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FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

Vol. 104 No. 64 • Established 1908

WEEKEND EDITION

28

THE VOICE OF VANCOUVER NEIGHBOURHOODS

NEWS: Short-term gardens 4/ OPINION: Dancing with BCTF 10

GenghisKhan invadesPNE fornewexhibit

MONGOL WARLORD EXHIBIT HAS CANADIAN CONNECTION SANDRA THOMAS Staff writer

T

screen grab from Gastown Rap

VANCOUVER MINUTE WINNER: Joel McCarthy’s humorous hip-hop ode to

Gastown called “Gastown Rap” won the Critic’s Choice Award in the Courier’s Vancouver Minute contest. But who won the Viewer’s Choice Award? See story page 5. Scan page with Layar to see McCarthy’s video and a video interview with the winners.

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here’s a Canadian connection to a new attraction opening at the Pacific National Exhibition Aug. 17, dedicated to the 13th-century Mongol warlord Genghis Khan. The exhibit’s creator “Dino Don” Lessem first visited Mongolia 30 years ago with a friend who worked as a producer for the CBC Radio program Ideas. Together the pair set off for Inner Mongolia to revisit the Canada-China Ex Terra expedition of 1988, which was responsible for the discovery of the 100-foot long Mamenchisaurus. “Then I was able to go back to follow the trail of [19th century explorer and naturalist] Roy Chapman Andrews to the Flaming Cliffs,” said Lessem Wednesday during a phone interview from his 18th-century home in Media, Pa. Lessem, who is often referred to as a real-life Indiana Jones, said Andrews really deserves that title. “He carried the pearl handled revolver, wore the jaunty hat and even was afraid of snakes,” said Lessem. “I’m none of those, though I have found my share of dinosaur eggs and ran excavations to put back together the biggest dinosaur and biggest meat-eating dinosaur in the world. But he was much better at inventing stories.” While Lessem may not wear a “jaunty hat,” he is still considered one of the world’s leading experts on dinosaurs, despite the fact he’s not a scientist. Lessem was a science journalist at the Boston Globe when he won a Knight Journalism Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the 1980s. Since then, Lessem has travelled the world researching and discovering dinosaur fossils and is responsible for reconstructing the skeleton of an Argentinosaurus. At 100-ton and 120-feet long, the Argentinosaurus was 20 per cent larger than the infamous Tyrannosaurus rex. See GENGHIS on page 4

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A3

IN THIS ISSUE

STARTS TODAY!

08 07 13 10 23 28 NEWS

UP TO 50% OFF CHEERS, DAN BY JONNY WAKEFIELD

photo Rebecca Blissett

Vancouver’s craft beer community mourns the passing of Dan Small, the expert brewer who kickstarted the city’s industry.

CENTRAL PARK: THE BOMB BY SANDRA THOMAS Canada’s team walks away with the Celebration of Light while the city’s controversial OneCard pass hits the 30,000-sales mark.

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THE ART OF SAFETY BY SAMUEL RAMOS Residents near a 10th Avenue traffic circle use it as a canvas for an eye-catching mural to increase safety for cyclists and pedestrians.

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OPINION TEACHABLE MOMENTS BY KEITH BALDREY

www.ladysport.ca

The provincial government is showing unexpected flexibility in its attempt to persuade teachers to accept a long-term contract deal.

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS OF THE WEEK Bands come up to help the beleagured WISE Hall while Chip Wilson sponsors a yoga party and the Rio goes spaghetti western.

EVERYONE’S EARS ARE DIFFERENT.

SPORTS JAYS TOWN BY MEGAN STEWART

20

When the Toronto Blue Jays visit the Seattle Mariners, thousands of Canadian fans take over Safeco Field.

HOME AND GARDEN

SEE MORE WITH LAYAR

THAT’S WHY EVERYONE NEEDS A DIFFERENT HEARING AID

Additional content in this issue available through the Layar app includes:

WIDHH is different too. Your hearing is assessed by a trusted clinician *. And we offer a wide range of hearing aids, not just one brand.

P01: VIDEO CONTEST The Gastown Rap video and a video interview with the critic’s and viewer’s choice winners of the first Vancouver Minute video contest.

We’re different because your hearing is different.

P23: ENTERTAINMENT PICKS Direct links to an online campaign to save the WISE Hall and a new video by Australian musician Xavier Rudd.

P28: JAYS FANS PHOTO GALLERY Photos of the action as thousands of Blue Jays fans turned Seattle’s Safeco Field into a boisterous Canadian village.

Download the free Layar app to your iPhone, iPad or Android smartphone or tablet. The Vancouver Courier, a division of LMP Publication Limited Partnership, respects your privacy. We collect, use and disclose your personal information in accordance with our Privacy Statement which is available at vancourier. com. For all delivery problems, please call 604-942-3081. To contact the Courier’s main office, call 604-7381411.

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newsfront A4

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

Short-termgardensgetmixedreviews SEVEN PER CENT OF CITY’S COMMUNITY GARDENS ARE TEMPORARY CONVERSIONS

DEVELOPING STORY

with Naoibh O’Connor

A

s with other short-term gardens sprouting up on land slated for development in Vancouver, the Hastings North Temporary Community Garden is attracting both praise and criticism. The garden is going in on a 22,000-acre site on the 2500 block of East Hastings until London Drugs, the landowner, moves forward with its Alba development, which it decided in May to delay until the market improves. Some residents welcome the transformation of the empty lot into a garden until then, while some critics consider such projects “greenwashing.” They lament the loss of long-term businesses knocked down to make way for developments, especially when they’re delayed for long periods, and complain landowners get a tax break while the land is being used for a garden, so the city loses out on cash.

Wooden boxes to serve as moveable garden plots take over the plot of land next to London Drugs on East Hastings where the Alba condo development will eventually be built. But, for now, the space is taken over by the Hastings North Community Temporary Garden. B.C. Assessment determines the taxable assessed value of properties and assigns property to a property class based on actual use. Some developers and commercial landowners can temporarily convert their sites to recreational properties, which include parks, playing fields and community gardens. As of 2012, about seven per cent of all community gardens were temporary conversions, according to the City of Vancouver. In 2012, there was no conversion of taxable commercial property to parks, gardens or play-

ing fields for tax-savings purposes. In 2011, two properties were converted to recreational properties, resulting in tax savings of approximately $47,300 for the owners. London Drugs won’t comment on financial details associated with the Hastings community garden, including specifics on how much it’s saving in property tax or how much of those savings will be invested in the garden itself. “London Drugs is making a contribution to the start-up cost for the Hastings North Temporary Community Garden.

Because we are a private, familyowned and operated company we do not discuss financials,” Donna Figuerira, director of real estate for London Drugs group of companies, told the Courier in an email. London Drugs did not comment on greenwashing accusations, but noted its website greendeal.ca, which outlines its green measures. Vision Vancouver Coun. Raymond Louie said land use reclassifications should be monitored carefully and there should be standards on how the space is used and what oppor-

tunity there is for the community to use it. Louie said the city has talked with B.C. Assessment about the process of how they assess the land and reclassify it. “But overall, I think it’s a positive thing when the land, which would otherwise be sitting fallow as a big brown space, is now used for the community to come together and have a growing opportunity,” he said. But Louie added that council is concerned about businesses being demolished to make way for developments such as Alba that end up being delayed. “We’re concerned, of course, when we allow for redevelopment to occur that the development proceed in a timely fashion,” he said. “We want the community to have those businesses available to them and this is a situation that I don’t think sits well with us. Certainly, as a resident of Hastings-Sunrise, I know many of those businesses that were there were a positive addition for our neighbourhood and my hope is we move through to development of that site sooner versus later.” Louie noted some developers, such as Concord Pacific, have donated taxes saved through land reclassification to the community. The grand opening for the Hastings North Temporary Community Garden, which is managed by registered charity Shifting Growth, is 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Aug. 10. noconnor@vancourier/com twitter.com/naoibh

Genghis Khan’s‘bad rap’ unwarranted, says expert CONTINUED from page 1

photo submitted

Don Lessem spent seven years working with the Mongolian government for permission to take rare artifacts out of the country for his Genghis Khan exhibit.

Lessem has also written more than 50 books, including children’s works, about dinosaurs and is the founder of the Dinosaur Society and Jurassic Foundation, which have raised millions for dinosaur research. He was an adviser for the movie Jurassic Park. As reward for his dedication, in the 1990s the Prosauropod dinosaur was named Lessemsaurus. “I consider myself the poor man’s David Attenborough,” Lessem said of the famous British naturalist. While travelling regularly to Mongolia, he came to realize Khan was not the brutal dictator he’s been made out to be. “He’s had a bad rap all these years,” Lessem said of the warlord who utilized paper money, passports and pants. “He didn’t discover them, but he did make them popular.” Lessem spent seven years working with the Mongolian government to get permission to bring the rare artifacts included in his Genghis Khan exhibit out of

that country. The interactive exhibition tells what Lessem calls the “true story of Genghis Khan” — his life, his land, his people, his culture — and his enduring legacy. The exhibit follows Khan’s life from “illiterate, tormented child” to the “millennium’s greatest ruler.” Lessem added while the warlord was known as a dictator, he was also responsible for the rise of an unparalleled empire of freedom and innovation. That’s illustrated in the exhibit through interactive media, presentations, performances and a unique collection of artifacts from the world Khan so quickly created and which just as quickly dissolved with his death. “We also always have some Mongolian people taking part,” said Lessem. “That’s the most important part of the exhibit.” Genghis Khan launches on opening day at Rollerland at the PNE Aug. 17 and runs through Sept. 2. For more information, visit genghiskhanexhibits.com. sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10


FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

news

Vancouver Minute winners explored city’s charms STEPHEN SMYSNUIK Contributing writer

B

efore last month, Zach Starko hardly knew Vancouver. Sure, he’d frequent downtown every few weeks, but the 17-year-old Tsawwassen resident had never managed to gain a true sense of the big city. His curiosity fuelled his short film “Vancouver Minute,” which snagged the Viewer’s Choice award on Tuesday for the Courier’s inaugural Vancouver Minute video contest. “The only logical thing that we thought we could do was to make a video of someone walking around Vancouver and experiencing it for the first time,” Starko said. “It brought out the wonder in the city, just seeing everything the city has to offer.” Filming took place in one day, and it allowed Starko to experience areas of the city he’d never seen before — Chinatown, Granville Island, and so on. The resulting video plays like a commercial rivaling anything Tourism B.C. has produced, capturing the excitement and innocence young travellers often feel when arriving someplace new. The Viewer’s Choice award was chosen by popular vote during the contest’s two-week voting phase. At 1,131 votes, Starko’s video had well over twice the votes of the runner-up, Joel McCarthy’s “Gastown Rap.” Not that McCarthy’s wallowing in despair. His

humorous hip-hop ode to Gastown snagged the Critic’s Choice award, which was chosen by the contest’s two judges. McCarthy, who doesn’t live or work in Gastown, conceived the idea during a brainstorming session for the contest. He said Vancouverites could appreciate a silly rap song profiling one of the city’s oldest neighbourhoods. “To turn a tourist trap into a gangster rap? We thought that was a really funny juxtaposition,” McCarthy said. According to filmmaker Warren Carr, “Gastown Rap” captured the spirit of the Vancouver Minute contest better than any other entry. Carr, along with Peter Leitch, president of North Shore Studios and Mammoth studios, served as the contest judges and picked McCarthy’s video fortheCritic’sChoiceawardbasedonthevideo’s quality, originality and local relevance. “Thecontestaskedaquestion,ithadatheme,” Carr said. “So the candidates that moved to the forefront [of our list] were those that paid attention to that. The winner was simply the best based on that, an original approach, good visuals of the city, use of music and editing.” The contest, which complements the Courier’s ongoing Vancouver Special neighbourhood series, was in a partnership with London Drugs. McCarthy won $1,500 in London Drugs gift certificates and Starko was awarded $1,000. Visit vancourier.com or scan the front page with Layar to see the winning videos.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

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news

Here’s the Lo down on cheap market housing in containers 12TH & CAMBIE with Mike Howell

I

wrote a story last week about a new housing complex in the Downtown Eastside built from recycled shipping containers. Maybe you read it. I know some of you did because I received calls and emails from folks wanting to know when more of this type of housing would be built and put on the market. As I mentioned in my story, the 12-unit complex at 502 Alexander St. is strictly social housing and will be occupied by women with low incomes and others who have been homeless or at risk of homelessness. I also pointed out another much larger complex made from shipping containers is proposed for property at Hawks and East Hastings. Again, it will be for social housing. But fear not all you people looking to buy a cheaper form of housing in what has become a very unlivable city for many residents. Frank Lo, president of MC Quarters Corporation, wants to build “affordable market housing” in Vancouver out of shipping containers. Who is Frank Lo? Well, he is the guy who arranged to have the shipping containers reinforced and delivered to the property at 502 Alexander St. He also donated a container for the project, which he acknowledged was like putting big pieces of Lego together. Lo has experience in putting shipping containers together since his company manufacturers modular housing for logging and mining

camps. His company has built social housing for aboriginal groups in Australia and mining operations in Alaska. Standing inside one of the box-shaped units on Alexander Street, there are no obvious signs the apartment is actually a shipping container. “It’s amazing how it looks,” said Lo as he pointed out the modern kitchen, bathroom, big windows and high ceilings. “We did this for the community. It’s a right for people to have shelter. But with this experience, I want to build more developments for affordable market housing.” Lo didn’t say where in the city or when he planned to build market housing. Nor could he anticipate how much the housing would cost. But, he noted, the Alexander Street project was considerably cheaper than typical complexes of its size and it cuts down on construction waste that goes to the landfill. The units on Alexander Street are an average of 290 square feet and cost $82,500 each to build. Over on Abbott Street, 320 square foot units made from traditional construction materials were built for $220,000. Of course, any project that Lo wants to pursue would have to be accepted by city council, which is on record for considering innovative ways to get affordable housing built in Vancouver. And I’m going to speculate shipping container housing might be accepted more in neighbourhoods — as it is on Alexander Street — than Mayor Gregor Robertson’s controversial idea to take away street space and build housing on it. The so-called “thin streets” idea has been a non-starter, as many Marpole residents will attest. Interested to know what the same residents think about shipping container housing. So would Frank Lo. mhowell@vancourier.com twitter.com/Howellings

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

news

A7

Canadian team takes top honours at fireworks festival

ONE ON ONE Despite the fact the park board’s OneCard is not being accepted at all of the city’s community centres, the passes are available at all 23 loca-

Just a reminder lawn-watering restrictions are in effect until Sept. 30 and those who ignore the rules could face $100 fines. Visit vancouver.ca for more information. sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10

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Following the finale of the 23rd annual Honda Celebration of Light fireworks festival this past weekend, the Canadian team blew the lid off the competition. Calgary-based “Fireworks Spectacular” wowed the crowds at English Bay on day two of the three-night event, beating out teams from the United Kingdom and Thailand. Thanks to our warm weather and clear skies, organizers estimate more than 1.2 million fireworks fans from the city and beyond attended during the competition. New this year was the 2013 Concord Pacific’s Seawall Challenge, which took place on the first day of the event. More than 20 teams competed for a chance to donate $5,000 to the school of their choice for after-school programs and/or equipment. Team “Wolf Pack” won the competition, receiving the top prize of $1,500 cash and thechancetodesignate$5,000toChiefMaquinna elementary school on East Second Avenue.

EY ST

with Sandra Thomas

BE NT L

CENTRAL PARK

tions. That said, more than 30,000 Vancouver residents have signed up for the card in the first month since its launch. The card is free, but you still have to pay for programs and classes. The card was included as one of the items included in the proposed joint-management agreement under negotiation between the park board and some of the city’s community centre associations. If that agreement is ratified, all of the city’s community centres should be accepting the card by this September. The community centre associations had already agreed to accept all memberships as universal so there’s a lot of discussion as to whether the OneCard was necessary. Meanwhile, the OneCard can be loaded with 10-visit pass or Flexipass options, and includes a builtin 50 per cent Leisure Access Program subsidy for qualified residents with financial barriers. The cards have been most popular at Hillcrest (6,088), the Aquatic Centre and outdoor pools (5,439), Killarney (2,578), Renfrew (2,238) and Kitsilano (1,644). If residents sign up for the OneCard before Sept. 30, they will receive three free drop-in visits to use across the city.

ST

MARPOLE SW M

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

news Beer lovers mourn passing of craft brewing icon OWNER OF DAN’S HOMEBREWING SUCCUMBS TO CANCER JONNY WAKEFIELD Contributing Writer

V

ancouver beer lovers are in mourning after the passing of the man credited with laying the groundwork for the city’s craft beer industry. Dan Small, owner of Dan’s Homebrewing Supplies at 835 Hastings St., passed away last Wednesday in hospital after a struggle with lung cancer. He was 49. Paddy Treavor, a friend and beer blogger, said Small inspired Vancouver’s burgeoning craft brewing scene. “He taught people how to build recipes, about the science of brewing,” he said. “Everyone who has brewed in Vancouver has been in his shop.” Small took an interest in brewing at an early age. According to his younger brother Tom, owner of the winemaking shop next door to Dan’s, he helped his father with small batches of beer on their farm outside St. Thomas, Ont. He moved to Vancouver in 1991 and purchased an ailing U-Brew shop located on Commercial Drive. “It was a mess. There wasn’t a lot of

photo Rebecca Blissett

Tom Small is grieving the loss of his older brother Dan, who is credited for laying the groundwork for Vancouver’s craft beer industry. He died last week at age 49. stock,” his brother said. “Dan was complaining about it, and [the owner] said ‘if you’re so smart, why don’t you try it?’” “The state of brewing was pathetic,” added Treavor. “We were looking at the big breweries [and nothing else].” He estimates that around a dozen microbreweries currently operate in Vancouver. Small would relocate his shop a total of three times. He spent time selling equip-

THE 52ND AVENUE DEVELOPMENT PROJECT IN LADNER, BC

ment out of the Storm Brewing facility at 310 Commercial Dr. — one of the city’s first microbreweries. A move across Hastings Street last June was brought on by a rent increase and a need for more space in the face of increased demand, according to new manager Chris Booth. James Watson, owner and brewmaster of Storm Brewing, first met Small shortly after he opened his first Commercial Drive loca-

tion. The two bonded over a skid of dextrose sugar Watson had acquired during his work at a pharmaceutical plant. Watson, who was then a home brewer, learned from Small that the corn sugar was ideal for priming beers. “After talking to him for awhile, I realized that I didn’t know as much [about beer] as I thought I did. He always had time to talk to people about brewing,” he said. Friends describe a man who was hard living at times, a musician and extreme sports enthusiast who “smoked like a chimney,” said Watson. “He had a lot of fun,” added Treavor. Small’s diagnosis came last September. Booth took over management of the store while Small was in treatment. His four years at the shop have seen a huge growth in interest in craft brewing, with new people coming in daily to buy a $70 startup kit. He said that Small brewed his last batch of beer in November. Forty Ninth Parallel brewing plans to create a 30-keg batch of Strathcona Pale Ale in Small’s memory. He thinks the hoppy beer would suit Small well. “He was a pale ale guy, a bitter guy,” he said. “He got more bitter towards the end there, a little more IPA. I don’t think he realized his impact on what’s happening in Vancouver as far as beer goes.” me@jonnywakefield.com twitter.com/jonnywakefield

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Teachers lured onto the dance floor

T

he B.C. Teachers’ Federation is about to be given the right to engage in a full-scale strike, something many of its members have been demanding for years. But they better be careful what they wish for. The public simply won’t tolerate prolonged work stoppages that close schools behind picket lines. I would guess a teachers’ strike would last a maximum two weeks before public pressure mounts on the provincial government to end the dispute through legislation. Granting teachers the power to strike is part of Education Minister Peter Fassbender’s interesting pitch to the BCTF. He’s trying to lure them onto the dance floor, and so far the BCTF has tentatively expressed interest in what he has to say, but has also made it clear that it’s time to “show us the money.” And there doesn’t appear to be much money to be had. Fassbender wants a 10year deal with the union, but with provincial finances expected to be fairly bleak for the next few years, it’s hard to see how the BCTF would be motivated to sign a long-term deal that gives its members minimal pay raises (or even none at all) for that stretch. Nevertheless, it’s too early to completely write off the chances of a long-term deal being reached. The government has signalled it’s willing to be creative and bend a bit to meet some of what the BCTF is looking for in certain areas, so we’ll see how long this little dance lasts. For example, Fassbender has said more items can be bargained at the local level rather than the provincial level, which may meet a long-standing demand by the BCTF. He has also agreed to have face-to-face negotiations between the central government and the union, something the BCTF has been calling for. Fassbender has taken away the provincial bargaining authority of the B.C. Public Sector Employees Association and has put it in the hands of two people: Health Employers Association CEO Michael Marchbank and long-time labour negotiator Peter Cameron. In elbowing BCPSEA aside, Fassbender has removed school trustees, who had representation on the BCPSEA board, from the bargaining process (although they will be retained in an “advisory capacity”). This is not necessarily a bad thing given that school trustees, who are elected by a relatively small part of the population, can’t point to any great success that is due to their presence at the provincial bargaining table. Cameron is an interesting choice here. His background includes working for a fairly militant union, CAIMAW, back in the 1980s. Since then he has emerged as a top labour negotiator and mediator, and if anyone can pull off a miracle deal it’s someone like him. While a 10-year deal seems like a remote possibility, I wouldn’t discount the chances of, say, a five-year contract being agreed to. Given the government’s tight money situation, such a contract would have to be backended loaded, meaning any wage hikes and big funding lifts would come in the last years of the deal rather than the first two years. Would the BCTF agree to a contract that has no wage increases for the first two years but then gives hikes of around three per cent in each of the next three years of a contract? If the government also agreed to increase funding to address class composition and class size in the back end of the contract, along with assigning more items to local bargaining, the roots of a contract start to become visible. Of course, Fassbender may discover, as his predecessors in the portfolio did, that the BCTF isn’t really capable of true collective bargaining and so any horsetrading that traditionally goes on in negotiations just doesn’t happen. But the leadership of the BCTF has changed since the last contract round, and so far the message coming from the union about Fassbender’s proposals has not been one of outright dismissal or condemnation, which was the norm in the past. In any event, don’t expect the government to impose a 10-year deal. Such a move would be unconstitutional, given that it would effectively remove the collective bargaining rights for thousands of people for a decade. But the courts have ruled that if governments show it has tried to bargain in good faith and has exhausted all avenues to reach a deal, it can impose a contract onitsemployees. We’veseenthatdonebeforewithB.C.teachers,butIdon’tthink we’re at that point yet. As long as Fassbender and the BCTF keep dancing, there is hope for a deal reached at the negotiating table rather than in the legislature. Keith Baldrey is chief political reporter for Global BC. (Allen Garr is on vacation.)

KEITH BALDREY

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Risking delight with public and private punnery

I

’m not great at telling long jokes. I can successfully complete “Angus the fence builder” with a Scottish burr included, but that’s about it. Otherwise, I usually get only partway through some time-released thighslapper before the struggle begins to keep the plot. “Talk among yourselves,” I’ll tell a small, unfortunate group of listeners, as I mumble and curse my memory. Always leave your audience begging for more, they say; in the past I have left people praying for less. Out of a sense of social responsibility and personal pride, I now keep the yuks brief. The average urban dweller encounters thousands of attention-getting messages every day through media and marketing. Humour helps cut through the clutter, and in this department a North Vancouver print shop always delivers. For years Contact Printing’s illuminated sign on Forbes Street has entertained passerby with regularly updated puns. My favourites include, “No matter how hard you push the envelope it will still be stationary” and “Six out of seven of Snow White’s dwarves are not Happy.” Also, “These days there is just no arrest for the wicked.” I have often passed by the print shop with a grin. After years of unsolicited entertainment, I feel like I owe Contact Printing an order for business cards (“Olson’s Joke Demolition Service: Weddings, Parties, Children’s Birthdays”). If only more marketers, educators, and bureaucrats recognized the effectiveness of bite-size humour. The parks department at the District of North Vancouver gets it. For years, their dog-walking signage has abandoned officious commandments in favour of droll nudges. Among the steel-plate witticisms are “Attention Dog Guardians: Pick up after your dogs – Thank you. Attention Dogs: Grrrr, bark, woof. Good dog.” Another reads, “Dog doo good God. Beware of Palindromes and Pick up after your Dog.” This kind of civic levity is thin on the ground in Vancouver. Last year some nameless wit erected a professional-looking sign reading, “Dude Chilling Park” at Guelph Park in Mount Pleasant. Reactions of locals were mixed; some loved it and others disapproved, interpreting it as an encouragement to drug-users who frequent the area. In any case the City has since removed the sign, but in a similar fit of grassroots creativity the “Dude Chilling Art Exchange” now sits by the park’s community garden, welcoming Vancouverites and visitors to drop off or pick up artwork on an honour basis. Cheryl Cheeks, a Mount Pleasant resident who conceived the six foot tall structure made out of salvaged cabinet drawers and cedar planks, hopes it will house all kinds of free art, including poetry chapbooks, sculptures and paintings. “I think whatever comes bubbling out of a creative person’s brain, if they want to put it in there, that’s fantastic,” she told The Globe and Mail. Of course, not every artistic creation is amusing or uplifting. I recently passed an extra ticket to a friend for VanCity Theatre’s screening of The Act of Killing, a surreal documentary about a group of aging, unrepentant gangsters who joined in on the paramilitary murder of hundreds of thousands of people in Indonesia during a U.S.-backed coup in 1965. The film is much about the clownery of evil as the banality of evil, but there’s nothing “funny” about it. I felt it had great redeeming value as a historical document, but my friend walked out feeling like he’d been shot in the gut. In a world with so many high-level assaults on reason and compassion, our appetite for positive information – or least some scraps inspiring us to laugh, dance or sing - is greater than ever. Poet Jack Gilbert’s “Brief for the Defense” addresses the need to find some shafts of light in the darkening clouds. Here is a brief extract (italics mine): “We must risk delight. We can do without pleasure, but not delight. Not enjoyment. We must have the stubbornness to accept our gladness in the ruthless furnace of this world. To make injustice the only measure of our attention is to praise the Devil.” To paraphrase Buddha, life is inseparable from shit; the trick is to clean up the latter with enlightened intent. Or in the words of the District of North Vancouver’s parks department, “Dog Guardians: In a world where everyone is looking out for number one, who is looking out for number two? Please pick up after your dogs. Thank you.” www.geoffolson.com

GEOFF OLSON

EARBUD-WEARING CYCLISTS LACK AWARENESS

To the editor: Re: “Be wary of cyclists who wear headphones,” Aug. 7. Amen, Kristina Bangma. I ride daily over the Lions Gate Bridge from North Vancouver, and have been for going on 20 years, and have noticed that people who wear headphones/buds are simply not aware you are there. Thanks for your column and I hope new and old riders take it to heart and respect their fellow riders, drivers and pedestrians. Forston Tylor, North Vancouver

LONDON DRUGS GARDEN STORY MISSING CONTEXT

To the editor: Re: “Empty lot transformed into garden,” Aug. 7. Replacing a vacant lot with a temporary community garden sponsored by the property owner, London Drugs, is a great idea and at first glance seems like an entirely positive good news story for the Courier’s front page. But there’s a back story to this garden project that is not as benign. Years ago, when London

Drugs first conceived of the Alba development, longtime small business owners who were engaged with the local community were put on month-to-month leases. Many of them closed or moved on and were replaced by a revolving selection of temporary businesses that came in to make a quick buck until London Drugs was ready to begin construction. These disappeared when the whole strip of small stores was demolished. Instead of promptly being replaced by an expanded London Drugs and a group of new retailers, after the demolition the heart of this once thriving block became a vacant lot surrounded by hoardings. Because they did not have the foresight of the other developers who have succeeded with residential projects on East Hastings, after almost a year in this condition, London Drugs pulled the plug on Alba. If they had simply held onto the site, the commercial property taxes would have been substantial. By covering the lot with bark mulch and having Shifting Growth set up garden plots in moveable wooden boxes, London Drugs can now have it designated as “recreational or non-profit property” so the mill rate is reduced from 16.4852 to 5.6491. The true cost of the Hastings North Temporary Community Garden has been a significant loss

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of commercial property tax revenue for the city and the needless destruction of a group of longterm small businesses that were part of the community. It’s wonderful to provide garden plots for local residents and certainly a good use for a vacant lot. But when looked at in context, this garden may just be lipstick on a pig.

Eileen Mosca, Vancouver

LACK OF INFO NOTED To the editor: Re: “City should reclaim Pt. Grey Rd. allowance,” Letters, July 30. The fact that city council did not inform the taxpaying citizens of Vancouver that city property is being used by property owners on Point Grey Road is appalling and a dereliction of duty. Kudos to Rick Angus for pointing this out in his letter. There is another point that has been made in recent issues of the Courier. The lack of adequate transit — in all sectors of the Lower Mainland. For the mayor and council to decide that a subway is the only answer to “speed” up traffic on Broadway begs the question of the needs of other municipalities in the region. Tatiana Easton, Vancouver

SOCIAL MEDIA COURIER RAINBOW LOGO: Aug. 1 edition Michael @MichaelBoulton9: THANK YOU for the equality rainbowed header on your newspaper this morning! I love it! COURIER STORY: “Hastings-Sunrise: Neighbourhood by the Numbers,” Aug. 1 mtnbvan @mtnbvan: $30MM anon donated 2 help get homeless ppl off the street @ Taylor Manor, house 56”=Caring 4 #Community vs. menial CACs COURIER STORY: “Hastings-Sunrise: Master Chef serves up cheap food with side of Chinese poetry,” Aug. 1 Lyndsay Sung @cococakecupcake: i love this. take over a little diner, do it up right because you like being social and active!! @VanCourierNews enjoying your spotlight on #HastingsSunrise! a great neighborhood! COURIER STORY: “Hastings-Sunrise: Deighton Cup just dandy,” Aug. 1 Deighton Cup @deightoncup: We’re everywhere! Great piece on the #DeightonCup from @VanCourierNews & @Cheryl_Rossi COURIER STORY: “Hastings-Sunrise: Mom and pop shops still a staple in the neighbourhood,” Aug. 2 Pebbles Willekes @pebbleswillekes: great article, love that the focus is on our sweet neighbourhood this issue! COURIER STORY: “West End: Couple to take Pride in public nuptials,” July 18 April Smith: Congrats!!!!!!!! Follow us on Facebook: The VancouverCourierNewspaper and Twitter: @VanCourierNews

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Letters may be edited by the Courier for reasons of legality, taste, brevity and clarity. To be considered for publication, they must be typed, signed and include the writer’s full name (no initials), home

address, and telephone number (neither of which will be published), so authorship may be verified. Send to: 1574 West Sixth Ave., Vancouver V6J 1R2 or email editor@vancourier.com


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013


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Residents painted the traffic circle at 10th Avenue and St. George Street to slow down traffic and reduce conflict between cars, bikes and pedestrians. Stephanie Ondrack and her three children live steps away from the new mural. She’s delighted with the initiative and looks forward to the annual repainting of the mural. Her children mingled with other children and adults they had never met before. “I was musing that this was probably the closest we’ll get to the village model in which the whole community is comprised of trusted allies, people with whom each other’s children are safe, known, and appreciated,” said Ondrack. Her main concern is safety and she appreciates the liberty of letting her children, all under the age of 11, to feel free and play without walking to a park. “My three children got a chance to utilize the physical block differently, riding their bicycles and unicycle up and down the road,” said Ondrack.

She’s optimistic about the mural’s effect and has already noticed a difference in traffic flow since it was painted. “It will remind vehicles that people live and play here,” she said. “It might encourage people on walks or leisure bike rides to detour this way, which will also help traffic to slow down.” The mural might inspire others to do the same in their community, and although Jerry Dobrovolny, Vancouver’s director of transportation, encourages them to get involved, he said such initiatives should first be run by city hall. “It’s important that the community recognizes that there is a process and that the city must be consulted, as there are safety concerns. We want to work with community groups to do this in a constructive way,” said Dobrovolny.

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Development Permit Board Meeting: August 12 The Development Permit Board and Advisory Panel will meet:

View my video with

Monday, August 12 at 3 pm City Hall, 453 West 12th Avenue First Floor, Town Hall Meeting Room to consider these development permit applications:

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1099 Richards Street: To develop the site with a 13-storey, multiple dwelling building with two and a half levels of underground parking accessed from the lane. The building will contain 162 social housing units, a portion of which meet the definition of low-cost housing as defined in the Downtown District Official Development Plan (DDODP).

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475 Howe Street: Interior and exterior alterations to restore, retain, and designate the existing 11-storey office building (Old Stock Exchange) as Heritage “A” and construct a 31-storey addition, thereby creating a 31-storey mixed-use commercial building containing general office and retail store uses and seven levels of underground parking accessed from the lane north of West Pender Street, subject to Council’s enactment of the CD-1 By-Law and approval of Form of Development. Please contact City Hall Security (1st floor) if your vehicle may be parked at City Hall for more than two hours. TO SPEAK ON AN ITEM: 604-873-7469 or lorna.harvey@vancouver.ca

081313

ed isn’t the only colour of choice used to slow traffic down at 10th Avenue and St. George Street. During an annual summer block party last month, neighbours of this Mount Pleasant community gathered around their traffic circle to paint a colourful street mural on the pavement to help make travel safer. As one of Vancouver’s prominent bike routes, 10th Avenue sees bikes and cars whiz by every day, sometimes creating conflict between motorists, cyclists and pedestrians. Alicia McLean, 22, and her roommate Emily, live in a house on 10th Avenue that is lovingly referred to as “the roost” by neighbours. They help run the St. George Lending library and decided to launch a new project to bring a touch of colour, and safety, to their community. “Wewerehopingthatitwouldmakethe intersection safer,” said McLean. “People are slowing down and even just standing in the traffic circle.” They hope the mural becomes permanent, but they used water based non-toxic paint for the safety of the rainway drainage, the inclusion of children while painting, and to ensure the surface doesn’t become slippery for cyclists when it rains. “We wanted to make sure that it doesn’t fall into disrepair, and didn’t want to put something down that people didn’t fully support, and so this freed it up to have more suggestions,” said McLean. This led them to rethink the project into an annual event with the greater, and common, purpose of bringing colour and safety to their street.

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WOMEN

news Safety inspires traffic circle mural

FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

EVENT OR COMMUNITY NEWS WE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT? 604-738-1411 | sthomas@vancourier.com

ChariotFestivalentersits40thyear COMMUNITY CALENDAR

with Sandra Thomas

WEST END A parade featuring a 30-foot high “chariot” marks its 40th anniversary in Vancouver this Sunday, but the roots of the celebration are based on an Indian tradition going back thousands of years. The Chariot Festival of India parade begins under the Granville Street Bridge at 11:30 a.m., Aug. 11, at Howe Street before meandering along Beach Avenue to Stanley Park for a family celebration including free vegetarian food for 10,000, music, dance, a puppet theatre, veggiecooking demonstrations, clowns, mehndi hand tattoos and a market. The festival starts at 1 p.m. at Second Beach. According to a history of the event, the original festival began thousands of years ago in Puri, a small town on the east coast of India by the Bay of Bengal. It’s home to the temple of Jagannatha, one of most magnificent monuments of ancient India. Modern-day festivals honour the god Jagannatha as an effigy of the deity that leaves the temple once a year to ride on his chariots. The huge chariots used in parades around the world are between 43 and 45 feet high, set on large wheels and are adorned with red canopies decorated with black, yellow and blue. In 1320 AD, Franciscan friar and explorer Odoric Mattiussi took the first reports of the chariot festival back to Europe following his trip to India. But Mattiussi apparently got his facts wrong, and for centuries Europeans believed Jagannatha to be a bloodthirsty idol that demanded human sacrifice. The friar reported that during the festival frenzied followers of Jagannatha would throw themselves under the huge turning wheels of the chariots to be purposely crushed. That image became so entrenched in Europe that the English word “juggernaut” was derived to describe an overwhelming force that crushes everything in its path. And on that cheerful note, visit vanchariotfest.com for more information about this weekend’s parade and festival.

CHINATOWN

Last year tens of thousands of festival-goers converged on Chinatown for a multicultural festival including the Historical and Food Tasting Walking Tour, a kids corner, stage performances, talent shows and Streetfest, which takes place Aug. 10 from 6 to 10 p.m. This year the TD Vancouver Chinatown Festival is Aug. 10 and 11 in and around Columbia and Keefer streets with the theme Discover Chinatown and even more to see and do. For a complete schedule of events and times visit vancouver-chinatown.com.

WEST END

Need a break from all those festivals? For some quiet reflective time, drop by Sr. Andrew’s-Wesley United Church, Burrard Street entrance, for Quiet Hearts Meditative Musical Respites, which take place every Wednesday from 4:30 to 5:45 p.m. During this time silent participants can enjoy a word-free, stress-relieving musical sanctuary from daily pressures while they listen to music arranged to offer an “engaging personal experience.” Participants may come and go as they please and are free to silently move about the sanctuary to enjoy soothing private time. These events are by donation and take place most Wednesdays, but please check ahead of time to ensure Quiet Hearts is taking place that day.

DOWNTOWN

ArtStarts presents a free art workshop for kids with artist Rebecca Graham, Aug. 31 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at ArtStarts Gallery, 808 Richards St. In this hands-on session with Graham, kids can explore the ingenious ways that bugs and birds use the plants and other materials around them to create shelter and camouflage. Kids aged three to 12 can make patterns with rubbings on paper or try their hand at weaving using all natural materials diverted from green waste. The workshop is free and no pre-registration is necessary. ArtStarts is a non-profit organization created to promote arts and creativity to the young people of this province. For more information visit artstarts.com. sthomas@vancourier.com twitter.com/sthomas10

photo submitted

The Chariot Festival of India begins under the Granville Street Bridge Aug. 11 at 11:30 a.m. and winds its way along Beach Avenue before culminating in Stanley Park for a family celebration of food, music, dance, a market and more.

It’s the one day a year when adults can be kids again and enjoy their very own Pirate Pak! And for each one we sell, we’ll donate $2 to the Zajac Ranch for Children. *Adult Pirate Paks only available on Wednesday, August 14th, 2013 after 11am.

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A

s Canadians, so many of us experience a long winter, short spring, and then, all of a sudden, summer is gone. What makes matters worse is that many of us were planning on working on our health regimen— eating better and being more active – but kept finding reasons to put it off.

focusing on some key areas of the mind and body, as well as nutrition and natural health products, you can experience positive changes that lead to a healthier you in just a few weeks,” says Sherrard. With additional support from both Kristi Richards, a world champion and Olympic mogul skier, as well as dietician, Nanci Guest, a strength and conditioning coach, here’s how you can benefit from the Revive in Five Challenge:

Before the long, dog-days of summer begin disappearing, we may find ourselves much further away from our healthy lifestyle goals than we’d hoped to be, come fall.

• Week one is about getting centred, with tips that will enhance gastrointestinal health and exercise suggestions to build core strength.

“The New Year is not the only time we make resolutions,” says Helen Sherrard, president of the Canadian Health Food Association (CHFA). “Fall is actually just as popular for goal setting. With the end of vacations and kids going back to school many are quickly forced back into a more ‘normal’ routine, which is the perfect time to kick-start a healthier regimen.”

• Week two you'll learn how you can activate the body naturally, exploring some simple ways to improve and protect your heart and blood vessels naturally. • Week three offers suggestions that will help you limber up and strengthen your bones, joints and muscles.

CHFA has partnered with two high profile fitness specialists to create the Revive in 5 Challenge, a well-rounded approach to revitalizing your health from the insideout, in just five weeks. Intended for Canadians of all fitness levels, this fiveweek guide will help to refresh your fall routine with exercise, organic eating and careful use of natural health products.

• Week four gives tips on how to fuel the brain and focus the mind with exercise, organic food and natural health product suggestions. • Week five delivers easy-to-use information to help you shine from the inside, out. To learn all the secrets for feeling and looking your best this fall, visit chfa.ca and download the program.

“We all know there is no quick fix to getting to a healthier you, but by

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A17

FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

health

Are you at risk of burning out? DAVIDICUS WONG

S

tress is an inevitable and essential part of your life. Without stress, you’d be bored. Without the positive stress of a best friend, you wouldn’t try new things and you wouldn’t have as much fun. Without the encouraging stress of a supportive parent, you might not push yourself to your potential. If you had no stress at all, you wouldn’t even get out of bed. But like everything else that relates to health, you can have too much of a good thing. Excessive stress causes distress – physical, emotional and behavioural. Stress raises your heart rate and blood pressure. It increases the acid in your stomach. It causes insomnia, exhaustion and headaches. It can impair your concentration and cause panic attacks. It can make you irritable, moody or emotionally disconnected. Take a pulse check now. Are you suffering from some of these symptoms? What’s

your stress level now? When you start attending to your own stress level, you’ll note how it varies throughout each day and throughout the week. If you have a high stress job – such as a server in a busy restaurant — you’re likely more relaxed at home, when you’re out with friends and on your days off. If you’re a busy parent with young kids, your break from stress might be when everyone else is asleep. If you suffer from high levels of stress day in and day out from the moment you awaken until the moment you finally fall asleep, your stress may already be compromising your emotional and physical health. We would all like an ideal job, but that wouldn’t be one where you get paid to do nothing. When the challenge or demands placed on us are far below our capabilities, we’re bored. Ideally, we’d want the challenge of our work to be a close match to our abilities. We’ll feel appropriately challenged and have a sense of accomplishment at the end of each day. We get into trouble when we don’t have the resources to meet the demands before us: a clerk with too much work to do without enough time or support, a single parent with sick or fighting kids, a nurse rushing to care for a ward of unstable patients, or a teacher with a class of out of control children. When the demands of our life overwhelm us in the short

term, we feel stressed and anxious. It’s just a bad day. But if we face this imbalance day after day with no end in sight, we begin to feel helpless. If this continues, we’re at risk for burnout. The key symptoms of burnout are: emotional exhaustion, feeling alienated or cynical about our work, and impaired performance. Doctors or nurses who are burnt out will be irritable with coworkers and patients. They may start treating patients impersonally before the quality of their care declines. When we’re overwhelmed by our situation, we feel helplessness, and this leads to anxiety. When we feel we have no control over our situation, we may feel hopelessness, and this leads to burnout and depression. One key to managing stress and avoiding burnout and depression is your locus of control. The key factor in the development of burnout is the feeling of a loss of control, but in spite of the demands of our work or our lives, we often have more control than we think. We must accept the things we cannot change and accept our responsibility to change what we can. Any one of us can feel emotionally overwhelmed at times. The next time you blow up or someone in front of you does, consider the 80/20 rule. 20 per cent of our reaction is related to the reality of the situation; 80 per cent arises from what we

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A18

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

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healthy living Courier readers are committed to living a healthy healthy, proactive lifestyle. We’d like to help by offering you information on new, exciting health initiatives in your community, a wealth of fitness and nutrition tips, plus advice on a positive mental outlook. Watch for – your guide to good health, publishing first and third Wed.’s of each month.

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ANNE MARRISON Q: Can I plant coriander in a container on a sunny patio? Also, I have a potted mint plant growing for the last two or three years that was doing well, but not now. What more can I do? Florence Salama

A: Coriander would do well in a container on your sunny patio. Soil should be rich and well-drained. It’s easy to sow coriander too thickly. If it’s spaced five or six inches apart, the plants are stronger and leafier. But some people sow thickly anyway then thin and eat the plants as they develop. Coriander can survive through a mild winter. If you want to try this, you could move it in late fall into a sheltered spot. Mint likes part shade, moisture and rich soil. But no matter how well you treat it, potted mint left unrenovated

DARTMOOR TO WOLFE

starts dying out after a while. You can keep mint fresh and growing in a container by cutting one or two pie-wedges out of the existing growth, removing the roots and that portion of the soil. Old mint roots are thick and tough so you need a very sharp knife or a serrated freezer knife. Discard the old roots you’ve lifted out of your wedges. Don’t compost the roots because parts of them may begin growing. City green waste bins are the best place for aged mint. You can compost the old soil if you can separate it from the roots. But the wedge holes should be filled with compost. The mint will quickly occupy the space. Mint needs a constant supply of new, fresh soil to grow well. That’s why it’s invasive in the open garden. If your mint pot is on soil, mint roots may reach out through drainage holes. Q: I have a wonderful tomato plant with a dozen or more tomatoes getting ripe. But a fat, green worm fell off a leaf. I saw another one today and they are hard to kill. I tried an insecticide and finally used hair spray. What else can I do and how can I tell if there are any more? Eileen

A: This sounds like the tomato hornworm. It’s active at night. You could

go out with a flashlight and hunt for more. If you could bring yourself to handpick them and stomp on them, this would be a quick, organic, easy and safe solution. Safe for you and safe for the fruit. Some gardeners throw slugs on the road in hopes a car will squish them. This would also work for hornworms. Hornworms could also be euthanized in the freezer inside a sealable plastic bag. I have heard of this being done with slugs. It’s said to be relatively humane. If any insecticide and hair spray got on the tomato fruit, I don’t recommend eating it. Spray tends to drift on the air and doesn’t always end up where you’re aiming. Sprayed fruit would likely have a nasty taste and insecticides can make people sick. Insecticidal soap will kill hornworms. But it needs great care. It’s harmful in eyes and mustn’t get on tomato fruit. A substance called Btk will work on hornworms when they’re small and young. You can find both in garden centres. Be sure to thoroughly dig the tomato soil this winter. Hornworm cocoons overwinter in the soil. Anne Marrison is happy to answer garden questions. Send them to amarrison@shaw.ca.

Next Friday the Vancouver Courier continues ourembark series Vancouver Special– On January 18th the Vancouver Courier will upon an ambitious year-long journey through twenty-seven neighbourhoods Vancouver Special—an ambitious year-long journey through that make up the city of neighbourhoods Vancouver. We willthat report on the character the changing face forty-eight make up the city ofand Vancouver. ofOver eachtwelve neighbourhood, what report makes it and how it is responding to the months we’ll onunique the character and the changing challenges of being part of our rapidly changing city. Next Friday we visit face of each, what makes them unique and how they are responding Kensington-Cedar advertise in thischanging special section to the challengesCottage, of beingtopart of a rapidly city. call 604-738-1411.


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A19


A20

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

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s the weather will cool off and the school year approaches, life gets busy again. What better way to unwind and relax than in the comfort of your own home spa? It’s easier than you think to go from bathroom blahs to bliss, say specialists in this field. Sharon Grech, a colour and design expert at Benjamin Moore, shares her easy tips for achieving ‘serenity now’: CREATE PEACE WITH PAINT: The simplest and most cost-effective way to completely transform the look and mood of the bathroom is with paint. Choosing the right colour is critical, since a colour too vibrant will stimulate rather than relax. Grech says the Benjamin Moore colour Gray Cashmere offers the perfect shade of gray with slight blue undertones. This colour evokes a feeling of calm and relaxation. When creating a home spa, a consideration to keep in mind is that humidity can have detrimental effects on paint. To solve this, designers choose the Aura Bath & Spa line, says Grech, since it offers mildew resistance against the steamy environments often found in washrooms, with the beauty of a smooth matte finish. She points out that the integrity of the colour lasts due to the patented Colour Lock Technology, which preserves the brilliance of the paint.

LIGHTING IS EVERYTHING: The right glow is key to creating an inviting, warm retreat and can dramatically alter the mood of a room. A pretty chandelier not only looks stunning, it envelopes the room with a warm wash of light. Candles are a must-have to instantly make the bathroom warm and inviting. The room’s lighting, depending on what source it comes from, can have an effect on the look of the wall colour. Grech recommends purchasing a colour sample and testing it first before committing to a wall colour. BRING THE OUTSIDE IN: Long birch branches in a tall clear vase give a natural outdoor feel to the bathroom. A potted bamboo plant can be left on shelf for months and brings green to the space. If the room’s windows are small, bring in a few large mirrors to reflect the light and make the space appear bigger and brighter. FINAL TOUCHES: If space permits, bringing in furniture like a shelf or small storage cabinet offers functionality and aesthetic appeal. Fluffy white towels, neatly rolled and stored offer a streamlined look. Hang a soft bathrobe nearby and purchase a few beautifully scented bath salts to bring comfort home. Article courtesy www.newscanada.com.

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A21

AUGUST 2013

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^

• If you can’t use up all of your fresh herbs, chop them fine, place in ice cube trays, cover with a bit of water and freeze them. Add to soups, stews and sauces.

It’s the most wonderful time of the year! (For parents, at least). The Courier is offering up some great knowledge to assist families in preparing for the new school year, plus a variety of registration options. Features will publish with these general topics, as follows:

• Snap asparagus ends off at the point where the stalk becomes tough. Freeze the bases and save them to make a rich, flavourful asparagus soup. • Save peelings and trimmings from scrubbed carrots, potatoes, celery, parsley stems, etc. Keep in a freezer bag, frozen, to make vegetable stock.

Wed. Aug 21:

Healthy lunches; Sporty style for boys and girls.

Wed. Aug. 28:

Mom’s best tips; Tech buys (cel, laptop, MP3).

Fri. Sept. 6:

School chat; Tutors, activities; Music lessons.

Fri. Sept. 20:

Fall classes for all ages; Private school preview.

Gardeners can also put to use all of their extra produce in gazpacho, a Spanish soup. Traditionally served cold, gazpacho showcases the entire summer season’s harvest and makes for a cool, nutrient-packed delight.

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In a large saucepan, bring three quarts of water to a boil. Score the bottom of each tomato with an X. Working in two batches, place the tomatoes in boiling water for 15 seconds. Remove tomatoes with a slotted spoon and place in an ice bath. Peel tomatoes starting at the point of the X, pulling downward. Seed and chop; set aside. Place corn, onion cut side down, poblano and bell peppers on a prepared charcoal or gas grill grate, over high heat. Grill and turn corn until tender, about 8 minutes. Remove onion when nicely grill marked. Using tongs, turn peppers until skin is charred. Place charred peppers in a medium bowl and cover with plastic wrap; set aside for about 10 to 12 minutes. Remove charred skin from peppers, rinse, stem, seed and chop; place in a large food processor bowl. Add sheared corn, onion and garlic to processor bowl. Add tomatoes, cucumber, vanilla extract, vinegar, cumin and cilantro and process to desired consistency. Pour mixture into a large bowl; add tomato juice; stir to combine. Add salt and pepper to taste. Cover and chill for two hours before serving. (Recipe supplied by Gardi Wilks).

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A22

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013


FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A23

GOT ARTS? 604-738-1411 | arts@vancourier.com

2

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The odds are good that if the WISE Hall can’t pony up the cash to better soundproof their walls in order to placate new neighbours, they could become No Fun City’s latest victim. Come help them out at a benefit night Aug. 9 featuring longtime local favourites THE ODDS, Big Top, the Palomars and Screaming Chicken Burlesque. Tickets are $25 in advance ($30 at the door) available at Red Cat Records, Highlife or brownpapertickets.com.

PICKS AUG. 9-13 For video and web content, scan page with

Possibly in an attempt to offset any bad karma from bringing the Red Hot Chilli Peppers to a private party in Kits last week and not inviting any of the unwashed masses, Lululemon founder Chip Wilson is throwing another party Aug. 10 featuring outdoor yoga by the sea and the soothing vibes of Aussie multi-instrumentalist XAVIER RUDD at Stanley Park’s Brockton Oval. Tickets are $25. available at seawheeze.com. Gates open at 4:30 p.m.

3 4

The Rio Theatre hosts a late night screening of possibly the greatest Western filmed on Italian soil, Sergio Leone’s THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY, starring Clint Eastwood as a bounty hunter of few words and many bullets. 11 p.m. Tix are $6 in advance or in costume, $8 at the door.

American crooner HARRY CONNICK JR., whose been sweating to the oldies and charming grandmothers since back in the days when Michael Buble was still working on his dad’s fishing boat, brings his supersuave self to the Queen Elizabeth Aug. 11 in support of his new album Smokey Mary. Tix are $45-95, available at livenation.com.


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

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Winter of our discontent

I

KUDOS& KVETCHES

t’s beginning to look like the IOC’s decision to let a brutal regime with an appalling disregard for human rights host the Olympics isn’t going as well as it did five years ago in China. As most people who haven’t been living under a rock or perhaps in a Siberian gulag know, hopes for a warm and fuzzy Sochi Games have gone off the rails due to new Russian anti-gay laws that make it illegal to say anything nice about the love that formerly dared not speak its name, never mind actively engage in it. Nobody is quite sure what to do about it. President Vladimir Putin, who Russian polls indicate has the support of 12 out of every 10 Russians, clearly couldn’t care less about the opinions of the international community. Just ask Pussy Riot, Garry Kasparov or a Syrian guerilla. Last week, the country’s sports minister even turned it up a notch by announcing he wouldn’t rule out arresting visiting athletes who defy the law. People have expressed their outrage by calling for a boycott of Russian or even vaguely Russian-sounding vodka. A Facebook group called “Send A Dildo To Vladimir Putin” quickly sprang up urging people to mail new or used sex toys to the oft-shirtless former KGB hitman’s office in the hope it might somehow change his mind on gay rights. After all, it worked on Dick Cheney. Many more have called for a boycott of the Games themselves, just like we did in 1980 over the Russian invasion of Afghanistan (awkward), or at the very least not bother to watch them on TV. George Takei, however, has a better solution. Earlier this week, the iconic gay activist best known for playing Lt. Sulu on Star Trek suggested Vancouver should simply host the event again and has launched

a petition at change.org that at press time had already garnered close to 65,000 signatures. We think this is a fabulous idea for a number of reasons: • The infrastructure is already here. Not only do we have all the sporting venues in place but the Olympic Village is still mostly empty after apartments that were promised to become social housing were instead put on the market. We’ve also proven that, even if it doesn’t snow, we’re still able to truck it in to any outdoor events that may require it. • It would provide an opportunity to show we don’t always necessarily riot when we lose important hockey games. And, even if the men’s hockey team manages to win gold again, the inevitably enormous police presence will surely ensure we won’t destroy the city again even if we try. As an added bonus, given that nobody is entirely sure if Roberto Luongo is going to show up at Canucks training camp this year, it also very well might be our last chance to cheer on Funny Bob on home ice. • It’s not like we’ll ever wear those stupid red mittens or baby-blue hoodies again otherwise. • We could potentially mend fences with Quebeckers, who were reportedly offended their culture wasn’t adequately represented last time, and prohibit participating athletes from wearing turbans for “safety reasons.” • We would belatedly have an opportunity to see the top women ski jumpers compete now that the boneheaded decision to exclude them has been repealed. • The anti-gentrification types would have a legitimate target to protest against instead of just some random Gastown restaurant. • Poet Shane Kozycan, who inspired countless Canadians with his We Are More speech in the 2010 opening ceremony, might still be available. He has since gone on to reach an even wider audience with his viral anti-bullying poem To This Day. Apparently it’s a lesson a lot of people still need to learn. twitter.com/kudoskvetches

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

arts&entertainment Dirty Apron helps break the ice with Tim Pawsey

I

n the immortal words of Noel Coward, “I went to a marvelous party...” And no, I didn’t “cry ‘fiddle-de-de’ and jump in the sea.” Not quite, anyway. Sometimes there’s no better way to experience Vancouver than through the eyes of folks from elsewhere, which is precisely what I spent last weekend doing: hanging with out of town guests, here for the wedding of good friends (also from out of town). One of the challenges the couple faced was coming up with an icebreaker that would allow guests to get to know each other quickly and in a (relatively) relaxed setting. Their solution was a stroke of genius: a group cooking class hosted by The Dirty Apron. Keeping the event and location a mystery until we arrived only added to the fun and anticipation. In a matter of minutes, a score of people from across the globe, many of whom had never met, were busy dicing and slicing, deboning game hens, making scratch fettuccini in white wine cream sauce, stirring morel and thyme risotto, crafting intricate desserts, and much more, all under the expert tutelage of Dirty Apron’s amiable, professional instructors. To say that I was impressed would be an understatement, as the chefs calmly coped with a broad range of skills and breezily coaxed a tasty three-course lunch out of the previously unsuspecting guests, who prepped and cooked everything in three groups. And then we dined,

photo Tim Pawsey

A group cooking class at the Dirty Apron helped out-of-town guests get to know each other quickly.

at a convivial long table, each team plating and serving their own course. Kudos to The Dirty Apron for such a successful event. Team building as part of a wedding was a first for them. But I suspect it won’t be the last. ••• From the “What’s in a name?” department comes news that the much anticipated resurrection of West End treasure Delilah’s is not to be, at least not as “Cafe Delilah” as was intended. Plans to open on the B.C. Day long weekend were abruptly derailed by “challenging and unforeseen circumstances,” according to owners Daryle Nagata and Paul Puratich. And the shiny new red logo at 1789 Denman St. has been black-taped over. No firm news yet on the new moni-

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ker but the duo hopes its no-name cafe — in what surely everyone will refer to in perpetuity as “the old Delilah’s location” — will be up and running with a new, even less notorious handle by mid-month. ••• Regional cuisine is not what first comes to mind when you think of the Hyatt Regency. However, the main floor resto has been impressively revitalized as Grain Tasting Bar. The casual and sleekly modernistic room sports a decidedly local-focused menu — not to mention a dramatic, fold-away wall that brings the outdoors in. One recent sunny day we worked our way through tastes of healthy fare such as Albacore tuna sliders with apple and fennel slaw and lime aioli, crab Louie, a Spring Creek prime rib sandwich, an Oyama charcuterie platter and more. Local wines and brews match the menu, with decent draught on tap from the likes of Lighthouse, Red Truck, Howe Sound and R&B, while a serious drinks list calls on Long Table and Victoria Spirits to assist in an inventive cocktail lineup. If the daytime room is bright and breezy, looking out onto leafy Burrard, the evening mood is sophisticated and sexy, enhanced by a reflective ceiling, coloured glass and richly textured woods.

BELLY’S BUDGET BEST Finca Los Primos 2012 Torrontes (San Rafael) —This Argentine producer enjoys a well earned rep for good budget drops—and this is no exception. Pale gold in the glass with orange-citrus on top before a textured palate with floral and honey notes and a touch of acidity. Think chilled chicken with mandarin salad. The Deal — BCLS $9.99, 89 pts. www.hiredbelly.com twitter.com/hiredbelly

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1660 East Broadway (604) 879-FILM CHARLES BRADLEY: SOUL OF AMERICA: Fri 7:00 Sun, Tues 7:30, 19+ only with bar service THE CANYONS: Fri 9:00 Sun, Tues 9:30 Thurs 7:00, 19+ only with bar service THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY: Fri 11:00, 19+ only with bar service SHARKNADO: Wed 7:00, 19+ only with bar service

www.festivalcinemas.ca CINEPLEX PARK THEATRE 3440 Cambie St., 604-709-3456 BLUE JASMINE: Fri 2:20, 4:35, 7:00, 9:20 Sat-Sun 12:05, 2:20, 4:35, 7:00, 9:20 Mon-Thurs 2:30, 4:40, 7:00, 9:20 www.festivalcinemas.ca DUNBAR THEATRE 4555 Dunbar St., 604-222-2991 WE’RE THE MILLERS: Fri-Thurs 1:30, 4:00, 7:00, 9:30

www.riotheatre.ca VIFF: VANCITY THEATRE 1181 Seymour St., 604-683-FILM DRUG WAR: Fri-Thurs 6:45 BERBERIAN SOUND STUDIO: Fri-Sun, Tues-Thurs 8:50 HANNAH ARENDT: Sat-Sun 4:00 UPSTREAM COLOR: Sat 10:30 BIG STAR: NOTHING CAN HURT ME: Mon 9:00 www.viff.org

AUGUST 9 -15


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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

FRED

EMAIL: yvrflee@hotmail.com TWITTER: @FredAboutTown

UNLEESHED

STAR BRIGHT: Escaping the throngs of people that moved into Vancouver’s West End for the annual Celebration of Light fireworks, a lucky few sought refuge high above English Bay. Taking in the spectacular views from the Coast Plaza Hotel, a hundred guests enjoyed food, wine and fireworks from the property’s penthouse floor. Helping feed those homebound by HIV/AIDS, executive director Lisa Martella welcomed guests to Dine Above the Stars, the ultimate fireworks feast designed by executive chef Kim Thai. Across town, making a similar big bang, Scotiabank hosted Sparkle, a fireworks fete benefitting McLaren Housing. From the 34th floor, guests helped generate nearly $20,000 for the local charity. RED RIBBON ROMP: AIDS Vancouver turned 30 this year and marked the milestone with a celebration at the Commodore Ballroom. Yours truly and Barb Snelgrove emceed the birthday bash. As part of the red carpet romp, inaugural Red Ribbon Awards were handed out honouring heroes in the HIV movement. The starry night realized $30,000 for the venerable institution. FLYING HIGH: Movie buffs converged at Scotiabank Theatre for the launch of Air Canada’s enRoute Film Festival. Sixteen Canadian films were shortlisted for the annual showcase to be screened on Air Canada flights from now until the end of the year. eTalk’s Ben Mulroney hosted the West Coast launch and screening.

eTalk’s Ben Mulroney feted filmmakers Sophie Jarvis and Kane Stewart at the enRoute Film Festival launch. Their film will be among 16 screened on Air Canada flights this

Coast hotel sous chef Vinay Racharla and executive chef KimThai fronted a five-course fireworks fundraising dinner high above English Bay.

Air Canada’s Edna Ray feted filmmakers Lewis Bennett, left, and Calum MacLeod at the enRoute film festival reception and screening.

Barb Snelgrove (left) emceed and artist Yared Nigussu performed at AIDS Vancouver’s 30th anniversary celebrations that netted $30,000.

Joel Leung and May McQueen, longtime AIDS Vancouver volunteers, were honoured with Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Medals for service.

Helping feed those homebound by HIV/AIDS, A Loving Spoonful’s Lisa Martell and Adria Karchut welcomed guests to their Dine Above the Stars fireworks benefit.

Scotiabank’s David Poole, with his wife Mary Beth, hosted Sparkle benefitting McLaren Housing Society. The fireworks fundraiser realized nearly $20,000.

DJ Vendisco spinned fresh ditties at the Joe Fresh store opening in North Vancouver.


FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

There will be no more world wars like the First and Second World Wars. We entered a golden age of peace in November 1983 – to last for the next 3,000 years or so. That’s pure astrology, which never has “reasons” behind it. But I suspect the largest cause is simply the maturation of mankind: even in the mere 60-plus years since the Second World War, we have advanced hugely: welfare and social safety nets, state-sponsored medical for all, political consciousness (e.g., perestroika and the fall of the Berlin Wall) relaxation of racial tensions, advances in medicine, psychology and technology. Now, for example, Google translatie is turning most languages from barriers to bridges – this column, for instance, is now read online in almost every nation. This communication erodes the barriers: Egyptians can read London newspapers, and a Parisian can read a Sao Paulo website). These have been huge steps. A more minor element contributing to peace might be the decline of racial divides from an increase in understanding, migrations, and ongoing sexual homogenization of the races. With the racial element gone, it will be more difficult to incite whole populations to hate their neighbour, and go to war against them. A beautiful, romantic, pleasure-oriented phase continues. Love could become meaningful Sunday (careful) and Wed. eve to Fri. morning (when love could be “sanctioned” – could inspire wedding plans). You’re mostly happy (many of you are still bummed about your career) and you’re still riding a winning streak – so start things, chase attractive singles, create or invent. Take a risk!

Your popularity continues. Optimism, wish fulfilment, entertainment, light romance or flirtations, group involvements and plans for the future fill your days. Now an additional hopeful note enters, perhaps because a Gemini or Virgo has befriended you, or because you find it easy to communicate your optimism, and others are interested.

The accent continues on your career and reputation, on prestige relations, and your community status. In 2012, fifteen years of wishful thinking and “rose-coloured glasses” combined with worry, ended. You can now see your forward path clearly: sit up, see it, and march forward! (If you started a new career project in the last 18 days, stick with it.) Success might involve accepting another person’s point of view.

Be ambitious; chase the brass ring. But don’t be ambitious in legal zones unless you’re a lawyer (until Aug. 27). Your ability to gain the ear of higher-ups increases this week and next; they like what you say and how you say (or write) it. It’s your last week of relative smoothness/joy with a business associate, mate or prospective spouse, so take advantage, especially Mon. afternoon to Wednesday evening.

Still talking, writing and travelling, Gemini – or you should be! Life’s fun, you’re energetic, and casual acquaintances are everywhere. Make friends. Money continues to flow swiftly to you – bank it, wait until late month or Sept. to spend. Romance, creativity and pleasure visit Sunday, but the road to love isn’t easy. Tackle chores Mon. afternoon to Wed. eve – most things run well here. It’s a good time to buy equipment, tools.

A gentle month continues. Dream, contemplate, seek wisdom, read, travel, attend courses and lectures, join cultural venues. Every day, you’re learning a little more, understanding a little more deeply how society, love and politics work. Bosses and parents continue to favour you, for one more week. Take advantage before Fri. Sexual and investment urges are strong – both are a bit impulsive now, but superbly lucky through next June.

Continue to chase money, to buy/sell, catalogue possessions, and seek higher earnings or more clients. Your health and energy are strong (relatively) and you remain determined to achieve something, probably something ambitious – a career project. Be gentle, treat kids, spouse kindly. You might feel the recent buoyancy that will lift your steps now to next July. Be home with kids Sun./Mon.

Eleven days left of a “mystery streak” cap. Use this time to dig deep through research or detective work. Reject surface appearances. Your subconscious floats to the surface, bringing intuition and ideas/nudges that align closely with your destiny. It also brings heightened sexual urges and financial courage and inspiration – act on these (but stay legal!)

Your energy, charisma, effectiveness and clout remain high, Leo. (Not so high as some years, as you have to watch – or bow to – institutions, gov’t, or “head office” – or some health problem, perhaps a stomach ache, keeps a small rope around you.) Your ability to express yourself is very strong this week and next, so it’s time to state your case, to a boss, lover, judge, etc. Sunday/ Mon. are for travel, errands, casual acquaintances.

You’re so lucky, Aquarius, at least in relationships. Your “natural mate” is Leo, and Leo is the simplest sign to please; just keep the praise flowing. You’re presently in the middle of a relationship month (to Aug. 22) – so turn up the praise, seek others, discern their desires/ needs and make an effort to fulfil them. Others will be your vehicle of opportunity, advancement, not only for 11 more days, but generally to late September.

Continue to rest, lie low and avoid competitive situations. This is a good time to contemplate, plan, reconnect with the spiritual, be charitable, and to form links with gov’t agencies, institutions and large corporations. You’ll write/talk easily to these large bodies for the next two weeks. Your social life still percolates, others still find you attractive, but you seek solitude. You’ve just begun a perfect year for making a wish come true in the food/shelter area.

Dive into chores, Pisces. You’re in a great year for two things: 1) advancing in career, esp. if you use your creative or “people sensing” talents, and 2) romance, creativity, speculation, teaching, pleasure and beauty. These could combine: a romance could lead to the “status” of marriage, or marriage “upward.” So chew on those chores diligently in the next 11 days in order to free yourself more completely for the true love and luck that will start late month.

Monday: Lisa Fleming (43). Tuesday: Fidel Castro (87). Wednesday: Tim Tebow (26). Thursday: Jennifer Lawrence (23). Friday: Steve Carell (51). Saturday: Colin James (49). Sunday: Madeleine Stowe (55)

MORE AT ASTRALREFLECTIONS.COM

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

GOT SPORTS? 604-738-1411 | sportsandrec@vancourier.com

Antonia Buono, 20, shouts for attention Aug. 5 at Safeco Field in Seattle. Thousands of Jays fans swelled attendance this week.

photo Megan Stewart

Jaysplayathomeontheroad MEGAN STEWART

Staff writer

W

hen the Lawries travel to see their son Brett play baseball, they take a handful of friends and sometimes their daughter tags along, too. When Charlene and Russ Lawrie, parents of the Toronto Blue Jays third baseman and the biggest thing to come out of Langley Little League, stopped in Seattle this week for a three-game series against the Mariners, they showed up at Safeco Field with thousands of friends. More than 3,300 kilometres from their favourite team’s ballpark, Toronto fans arrived from B.C, Alberta and Saskatchewan and overwhelmed Seattle’s supporters. Patriotism drew these fans, as did hype and hope, but also the only chance this summer to see major league ball played close to home by “Canada’s Team.” The west coast swing through Seattle was the only one the Jays will make all summer. Regardless of their mediocre record, the Jays are a hot ticket. “Looking around, I see a lot of blue,” said Russ Lawrie. “I think we might even have more fans than Seattle now. You should have seen how many Blue Jay fans were in L.A.” He trailed off to shake hands with one of his son’s teammates. “Colby, how you doing, my man?” The Lawries flew to L.A. and worked their way up the coast with each road series. “If I could do them

all, I would,” he said. He’s not alone. For three days, Jays fans swelled the numbers at Safeco Field, a ballpark where attendance has dropped by half since 2001 and so far his summer has averaged crowds of 22,520. On Monday, attendance hit 32,300 and on Tuesday 28,198. Wednesday’s mid-day start was the busiest at 34,792. In Toronto at the Rogers Centre, the Blue Jays draw an average 31,752 to fill twothirds of the stands.

PRETTY YOUNG THINGS As batting practice continued before Monday’s evening game, Courtney Jensen held tight to a sign and high hopes. “Kiss me Colby,” asserted the hand-written poster. Blue Jay Colby Rasmus, mulletted locks curling out from his ball cap, ducked into the visitors clubhouse without a sideways glance, but Jensen gushed with praise. “He is the best centre fielder that ever lived and he’s really handsome and I love his hair cut.” The 34-year-old from East Vancouver could be the face of the modern Blue Jays fan: young, educated and female. Half of Toronto’s fans were 18 to 34 years old last year, a considerable increase from 34 per cent in 2010 and in contrast to trends across Major League Baseball, according to in-stadium survey results compiled by Ipsos-Reid for the club and released to the Globe and Mail. “I have to go to school tomorrow, but I’m skipping the morning,” said Jensen.

“My classmates are going to lie for me. They know how important this is for me. I grew up playing baseball and a few years ago I stated watching again and now I’m just hooked. I think the Jays should move to Vancouver and make it easier on all of us.” Female fans the same age as Jensen make up half the Blue Jays hometown fan base. As a road team, Toronto is also developing a loyal following. It’s being noticed. During a recent Sportsnet broadcast of the Jays game against the Angels in Los Angeles, commentator Buck Martinez noted the Toronto team has fans everywhere. “Seattle, that’s almost like a home game for the Blue Jays,” he said. Andrea Baartman, 20, wouldn’t describe her, her two brothers, two sisters and parents as “roadies,” but they have travelled to Seattle to see the Jays each summer for the past five years. They sit in the bleachers where tickets are $23 and she brings the same pale blue t-shirt to collect autographs. The attendance has grown each trip, she said. “It’s gotten younger and bigger. More people are travelling to see them and travelling more distances, too.”

WHO’S ON FIRST? WHO’S AT HOME?

The Blue Jays sit last in the American League East, 16 games behind the Red Sox with 53 wins and 61 losses as of Thursday morning. At Safeco, however, you’d be forgiven if you thought the scene was Toronto

and the team a winning club. The Canadian anthem, which doesn’t play at an American ball park unless the Jays are in town, was loudly sung and followed by a tremendous, lasting cheer. The hosts flashed the Maple Leaf on the big screen along with the lyrics, which were displayed for both anthems. Fans waved Canadian flags and wore red national team jerseys as well as Blue Jays garb that was red, not the namesake blue. “It’s pretty crazy, this is pretty extraordinary — two thirds are Blue Jays fans,” said Roger Grutzmacher, 22, who drove five friends in his Volkswagen Golf from the Comox Valley on Vancouver Island to catch the entire series. “I don’t care that the Blue Jays are out of the playoff race, they’re Canada’s team.” On Monday alone, more than a dozen independent chants for the visitors circled the park. “Let’s go Blue Jays, let’s go,” was coupled by a deafening wave, started behind home plate by a lone man’s battle cry: “The wave, we’re doing the wave right now! Ready Toronto? Let’s go.” In the top of the fourth, Edwin Encarnation sat on two balls and no strikes with no outs and a runner on first. Boos engulfed Safeco when the next pitch, outside and low, was called a strike. The batter fouled the next pitch and when the ball was caught barehanded by a Mariners fan, he pointed over his shoulder to the name on his jersey, [Jay] Buhner, a popular outfielder. He was booed.


FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

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sports&recreation

photos Megan Stewart

Above left, Courteney Jensen, 34, calls for her favourite Blue Jay at Safeco Field Aug. 5. At right, Roberto Iacayo, Sara Shull and Megan Washington pose in centre field with a bronze statue of Seattle Times reporter Dave Niehaus while a Mariners staffer takes their photo. verite cheering for a Toronto team. “You people drive like drunken geriatrics, park like assholes, love the crap out of our outlet malls, can’t get enough of American name brands, and have an unrequited, damn near inexplicable love affair with a baseball team half a world away. “Do you see the Blue Jays organization going out of its way to celebrate an adoring West Coast fan base? No. So what is it?” On the last front at least, the writer is wrong. The Jays have courted a fan base across the country and since becoming the affiliate to the single-A Vancouver Canadians, have been involved in this city’s baseball community. (In fact, several C’s were recognized Monday at Safeco along with other Northwest League players on the eve of the All-star game in Everett. The Canadians, of course, were excitedly and loudly cheered.)

VANCOUVER’S MARINERS FAN Arthur Berman was recently celebrated before the opening pitch at Safeco Field as the Canadian with the longest tenure as a season ticket holder. He’s held a weekend pass since 2000 and is also holds Red Sox tickets at Boston’s Fenway Park. He travels to Seattle for Saturday and Sunday games. “Life is not complete without baseball,” said Berman, an inter-faith hospital chaplain. He recommends a Nexus pass for regular road trips to Washington State and strongly suggests arriving the 30 minutes before the gates open to observe the bullpen, a special feature

at Safeco that puts multi million-dollar arms and acquisitions a few short feet away from the drinking, shouting hoards. Berman attends Canadians games when the Mariners are on the road and last weekend watched a foul ball fly out of Nat Bailey, destined for his car’s rearview window. The club replaced the shattered glass.

HOME FIELD DISADVANTAGE The Mariners prevented a three-game sweep but the Blue Jays took the series 2-1. In the home clubhouse Tuesday after the second loss, the mood was downcast. Acting manager Robby Thompson said his side had a “sloppy night” and didn’t want to talk about the crowd a second night in a row but obliged. “I had enough to worry about how we were playing and trying to get back into the game, let alone think about what’s going on in the stands. I definitely noticed the crowd.” The boisterous almost riotous crowd all but usurped the Mariners form their own park. Did it feel like a Blue Jays home game, Thompson was asked. “Pretty much. You could say that.” He added, “When you go out and play, it doesn’t matter where you play at, you’d rather play in front of a big crowd regardless, than empty seats.” The manager said the players weren’t affected in the dugout, but Victoria’s Michael Saunders did not want to chat about the B.C. fans after Tuesday’s game. The word in the locker room was that the Mariners were

unhappy to forfeit their loyal followers to a louder, more strident, rowdy road crowd. For all the Mariners’ unrest, the Jays were uplifted. “It felt a lot like we were at home,” said Toronto manager Bobby Gibbons, “and they were loud, they were all in their blue. It makes you feel good, you know, it does.” Jays knuckleballer, R.A. Dickey, a thoughtful, measured player who’d once been a Mariner, said, “We’re taught to kind of, you know, focus in on our task at hand and neglect all the peripherals, but the truth of the matter is when you’re walking off, like when I was walking off in the eight, it was a nice feeling. I feel like our team shows glimpses of what we can be and that’s what makes the season all the more frustrating.” Brett Lawrie, added Dickey, “was a sparkplug tonight. It was good in front of a Canadian crowd to do that. I think he enjoyed that.” Lawrie, who turned an excellent double play and nailed an RBI triple (which would have been a stand-up hit but the baller slid head-first anyway) said the fans and his family brought him a boost. He felt the energy. “It’s just a lot of fun to be a part of. I know everyone was coming down from B.C. and I got the chance to see a lot of people I don’t normally get to see. It’s definitely good to have all those people in your corner and have all those people cheering for you.” mstewart@vancourier.com twitter.com/MHStewart

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On Tuesday between the top and bottom of the seventh, a pause known as the seventh-inning stretch, fans sang along to a classic sports hymn. But the considerable Canadian contingent changed the lyrics to “Take Me Out To The Ball Game.” Instead of “Root, root, root for the home team,” thousands overwhelmed the canned music to displace “Mariners” and holler, “BLUE! JAYS! Since Felix Hernandez started Tuesday, the Mariners’ “King’s Court” was shoulder-toshoulder yellow t-shirts heralding King Felix. The fan club grew organically around the Venezuelan pitcher but this week the sections were defending their territory and Seattle pride. The game took on tones of an international grudge match; to counter the Canadians’ assertive, joyous patriotism at Safeco, the fans in the King’s Court tried to remind the visitors whose turf they were on. Their short-lived chant “U-S-A! U-S-A!” was booed into silence. “We’re quite perplexed about why there are so many Blue Jay fans,” said Ryan White, a 27year-old Seattleite who matched the bright yellow t-shirt of his four friends “We’re not close to Toronto. We’re close to Canada but were not close to Toronto. We’ve been asking around. Still, we’re perplexed by it. At least tonight Felix was pitching so Mariners fans have a reason to go, otherwise we don’t really have a reason to go to games.” Also on Tuesday, a Seattle blogger nagged, “I just don’t get you, Blue Jays fans.” The no-lastname writer scratched his head over Vancou-

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

sports&recreation

Stories and photos from your

community

~ In print and online all the time

Apps track progress, not just data WHEEL WORLD

vancourier.com

with Kay Cahill

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racking your mileage on a bike is great for all kinds of reasons. If you’re riding for fitness, you can keep an eye on your time on the bike, the distance ridden and your speed. You can track your improvements and set goals. If you’re commuting, you can track how much you’re saving yourself in gas money or transit fare. And of course these tools make logging your mileage for Bike to Work Week quick and easy. One question that arises: if you’re using your phone rather than a bike computer to track your cycling: which app should you use? There are a ridiculous number of apps to choose from and they range from very simple trackers to data-miners with all kinds of bells and whistles and social media link-ups. Many apps also offer free, paid and even premium versions. Picking the right app does depend on your own priorities. For me, it’s really important to have an app that’s accurate and one that doesn’t drain the battery excessively fast on my longer rides. Ease of use is also important; I like to track my miles but I don’t want to spend time fiddling with my phone at the beginning and end of each ride. For ease of use, Cyclemeter wins hands down. This simple app allows you to track and save rides and routes, easily compare your riding time on repeat routes, and can be used immediately after download with no lengthy

photo Rebecca Blissett

Cyclemeter, an app that costs $4.99, is the best iPhone app to easily track rides and routes. setup or account creation. In default mode it uses no data, so it’s great if you’re roaming or wanting to keep an eye on your data usage. On the down side, it’s a bit of a battery hog and it’s only available for iPhone. Data can be downloaded in a spreadsheet for reference, but this is clunky to work with and hard to import to other apps. Strava and Endomondo are two good but slightly more involved tracking apps with both Android and iPhone versions. They have all of the basic route tracking info and a lot of the same bells and whistles — both have websites where you can review your rides and compare your times against other cyclists who have also logged that route, as well as training modules where you can set goals and track your progress. Strava is only for cycling and running whereas Endomondo enables you to log all your sports in one place and easily pull out totals for specific sports. Endomondo also offers the significant bonus of a low power mode. I’ve run

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the app continuously for up to nine hours, during which time I’ve also taken pictures and made calls, and drained less than 25 per cent of my phone’s battery. The other aspect of Endomondo that’s really fun is the challenges. I’m not as interested in tracking my time on specific routes against other riders — my strength is endurance, not speed — but Endomondo offers longer term goals like tracking your calories burned or kilometres pedalled over a couple of months. Tracking progress over these challenges is both motivating and interesting. Of course, these are far from the only cycle tracking apps out there. MapMyRide and Google Tracks are also popular, but after testing a whole variety of them when I recently got a new bike, these three are the ones I’ve found to be best. Kay Cahill is a cyclist and librarian who believes bikes are for life, not just for commuting. Send a comment to kay@sidecut.ca.

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Cadillacplanstorebootflagshipsedan BRAKING NEWS with Brendan McAleer

are already the size of your average ocean-going vessel, swelling one up to the size of a Range Rover isn’t all that difficult. The problem is how the styling of something like a Mulsanne looks when ballooned up, and I can tell you that, so far, efforts have not been pretty. Also, with the new lighter-weight Range Rover starting to trickle out and gain a foothold, Bentley’s foray into the luxo-SUV field is going to have some stiff competition. Anyway, look forward to spending 2016 stuck in aparking lot while one of these behemoths attempts a 48-point turn. brakingnews@gmail.com twitter.com/brendan_mcaleer

They sure are cute though, if slightly deformed. From humble beginnings, the Subaru brand has grown into a full range of vehicles, and has been on something of a tear recently, with the redesigned Forester doing very well.

BENTLEY BULKS UP

THE DARK KNIGHT SURPRISES Na-Na-Na-Na-Na-Na-Na-Na Bat-truck! For some reason, Ford has built itself a Bat-truck. Seems a perfectly sensible thing to do. “Holy Lasers!” and whatnot. We’re not talking the gravely voiced Dark Knight here — this red-and-black, be-finned F-150 is made in the mold of George Barris’s original creation. That particular Batmobile was also a Ford underneath, a Futura concept, and the V-8powered truck echoes its somewhat campy (but legendary) lines. Put together by Galpin Auto Sports in South Cali, the truck was sketched out by Barris’s grandson Jared in Tuxedo Black with Ferrari Red accents. Everything was together just in time for Comic Con in San Diego (ah, that makes sense), and Galpin is reportedly taking orders for anyone who wants to convert their F-150 to Batspec. Look, if you’re thinking about sticking bat-fins on your pickup, just get your best friend to come over and Biff! Pow! Socko! some sense back into you.

SUBARU’S SEXAGENNIAL Well, sort of. Actually celebrating a birthday this year is Fuji Heavy Industries, the pragmatically named company that churns out the rugged all-wheel-drive machines that urban dwellers so love. After a series of name-swapping reorganizations more convoluted than three seasons of Days Of Our Lives, the Nakajima Aircraft Company split into subsidiaries and then reorganized, taking the name of Fuji Heavy Industries in 1953. The company produced a jet, and I have to wonder why Subaru doesn’t make a bigger deal of this given how Saab was always trumpeting its aeronautical heritage. They also built the Subaru 360: this wonky little micro-car was basically like a VW Beetle in many ways, except mostly worse.

Bentley has announced a concept of what a Bentley SUV might look like called the EXP 9 F, which sounds like what a Dungeons and Dragons character receives as a reward for slaying an orc. And speaking of slaying orcs.. .. Given that most Bentleys PLEASE READ THE FINE PRINT: Offers valid until September 3, 2013. See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. In the event of any discrepancy or inconsistency between Toyota prices, rates and/or other information contained on toyotabc.ca and that contained on toyota.ca, the latter shall prevail. Errors and omissions excepted. 2013 Corolla CE Automatic BU42EP-B MSRP is $19,635 and includes $1,645 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. *Finance example: 0% finance for 84 months, upon credit approval, available on 2013 Corolla. Bi-Weekly payment is $99 with $1850 down payment. Applicable taxes are extra. **Lease example: 0% Lease APR for 60 months on approved credit. Monthly payment is $169 with $2,300 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $12,440. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.07. Applicable taxes are extra. Down payment, first monthly payment and security deposit plus GST and PST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. ***Up to $2,500 Non-stackable Cash Back available on select 2013 Corolla models. Cash back on Corolla CE is $2,000. 2013 RAV4 FWD LE Automatic ZFREVT-B MSRP is $26,605 and includes $1,815 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. †Finance example: 4.3% finance for 72 months, upon credit approval, available on 2013 RAV4. Bi-Weekly payment is $179 with $2300 down payment. Applicable taxes are extra. ††Lease example: 4.5% Lease APR for 60 months on approved credit. Monthly payment is $288 with $1,800 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $19,080. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.10. Applicable taxes are extra. Down payment, first monthly payment and security deposit plus GST and PST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. 2013 Tundra Double Cab 4.6L 4x4 Automatic UM5F1T-A MSRP is $38,050 and includes $1,815 freight and pre-delivery inspection, tire levy, battery levy and air conditioning federal excise tax. ‡Finance example: 0.9% finance for 72 months, upon credit approval, available on 2013 Tundra. Bi-Weekly payment is $239 with $2000 down payment. Applicable taxes are extra. ‡‡Lease example: 1.9% Lease APR for 60 months on approved credit. Monthly payment is $429 with $1,000 down payment. Total Lease obligation is $26,740. Lease 60 mos. based on 100,000 km, excess km charge is $.15. Applicable taxes are extra. Down payment, first monthly payment and security deposit plus GST and PST on first payment and full down payment are due at lease inception. A security deposit is not required on approval of credit. ‡‡‡Up to $8,000 Non-stackable Cash Back available on select 2013 Tundra models. Cash back on Tundra 4x4 Double Cab 4.6L is $6,000. Non-stackable Cash Back offers may not be combined with Toyota Financial Services (TFS) lease or finance rates. If you would like to lease or finance at standard TFS rates (not the above special rates), then you may be able to take advantage of Cash Customer Incentives. Vehicle must be purchased, registered and delivered by September 3, 2013. Cash incentives include taxes and are applied after taxes have been charged on the full amount of the negotiated price.See toyota.ca for complete details on all cash back offers. Visit your Toyota BC Dealer or www.toyotabc.ca for more details. Some conditions apply; offers are time limited and may change without notice. Dealer may lease/sell for less.

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eally, that headline ought to read: “Cadillac to build Cadillac.” The crest and wreath has been emblazoned on all kinds of very interesting cars of late, but in its quest to establish itself as a performance brand, Cadillac has been missing something. Yes, the current range-topping XTS sedan looks decent, but it’s a front-driver that comes with nothing larger than a V-6. They’ll be doing a twin-turbo version soon enough, but what part of “twin-turbo V-6 front-wheel drive” says Cadillac to you? No, a proper Caddy of the old school is essentially a yacht for the road, somewhere between big, brooding menace and chrome-finned splendour. To my mind, it doesn’t just need to sit beside a Mercedes-Benz S-Class and look creditable — it needs to do better than that. Quite frankly, Cadillac should put Rolls-Royce in their crosshairs, and I know what you’re thinking: no American car could ever match the peerless heritage of the RR brand. Why not? The Cadillac of the 1930s used to, and why not at least aim at creating a driving experience as special as that of a Rolls-Royce, rather than some charmless wafting German executive limo? We’ll have to wait a further two years before GM will launch their flagship. In the meantime, here’s hoping they pull out all the stops, put Goodfellas on the DVD and force all the designers to listen to nothing but Frank Sinatra.

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THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A37

dashboard Eco-friendliest Prius goes to the wall they’ve sold three million of the things and expanded a single model into a brand. However, from the outside, there’s almost nothing to differentiate this plug-in variant from its cordless brethren. Yes, the PHEV Prius (for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle) does say “Plug-In Vehicle” right there on the front flanks, but you’d be forever explaining it to people, and that’s not very exciting. On the good side, the Prius’ ergonomicmouse design now has a bit of flair, with sharp-looking headlights and a modicum of styling lines. It’s also immediately recognizable as a hybrid, something that gives it status, in a way. Mind you, Prius styling is all about a low coefficient of friction, and the PHEV is certainly slippery. Other than that, you’ve probably ridden in a taxicab that looks just like it.

BRENDAN MCALEER Contributing writer

O

ne of the major problems with the electric car is that they haven’t really designed it for idiots like me. Let me explain. I quite like electric cars for short-distance travel. They’re smooth, they’re quiet, they cost just pennies a kilometre (once you’ve paid for the initial cost), and there’s something to be said for the scavenger-hunt feel of tracking down a free charging station. Actually, if you drive your electric car to Granville Island on a weekend, you get VIP parking right out front, courtesy of BC Hydro. But for all of this to work, for all this excellence to actually be there in your driveway, humming and ready to go, you have to remember to plug the darn thing in. And, unfortunately, remembering to plug things in is not my forte. Here’s Toyota’s solution, and it’s a simple one. It’s a Prius with a cord, an electric car with a short range that can be fully charged in just three hours from a regular outlet, but that turns into a regular hybrid when the battery runs out. In many ways, it’s an electric car for dummies — but is it really worth the premium over a regular hybrid?

ENVIRONMENT More good news on the inside, as the fitment of a larger lithium ion battery pack to boost the Prius’ maximum carry charge hasn’t really impacted interior space. You get a spacious, airy cabin along with a usefully sized lift-back trunk. Rear seat room is good, the seats are all comfortable, and a jogging stroller fits in the back without any hassle. Unfortunately, Toyota’s obsession with making sure the Prius is as environmentally sensitive as possible has resulted in an interior

DESIGN There’s much to like about what Toyota has done with their eco-friendly Prius, now that

to flash on the high-mounted screen so you could see what button you were about to press without actually looking down.

PERFORMANCE

submitted photo

The new PHEV Prius is an electric car for dummies.

that’s a bit recycled-looking, and not in a good way. The plastics are all lined up well, but they’re all also very thin and flimsy feeling. High-trim PHEVs come with a pseudo leather that looks okay, but has the feel of a wetsuit, and the unrelenting grey of everything is a bit depressing. It feels like you’re about to take Eeyore for a ride. The ordinary Prius has been in service for some time now, and likewise the PHEV model has a dated interface and old-fashioned navigation system that’s more flipphone than iPod. Everything’s all green and black, like an early 1990s desktop computer, and it certainly doesn’t feel cutting edge. Happily though, the ergonomics are mostly quite good - apart from the switches for the heated seats, which are located so far away they might as well be in another car. I especially liked the way touching the steering wheel controls caused a diagram

By law, every single motoring writer is required to spend a minimum of four column inches complaining about how dull and soulless a Prius is to drive. But we’ll take that as read. The fact is, driving the PHEV requires a certain recalibration of the old gearhead meter — it’s a car in that it has wheels and goes places, but you really need to rethink the definition of “performance.” Add in a very small electric traction motor and the shortrange pack (electric car owners scoffed at the three kilowatt hour rating), and highway on-ramps become a bit of an ordeal. This Prius loves to turn its gasoline engine on at the slightest provocation. Instead of acting like a proper electric car, it doles out the stored electricity to supplement its natural hybrid car tendencies - which actually works quite well. There are few occasions where you can drive just on electricity, but a quick plug into the wall means short-range trips consume in the neighbourhood of 2.2 litres/100 kilometres. Program in all the free charging points in the Lower Mainland, and costs go down even further. mcaleeronwheels@gmail.com twitter.com/brendan_mcaleer

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5-year/100,000 km Comprehensive Limited Warranty†† 5-year/100,000 km Powertrain Warranty 5-year/100,000 km Emission Warranty

HyundaiCanada.com

The Hyundai names, logos, product names, feature names, images and slogans are trademarks owned by Hyundai Auto Canada Corp. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. †Finance offers available O.A.C. from Hyundai Financial Services based on a new 2013 Accent 5 Door GL 6-Speed Manual/Elantra GL 6-Speed Manual /Santa Fe Sport 2.4L FWD Auto with an annual finance rate of 0%/0%/0.99% for 96 months. Bi-weekly payments are $83/$92/$139. No down payment required. Cost of Borrowing is $0/$0/$1,126. Finance offers include Delivery and Destination of $1,550/$1,550/$1,760. Registration, insurance, PPSA, fees, levies, charges, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. Delivery and Destination charge includes freight, P.D.E., dealer admin fees and a full tank of gas. Financing example: 2013 Elantra GL 6-Speed Manual for $19,149 (includes $750 price adjustment) at 0% per annum equals $92 bi-weekly for 96 months for a total obligation of $19,149. Cash price is $19,149. Cost of Borrowing is $0. Example price includes Delivery and Destination of $1,550 Registration, insurance, PPSA, fees, levies, charges, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. !Fuel consumption for 2013 Accent 5 Door GL 6-Speed Manual (HWY 5.3L/100KM; City 7.1L/100KM)/Elantra GL 6-Speed Manual (HWY 5.2L/100KM; City 7.1L/100KM/Santa Fe Sport 2.4L FWD Auto (HWY 6.7L/100KM, City 10.1L/100KM) are based on Energuide. Actual fuel efficiency may vary based on driving conditions and the addition of certain vehicle accessories. Fuel economy figures are used for comparison purposes only. "Price of models shown: 2013 Accent 5 Door GLS 6-Speed Manual/Elantra Limited /Santa Fe Sport 2.0T Limited AWD are $19,249/$24,849/$40,259. Prices include Delivery and Destination charges of $1,550/$1,550/$1,760. Registration, insurance, PPSA, fees, levies, charges, license fees and all applicable taxes are excluded. ΩPrice adjustments are calculated against the vehicle’s starting price. Price adjustments of up to $200/$750/$500 available on 2013 Accent 5 Door GL 6-Speed Manual/Elantra GL 6-Speed Manual/Santa Fe Sport 2.4L FWD Auto. Price adjustments applied before taxes. Offer cannot be combined or used in conjunction with any other available offers. Offer is non-transferable and cannot be assigned. No vehicle trade-in required. †Ω"Offers available for a limited time, and subject to change or cancellation without notice. See dealer for complete details. Dealer may sell for less. Inventory is limited, dealer order may be required. ††Hyundai’s Comprehensive Limited Warranty coverage covers most vehicle components against defects in workmanship under normal use and maintenance conditions. TM

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Vancouver’s only Hyundai dealer!

445 Kingsway near 12th Ave in Vancouver

call 604-292-8188 www.DestinationHyundai.com


FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013 THE VANCOUVER COURIER

A39

kia.ca

ZERO COMPROMISE SALES EVENT

%**

FINANCING

84 UP TO

MONTHS

ON SELECT MODELS

More standard features than ever before. It’s one more way every Kia is designed without compromise.

Only at Kia Vancouver.

JWK _RZUV ZUX

NEW CAR BUYER’S PACKAGE: I TLOPVL]P SL^ Changes I TLOPVL]P H_X Washes I TLOPVL]P JLXYZXV Shuttle Service I TZQKL\N GMPP^ Nuts

All new vehicles financed, leased or purchased from today through to Nov. 30/2013 will be entered into a draw to win your purchase. See dealer for details.

WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED

*5-year/100,000 km worry-free comprehensive warranty.

Visit drivechangewithkia.ca to learn how you can help on August 21st, Drive Change Day.

Offer(s) available on select new 2014 models through participating dealers to qualified customers who take delivery by September 3, 2013. Dealers may sell or lease for less. Some conditions apply. See dealer for complete details. All offers are subject to change without notice. Vehicles shown may include optional accessories and upgrades available at extra cost. All pricing includes delivery and destination fees up to $1,665, other fees and certain levies (including tire levies) and $100 A/C charge (where applicable) and excludes licensing, registration, insurance, other taxes and variable dealer administration fees (up to $699). Other dealer charges may be required at the time of purchase. Other lease and financing options also available. **0% purchase financing is available on select new 2014 Kia models O.A.C. Terms vary by model and trim, see dealer for complete details. !Bi-weekly finance payment O.A.C. for new 2014 Forte LX MT (FO541E)/2014 Rondo LX MT (RN551E) based on a selling price of $17,502/$23,482 is $96/$129 with an APR of 0% for 84 months, with a remaining balance of $0. Bi-weekly finance payment O.A.C. for new 2014 Sorento 2.4L LX AT FWD (SR75BE) based on a selling price of $28,482 is $156 with an APR of 0% for 60 months, amortized over an 84-month period. Estimated remaining principal balance of $8,138 plus applicable taxes due at end of 60-month period. Retailer may sell for less. See dealer for full details. ‡$2,500/$1,250/$1,750 cash savings on the cash purchase of an eligible new 2014 Sorento 2.4L LX AT FWD (SR75BE)/2014 Forte LX MT (FO541E)/2014 Rondo LX MT (RN551E) from a participating dealer between August 1-September 3, 2013, is deducted from the selling price before taxes and cannot be combined with special lease and finance offers. Some conditions apply. ÿModel shown Manufacturer Suggested Retail Price for 2014 Sorento 3.3L EX AT AWD (SR75HE)/2014 Forte SX AT (FO748E)/2014 Rondo EX Luxury (RN756E) is $34,195/$26,195/$32,195. ÿHighway/city fuel consumption is based on the 2014 Sorento LX 2.4L GDI 4-cyl (A/T)/2014 Forte 1.8L MPI 4-cyl (M/T)/2014 Rondo 2.0L GDI 4-cyl (M/T). These updated estimates are based on the Government of Canada’s approved criteria and testing methods. Refer to the EnerGuide Fuel Consumption Guide. Your actual fuel consumption will vary based on driving habits and other factors. °The Bluetooth® wordmark and logo are registered trademarks and are owned by Bluetooth SIG, Inc. Information in this advertisement is believed to be accurate at the time of printing. For more information on our 5-year warranty coverage, visit kia.ca or call us at 1-877-542-2886. Kia is a trademark of Kia Motors Corporation.


EW40

THE VANCOUVER COURIER FRIDAY, AUGUST 9, 2013

WEEKLY SPECIALS 100% BC Owned and Operated Prices Effective August 8 to August 14, 2013.

We reserve the right to limit quantities. We reserve the right to correct printing errors.

Grocery Department Crofter's Organic Just Fruit Spreads

Meat Department Kettle Foods Potato Chips

assorted varieties

assorted varieties

3/9.99

SAVE

SAVE

235ml

37%

35%

product of Canada

Tropicana Pure Premium Orange Juice and Blends

25%

SAVE

33%

1.75L

+deposit +eco fee product of USA

assorted varieties

30%

6.99

1.19

SAVE

Gerolsteiner Sparkling Water

Deli Department Tre Stelle and Dofino Cheese Slices

SAVE

4.69

product of USA

2/7.00

737g product of USA

Bakery Department

Organic Sourdough Bread Levain Style

WOW!

PRICING

from 29% 5.99

SAVE

1.89L product of Canada

assorted varieties

assorted varieties

2.99

530g • reg 4.99

Oatmeal Carrot Walnut or Banana Chocolate Chip Muffins mini or regular

1.00 off regular retail price package of 6

Rice Bakery

4.69

473ml • +deposit +eco fee product of USA

Woolwich Medium Goat Cheddar or Goat Mozzarella Cheese

Baby Gourmet Organic Baby Food

5.99

3/6.99

190g • product of Canada

reg 5.29

assorted varieties

Ciao Bella Sorbet

PRICING

WOW!

PRICING

WOW!

PRICING

128ml • product of USA

BC Grown Organic Mixed Medley Cherry Tomatoes from Lina’s

WOW!

3.98 1 dry pint

product of Canada

Bulk Department

Choices’ Own Mountain Mix bags or bins

20% off regular retail price

Health Care Department

Avalon Organics CoQ10 Facial Cleansing Gel

12.99

246ml

CoQ10 RepairTM skincare supplements your skin with powerful antioxidants, Coenzyme Q10, plant extracts, essential oils and natural sugar that are known to re-energize skin cells to help improve skin elasticity .

Andalou Naturals Lavender Shampoo

7.59

340ml

Andalou Naturals Fruit Stem Cell Science improves hair follicle longevity and vitality for healthy hair from root to tip. Lavender gently refreshes, stimulating follicles and circulation.

2.00 off

regular retail price package of 3

11.99

90 tablets

• Gentle on tooth enamel. • Naturally flavoured and sweetened. • Boosts immune system function.

WOW!

Dietitians’ Top Choices

PRICING

Are you looking for healthy variety in your diet? Let the Choices Nutrition Team help. Each month in our stores you’ll find a green label on certain products, indicating our Dietitians’ Top Choices. There will be a number of items featured in every department. These Top Choices are selected by our Dietitians in hopes of helping customers navigate their way to healthier food choices. 2010 - 2013 Awards. Your loyalty has helped Choices achieve these awards. Thank you!

4/3.00

product of Canada

Big Friends® Children’s Chewable Multivitamins Mixed Fruit

Rice Blueberry or Banana Muffins

assorted varieties

product of Canada

Organic Corn on the Cob from Wild Moon Organic Farm, Armstrong, BC

each

4.29/100g

500ml

3.98lb/ 8.77kg

WOW!

PRICING

Choices’ Own ORGANIC Regular and Smoked Turkey Roasts

Mountain Pride Ice Cream

1L +deposit +eco fee product of Germany

Organic Cherries from Sproule & Sons Organic Farm, BC

145-165g • reg 6.49

assorted varieties

38%

1.79

113g • product of USA

4.99

Bob's Red Mill Brown Rice Farina Hot Cereal

Mariner Gourmet Water Crackers

2/7.00

5.99lb/ 13.21kg

3/6.99

470ml product of USA

3/9.99

33%

68g product of USA

34%

value pack

113-126g product of USA

SAVE

4.49lb/ 9.90kg

Boneless Skinless Chicken Breasts

So Delicious Frozen Coconut Desserts

375ml product of Canada

assorted varieties

28%

29%

product of Canada

Clif Bar Energy Bars

SAVE

SAVE

650g

Uncle Luke's Medium Maple Syrup

SAVE

product of USA

assorted varieties

2/6.00

25%

PRICING

220g

Robert’s American Pirate’s Booty Snacks

Danone Activia Yogurt

SAVE

WOW!

assorted varieties

3.99

from

3/6.99

Simply Natural Organic Salsa

assorted varieties

SAVE

Produce Department

BC Certified Grass Fed Forage Finished Lean Ground Beef

Look for our

WOW! PRICING

Find us on Facebook: facebook.com/ChoicesMarkets Best Organic Produce

Best Grocery Store

Follow us on Twitter: twitter.com/ChoicesMarkets

2010-2012

www.choicesmarkets.com Kitsilano

Cambie

Kerrisdale

Yaletown

Rice Bakery

South Surrey

2627 W. 16th Ave. Vancouver 604.736.0009

3493 Cambie St. Vancouver 604.875.0099

1888 W. 57th Ave. Vancouver 604.263.4600

1202 Richards St. Vancouver 604.633.2392

2595 W. 16th Ave. Vancouver 604.736.0301

3248 King George Blvd. South Surrey 604.541.3902

Choices at the Crest

8683 10th Ave. Burnaby 604.522.0936

Kelowna

Floral Shop

1937 Harvey Ave. Kelowna 250.862.4864

2615 W. 16th Vancouver 603-736-7522

Vancouver Courier August 9 2013  

Vancouver Courier August 9 2013

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