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VOTER GUIDE for the 2017 general election Jefferson County • Clallam County • State

Published as a public service by the

Peninsula Daily News


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FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

VOTER TAB 2017

Introduction

Be sure to vote by 8 p.m. Nov. 7 PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

This special section of the Peninsula Daily News, also available online at www.peninsula dailynews.com, provides voters with information about the Nov. 7 general election. It includes candidate questionnaires and biographical profiles for all contested races in Clallam and Jefferson counties. It does not include questionnaires and profiles from candidates who did not submit requested information to the Peninsula Daily News for this publication or who are running in races in which they are unopposed but appear on the ballot. Port Angeles City Council Position 1 candidates Jim Moran and Todd Negus and Position 2 candidates Mike French and Jake Oppelt are not included in this special publication. Negus and Oppelt withdrew from their respective races after advancing from the primary to the general election, which was too late to have their names removed from the general election ballot. The voter guide also includes “About the Job” features that contain information on the duties of the positions being sought, compensation, election boundaries and regular meeting schedules. Ballots will be mailed by auditor’s offices in Clallam and Jefferson counties to registered voters Wednesday, Oct. 18. Voting continues until 8 p.m. Nov. 7. Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb coordinated compilation of candidate questionnaires and biographical profiles and compiled and wrote the “About the Job” features. Copy Editor Allison McGee designed this section.

Staff photojournalist Keith Thorpe processed photos. Executive Editor Leah Leach edited the copy. Candidate answers were limited to 75 words per question and were edited for length, grammar and spelling. For voters who are disabled, a voting terminal is available at the Clallam County Auditor’s Office in the county courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., Suite 1, Port Angeles, and at the Jefferson County Auditor’s Office in the county courthouse, 1820 Jefferson St., Port Townsend. Ballots must be postmarked no later than Nov. 7 or dropped off by no later than 8 p.m. Nov. 7 at the following drop boxes:

Clallam County • Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. Fourth St., Port Angeles. Drive-up drop boxes are on the circular drive in front of the main entrance and directly across from the disabled parking area near the main entrance. • Auditor’s office in the county courthouse, open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Nov. 7. • Sequim Village Shopping Center, in the parking lot near the J.C. Penney store, 651 W. Washington St. • Forks City Hall, outside near the entrance, 500 E. Division St., Forks.

Jefferson County • Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson St., Port Townsend. A drive-up drop box is in the parking lot off Franklin Street. • Auditor’s office inside the county courthouse, open 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, 8:30 a.m. to

8 p.m. Nov. 7. • Jefferson County Library: 620 Cedar Ave., Port Hadlock. A drive-up drop box is in the parking lot. • Brinnon Community Center, walk-up, outside near the entrance, 306144 U.S. Highway 101, Brinnon. • Quilcene Community Center, walk-up, outside near the entrance, 294952 U.S. Highway 101, Quilcene. • Nordland Fire Station, drive-up, in the parking lot, 6633 Flagler Road, Nordland.

Election calendar • Oct. 18: Ballots are mailed to voters for the Aug. 1 primary election. • Oct. 20: Last day to file as a write-in candidate. • Oct. 30: Last day for in-person voter registration. • Nov. 7: General election. • Nov. 28: County canvassing boards certify election results. • Dec. 7: Last day for state secretary of state’s office to certify election results.

Have questions?

Statewide advisory votes on ballot PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The only statewide measures on the Nov. 7 ballot will be advisory votes on three bills approved by the 2017 Legislature. Advisory votes give voters the opportunity to advise the Legislature on whether to repeal or maintain a tax increase. They are non-binding votes that will not change the law. The advisory votes on the general election ballot are: • Advisory vote 16: The Legislature increased, without a vote of the people, the food fish excise tax rate on certain salmon and game fish, costing less than $1,000,000 in the first 10 years, for government spending. This bill increased revenue to the state wildlife account by increasing commercial fishing license fees and streamlining wholesale fish dealing, buying and selling requirements, according to a bill summary. The state Office of Financial Management’s 10-year tax projection was $546,000. Among those approving the bill were Reps. Mike Chapman, D-Port Angeles, and Steve Tharinger, D-Sequim, and Sen. Kevin Van De Wege, D-Sequim, of Legislative District 24, which covers Clallam and Jefferson counties and part of Grays Harbor County. • Advisory vote 17: The Legislature expanded, without a vote of the people, the business and occupation tax and narrowed certain retail sales and use tax exemptions, costing $565,000,000 in the first 10 years, for government spending. Among those approving the bill were Chapman, Tharinger and Van De Wege. • Advisory vote 18: The Legislature imposed, without a vote of the people, an additional state property tax for common schools, costing $12,949,000,000 in the first 10 years, for government spending. The bill funds fully the state’s program of basic education by providing equitable education opportunities through reform of state and local education contributions, according to a bill summary. Among those approving the bill was Tharinger. Chapman and Van De Wege opposed it. For more on the measures, see the state secretary of state’s website at http://tinyurl.com/PDN-StateGuide and the Office of Financial Management’s website at www.ofm.wa.gov/ballot.

• Call the Elections Center at the Clallam County Auditor’s Office at 360-417-2217, email rwagner@co.clallam.wa.us or go to http://tinyurl.com/PDNClallamElection for information on the election, including the Clallam County online voter guide. • Call the Elections Center at the Jefferson County Auditor’s Office at 360-385-9117, email elections@co.jefferson.wa. us or go to http://tinyurl.com/ PDN-JeffersonElection for information on the election, including the Jefferson County online voter tary of State’s Office’s online guide. voter guide for registered voters • The Washington Secre-

is at http://tinyurl.com/PDNStateGuide.


VOTER GUIDE 2017

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

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Clallam County

Port of Port Angeles, District 1

plan is implemented. A description of the competitive advantage available to the organization has to be included. Question: Can CRTC products Port of Port Angeles commissioner, District 1 be sold in a cost-competitive environment with a profit? Election boundaries: Clallam County Management needs to focus on a marketing and sales effort Voters: 50,707 as of Sept. 19 with the technology that is developed. Term: Four years Staffing needs to include experienced individuals capable of Meetings: First and third Tuesday every month implementing a successful sales plan. Compensation: $254 monthly salary, $114 per day for port McAleer: While the state and business for up to 96 days, totaling a maximum of $13,992; port were instrumental in creatreceive the same health insurance received by port employees ing the Composite Recycling Technology Center, it now funcCommissioner duties: Pass a general fund operating budtions independently. get that for 2017 is $9 million for 2017 and funds 43 full-timeClallam County has benefited equivalent positions; governance and oversight of all port operfrom the international attention ations, including setting lease rates for port property and rates it has brought us, and the port is for berthage at the Port Angeles Boat Haven and John Wayne watching the CRTC’s progress Marina; operate William R. Fairchild International Airport; closely as it refines its product pass resolutions; set property tax levy rates; and approve ecostrategies. nomic incentives for incoming businesses. But the port has not discussed extending an additional contractual arrangement, nor has the McAleer: I’ve helped facilitate In addition, work needs to CRTC requested it. continue to attract additional 14 meetings with potential airLike other businesses, its companies to operate with the lines as commission president. management can seek funds Air service will continue to be a resources available in Clallam from traditional commercial County. top priority. sources. The port’s land use decisions We are working with U.S. Rep. should consider how to balance Derek Kilmer and other electeds What is your plan for to find creative solutions to issues and support logging, the maribringing back commercial time trades, recreational boating passenger service to Fairchild like fares and subsidies. and tourism. Like all small airports in the International Airport? McAleer: While the port is U.S., ours is dealing with national Cobb: Returning commercial certainly focused on growing market forces that will be chalair service to the airport is a high marine trades and new induslenging for some time, but I am priority for the community and tries like composites, timber is certain we will be successful in will take a concerted, long-term effort, especially with the current bringing back commercial air ser- still an economic powerhouse, generating more than $4 million vice. pilot shortage for smaller comof revenue for the port alone. munity airlines. It remains a priority for us. What emphasis should the Promoting demand will be In fact, no other single indusport give to the logging indusnecessary to make air service try in Clallam County comes try and forest products? profitable. close to providing the economic Cobb: The port should conThe port needs to maintain tinue supporting the forest prod- impact that timber does. and upgrade the field to remain The timber industry supports ucts industry as a priority, just capable of supporting mid-size many good-paying jobs — forestnot its only priority. commercial aircraft. ers, loggers, truckers and longCreative efforts are needed to A continued outreach needs to shoremen, plus many indirect be maintained with all likely air- encourage existing forest prodjobs. lines that could serve Port Ange- ucts companies to expand and les. diversify. PLEASE TURN TO NEXT PAGE

ABOUT THE JOB

Michael R. Cobb

Colleen M. McAleer

Residence: Sequim Phone: 805-504-6609 Email: mcobb@michael cobbforport.com Campaign website: http://tinyurl.com/pdncobbport Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 74 Education: Bachelor’s degree, finance, University of Washington, 1966; master’s in business administration, accounting, Seattle University, 1973; U.S. Coast Guard master mariner’s license, American Marine Training Centers LLC, 2016 Occupation: Part-time senior sail training instructor, Northwest Maritime Center, Port Townsend Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No.

Residence: Sequim Phone: 360-681-0588 Email: colleenforport commissioner@gmail.com Campaign website: www. facebook.com/ColleenForPort Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 50 Education: Certified commercial investment manager, 2004; military intelligence advanced course, graduated 1995; U.S. Army Aviation Flight School, multiple fixed wing and helicopter ratings, 1993; bachelor’s degree, computer science, Florida Institute of Technology, 1989 Occupation: President, Washington Business Alliance, Port Angeles Have you ever run for or held elective public office? District 1 Port of Port Angeles commissioner, 2014-present

How financially committed should the port be to the Composite Recycling Technology Center (CRTC) once the port’s 2017 funding commit-

ment is fulfilled? Cobb: The port should discontinue additional support for the CRTC unless a sound business


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FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

Clallam County

Port Angeles City Council, Position 3 How should the city address the needs of its economically challenged population, such as panhandlers and homeless people? Schromen-Wawrin: There are numerous benefits to helping people get back on their feet. Our economy and community are stronger and healthier when more people are productive and selfreliant. This isn’t just good social policy, but it also saves taxpayers money by reducing the demand for expensive emergency services. The city can work with builders, developers and social service providers to address affordable housing, which is often a root cause of homelessness. Wojnowski: Panhandling and homelessness are two separate issues. Identification, communication and assessments are first steps, and subsequently educating and pairing with available services and jobs. There are currently no laws on the books prohibiting panhandling.

Lindsey Schromenwawrin and artur wojnowski Candidates’ biographies appear on the next page. The city needs to enforce existing codes to deter unwanted behavior and actions. We need to be compassionate and helpful but not tolerant and enabling of negative behaviors and actions. We can only help those receptive to help. What should be done to improve the city’s streets beyond using funds from the transportation benefit district? Schromen-Wawrin: Port Angeles’ streets were developed around facilitating truck and car traffic through the city. Our long-term plans should account for how we will likely move goods and

predict the cost of maintaining, rehabilitating or replacing infrastructure. It also means doing cost-benefit analysis to make sure we are properly accounting for the value of preventative services. For revenue, we need to take the burden off fixedincome residents by encouraging mixed-use economic development. Wojnowski: I would make sure we are constantly reviewing the budget to decrease expenses, and growing industry to raise revenue without needing to raise taxes, which hurts the majority of middle-income and poor residents in our communities. We need to make sure we are using money wisely and expanding revenue How would you fund through properly managcity services? ing growth. Schromen-Wawrin: We need to make sure The city needs to be fiscally we have creative options responsible. available to stretch our We need to avoid spend- dollars. ing money that we don’t We need to have staff have and provide services accountable for productivas efficiently as possible. ity. This means doing longterm asset management to PLEASE TURN TO PAGE 6 people in the future. Along with an efficient system of arterials, we should also facilitate neighborhood development through street designs that calm traffic and make it safer for healthy activities like walking and bicycling. It’s important for the city to work closely with nearby residents on street improvements. Wojnowski: Aside from currently available grants and funding, we need to make sure we are properly allocating money in the budget. We need to cut and reallocate money from unsuccessful areas, and we need to increase revenue through other programs and partnerships without increasing taxes.

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Port of Port Angeles, District 1/continued What would you like to see as your biggest accomplishment by the time your term expires? Cobb: I will be proud to review the port’s success in attracting at least four new significant employers to locate or expand in Clallam County with more than 250 new family-wage jobs. This will be the result of a team effort involving the cities, Clallam County government, the county Economic Development Corp. and other supporting organizations. This will be accomplished while improving the appearance of the Port Angeles waterfront and protecting our environment. McAleer: I’ve been proud to be a leader in the planning to develop the former Peninsula Plywood mill site as the port’s new Marine Trades Industrial Park. It is a unique and critical area — an industrially zoned 18 acres adjacent to the port’s marine terminals and travel lift pier. There’s no doubt that in my next term, it will become an important new economic base for our community, with companies that provide modern, good-paying jobs. How would you be a

more effective port commissioner than your opponent? Cobb: My broad and extensive business experience will serve the port and our community well. I understand what it takes to start and run a successful business and put my personal guarantee on the line. I have also helped many companies in the startup and expansion phase on their way to long-term profitability. I have held positions requiring financial management of multimilliondollar organizations. This experience will enable me to relate effectively with business owners and managers. I like working together as a team for results. McAleer: The port was a much different place when I arrived as an employee six years ago. I am proud to say I acted as a change agent and was a part of a remarkable turnaround. The port has accomplished much in the last four years, including the Peninsula Plywood cleanup, tenant recruitment and increased community outreach. There is no substitute for experience and proven leadership.

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PA council, Position 3/continued

Lindsey schromenwawrin Residence: Port Angeles Phone: 360-406-4321 Email: lindsey@Lindsey SchromenWawrin.com Campaign website: www. LindseySchromenWawrin.com Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 38 Education: Port Angeles High School graduate, 1998; bachelor’s degree, Oberlin College, Ohio, 2002; law degree, Gonzaga University School of Law, 2013 Occupation: Attorney Have you ever run for or held elective public office? Ran for the Clallam County Charter Review Commission in 2014, did not win

Artur wojnowski Residence: Port Angeles Phone: 360-808-5597 Email: Artur@Home-Guys. com Campaign website: www. facebook.com/ArturWojnowski Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 33 Education: Graduated from Lake Park High School, Roselle, Ill.; four years of classes at College of DuPage, Lombard, Ill., and Harper College, Palatine, Ill. Occupation: Lead maintenance manager, Dungeness Meadows Homeowners’ Association, Sequim; self-employed general contractor Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No.

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What would you do to prevent the kind of discord that characterized the City Council in 2016? Schromen-Wawrin: Council members are representatives of the people of Port Angeles. We’re civil servants. We need to listen to the people. Our leadership is in finding solutions that best address the numerous concerns of a diverse constituency. We should look at public participation as an opportunity for better collaboration, deliberation and decision-making. By maintaining a civil and democratic dialogue, we can reach decisions that most people recognize to be in the best interests of our community. Wojnowski: I will communicate, understand and comprehend the voters. I won’t flip-flop on issues. I will represent my voters and be open to them. I will do what is in the best interest of our community and its people, which is to give them opportunities and not price them out of the area. How would you be a more effective City Council member than your opponent? Schromen-Wawrin: As a constitutional law attorney, I understand what governments can do, what they can’t do and how they can remain accountable to the people. I can take your concerns and address them in policy changes. I recognize the interconnections between our economic, social and environmental policies. It takes a community to build a community. I am ready to put my skills and experience to work as part of an active City Council to strengthen our community. Wojnowski: I have more experience in running and managing a business and a small community. My current career, maintaining a community of 200-plus homes, has given me valuable insight and experience, which is a tremendous benefit to our community.

CLALLAM COUNTY

Port Angeles City Council, Position 4 How should the city address the needs of its economically challenged population, such as panhandlers and homeless people? Berglund: First, the good news: The number of homeless people has gone from 740 in 2006 to 114 in the most recent count by the Homelessness Task Force. As we continue to address this crisis, the city has an important leadership role. By supporting collaboration between existing agencies, especially those focused on workforce programs, job training and giving individuals the opportunity to lift themselves out of poverty, we will continue our progress. Dexter: The city faces major challenges with affordable and available housing, child care for working parents and jobs that offer wages allowing families to enjoy a high quality of life. The City Council can continue to support public and private collaborations to address the needs of everyone in the community. The council can also be a sounding board and liaison for community members to help address these key issues.

Travis berglund and kate dexter Candidates’ biographies appear on the next page. needed, we should treat infrastructure maintenance as a priority in the future and resist the attempt to raise taxes for core services. I will focus on creating a long-term plan for street maintenance so that we are able to replace the transportation benefit district when it expires. Dexter: The city should focus on making our streets accessible to people of all ages and abilities, including projects that improve safety for pedestrians, bicyclists and people in wheelchairs. Connecting neighborhood sidewalks would allow families to walk to school safely and our seniors to remain active and independent. The upgraded crosswalk at Civic Field has improved pedestrian and motorist safety, and I support installing them in other locations, such as Lauridsen Boulevard near the public library.

What should be done to improve the city’s streets beyond using funds from the transportation benefit district? How would you fund city Berglund: Port Angeles services? recently approved a new tax to Berglund: I will focus on fund a transportation district, efficient use of the budget to which will help with ongoing improve services in Port Angeles. maintenance of our streets. PLEASE TURN TO NEXT PAGE While this funding was badly


VOTER GUIDE 2017

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PA City Council, Position 4/continued

Our outstanding debt is starting to decrease, and I will work to continue that trend. My professional background has prepared me well to understand the city’s budget and financial limitations. The city has the responsibility to invest your money wisely, and I will analyze the return on investment at every opportunity. Dexter: The City Council should work collaboratively with city staff and the community to prioritize our needs and wants and make budget decisions accordingly. As a council member, I will support maintaining current service levels while also exploring available federal and state funding that would relieve pressure on the local budget. In addition, I will work to learn about and share additional funding opportunities that enhance current services and allow us to widen our scope of offerings. What would you do to prevent the kind of discord that characterized the City Council in 2016? Berglund: If elected, I will treat other City Council members, staff and citizens with respect. When there are disagreements, I will move on to issues where there is unison. When residents express a clear consensus on an issue, I will put my convictions aside and represent the majority. I will encourage commu-

are fully addressing everyone’s needs and concerns. I would like to see the council expand its outreach with community members beyond the farmers market. Council meetings do not provide an opportunity for dialogue, which is critical for quality representation.

travis berglund

kate dexter

Residence: Port Angeles Phone: 360-4618338 Email: travismichael berglund@hotmail.com Campaign website: www.facebook.com/ TravisPACouncil Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 34 Education: Graduated 2001, Port Angeles High School; University of Washington, Seattle, 1980-82; attended Essex County College, Newark, N.J.; Bellevue Community College, Bellevue; Peninsula College Occupation: Financial adviser, owner of Financial Advocates Investment Management, Port Angeles Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No.

Residence: Port Angeles Phone: 360-4614330 Email: kate dexter2017@gmail.com Campaign website: www.DexterForCouncil. com Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 44 Education: Bachelor’s degree, history and public service, Albion College, Albion, Mich., 1994; master’s degree, public administration, University of Washington, Seattle Occupation: Substitute teacher, Port Angeles School District; special projects coordinator, First Presbyterian Church of Port Angeles Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No.

nication with the public and focus on issues that have the most impact on our quality of life.

Dexter: Improving communication with the community is an important step to ensuring that we

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How would you be a more effective City Council member than your opponent? Berglund: My longtime community leadership and professional background have prepared me well to address the challenges we face as a city. I will work hard to resolve these issues, focus on efficient use of the public’s funds and push for a council that is truly responsive to the citizens. I will bring strong, creative leadership to our council, and I will promote civil and productive dialogue. I would be honored and grateful to have your vote. Dexter: As a working mom with a background in public administration and rural community development, I know the challenges families face and that working together is the best way to achieve our common goals. I will collaborate on policies that positively impact our community. Together, we’ll make Port Angeles a city where we can all live, work and play, and where our young people have ample opportunities to raise families and start businesses of their own.

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

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CLALLAM COUNTY

Forks Community Hospital, Position 5 How would you respond to the budgetary challenges the district will face if the Affordable Care Act is repealed? DeMatties: If the Affordable Care Act is repealed, the hospital will face the enormous challenge of treating patients without insurance. The hospital board will need to join together to come up with a budget plan that allows for patients to be treated without the hospital going into debt. It is important we do not just throw away the opportunity of helping our community members who are in need of medical attention. George: The Forks Community Hospital administration began preparing for anticipated changes in the Affordable Care Act some time ago. Compensation by the federal government will change and challenge the hospital’s operation. We are confident the challenge will be met. What should the district do to address the opioid crisis? DeMatties: The opioid crisis is hitting our community drastically.

gerald ‘jerry’ george and Skyler dematties Candidates’ biographies, About the Job outline appear on the next page.

I believe the district should have a stronger repercussion community members need to face if they are caught with a drug addiction. But when overdosed patients come into the hospital for medical treatment, I 100 percent believe they are just as equal to any other patient, and we need to do everything possible to bring them back from the overdose. George: Continue existing CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) guidelines severely restricting opioid prescriptions. Hospital staff train and supply Narcan to first responders for treatment of overdose victims. At least three lives have been saved by this staff initiative so far. PLEASE

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FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

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Forks Community Hospital, Position 5/continued ABOUT THE JOB Clallam County Hospital District 1 (Forks Community Hospital) Election boundaries: West End of Clallam County, including Neah Bay, Clallam Bay, the city of Forks and most of Beaver Voters: 4,558 as of Sept. 19

gerald ‘jerry’ george Residence: Sekiu Phone: 360-6452354 Email: diggerjg@ curiositypress.com Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 74 Education: Bachelor’s degree, ecology and systematic biology, San Francisco State University, San Francisco; extensive graduate study Occupation: Former San Francisco Chronicle lifestyle columnist Have you ever run for or held elective public office? Currently the appointed Position 5 Forks Community Hospital commissioner; library commissioner, Marin County, Calif., for 15 years

skyler dematties Residence: Beaver Phone: 360-6402931 Email: skyler balla4@gmail.com Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 18 Education: Graduated from Forks High School; currently enrolled in Central Washington University Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No.

Term: Six-years, short and full term. The winner of the general election takes office after results are certified Nov. 28. Meetings: Fourth Tuesday every month. Compensation: $114 per day for district business up to 96 days annually, maximum $10,944 a year; the same insurance coverage that is provided to employees

VOTER GUIDE 2017

facing, in a positive way. Sometimes, this can’t be treated with just an arrest. In some cases, it takes rehabilitation and months of fighting the addiction. I think the hospital could have a huge hand in this and come together to help fight this epidemic. George: To ensure and celebrate the dedication and fine accomplishments of Forks Community Hospital staff and administration in our community while providing a planned future that ensures its continued excellence.

How would you be a more effective hospital commissioner than your opponent? DeMatties: I believe I Commissioner duties: Approve a general would be a more effective fund operating budget that in 2017 is $45.2 milhospital commissioner lion, which pays for 214 full-time-equivalent over my opponent due to employees and pays for the operation of Forks the fact that I have been Community Hospital, Bogachiel Medical Clinic raised in our community in Forks and West End Outreach Services (menof Forks. tal health and chemical dependency services) in I truly care about Forks, which serves Clallam and Jefferson counour community, and espeties; Clallam Bay Medical Clinic in Clallam Bay; cially since I am going to and for Forks Ambulance school to be a part of the medical field, I care about our hospital and believe our hospital is such a big What is your top pri- ing the best possible com- part of our community and in saving the lives ority for the district’s passionate health care to of our community mem2018-20 strategic plan? our community and combers. DeMatties: My top plies with the laws and George: My opponent priority for the district’s regulations govern modis a bright young woman strategic plan would be ern medical care. who graduated as valedicmaking sure our commuI will also work with the newly formed Recruit- torian of 2017 Forks High nity hospital can give its School class, but her expeabsolute best care and be ing and Retention Committee to stabilize medical rience is limited. as effective as possible to I have served on Clalproviders. every patient while still lam Bay Clinic’s advisory staying afloat in the budboard for three years, What would be your get aspect. chaired that board for two biggest accomplishTrying to cut costs is years, served on the Clinic important, but we can’t do ment by the time your Provider Operating Counterm expired? so if it means cutting DeMatties: I hope my cil for both clinics for two patient care. biggest accomplishment is years and been on the George: Ensure that hospital district board improving the opioid epithe hospital remains fisdemic our community is cally sound while providsince January.


VOTER GUIDE 2017

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Clallam County

CLALLAM COUNTY

Forks mayor ABOUT THE JOB

Candidate Tim Fletcher declined to fill out a questionnaire for this voter guide. What would be your leadership style on the City Council? Ayers: An effective city leadermanager is a teambuilder who uses his or her skills and experience to lead the City Council in attaining the city’s organizational goals. I would facilitate the success of the City Council by providing it with the critical information and resources its members need to effectively do their jobs in serving the citizens of the city. My leadership styles would vary with city goals, City Council members’ skills and fiscal constraints. Should law enforcement and jail services be consolidated with the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office? Ayers: No, I do not support contracting of the Forks Police Department with Clallam County. Any decision on contracting jail services would have to be made in conjunction with Forks voters and the City Council. How do you see the city undertaking sewer system improvement and expansion? Ayers: The existing sewer system needs updating and repairs so new businesses can start operating in Forks. Additionally, new businesses outside the sewer district should be allowed to pay for their connection costs so they can start operating in Forks. Right now, the system is over capacity in the summer, and the city simply does not have the money to fully expand the system in accordance with the long-term sewer plan. Should city government be more active on social media

Forks mayor General election boundaries: City of Forks Voters: 1,547 as of Sept. 19 Term: Four years

Kenneth ayers Residence: Forks Phone: 360-963-2550 Email: kilofox59@ hotmail.com Campaign website: www.facebook.com/KenFor ForksMayor Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 58 Education: Graduated from Tyee High School, SeaTac, 1977; bachelor’s degree, aerospace science, Central Washington University, 1983; master’s degree, aerospace science, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Fla., 1993 Occupation: Retired intelligence analyst, U.S. Department of Defense Have you ever run for or held elective public office? I was unanimously appointed to the Forks City Council Position 4 in February 2016. such as Facebook? Ayers: Facebook would be a great way to communicate city operations, soliciting public input and reporting maintenance problems with our streets, but not for communicating with the City Council due to the associated Public Meetings Act issues.

Meetings: Meets with the City Council the second and fourth Monday every month Compensation: None Duties: Forks operates under a strong-mayor form of government. The mayor acts as the chief executive and administrative officer of the city. The mayor submits a general fund operating budget for City Council approval that in 2017 is $1.8 million, which pays for 28 full-time-equivalent positions; hires all city staff; chairs and sets the agenda for council meetings; sets administrative priorities; and implements the budget. The mayor also breaks tie City Council votes. How would you be a more effective mayor than your opponent? Ayers: I have decades of leadership and management experience and all the necessary skills to lead and effect change in the city’s government. I also have many years of experience in executing multimilliondollar budgets and the expertise to work with the Forks City Council to streamline our expenditures and focus savings on improving services for the citizens of Forks.

Forks City Council, Position 4 For the Forks City Council Position 3 race, neither Mike Gilstrap nor Joe Soha provided information for this voter guide. For Forks City Council Position 4, candidate Bridgette Soha did not provide information.

The About the Job outline appears on the next page. Should law enforcement and jail services be consolidated with the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office? Brager: Law enforcement and jail services should always remain with the city of Forks, as long as we can afford to pay for them. How do you see the city undertaking sewer system improvement and expansion? Brager: I would support the efforts of the mayor and city staff to implement the comprehensive sewer plan and find ways to improve and expand the system to allow for business development. To what degree should levy increases be imposed to fund the general fund budget? PLEASE

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Bill brager Residence: Forks Phone: 360-374-9027 Email: billbrager@ gmail.com Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 62 Education: Graduated from Forks High School, 1973; bachelor’s degree, business administration, Washington State University, Pullman, 1978 Occupation: Currently bed-and-breakfast innkeeper, Miller Tree Inn Bed & Breakfast, Forks Have you ever run for or held elective public office? Currently Position 3 Forks City Council member; also served as hospital commissioner for Forks Community Hospital.

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FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

Crescent School Board, Position 1

Forks City Council Election boundaries: City of Forks

Term: Four years Meetings: Second and fourth Monday every month Compensation: None Council member duties: Approve a general fund operating budget that in 2017 is $1.8 million, which pays for 28 full-timeequivalent positions; adopt all ordinances; approve all contracts; serve on boards, commissions and subcommittees at the city, county, regional and state levels; and levy taxes.

Forks council continued Brager: Levy increases should only be imposed as a last resort to fund essential city services and, of course, after a vote of our citizens. All other avenues should be explored before considering this option. What will you do to attract businesses to Quillayute Airport and the industrial park? Brager: I would support the efforts of the mayor and city staff in attracting prospective businesses. How would you be a more effective City Council member than your opponent? Brager: I have no way to know if I would be a more effective City Council member than Bridgette [Soha].

VOTER GUIDE 2017

Clallam County

ABOUT THE JOB

Voters: 1,547 as of Sept. 19

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Is the school district’s anti-bullying policy adequate? Chang: Crescent School has an anti-bullying policy. Our job is primarily to help people understand how the policy works and to direct them to the appropriate district resources if they have a concern. Conat: I don’t believe the school’s anti-bullying policy is adequate as it is written today. There has been much discussion regarding the anti-bullying policies and follow-through procedures. There’s been a lot of work done by the current administration and school board over the last several months. It is a policy that needs to stay in the forefront to benefit and protect our students.

The About the Job outline appears on the next page.

tainties resulting from the state Supreme Court’s McCleary decision? Chang: The district addresses funding uncertainties by continued prudent financial management. Legislative contact to urge that the state fully fund education is important. Making sometimes tough decisions about wants vs. needs is a part of our budget process. We are always aware that our students’ education is our first priority. Conat: The district must remain financially solvent. There are many rules for the How would you reach out allocation of the funds. for community input? It is the district’s responsibilChang: We recently ran a cli- ity to proactively stay informed. mate survey, which gave students, district employees and What would be your bigthe community an opportunity gest accomplishment by the to express their opinions. time your term expires? Also, community members Chang: My biggest accomare encouraged to attend school plishment at the end of my term board meetings, and they are would be helping to continue given a chance to comment. making Crescent a really great Conat: First of all, we need school — one that students want to welcome input from the com- to attend, one that employees munity. wish to stay with and one that I value the input the commu- provides incentive for lifelong nity can provide. learning. Many different avenues can Conat: My biggest accombe utilized. plishment I hope to achieve Social media and networking when I serve is to increase is a quick way to communicate awareness and maintain an as well as newspapers, surveys open dialogue between the needs and community gatherings. of the school and the community. The community should be We cannot have a flourishing kept informed in order to supschool without the support of our port the school. surrounding community. The Joyce community has As the needs change, we need been very supportive of the to be prepared to change as well. school district in years past. How would you be a more How should the district effective school board memaddress the funding uncerber than your opponent?

Ann chang Residence: Port Angeles Phone: 360-460-6287 Email: sierra4_33@msn. com Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 78 Education: High school graduate, two years of nursing school Occupation: Operating room secretary, Olympic Medical Center Have you ever run for or held elective public office? Served on the Crescent School Board, 1990-99; appointed to the current school board Position 1 seat in 2015

Chang: As far as being a more effective board member than my opponent, I can only say that I have been a Crescent School Board member for

kathleen marie conat Residence: Joyce Phone: 406-270-0851 Email: kathyconat@ yahoo.com Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 54 Education: Graduated from Powell County High School, Deer Lodge, Mont., 1981; graduated from practical nursing program, Helena Vocational Technical School, Helena, Mont., 1985-86; Associate of Applied Science, Salish Kootenai College, Pablo, Mont., 2005-07 Occupation: Registered nurse, working as a nursing supervisor at Olympic Medical Center Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No. approximately 12 years — my present term plus nine-plus years from 1990-99. PLEASE

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VOTER GUIDE 2017

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Clallam County

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Crescent School Board, Position 2 Candidate Amanda K. Jennings did not provide information as requested for this voter guide. Is the school district’s anti-bullying policy adequate? Evinger: The Crescent School District is aware that bullying is problematic in many schools across the nation. In light of this, the district has adopted a no-tolerance policy that will be implemented through the “restorative justice” process. The effectiveness of this process will be continually monitored and evaluated by teachers, staff and administrators throughout the school year. How would you reach out for community input? Evinger: I would seek out community input by being available through personal conversations, electronic means (telephone, email or text) and by encouraging public attendance at all school board meetings. I would specifically request input from community leaders, parents, students, school staff and administrators in order to be informed about critical issues, because good communication is essential for the development and maintenance of a quality educational environment. How should the district address the funding uncer-

How would you be a more effective school board member than your opponent? Evinger: I have been an educator for over 40 years and understand the special relationship between students, teachers and administrators. This gives me a perspective that will benefit the entire Crescent community. Having no children attending Crescent, I will be a fair and equal advocate for all students and serve as their spokesperson.

ABOUT THE JOB Crescent School District School Board Election boundaries: Includes the community of Joyce and part of Freshwater Bay east to areas near Lake Sutherland Voters: 1,971 as of Sept. 19

tainties resulting from the state Supreme Court’s McCleary decision? Evinger: The Crescent School District has proven to be very resourceful in the development of its annual budgets over the years in which the McCleary stalemate has hung over the state. I suspect the same resourcefulness will allow the district to navigate the uncertain fiscal waters as McCleary funds and tax dollars are identified. What would be your biggest accomplishment by the time your term had expired? Evinger: I envision a school with engaged students working hand-in-hand with a dedicated and respectful faculty being supported by effective administrators and staff delivering a curriculum that will prepare our graduates for success after Crescent. I will strive to see that vision come to life at Crescent School.

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Term: Four years Meetings: Fourth Thursday every month Compensation: None

lee evinger les

Residence: Port Ange-

Phone: 816-390-1684 Email: crescent evinger@hotmail.com Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 70 Education: Mechanicsburg (Pa.) High School graduate; bachelor’s degree, Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa., 1968; master’s degree, Indiana University, 1970; coursework, Indiana University and Missouri Western State University Occupation: Retired professor of Geology, Missouri Western State University, St. Joseph, Mo. Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No.

Duties: Pass a general fund budget that for 2017-18 is $4.7 million and funds 42 full-time-equivalent positions; hire a schools superintendent; establish staff performance criteria; set student behavior and education policies, including curriculum standards; provide information to the public on district policies; evaluate teaching materials; and levy taxes

Crescent Schools, Position 1 continued

I have budget experience and board collaboration ability. I have attended a number of conferences and workshops. I have a good working relationship with the school and the supportive community. Conat: First of all, I must thank my opponent for her years of service to the Crescent School District. I have twins who have attended Crescent for 11 years, and I have grandchildren who are currently attending. I feel I am current with the needs of the students.


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

VOTER GUIDE 2017

Clallam County

CLALLAM Cape Flattery COUNTY School Board, Clallam County Position 3 Candidate Joe McGimpsey did not provide information as requested for this voter guide. How would you address overcrowding at Neah Bay Elementary School? Campbell: As it is now, Neah Bay Elementary School needs to be relocated out of the tsunami zone. As this is put into the works, the facility will be built to accommodate a growing student body. In the interim, portable buildings and repurposing the existing infrastructure to accommodate the students’ needs will be addressed, as well as looking at the high school and middle school room availability. Would you expect to ask voters to support a levy or bond measure during your term? Campbell: I would not, unless absolutely necessary. It is my goal to address the financial spending throughout the district to make sure that funds are being used to the best ability for both Neah Bay schools and Clallam Bay schools to benefit all the kids. How should funding be provided for music, art and shop classes? Campbell: Music, art, shop and other classes are important in creating a well-rounded education. I believe the funding is available in the budget, but we must make it a priority. We have a fantastic community, and between our wonderful volunteers and the talents of our staff, it’s very attainable to provide these.

Fire District 2, Position 1

ABOUT THE JOB Cape Flattery School District School Board Election boundaries: Neah Bay and Clallam Bay Voters: 1,217 as of Sept. 19 Term: Four years Meetings: Third Wednesday every month, alternating meeting sites between Clallam Bay School and Neah Bay High School Compensation: None Board duties: Pass a general fund budget that for 2017-18 is $9.3 million and funds 100 full-time-equivalent positions; hire a schools superintendent; establish staff performance criteria; set student behavior and education policies, including curriculum standards; provide information to the public on district policies; evaluate teaching materials; levy taxes; and establish a longterm strategic plan How should the district address the funding uncertainties resulting from the state Supreme Court’s McCleary decision? Campbell: Until we are certain of how much money will be

janet campbell Residence: Sekiu Phone: 360-640-4583 Email: janet.d.campbell18@gmail. com Campaign website: www.janetcampbellcape flatteryschoolboard3.com Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 38 Education: Graduated from Sonoma Valley High School, Sonoma, Calif., 1997 Occupation: Owner, Breakwater Restaurant, Clallam Bay Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No. awarded to our district, we will have to continue to operate as if we don’t have it. As a business owner, I cannot spend money I do not have, nor should a responsible school district. PLEASE

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What is your replacement plan for vehicles and apparatus? Martin: Apparatus is related to district ratings that reflect insurance cost to the taxpayer. It will involve meetings with our constituents throughout the district and involving them in the decision process of upgrading fire stations prioritizing which apparatus needs to be replaced. I want to get the community involved with the workings of the district and be a part of the decisions process. The situation is best addressed through a combination of short- and long-term planning. Reifenstahl: A vehicle replacement schedule is dependent on the age of the vehicle, the needs of Fire District 2 and dollars available to purchase the vehicles. I would consider all of these factors when working to develop this schedule.

Tom martin and patricia reifenstahl Candidates’ biographies and the About the Job outline appear on the next page. one of these to be a possibility. With rising call volume and increasing needs in the community, the need to expand or build a station could be a possibility. This would be dependent on community support.

Would you expect to ask voters for a levy increase? Martin: There will come a time when a levy will be addressed for maintenance and operations. This will help facilitate stations and apparatus upgrades as well as personnel gains. Do you foresee the need to The two main stations need to expand, close or build fire stabe upgraded for earthquake stantions? dards. An earthquake is only a Martin: The stations in the moment away by today’s informadistrict all serve a purpose. tion. One station has the ability for Fire departments have stood training, not just by District 2, for many resources to the public but other fire departments have and may be the only resource used equipment at this training after a major earthquake to profacility. vide the resources they need. I don’t see, at this time, closing Reifenstahl: If Fire District 2 any of the stations, for they all had to build or expand a station, are at strategic locations to serve the current budget may not have the taxpayers’ needs. The two available dollars to fund this projmain stations are the hub of the ect, and we would have to go to district, and their location is vital the voters. for total coverage. PLEASE TURN TO NEXT PAGE Reifenstahl: I foresee any


VOTER GUIDE 2017

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Clallam County Fire District 2, Position 1/continued

Tom martin Residence: Port Angeles Phone: 360-460-4900 Email: tmartin@olypen. com Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 70 Education: Port Angeles High School graduate; took classes at Peninsula College and at Lower Columbia College, Longview Occupation: Retail sales Have you ever run for elective public office? Current Position 1 fire commissioner

patricia reifenstahl Residence: Port Angeles Phone: 360-460-2411 Email: Pattireif@olympus. net Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 59 Education: General Education Development certificate, some college. Occupation: Port Angeles School District para-educator. Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No.

What would be your biggest accomplishment by the time your term expires? Martin: I see Districts 2 and 3 developing into one fire-rescue department. This will create better equipment and personnel for all. Training is at the heart of this, and I believe both departments are dedicated to the job at hand. As communication is beginning to change to a separate entity, I see that Port Angeles will even get involved in a creation of all three departments into one fire-rescue department. Reifenstahl: That I listened to our community, paid staff and volunteers, and made good decisions based on their input.

and vice chair, been involved in ongoing education on the state Open Public Meetings Act and have broad knowledge of the responsibilities of a commissioner and an understanding of the district’s economic needs. In this business, you take care of the taxpayers’ needs. The district is a business that has a fiduciary trust to the taxpayers. The district can only sustain itself with that in mind. Reifenstahl: I have served as a volunteer in the fire service for the last 16 years and still volunteer. This provides me with a current perspective on the needs of our community and fire district. I will work toward transparency, fiscal responHow would you be a more effective fire comsibility, cohesive working relationships with surmissioner than your rounding agencies and open opponent? Martin: This is my third communication with all stakeholders in the commuterm as commissioner. nity. I have been board chair

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

ABOUT THE JOB Clallam Fire District 2 Board of Commissioners (Port Angeles area) Election boundaries: Deer Park west to Lake Crescent and a portion of Freshwater Bay, not including the city of Port Angeles Voters: 6,829 as of Sept. 19 Term: Six years Meetings: Third Tuesday of the month Compensation: $114 per day for district business up to 96 days annually, maximum $10,944 a year Commissioner duties: Commissioners pass a general fund budget that for 2017 is $1.6 millions and funds nine full-time employees and 48 volunteer firefighters and emergency medical technicians. Commissioners hire district staff, including the chief; approve fire district policies; approve capital purchases; and levy taxes.

Cape Flattery History then, history now School Board, Position 3/continued How would you be a more effective school board member than your opponent? Campbell: I have four children attending Clallam Bay School, and with my constant interaction with members of Clallam Bay and Neah Bay as a local

business owner, I am very approachable. I want to serve the needs and concerns of the community, parents, teachers, staff and most importantly all the children who attend our unique school district, both in Neah Bay and Clallam Bay.

Every day, the Peninsula Daily News recollects 25, 50 and 75 years ago with history vignettes in its popular Page A2 feature, “Peninsula Lookback.” But those were then, and this is now.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

VOTER GUIDE 2017

Clallam County

CLALLAM COUNTY

Clallam County Fire District 5, Proposition 1: Position 1 Candidate Michael Maines Jr. did not provide information as requested for this voter guide. What qualifies you for this position? Wright: I understand the challenges involved in rural emergency medicine, as I was an emergency medical technician on the Clallam Bay-Sekiu ambulance for a number of years in the 1980s at a time of low staffing. Most fire department calls are for medical services. Serving the last six years as a commissioner has allowed me to serve the community in a different capacity. What staffing changes would you make, if any? Wright: The most important staff issues facing our fire department are lack of volunteers able to sign up and respond to emergency medical service calls. Trying to increase certified EMTs willing to take on this challenge will be my first priority. Would you expect to ask voters for a levy increase? Wright: There is a maximum percentage increase on property taxes of just under 1 percent allowed by law each year. This is something that I vote for annually. I do not expect, nor will I support, a levy increase for our fire department. We are in good shape financially and are looking at upgrading one of our ambulances.

ABOUT THE JOB Clallam Fire District 5 Board of Commissioners Election boundaries: Clallam Bay Voters: 503 as of Sept. 19 Term: Six years

Roy ‘spider’ wright Residence: Sekiu Phone: 360-963-2822 Email: spidersweb 1977@gmail.com Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 63 Education: High school graduate Occupation: Union carpenter Have you ever run for or held elective public office? Currently the Fire District 5, Position 1 incumbent, serving for six years

your term expired? Wright: If re-elected, I will continue to work on disaster preparedness for our community. This is one of my goals: to have the community and fire What would be your biggest department as prepared as possible, not just for “the big one,” but accomplishment by the time

Meetings: The fourth Monday of every month Compensation: $114 per day for district business up to 96 days annually, maximum $10,944 a year Commissioner duties: Commissioners pass a general fund budget that for 2017 is $217,000 and funds a full-time employee — the fire chief — 11 volunteer firefighters and four volunteer emergency medical technicians. Commissioners hire the chief, approve fire district policies, approve capital purchases and levy taxes.

for smaller disasters as well. I would feel I accomplished my goals if we have enough volunteer EMTs to fully staff a roster so that members could avoid burning out. PLEASE

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Juvenile justice sales tax

BY JESSE MAJOR

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Clallam County voters will be asked in the Nov. 7 general election to consider approving a sales tax increase to support county Juvenile and Family Services. The proposed 0.1 percent countywide sales tax increase that would support the county Juvenile and Family Services facility at 1912 W. 18th St. in Port Angeles would cost most residents about $12 to $14 each year, said Clallam County Sheriff Bill Benedict. The tax, which requires a simple majority for passage, would add 1 cent to a $10 purchase and $1 to a $1,000 purchase. It would generate an estimated $1.1 million per year for equipment, repairs, maintenance and operations of the facility. The state pays about 40 percent of the costs. The rest is picked up in the county’s general budget. Currently, about $1.9 million from the county’s general fund is used to support the facility. About $1.2 million is picked up through grants and revenue. Clallam County Auditor Shoona Riggs said that as of Sept. 19, there were 50,694 voters who would consider the measure. Retired probation officer Danetta Rutton spoke at a Port Angeles Business Association meeting on Sept. 19 and urged voters to approve the tax. She said the facility houses a number of programs that help children. Among those programs

Tax for Juvenile Detention Facilities Proposition No. 1 The Clallam County Board of Commissioners adopted Resolution 69-2017, concerning a proposition to finance its juvenile detention facilities. If this proposition is approved, the County will impose a sales and use tax, in addition to other lawful sales and use taxes, at the rate of one-tenth of one percent (0.1%) of the selling price, or the value of the article used, for the sole purpose of providing funds for the maintenance and operation of the Clallam County’s Juvenile Detention Center. Should this proposition be approved?  Yes  No is the court-appointed special advocate program, guardian ad litem and youth at risk. There is also inpatient treatment. Though there is no organized opposition, Kaj Ahlburg of Port Angeles said at the same PABA meeting that though he supports the programs at the Juvenile and Family Services facility, he doesn’t support using a new sales tax to fund those services. PLEASE

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VOTER GUIDE 2017

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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City of Port Angeles

Proposition 2: Fluoridation of municipal water supply BY ROB OLLIKAINEN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — City voters will tell the Port Angeles City Council their preference on fluoridating municipal drinking water in a Nov. 7 ballot measure. The advisory vote developed out of opposition of water fluoridation during a series of contentious City Council meetings and fractious community debate. The council voted 4-3 in August 2016 to end the longstanding practice of adding fluorosilicic acid to the municipal water supply, saying it would keep it out of the water until the outcome of an advisory vote. Mayor Patrick Downie flipped his original vote on fluoridation and sided with the 4-3 majority that decided to end fluoridation. Although an advisory vote is not binding, the council said it

would accept it as binding. An unscientific survey conducted in November 2015 found that a majority of city water bill recipients who returned the survey — including those outside the city limits who receive city water — were opposed to adding fluoride as a public dental-health measure. The ballot measure asks whether the city of Port Angeles should add fluoride to the municipal water supply. “The citizens of Port Angeles were smart enough to turn it down on two or three previous occasions,” said retired Dr. Eloise Kailin of Sequim, president of the anti-fluoridation group Our Water, Our Choice!, referring to the 2015 survey and previous advisory votes. Kailin drafted a statement against Port Angeles Proposition 2 for the ballot, listing five rea-

Clallam County Fire District 5, Position 1/continued Please volunteer. Your community needs you.

updating equipment, achieve the best training possible and continue to keep the fire department How would you be a financially stable. more effective fire comI proudly worked with missioner than your other commissioners to opponent? Wright: After six years establish the full-time, paid as a commissioner, I under- fire chief position, with litstand the financial, staffing tle additional cost to the community. and equipment requireThis will add stability to ments of the fire departour fire department for ment. I want to continue many years to come.

Fluoridation of Municipal Water Supply Proposition No. 2 The City Council for the City of Port Angeles adopted Resolution No. 12-17, concerning fluoridation of its municipal water supply. This is an advisory ballot, and is not binding on the City Council. However, the Council will be guided by the results of this ballot in deciding whether to resume fluoridation. Shall the City of Port Angeles add fluoride to its municipal water supply?  Yes  No sons for opposing water fluoridation. She cited a lack of informed consent, non-pharmaceuticalgrade fluorosilicic acid in water, studies that link fluoride to health problems, a lack of dose control and monitoring of side effects, and that fluoridated water contaminates the environment.

Our Water, Our Choice! attorney Gerald Steel cited a new study published in Environmental Health Perspectives showing that pregnant women who drank water with naturally occurring fluoride in Mexico gave birth to children who had lower cognitive function. “There are so many reasons to

vote no,” Kailin said in a telephone interview. Dr. Michael Maxwell countered that fluoride provides equal opportunity for better health, that fluoridation is safe and that most scientific organizations recommend community water fluoridation. “Fluoride has been added to water in the U.S. for over 70 years because it safely reduces cavities for children and adults,” Maxwell said in a pro-fluoride statement co-signed by former Mayor Glenn Wiggins and nurse-midwife Deborah Bopp. Maxwell, CEO of the North Olympic Healthcare Network, said fluoride reduces dental decay by 25 percent and lowers the cost of dental treatment by about $38 per person per year. PLEASE

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Juvenile justice sales tax/continued “I do disagree with the proposition that a sales tax rate increase is needed at this time,” he said. “As inflation raises prices, the county already collects a proportionally higher tax rate.” Ahlburg said that in recent years, the county has increased its full-timeequivalent employees by 29. He didn’t feel underserved before those employees were added, he said. Ahlburg said voting against the proposition would send the message that the county needs to look for other funds to pay for the juvenile justice services.

Clallam County Administrator Jim Jones said the last time the county asked voters for a tax increase of any kind was in 2003. Voters then approved a countywide 0.1 percent 9-1-1 sales and use tax. The county is facing a $1 million structural deficit going into next year, and commissioners have asked staff to balance the budget before department requests are considered. It’s not unusual for the county — the only county in the state not in debt — to be facing a deficit this early in the budget process, and about half of budgets in the past 11

years have relied on reserves from the general fund, officials have said. If the tax isn’t approved, the county still will be required under state law to fund the facility, though the county could see cuts in other areas, officials said. “No, we’re not going to shut the facility down,” Benedict said. As a county with more than 50,000 residents, Clallam County is required by state law to operate a jail and a juvenile detention center. Commissioner Mark Ozias said he didn’t know what the impact would be

but that “it will be broad.” “Whether this tax passes or not, we will continue to have budgetary challenges,” he said. The argument in favor of the measure that will appear on election ballots was drafted by a committee made up of John Brewer, former editor and publisher of the Peninsula Daily News; retired Superior Court Judge Brooke Taylor; and Benedict. No argument against it was received.

________ Reporter Jesse Major can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 56250, or at jmajor@peninsula dailynews.com.


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

VOTER GUIDE 2017

City of Port Angeles

Second-class city measure BY PAUL GOTTLIEB

Change in City’s Form of Government Proposition No. 1

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles voters will decide on Proposition 1, which says it would remove the four newly elected City Council members and three current colleagues at an unspecified future date in order to hold new elections. Opponents say approval would not necessarily prompt another election. Approval of the proposition on the Nov. 7 general election ballot would change Port Angeles to a second-class city from a code city, a first in Washington state among 281 municipalities, all but five of which are code cities. The ballot measure proposed by the anti-fluoridation group Our Water, Our Choice! was borne out of frustration with a City Council decision that initially ignored a nonscientific survey of city water customers and was sparked by dissatisfaction with the city’s fiscal policies, proponent Edna Willadsen said. The City Council ordered an

After receiving a citizen petition from Our Water-Our Choice, the City Council for the City of Port Angeles adopted Resolution No. 11-17, concerning a change in the form of the City’s government. If approved, the City of Port Angeles, a non-charter code city, will change from the current council-manager form of government under RCW 35A to the council-manager form of government under RCW 35 in a second class city in order to elect a full new city council. Should this proposition be approved?  Yes  No end to fluoridation of the municipal water supply in August 2016 and said it would put an advisory vote on the issue on the Nov. 7 ballot. The council said it would abide by the results of the vote. Willadsen said the change to a second-class city would make city leaders more responsive to residents who would make their wishes known by advisory ballots that council members would follow or face the prospect of being

ousted by voters. She said council members ignore voters’ wishes on budget matters and act without regard to residents’ concerns. “We brought up this question to get more of a voice in some of these things,” Willadsen said. “They don’t listen to you when you comment. “We want to know where our money is going, why it’s going there and why couldn’t we do

something else for less money. “Everyone sitting [on the council] now would have to leave, and they will have to have a new election.” Code status is an optional municipal classification established in 1967 that “was designed to provide broad statutory home rule authority in matters of local concern,” according to the Municipal Research and Services Center. The change would be made, according to Proposition 1, “in order to elect a new City Council,” although Seattle lawyer Hugh Spitzer recommended that the legality of having a ballot measure that calls for the election of a new City Council should be reviewed by a court as part of a declaratory judgment. Voter approval of the measure would have more impact than that. Under a second-class designation, the city could pass laws only under authority explicitly granted by the state Legislature — and would lose the initiative powers that make a proposal such as Proposition 1 possible.

Metropolitan Park 1

Community pool levy BY ROB OLLIKAINEN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The William Shore Memorial Pool District’s proposed debt capacity increase is a make-or-break proposition for the planned expansion of the aging pool in Port Angeles, the pool director said. Voters in the junior taxing dis-

trict, which shares a boundary with the Port Angeles School District, will decide Nov. 7 whether to approve a $3.5 million increase in the district’s debt load to about $10 million. If approved, district commissioners would levy an additional 6 cents per $1,000 of valuation for the levyfunded portion of the $12 million expansion. The debt-capacity increase would

mean the owner of a $200,000 home would pay an additional $12.80 per year. The rest of the expansion would be funded by $5.5 million in bonds from existing levy capacity and about $3 million in state grants. The project would be completed in 2020. PLEASE

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Emergency expenditures, for example, would be limited to those given under specific authority for specified situations rather than for the general protection of public health, safety, property or peace, according to the nonpartisan Municipal Research and Services Center. Second-class-city proponents had held up nearby Port Orchard as an example of a working second-class city. That was before the Port Orchard City Council decided earlier this year to switch to code status, pointing to 80 percent of 148 city-sponsored-survey respondents who favored the change and 59 percent who wanted the council to make the decision. Second-class-city opponent David Mabrey said making the change in Port Angeles would not address Willadsen’s concerns. “Moving to a second-class city isn’t going to change any of the problems that she sees we have,” he said. “You are actually shackling yourself to the state.” PLEASE

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Fluoridation proposition/ continued

“Fluoridation of community water is recommended by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), American Dental Association (ADA), American Medical Association (AMA) and over a hundred other well-respected scientific organizations, along with the vast majority of medical/dental providers in Port Angeles,” Maxwell said in his statement.

Maxwell could not be reached for further comment Sept. 22. There were 12,166 active voters within the city of Port Angeles as of Sept. 19, Clallam County Auditor Shoona Riggs said.

________ Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 56450, or at rollikainen@peninsula dailynews.com.


VOTER GUIDE 2017

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

Jefferson County

Debt to Renovate and Expand the Community Pool Proposition No. 1

Port of Port Townsend, District 2

The Board of Commissioners of William Shore Memorial Pool District adopted Resolution No. 3-2017, concerning debt to renovate and expand the community’s pool. This proposition would authorize the District to: finance a portion of constructing health and wellness improvements to the community’s pool; and issue no more than $3,500,000 of general obligation bonds maturing within 30 years (in addition to District non-voted indebtedness) to be paid from program and admissions revenue and an increase to the District’s regular property tax levy, all as provided in Resolution No. 3-2017. Should this proposition be:  Approved About the Job outline appears on the next page.

 Rejected

Pool levy/continued “From a practical sense, if we lose any one of these, we don’t go ahead,” William Shore Memorial Pool Executive Director Steve Burke said of the three funding sources. “At the end of the day, this is a go, no-go vote on the project, even though technically it’s not.” The proposed debt capacity increase requires a 60 percent supermajority to pass. The long-planned expansion would add 10,000 square feet to the 15,000-square-foot facility at 225 E. Fifth St. It would add a kids’ splash and play area, warm-water therapy pool for exercise classes and hydrotherapy spa. The 55-year-old pool would get modern locker rooms and more meeting space, and its main entrance would be moved to the west side of the building along Lincoln Street. Voters formed a metropolitan park district in 2009 to keep the pool, the only public one in Port Angeles, open. The city of Port Angeles had operated the pool since it opened in 1962 and planned to close the facility because of the cost of needed renovations. The metropolitan park district has completed more than $2 million in improvements while adding programming and swim lessons and drawing a record number of visitors, the William Shore Pool Advisory Committee said. Given its age and heavy use — attendance has doubled to more than 100,000 per year — Burke

said the pool is in need of another $2 million in maintenance. “I’d hate to do that because I could roll that into an expansion and get much more bang for our buck,” Burke said. The pool district levies 18 cents per $1,000 of assessed property valuation to operate the pool. It has the authority to levy 75 cents per $1,000. “We’ve never done that,” said Burke, who is also a Port of Port Angeles commissioner. “We’ve said we’re only going to take exactly what we need. And then when we do need it, we’ll come back and ask. That’s what we’re doing now.” Burke would not speculate on the odds of the measure passing. He noted that 98 percent of respondents to a pool survey said they supported the expansion and that many business leaders have said the proposed dept capacity increase is “reasonable.” “I think because we’ve taken far less than we are allowed, that’s built some trust,” Burke said. “I think that helps with some of the people that have some skepticism that the government will just always spend what they’re allowed.” The William Shore Pool Advisory Committee drafted a statement in support of the pool measure that will appear on election ballots. The Clallam County Auditor’s Office received no statement against the measure, Auditor Shoona Riggs said.

How would you address the backlog of capital projects at port marinas? Clinefelter: Keep on track with the process we established over the last three years, eight months. Critical needs have been identified and prioritized with a matrix developed to score elements related to the port’s strategic plan. Continue the process we have newly developed to incorporate the capital repair and replacement plan into the annual budget process, aligning with financial capacities beyond the budget year. Putney: The project backlog must be prioritized first by need and then revenue generation. Better project management will reduce costs, as I did with the [Jefferson County International] Airport’s weather system. I will maximize the economic value of underutilized assets such as the airport. And new income, created using the port’s development authority, will bring muchneeded cash to maintain our maritime trades and infrastructure. I want to bring my vision and collaborative skills to make economic development happen. To what extent should Herb Beck Marina be developed beyond making repairs to the facility? PLEASE

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brad clinefelter

Bill Putney

Residence: Nordland Phone: 360-531-1303 Email: greenislehorizon@ gmail.com Campaign website: www.reelectbradforport commission.com Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 57 Education: Lakeridge High School, Lake Oswego, Ore., graduated 1978; Portland State University, Portland, Ore., two years studying structural engineering; Inland Boatmen’s Union maritime school, Astoria, Ore., graduated 1981; Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding, Port Hadlock, graduated 2009 Occupation: Owned BC Marine Services, Nordland Have you ever run for or held elective public office? Yes, I ran in primary and general election four years ago for Port of Port Townsend District 2 commissioner and was elected.

Residence: Port Townsend Phone: 360-302-5577 Email: bill.putney@ putneyfortheport.vote Campaign website: www.putneyfortheport.vote Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 71 Education: Graduated from Birmingham High School, Van Nuys, Calif., 1965; studied computer science, Pierce College, Woodland Hills, Calif.; aviation technology certificate, College of Alameda, Alameda, Calif., 2006 Occupation: Chief engineer, KPTZ-FM radio Have you ever run for or held elective public office? I ran for District 2 Port of Port Townsend commissioner in the 2013 primary election.

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FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

Second-class city measure/continued

Mabrey said if the change is made, it would take six years before voters could move back to code-city status. An Our Water, Our Choice! petition that qualified the measure for the Nov. 7 ballot is similar in wording to the ballot measure. The petition received more than 1,000 signatures, twice the 467 required. All of the six City Council candidates running for the three contested council seats Nov. 7 have said they are against making the switch. Willadsen says in her statement that will be included in a voters pamphlet sent to every household in the county that the new designation “empowers citizens of Port Angeles through their elected mayor to approve or decline council actions that would increase city indebtedness; removes politics from city administrative matters; and makes residents of Port Angeles first-class citizens!”

But the ballot measure says the current council-manager form of government — with a council-appointed mayor — would stay in place and says nothing about a voter-elected mayor. “It could go either way,” Willadsen said. “They could use the mayor, they could use the city manager, one of the two. “We don’t know which way they would choose because we have never been there.” The ballot argument prepared for the Clallam County Auditor’s Office in favor of the measure was submitted by Willadsen and Jessica Grable. The argument against was prepared by John Brewer, former editor and publisher of the Peninsula Daily News, and Mabrey.

________ Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 55650, or at pgottlieb@peninsuladaily news.com.

Got an idea for a story? Just email us the facts — topic, contact, phone number, name, etc. — and our staff will check it out. Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com

Peninsula Daily News

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

VOTER GUIDE 2017

Port of PT, District 2/continued

Clinefelter: Our new port executive director, Sam Gibboney, has succeeded in acquiring a grant to fund a feasibility study to outline potential options for improvements to the port’s Quilcene property, which will incorporate a rigorous community involvement process. This is something I have advocated and asked for since being elected to the board of commissioners, and fortunately, Sam and her staff recognized the need for such an effort. Putney: This marina is a community asset that benefits the whole county. We need to respect and act in concert with the local community’s vision for the marina. I will be a commissioner who helps this happen again. We all need to work together to keep this in the public trust and find new ways to generate sufficient revenues to pay for and maintain this wonderful marina that both users and taxpayers can afford. Should the port partner with the city of Port Townsend and the Northwest Maritime Center to develop Point Hudson? Clinefelter: The port has initiated and funded a robust feasibility study process that incorporates the city of Port Townsend, the Northwest Maritime Center and concerned members of our community to evaluate what potential improvements might be possible, and align with the unique nature of Point Hudson. This effort is not necessarily to “develop” Point Hudson but to enhance the character, increase employment opportunities and generate revenue with economic sustainability. Putney: Point Hudson is the heart of the city’s maritime heritage. Its importance as the soul of our Victorian seaport town cannot be overlooked in our rush to solve an immediate problem. The port must continue to listen to users and the community. I support a robust community conversation, which will help set the direction for Point Hudson’s future. The Northwest Maritime Cen-

ABOUT THE JOB Port of Port Townsend Board of Commissioners Election boundaries: Jefferson County Voters: 24,262 as of Sept. 19 Term: Four-year term Meetings: Regular meetings the second and fourth Wednesday of the month, a workshop on the second Wednesday of the month Compensation: $254 monthly salary, $114 per day for port business for up to 96 days, totaling a maximum of $13,992; receive the same health insurance received by port employees Commissioner duties: Pass a general fund operating budget that for 2017 is $6 million and funds 29 full-time-equivalent positions; governance and oversight of all port operations, including setting lease rates for port property and rates for berthage at Point Hudson and Herb Beck marinas and Port Townsend Boat Haven; manage the 19-acre Boat Haven and Port Townsend Boatyard; operate Jefferson County International Airport; set property tax levy rates; and approve economic incentives for incoming businesses ter, the city and others may be important partners with the port in this effort. How would you reach out more to south Jefferson County residents? Clinefelter: As I stated in my answer to the question regarding Herb Beck Marina, we now have the funding to perform a feasibility study to evaluate and identify potential improvements to benefit members of our community as well as visitors. This process will incorporate a rigorous south county resident involvement throughout this effort to determine what changes may best enhance the site while keeping what is commensurate with local community values. Putney: For five years, I have attended nearly every commission meeting. I’ll have regular office hours at locations around the county to hear residents’ concerns. Ports must broaden their economic activities beyond boats and shorelines. Ports are responsible for growth in all economic sectors.

The port has undeveloped land for small business, tech, agriculture, processing and transportation. We can help with Hadlock’s treatment facility and coordinate with the [Jefferson County Public Utility District] to bring broadband throughout the county. How would you be a more effective port commissioner than your opponent? Clinefelter: There is no substitute for experience. I have 43 years in maritime industries. The port is now on a trajectory of responsible, long-term planning and prioritization of capital needs and expenditures, which was not the focus prior to my time on the board. Our port has been headed toward insolvency for many years, a result of such things as building offices for port directors and ignoring crumbling infrastructure such as the Point Hudson breakwater. Putney: I’ll keep an eye on daily operations, but I have a vision for the future. PLEASE

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VOTER GUIDE 2017

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Jefferson County

Chimacum School Board, District 1 sarah martin and ron riggle Candidates’ biographies appear on Page 21.

ABOUT THE JOB Chimacum School District School Board Election boundaries: All or parts of the communities of Chimacum, Port Hadlock, Irondale, Nordland, Four Corners, Port Ludlow and Coyle

Should the district re-evaluate student disciplinary policies? Martin: The district recently updated its disciplinary policies and student rights and responsibilities guide after much collaboration and discussion on disciplinary issues. We should continue to monitor the policy for compliance with current laws and with the district climate we wish to foster. The district has a responsibility for both the education and the safety of each child, and we must ensure those interests are balanced. Riggle: These issues have been addressed over the summer. I have attended these meetings and think they are on track. We will see how the new policies work and adjust them as needed.

The best form of getting the information out is Facebook, which is a way I am hearing the parents would like, and just being out in front of the school when kids are being dropped off and picked up.

How should the district better address the needs of homeless and other lowincome children? Martin: Children have a harder time learning when their basic needs are not being met. Assisting homeless children and families to access resources available to help them will ultimately allow these children to focus their energy and attention on learning and help them reach their fullest potential. Riggle: Better communication with parents on what is available to help them.

How should the district address the funding uncertainties resulting from the state Supreme Court McCleary decision? Martin: As always, the district must be diligent in managing its resources. It has been 10 years since McCleary was filed and over five years since it was decided, and still the uncertainty continues. The plan the Legislature passed recently will cap levies and leave Chimacum $1 million short in funding. We must do our best to find

Voters: 9,228 as of Sept. 19 Term: Four years Meetings: Second and fourth Wednesday every month Compensation: $50 a day for district business up to 96 days, maximum $4,800 a year Duties: Pass a general fund budget that for 2017-18 is $14.7 million and funds 121.5 full-time-equivalent positions; hire a schools superintendent; establish staff performance criteria; set student behavior and education policies, including curriculum standards; provide information to the public on district policies; evaluate teaching materials; and levy taxes. secure sources of funding and manage funding wisely. Riggle: There are many layers to it, and we are getting educated on how it is going to shake out. It looks like there will be a shortfall in 2019 that we will need to prepare for. What will you have accomplished by the time your term expires? Martin: In general terms, I wish to serve the district and the Chimacum-Jefferson County community with thoughtfulness, wisdom and compassion. I hope to be able to share my experiences and perspectives, as well as the values of the community I represent, on issues to help the board come to wellrounded decisions. PLEASE

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19

JEFFERSON COUNTY

Port of Port Townsend, District 3 How would you address the backlog of capital projects at port marinas? Beck: Firstly, I would examine all of the projects and maintenance that needs to be done on port marinas. After compiling a list, I would make a priority list using my knowledge as well as input from others as to what needs to be done. I would ensure projects are executed and finished. The most important part, after these projects are complete, is maintaining our ports so they do not get into disrepair again. Hanke: The port has two tools for determining priority and cost for capital projects. These include the application of the scoring matrix from the strategic plan and the capital repair and replacement survey. Funding for these projects includes federal and state grant and loan programs, bonds, levies, property tax revenue and increased port revenues. In addition, reducing overhead costs through a reduction in staff, contract labor or facilities would also raise port net profits. To what extent should Herb Beck Marina be developed beyond making repairs to the facility? Beck: Herb Beck Marina is a vital point of the Quilcene and Brinnon communities. After the needed repairs, I would first address the security of the port for the patrons.

Keith beck and peter hanke Candidates’ biographies appear on the next page. The park area would be improved and camping and RV sites would be viable. Adding a mooring buoy for visiting vessels would increase port use. A visitors center and an area for a small business would be included to attract residents and tourists to the marina. Hanke: The use of Herb Beck Marina is changing. The boat ramp use is increasing, while long-term moorage is decreasing. The port has commissioned a study to examine this change in order to understand clearly how the community is best served by this facility and its surrounding uplands, into the future. The port is committed to maintaining and improving this facility per the results of the study for the community. Should the port partner with the city of Port Townsend and the Northwest Maritime Center to develop Point Hudson? Beck: Yes. All three entities have a major role in the development of Point Hudson and Jefferson County. PLEASE

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

JEFFERSON COUNTY

Jefferson Healthcare, Position 1 To what extent should mental health services be integrated into hospital services? McComas: I believe mental health services should be integrated into the clinics to the fullest extent possible without creating problems with billing, insurance payments and Medicare and Medicaid reimbursements. The district should continue to strengthen the affiliation with Discovery Behavioral Health to improve the delivery of mental health and substance abuse treatment services to meet the needs of the community. It is a growing problem that needs to be addressed. Van Hoover: Mental health is inextricably linked to physical health. Early intervention in mental health conditions, with these services integrated into the primary care setting, will reduce the need for more acute mental health care including overnight hospitalization. Limited inpatient care for

Bruce J. mccomas and cheri van hoover Candidates’ biographies, About the Job outline appear on Pages 21 and 22. those experiencing psychiatric crisis should be available, with staff receiving additional training in the safe and effective delivery of these services. Psychiatric consultation via telemedicine is now available 24/7 and should be fully utilized. What should be done to recruit and retain primary care physicians? McComas: With a nationwide shortage of primary care doctors, we are competing with everyone else for hiring doctors. PLEASE

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Port of PT, District 2/continued I’ll work for existing businesses that want to grow within the county while looking for new businesses to bring new jobs. I’ll be a catalyst for new ideas. The 2016 Heart of Service

Award attests to my commitment as a community contributor, working with community groups, organizations and government agencies. I want to be your port commissioner for District 2.

VOTER GUIDE 2017

Port of Port Townsend, District 3/continued

The port had a 20-year master lease before. The port made little to no money. I do not think the port should give a master lease to one sole entity but should work together with all parties. Hanke: Point Hudson lies at the heart of Port Townsend. Its future should and will be tied to the interests of the community that surrounds it. Whether that means a management agreement between the port and other entities or the port continuing to manage Point Hudson while applying a more inclusive approach is not known at this time. What is certain is that everyone cares deeply about the health and future of that facility. How would you reach out more to south Jefferson County residents? Beck: My family has lived in south Jefferson County for five generations. As a resident, I already participate in many community activities. As port commissioner, I would listen and talk to my fellow residents at these events. Getting their input on the ports is key. Hanke: South County presents a unique issue for the port in that those facilities, although smaller than District 1 facilities, are critical to community vitality. Issues surrounding the marina, the three boat ramps or the beach are often overshadowed. It’s important that everyone, whether in District 3 or 1, feels included in the process. I intend to have more community meetings, more flyers and more attendance in local community groups to help bridge this gap. How would you be a more effective port commissioner than your opponent? Beck: I feel that I will represent the District 3-south Jefferson County area better because I

Keith beck

peter hanke

Residence: Brinnon Phone: 360-774-2488 Email: beckkeith@live.com Campaign website: www. facebook.com/electkeithbeck Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 43 Education: Quilcene High School, graduated 1992; studied criminal justice at Peninsula College, 1993-94; U.S. Coast Guard-issued captain’s license, 200- to 500-ton master-tow-vessel certification, Crawford Nautical School, Seattle Occupation: Retired tugboat captain; co-owner, McKay’s Shrimp and Crab Gear; co-owner, Brinnon Liquor Outlet; charter boat captain Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No.

Residence: Chimacum Phone: 360-732-6820 Email: petehanke@gmail. com Campaign website: www. petehanke.com Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 59 Education: Graduated from Sunnyside High School, Sunnyside; bachelor’s degree, English, Whitworth University, Spokane Occupation: Owner and manager of Puget Sound Express Inc. since 1988 Have you run for or held elective public office? Currently hold elected office of District 3 Port of Port Townsend commissioner

am centrally located in south Jefferson County. I am looking to represent District 3 in longevity for at least 20 years. I co-own two businesses in south Jefferson County. South Jefferson County is important to my family as well as me. Therefore, I care. Hanke: As a long-term business tenant of the port, a pilot at

the airport and a resident of District 3, I have a unique perspective on the problems and opportunities the entire port faces. My family roots are farming in Eastern Washington, where hard work and ingenuity usually created success. As commissioner of District 3, I have found those same values to be effective tools in working through the many issues surrounding the port.


VOTER GUIDE 2017

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Peninsula Daily News

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

bruce j. mccomas

cheri van hoover

Residence: Port Townsend Phone: 360-301-3699 Email: mccomas4hospital commission@gmail.com Campaign website: www. brucemccomas.org Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 67 Education: Bachelor’s degree, chemical engineering, 1972, University of Washington; master’s degree, business administration, University of Washington, 1992 Occupation: Retired in 2008 as vice president and general manager, Port Townsend Paper Corp., then worked as power and recovery superintendent for Cosmo Specialty Fibers Inc., Cosmopolis, 2011-13 Have you ever run for or held elective public office? Yes, Port Townsend School District School Board member, 1993-2000

Residence: Port Hadlock Phone: 360-385-1104 Email: cheriforhealth@ gmail.com Campaign website: www. cheriforhealth.com Age as of Nov. 7, General Election Day: 64 Education: Associate degree, nursing, City College of San Francisco; nurse-midwifery certificate, University of California at San Francisco (UCSF); bachelor’s degree, nursing, University of Phoenix, Tempe, Ariz.; master’s degree, State University of New York at Stonybrook Occupation: Adjunct faculty, Philadelphia University, Philadelphia; clinician, Planned Parenthood Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No.

Jefferson Healthcare/continued We need to ensure we are advertising in the most effective manner, we need to continue to seek the highest accreditations and accolades for our services, we need to be competitive for salaries and benefits and opportunities for personal growth, and we need to let our providers know they are appreciated and valued.

Van Hoover: Partnering with medical schools and nurse practitioner and physician assistant training programs to provide clinical placements would enhance recruitment of providers who would fit well in our community. PLEASE

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FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

sarah martin Residence: Chimacum Phone: 206-902-6343 Email: ses325@yahoo. com Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 44 Education: Bachelor’s degree, The Evergreen State College, Olympia, 1994; paralegal certificate, University of Washington Extension, 2000; forensics certificate, University of Washington Extension, 2002 Occupation: Senior legal assistant, Jefferson County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office Have you ever run for or held elective public office? Incumbent Position 1 Chimacum School Board member, elected in 2013

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ron riggle Residence: Chimacum Phone: 360-643-3220 Email: ronriggle1961@ msn.com Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 56 Education: Graduated from Chimacum High School, 1979 Occupation: Owneroperator, Red Barn RV, Chimacum Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No.

Chimacum School Board,continued District 1/ But specifically, I am excited to see Chimacum moving forward with programs that bring the school and the community together on innovative levels. Riggle: The kids are our future, and getting them the education they deserve is my goal.

I want to give our kids an education that will help them transition from school to a fulfilling life in our community or college, whichever path they choose, and want to strive to make Chimacum a school that sets an example for others to follow. PLEASE

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FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

Chimacum School Board, District 1 continued

How would you be a more effective school board member than your opponent? Martin: My strengths, without comment on or comparison with my opponent’s strengths or weaknesses, come from years of employment in the public legal field, my term on the school board and previous board experience. I am familiar with public service and working in an open and transparent manner. I am committed to finding solutions that provide the most benefit. Integrity, justice, equity and

empathy are all important values in how I work and live. Riggle: Thirty years running a business gives me the skills needed to read the numbers in the budgets of the school. Twenty years coaching here gives me insight into the social aspects of the kids here. Being a 13-year graduate gives me the desire and dedication to see this school be the best. With three kids who have attended Chimacum — the youngest a senior, and two grandkids starting here — I am very invested.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

VOTER GUIDE 2017

Jefferson Healthcare/continued

A team approach with greater reliance on nurse practitioners and physician assistants and with nurses and medical assistants working to the top of their licensing will reduce workload and enhance job satisfaction for physicians. Community partnering to improve housing, schools and spousal job opportunities will help retention. What additional hospital district services, if any, should be offered in south Jefferson County? McComas: We need to have a clear understanding of the health care needs of citizens in the south county. [Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioner] Merrily Mount from the Quilcene Clinic, surveys and town hall meetings could give insight to additional services needed. Based on the data, we may want to look at rotating specialists through the clinic or investigating the possibility of a mobile pharmacy. It will really depend on the demand for services from the citizens of the area. Van Hoover: Wellness programs tailored to an aging population should be offered in South County, including classes such as exercise, nutrition, home safety and fall prevention. These types of classes provide needed social support in addition to other health benefits. An efficient system of referral for home health is also important to allow for aging in place. Improved access to lab testing and pharmacy services would be very helpful. Consultation with specialists could be provided through telehealth. What will you have accomplished by the time your term expires? McComas: What I would hope and work for are: • More complete integration of mental health services into the clinics and hospital. • Dental services provided at the hospital. • Improved financial stability

ABOUT THE JOB East Jefferson County Hospital District 2 (Jefferson Healthcare Hospital) Election boundaries: Port Townsend, Port Ludlow, Nordland, Gardiner, Quilcene, Brinnon — all of Jefferson County except the West End Voters: 24,006 as of Sept. 19 Term: Six years Meetings: First and third Wednesday every month Compensation: $114 per day for district business up to 96 days annually, maximum $10,944 a year; benefits consistent with those provided to hospital employees, including health and life insurance, hospital cafe discount and discounts on some local services Duties: Pass a general fund budget that for 2017 is $96.3 million and funds 515 full-time-equivalent positions; hire a chief executive officer; purchase, lease and develop district property; provide hospital and health care services to district residents; and levy taxes. for the district. • County medical needs assessment completed. • Increased access for patients with more primary care doctors and lower prices. • Improved patient satisfaction. • A more cohesive board. Van Hoover: I will strive for an efficiently functioning board with enhanced internal and external communications and for greater transparency in billing with fair and reasonable charges for services. I hope to facilitate more robust primary care with fully integrated behavioral health services and more timely access to appointments. I will advocate for a dental clinic to serve the 25 percent of Jefferson County residents whose Medicaid insurance currently allows them no access to oral health care. How would you be a more effective hospital commissioner than your opponent? McComas: • Using my understanding of the financial complexity of running a 24/7 operation the size of the hospital district with

metrics to ensure the district is improving its financial stability. • Understanding policies needed for the board to operate effectively. • Using my patient caregiveradvocate perspective, not a health care provider perspective, to understand what patients want from their hospital district. • Using my experience from other boards for bringing diverse groups together to meet the needs of the community. Van Hoover: I bring a unique breadth and depth of health care experience, having worked in administrative and clinical positions in private practices, private hospitals, nonprofit organizations, an HMO [health maintenance organization] and a [University of California, San Francisco] medical school faculty. I have taught health policy to graduate students for 13 years. I am skilled at problem identification, and my approach to problem-solving is from a systems perspective. I work well with groups, striving for consensus-building, positive and open communications, and collaboration.


VOTER GUIDE 2017

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

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Jefferson County

Chimacum School Board, District 5

wilma hackman Residence: Port Hadlock Phone: 360-385-3002 Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 72 Email: oak@olypen.com Campaign website: None Education: Bachelor’s degree, sociology, University of Washington, 1972; master’s degree, teaching, University of Puget Sound, 1993 Occupation: Retired in 2015 as manager of Port Townsend-based ECHHO [Ecumenical Christian Helping Hands Organization] Have you ever run for or held elective public office? Current Democratic Party precinct committee officer, Hadlock Precinct 303

jack mckay Residence: Port Ludlow Phone: 360-821-9877 Email: jmckay@hnleague. org Campaign website: www. mckay4schoolboard.org Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 79 Education: Bachelor’s degree, history-education, Central Washington University, Ellensburg, 1961; master’s degree, educational administration, Central Washington University, 1965; Ph.D., educational administration and sociology, Washington State University, Pullman, 1974 Occupation: Executive director, The Horace Mann League of the USA Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No.

Should the district re-evaluate student disciplinary policies? Hackman: The district is engaged in ongoing re-evaluation of disciplinary policies. I am impressed with recent staff training. Emphasis must be placed on communicating consistent high expectations throughout all grade levels, creating a good learning environment and reaching out to disengaged students before they become disruptive rather than focusing on consequences for misbehavior. I’m hopeful that the new dean-of-students position will be a positive direction for discipline in the high school. McKay: School policies relating to discipline, attendance, parental engagement and curriculum should be routinely reviewed. District policies set the tone and guidelines for carrying out the rules and regulations with consistency by teachers and administrators. I do not see the discipline policies in need of significant change. It has been my experience

that student misbehavior is more often from physical and mental abuse by family or classmates. Emphasis must be on dealing with the cause. How should the district better address the needs of homeless and other lowincome children? Hackman: It is crucial to maintain funding for maximum hours for Chimacum’s McKinneyVento Homeless Assistance Act liaison position after the state Homeless Student Stability Grant expires. We must have a knowledgeable person available to coordinate services with other agencies and organizations, a caring person personally committed to making sure the students’ basic needs are met when they arrive at school so that they can be ready to learn. McKay: Since homelessness and poverty have an impact on student achievement and wellbeing, it becomes a school issue. Teachers are already reducing the impact of homelessness and poverty by being sensitive to the students’ need for a safe and

secure place, providing emotional support and providing suggestions about where to get health care, clothing and meals. Addressing student homelessness and poverty is not just a school issue. This requires cooperation with all involved in helping kids. How should the district address the funding uncertainties resulting from the state Supreme Court’s McCleary decision? Hackman: The McCleary decision was a step in the right direction, but until there is a basic change in Washington’s regressive tax structure, there will be issues with school funding. Now that the maintenance and operations levies are being phased out, the district must clarify what is basic education and what is enrichment. Community involvement and support will be crucial. McKay: The Legislature’s funding plan is still not fully understood. PLEASE

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FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

Chimacum School Board, District 5/continued

It is in the details. I am skeptical because the legislation falls short of reducing student equity and opportunity for all children in our state. Chimacum schools will have additional state funding, but the school board’s discretion about how to best allocate the state funds to deal with local priorities is restricted. There is an old axiom: Whoever has the gold makes the rules. What will you have accomplished by the time your term expires? Hackman: I’ll be thoroughly familiar with Chimacum’s day-to-day operations, personnel and financial and legal issues. I’ll have contributed analytical insight to policy and decisions. I intend to have increased community involvement and pride in [Chimacum School District 49]. And I fervently hope, in this age when we are inundated with information, to inspire our schools to be not merely another (and not very glamorous) information provider. I want us teaching our students how to evaluate information critically. McKay: Help the school board accomplish the following: • Building long-term stability within administration and teacher groups by recognizing professional accomplishments. • Improving student achievement by emphasizing the direct relationship between student attendance and achievement.

• Improving teacher development by offering incentives for workshops and advanced degree programs, for teacher collaboration and for supporting innovation in teaching. • Building stronger school pride by citizens by communicating great things happening daily for all children in the Chimacum Schools. How would you be a more effective school board member than your opponent? Hackman: During the 30 years I have lived in Hadlock, I’ve been deeply involved in the community. I’ve worked in Chimacum Schools in the [Learning Assistance Program] and as a substitute teacher. I ran the nonprofit ECHHO (Ecumenical Christian Helping Hands Organization) program office for 14 years. I’ve been an active volunteer in environmental education and organizing local events including salmon festivals, Low Tide Fest and the Phil Johnson Environmental Scholarship Auction. I know our community and work hard for it. McKay: Being an effective resource by providing insights and implications about the decisions needed to improve instruction and learning for all students. Most important, being one of five on a board that employs the very best people, making sure they have the resources they need, staying out of their way and then sharing in their success.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

VOTER GUIDE 2017

Jefferson County

Quilcene Fire District, Position 1 Candidate Wayne Siscoe did not provide information for this voter guide. What is your replacement plan, including funding, for vehicles and apparatus? Frank: In a small district with limited funds, we have to match the needs of our community with the available financial resources. In order to achieve and maintain the most up-todate fire department possible, I would continue to aggressively seek grants in addition to other onetime funding sources to supplement current funding for infrastructure and vehicles as well as personnel. What would you do to increase the dwindling number of volunteers? Frank: When we hired three professional firefighters, the existing volunteers became less active and participation dropped off. Volunteers are still an important part of our fire department. However, the changing demographic of our fire district means there are fewer volunteer candidates. Efforts to maintain volunteer staffing have been unsuccessful. I would continue to

ABOUT THE JOB Quilcene Fire District 2 Board of Commissioners Election boundaries: Quilcene and parts of Center and Shine Voters: 1,481 as of Sept. 19 Term: Two-year unexpired term Meetings: Second Monday of the month

art frank

Compensation: $114 per day for district business up to 96 days annually, maximum $10,944 a year. Commissioner duties: Pass a general fund budget that for 2017 is $700,000 and funds four full-time-equivalent positions, including a fire chief, 20 volunteer firefighters and emergency medical technicians; hire fire district staff; approve fire district policies; approve capital purchases; and levy taxes seek out volunteer resident applicants — who are paid a stipend — to work alongside our career staff.

commissioners, including me, and should be considered a priority in a fiveyear strategic plan for the district.

Do you foresee the need to expand, close or build a new fire station? Frank: Yes. Our current primary fire station, located in downtown Quilcene, is inadequate given our current staffing and equipment requirements. We need to rebuild on property currently owned by the fire district. This has been a longterm plan of the fire district and several prior

What would be your biggest accomplishment by the time your term expires? Frank: Further modernize and professionalize by replacing the aging vehicle fleet to meet the needs of our community, provide training to our career staff and volunteers, and rebuild the outdated central station to provide the best service to our citizens. PLEASE

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Residence: Quilcene Phone: 818-3955797 Email: awf2nd@ aol.com Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 7, General Election Day: 56 Education: Studied administration of justice prior to career in law enforcement Occupation: Chief criminal deputy, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office Have you ever run for or held elective public office?: Appointed to fill the position of commissioner, Quilcene Fire District 2, in summer 2016


VOTER GUIDE 2017

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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Jefferson County

Prop 1: Levy to fund affordable housing BY CYDNEY MCFARLAND

found at www.co.jefferson.wa.us. A citizen committee made up PORT TOWNSEND — Propo- of nine volunteers would oversee the fund, review applications for sition 1 on the Nov. 7 ballot asks affordable housing projects and voters to approve a seven-year allocate money to help projects property tax levy to support the leverage more money from state building and maintaining of and federal grants, according to affordable housing in Jefferson the levy proposal from Homes County. Now. The tax of 36 cents per $1,000 Project proposals would have assessed value would go into the to abide by certain standards, housing-specific Home Opportuincluding a guarantee that projnity Fund, which would be a ded- ects would remain affordable icated fund for affordable houshousing for a minimum of 40 ing projects, according to the pro- years. posed ballot measure. The levy is expected to raise The levy needs a simple $1.9 million per year, or $13 milmajority to pass. lion to $13.9 million over its The measure was proposed by seven-year term. Homes Now, a local citizen group, If approved, the tax revenue and approved for the November would be divided up to specifiballot by the Jefferson County cally target low-income and verycommissioners in August after a low income housing projects. public hearing in July. One-third of the tax revenue, The full text of the resolution or 12 cents per $1,000 assessed approved for the ballot and the value, would go toward lowdraft financing plan for the income housing projects and twothirds of revenue, or 24 cents per Home Opportunity Fund can be

Proposition No. 1

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The Jefferson County Board of Commissioners passed Resolution No. 35-17 declaring an Emergency in Jefferson County in the availability of affordable housing for low- or very low-income households, and referring the following ballot proposition to the voters: Proposed: Establish a fund providing affordable housing for low- or very low-income households including disabled people, veterans, seniors, and families with children, by increasing the County’s regular property tax levy up to $0.12/$1,000 for low-income housing (for a maximum rate of $1.80/$1,000 assessed value collected in 2018); and authorize a separate levy under RCW 84.52.105 of approximately $0.24/$1,000 to generate $1,200,000 in 2018; each levy for seven years and subject to limitations under RCW 84.55. Should this proposition be:  Approved  Rejected $1,000 assessed value, would fund very low-income housing projects. Residents who qualify as lowincome make 80 percent or less of the local median income, and residents making 50 percent or less of the local median income

Quilcene Fire District/continued With changing demographics — including the mix of year-round residents and vacation homeowners (especially in more remote areas such as the Toandos Peninsula) — we must continue to improve response capabilities through modernization. How would you be a more effective fire commissioner than your opponent? Frank: As a career first responder with over 37 years’ experience, I have

been on the front lines of emergency service and first-level response. As an active volunteer for almost three years with Fire District 2, I have a clear understanding of the day-to-day operation and capabilities of our department. As an appointed fire commissioner, I have developed knowledge of the administrative functions of a small, rural fire district, including funding requirements and personnel management issues.

qualify as very low-income, according to Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The median income in Jefferson County is $47,202 per year, according to the 2014 U.S. census.

Based off that data, in Jefferson a single person making $36,050 per year or less would qualify as low-income and a person making $22,550 per year would qualify as very low-income by HUD standards. The levy would raise property taxes over the 1 percent cap set by the state. In August, the Jefferson County commissioners declared a state of emergency in the availability of affordable housing for low-income and very low-income residents of Jefferson County, which allowed the levy to be put on the November ballot. That declaration was based in part by a HUD study that found that roughly half — 1,680 out of 3,425 of all renters in Jefferson County — are paying more than 30 percent of their income for housing. About one in four renters are paying more than 50 percent of their income to housing costs. PLEASE

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Discovery Bay Fire District 5

Proposition 1: Property tax levy BY CYDNEY MCFARLAND PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

DISCOVERY BAY — Discovery Bay Volunteer Fire and Rescue is asking voters to approve a property tax levy for maintenance and operations on the Nov. 7 ballot. The levy for Jefferson County Fire District 5, which is not to exceed $1.50 per $1,000 assessed value, would be levied in 2017 and collected in 2018, and would serve as a baseline for computing subsequent levy limitations.

The ballot measure, which was approved by Fire District 5 commissioners in July, needs a simple majority — 50 percent plus one — to pass. Fire District 5 is roughly 75 square miles. It serves just over 500 full-time residents and roughly 350 registered voters. The district extends from milepost 276.2 on U.S. Highway 101 east of Gardiner to milepost 286 at Snow Creek Ranch Road, south of Discovery Bay.

Boundaries of the district include state Highway 104 from Highway 101 to milepost 4 just west of Center Valley Road, and state Highway 20 from Anderson Lake Road to Eaglemount Road, according to the District 5 website at www.dbvfr.org. District 5 has two stations: one at 12 Bentley Place in Port Townsend, which was created by a bond approved by voters in 2016, and a secondary station at 2000 Old Gardiner Road, which is unstaffed. PLEASE

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FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

Housing/continued

According to HUD, anyone paying more than 30 percent of their income to housing costs is considered “cost-burdened” and likely will not have enough income to pay for other necessities. Jefferson County has 600 subsidized low-income housing units, all of which have a six- to 12-month waiting list, according to Olympic Community Action Programs, which is one of the local organizations to endorse Proposition 1. Habitat for Humanity of East Jefferson County, Bayside Housing Services in Port Hadlock, the Peninsula Housing Authority and the Economic Development Council also have endorsed the ballot measure. The proposal is based on levies passed in other cities in Washington, specifically Bellingham, which passed a levy in 2012, and Vancouver, which passed a levy in 2016. During a public hearing in July, community members opposed to the levy argued that the higher property taxes would mean

landlords would be forced to increase rent and higher taxes would burden retired residents on a fixed income. Others argued that the county should focus on creating more jobs and loosening building codes and regulations that have slowed development. Those organizations and community members that have spoken in favor of the ballot measure have said it specifically targets Jefferson County’s most vulnerable populations including veterans, elderly and homeless community members. It would also allow young families, service workers and young professionals to continue to live and work in the community and contribute to the local economy. The seven-year fixed levy would expire in 2024. To continue longer, it would have to be approved by voters.

________ Jefferson County Editor/ Reporter Cydney McFarland can be reached at 360-385-2335, ext. 55052, or at cmcfarland@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Got an idea for a story? Just email us the facts — topic, contact, phone number, name, etc. — and our staff will check it out. Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com

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VOTER GUIDE 2017

Clallam-Jefferson

Sequim School Board, District 2 The old agreement expired Aug. 31, 2017, with Jon the Sequim Education kirshbaum Association, and the new and brian version could be further refined via other board kuh members. Kuh: A key component Candidates’ biogof the recently approved raphies, About the state budget, which Job outline appear attempts to meet the on the next page. requirements of the McCleary decision, is the equalization of teacher What standards salaries throughout the would you employ for state. teacher salary Given this, all teachers’ increases? scheduled salaries (based Kirshbaum: Standards on tenure and certificaimply something different tion) for basic education than criteria. instruction will be stanAs a board member, I dardized but will include a would be using various cri- regional cost-of-living teria in collective bargain- adjustment. ing, though some current Additional compensaand previous criteria may tion will be available for have been pre-empted by teachers in programs such the recent legislative as CTE (vocational educaaction and might be tion), special education, altogether eliminated highly capable and learnthrough the Office of the ing assistance. Superintendent of Public Instruction models put How well did the school district handle forth.

Fire levy/continued District 5 staff, including Chief Willie Knoepfle, firefighters and emergency medical technicians, are all volunteers. The district has a mutual-aid agreement with neighboring districts covered by East Jefferson Fire-Rescue and Clallam County Fire District 3 to the west.

Fire District 5 also has an uncontested race for commissioner Position 1, with the sole candidate being Casey Carson.

________ Jefferson County Editor/ Reporter Cydney McFarland can be reached at 360-385-2335, ext. 55052, or at cmcfarland@ peninsuladailynews.com.

the discovery last year of a swastika drawing outside the high school library? Kirshbaum: With what I am able to ascertain, I feel the purported handling both by the assistant principal of Sequim High School and by the superintendent were appropriate. To my knowledge, the incident did not escalate into a major event or any unnecessary overreaction. Had I been an insider, perhaps there is some further pertinent information that might have tempered this view. Kuh: After reviewing the activity surrounding this incident, it appears that the district appropriately followed protocol to address the matter. Local police were also involved. There were a few wellintentioned community members who sought to independently address the matter.

However, many of them have since commended the district for their due process in handling things. Throughout this, it was reaffirmed by the community that Sequim celebrates our diversity and the unique qualities of each of us. How should the district address overcrowding at Helen Haller Elementary School? Kirshbaum: While there were other options, I feel that the bond that was passed for significant upgrades to Helen Haller Elementary School and adding a new 14-classroom facility to be built next to the choir, band and gym facility across from Sequim Community School was the preferred and most forward-looking approach in terms of the current overcrowding and any future potential growth needs of the district. PLEASE

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Proposition No. 1 The Board of Commissioners of Jefferson County Fire Protection District No. 5 adopted Resolution No. 2017-02 concerning a proposition to establish its regular property tax levy for maintenance and operation to an amount not to exceed $1.50 per $1,000.00 of assessed valuation to be levied in 2017 for collection in 2018. The maximum allowable levy in 2018 shall serve as the base for computing subsequent levy limitations as provided by chapter 84.52.44 RCW. Should this Proposition be:  Approved  Rejected


VOTER GUIDE 2017

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

Sequim School Board, District 2/continued

Kuh: The district continues to adapt to overcrowding issues at all of the schools, including the addition of portable classrooms. However, the responsibility to fund the facilities that our students deserve falls upon us as citizens. Following the recent community engagement around strategic priorities of the district, I’m confident that we’ll see a new bond proposal come before the voters soon. It’s critical that we pass this for the sake of our economic growth and prosperity. How should the district address the funding uncertainties resulting from the state Supreme Court’s McCleary decision? Kirshbaum: Play it by ear. It is anticipated that the court won’t address their decision as to whether the Legislature fulfilled its responsibility in funding K-12 instruction until later this fall. The district can only anticipate best- and worstcase scenarios like it has had to do up until now. Kuh: The school board has recently adopted a budget that attempts to address the many priorities the district faces. This includes deferred maintenance, necessary staffing levels and the maintenance of a small capital reserve. State-level agencies are working hard to interpret the impacts of the new budget, and our local representatives can continue to assist by clarifying critical details that affect daily operations and planning for the immediate future.

Pick from the Money Tree!

ABOUT THE JOB Clallam-Jefferson Sequim School District Election boundaries: City of Sequim and the communities of Carlsborg, Agnew, Monterra, Jamestown, Blyn, Diamond Point, west to Blue Mountain, and two Gardiner precincts in Jefferson County Voters: 23,940 as of Sept. 19 Term: Four years Meetings: First and third Monday of the month Compensation: None Commissioner duties: Pass a general fund budget that for 2017-18 is $35 million and funds 321 full-time-equivalent employees; hire a schools superintendent; establish staff performance criteria; set student behavior and education policies, including curriculum standards; provide information to the public on district policies; evaluate teaching materials; levy taxes; and establish a long-term strategic plan

can reflect on my experience. At IBM and the Chicago Board of Education, I was a team builder and a team player. I was active in both [information technology] and non-IT activities at Chicago Public Schools. I trained local school council members in budgeting and school finance, coordinated end-of-year processing for all 501 units How would you be a and conducted regional more effective school board member than your focus groups, listening and carefully discerning conopponent? cerns of all board stakeKirshbaum: I cannot evaluate my opponent but holders.

Kuh: I have the potentially unfair advantage of currently serving on the school board, which has given me the opportunity to become much better informed about details and issues associated with the district’s operations. Additionally, my professional career in economic development overlays strongly with my role as a school board member, as education and workforce training are key pillars of our regional economic strategy. I absolutely love the work I’m able to do in both roles.

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Jon kirshbaum Residence: Sequim Phone: 360-4617365 Email: jon kirshbaum511@gmail. com Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 75 Education: High school diploma, Reseda High School, Reseda, Calif.; bachelor’s degree, comprehensive marketing; master’s degree, business administration (specialization in finance); doctoral coursework completed (all but dissertation) in educational administration (major in school business administration and minor in adult continuing education), Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Ill. Occupation: Retired information technology project manager, Illinois State Board of Education Have you ever run for or held elective public office? Ran unsuccessfully for the Clallam County Charter Review Commission, November 2014

brian kuh Residence: Sequim Phone: 360-7975185 Email: connect@ briankuh.com Campaign website: www.briankuh.com Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 38 Education: Graduate of Franklin High School, Portland, Ore; bachelor’s degree, business administration, Portland State University, Portland, Ore. Occupation: Executive director, EDC Team Jefferson Have you ever run for or held elective public office? Currently the appointed atlarge Position 4 Sequim School Board director

EVERY TUESDAY! Every week’s Money Tree is ripe with exclusive discounts — 35 percent off! — from North Olympic Peninsula businesses. It’s easy and fun. ✔ Check the Money Tree page on Tuesdays for the bargain you want. ✔ Phone the PDN’s Port Angeles office at 360-417-7684 and use your credit card to claim your purchase. We’ll mail the certificate to be redeemed to you . . . at no extra cost. ✔ Or if you’re in the neighborhood, drop by the PDN’s Port Angeles office at 305 W. First St. to pick up your certificate. (It’s not available at our Port Townsend or Sequim offices.) Have fun!

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

Clallam-Jefferson

CLALLAMJEFFERSON

Clallam-Jefferson Fire District 1, Position 1 What is your replacement plan for vehicles and apparatus? Kraft: We need to focus on a plan that doesn’t just follow but runs parallel with nationwide recognized vehicle compliance practices. This means maintenance on our current vehicles is key to keeping vehicles in service longer. My plan is to sit with the other commissioners and our fire chief to discuss the district’s needs for vehicles and to come up with a solid plan that will work with our current budget collectively. Riker: We can reduce costs while ensuring accountability with good used vehicles. Properly maintained equipment for firefighting is necessary to keep what we have working and extends the life of equipment. Lives and property are at stake when a firetruck breaks down. Firefighters’ safety equipment should also be on this list. We ask much from these volunteers. They should have the best equipment for the job. What would you do to meet the budgetary challenge of receiving less timber revenue? Kraft: It is very important to recognize the areas surrounding the district, including into Jefferson County, that still to this day remain uncovered with fire protection.

dustin kraft and jodi riker Candidates’ biographies, About the Job outline appear on the next page. Speaking with the surrounding areas about mutual response contracts and possibly more funding from these areas for fire protection is key to creating more revenue for the district without raising the tax on current taxpayers. Riker: Pursue grants from [the Federal Emergency Management Agency] and [U.S. Department of Agriculture]. Obtain reimbursement for the amount of direct expenses for service fighting of a fire on property under the jurisdiction of the United States administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, USDA and Department of the Interior, [state Department of Natural Resources] and from other jurisdictions that receive our services. Litigation if necessary. A bond issue as a last resort. We are all feeling a financial pinch. How should the district fund a new firetruck, which could cost about $500,000? Kraft: The need for new vehicles does not go unrecognized. PLEASE

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VOTER GUIDE 2017

Sequim School Board, Position 4 What standards would you employ for teacher salary increases? Gibson: The McCleary [ruling] has set the standards and requirements for the framework for districts to follow regarding teacher and staff salaries. However, I also strongly feel it is just as important to ensure we provide a 21st-century learning environment and classroom facilities for our teachers and students. Judd: I am not currently on the school board, and I am not privy to that information. How well did the school district handle the discovery last year of a swastika drawing outside the high school library? Gibson: First, I believe that any issue regarding hate or discrimination should be taken seriously and that Sequim School District staff take these issues very seriously as well. After doing some research, I believe that the district did handle this situation appropriately within the legal parameters required. They followed the required procedures while maintaining the safety and confidentiality of those involved. Judd: No comment. How should the district address overcrowding at Helen Haller Elementary School? Gibson: There is more than an overcrowding issue at Helen Haller. There is a growing overcrowding issue across the district. Additional portables are not a solution. They are not a permanent fix and are very costly. In the end, the only real solution is building a new school.

Brandino gibson Residence: Sequim Phone: 360-797-5686 Email: ElectBrandino. Gibson@gmail.com Campaign website: www. facebook.com/electbrandino gibson Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 59 Education: Bachelor’s degree, workforce education and development, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Ill., 1996 Occupation: Supervisor, Clallam County WorkSource and Jefferson County WorkSource, overseen by the state Employment Security Department Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No. With the current deconstruction of the old community school, this would offer a centralized space to put a school, something

nola judd Residence: Sequim Phone: 360-808-0721 Email: judd_ne@yahoo. com Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 77 Education: Graduated from Columbia High School, Richland, 1958; two years of classes at City University, Seattle Occupation: Retired administrative assistant, Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe, Sequim Have you ever run for or held elective public office? Precinct committee officer, King and Clallam counties

that voters were concerned about with the prior bond. PLEASE

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VOTER GUIDE 2017

Fire District 1, Position 1/continued

I think that re-evaluating the current budget and prioritizing the needs for the district should all be looked at to come up with a five-year plan of replacement. Another option to be looked into is outside funding such as grants that the district may qualify for. Riker: Fiscal stewardship is primary here. Good used vehicles are available with service records and years of service remaining. The [Government Accountability Office] has auctions of equipment. FEMA/[Homeland Security] Fire Service Grants and USDA funding would be possible financial sources. Explore the resources to identify federal grants and other innovative alternatives that can help provide funds for expenses such as the equipment, apparatus, training and salaries necessary to protect and serve our communities.

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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ABOUT THE JOB Clallam-Jefferson Fire District 1 Board of Commissioners Election boundaries: City of Forks, portions of the Bogachiel area and a section of Beaver, and 20 voters in the Forks ZIP code who live in Jefferson County Voters: 2,905 as of Sept. 19 Term: Six years Meetings: Every second Sunday at 8:30 a.m. Compensation: $114 per day for district business up to 96 days annually, maximum $10,944 a year

dustin kraft

jodi riker

Residence: Forks Phone: 360-640-4832 Email: votekraft@gmail. com Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 22 Education: Graduated from Forks High School, 2014; studied health sciences, completed emergency medication technician education program, Peninsula College, 2014; studied health sciences, University of Washington, 2014-15; bachelor’s degree studies in progress, completion of paramedicine education program, Central Washington University, Ellensburg, beginning in 2015 Occupation: Paramedic, Forks Community Hospital Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No

Residence: Beaver Phone: 253-293-5643 or 360-327-3790 Email: ElectJodi@aol.com Campaign website: www. facebook.com/ElectJodi RikerYap Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 62 Education: Graduated from T.G. Browne High School, Phoenix, 1972; emergency medical technician certification; Phoenix College, 1972-73, nursing certificate; working on a master’s degree in humanities Occupation: Retired emergency medical technician-first responder Have you ever run for or held elective public office? Precinct committee officer in Maricopa and Gila counties, Arizona, 1976-80; candidate for Arizona governor in a nonpartisan special election, 1987 (one of the first women to run for Arizona governor); elected city of Talent City, Ore., City Council, 200103, resigned; candidate for Auburn City Council, 2013; currently Clallam County precinct committee officer

What should the fire district do to prepare district facilities for the Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake? Kraft: It behooves the district to have supplies for such an event kept separate from everyday use and stored at a district facility if declared safe. If district facilities don’t allow this, a plan to keep in mind is building a separate outbuilding on district property to withstand disaster or possibly leasing a structurally sound building from the city of Forks. Riker: We have to make sure the fire stations are compliant with current earthquake standards to have vehicles and equipment available as part of the recovery effort, not trapped under rubble. Stations can store extra equipment, extra fuel for trucks and station generators to keep power on for communication, pumping water and emergency response. Reach out to tribal governThis outbuilding would withments, DNR, USDA and the stand such disaster and allow National Park Service. Have reciprocal agreements to storing of emergency supplies assist each other as needed. and vehicle(s).

How would you be a more effective fire commissioner than your opponent? PLEASE

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Commissioner duties: Commissioners pass a general fund budget that for 2017 is $290,460 and funds one full-time department chief and part-time administrative assistant. The district’s 24 firefighter volunteers are not compensated. Commissioners hire district staff, approve fire district policies, approve capital purchases and levy taxes.

Sequim School Board, Position 4/continued Judd: This is already being addressed within the constraints we have. How should the district address the funding uncertainties resulting from the state high court’s McCleary decision? Gibson: There are still many unknowns with McCleary, and this next year will be a data-gathering year. Fortunately, Sequim voters overwhelmingly approved the [Educational Programs & Operations] levy that goes through 2021, and this will allow the district time to learn more about funding allocations and transition to the new funding model. However, McCleary does not provide funding for building facilities, and this will continue to be the responsibility of the community and voters. Judd: The district has limited input, as this is a state issue and responsibility.

But I believe the measures employed by the Legislature to address the McCleary decision will be challenged in court. How would you be a more effective school board member than your opponent? Gibson: I bring several factors to the board. With a degree in education development, I understand the requirements of a good curriculum. As I have spent time in the classroom as a substitute teacher, I have an understanding of classroom management and student needs. And as part of my involvement with Citizens for Sequim Schools, I have listened to many of our community members and learned what they believe are the needs within the Sequim School District. Judd: I do not believe I would be more effective. I simply propose to bring experience of a parent within various aspects of the school system.


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

Fire District 1, Position 1 continued

Kraft: My passion for emergency services and dedication to the community that I was born and raised in makes me the best choice for commissioner. My career started in emergency services as a volunteer at just 18 years old. I’ve grown to understand the needs of our community. Being a volunteer, I understand our fire volunteers are the core of the fire district and the importance of hearing all voices, including those on the front line. Riker: My opponent is an intelligent young man. This commitment is for six years. Who can say what opportunities will open up for him? We have four out of five seats open this year for the commission. When we lose members on the commission, a year is needed for a new commissioner to gain footing. We need to keep a strong continuity to properly and efficiently function. I humbly ask for and would appreciate your vote.

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VOTER GUIDE 2017

Clallam-Jefferson

Clallam-Jefferson Fire District 1, Position 2

What is your replacement plan for vehicles and apparatus? Duncan: I would need to learn more on what is available for funding and what the needs are before determining a plan or idea. Hunt: There is a replacement plan in effect.

What would you do to meet the budgetary challenge of receiving less timber revenue? Duncan: Look at the needs and determine priorities. Also, look for other grants or funding sources that may be available. Hunt: The budget is always difficult, but we manage. The important part is using the money to keep our firefighters safe and with good response times. How should the district fund a new firetruck, which could cost about $500,000? Duncan: Look at grants or other funding sources outside before considering any taxing. Hunt: A replacement plan for the firetruck is in place. What should the fire district do to prepare district facilities for the Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake? Duncan: I think training of all firefighters as well as incorporating other agencies and the community to educate and create a plan. Informing others and educating emergency personnel is key to a successful plan. Hunt: There are a lot of Cascadia preparations in place.

Chet Hunt did not provide a photo for this voter guide.

britni duncan Britni Duncan Residence: Forks Phone: 360-640-0419 Email: britni-duncan@ hotmail.com Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 37 Education: General Associate of Arts and Associate of Applied Science in early childhood education, Peninsula College Occupation: Emergency medical technician, emergency room technician Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No.

How would you be a more effective fire commissioner than your opponent? Duncan: I have 10 years’ experience in emergency personnel services and have worked hand in hand with the

Chet hunt Residence: Forks Phone: 360-640-0483 Email: chet.shana@ gmail.com Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 65 Education: Forks High School graduate, 1971; one year of classes at Peninsula College Occupation: Finish carpenter Have you ever run for or held elective public office? I am the incumbent Position 2, District 1 fire commissioner.

fire department. My goal is to learn more about their needs and move the department forward with upcoming technology and services available to serve the community. Hunt: Experience.

CLALLAMJEFFERSON

ClallamJefferson Fire District 1, Position 5 Neris biciunas, anthony ‘tony’ romberg and john witherspoon Candidates’ biographies appear on the next page. What is your replacement plan for vehicles and apparatus? Biciunas: Maintaining the right tools and vehicles to be effective as a fire district is critical. Making sure dollars are not wasted on inferior products and services and continuing to be diligent with repairs and maintenance are solid first steps. Proper training in equipment used by staff will also aid in preventing unnecessary damage to vehicles and apparatus. A long-term plan (and budget) for equipment replacement is required to reduce the likelihood of short-term fiscal crises. Romberg: We need to maintain the volunteer system in District 1 so that revenues are readily available through fiscal responsibility. We can update and retrofit the capable equipment we already have while maintaining the highest service rating the district volunteer department has enjoyed for a long time. PLEASE

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VOTER GUIDE 2017

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

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Fire District 1, Position 5/continued do drills. They need proper training. There should be preparation sessions with the community to inform the people how to prepare, what to do and also what to accept in those circumstances. This would include fire, police, the mayor, Red Cross and other organizations that would be on board, and would include having a full plan in place if a disaster happened.

Three candidates are on the ballot for the Forks Fire District 1 Position 5 commissioner seat. Commissioners removed incumbent Commissioner Lowell McQuoid for a meeting attendance violation May 14 and did not notify the Clallam County Auditor’s Office in time for candidates to file for the Aug. 1 primary election. Witherspoon: First, see what federal or state funding is available and look at trade-ins and fundraisers. Lastly, a tax increase, only if there is no other option. What would you do to meet the budgetary challenge of receiving less timber revenue? Biciunas: It’s been said money doesn’t grow on trees. In some ways, it does. The state of Washington is obligated to support local communities with revenue from state timber sales. By adding our voice to that of the city of Forks and Clallam County commissioners, we need to compel the state of Washington to fulfill its legal obligation. In the short term, careful budgeting and creative problem-solving will be required to meet our ongoing obligations. Romberg: We need to maintain the volunteer system in District 1 so that revenues are readily available through fiscal responsibility. We also need to ensure that everyone who is being served by the district is fulfilling their commitment of contributions. Witherspoon: First, again seek federal and state help, and then look at the pay. Also, see where we can make cuts that will not hurt the community. How should the district fund a new firetruck, which could cost about $500,000? Biciunas: Every option needs

neris biciunas Residence: Forks Phone: 360-589-8698 Email: nbiciunas@gmail. com Campaign website: None Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 44 Education: Bachelor’s degree, forest resource management, University of Washington, 1995 Occupation: Resource land manager-forestry, Pacific Resource Unit, Rayonier Inc., Yulee, Fla. Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No. to be carefully considered, including the least likely, the least popular, the options that have been attempted before and new suggestions from the community. It will be likely that a composite of several sources will be necessary to meet this need. Romberg: We need to maintain the volunteer system in District 1 so that revenues are readily available, through fiscal responsibility, to ensure the need is met when it arises. Our firetrucks are currently in good working order, with some planned updates and retrofits. Witherspoon: I would first

anthony ‘tony’ romberg Residence: Beaver Phone: 360-640-8181 Email: tonyromberg@ gmail.com Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 60 Education: High school Occupation: Owner and operator, Premium Shingle LLC (31 years), Beaver Have you ever run for or held elective public office? No.

look at federal and state funding, then fundraisers. Lastly, if there are no other options and it becomes necessary for the safety of the community, I would then look at taxes to help. What should the fire district do to prepare district facilities for the Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake? Biciunas: Plans are already in place for various contingencies. Refinements to those plans will continue to be made as we actively participate in exercises and drills with other entities.

How would you be a more effective fire commissioner than your opponents? Biciunas: I’ve been working in the private sector of the forest products industry since 1998. I’ve learned much about careful budgeting and financial analysis. I also have extensive training and a work history with the Lean method of process improveResidence: Forks ment. Phone: 360-640-9838 Romberg: I’ve served as a Email: bos_jerri@yahoo. volunteer firefighter for 38 years com in District 1. Campaign website: None This is my home and my comAge as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 42 munity. Education: Attended high I’ll bring my experience to the school through the 11th grade, board table on behalf of my Kellogg High School, Kellogg, neighbors and fellow firefighters. Idaho District 1 has the highest ratOccupation: Log truck ing a volunteer fire department driver can attain. Have you ever run for or I will show fiscal responsibilheld elective public office? ity and look to improve ourselves No. with all options. It is from this background that I will be able to critically evaluate the questions and Learning how to collaborate effectively with other emergency issues facing our fire district. I will bring a fresh perspective response services will be the most productive way of respond- that is not tainted by legacy ways of thinking. ing to an emergency the scale of Witherspoon: I have been a Cascadia Zone earthquake. involved with the fire departRomberg: We have already ment most of my life. begun storing food and supplies I have fought all types of fires. for such an event. I have also been trained in Some of the facilities are search and rescue. already capable of providing I have done fast-water resdisaster relief. cues. I believe our community’s I personally know what is greatest strength is the volunteer spirit that always causes us to needed to get the job done the rise to the occasion together and best and easiest way possible. meet every challenge. I know what is necessary to Witherspoon: They should get the job done efficiently.

john witherspoon


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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

FOR ELECTION ENDING NOVEMBER 7, 2017

VOTER GUIDE 2017

Clallam-Jefferson

Clallam-Jefferson Fire District 3 Pick from the Money Tree! EVERY TUESDAY! Every week’s Money Tree is ripe with exclusive discounts — 35 percent off! — from North Olympic Peninsula businesses. It’s easy and fun. ✔ Check the Money Tree page on Tuesdays for the bargain you want. ✔ Phone the PDN’s Port Angeles office at 360-417-7684 and use your credit card to claim your purchase. We’ll mail the certificate to be redeemed to you . . . at no extra cost. ✔ Or if you’re in the neighborhood, drop by the PDN’s Port Angeles office at 305 W. First St. to pick up your certificate. (It’s not available at our Port Townsend or Sequim offices.)

Peninsula Daily News

Sean Ryan did not provide information as requested for this voter guide. What is your replacement plan, including funding for vehicles and apparatus? Chinn: A vehicle replacement plan needs to be based on two factors: mileage and compliance with national standards. As a vehicle reaches its mileage peak, we evaluate its maintenance history to determine a replacement time for it. With every fleet acquisition, a vehicle or apparatus is updated to current national standards. The district has an established vehicle maintenancereplacement program. Funding for the program is taken from our annual budget. What staffing changes would you make, if any? Chinn: At this time, I believe the district needs to maintain the current level of staffing. We are still evaluating the Fitch study, which will give us direction in how to provide better service. With a 280 percent increase in calls in the last 22 years, we have had to add staffing to keep up. The district is currently seeking support of a [Federal Emergency Management Act Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response] Grant, which will help fund increased staffing over the next three years. Would you expect to ask voters for a levy increase? Chinn: I feel that the current levy, which expires in December

2019, is critical for maintaining our program. With increased staffing and call pressure since the inception of the levy in 2009 and careful financial foresight, the district has done an admirable job of managing the existing levy money. I foresee no change in the existing levy amount of 49 cents per $1,000 of property valuation. In 2019, the district will seek a continuance of the levy. What would be your biggest accomplishment by the time your term had expired? Chinn: It is an understatement to say we have an excellent staff. My goal as a commissioner is to ensure that our community receives the best emergency medical, fire and prevention programs that can be provided within our financial means. In doing that, the commissioners need to support the staff by giving them state-of-the-art training, tools and guidance to impart to our citizens. How would you be a more effective fire commissioner than your opponent? Chinn: I have been a member of the fire service for over 30 years. Having served in a number of positions both as a volunteer and an employee, I worked alongside every staff member in this department. I continue to maintain a good, positive working relationship with all the staff. I consider communication as my strong suit. Observing and interacting with dozens of fire departments along the West Coast has broadened my knowledge.

ABOUT THE JOB Clallam-Jefferson Sequim-Area Fire District 3 Election boundaries: Communities in the Port Angeles and Sequim areas including Agnew, Dungeness, Lost Mountain, Diamond Point and six Sequim voting precincts; and Gardiner and a portion of Port Discovery in Jefferson County (question to Paul)

steve chinn Residence: Sequim Phone: 360-460-8982 Email: Chinnfor commissioner@gmail.com Campaign website: www.chinnforcommissioner. com Age as of Nov. 7, Election Day: 68 Education: High school diploma, Aberdeen High School;. associate degree, Grays Harbor Community College, Aberdeen; bachelor’s degree, social scienceseducation, Central Washington University, Ellensburg; master’s degree, educational administration, Portland State University, Portland, Ore. Occupation: Retired teacher and retired volunteer firefighter-emergency medical technician Have you ever run for or held elective public office? Appointed to the Fire District 3, commissioner Position 2 seat in July 2016

Voters: 25,782 as of Sept. 19 Term: Six-year short and full term. The winner of the general election takes office after results are certified Nov. 28. Meetings: First and third Tuesday every month Compensation: $114 per day for district business up to 96 days annually, maximum $10,944 a year Duties: Pass a general fund budget that for 2017 is $8.6 million and funds 45 full-time-equivalent positions and compensates 70 volunteer firefighter-emergency medical technicians; hire fire district staff; approve fire district policies; approve capital purchases; and levy taxes.

Special Sections - 2017 Voter's Guide  

i20171014175037420.pdf

Special Sections - 2017 Voter's Guide  

i20171014175037420.pdf