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f a l l 2012


f a l l 2012

Number 141

Published by Preservation North Carolina, Est. 1939 www.PreservationNC.org

The Historic Preservation Foundation of North Carolina, Inc. 2012 Board of Directors Eddie Belk, Durham, Chairman Rodney Swink, Raleigh, Vice Chairman and Chairman-Elect Agnes T. Harvin, Henderson, Secretary Andrew Stewart, Raleigh, Treasurer Marty Moser, Clayton, At-Large Executive Committee Member Jo Ramsay Leimenstoll, Greensboro, Immediate Past Chairman Summer Steverson Alston, Durham Lucy Webster Archie, Asheville Ramona Bartos, Raleigh Fred Belledin, Raleigh Cynthia Brodhead, Durham Elizabeth F. Buford, Raleigh Jerry Cashion, Raleigh Anne Rendlemen Daniel, Greensboro Meg Kluttz Dees, Salisbury Linda Etheridge, Elizabeth City Anne Faircloth, Clinton Charles P. Gaylor III, Goldsboro Debby Gomulka, Wilmington Rebecca Love, Shelby Bettie Edwards Murchison, Wake Forest Edward Norvell, Salisbury Libby Pope, Edenton Gray Reed, Raleigh Tara Sherbert, Charlotte James M. Tanner, Jr., Raleigh Don Tise, Chapel Hill J. Chris Wilson, Wilmington

Regional Offices and Staff

Headquarters 220 Fayetteville Street Suite 200 P.O. Box 27644 Raleigh, NC 27611-7644 919-832-3652 Fax 919-832-1651 e-mail: info@presnc.org

Piedmont Regional Office 3001 Academy Road Suite 130 P.O. Box 3597 Durham, NC 27702-3597 919-401-8540 Fax 919-489-4499 e-mail: cturner@presnc.org

Myrick Howard, President Shannon Phillips, Director of Resource Development Jason Queen, Director of Urban Issues Lauren Werner, Director of Outreach Education/ Website Editor Dawn Williams, Office Manager/Properties Coordinator Mary Frances Wilson, Development Associate

Cathleen Turner, Director

Bellamy Mansion Museum of History and Design Arts 503 Market Street P.O. Box 1176 Wilmington, NC 28402-1176 910-251-3700 Fax 910-763-8154 e-mail: info@bellamymansion.org

Western Regional Office 319 N. Lafayette Street P.O. Box 2 Shelby, NC 28151-0002 704-482-3531 Fax 704-482-3774 e-mail: talexander@presnc.org Ted Alexander, Director Northeast Regional Office 420 Elliott Street Edenton, NC 27932 252-482-7455 Fax 919-832-1651 e-mail: cdeviney@presnc.org Claudia Deviney, Director

Gareth Evans, Director Jennifer Scott, Operations Manager

On the cover: The front door of the Arrah Belle Johnson House, in Franklin. To read more about this house, see page 5.

The mission of Preservation North Carolina is to protect and promote buildings, sites and landscapes important to the diverse heritage of North Carolina.

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Letter from the President

Gratification

Left: Renovation underway at the Armstrong Apartments, Gastonia. Right: former Gaston Memorial Hospital, Gastonia.

P

reservation is usually an exercise in delayed gratification. Things happen slowly, and often that’s okay.

Preservation is like a healthy homecooked meal—individually prepared, rich with great ingredients, and the beneficiary of someone’s passion. Much new construction (though certainly not all) is more akin to fast food—not as good, not as good for you, more expensive, but certainly easier. One of the joys of preservation is the opportunity to stop and admire the object during renovation. Sort of like taking a break midway through a delicious meal and saying out loud: wow, this is great! Since our last issue, I’ve had several instances of gratification that have brought me a big smile and quiet pleasure.

Our last magazine was an experiment in downsizing. I asked for your input, and you gave it to me—in emails, phone messages, and at the grocery store. I heard from numerous Preservation North Carolina members, and the response was nearly unanimous: we like it. That’s great. Thank you. Recently I visited two of the properties in Gastonia that were featured in that issue as recent sales, and work is in full swing on both sites. There is no question that if PNC hadn’t gotten involved with the Armstrong Apartments, a teacherage in Gastonia, and the old Gaston Memorial Hospital, they would both 3


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be only memories. Seeing them under renovation, I thought to myself—with a little lump in my throat: wow, this is great! That gratification was reinforced by conversations with locals who remembered teachers who lived in the apartments, or who were born in the hospital. They were pleased that “someone saved them.” I also had a very different kind of gratification when I heard the final news that the North Carolina General Assembly extended our historic rehabilitation tax credits to 2015. It was the longest extension of any tax credit, and it passed by a combined HouseSenate vote of 161–2, a testament to the bipartisan appeal of preservation. Fifteen years ago, when PNC first pushed for the creation of the state’s tax credit program, who would have imagined that it would result in more than $1.3 billion (billion!) in private investment in North Carolina’s heritage? Not me, that’s for sure. We are now waiting for PNC’s biggest project ever to close: Loray Mill in Gastonia. Since the pending closing has already received tremendous publicity, I’m hoping that I’m not jinxing the sale by writing these words. My first meeting about saving Loray was twenty years ago. When it sells, there will be great relief—and that slow-cooked meal is going to be scrumptious!

Myrick Howard 4

Dewey Anderson with Landmark Asset Services of Winston-Salem inside the Nurses Dormitory at the former Gaston Memorial Hospital, Gastonia.


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Interesting Places, Fascinating People “Welcome, do come in.” One can easily imagine Arrah Belle Johnson answering the rap of the exquisite door knocker (cover photo) and welcoming guests into her newly built “dream house” in Franklin in the late 1930s. Widowed in 1929, she put down roots in Franklin, buying the local weekly newspaper and hiring a prominent Asheville architect to design her home. Her home survives, much as she built it. As with many of North Carolina’s historic buildings, the deeper you drill into their history, the more interesting they become. Arrah Belle Johnson was an exceptional woman, especially in her

day. After decades of being an Episcopal minister’s wife and serving in numerous volunteer capacities, she used her life savings to purchase The Franklin Press in 1931. She worked in the background while the paper was managed by two of her sons. After World War II began, Mrs. Johnson took on the roles of editor and publisher. After a lifetime of moving from one rental or church-owned home to another, she decided in 1939 to build her own home. She couldn’t get a mortgage for her home from the local bank, so she had to go to Sylva for a loan from a bank managed by a fellow Episcopalian. We don’t know why her loan was denied, but we can guess that the Bank of Franklin wasn’t

The Arrah Belle Johnson House, Franklin, Macon County 5


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used to making home loans to women, especially ones who were sixty-five. To design her home, she engaged Eric Stillwell of Asheville, a partner in the prominent firm Six Associates. Stillwell designed a home that combined the latest in fashion and technology (like knotty pine paneling and steel casement windows) with local craftsmanship (such as using mylonite, a locally quarried stone). The plan for the house was considered unusual, placing the porch at the rear in order to take advantage of the mountain view. If her home hadn’t survived, the story of the pioneering Arrah Belle Johnson would probably be limited to an obscure 1944 obituary in a smalltown weekly newspaper. Her house— and her story—will continue. The current owner of the house, Barbara McRae, has more than a casual connection with Arrah Belle Johnson. Not only does Barbara live in Mrs. Johnson’s home, she is also the editor

of The Franklin Press. She often writes about preservation and conservation issues. After learning more about her predecessor, Barbara enthusiastically agreed to place the house under a preservation easement, ensuring that the house would be permanently preserved. The Patrick St. Lawrence House in Pittsboro, the oldest house in town, features notable architectural features and has an unusual history. Originally built as an inn, the late 18th century house has an entire paneled wall that’s hinged and can be hooked to the ceiling. Just as modern hotels have movable walls to open up spaces for special events, so does the St. Lawrence House. The “ballroom” could be expanded to include the stair hall. The house, which started out on the courthouse square, is now sitting on its fourth site, having been moved around 1907, again in 1955, and most recently in 2011—in each case to allow expansions of county facilities.

The hinged wall in the Patrick St. Lawrence House, Pittsboro

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The Old Lexington Post Office, Lexington New buyers, Ray and Janet Carney of Wyoming, New York, enthusiastically anticipate returning Pittsboro’s oldest house to its early status of being one of its finest. We trust they won’t do historically accurate reenactments of the cockfights that were used by the inn in the early 19th century to attract visitors from Raleigh. The St. Lawrence House is an example of PNC working with local government to dispose of historic surplus property. Chatham County relocated it and two other early houses as part of an environmental review process tied to funding for its new justice center. The county then worked with PNC to market the houses and place them under protective covenants, based on enabling legislation that allows a streamlined process for a sale through PNC. Another surplus local government property has found a new owner through PNC: the old Lexington Post Office. James Knox Taylor, the Supervising Architect of the U.S.

Treasury, designed this stone building, built in downtown Lexington in 1911. From 1897 through 1912 Taylor was “supervising architect” for hundreds of federal buildings, including dozens of post offices, court houses and other structures. Not nearly as large as it first appears, the structure achieves an air of monumentality with its six large Tuscan columns and Classical details. Since the 1950s, it has been adaptively used for public purposes, first as the local library and then for the arts council. Then, it was declared surplus, and Davidson County agreed to work with PNC to find a buyer. PNC’s advertisement for the property posited: “With its impressive Beaux Arts architecture, the Old Lexington Post Office is a terrific site for a gallery or attorney’s office.” The purchaser, Lillian Hardy, an attorney from Washington DC, plans to do just that: use the building for her own law practice and make the front lobby available for special events. 7


Tim Buchman

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The Old Davidson County Courthouse, Lexington which today have similar funds under their purview. Historic Woodville, a local organization spearheaded for years by Vicki Paton and Molly Ward Urquhart of Raleigh, has placed covenants on St. Frances Methodist Church and Cemetery in Lewiston-Woodville. Described as “the finest and best preserved church in Bertie

Photo courtesy of E. Watson Brown, Tarboro

A few blocks away, PNC provided $50,000 for the restoration of the old Davidson County Courthouse from a fund established at PNC by local citizens in the 1980s. Built in 1856-8, the temple-form building is one of the most architecturally significant courthouses in the state. For many years, it has served as the Davidson County Historical Museum. The organizers of the fund (most notably Richard Barentine) dictated that the funds would be invested in longterm investments, with no distributions for twenty-five years. The fund grew and grew, providing a substantial grant for the architectural plans for the courthouse’s exterior restoration, especially its cupola. This fund predated the establishment of several of North Carolina’s community foundations,

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St. Frances Methodist Church and Cemetery, Lewiston-Woodville


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County,” the Greek Revival structure dates from 1845 and is attributed to Warrenton builder Thomas Bragg. For more than a century, neighboring Woodville (originally named Hotel) and Lewiston were two separate towns, on opposite sides of the railroad tracks. In 1896, the church was moved from Woodville to Lewiston, when Lewiston members outnumbered Woodville members, while the church cemetery in Woodville remained active. Then, in 1966 the church was moved away from the road, and in 1997 it moved yet again, back to its original site in Woodville where it is used for community activities. The two towns merged in 1981, and in 2011 their combined population is 537. Perhaps you don’t remember St. Frances? In 1843 Frances Pugh left the church $1000 in her will to build its new sanctuary and an additional $500 for a parsonage. If only we at PNC had a way to declare sainthood for our donors! So with PNC covenants in place, hopefully the St. Lawrence House and St. Frances Methodist Church will end their peripatetic ways. North Carolina’s history is rich and varied. Who would have expected to find a pioneering newspaper woman in Franklin? Or historic properties that were first moved in 1896 and 1907 and then moved again…and again? The people and history associated with these properties are fascinating, but if the structures that connect us with those stories don’t survive, the people in those stories are lost to obscurity.

With more than 600 historic properties under its protection, PNC is proud to be a part of the story for these properties. P.S. Of course, things are not always simple and easy. In late July, the Albemarle Peanut Mill in Edenton, a property donated in 2010 to PNC, was damaged by a microburst, causing the huge metal bins to shear off the side of the building and the top three floors to collapse. The property, immediately condemned by the Town of Edenton, quickly turned from an asset into a liability. With pro bono assistance from local attorney Hack High, the property was deeded without charge to Lincoln Adams and Julia Townsend, who previously looked at acquiring it. Bless them. They started work on stabilizing the remains of the structure before the ink on the deed was dry. Win some, lose some. At least we tried.

Albemarle Peanut Mill, Edenton

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See www.PreservationNC.org for more information

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First National Bank of Cherryville

100 S. Mountain Street Cherryville $329,000 See (F) on map This impressive three story neoclassical commercial structure is the most impressive building in Cherryville’s charming downtown and includes three parcels on the key block in the historic central business district. Built in 1916, the Bank was designed by noted Charlotte architect, Willard G. Rogers. Major assets include over 30 paved parking spaces, as well as a covered drive-through and an elevator. The first floor would make a great restaurant or commercial space, and the third floor features a nearly 20 ft high ceiling, and an open area suitable to be converted into loft/live/work units. Downtown Cherryville is a newly designated NC “Main Street” City. Square Feet: 12,515; Lot Size: 0.5 acre; Zoning: Commercial. Contact: Ted Alexander, PNC Western Office, Shelby at 704-482-3531 or talexander@presnc.org 10

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See www.PreservationNC.org for more information A VA I L A B L E

The Fountain

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1677 NC Highway 268 Lenoir $99,500 See (B) on map This 1807 home features many original early details, including painted Flemish bond brickwork on the chimney, and an original basement kitchen—one of few surviving nineteenth century examples in the western part of the state. The house also features a brick well house/ dairy, and lots of space, and situated on a picturesque knoll in a beautiful rural setting near Happy Valley, with a stream in the side yard. It is individually listed on the National Register, and eligible for historic preservation tax credits. Square Feet: 2,595; Lot Size: 1.426 acres; Zoning: RA20. Contact: Ted Alexander, PNC Western OfďŹ ce, Shelby at 704-482-3531 or talexander@presnc.org

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See www.PreservationNC.org for more information

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William Morrison, Sr. House and Farm

195 Lakey Creek Rd. Franklin See (A) on map $350,000 Surrounded by an impressive landscape, including a pond and a view of the Nantahala Mountains, and located less than ½ mile from the Little Tennessee River, this historic mountain retreat would make an excellent guest home, since the property is large enough to accommodate an additional residence. This sportsman’s paradise features sweeping views, nearby streams with abundant fish, birds, and other wildlife, as well as a barn and other outbuildings, all within one of the most intact historic cultural landscapes in Western NC. Square Feet: 1,083; Lot Size: 130 acres; Zoning: TBD. Contact: Ted Alexander, PNC Western Office, Shelby at 704-482-3531 or talexander@presnc.org 12

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See www.PreservationNC.org for more information A VA I L A B L E

Villa Florenza

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1415 Poole Rd. Raleigh See (L) on map $70,000 Also known as the William A. Curtis House, Villa Florenza is just blocks from everything downtown Raleigh has to offer. One of the most signiďŹ cant African American dwellings in Raleigh, the house features an inviting wraparound porch, leaded glass ornaments, grand staircase, completely intact collection of Neoclassical mantels, pocket doors, and nicely molded baseboards. On a large corner lot suitable for single-family residence or business, and close to WakeMed. Individually listed on NR; eligible for historic preservation tax credits. Square Feet: 2,520; Lot Size: 0.30 acre; Zoning: Neighborhood Business. Contact: Jason Queen, PNC Headquarters OfďŹ ce, Raleigh at 919-832-3652 x230 or jqueen@presnc.org

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See www.PreservationNC.org for more information

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Cascine Mill

Highway 401 S Louisburg See (O) on map $88,000 This early 19th century mill is the perfect opportunity to preserve a part of NC’s Antebellum industrial past. Located on a beautiful site overlooking Cedar Creek, the property features two additional properties that would make excellent residences, suitable for sympathetic additions. Close to downtown Louisburg, this imposing 3 story mill on a full stone foundation is an exceptional example of quality craftsmanship and material; may be eligible for historic preservation tax credits. Square Feet: 3,600; Lot Size: 13 acres; Zoning: R-30. Contact: Cathleen Turner, PNC Piedmont OfďŹ ce, Durham at 919-401-8540 or cturner@presnc.org 14

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See www.PreservationNC.org for more information A VA I L A B L E

Charles S. Brewer House

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107 N. Clark Street Henderson See (M) on map $79,900 This spacious 1920s home, designed by NC architect Frank B. Simpson, has Colonial Revival and Craftsman elements. The house has a slate roof and dormer, fireplace, central hall floor plan, main floor master suite (built in 1987), and a screened-in back porch, plus a large basement. A cruciform goldfish pond and mature landscaping enhance the exterior of the property. The house is conveniently located in Henderson and commutable to the Triangle. Square Feet: 3,468; Lot Size: 0.62 acre; Zoning: R-4. Contact: Cathleen Turner, PNC Piedmont Office, Durham at 919-401-8540 or cturner@presnc.org

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See www.PreservationNC.org for more information

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Peete House

307 Church Street Warrenton See (N) on map $275,000 This early twentieth century Neoclassical house in a beautiful neighborhood near downtown Warrenton requires only cosmetic updates, and features a detached office that could also be used as a guest house. The house has gracious front and side porches and a slate roof, making it attractive from any angle when outside. The interior features beautiful fireplaces, several French doors, and abundant natural light. Square Feet: 4,400; Lot Size: 1.43 acres; Zoning: Residential. Contact: Cathleen Turner, PNC Piedmont Office, Durham at 919-401-8540 or cturner@presnc.org

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See www.PreservationNC.org for more information A VA I L A B L E

Grantham-Baker House

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106 N. Virginia Street Goldsboro See (Q) on map $39,000 Built in 1902, this Victorian home has many attractive features, and a spacious backyard—a rare commodity for a downtown property. The house also has original mantels, wood floors, paneled doors with transoms, beadboard wainscoting, two clawfoot tubs, and a beautiful staircase. It is eligible for historic preservation tax credits. Square Feet: 3,719; Lot Size: 0.3 acre; Zoning: R-6. Contact: Dawn Williams, PNC Headquarters Office, Raleigh at 919-832-3652 x 221 or dwilliams@presnc.org Goldsboro’s plan for revitalization will pave the way for a thriving live-work community. Historic homes that range from Queen Annes to Bungalows, Greek Revivals to Italianates are available for restoration, and accommodate families of any size. Visit www.PreservationNC.org/Goldsboro to view all houses available for restoration in Goldsboro, and to learn more about possible financial incentives available through the city.

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See www.PreservationNC.org for more information

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Greenwreath

5157 NC 43 N Greenville See (S) on map $199,000 This impressive 1780s home is your opportunity to own an important part of NC history, as well as the finest Federal mantel in Pitt County! Individually listed on the National Register, Greenwreath has far too many important and attractive features to list here, but additional highlights include many decorative paint finishes, a boxed cornice and three outbuildings. Just 10 minutes from downtown Greenville, there is the option to purchase up to 4 additional acres, and the property is eligible for historic preservation tax credits. Square Feet: 3,000; Lot Size: 1.41 acres; Zoning: Residential. Contact: Claudia Deviney, PNC Northeast Regional Office, 252-482-7455 or cdeviney@presnc.org 18

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See www.PreservationNC.org for more information A VA I L A B L E

Edenton Mill Office Building

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420 Elliott Street Edenton See (T) on map $212,269 Enjoy the charm of Edenton’s Mill Village while you work! This handsome, tall building features arched windows that complement the mill building immediately to the East and a hip roof accented with boxed cornices. Originally built in 1909, the office had sympathetic additions in 1948. It is currently used for office, a use that may be grandfathered. Square Feet: 1,672; Lot Size: 0.23 acre; Zoning: R-1. Contact: Claudia Deviney, PNC Northeast Regional Office, 252-482-7455 or cdeviney@presnc.org

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See www.PreservationNC.org for more information

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George Lassiter Store

108 S. Oakum Street Edenton See (T) on map $135,000 This 1920s store offers a wonderful live/work opportunity within the National Register District in Edenton! The George Lassiter Store is divided into four units: the storefront and three one-bedroom apartments, each with its own porch. Historic features include a second-story porch with turned columns, a recessed door entrance with large display windows, and wood oors. This property is eligible for historic preservation tax credits, and offers a wide variety of uses. Square Feet: 3,083; Lot Size: 0.177 acre; Zoning: Residential. Contact: Claudia Deviney, PNC Northeast Regional OfďŹ ce, 252-482-7455 or cdeviney@presnc.org

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See www.PreservationNC.org for more information

Stuart House

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624 S. Washington Street

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Shelby (E on map) $145,000

210 McBrayer Street

216 McBrayer Street

Shelby (E on map) $42,500

Shelby (E on map) $26,300

903 W. Sixth Avenue B

Gourd Hollow

Gastonia (F on map) $48,000

Spring Hope (P on map) $130,000

McClenahan House

Terry-Taylor House

Pittsboro (I on map) $30,000 HISTORIC PROPERTIES

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Shelby (E on map) $135,000

Pittsboro (I on map) $30,000 OF THE

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See www.PreservationNC.org for more information

Jordan C. Horne House

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Glencoe School

Burlington (H on map) $137,500

Magnolia (R on map) $37,000

213 S. Driver Street

Browning Cottage

Durham (K on map) $125,900

Warrenton (N on map) $84,500

Harrington-Brooks House

Simons House

act

ontr

er C Und

Greenville (S on map) $100,000

Edenton (T on map) $127,000

Riddick House

Arnold House

Edenton (T on map) (Documentary photo) $61,000 22

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Roper (U on map) $74,900 A S S O C I AT I O N

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See www.PreservationNC.org for more information

318 Third Street, SE Hickory See (C) on map $83,300

Finely crafted, one of Hickory’s earliest homes. Built c. 1907, oneand-three-quarter story frame cottage. Hipped, gabled roof. Central dormer. Built-in cabinets, natural beaded board room, original mantels, crown moldings, “banker’s door” in foyer. Recent, architecturally sympathetic renovations. Stuccoed foundation. Parlor rooms, kitchen, dining, 2 baths, 4 bedrooms. Central heating/air. Move-in ready. Square Feet: 2,369; Lot Size: 0.6 acre; Zoning: R-4.

Emma and Simon O’Neal House

Ocracoke Fine example of an Ocracoke See (V) on map story-and-a-jump style house $235,900 with a hipped porch. This home built in the early 1900’s, has many of its original features. Great opportunity to preserve an Ocracoke Island village home in the historic district. Eligible for historic preservation tax credits. Square Feet: 1056; Lot size: 9,025 sq. ft. Contact: Paula Schramel, Ocracoke Preservation Society; 252-921-0290 or giftshop@ocracokepreservation.org

Contact: Patrick Daily, 828-322-4731, pdaily@hickorylandmarks.org

Pilgrim’s Rest

Pilgrim’s Rest, circa 1819. Special home on 1.7-acre site in historic Hillsborough, easy walk to shopping, restaurants, coffee shops, library, and more. Carefully updated with high quality finishes. Winding walkway (original carriage path) with mature boxwoods. Authentic millwork/moldings and door hardware, 11' ceilings, heart-of-pine flooring. Many rooms open to a central courtyard with garden and covered porch. Guesthouse. Pool. Large back yard, vegetable garden, arbor, fenced dog run or chicken coop. Square Feet: 5,021; Lot Size: 1.76 acres; Zoning: Historic District. 116 W. Queen Street Hillsborough See (J) on map $1,500,000

Contact: Tony Hall, Tony Hall & Associates 919-933-8500 or tonyhall@tonyhallassociates.com

Lowenstein-Henkle House

National Register Lowenstein House currently has 6 two bedroom two bath upscale apartments. Located on Walnut Street. Additional uses include retail, office, bed and breakfast, and restaurant. Square Feet: 6,800; Lot Size: 0.039 acre; Zoning: Central Business Perimeter HD. 221 Walnut Street Statesville See (D) on map $398,000

Contact: David Pressly, 704-872-1000 or davidpressly@comporium.net

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John Eckard House


See www.PreservationNC.org for more information HISTORIC PROPERTIES EMPORIUM

See (J) on map

The Ashe House

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Built for the family of Samuel Ashe, Governor of North Carolina, 1795-1798, the home became the residence of Ann Lloyd Ashe, the widow of Richard Ashe, Samuel Ashe’s grandson. Characterized by its largely intact historic architecture and interior detailing, The Ashe House occupies a half-acre in the heart of Historic Hillsborough and is surrounded by exceptionally fine gardens. A spacious “gathering room� and large, well-appointed kitchen were added to the original structure. Designed by Stephen Clipp, a Chapel Hill based architect, and constructed by Hillsborough’s own Dovetail Construction, these spaces make use of lovely salvaged heart pine and dramatic trussed ceilings. Offered at: $650,000 See (W) on map

The Ellsworth & Lovie Ballance House

Circa 1915, Hatteras Village

Lovingly restored and adapted for modern living, the Ellsworth & Lovie Ballance House sits on almost a half-acre nestled beneath mature live oaks and overlooking a pond. The house is a rare surviving example of the vernacular island house style preferred by local families during the first two-decades of the twentieth century. The home features 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, and an attached tackle/recreation room with extensive cabinetry, rod-racks, and exterior access to the rear deck. The property conveys with a boat slip on a sheltered navigable creek that provides access to Pamlico Sound. Hatteras Village is one of the Outer Banks most popular destinations. In addition to several marinas and charter boat facilities, beach and sound access, the village is noted for its historic tourism. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Offered at: $495,000

#ONTACT$IANE,EAsDIANELEA MECOMsWWWNCESTATESCOM EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY. OFFERING SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGE OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ©2012 NORTH CAROLINA ESTATES

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See www.PreservationNC.org for more information HISTORIC PROPERTIES EMPORIUM

See (N) on map

See (O) on map

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DID YOU KNOW?

See www.PreservationNC.org for more information

Did You Know? Available for Restoration is published by Preservation North Carolina to advertise the endangered historic buildings of the members of the Association of Revolving Funds. The historic properties listed in this section will be sold subject to protective covenants and rehabilitation agreements. The Association of North Carolina Revolving Funds, founded by Preservation NC, is the nation’s first statewide association of nonprofit organizations and public agencies that purchase and sell historic properties in order to preserve them. The Historic Properties Emporium section contains paid advertisements of historic

properties for sale by owners and realtors. Preservation NC strongly encourages the buyers of these properties to place protective covenants into the deed at the time of closing to ensure the preservation of the historic buildings. Preservation NC will gladly assist in formulating covenants suited to specific buildings and sites. Paid advertising is also available on Preservation NC’s web site. Visit www.PreservationNC.org for more information. Preservation North Carolina is the only statewide nonprofit preservation organization in North Carolina. It is a membership organization dedicated to preserving and promoting buildings and sites

important to North Carolina’s diverse heritage. Preservation NC provides educational opportunities and public recognition of outstanding individuals and groups in preservation. Preservation NC operates an Endangered Properties Program (the Revolving Fund) to preserve endangered historic buildings and sites. Preservation NC’s staff members travel extensively, and are frequently out of the office. Their hours are generally 9 am to 5 pm, Monday–Friday. Appointments to see properties need to be made several days in advance, since volunteers help show them.

Tax Credits Available Valuable tax incentives are available in North Carolina for the rehabilitation of historic structures. Owners of incomeproducing historic structures who qualify for the 20% federal rehabilitation tax credits may also take a 20% North Carolina income tax credit, combining to create a 40% credit on qualified rehabilitation expenses. Additionally, a 30% North Carolina income tax credit is available for the rehabilitation of non-income-producing historic structures (including owner-occupied historic

residences). Eligible properties must be certified historic structures (that is, listed on the National Register of Historic Places or a contributing property in a National Register historic district), and rehabilitation work must be done in accordance with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation.

The North Carolina Historic Preservation Office (NCHPO) strongly urges owners interested in receiving tax credits to submit their rehabilitation plans for approval prior to commencement of work. For more details, visit the NCHPO website at http:// www.hpo.ncdcr.gov/tchome. htm, call 919-807-6570, or find NCHPO on facebook. You can also visit www. PreservationNC.org, call 919832-3652, or find Preservation NC on facebook.

Advertise Your Historic Property Find your buyer through the Historic Properties Emporium, online and in North Carolina Preservation. With nearly 20,000 visitors each month, PreservationNC.org is the place to reach a nationwide audience interested in

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historic properties in North Carolina. North Carolina Preservation is the best source for showcasing your historic property for nearly 5,000 PNC members. Member discounts available, and properties protected by PNC

HISTORIC PROPERTIES EMPORIUM

covenants and easements receive free online listings and discounted ads. Listing rates and terms available at www. PreservationNC.org/advertise


See www.PreservationNC.org for more information HISTORIC PROPERTIES EMPORIUM

Belmont Estate 1700 Richardson Drive Reidsville See (G) on map $2,900,000 One of the finest hand crafted Greek Revival homes in the Triad, and celebrating its 100 year anniversary in 2012. This property listed with the National Park Service historic registry. Used as a private residence and hosting events such as weddings, dinners, fundraisers, etc since 1996. This estate boasts one of the most breathtaking staircases in the southeast. Complete with inlaid floors, marketry doors, palladium leaded glass windows, gas fireplaces, ornate mantels, and much more. Six bedrooms, four baths, tow showers, three parlors, large dining room, enormous cedar ballroom, grand hall, two kitchens, full unfinished basement, balcony overlooking front lawn, 1800 sq ft gazebo, pavilion detached garage, 2400 sq ft courtyard. French tile roof. Property comes fully furnished with period pieces. Turn-key. Square feet: 22,000; Lot Size: 9 acres; Zoning: Office & Institutional. Contact: Charles Adams, 336-616-1714 or cadams@dcc.vccs.edu

Before & after Rosedale Plantation, Beaufort County Rosedale, after sitting vacant for decades, had to be moved to a new nearby location outside Washington. A descendant of the original owner made a contribution that underwrote a portion of the cost of the move. It has been lovingly restored by Steve and Barbara Brodie as their home.

HISTORIC PROPERTIES EMPORIUM

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A

,Asheville

E

B

N O RT H C A RO L I N A P R E S E RVAT I O N

F

C ,Charlotte

D

Winston-Salem,

U

T

,Jacksonville

S

,Wilmington

,Fayetteville R

Q

G M N JK H O ,Greensboro ,Durham P I L #Raleigh

V

Take Your Place in North Carolina History

H I S TO R I C P RO PE RT I E S A VA I L A B L E

W

FOR

SALE

See www.PreservationNC.org for more information


P Gourd Hollow Spring Hope, Nash Co., page 21 Q Grantham-Baker House Goldsboro, Wayne Co., page 17

I McClenahan House Pittsboro, Chatham Co., page 21

Williamson House Louisburg, Franklin Co., page 25

O Cascine Mill Louisburg, Franklin Co., page 14

Bobbitt-Pendleton-Arrington House Warrenton, Warren Co., page 25

H Glencoe School Burlington, Guilford Co., page 22

G Belmont Estate Reidsville, Rockingham Co., page 27

First National Bank of Cherryville Cherryville, Gaston Co., page 10

F 903 W. 6th Avenue B Gastonia, Gaston Co., page 21

Peete House Warrenton, Warren Co., page 16

N Browning Cottage Warrenton, Warren Co., page 22

624 S. Washington Street Shelby, Cleveland Co., page 21

Stuart House Shelby, Cleveland Co., page 21

M Charles S. Brewer House Henderson, Vance Co., page 15

L Villa Florenza Raleigh, Wake Co., page 13

E 210 McBrayer Street Shelby, Cleveland Co., page 21

216 McBrayer Street Shelby, Cleveland Co., page 21

K 215 S. Driver Street Durham, Durham Co., page 22

Pilgrim’s Rest Hillsborough, Orange Co., page 23

J Ashe House Hillsborough, Orange Co., page 24

D Lowenstein-Henkle House Statesville, Iredell Co., page 23

C John Eckard House Hickory, Catawba Co., page 23

B The Fountain Lenoir, Caldwell Co., page 11

Please visit our website at www. PreservationNC.org to see the many historic properties available through PNC

W Ellsworth and Lovie Balance House Hatteras Village, Dare Co., page 24

V Emma and Simon O’Neal House Ocracoke, Hyde Co., page 23

U Arnold House Roper, Washington Co., page 22

Simons House Edenton, Chowan Co., page 22

Riddick House Edenton, Chowan Co., page 22

George Lassiter Store Edenton, Chowan Co., page 20

T Edenton Mill Office Building Edenton, Chowan Co., page 19

Harrington-Brooks House Greenville, Pitt Co., page 22

S Greenwreath Greenville, Pitt Co., page 18

R Jordan C. Horne House Magnolia, Duplin Co., page 22

SALE

Terry-Taylor House Pittsboro, Chatham Co., page 21

FOR

N O RT H C A RO L I N A P R E S E RVAT I O N

H I S TO R I C P RO PE RT I E S A VA I L A B L E

A William Morrison House and Farm Franklin, Macon Co., page 12

See www.PreservationNC.org for more information

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EVENTS

See www.PreservationNC.org for more information

CALENDAR

OF

Calendar of Events Mark your calendars for these upcoming Preservation North Carolina events throughout the state:

October 7 Edgecombe County: Edgecombe County Preservation Celebration Join us for a brunch-time tour of three outstanding eastern North Carolina homes: Piney Prospect, Myrtle Grove and Bracebridge Hall (pictured below).

November 16 Salisbury: Preservation Celebration We’ll have a fun Friday evening in Salisbury, socializing with preservationminded professionals.

December 9 Gastonia: Preservation Celebration Help us celebrate the closing of three significant properties in Gastonia: Loray Mill, Armstrong Apartments, and Gaston Memorial Hospital.

[

Photo courtesy of E. Watson Brown, Tarboro

Full details are available at www.PreservationNC.org. If you have an event that you’d like to list on our online calendar, please send all of the details to calendar@presnc.org.

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N O RT H C A RO L I N A P R E S E RVAT I O N


See www.PreservationNC.org for more information

JOIN US!

Join Us! I (we) want to contribute $_______ to help preserve North Carolina’s heritage. Name Address City/State/Zip Day Phone E-mail address

____ Check payable to Preservation NC ____ MasterCard, Visa, American Express or Discover (circle one) Cardholder Name Account Number Amount/Exp. Date Signature

____ I (and/or spouse) work for a Matching Gift Corporation and have enclosed signed matching gift form. Company

___

$2,500 Heritage Leader

___

$1,200 Cornerstone Club

___

$600 PNC Benefactor

___

$300 PNC Sponsor

___

$150 Friend of NC Preservation

___

$100 Organization

___

$75 Contributor/Household

___

$50 Individual Member

___

$25 Student

Or join online at http://www.presnc.org/Join-PNC

Follow PreservationNC on:

E-mail: info@presnc.org Preservation North Carolina 220 Fayetteville Street, Suite 200, P. O. Box 27644, Raleigh, NC 27611-7644

N O RT H C A RO L I N A P R E S E RVAT I O N

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Follow PreservationNC!

Visit www.PreservationNC.org

P.O. Box 27644 Raleigh, NC 27611-7644

The Historic Preservation Foundation of North Carolina, Inc.

ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED

Non-ProďŹ t US Postage Paid Raleigh, NC Permit No. 810


North Carolina Preservation Fall 2012