, but it’s still functional as a fractal city. The fourth image is a setting of Julian 0.4 (remember, this is a change to the third transform, not the second for this last image). The fractal is built better, but is also more compact.

Don't mess with the fourth transform much. Its purpose is mainly to heighten the power of the other transforms. You can even delete this transform if you wish, but the result will not be as pretty. The following two images show the possibilities of simple changes on the final transform. You could probably find even more possibilities; this is really just the tip of the iceberg for this transform. The first image shows a setting of Julian 0.25. The result is a far thinner tower, and more detail. The second image shows a setting of Juliascope 0.5, and Juliascope_power 2. This result shows the tower becoming two towers.


I hope youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve enjoyed this tutorial! This marks the halfway point in this series! If you have any questions, feel free to note me.


LIBERTAS


Welcome to my seventh fractal tutorial in this series, today we're going to examine how to make this fractal:

So let's begin! The first step is to create a new blank flame. If you do not know how to do this refer to the earlier tutorials in this series. Set transform one's variations to: Linear3d: 0 Swirl: 0.1 Disc: 0.1 Blur: 0.1


This will create a swirl pattern and with the right gradient it can be made to seem gem-like. Also, this is a highly changeable transform; you can do all sorts of things to make the fractal different looking. I suggest trying out different variations; I will have some examples for you at the end of the tutorial. The next step is to set the weight to 0.1.


This is how it should look so far:

Create a new transform, on this transform set the variations to: Linear3d: 0 Julian: 1


Go to the variable tab, set julian_power to 3 and julian_dist to 1.


Now, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to mess with the location of this transform. Move the transform upwards by 0.2 units, and then move it to the right by 0.2 units. If you do not know how to do so consult the earlier tutorials in this series. Now rotate the transform counterclockwise by 45 degrees.

This is how it should look so far:


Create another new transform. Set the variations to: Linear3d: 0 Julian: 0.5

Set the variables to: Julian_power 2 and julian_dist 1.


By the way, if you mess with the powers and the dist of the Julian variable you can get very interesting result and shapes. Now once more go to the triangle tab, rotate the transform counterclockwise by 45 degrees three times.


This is what it should look like now:


Create a fourth transform. Set the variations to: Linear3d: 0 Julian: 0.5

Go to the variables and set them to: Julian_power -30 and julian_dist 2.


Now go to the transform tab and set the weight to 0.25.


On the triangle tab move the transform downwards by 1.2 units. Rotate it counterclockwise by 45 degrees. Make sure to take a look at the screenshot, all of your transforms should be positioned like those on the example.

This is what your fractal should look like:


Now on to the alternative version! This is what we're going to make:


All it takes is some very small changes, on transform two change the settings to julia3Dz 1 and julia3Dz_power -3. On transform three change the settings to julia3Dz 0.6 and julia3Dz_power 2. As you can see the fractal quickly changes into something quite different. In fact, this is one of my most changeable fractals. There's so much you can do! Now let's explore some more alternatives. Remember, the settings on most of the following completely replace the settings on the transform in question. Here are some alternatives to Transform One:

The first image shows a setting of flower 0.2, as you can see the gem areas have turned into flowers. This is because the first transform contains the main foundation of the fractal. There are literally tons of different things you can do with the first transform, so please explore! The second image shows a setting of spherical3D -0.03. You can't see it well in the example but there is a lot of detail work in the gem areas now. The third image shows a setting of xtrb -0.25; once more itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quite detailed. The fourth image shows a setting of block 0.4. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got more structure now and is also very detailed. Here are some alternatives to transform two:


The first image shows a setting of julia3Dz 0.5 and julia3Dz_power -3. As you can see the entire structure completely changes and forms a far more interesting fractal. The second image shows a setting of foci 1, which creates little light points but an unstructured fractal. I suppose with some photoshop work you could even make this sort of dreamy looking. The third image shows a setting of foci 1 and foci_3D 5. The center area becomes very pronounced with this setting. The fourth image shows a setting of foci 1 and foci_3D 0.25. This is somewhat like the second image but with a bit better flow in it. The fifth image shows a setting of juliac 2. This setting results in a bloated looking Julian, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still interesting visually. Here are some alternatives for transform three:


As you can see transform three can also be changed a ton. The first image shows a setting of spherical 1. As you can see the connecting areas of the fractal have became much finer. The second image shows a setting of spherical 0.5. The connecting areas are now far more constructed looking and highly detailed. The third image shows a setting of spherical 0.1. This makes a highly detailed image and the gem areas almost take on a faceted look. The fourth image shows a setting of bubble 1. This makes the connecting areas look they've been braided. The fifth image shows a setting of curl3D 1, set curl3D_cz to 0.435438. The braids are now a bit larger and it fills up more of the image. The sixth image shows a setting of foci 0.1. This results in a highly detailed fractal that seems to glow. The seventh image shows a setting of ngon 0.15. While itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s highly detailed it looks like itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on the verge of falling apart. The eighth image shows a setting of spherical3D 0.15, it has very fine details as well as looking uniform. The ninth image shows a setting of xtrb 2. This results in a pattern like fractal that is incredibly detailed. Here is one alternative for transform four:


Transform four is hard to change, for some reason any change you make distorts the fractal. I couldn't figure out why. This is the neatest change I could make, the setting is xtrb 1. If it hadn't distorted so much it would have resulted in a fluffier looking fractal. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s somewhat softer looking. I decided to show you one example of a final transform as well:

The setting on the final transform is linear3D 1, and spherical -0.1. As you can see these settings result in a more drawn in fractal with oval shapes. The center gem is replaced by a complex glyph like structure. As you can see, you can play with a final transform as well even though I didn't in the main fractal. Well, that's it for the seventh tutorial. If you need any help please send me a note and I'll do my best to help!


AUREUS


Welcome to the eighth part of this series. Today we're going to make this fractal:

This fractal is not very complex and has repetitive steps. It doesn't look like much till you enable the final transform. The final transform is what creates the shape of the fractal. So let's begin! Create a new blank flame. On transform one enter these variations: Linear3D: 0 Blur3D: 1


That's all; you're done with that transform! This transform is the most versatile transform in the entire fractal; I suggest trying out different variations. Later on in this tutorial I will give you several examples of what you can do. Here is what the fractal should look like so far:


Enable a second transform. Input these variations: Linear3D: 0 Rectangles: 1


Now go to the triangle tab and move the triangle to the left by 0.251 units. Move the transform down by 0.76 units.


This is what the fractal should look like so far:


Enable a third transform. Input these variations: Linear3D: 0 Rectangles: 1

Once more go to the triangle tab and move the triangle to the right by 0.75 units. Move the triangle up by 0.55 units.


That's it for the third transform. Here is what the fractal should look like:


The fourth transform is incredibly easy, just duplicate transform three!

This is what it should look like:


The fifth transform is also easy. Duplicate the fourth transform and change the rectangle variation to 5 instead of 1.


This is what the fractal should look like:

Now enable a final transform. Input these variations: Linear3D: 0 Julia3D: 1


Input this variable: Julia3D_power: -4


Now go to the triangle tab. Scale the transform down by 600 units.

Now move the transform downwards by 0.15 units. Move the transform left by 0.25 units.


That's all! Make sure all of the transform's placements match the ones on the screenshot. This is what the fractal should look like:


Now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to learn how to make the main alternative fractal, this is what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to make:


Remember, these steps will replace what the normal settings were on each of the mentioned transforms. On transform two change the rectangles variation to -1. Set the weight to 0.75. On transform three change the rectangles variation to 5. Set the weight to 0.1. That's it! All you have to do is change those four settings and you'll get a drastically different fractal. Here are transform one's alternatives:


Image one is a setting of blur3D 0.25, as you can see the image becomes far sharper. Image two is a setting of linear3D 0.01. This makes the image sharper still, the shell like pattern also becomes a bit disorganized. The third image is a setting of polar 0.05. This creates a flower like look. The fourth image is a setting of cylinder 0.1. This once more changes the fractal into something flower like, the center is far superior to the third one. The fifth image is a setting of rectangles 0.1, this leads to a somewhat smoother looking fractal. The sixth image is a setting of block 1, this leads to a whirlwind of shapes as well as a more pronounced shell like texture. The seventh image is a setting of crackle 1, crackle_cellsize 0.5, crackle_power 1, crackle_distort 1, and crackle_scale 0.5. This once more creates a storm of shapes; the texture is somewhat smoother as well. The eighth image is a setting of layered_spiral 0.1. This leads to a glowing look in the fractal. The ninth image is a setting of lissajous 5. This leads to the fractal becoming mainly lines; it is also very sharp looking.


The tenth image is a setting of modulus 1. This leads to shapes forming, as well as a smooth texture. Here are some alternatives for transform one and transform two:

Image one is a setting of flower 1 on the first transform and rectangles 5 on the second transform. This creates a better focal in the center and flower like shapes. Image two is a setting of flower 1 on the first transform and rectangles -2 on the second transform. This creates a less sharp version of image one. Here are the alternatives for transform three:

Image one is a setting of rectangles -5. This creates a sharper and harsher texture.


Image two is a setting of rectangles -1. This smoothes the texture out once more, it is also highly detailed and layered. If you haven't noticed I'm only showing alternatives that are changes to the rectangle variation on these latest transforms. This is because the fractal is using the rectangle variation mostly; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s based off of it. If you want to use a different variation I suggest changing transforms 2, 3, 4, and 5 to something other than rectangle. Here are the alternatives for transform four:

Image one is a setting of rectangles 2. This creates a highly smoothed fractal. This smoothness takes the fractal almost to a point where there is not much texture. The second image is a setting of rectangles -2.5. This creates a sort of fluffy texture, it somewhat looks like some sort of stargate. Here are the alternatives for transform five:


Image one is a setting of rectangles 15. This creates a layered look in the fractal. It also makes a cross like feature in the center and an appearance of the fractal getting smaller and smaller. If you mess around with some settings you could probably make this look like a warp scene in a sci-fi movie. The second image is a setting of rectangles -5. This creates a very smooth look, but it still features the appearance of things getting smaller and smaller. Now, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s play with the final transform:


The final transform is the transform that shapes the fractal. It is the most IMPORTANT transform for this type of fractal. It is literally what gives the fractal its entire shape. So hint here, use it, explore it, and experiment with it. There are a ton of options here and I'm certainly not giving you all of them. Image one is a setting of Julian 1, julian_power -3, and julian_dist 2. This creates a sort of trillium flower appearance. The many spokes of the fractal become only three. Image two is the direct opposite of image one. There are literal tons of spokes, almost like a bicycle wheel. Image two is a setting of Julian 1, julian_power -10, and julian_dist 3.


Image three is a setting of Julian 1, Juliascope 1, julian_power -10, julian_dist 2.5, juliascope_power 10, and juliascope_dist 1. This creates a star like center as well as a spiky look. If you explore the powers and dist variables you can find many different looking fractals. Just one little change can drastically change the appearance of the fractal. For example the fourth image is a setting of Juliascope 1, juliascope_power -10, and juliascope_dist 2. While the Julian has been removed, look at the drastic change overall. This image is highly organized and looks like a sand dollar. Image five is a setting of bipolar -1. This creates a disorganized fractal. But it is visually interesting with a glowing center and flowing network of golden squares. Image six is a setting of disc3D 1. This makes a giant swirl out of your fractal with a curling center. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost like a whirlpool. Image seven is a setting of polar2 1.5. This creates a column like appearance. The texture is back, and the fractal is very tall looking. The tops are gentle curves as well. The eighth image is a setting of xtrb 1. This creates a cell-like look. As you can see there are many options for alternative fractals on the final transform. If you need any help with this tutorial please send me a note. Enjoy and good luck!


Deciphering Fractals: A Beginner's Guide to Understanding Apophysis Part Two


ORBIS


Welcome to my ninth tutorial in this series. Today we're going to make this fractal: I call the fractal we’re going to make today a very happy accident. This was one of my first decent looking fractals and the original base was made FOUR years ago. It’s a bit cluttered and complex, but I enjoy it nevertheless. It’s also very repetitive and relies a lot on Julian. Today we're going to make this fractal:

Anyways, let's begin! Create a new blank flame. On transform one, there is only ONE step. Here are the variations settings: Linear3D: 0 Blur: 0.5


Here is what it should look like:


On transform two input these variations: Linear3D: 0 Julian: 0.2

The variation on this transform is VERY IMPORTANT. If you want to fiddle with it, I recommend sticking to Julian based variations. Because the rest of the variations are Julian settings other than the final transform you can't really use more than a Julian type variation on this one either. They overwhelm any other variation. Input these variables: Julian_power: 4 Julian_dist: 1


Playing with the variable settings is a very good idea on this fractal. You can get all sorts of changes if you play with it.

Now go to the transform tab and set the weight at 80. (Like I said, this is a dominant transform).


Go to the triangle tab and rotate the transform 180 degrees counterclockwise.

This is what your fractal should look like:


On transform three input these variations: Linear3D: 0 Julian: 0.3

Change these variables: Julian_power: 2 Julian_dist: 1


Change the weight to 2.


Rotate the triangle 90 degrees clockwise.

Here is how it should look now:


On transform four change these variations: Linear3D: 0 Julian: 0.4

Here are the variables: Julian_power: 2 Julian_dist: 1


Change the weight to 2.


Rotate the triangle 90 degrees counterclockwise.

As you can see, many of these steps repeat, I was building up the fractal using a very gradual build up method. You can also see that the fractal has now formed a diamond shape in the transform editor. This was intentional. You will see later on in the tutorial how each transform builds upon another. This is what it should look like so far:


Transform Five has a variation setting of: Linear3D: 0 Julian: 1

The variables should be set to: Julian_power: 2 Julian_dist: 1


The weight should be set to 2.


Now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to move the fractal, instead of degrees, we will be moving it by units. Move the triangle left by 1.09 units, move it upwards by 0.57 units.

This is how it should look now:


As you can see itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s slowly building up. On transform six input these variations: Linear3D: 0 Julian: 1

Here are the variables: Julian_power: 2 Julian_dist: 1


The weight should be set to 2.


Now flip the triangle horizontally. Move the triangle to the right by 0.095 units, now move it upwards by 0.57 units.

Here is what the fractal should look like:


Here are the variations for transform seven: Linear3D: 0 Julian: 1

Here are the variable settings: Julian_power: 2 Julian_dist: 1


The weight setting should be set at 2.


Now flip the triangle vertically. Move it to the right by 0.093 units. Move the transform downwards by 0.325 units.

Here is what it should look like:


The variation settings for transform eight are: Linear3D: 0 Julian: 1

Here are the variable settings: Julian_power: 2 Julian_dist: 1


The weight should be set at 2.

Now flip the triangle vertically, then horizontally. The next step is to move the triangle to the right by 0.36 units. Now move the triangle downwards by 0.325 units.


Here is what it should look like:


The variation settings for transform nine are: Linear3D: 0 Julian: 5

Here are the variable settings: Julian_power: 2 Julian_dist: 1


The weight setting is 2.

Move the triangle to the left by 1.1 units, and move the transform downwards by 0.6 units.


Here is what it should look like:


Here are the variation settings for transform ten: Linear3D: 0 Julian: 1

Here are the variable settings: Julian_power: 2 Julian_dist: 1


The weight should be set at 2.


Now flip the triangle vertically, and then horizontally. Move the triangle to the right by 1.105 units, and move it upwards by 0.59 units.

Notice how there's a lot more to it now. It will become just a bit more developed before we warp the shape using the final transform. This is what it should like:


Here are the variation settings for transform eleven: Linear3D: 0 Julian: 5

These are the variable settings: Julian_power: 2 Julian_dist: 1


The weight setting is 2.


Now move the triangle to the right by 0.015 units, and then move the transform down by 0.125 units.

Here is what it looks like so far:


On transform twelve the variations settings are: Linear3D: 0 Julian: 5

Here are the variable settings: Julian_power: 2 Julian_dist: 1


The weight should be set at 2.


Flip the triangle vertically and then horizontally. Now move the triangle to the left by 0.02 units. Move the transform up by 0.12 units.

This is the last regular transform for this fractal, we're almost done! Here is what it should look like:


Now enable a final transform. Here are the variation settings: Linear3D: 0 Bipolar: 1 Ngon: -0.3

Now move the triangle to the right by 0.013 units. The last step is to scale the triangle up by 673 percent.


That's it! You're done! Here is what the final fractal should look like:


Now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to construct the alternative fractal. This is what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to make:

Here is how to make this fractal. Delete transforms 5, 6, 7 and 8. Make sure to delete these exact transforms, it might be best to start with the fifth transform so the transforms you are deleting won't be re-numbered. An easy way of making sure you have deleted the correct transforms is by looking at each transform's Julian variation. For example, transform 4's is 0.4, transform 5's is 5, transform 6's is 1 etc. Now on transform two; change the Julian variation to 0.175. Change the Julian_power variable to Julian_power 6. Now set this transform's weight to 20. On the final transform here are the variation settings: Linear3D: 0 Julian: 1 Julia3Dz: 1 Here are the variable settings: Julian_power: 3 Julian_dist: -1 Julia3Dz_power: -9 That's it!


Now let's explore some other alternative fractals. Make sure to leave transform one alone, you won't be able to change much about it. You can probably make some changes to it by changing the weight to a high number like 20 or more. Then you can change the variation settings. Just remember that this will change how the entire fractal looks though, transform one acts like a building block. Here are some alternatives for transform two:

Image one is a setting of Julian 0.15. As you can see it forms a woven pattern.


Image two is a setting of Juliascope 0.2, juliascope_power 6, and juliascope_dist 1. It makes things become wider and little bit more firm. Image three is a setting of Juliascope 0.2, juliascope_power 3, and juliascope_dist 1. This setting makes the branch portions stand out more. The fourth image is a setting of Juliascope 0.2, juliascope_power 6, and juliascope_dist 2. The higher juliascope_dist setting makes things a little bit more oval in shape and gives the fractal some movement. The fifth image is a setting of Juliascope 0.2, juliascope_power 10, and Juliascope_dist 2. This makes things wider once more, but not uniform. The sixth image is a setting of Juliascope 0.2, juliascope_power 10, and juliascope_dist 3. The Juliascope_dist 3 setting makes things a little thorny. It also adds interest to the fractal.


The first image is a setting of Juliascope 0.2, juliascope_power 10, and juliascope_dist 4. As you can see things become even more interesting with the higher juliascope_dist setting, things become more interestingly shaped. The second image is a setting of Juliascope 0.2, juliascope_power 12, and juliascope_dist 4. Things are far more interesting though with a higher Juliascope_power setting, it takes on the traditional form of the fractal but with a twist. The third image is a setting of Juliascope 0.1, juliascope_power 20, and juliascope_dist 1. This makes the woven look come back and its almost floral looking. The fourth image has a setting of Juliascope 0.1, juliascope_power 10, and juliascope_dist 1. This is highly woven and is somewhat Julian like in nature in the center areas. The fifth image is a setting of Juliascope 0.075, juliascope_power 10, and juliascope_dist 1. This makes an ornate looking fractal; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of my favorites texture-wise. The sixth image is a setting of Juliascope 0.075, juliascope_power 50, and juliascope_dist 1. As you can see the higher juliascope_power setting makes things blur out and makes a flat boring fractal.


The first image is a setting of Julia3D 0.1, and julia3D_power -5. As you can see the image is not uniform and sort of bulky. The second image is a setting of Julia3D 0.1 and Julia3D_power -10. Now the image becomes uniform and ornate looking. The swirls add an elegant look to the fractal. The third image is a setting of flower 0.25. As you can see I don't recommend using other variations other than Julians on this transform. Things come out a bit weird. Now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time mess with weights to show you the effect it has on this fractal.


The fourth image is a weight setting of 20. As you can see it makes a fractal that's somewhat blurry but okay. The fifth image is a weight setting of 15. Things really donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t improve. The sixth image is a weight setting of 160. This now double the original setting of 80. As you can see the fractal has more lines than anything else. The seventh image is a weight setting of 1000. As you can see the fractal is nothing but lines. The importance of the weight is that you have to have the correct weight setting otherwise you'll end up with a blurry fractal or line art. Here is an alternative for transform three:

This one image is a weight setting of 80. Only by shifting the weight high can you really change transform three. You can see what transform three controls by shifting the weight high like this. This creates a lovely ornate look and makes the circular areas come out better. Here is an alternative for the fourth transform:


Once more this image is a weight setting of 80. As you can see, transform four controls the arms of the fractal. This does not create a beautiful fractal, instead if makes it look bloated, but it does show you what this transform controls. I suggest keeping the weight low. Here are some alternatives to transform eleven:

The first image is a weight setting of 80. As you can see, transform eleven controls a lot of the fractal, this a good way of making it appear more Julian like in nature.


The second image is a weight setting of 80 as well as julian_power 3 and julian_dist 2. As you can see things get a lot more interesting looking with this image, there's a lot more detail to it. The third image is a weight setting of 80, Juliascope 1, juliascope_power 3, and juliascope_dist 1. This makes the image jagged looking. The fourth image is a weight setting of 80, Juliascope 1, juliascope_power 3, and juliascope_dist -2. This makes the fractal have very little detail and next to nothing in form compared to the others. The fifth image is a weight setting of 80, Juliascope 5, juliascope_power 3, and juliascope_dist -2. As you can see there's some flowing appearance to the outward areas of this fractal. I suggest you play with this transform some more and heighten this effect. You might get something truly interesting. (When you fiddle with the transforms after transform two you have to increase the weight setting for anything to appear). Here are some alternatives to transform twelve:


Image one is a weight setting of 80. As you can see this transform controls some more of the Julian areas. It makes a lovely image doesn't it? I love the detail this weight makes pop in the outer areas of the fractal as well as how the center is more uniform. The second image is a weight setting of 80 and Julian 2.5. As you can see the center is still lovely but the outer areas are a mess. Be careful not to make set the variations too high. The third image is a weight setting of 80, Juliascope 1, juliascope_power 3, and juliascope_dist 1. This makes a uniform fractal with firm areas, but the outer areas are not that interesting. The fourth image is a weight setting of 80, Juliascope 2.5, juliascope_power 3, and juliascope_dist 1. As you can see the fractal becomes unbalanced looking. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s visually interesting though. The fifth image is a weight setting of 80, Juliascope 5, juliascope_power 3, and juliascope_dist 1. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unbalanced once more but uniform in general, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s alright because of the level of detail. Here are some alternatives for the final transform:


The first image is a setting of bubble 1. This produces a circular well-patterned fractal. The second image is a setting of rings2 1 and rings2_val 0.329416. This produces a flower like fractal somewhat similar to one of my first fully constructed fractals. The third image is a setting of Julian 1, Juliascope 1, julian_power 9, julian_dist 1, juliascope_power 6, and juliascope_dist 1. This makes an ornate fractal with tons of detail. It’s one of my favorites in this tutorial. The fourth image is a setting of Julian 1, Juliascope 0.5, julian_power 9, julian_dist 1, juliascope_power 6, and juliascope_dist 1. This creates a black area in the center and it’s not nearly as nice as the previous one. It’s still visually interesting though. The fifth image is a setting of Julian 1, julian_power 1, and julian_dist -1. This once more creates a circular fractal with a well detailed pattern. The sixth image is a setting of Julian 1, julian_power 1, and julian_dist -2. This once more creates a circular pattern, but it’s not as interesting as the previous one.


Image one is a setting of Julian 1, julian_power 10, and julian_dist -5. This creates a circular fractal, that while detailed isn't that interesting. As you can see, the julian_dist when set negatively can create a mess if you're not careful. The second image is a setting of Juliascope 1, juliascope_power 6, and juliascope_dist -2. The image is now far more interesting, there are also plenty of details. The third image is a setting of Julia3D 1 and julia3D_power -10. As you can see, while the fractal is detailed, it has a big hole in the center.


The fourth image is a setting of Julia3D 1, Julia3Dz 1, julia3D_power -8, and julia3Dz_power -2. This makes a very detailed fractal but a messy one. The fifth image is a setting of Julian 1, julian_power 1, and julian_dist 1. This fractal is the original fractal I made with these parameters. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s flowery and beautiful. This fractal was one of the very first ones I made from scratch. The sixth image is a setting of curl 1 and curl_c2 0.698981. This makes the fractal fling apart but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still detailed and uniform. The center also remains lovely.


Image one is a setting of rectangles 1. This creates a paned look to the image with nine separate pieces. Each piece is ornate in its own way. The second image is a setting of bipolar 1. This inverts the fractal itself; this is a highly complex variation. I suggest playing with it thoroughly because of all that you can do with it. The third image is a setting of bipolar 1 and bipolar_shift 1. As you can see by activating the bipolar_shift part you've inverted it once more, can you see what I mean? The fourth image is a setting of edisc 1. This creates a gem-like area with plenty of details. I suggest playing with this some more as well. The fifth image is a setting of elliptic 1. This creates a highly detailed fractal but since it’s so uniform it’s not as visually interesting as the previous one. The sixth image is a setting of loonie 1. This creates a flower like structure; it’s beautiful except for the very center.


Image one is a setting of ngon 1. As you can see it’s visually interesting, but there is only one flaw. The image is skewed in one direction. I'm not sure why. If you can fix this, this would make a good piece. The second image is a setting of octagon 1. As you can see, it’s a mess, but it’s unique in its warp drive center. The third image is a setting of polar2 1. This creates a column look, but it’s also the bottom portion is highly detailed. The fourth image is a setting of scry 1. This creates a circular fractal that is detailed in the center portion. The fifth image is a setting of xtrb 1. This creates a complex outlined looking fractal. The sixth image is a setting xtrb 1 and xtrb_power 1. This creates a three pronged looking fractal. The details are more stretched out though.

Image one is a setting of xtrb 1, xtrb_power 3, xtrb_radius 0.5, xtrb_width 0.5, and xtrb_dist 1. As you can see this forms an outlined cellular looking fractal. It’s very uniform as well in its own way. I suggest tinkering with xtrb some more, you can come up with some very complex looking fractals.


The second image is a setting of xtrb 0.75, xtrb_power 3, xtrb_radius 0.5, xtrb_width 0.5, and xtrb_dist 1. The flower shape is back and only the center portion has the outlined cellular look to it. This makes it appear more ornate in the center. The final transform is one of my most treasured transforms to use. It can warp the fractal in all sorts of different shapes and do so easily. I suggest exploring it, the options are limitless. If you need any help with any portion of this fractal please don't hesitate to send me a note. I hope you've enjoyed this tutorial and good luck!


MARE SOMNIUM


Welcome to my tenth tutorial in this series. Today we’re exploring some more of the Julian based fractals (my favorite). This is a relatively easy fractal to make with a simple result. It can produce complex alternative versions though. Remember, I won’t spoon feed you the information on how to do everything. I’ve explained all of this in earlier parts of this tutorial. Anyways, let’s begin! Zoom out to -3. This is a large fractal and zooming out is the only way you'll be able to see it in its entirety. Trust me on this. While you’re in the adjust window go ahead and set the pitch to 75. Create a new blank flame. Transform one is somewhat simple, it stays in its basic position. There are only two changes, the variation and the weight.

Set the variations to the following: Linear3D: 0 Bubble: 0.15 Zscale: 0.1


Now go to the transform tab and set the weight to 0.1. As you can see there is nothing visible so far, this will change with the next transform. Here is what the fractal should look like so far:

I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t joking. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing visible. Now add another transform.


Set the variations to the following: Linear3D: 0 Pre_blur: 0.001 Pre_ztranslate: -0.456 Zscale: 0.75 Julian: 2

Set the variables to the following: Julian_power: 3 Julian_dist: 1


Now, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to play with the location of the second transform. The first step is to move the transform 0.23 units upwards. The second step is to rotate the transform counterclockwise by 45 degrees. Now move the transform 0.2 units to the right. This is what the fractal should look like now:


As you can see thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a little bit of the fractal showing now! Once more add another transform.

Set the variations to the following: Linear3D: 0 Zscale: 0.5 Julian: 0.5


Set the variables to: Julian_power: 2 Julian_dist: 1

Now rotate the triangle counterclockwise by 135 degrees.


The fractal should now look like this:

Once more add another transform.

Set the variations to the following: Linear3D: 0


Bubble: 0.01 Pre_blur: 2 Ztranslate: 1 Curl3D: 5

Set the variables to: Curl3D_cx: -0.48750 Curl3D_cy: 0 Curl3D_cz: 0.5


Now go to the transform tab and set the weight to 0.25.

Rotate the triangle counterclockwise by 45 degrees. Now move transform four downwards by 1.2 units. Your fractal should look like this:


As you can see the fractal is now taking shape and details have started to form. Now enable a final transform. (If you do not know how to do this refer to the earlier parts of this tutorial).

Set the variations to the following: Linear: 0 Zscale: 1


Curl: 2

Set the variables to: Curl_c1: 0.29864 Curl_c2: 0.385273


Now, this step is exactly like transform four’s. Rotate the triangle counterclockwise by 45 degrees. Now move transform four down by 1.2 units. This is what the fractal should look like:

That’s it! Easy wasn’t it? Now let’s explore the alternative fractals, let’s begin with the main alternative fractal. It’s only a few simple changes to get to the alternative.


On transform one change the bubble setting to 0.2. On transform two change julian_power to 5, and julian_dist to -1. Now go to the final transform and change the settings to curl 0, and disc -5. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s it! Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get this as the result:

As you can see the changes are drastic with just a few changes to the parameters. Now letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s explore 86 more alternatives to this fractal!


The images above illustrate the changes to transform one that are possible. You probably can figure out several more though, these are just a few examples of what is possible. Image One: Bubble 0.05. Image Two: Rings2 0.5 and rings2_val 1.51735. Image Three: Weight 0.25. Image Four: Weight 0.5. Image Five: Scale the triangle up by 1,000. As you can see the images are not changed a lot. The fractal is hard to change in transforms one, two, and three. As you can see the image generally becomes sharper looking. Image one is sharper; thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very little difference in image two other than a less prominent center areas. In image three itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not very different either, image four is sharper though. Image five is somewhat different mainly due to the tiny center areas.


The images above are some of the changes that are possible with transform two. Image One: Julian 0.5, julian_power 6, and julian_dist 1. Image Two: Julian_power 5, and julian_dist 1. The following images do not have a Julian setting. Image Three: Rectangles 1. Image Four: Hemisphere 2. Image Five: Bipolar -3. As you can see changes to the Julian setting can cause drastic changes, though not very pleasant ones. Image one shows how making the setting smaller can make the fractal itself smaller and more condensed. Image two shows what can happen if you mess with the Julian variables. I suggest playing with those by the way; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a quick and easy way of changing your fractal without making a mess too much. Image three shows what can happen when you change the variation from Julian on transform two. The simple answer is chaos. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to produce good looking results if you go beyond the Julian on this transform.


The images above are changes to transform three. Image One: Julian_power 3, and Julian_dist 1. Image Two: Julian_power 5, and Julian_dist -3. Image Three: Juliascope 0.5, Juliascope_power 3, and Juliascope_dist 1. Image Four: Bipolar 1. Image Five: Weight 0.25. A change to the variables can produce drastic changes; observe the differences between the first three images. On image three there is an additional change to the variation. As you can see as long as you stick with a Julian based variation there wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be too much change. If you add additional variations there are some changes, look at image four closely, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not as balanced due to the additional variations. Image five seems a bit more defined due to the weight change.


The image above is an alternative to transform four: Image One: Curl3D 2.5, curl3D_cx -0.48750, curl3D_cy 0, and curl3D_cz 0.5. As you can see there is not a drastic change when messing with the curl variation. It looks just about the same as the non-altered fractal.


The above images are still changes to transform four, but these images do not include the curl3D variation. Image One: Julia3Dz 1, and Julia3Dz_power 5. Image Two: Julia3D 1, and Julia3D_power -2. Image Three: Julia3D 1, Julia3Dz 1, julia3Dz_power 5, and Julia3D_power -2. Image Four: Julia3D 3, Julia3Dz 3, Julia3D_power -5, and Julia3Dz_power 5. Image Five: Rectangles -3. On all of the images the changes make the fractal flatter looking. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s like you're looking out at a fractal plane. There are only slight differences between these five alternatives.


Image One: Hemisphere 0.25. Image Two: Hemisphere 0.5. Image Three: Crackle 1, Crackle_cellsize 1, Crackle_power 0.2, Crackle_distort 0, Crackle_scale 1, and Crackle_z 0. Image Four: Crackle 1, Crackle_cellsize 1, Crackle_power 0.5, Crackle_distort 1, Crackle_scale 0.5, and Crackle_z 1. Image Five: Crackle 1, Crackle_cellsize 1, Crackle_power 0.2, Crackle_distort 1, Crackle_scale 0.5, and Crackle_z 1. Image one and two have a cluster look to them due to the hemisphere providing some roundness. Image three shows some sort of webbing like areas due to the crackle variation. Image four and five shows what happens when you play with the crackle variables, you can form a blocky sort of look instead of webbing.


Image One: Disc3D 0.5. Image Two: Duality 1. Image Three: Duality -1. Image Four: Loonie_3D 0.5. Image Five: Lissajous 0.4. As you can see disc3D seems to make the image sharper. Duality in image two and three make the fractal appear to be more solid with solid curves forming. Image four is an example of loonie_3D, which makes the fractal plain looking. Image five shows what lissajous can do to a fractal, once more some sort of web like features appear which are interesting visually.


Image One: Oscilloscope 1. Image Two: Oval8 0.1. Image Three: Pie 25. Image Four: Pyramid 15. Image Five: Rays3 3. On image one oscilloscope creates lots of different lines on the image giving it a sort of striped appearance. On image two oval8 creates another sort of web but it’s not very visually appealing. Pie on image three creates lots more stripes than oscilloscope. Pyramid on image four creates a sort of volcanic explosion in the center of the image but overall its appearance is sharper. Image five shows what rays3 does to the fractal, it’s sort of overlapping stripes, it’s not very visually appealing.

Okay, the following are the last two alternatives for transform four. Both of them relate to the weight of the transform. Image One: Weight 0.1. Image Two: Weight 0.001. The image becomes a little sharper as you get lower in the weight as you can see via image one. But if you go too far down the scale your image becomes not very appealing, as you can see via image two. So be careful with your weights on image four!


The images above are examples of alternatives for the final transform. All of these alternatives do not include the curl variation. Most of these changes are drastic changes with dramatic results. Image One: Sinusoidal 5. Image Two: Spherical 5. Image Three: Swirl 3. Image Four: Horseshoe 5. Image Five: Disc 5. As you can see Sinusoidal makes a column like appearance with a center that is fascinating. Spherical centers the fractal and makes it once more very appealing. Swirl makes a mess but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also interesting. Horseshoe makes a city like appearance but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also too chaotic. Disc is my favorite as you can tell by the main alternative fractal. It creates a turbulent yet orderly looking fractal with tons of energy.


Image One: Diamond 5. Image Two: Eyefish 5. Image Three: Sinusoidal -5. Image Four: Eyefish -5. Image Five: Bubble -5. As you can see in example one the fractal gets sort of diamond shape along the plane of the fractal. In image two the fractal becomes circular with a sort of sunken center. On image three the column reappears but because of sinusoidalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s negative setting the center appears to be levitating up the column. On image four become of the negative eyefish setting the center now appears to be rising. Image five shows a negative bubble setting, the fractal appears to be on its side or falling.


Image One: Cylinder 5. Image Two: Rings2 5 and rings2_val 0.967456. Image Three: Rings2 -5 and rings2_val 0.967456. Image Four: Julian 3, Julian_power 1, and Julian_dist 1. Image Five: Julia3D 3, and Julia3D_power 1. Image one shows what cylinder does to a fractal, as you can see it warps the image and makes it into a column. If you look closely you can see how it warps it into the cylinder shape by starting at the bottom of the image. Image two and three shows what rings2 does the fractal. The positive version shows the center rising, the negative version shows a sunken center. Both are visually appealing. Image four and five are examples Julian based variations, as you can see regular Julian produces a beautiful fractal city, whereas julia3D produces too much height in the fractal making it look messy but still very interesting.


Image One: Curl -3, curl_c1 0.29865, and curl_c2 0.385273. Image Two: Curl3D 3, curl3D_cx 0, curl3D_cy 0, and curl3D_cz -0.57204. Image Three: Curl3D -3, curl3D_cx 0, curl3D_cy 0, and curl3D_cz -0.57204. Image Four: Hemisphere -5. Image Five: Bipolar -5. Image one shows regular curl does not produce an appealing image, everything but the center is flattened. Image two and three show the positive and the negative sides of curl3D. Both of these produces puckered looks. Image four shows what happens when you use a negative hemisphere, the fractal becomes skewed to the side slightly, but it still looks okay. To me the best of these five is the last image; a negative bipolar produces a centered fractal that also looks dramatic.


Image One: Block 5. Image Two: Block -5. Image Three: Butterfly 5. Image Four: Butterfly -5. Image Five: Circlize -5. On image one and two you can compare the positive and negative aspects of the block variation. As you can see both of them form a diamond like shape, but the positive remains flat while the negative version seems to rise. Image three and four are another comparison set, this time for the butterfly variation. The main difference is that they're flipped versions of each other. The butterfly variation just creates butterfly wings on the fractal. Circilize is image five; this creates an okay looking fractal but nothing special.


Image One: Crescents 0.5. Image Two: Curve -5. Image Three: Edisc 20. Image Four: Foci 5. Image Five: Foci -5. On image one the crescents variation creates a strong center area but very little detail. The second image shows what curve does, you get a beautiful well centered fractal. The third image shows edisc, this produces a side fractal with some nice detail. The last two images show what can happen when you use a positive and a negative foci setting. The positive gives a centered fractal with the center closer to the screen. The negative version gives a far in the distance look to the center which also seems to be on a platform.


Image One: Foci_3D 5. Image Two: Funnel 5. Image Three: Hypersphere 5. Image Four: Hypertile 5. Image Five: Layered_spiral 5. Image one is interesting visually; it’s sort of dramatic with a lot of energy. I recommend exploring using Foci_3D. The second image is also dramatic; it’s also got some slight perspective built in. The third image is also interesting, it’s got a skewed look, but because of the center it’s decent. The fourth image once more is towards the side, but it gives it a city sort of look. The last image has a swirl look to it with a fascinating stable center. This is another variation you should explore.


Image One: Loonie_3D -1. Image Two: Modulus 5. Image Three: Ngon 5. Image Four: Ngon -5. Image Five: Polar2 5. Image one is set far in the distance. I suggest playing with the zoom to see it in its full detail. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interesting though. Image two is sort of a mess, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s okay. Image three and four is another comparison between negative and positive, this time with the variation ngon. The positive brings the center forward while the negative pushes it far into the distance. I prefer the positive image since it doesn't have a square void in the middle of the image. The fifth image is also interesting due to the height involved.


Image One: Polar 2 -5. Image Two: Rippled 5. Image Three: Snowflake 5. Image Four: SphericalN -5. Image Five: Squarical 5. Image one is somewhat interesting, this is due to the repetitive background, the height, and the center of the image. Image two is not very good in my opinion, it’s too chaotic. I suggest avoiding rippled. You might be able to pull it off if you explore a lot though. Image three is okay, but it’s has the void in the center that ngon had as well. Image four is somewhat the same, except it looks closer, but it’s got the same void. Image five is abstract almost, it’s has a very sharp cutting look to it. I suggest playing with the squarical variation.


Image One: Synth 5. Image Two: Xtrb 2, Xtrb_power 1, Xtrb_radius 1, Xtrb_width 0.5, Xtrb_dist 1, Xtrb_a 1, and Xtrb_b 1. Image Three: Xtrb 2, Xtrb_power 1, Xtrb_radius 0.5, Xtrb_width 1, Xtrb_dist 2, Xtrb_a 1, and Xtrb_b 1. Image one is interesting looking with its height, its center also helps give it a beautiful look. Image two and three both involve the Xtrb variation, the difference between the two are the variables. Image two shows a centered fractal, with a beautiful but small center. The center is surrounded by other portions of the fractal. The third image shows a center that is larger; it almost looks like it’s in a fractal world. This is one of my favorite alternatives.

Well, that’s it! Thank you for reading my tutorial, if you have any questions feel free to send me a note. I’ll be happy to try to answer them. Good luck and have fun exploring!


EMANIO


W

elcome to the eleventh fractal tutorial in this series. Today we’re going to make a

rather complex looking fractal that is in reality quite simple. It’s mainly rectangle based; only the final transform is complex. Remember, I will not cover the bare basics of Apophysis in this part of the series. Please refer to the earlier parts of this series for this information. So let’s begin! This is what we’re going to make today:


Zoom out to at least -1.5 in the adjust window. This is a rather large fractal after all. If you want to see it all while you explore then youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need to zoom out. Input the following settings: Pitch: 33.6 Yaw: 341 Height: 0 Perspective: 1 Scale: 30.3629 Rotation: -132.82

Now letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s explore transform one!


There is only one step to transform one. (Remember, linear is always automatically set at zero in this series). Input the following variations: Linear3D: 0 Blur3D: 1 This is what it should look like so far:


Create a second transform. Input the following variations: Linear: 0 Pre_blur: 2 Rectangles: 0.9 This is what it should look like so far:


Create a third transform. Input the following variation: Linear: 0 Rectangles: 0.9


First move triangle to the right by 0.75 units, and then move the triangle upwards by 0.55 units. This is how it should look so far:


For transforms four and five, just duplicate transform three twice. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s it. This is what the two transforms should look like:

Now, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s move on to the final transform!


Input the following variations: Linear3D: 0 Spherical: 25 Cylinder: 1.2 Pre_ztranslate: -2 Rings2: 0.2 Fan2: -0.5


Pdj: 1 Julia3Dz: 5 Curl: -5 Rectangles: -2 Hemisphere: -1

Input the following variables: Rings2_val: 0.276306 Fan2_x: 0.00861139 Fan2_y: 0.761234 Pdj_a: 2.56244 Pdj_b: -1.47275


Pdj_c: 0.360724 Pdj_d: 0.514129 Julia3Dz_power: -5 Curl_c1: 0.145106 Curl_c2: 0.737541

Now, move transform upwards by 1.64 units. Then move transform to the right by 1.175 units. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s it! Your fractal is complete! This is how it should look like:


Now, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s begin our study into the alternative fractals! We shall begin with the main alternative fractal.


Follow these instructions exactly. On transform one set Blur3D to 1.5, and the weight to 0.75. On transform two set Pre_blur to 0.5, Rectangles_x to 0.5, Rectangles_y to 0.5, and the weight to 1. Now, the last steps are to set Cylinder to 1.5, Pre_ztranslate to -1.5, Rings2 to 0.5, Julia3Dz to 10, Julia3Dz_power to -7, Curl to -10, Rectangles to -0.5, and Hemisphere to -2.5 on the final transform. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s it! Now letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s explore the rest of the alternatives. The following alternatives are for the first transform:


Image One: Weight 2.5. Image Two: Weight 0.25. Image Three: Blur3D 0.5. On image one you can see the image becomes less detailed with more weight. You can see with image two that less weight on transform one leads to a more detailed fractal. On image three lowered blur3D leads to more detail as well.


Image One: Crackle 1, Crackle_cellsize 1, Crackle_power 0.2, Crackle_distort 0, Crackle_scale 1, and Crackle_z 0. Image Two: Crackle 1, Crackle_cellsize 0.5, Crackle_power 1, Crackle_distort 1, Crackle_scale 0.5, and Crackle_z 0. Image Three: Disc3D 0.5. Image Four: Curve 0.25.


Image Five: Bubble2 1. On image one you can clearly see the grid patterns that crackle creates, the next image illustrates what will happen if you mess with the variables of crackle. Disc3D provides another interesting texture, as does Curve and Bubble2.

Image One: Bubble2 0.75. Image Two: Polar 0.25. Image Three: Disc 0.5.


Image Four: Spiral 1. Image Five: Diamond 2. As you can see the changes are not very drastic so far. They won't be. Most changes to this fractal are not drastic. As you can see lowering bubble2 can add more detail, as can polar. Disc, spiral, and diamond add less sharpened details, but there is more of it.

Image One: Diamond 1. Image Two: Eyefish 0.5.


Image Three: Eyefish 1. Image Four: Eyefish 0.75. Image Five: Bubble 0.5. On image one you can see diamond in higher amounts can lead to very sharp details. The next three images show the differences between varying amounts of eyefish. The last image shows what happens with bubble, sharp details in some areas, but not as much in other areas.


Image One: Bubble 1. Image Two: Rings2 0.5. Image Three: Rings2 1. Image Four: Rings2 -1. Image Five: Hemisphere 1. Image Six: Bipolar 1. Image Seven: Ngon -1. On image one you can see there's some sort of feathering details produced from the bubble variation. The next three images show differing amounts of Rings2. It can go from sharp details, to somewhat blurry details. Image five and six shows sharpened details as well. Image seven is quite different, less sharp, and not as detailed. The following alternatives are for the second transform:


Image One: Pre_blur 1. Image Two: Pre_blur 0. Image Three: Rectangles 0.1. Image Four: Rectangles -0.9. Image Five: Linear -1.


Image Six: Weight 0.1. Image Seven: Weight 1. Remember, all variations remain the same unless I write otherwise. As you can see the lowering of Pre_blur brings out more details but at the same time less fractal. Images three and four shows drastic differences between differing amounts of the rectangle variation. A negative amount of rectangle leads to new areas of the fractal. Image five shows what happens when you add linear to the mix, the results are sharp details. Image six and seven shows the difference between different amounts of weight. A lower weight will lead to very sharp details whereas a higher amount will lead to little details. The following images are the alternatives for transform three:

Image One: Rectangles 0.1. Image Two: Rectangles 1.5. Image Three: Linear3D -1. The main difference between images one and two is the texture of the fractal. Image one has more texture, whereas image two is more smooth. Image three has a lot more visible areas due to Linear3D. The following alternatives are for transform four:


Image One: Rectangles 0.1. Image Two: Rectangles 1.5. Image Three: Linear -1. Image Four: Weight 1.5. Once more the main difference between image one and two is the texture. Image three is not as detailed as the typical linear variation. Image four is very detailed due to the increased weight. The following alternatives are for transform five:


Image One: Rectangles 0.1. Image Two: Rectangles 1.5. Image Three: Linear -1. Once more the main difference between image one and two is the texture. The third image has a linear variation added, as you can see there is more fractal but not that much detail. The following alternatives are for the final transform:


Image One: Spherical 5. Image Two: Spherical 35. Image Three: Cylinder 0.1. Image Four: Cylinder 2. Image Five: Pre_ztranslate 2.


Image Six: Rings2 -0.2. From now on, the changes are going to be far more drastic. This is due to the final transform. This is the best way of getting major changes with this fractal. Image one and two show the different amounts of the Spherical variation. As you can see there's a drastically different shape to the two images. Images three and four show the differences between different amounts of cylinder. Once more the main difference is the shape. One is separated and the other is gathered together. Image five has a woven look to it. Image six has the lines that are usually very prominent on the wings not present due to the negative Rings2 variation.

Image One: Rings2 1.


Image Two: Rings2 -1. Image Three: Fan2 0.5. Image Four: Fan2 -1. Image Five: Fan2 1. Image Six: Pdj -1. The difference between image one and two is the amount of rings variation. This leads to either separate lines or in image two gathered together lines. The next three images are the different Fan2 amounts. As you can see it leads to drastically different fractal shapes. Image six shows an oddly shaped fractal but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interesting visually.


Image One: Pdj 0.5. Image Two: Pdj -0.5. Image Three: Julia3Dz -5. Image Four: Julia3Dz -10. Image Five: Julia3Dz 10. Image Six: Curl -10. There isn't a ton of differences in image one and two other than slight size differences. The next three images are different amounts of Julia3Dz. As you can see it leads mainly to different shapes, my favorite is the last one due to the woven look. Image six is once more a gathered fractal look that has a more flowing like shape than anything else.


Image One: Rectangles -3. Image Two: Rectangles -5. Image Three: Hemisphere 1. Image Four: Hemisphere -3. Image Five: Hemisphere 3. The first two images are examples of Rectangles. As you can see you can go too far with this variation, as the fractal loses shape if you enter too negative of a Rectangle. The last three images are examples of Hemisphere. There are not a lot of differences between the three other images than subtle differences. I hope you've enjoyed reading this tutorial. If you have any questions feel free to send me a note, I'll happily answer. Good luck!


BREAKING PAST THE MAXIMA


W

elcome to my final tutorial in this series. Before we begin, I need to say this. The

fractal we are going to make in this part is something that is precious to me. I won the NVIDIA contest’s fractal division with this entry and before now I thought that I could not share how I made it. I discussed the copyright part of the contest rules with DA, and they gave me permission to write this tutorial. That being said, I’ve enjoyed writing this series over the past year and I can’t believe it’s about to come to an end. It leaves me with a sad feeling. So let’s begin! This is the fractal we are going to make today:

We shall begin with the adjust window.


Input the following: Zoom: -1.748 Pitch: 24.1 Yaw: -64.7 X position: 0.0846 Y position: 0.0750 Rotation: 3.48

You have to have a negative zoom on this; otherwise you won’t be able to see much of your fractal. It’s quite large. I’ve also rounded up the X and Y position settings, so it won’t be 100% exact but close enough. The next step is the first transform!


Input the following variations: Linear: 0 Ztranslate: 0.2 Pyramid: 0.3


The weight should be set at 0.1. This is what the fractal should look like now:

Yes, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right. You should see NOTHING. Pyramid does not provide as much a foundation like blur does, so it will not show up until later on in the fractal. Now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to play with the second transform:


Input the following variations: Linear: 0 Pre_blur: 0.001 Pre_ztranslate: -0.456 Zscale: 0.691 Julian: 2 Pyramid: -0.2

Make sure the Julian_power variable is set to 3, and the julian_dist is set to 1.


Rotate the transform 45 degrees counterclockwise, and then move it upwards by 0.23 units. The last step for this transform is to move it to the right by 0.2 units. Afterwards the fractal should look like this:

As you can see the fractal is still bare bones, the reason behind this is that there isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t much of a foundation yet. This will soon change. Create a third transform:


Input the following variations: Linear: 0 Zscale: 0.421 Julian: 0.5


Input the following variables: Julian_power: 2 Julian_dist: 1

I highly suggest playing around with these settings. They can produce quite a different array of alternative fractals.


The final step for transform three is to rotate it counterclockwise by 135 degrees. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s it! Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re finished with this transform. This is how the fractal should look so far:

The fractal looks much fuller now; this is mainly due to the Julian variation. Now, create a fourth transform:


Input the following variations: Linear: 0 Bubble: 0.01 Pre_blur: 1 Pre_zscale: 1 Curl3D: 5


Input the following variables: Curl3D_cx: -0.487507 Curl3D_cy: 0 Curl3D_cz: 0


Set transform fourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weight at 0.25.

Rotate the triangle 45 degrees counterclockwise and then move it downwards by 1.2 units.


This is what the fractal should look like:

I believe Curl3D is what helped fill out the fractal. Now enable a final transform:

Input the following variations:


Linear3D: 1 Pyramid: -0.5

Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s it! The fractal is now finished. This is what it should look like:

I have one more thing to cover about the main fractal though. The colors! If you want the same color scheme this is how you do it. Go download this pack: Gradient Pack Do what you normally do with gradients, and then look for this particular gradient: Apophysis-07072519038291.


Once you select that gradient then input the following transform color codes: Transform One: 0.494 Transform Two: 0.377 Transform Three: 0.675 Transform Four: 0.169

Once inputted you should have the exact colors of my fractal. The cover page image is heavily edited, so if you wish to have those colors youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to have to edit the image in a program like photoshop or gimp. Alright, now letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s study the alternative fractal pictured below:


On transform one set ztranslate to 1. Then on transform two set pre_ztranslate to 1, and julian_dist to -1. The next step is to change transform three, on that transform set zscale to -0.421, julian_power 3, and julian_dist -1. The final step is to change the final transform pyramid setting to -0.25. As you can see, you'll get a drastically different fractal as the result. Now, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s explore the 200 other alternative fractals! The First Transformâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alternatives (Remember, everything is in addition to the normal settings unless I say so):


Image One: Linear3D 1. By adding linear3D you normalize the fractal. The chaos seems tamed.

The rest of the alternatives for transform one does not have pyramid unless stated to do so. Image One: Sinusoidal 1. Image Two: Spherical 1. Image Three: Swirl 0.1. Image Four: Disc 0.25. Image Five: Disc 0.1.


Image Six: Spiral 0.25. As you can see transform one controls the tops of the towers (the innards of the fractal that are a darker purple) and the smaller towers in the blue areas. These changes so far can add a sparkle like look, diamonds, or swirls even.

Image One: Hyperbolic 0.1. Image Two: Diamond 0.25. Image Three: Bubble 0.25. Image Four: Cylinder 1. Image Five: Rings2 1. Image Six: Rings2 0.25. As you can see the patterns continue until image four, cylinder sends shafts of fractal out of the main fractal.


Image One: Julian 1, Julian_power 5, and Julian_dist 1. Image Two: Julian 0.5, Julian_power 5, and Julian_dist 1. Image Three: Hemisphere 1. Image Four: Hexes 0.25. Image Five: Block 1. Image Six: Block 0.25. Julians produce interesting results, hemisphere produces bubbles. Hexes produce patterns, and block produces lines. All have pretty results.


Image One: Bubble2 0.25. Image Two: Butterfly 0.25. Image Three: Crackle 1, Crackle_cellsize 1, Crackle_power 0.2, Crackle_distort 0, Crackle_scale 1, and Crackle_z 0. Image Four: Crackle 1, Crackle_cellsize 0.5, Crackle_power 0.5, Crackle_distort 1, Crackle_scale 0.5, and Crackle_z 0. Image Five: Crescents 1. Image Six: Crescents 0.25. Bubble2 produces circular results that make the towers look neat. Crackle produces lines or smaller shapes. Crescents can produce a mess if you aren't careful.


Image One: Disc3D 0.25. Image Two: Duality 1. Image Three: Duality 0.25. Image Four: Edisc 0.25. Image Five: Elliptic 0.25. Image Six: Flower 0.25. Duality managed to send spikes out of the main fractal. Elliptic produces smaller patterns in the towers, flowers of course, produces flowers.


Image One: Funnel 0.25. Image Two: Hypersphere 1. Image Three: Hypersphere 0.25. Image Four: Layered_spiral 0.25. Image Five: Lissajous 0.25. Image Six: Mandelbrot 1. Funnel sends more spikes out of the fractal. Hypersphere can look good if you're careful, smaller amounts can produce good results and larger amounts can produce rubbish. Lissajous produces beautiful line patterns. Mandelbrot produces a diamond shape.


Image One: Mandelbrot 0.25. Image Two: Mask 1. Image Three: Mask 0.25. Image Four: Modulus 1. Image Five: Modulus 0.25. Image Six: Pie 0.25. Small amounts of Mandelbrot will produce the famous image in the towers. Mask can produce swirls or it can produce a mess. Modulus can produce an inner diamond or an outer one. Pie produces spokes.


Image One: Rippled 0.25. Image Two: Scry 1. Image Three: Scry 0.25. Image Four: Sigmoid 1. Image Five: Sigmoid 0.25. Image Six: Spikes 1. Scry produces patterns. Sigmoid can produce diamonds or odd lines. Spikes can produce a sort of puckered diamond shape.


Image One: Spikes 0.25. Image Two: Squarical 1. Image Three: Squarical 0.25. Image Four: Stripes 0.25. Image Five: SuperShape3D 1. Image Six: SuperShape3D 0.25. Squarical predictably produces square lines. Stripes, is also predictable, it produces stripes.


Image One: Tri_boarders2 0.25. Image Two: Xheart 0.25. Image Three: Xtrb 1. Image Four: Xtrb 0.25. Xheart produces interesting patterns. Xtrb can do so as well in smaller amounts.


These last six return to the original transform settings. That means Pyramid is included. Image One: Pyramid 1. Image Two: Ztranslate 1. Image Three: Ztranslate -0.2. Image Four: Weight 0.5. Image Five: Weight 0.3. Image Six: Weight 0.2. A higher amount of pyramid produces a more uniform version of the center bit of the fractal. Ztranslate controls the height of the fractal in the 3D mode. You can't see it here very well but the positive settings make the image seem to rise, whereas a negative setting makes it seem to sink. A lower weight will make the image seem to stand out a bit better; a larger weight will make it a tad bit sharper.


The Second Transformâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alternatives:

Image One: Linear3D 1. Image Two: Linear3D 0.1. Image Three: Linear3D -0.1. Image Four: Linear 0.1. Image Five: Linear -0.1. Image Six: Pre_ztranslate 0.456. A positive and high amount of Linear3D causes complete chaos. A negative amount causes some weirdness in the height level of one of the fractal arms. A positive Pre_ztranslate flips the fractal upside down.


Image One: Zscale -0.691. Image Two: Julian 1. Image Three: Julian -1. Image Four: Julian_dist -1. Image Five: Julian_dist 0. Image Six: Pyramid 0.2. Changing the Julian settings produces a variety of shapes; one look is a puckered look. If you mess with the Julian_dist variable you can also get interesting results. For example a negative setting produces real arms.


Image One: Pyramid -0.1. Image Two: Weight 0.25. Image Three: Weight 0.75. Image Four: Weight 1. Image Five: Weight 2. The weight setting influences how defined the fractal appears. The lower the weight the less defined, the higher the weight the more defined it gets. As you can see a weight of 2 almost makes line art of the fractal.


The following alternatives do not have the regular Julian setting for transform two. Image One: Juliascope 2, Juliascope_power 3, and Juliascope_dist 1. Image Two: Julia3D 3, and Julia3D_power 3. Image Three: Julia3Dz 5, and Julia3Dz_power 3. Image Four: Julia3Dz 5, and Julia3Dz_power -3. Image Five: Pyramid 0, and return to the normal Julian settings. As you can different types of Julian settings can produce drastically different results. All of which are highly uniform in nature though.


The Third Transformâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alternatives:

Image One: Zscale -0.421. Image Two: Linear3D 0.1. Image Three: Linear3D -0.1. Image Four: Linear 0.1. Image five: Linear -0.1. Image Six: Weight 0.1. Linears of all types add interesting details. A low weight can also make the fractal more defined.


Image One: Weight 1. Image Two: Julian 0.25. Image Three: Julian_power 3. The more weight transform three has, the less defined it is. A lower amount of Julian makes a pinched but much more uniformed look. Julian_power 3 also makes an interesting effect. Image two and image three are some of my favorite alternatives for this fractal.


The following images do not have a Julian setting unless stated to do so. Image One: Sinusoidal 1. Image Two: Spherical 1. Image Three: Swirl 0.25. Image Four: Horseshoe 0.5. Image Five: Disc 0.5. Image Six: Spiral 1. Sinusoidal makes a glyph like center. Swirl produces a very lovely image that is detailed and sharp at the same time. Disc produces little mini areas of very interesting detail.


Image One: Hyperbolic 1. Image Two: Hyperbolic 0.5. Image Three: Diamond 1. Image Four: Diamond 0.5. Image Five: Eyefish 1. Image Six: Eyefish 0.5. Hyperbolic makes shafts appear outside the fractal, a lower amount will make the shafts go more inwards. Diamond makes the entire center area of the fractal become uniform and form into one shape. Eyefish also produces a uniform look, though a lesser amount will make the fractal less circular.


Image One: Bubble 1. Image Two: Cylinder 1. Image Three: Cylinder 0.5. Image Four: Curl3D 1, Curl3D_cx 0, Curl3D_cy 0, and Curl3D_cz -0.37856. . Image Five: Curl3D 0.5, Curl3D_cx 0, Curl3D_cy 0, and Curl3D_cz -0.37856. . Image Six: Hemisphere 1. Bubble makes an interesting raised center. Curl3D can make a neat center or be too chaotic depending on the setting. Hemisphere creates a circular center, and a relatively interesting fractal.


Image One: Hemisphere 0.5. Image Two: Block 1. Image Three: Block 0.5. Image Four: Disc3D 1. Image Five: Disc3D 0.5. Image Six: Hypersphere 0.5. Hemisphere produces a tight looking center with interesting tower areas. Block produces something similar. Disc3D produces a mess.


Image One: Layered_spiral 0.5. Image Two: Lissajous 1. Image Three: Lissajous 0.5. Image Four: Ngon 1. Image Five: Ngon 0.5. Image Six: Pyramid 0.5. Layered_spiral produces a line effect and makes the fractal look quite sharp in areas. Lissajous produces another type of line effect. Ngon makes a mess. Pyramid produces quite an interesting uniform effect.


Image One: Scry 1. Image Two: Spikes 0.5. Image Three: Stripes 0.5. Image Four: Tess_v2 1. Image Five: Xheart 1. Image Six: Xheart 0.5. Scry produces a drooping effect. Spikes produces an interesting uniform look. Stripes once more produces stripes, except on this transform it seems to go more along the contours of the fractal. Tess_v2 makes the outer ring very uniform and almost carved like. Xheart tends to be uniform as well; lower amounts of xheart make the fractal appear more flower like.


Image One: Xtrb 1. Image Two: Xtrb 0.5. Image Three: Xtrb 0.25. Large amounts of Xtrb can produce very complicated fractals. Medium amounts can produce complex but flower like fractals, but too little of Xtrb can make a very minimal looking fractal.


The Fourth Transformâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alternatives:

Image One: Weight 0.1. Image Two: Pre_blur 0. Image Three: Pre_zscale -1. Image Four: Curl3D 1. Image Five: Curl3D 2.5. Image Six: Curl3D 10. The lower the weight on this transform the more defined the fractal. By removing the pre_blur the entire background of the fractal becomes clear. As you can see there's quite a lot of it. Curl3D has plenty of different looks to it, some of it brings the fractal all the way into itself, and a larger amount makes the fractal more intense.


The following images do not have the Curl3D variation. Image One: Spiral 5. Image Two: Julia3D 5, and Julia3D_power 2. Image Three: Julia3Dz 5, and Julia3Dz_power -2. Image Four: Julia3Dz 5, and Julia3Dz_power 2. Image Five: Curl 5, Curl_c1 0.811144, and Curl_c2 0.094605.. Image Six: Hemisphere 5. Spiral predictably produces a sort of spiral effect on the outer bands of the fractal. The Julian variations produce interesting results, some even give an interesting outer area to the fractal. Curl produces a beautiful extensive outer ring around the fractal. Hemisphere produces a giant bubble over the fractal.


Image One: Fourth 5. Image Two: Funnel 5. Image Three: Lissajous 5. Image Four: Oscilloscope 5. Image Five: Pyramid 5. Image Six: Split 5. Fourth and Funnel both produce interesting outer spokes. Lissajous produces lovely lines. Oscilloscope produces stripes. Pyramid makes the fractal more line like, but also makes a square appear on the outer areas of the fractal. Split produces an interesting outer spoke pattern with some grid detail.


Image One: Stripes 5. Image Two: Xheart 5. Stripes of course, leave stripes, but the stripes on this variation align along the contours of the fractal and extend from it. Xheart produces a bubbly looking fractal.


The Final Transformâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alternatives:

Image One: Pyramid 0.5. Image Two: Pyramid -1. A setting of 0.5 leaves a wide looking pyramid in the center; it also expands the rest of the pyramid areas of the fractal. A negative setting makes a jewel like area in the center of the fractal. It also gives it a very interesting 3D aspect to the center.


The following images do not have the pyramid setting. Image One: Pyramid 0, and no final transform. Image Two: Spherical -1. Image Three: Disc -1. Image Four: Eyefish 1. Image Five: Eyefish -1. Image Six: Curl 1, Curl_c1 0.200532, and Curl_c2 0.758053.. The final transform molds the entire fractal with whatever variation you use. As you can see here there is quite a lot you can do with this transform. A negative eyefish setting makes a puckered fractal; curl produces an oblong one though.


Image One: Curl -1, Curl_c1 0.200532, and Curl_c2 0.758053.. Image Two: Curl3D 1, Curl3D_cx 0.367255, Curl3D_cy 0, and Curl3D_cz 0. . Image Three: Hemisphere -1. Image Four: Hexes 1. Image Five: Block -1. Image Six: Boarders 1. Curl3D produces a bird’s eye view of the fractal, it’s almost like you're looking down at the fractal from above. Hemisphere and block both produce a puckered look that oddly enough works. Hexes produces an effect that makes it look like the fractal was twisted about. Boarders produces an effect that makes the fractal look like it’s been shaking.


Image One: Bubble2 1. Image Two: Bubble2 -1. Image Three: Butterfly 1. Image Four: Circlize 1. Image Five: Elliptic -1. Image Six: Fibonacci 1. Bubble 2 can produce drastically different fractals, the higher the amount the more round it can get, the lower the amount the more puckered it is. Butterfly of course produces a butterfly like shape. Circlize produces a field like fractal with more area to it. Fibonacci produces another bird's eye view fractal.


Image One: Fibonacci -1. Image Two: Foci -1. Image Three: Foci_3D -1. Image Four: Hypertile 1. Image Five: Hypertile -1. Image Six: Layered_spiral 1. A negative Fibonacci produces an interesting spiral effect. Foci and Foci_3D produces a puckered like fractal. Hypertile produces two very different effects; a positive one produces a wider fractal with a bird's eye view. A negative one produces a gathered together fractal that looks far off in the distance.


Image One: Loonie 1. Image Two: Modulus 1. Image Three: Ngon -1. Image Four: Oscilloscope 1. Image Five: Polar2 -1. Image Six: Pyramid 1. Loonie creates a hole in the fractal. Modulus builds up the fractal; it makes it look more 3D in the center. A larger Pyramid setting makes the center look bigger as well.


Image One: Pyramid -1. Image Two: Scry -1. Image Three: Scry_3D 1. Image Four: Snowflake 1. Image Five: Spherical3D -1. Image Six: SphericalN -1. A negative Pyramid setting produces a center that looks raised. A negative Scry make a hole in the fractal with very little details. A positive setting of Scry_3D produces a very bulbous looking center.


Image One: Squarical -1. Image Two: Synth -1. Image Three: Tess_v2 1. Image Four: Tess_v2 -1. Image Five: Truchet -1. Image Six: Twoface -1. Synth produces a puckered fractal with an interesting outer area. Tess_v2 has plenty of options as well; the positive version creates a middle ring. A negative version produces a highly detailed puckered fractal. The outer areas are elaborately detailed. Truchet produces a flower pattern overlay. Twoface makes what looks like two different fractals, one that is like an outer band, and one that is somewhat like the normal fractal.


Image One: Z_vortex -1. Z_vortex creates a complete spiral effect in the outer bands. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an interesting effect, only the center area remains unaffected. I hope you've enjoyed this tutorial. It's very special to me, after all, not only did this fractal win the fractal division, it also symbolizes the end of a year's work. I hope you've all enjoyed this series, it's been very hard work to write them, but fun at the same time. I just can't believe it's all over. If you have any questions feel free to send me a note, I don't mind answering them at all. Thank you for reading this series, and good luck fractaling!


Deciphering Fractals: A Beginner's Guide to Understanding Apophysis Gradient Pack


Deciphering Fractals: A Beginner's Guide to Understanding Apophysis Flame Pack


Final Note... 

Hope you enjoyed reading the seventeenth issue of the planet renders magazine! If you've got any suggestions or complaints, you can express them by leaving comments on each separate article. Be sure to vote in the poll above as well. Want to get involved?

We have plenty of blog contributor spots available for grabs. If you'd like to get involved, make an application in the correct forums. Again, I'll say that you don't necessarily have to be well known. You just have to be active, well mannered and have a decent grasp on the English language. Either way, it's nice having your name in a different color!

Remember, if you want some quick pr points, you can write an article and you will be rewarded if it is featured in the next issue. Just pm your submission to one of the team. You also receive points for being featured in the Monthly Top 10. But since charity is more our thing, we are always looking for psd's that we can release each month. So donations are much appreciated. But most importantly..

As we are planning to release a pdf magazine every quarter. We need layouts to be fully designed. The magazine will be submitted to dA so hopefully lots of people will see it. If you have any knowledge regarding anything from pdf files to online magazines, please come forward. Also we need people to design layouts, so again, if you are interested, come forward.

Another quick thing that needs to be said: If you read anything in the magazine which is either false, offensive or inappropriate, please notify one of us as soon as possible.

We hope you look forward to the next issue.


PR Magazine Issue Four