Issuu on Google+


Th., Iniurm�llon cont.mrd h�r.... rtfl�clt.an AC1:unlt' plClure I) r.anrlC lulh.ran Un.venlly .. t th� lim .. .,f pubhc.. uon How."vu ,h .. unlVn'lIY I"\'frrvn th� right to m�.. n ..,ut. han!\." n procrdur�. PLlt.dl!', ",I odAr. curn ulum. ,nil <"OiU

'oluml LIX No. -1 Bulletin f Paetfi Lutheran Univer ity, July 1979 Pubhshed si times annually by Pa lEie Lutheran University. P Bo 2008, T coma, Washington 98 47. 51.! and Class post gc paid at Tacoma. Washingt(ln.

Pacific Lutheran University does nClt discriminal n the bash. � f se , race, creed, color, nati lnill origin, age. or handicapped onclition ill Ihe education programs or activities whi h it operates, and is required by Title IX of the ducation Amendments of 1972 and the regulations adopted pursuant thereto, by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 197.t, and by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of ] 973 not to discriminate in such manner. The requirement not to discriminate in educclti n programs and activities e tenus to employment therein and to admission thereto. Inquines concerning the applicatioll of said Title IX and published regulations to this university may be referred to: L The Director of Personnel, Room A-107 Administration Building. Pacific Lutheran University, telephone 531-6900 extension 573, for matters relating to employment policies and practices, promotions. fringe benefits, training. and grievance procedures for personnel employed by the univerSity. 2. Th Executive Assistant to the Provost, Room 1\-100 Administration Building, Pacific Lutheran University, telephone 531-oQOO eXl nsion 433, for matters relating to student admissions, curriculum. and financial aid, 3. The Assistant Dean for Student Life, Room A113 Administration Building. Pacific Lutheran University, teleph ne 531-6QOO extension 443. for matlel's regarding administrative policie relating to students, student services, and the student grievance procedure. 4. Or the Director of the Office of Civil Rights, Department of Health. Education and Welfare, Washington, D.C. Inquirie I: n erning the application of aid 5e lIOn 504 of th Rehabilitation Act may be referred to: The Registrar, Room A-J02 Administration Bldg., Pacific lutheran University, telephone 531-6QOO e. tension 213. Pacific Lutheran University complies WJth the Family Education Rights and Privacy A t of 1 974.


Directory

PA CIFIC LUT HE R A N UNIVE R SITY Taco ma, Washington 9 844 7

(206) 531-6900

The uni ersity is located at South 1 2 1 s1 Street an<iParkAvenue in s u burban Parkland. Office h our s are from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday th ro u g h F riday . Most offices are closed for c ha pel on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 10:00 to

rriday' during June, July, and

ugust all offices clost:! at 12

10:30 a.m. during the school year, and on noon. The uni �r�ity also observes all legal holi day s .

The Uni v e rSity Center maintains an information desk (I' tension 401) which is open d i1y u n til 10 p.m. (11 p.m. on FrIday and Saturday). Visitors are welcome at any time. Special arrangements for tours and appointments may be made through the admissions office

227) or the university

r lations of fi c e

(extension

(extension 336).

F O R lNFORMA T I ON ABO UT:

C O N T A C T TH E O F F I C E O F:

General i n teres ts of the u n iversity, ch urch rel a tio ns , and c omm u n i ty relation s

THE P R E SIDENT

Academic poli c ie s and programs, facu l t y appoin t­ men ts, c u rricu l um developmen t , academic advising a n d assis t a nce, and foreig n s t udy

T H E PROVOST Colleg e of Arls alld Sciellces Divisiorl of DiuisiOlI of

Humanilies Nalural Sciences

DiuisiMI of Social Scimas School of Busilless Adminislration School of EduCillion School of Fine

A rls

School of Nursing School of Physical EducaliMI

General i nformation, adm i ssion of students, publica­ tions for pros pective s t udents, freshme n class regis tration, and advanced placement

THE D E AN OF A DM I S S IONS

Transcripts o f records, sched u l es, reg i stra t io n, and tran s fer s tudents

THE R E G I ST R A R OR TH E T R A NSFER C O O R DINATOR

Financial assi tance, scholarships, and l oan s

TH E D I RECTOR OF FINANC I A L AID

Financial

m a na ge m e n t

and ad m i n is trative services

T H E VICE P R E S I D ENT - FINANCE AND OPE RATIONS

Fees and p a y m e n t p l ans

TH E MANAG E R OF STUDENT A C C O UNTS

Campus parki ng and se cu ri ty

T H E C HI E F OF SEC U R IT Y

Residence h alls, counseli ng and tes t i ng, health services, min rity a f f airs, foreign students, and extra urricular activi t ies

T H E V I C E P R E S I DENT F O R STUDENT L I F E

G i fts,

be q u e s ts,

grants,

and

the a n n u a l

fund

T H E VI C E P R E S I DENT FOR DEVELOPMENT

W o rk - study oppor t u n it ies, s t u d e n t emp l o y m e n t, and career op t ions

T H E DIRE C TO R OF CAREE R PLANNING AND PLACEMENT

Graduate programs a nd s ummer s e ssi o n s

TH E DEAN OF G R A D U A T E AN D S UMMER STU DI E S

Continuing edu cati on oppo r t u nities

T H E DIRECTOR OF C ONTINUING E D U C A TION

Alumni activi ties

T H E D I RE C TOR OF THE A L UMNI A S SOClA TION

Wor s h i p s e rvices and religiOUS li f e a t the u niversi ty

THE UNIVE RSITY PASTO R S

C O R R E S PON D E N C E DIRE CTORY 1


Contents Correspondence Directory 1

Communication Arts Earth Sciences

Academic Calendars Objectives

7

Admission

9

English 12

History

Student Life

18

21

Academic Structure Majors/Minors

Academic Procedures College of Arts and Sciences Departments and Schools

Art

30

Biology

22 24

Chemistry

68 72 73 76

Mathematics and Computer Science

79

Modern and Classical Languages 84 Music

88 94

Philosophy

Business Administration 42

37

53

Integrated Studies

Nursing 33

50

55

Fine Arts

16

Advising

Economics Education

Financial Aid Costs

4 & 5

46

98

Physical Education

102


Physics and - Engineering

106

'-- Political Science Psychology Religion

Pre-professional Programs 136 Health Sciences

113

Cross-Disciplinary Career Programs 138

119

Environmental Studies

Sociology and Anthropology

Public Affairs

122

Lay Church Worker Program

127

Board of Regents

Statistics Program

129

Graduate Studies

131

'- Affiliate Resources

132

CHOICE

133

Classics

134

Scandinavian Area Studjes Foreign Area Studies Legal Studies Center for the Study of Public Policy

-

The Faculty Faculty Associates

144

Part-time Lecturers

Special Programs

Jazz

Administrative Offices 142

Committees

KPLU-FM

Study Abroad

140

Professors Emeriti

W SCEE

_

Theological Studies Air Force ROTC

116

Social Work

Pre-Law

The Collegium

152

Campus Guide

154

Index

156

Application Form

159


Acadetnic Ca endar 1979-80 SUMMER SESSI ON 1979 ... .. . . Classes begin, 8:00 a.m. Mo nday, June 18 . Wednesday, July 4 . ... ..Independence Day holiday .

.

.

.

Friday, August 17 Friday, August 17

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.. ..... .

....

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.Summer Session closes .

Commencement

FALL SEMESTER 1979 Friday, September 7 to Monday, September 10 Tuesday, September 11 .

Friday, October 26

.

.

.. . ... Orientation and registration .

.

.

... . ...Classes begin, 8:00 a.m. . . .. .. Mid-semester break .

.

.

.

.

.

Wednesday, November 21 ... ...Thanksgiving recess begins, 12:50 p�m. .

Monday, November 26 Friday, December 14 .

.

.

.

.

.

.

... . Thanksgiving recess ends, 8:00 a.m. .

.

.... ...Classes end, 6:00 p.m. .

Monday, December 17 to Friday, December 21

.

.... ... .

.

.

.

Final examinations

Friday, December 21 . . .. .. . Semester ends after last exam .

.

.

.

.

INTERIM 1980 Monday, January 7

..

.

Friday, February 1 ..

.

.

.

.

.

.

.... Begins

.

.

. . . .

.

.

.

.

.

.

Ends

SPRING S E MESTE R 1980 Tuesday, February 5 . .

.

.

.

Wednesday, February 6

.

.

.

. .. .Registration .

.

.. .. .

.

.

.

Classes begin, 8:00 a.m.

Monday, February 18 . . .. Washington's Birthday holiday Friday, March 28 ...............Easter recess begins, 6:00 p.m. .

Monday, April 7 Friday, May 16

.

.

...

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.. ..... .. .

.

.

.

.

.. ..Easter recess ends, 4:00 p.m. .

.

.

.

.

.Classes end, 6:00 p.m.

Monday, May 19 to Friday, May 23

.

.

.

Friday, May 23 .. Sunday, May 25 .

.

4

C ALENDAR 1979-80

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. .

..

.

.

. . .

.

.

.

.

final examinations

. . . Semester ends after last exam . .... ...Worship service and commencement .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.


Acadetn 路 c Calendar

1980-81

SUMMER SESSION 1980 Monday, June 23 .....

.

.... Friday, July 4 Friday, August 2 2 .. .. .

.

.

.

.

.

Friday, August 2 2

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

... .Classes begin, 8:00 a.m. .

.......Independence Day holiday .

...

.

.

.Summer Session closes

.. . ....Commencement .

.

FALL SEMESTER 1980 Friday, September 5 to Monday, September 8

.

Tuesday, September 9 Friday, October 24

.

.

...

.

.

.

.

.

.

. . Orientation and registration

.. ..

.

.

.

.

.

.

Wednesday, November 26 ... Monday, De ember 1

.

Friday, December 12 .

.

. .

.

.

Monday, December 15 to Friday, December 19 . Friday, December 1 9

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. .. .

.

..

.

.

.

.

.

.

Classes begin, 8:00 a.m.

.Mid-semester break .Thanksgiving recess begins, 12:50 p.m. .Thanksgiving recess ends, 8:00 a.m.

..Classes end, 6:00 p.m.

... ...Final examinations .

. . .

.

.

.

...Semester ends after last exam

INTE R I M 1981 .

Monday, January 5 Friday, January 30

.

.

.

. .. .

.

.

.... ..Begins .

.

.

.

... Ends .

SPRING SEM ESTE R 1981 Tuesday, February 3

.

.

.

. .... .

Wednesday, February 4 .

.

.

.

.

..Registration

..... CLasses begin, 8:00 a.m. .

Monday, February 16 ....... ....Washington's Birthday holiday Friday, April 10

.

.

.

.

Monday, April 20 --

Friday, May 15

.

.

.

.

....... ....Easter recess begins, 6:00 p.m. .

..

.

.

Monday, May 18 to Friday, May 22 .... .

Friday, May 22 Sunday, May 24

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. ... ...Easter recess ends, 4:00 p.m. .

.

.

.. .

.

.. ...

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Classes end, 6:00 p.m.

. .......Final examinations .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.... .. Semester ends after last exam ... . Worship service and commencement .

.

.

.

.

.

CALENDAR 198 0-81

5


Objectives of t e Un ·versity Pacific L u t hera n Universi ty, b o r n of the Refor m a t i o n spirit,

maintainS the p ri vile ge of exploration and learning in all areas

<-

of t he arts, scie n c es, and religion. The basic concern o f Ma rti n Luther was relig i o u s , but his reje t i on of ch urch t rad i t ion as primary a uth o r i ty , a n d his own free search for re li gi o u s t r u th, s erve d in e ffec t to liberate the mode rn mind in its que s t for all t ru th. The tot a l i mp a c t of Luthe r's stand has permanently shaped the m der n world and h el ped pr ov i de the modern u n iversity with its basic methodology. Pacific L l . t h eran Uni versity is a c o m m u n i t y of profe S S i ng Ch ris ti n scholars ded ica ted to a philoso p h y of liberal educat i on . Th e m<ljor go al s o f the i n s t i t u tion a re to i n c u l c a t e a respect for lea rn in g and truth, to f ree the mind from the c o n f i n e m e n t s of ignorance and p rej udic e, to organize the powers o f clear t houg ht and expressio n, to preserve and extend k now l ed ge , t o help men and wo men achieve professional compe te nce , a n d to establish lifelong habits o f s tudy, reflection, a n d 1 a rn i ng . Th rough an e m phas i s on the libe ra ti n g arts, the University seeks to deve lop creative, re fl e c t i e, a n d respon sible pe r s ons . At the same time, the acq ui siti on of sp cialized i n formation and te ch n ica l skill is recognized as a condition of su cc ess f u l i nvolveme n t i n t h e m dern world. The University seeks to devel o p the valuiltive and spir i t ua l capacities of the s t ud e n ts a n d to acquaint them hon s t l y with rival cla i m s to t h e true a nd the good. rt e n OUTages the pursuit of r i c h a n d e n n obling experiences and the development of sign if i ca n t person hood t h r ou gh an appreciation of hum ani ty 's intellectual, artistic, cultUIai. and n a tural s u rr o u n di ngs . The University affirms its fundamental obligation to con fron t liberally educa ted me n and women with th challenges of Christ ian f a i t h and to i n s til l in them a tru e sense of vocation. By pr o v idi ng a rich variety of s od a l experien ce s , Pacific Lutheran Un i v e rs i ty se eks to develop in t h e s t udent a joy i n ab u n dan t living, a feeling for t h e welfare and pe r s o n al integrity of others, good ta s t e, and a se nse of s oc i a l propriety and adeq u a c y . Distinguishing between p e r s o n a l Ch risti a n et h i cs a n d norma l social controls, t h e U n ive rSi t y adopts only such rul es 3S seem necessary for the welfare of the edu c a t i o n a l community. The physical development o f s t ude n ts is rega rded as a n integral part of t h eir l i b e ral f'ducation. H e n c e t h e Unive rsity encourages parti ipation in physical activities a nd respect for hea lt h n d fi t n e ss. ProfesSing con�ern for h u ma n nature in i ts entirety, the faculty of th U n iversity e nc o u ragf's wholesome development of Ch ri s t i a n fai t h and l i fe by p rovidi n g opportunities for worship and medit a t i o n , offering syst e m a tic s t udi e s of religion and encouraging free in estigat ion a n d discussion o f basic re l i g i ous questions. The Un iv e r s it y believes the essence of C hr i s t i a n i t y to be personal f a i t h in God as Creator and Rede e m e r , and it believes that such faith born of the Holy Spirit g e n er a t es integrallve power ca pa bl e of guiding h u m a n bei ngs to i l lu m i n a t i n g perspectives and wo rt h y p u rposes . The U n i v e r s i ty community co n fes ses the faith that the u l t i m a t e m a n i n g and purposes of h u m a n life a r e to be di s c ov ered in t h e person and work of Jesus C h rist.

As an educa t i o n a l a r m o f the Ch u r h, Pacific Lutheran Uni ersity provides a lo cus for the fru i t f u l in terplay o f

C h ristian fa i t h a n d a l l o f h u ma n l e a r n i n g and c ul t u re, a n d a s s u c h h olds i t a re s p o n si b ili ty to disc over , e x pl o r e, and d eve lop ne w fron tie r s . BelievIng t h a t a l l t r u t h is God's trut h, lh U ni ve r s i t y, in achi ev i ng its educa tional a n d s p i r i t u a l g als, m a i n ta i n s the right and in deed t h e ob liga ti on of fa c u l ty and s t udents to engage i n n u n b iased search for truth in all realms.

H[STORY

Pacific Lutheran University was founded i n 1890 by m e n and women of the L u t h e ra n C h u rch in t h e Northwest, a n d by t he Reverend B j u g H ars t ad in pa rt ic u l a r . T h e i r pu rpose wa s t o e s tablis h a n institu tion i n w h i c h their people co ul d b e e d u a ted. Educa tion was a venera ted part of the Sc an din a via n and Ger m a n t raditions from w h ich t h e s e pioneers c a m e . The i n s tit ution opened as Paci fic Lutheran A ade my. G rowing in stat u re, PLA bec a m e a j u n i o r college i n 1 9 21. Te n yea rs la ter, it was orga n ized into a t h r e e - year n o r m a l school which became a co lle ge o f education i n 1939. A f te r 1941, i t expanded a s Pacific L u t h e ra n College until it was reorgan ized as a u n i ver si ty in 1960, r e fl e c t i n g the gr o w t h of both i t s professional schools and liberal a r t s cor e .

ACCRE DITATION

Pacific L u t h e r a n University is fully ac cr edi ted b y the Northwest Associa tion of Sc hools a n d Colleges a s a fo ur - yea r inst i t u tion of higher education a nd by t h e Natio n a l Council for the Accreditation of Teach e r Educa t i on for the preparation of eleme n t a ry and secondary te ac h er s , princi pals a n d g uidance counselors with the rna t r's degree a s the hi g h es t degree appro I'd. The u n i v e rs i ty is a lso approved by t he A m e rican Chemi c a l Society. The School of N ur s in g is a cc redi ted by t h e at ion al League f o r Nursing. The School of B u si n e ss Adm i nistratio n is a ccr ed i t e d by the A merican As s e m b ly of Co l l eg i a te Schools of B us i ness. The Social Work Progra m is a ccred it ed by the Co u n ci l o n Social Work Education at t h e ba c cal a u re at e level. The Depa rtm e n t f Musi c is accredited by t h e National Association o f Schools of M usic.

INSTITUTIONA L MEM BERSHIPS

The U n iversity is a m e m ber of: Am rican Association of Higher E duca t i on A m ri c a n Council on Educa t i o n Association of A m e ri ca n Colleges Indepe nde n t Colleges of Wash i ng ton, Inco r po r at ed L u t h eran Edu at i o na l Conference of North America Nat ional Associa tion of S u m m er Schools Was h i ngt on Friends of Higher Ed uc a t ion Wes tern Association of G rad ua te Schools Wes tern I n terstate Commission for Higher Education

OBJECTIVES

7


S U M ME R SESSION

G ROUNDS

Located in suburban Parkland, PL U has a picturesque 126-acre

An ex.tensive summer school curriculum, of the same quahty as

mpus, truly representative of the natural grandeur of the Pacific

that offered during the regular academic year, is available to all

Northwest.

qualified persons. In addition, summer session typically is a time

ENROLLMENT

cover a brOJd range of contemporary issues and perspectives in

when the faculty offers innovati ve, experimental courses which

2,658 full-tIme students

many fields. The summer session consists of two fourand one-half

b90 part-time students

week t rms teachers

J 96 full-time faculty

special

A completeS"""",, St'SSiOlI Catalog. outlining the curriculum as well 4-J-4- calendar

which consis ts of two fourteen-week semesters bridged by a four­ week interim period . Course credit is computed by hours. The majority of c urse

are

for 4 hours. Each undergraduate degree candidate is

expected to complete 128 hours with an overall grade point average f 2.00. Degree requirements are specifically stated in this catalog. Each student should become familiar wit h

these requirements and

prepare to meet them.

INTERIM The int rim provides time during the month of January for fo�u5ed, creative study in a non-traditional environment. It allows both faculty and students to inquire into areas outside the regular cur riculum, to develop nl'w m thods of teaching and learning, and to enhance their imaginative and creative talents. The study options are v a rious, Including foreign study, interd partmental on-campus

programs,

and

exchange

programs with other institutions. Special publications highlight

the Interim program.

LA TE AFTERNOON AND E VENING CLASSES

To provide for the profess ional growth and cultural enrichment

f persons un.lble to take a full-time cullege course, the university onducts late-afternoon and evening classes. In addition to a wide arts and sciences, there

re specialized

and graduate courses for teachers, administrators and persons in business and industry.

8

and

prepared for college study.

In 1969, Pacific Lutheran University adopted th

variety of offerings in th

credentials

Transient students who enroll for the summer session need only

ACAD E M I C PROG RAM

other

seeking

submit a letter of academic standing or give other evidence of being

13.6: 1

numerous

administrators

desiring special studies offered by the schools and departments.

STUDENT IFACUl T Y RATJO

study,

and

courses, freshmen desiring to initiate college study, and others

64 part-time faculty

offered

and begins in the middle of June. Designed for

undergraduates and graduate students alike, the program serves

fAC ULTY

GENERAL INFORMATION

as

pecial institutes, workshops and seminars, is printed each

spring and is a vailable from the Dean of the Summer Session at the un iversity.


Admission It is s tron Iy re�o mmended, but not required, that app licants hig h school which includes: E nglis h, 3-4 years ; mathematics, 2 years (p referably alge br a and geomet ry ) ;

complete a program in

social scie nces, 2 ye a rs ; one foreign l a nguage, 2 years; labo ratory sciences, 2 years; electives, 3 yea rs selected from above areas but also su c h courses as speech, deba t e , typing and mus ic. An additio nal l-wO yea rs of bot h mathematics and for eig n language is " dv is a bl e for m an y areas in bu si n 55, education, and arts and sciences. Those

f ollow the above preparatory program WIll fi nd most curricular offerings of tne u n iversity open to t h m and may also qI.lalify for advanced pl a ce ment in some a reas . Applicants for admission are evaluated without regard to sex, who

cree.d, color. age , n a t i onal or igi n, or ha ndica p ped condit ion . there a r e no arbitrary entrance requirem en ts, a dmis sio n is selective. Applicants who present academic a nd personal traits race,

A l t houg h

which our experience indicates will e nable t h e m to succeed at the

university a nd benefit from its environm e n t will be offered admi ss ion . T h criteria considered include grade po i n t a ve rage (2.5 or abovel. cl as s rank (top half), transcript pattern, test scores, and recommendations.

Students are a d mi tt ed to eit her the fall or spring semester.

Acce pt ance

to t he fall term

carnes p nnission to att end the

previoll' 5U mmer sessions . Spring a cce pt a nce approves enroll men t

EARL Y DECISION High schou! students w h o have decided u p n PLU as their first choice may be offered admission as e a rl y as October

1 of their

senior year. Early Decision a ppl ica tio ns must b e made by Novembtr

15 o f the senior year. SA T, ACT or WPCT s c or es from the previous May or Jul y are accep table . E a rly Decisio n students are given preferent ial treatment in cam pus housing and financial aid. An Early Decision form is a va il able from t h e Admiss io n s Office. If an Early Decision is un fa v·ora ble , a student may still be conSIde re d for

regular admission.

EARL Y AD MI SSION Qua lified

students

interested

in

accelerating

thei r formal

education may be gi n work toward a degree after completion of the

junior year or first semester of the senior year of high scho l.

Exceptional students who wish to en roll before completing a ll

requir ed units i n high school must h3 ve a letter submitted by a recognized sch ool official which and gives

approves early college admissi n

ssurance that a high school di p loma will be issued after

college work. Only students high ly Ad m ission will be considered. Generally these students rank among the top s tudents in their class and present h ig h aptitude test scores. completion

of

specified

recommended for Early

in the lanuary Interim. We suggest the following a p plica tion deadlines: FilII Stmester - JU'It I; Spring Semester - January 1.

APPLICA nON PROCEDURE: ENTERING FRESHME

Student s pla nning to e nter as freshmen may submit application materials anytime after compl e tion of the junior year of high scho I Admission decisions are ma de beginning De c e mb r 1 u nless a request for Early De cision is received. C andidat es are noti fie d of their status a s soon as t hei r co mpleted ap p li cati on has been received a nd evaluated. Credentials req uired are: 1. Fo r m al A pp l Icat io n : Submit t he Uniform Ul1drrgradualr ApplieatlOll for

Admission to Fo II r- YfI" Colleges and Unit,nsities i" the State of W,,,/iingtorl. Av il. bl f rom high sc h ool counselors or the PLU

Adm i s s io ns Offi e. 2. $15.00 Applicatiol1 / Rtco rd; Fee: A $15 fee must a company your applicati on or be mailed sep a rately T h i no n - refu n d able 5 rvice f 0. d o es not apply to your acco un t. Make c hecks or money orders payable to Pacific Lu t he ran University and mail to the PLU Admissions Office. 3. Tt,"lSCrrri: The trans ript you s ub m it must include all credits

co mplet e d through your junior yea r of high school. If a d missio n is offered, an acceptable final tra nscript which indicates satis­ factory campleti n o f the seni r y ea r and attainment of a diploma must Iso be present ed. 4 . Rt(ommtndMI.",: Two recommendation, must be p r ep ared by prinCipals, counselors, past or s , or uther qualified persons. The PLU Adm is sio ns Office will s up ply t h e forms. 5. Test l<equimnFnt: All entering fresh men must subm it scores from <il/.rr th ullege Entrance Examination Board, Sch lastic AptItude Test (SAT) or the merican Coll ege Test A sses s m ent (ACT) or, for Washington State residents, the Wa hington Pre­ Colleg Test (WPCT). Reg is trati n procedures and form, are available at hi g h school cuunseling offices.

ADMISSION

9


HONO RS AT ENTRANC E

PLU confers Honors at En t ranc e to t e most h ig hl y qualified

frl'shml' n who are offered admission. Certific at s are mailed in l'arly May to high 5c h ools for presentation to r c.ipil'nts at an honor s convocation or an assembly or during their g r adua ti on ceremony itself. The g ran ting of Honors at Entrance recognizes

outsta nd i ng h igh school achievemen t and anticipates superior pe r f orman ce at the un iv e rS ity level. These awards have no monetary va lue . (See H onors Programs, page 26)

A D V ANCE D PLA C E M ENT OPPORTUNITIES 1

College

Board

&am;'lIllions:

Students

interested

in

seeking

advanced pla cem en t or c redi t toward graduation through the examination program of the College Board should direct

inquiries for sp dEic information to the de partme n t or school which offers t he aca d em ic subjec t of t hei r choice. G ene ral inqUIries about the Col l eg e Board progra m may be addressed to

the Office f Admissions. 2. Deparlmfnlal Exam inatIOns : A nu m be r of department and schools offer p lace ment examinations in order that stude nts may be advi I'd as to the leve l at which they may most ad antageously pu rs ue .3 given subject. Credit toward graduation may be given In certain ases, depending on the examination score and whether the s ubje ct matter was "01 pa r t f the course w rk by whi ch the high school diploma was earned. Again, inquiries for specific information should be directed to the de partment or school offering the pa r ticula r subj e ct.

10

ADMISSION

APPLICA nON PROC EDURE: TRANSFER STUDENTS

Students who beg n t h e i r higher educa t ion at other accredited colleges or universities are we.lcome to apply for admis s ion wi th ad v anced standin g . Candidates must have good aeadem; and personal s t a n ding at the institution last at te n de d fuji-time. I t h ou g h it does n t guarantee admission, a C+ gra de point average (2.25) in all college work attempted is required for reg u l a r admission. Test scores ma!l be r equired for ap p li cant s who have Hmited col leg e e p !"ienct'. Credentials required are: 1. Formal Appltmlion: Submit a Unifo rm Undergraduate Application with $15.00 non - refun dabl e application/records fee. 2. Tr.1n,crrpts: Official ranscripts from all previ ous c ,lIegiate insti­ t utions attended must be sent by those institutions directly to the PLU Admissions Office. Official hi h sc hool tr.nscripts of c r edits are neces sa ry if they are not listed on college transcripts. 3. CI<arana Fo rm: The Offi e of the Dean of Students at your most r cently at t end ed (full-time) institution must complete a clearance form (provided by t he PLU Admissions Office). 4. Recommendlltions: Two rec omme.ndations must be pre.pared by instructors, counselors, pastors, or oth e r qualified persons. The PL Admissions Office provides the forms.

EV AlVA nON OF C RE DITS

1. The Registrar eva lu ates all transf r r eco rd s and crea tes an

ad vis ing book le t (Gold Book) indicating completion of any core re ui remen ts and total hours accepted. I ndividu a l schools a n d departments detl!rm ine which courses satisfy maj or require­ ments. 2. Generally, college-level c ours es carrying grade "C" or above ap ply toward grad uatio n . "D" g r ad ed courses will be w ithheld un til a student ha, success f ully co mple te d one s eme st e r's work at the university. 3. A co mm u ni t y c oll ege student may transfer a ma x im u m of 6 4 semester (96 q u a rte r ! hours o f credit from the two-year institution. 4. To qu a Lify as a degree candidate. a student must take the final28 s � mes te r hours in residence.


UNACCREDITED EDUC ATION A L E XPERIENCES

I . C redi ts earned I n unacc re dited schools are not transferable at

the time of a d mis s ion . Evalua t ion and decision on such cou rses will be made after the student h a s been in atten d a n ce at the university on e seme ter. 2. The unIversity allows up to 20 sem es t er hours of USAFI c r edi t and up t 20 semester hours for military c redit, provid i n g t h e total f the two does n o t exceed 30 semester hours. 3. The u n i ver i t y does not grant c red it for c oll e ge l eve l GED tests. 4. For information n the Co l le ge Level Examination Program ( ClEP ), refer to t h e secti n on Cr,dit by &ami>l,lIiotl (p age 26).

APPUCATfON PROC EDU RE:

FORMER STUDENTS

Full-time students who have not been in at ten da nc e for one

semester or more m a y seek re admi ssi n by btaining an appli c a t i o n for re-entran e from the d missions O ff i c e unless t h e y have been approved, at the ti me o f la s t enrollment, for a Leave of Absence. Students

who have been dropped for academic or d i sciplinary

rea s on s must identify a faculty member willing to act as a sponsor and adviser if re -a dm i t t ed . Re-en ter!ng stude n t s who h a ve a t t e n de d another col lege in the mea n t ime must request that iI transcript be sent from tha t i n s t i t u t i o n dire ctiy to the Dean of

FINALIZING AN OffER OF ADMISSION 1.

Medical Rtqui"m,,,1; Before final m arrfc u l ati o n , each n e w full­ t i me unde rgradua te stu d en t (ten semester h ou rs or m o re ) must

submit a M edi ca l History and Consent Form a ccep tab le to t h e

f'LU Health Service. S t udents are n t fi n a ll y form is approved.

d m i tted u n t i l this

2. Advance Paymwt: A $75_00 Adv a nce Payment is n ecessary follow­ ing an offer of admission. This p ay m en t is the s tu d en t' s a k n o w ledge m n t o f a cce pt ance and both guarantees a place in th s t u d � n t bo d y and reserves housing On ampus if requestecl It is cred ited to the s t u dent's account and is app lt e d t o w a rd ex­ pe n ses f the first seme,ter. Fall "ppl,(,wt, o[f,r.d "dmi"io" /re{Qre Ivfay 1 IIIUst slIbmittlre p"ymtlll b� }\tfay 1. If circumsta nces ne eSoi­ tate c a n cellation of en rollm nt and the Dean of Ad miss io n s is no t i f i d in writin g befor May 1, th e $75.00 will be re f u n ded . The refund dat for I n t e ri m is December 15, and for sp rin g semester, J a n u r y 15. 3. Two Forms: A Student Perso n n e l Form and a Directory Informa­ tion/HOUSing Applica tion Form must b c o m p l e te d by "II students and returned with the ad va n ce payment.

Admissions.

APPUCA nON PROCED URE:

FOREIGN STUDENTS

Fore i gn students who a,.e q u a l i f ie d academ ically and fi n a ncia l l y

a re en ou ra ge d t o join the u n i versity co m m u nit y . Information and procedures may be obtai ned from the Dean of Admissions Or F ore ig n Student A dviser.

application

ADMISSION

11


ancial Aid R e cog n i z.in g t h at m a l lY stud e n ts w h o wan t to attend Pac ific L u the ran n iv e rsi t y w o u l d be un abl e to me t all e x p e nse , o f enrol I m " n t from pe rs ona l or f a m i l y s o u rces, t h e u n i ve r s i t y a tte m p tďż˝ to provide fin a n cia l as s i s ta n ce to a l l e l i g i b l e studen ts. A n y s t u d e n t ap p rov e d for e n rol l m en t O T curre n t l y e n rol led m a y request

financial aid. Appro x i m a tely half of the un iversity's s t u d e n t s

receive h e l p in t h e f o r m o f gift a s s ista.nce ( t h a t is, s ch ol a rs hip s , talent a w a rds. or g ra n t s ) , low interest deferred loans, o r empl oy m en t . I n m a n y c a s e s a financial a i d a w a rd wil l be a com bi n a tion o f these forms tJf a s sistance. TI, e q u a n t i t y a n d co m pos i t i on of <1f1 a wa r d is based u pon demon s tra ted financial need, a c a de m i c ac h ievemen t, te st scores, and o t he r person al t a le n ts a n d in t e res ts . Need is determined from a n a l ysis of the F i n a ncial Aid Form ( F A F ) . which is a st a te me n t o f fi na nci a l co n dit i o n p rovided b y t h e Col lege Scho l a rs h i p Se rvice ( 5 5 ) . A n a ly si s o f t he Financial Aid For m de te r mines an expected con t Tib u tion for col lege expe nses from the s t u d en t a nd p a r en ts or g ua r dia n . " Fin a n c ial Ne e d " is d e fined a s the diffe rence b e t ween total s tuden t e xpe n se s for

an

year a n d t h e e x pected p rim a r y f ac t o r i n de t e r mi n in g

aca d em i c

s t u d e n t / f a m i l y c o n t r i b u tion and i s

a

eligibility for most available a i d .

assis tan e is avail a ble to a l l q u a l i fie d s t ud e n t s of t h eir sex , ra c e . creed, color, age, natio n a l origin , or h a ndic a pped co ndition Financial

regardless

APPLICATION PROCEDURE : F r, ESHMEN A N D TRA NSFERS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5

D E ADLI N E : A l l materials must be in the Fin an c ia l Aid Office by March 1. Mail a Fi n a nC ial Aid 'Form ( FA F) to t h e Col lege Schola rship Service by F e b r u a ry 1 . B e o ffered admission b y M a rch 1 . Su b mit a wh i te PlU A p p l i c a ti on ( t ransfers on l y) . S ubmit a F in a n c i al A i d Tra nscript ( t ransfers on l y ) .

C O N TINUI N G S T U D ENTS 1 . DEA D L I NE : A l l m ate ria ls m u s t be in t h e Fina n c i a l Aid Office b y April

2

1.

CoIlege Sc holarship (CS S ) by March 1 . 3 . C om plete a w h i te P L U App l i c a tion. Applica t ion for f i n a ncial aid i s encouraged at a l l tim , b u t fa. il u re to meet the p reced in g a pp l i c a tion da tes may res u l t i n a de ni a l of aid Mail it Fi na n ci a l A i d F o r m ( F A F ) to the

Se rvice

e v e n though need i s demonstra ted . The Fin a nci a l Aid Of fice wi l l

conside r a ll a. pp l ica n ts f o r a n y awa rd f o r w h i c h t h e y m i g h t b e eli g i ble . id a w a r d s are for one yea r a n d m os t a re re n e wable , is completed on time, financial nee d c o n ti n u e s . a d s a t i s f a c t o r y a cad e m ic progress i s main t ain e d . A i d i s not a u tom a t ica l l y renewed each :ea r. provi ded

re - a p p l i c a t i o n

NOTIF I C ATION OF AWARD DECISIONS

1 . A wa rd dec isions f o r f re sh me n a n d tra n s f e r s t u d e n t s who meet t he M a rc h 1 co m pl e t i o n d a te will b e made i n Ma rc.h . and a.ct ua J n ot i f i ca t i on w i l l be m a i l e d April 1. 2. Ea rly decision s t u den t s who reques t financial assistance wi l l be se n t a ward d eci s i o n s if t h e i r pro essed FAf i s recei ved from t h e SS be t ween Ja n u ary 1 5 a n d F e b r ua r y 24 Fi n a n c ia l a i d decis i o n s for con t i n u i n g P L U studen t s a r e m a d e i n Ap ril and n otification s a r e sent o u t begi n n i n g i n M a y .

12

F I N A NCIAL A I D

V AUDA TlNG THE A I D OFFER

Aid offers m u s t be v al i d ated by re t u rning t h e s i g n ed F i na nc i a i A i d Awa rd Not ice a n d s u b mi t ting t h e $75 Advance Pay m e n t

req ui red by the universi t y . This s h o ul d be d one as soon as poss i ble but m u s t be co m p l e t ed by May 1. A p p lica n ts not returning t h e i r acceptan ce of a n award by t h e reply d a t e s pecified w i l l h a v e their awards c a n cel led . I f a n a p plicant later d.ecides to reapply, t h e applica tion will be reviewed with t h e group c u rren t l y being

p rocessed. Aid, with t h e exception of C o l l eg e Work - S t u d y , i s credi t ed to the s tu d en t's accoun t when a ll pape rw ork has been c o m p l e t e d . One - h a l f o f t h e a wa rd is dis b u rs e d each semes t e r . Pa ren ts and s tude n t s are re pon s i b le for the c h a r g es in exc es s of th e award. In some cases a i d i s a wa r d ed in excess of d i rec t u ni ve rs i t y c h arges t o h e l p w i t h living expen s e s . T h i s money will rem ain on the s t u d e n t's acco u n t u n le s s requ e s t e d by the s t u d e n t t h rough the B u s iness Office after c la s s e s have beg u n . Under fede r a l reg u la ti o n s , ad j ust men ts to an a ward package m u s t b e made i f a s tu d e n t re c eiv e s additional a ward s of aid from s o u rc e s extern al to the u n i v e r s i t y . In every c a s e , however. t h e F in a n ci a l Aid Office wi l l a t te m p t t o allow t h e s t u d en t to keep a s m u c h of t h e a wa rd p a c kag e as p os s i b l e B y t r e a tin g aid recei v ed from e x ternal S O U Tces i n this way, addit ion a l a w a rd s from t h e u n i vers i t y's resou rces can be made to o t h e r q uali fied n eedy

s tu den ts.

RIGHTS A N D R E SPONSIBi liTIES

for fi n a n cing a n ed uc a t ion a.t P L U r e s t s and their fa m ilies. In addition t o e xpected co n t ri b u tions hom p a re n t s or g u a rdian s, s tu d en ts are e x pec t ed to a ss ist by con t ri b u ting from t h e i r savings an d s u m mer earnings. Financial a s s i s tance from the u n i v e r s i ty is t h e re fore s u p ple ­ men t a r y to t h e e f forts of a s t u d e n t 's family. It is p r ovi d ed for s t u d e n t s who d e m o n s t ra t e n ee d . Add i tional r i g h t s a n d res ponsibilities of f in a nc ia l a i d recipien t s in c l ude : 1 . Sign i ng and ret u rning each fi n a n c i a l aid notice rec e i v e d . l . Dedi n i n g a t a n y t i me a n y portion o f a n a w a rd . 3. Notifying the Fin a ncial Aid Office in case of a c h a n g e in credit h o u r s a t te mpted ; a ch,a n ge i n re s i d e nce (off-ca m p u s or a t home); or receipt of ad d i tion a l ou ts id e s ch ola r sh i ps. 4 . Signi n g a d d i tio n a l documen ts in t h e Fin ancial Aid O ffi c e at t h e beg i n ning of each s e m es t er . The basic respo n s i bi l i t y

With

s t u den ts

ACADEMIC REQU IREME NTS / SATISfACTORY PROG RESS

of t h e F i n ancial Aid Office is to a l l ow s t u d en t s t o good s t and i ng a t t h t' u n i v rsity. To do lltherwise would c a u s e a severe h a r d s h i p on s t udents who m u s t devote t h eir efforts to ac hjevin g sa tlsfactor'y g r a d e s . However, no i n s t i t u tion " l g ra n ts w i l l be The policy

c o n t i n u e receiving financial assis tance as long a s t hey a re in

awarded to s t u d e n t s wit h c u m u l a t i ve grade poi n t a.ve rage s below

2 . 00. T o b e given prio r i t y for most t ypes of f i na nci a l aid, an applicant m u s t b e en r o l l e d a s a f u l l - time stude n t . For f ed eral fi n a n c i a l a i d prog ram s , a fu l l- t i me s t uden t is d e f i n e d as a n y person e nro l l ed f o r a mi n i m u m of twelve credit h ours or more per semes t e r. Most fi n a nci a l aid a t f' L U is based on a n a v e r a ge of 32 creelit hou rs for t he ..cade m ic yea r. Th is inc l u d e s t he p oss i bi l i t y of f ou r h o u rs d u r ing t h e In te ri m . Adj u s t men ts in a n a wu d may be made d u ri n g the year if an aid reci p i n t has not enrolled fo r the rtwnber of credit h o u rs s hown o n t h e fron t of the a w ard no tice. In every case, f u l l - ti m e s t u d e n t s will be g ive n prio rity f o r f in an c i al a i d .


TYPES OF A I D

UNI V E R S I TY GIFT ASSIS TA NCE U N I V E R S I TY SCHOLARSHJPS a re granted on the basis o f

al;ade m ic ach ieveme n t a n d financial n eed . To be c o n s i d e r d, a {,.slrmGn applica n t m u s t h a ve a 3 . 3 0 s econd a r y school g r ade p oi n t average . Sch olast ic ability m u s t a l s o be reflec ted in test 'core s f ro m the Sch olas tic A p tit u d e Test (SAT), or t he Ame rican Colleg T e s t (AC T), or t h e Wash ing t on Pre-College Tes t (WPCT). Tra'IS!" a nd LQn/Jrluing s t ude n t s m u s t h ave a 3. 0 cumulative grade point average to be q uali f ie d fo r f i rs t - t I m e or re n e w a l awards . P L U IS a sponsor o f Nalional Mrril SdlOlars!rip• . S tu d en ts wh e a r n s e m i fi nalist s t a nd in g are encouraged to on t a ct the F i n a ncial Aid Office for i n fo r m <l ti on conce rn i ng a P L U Merit Sc h ol a rs h i p . PRESIDENT'S SCHOLA RSHIPS of $600 a re awarded t o en t ering freshmen i n recog ni tion of olltsla trditrg a c ade m i c a h ieve­ ment in high school a n d in a n t i c i pa t i o n of s u pe r i o r perfor m a nce a t P L U T o be " ca n d ida t e , a s u de n t m ust have a high school g .p .a . of

3. 75 or higher, prese n t h igh te s t score , and b o f fer e d a d m i s sion by March 1. FinaNcial "ud is .!ol a dtterm i";IIg actor and no app l ica ti on i � re q u i red . On ly a l i m i ted n u m ber of s t u d e n ts w h o meet t he above req u I remen ts a re selected . Th� awa rd s , m de in March, are r en e wa b l e i f a 3. 3 g rad e poi n t a vera g e is main ta i n ed .

A L U M N I MERIT SCHOLARSH1PS of $ 1 , 0 0 0 ar a vailable t o excepti n a l s t uden t s. Prefe re nce w i l l be gIven to sons and d a ughters of FLU a l u m n i . To be e l i g i b l e e n te r i n g f r e s h m e n m u s t have a cu m u la ti ve h i g h seh 0 1 g . p . a . of 3 . 5 or h igh e r . Non ­ f resh men a nd re ne w a l a p p li ca n t s m us t have a mini m u m collegiate g.p.a. f 3.3 to be eligible. Financial need is not a d e t e r m in ing fac:tor and a special a p p l i ca t i o n is re q u ired . M e r i t sc h ol a rs h ip app l ic a n ts must be o f f er ed a d m i s sion to t h e university a n d m u st s u b m i t appli a t i on s by M a rc h 1 o f t he yea r p rece di n g t h e i r en r ol l m e n t . FACULTY MERIT SCHOLARSHIPS (24 sch ola rsh ips ) are ava il a b le to those stude n t s who have co m pleted a m m i m u m of 4 5 se meste r h o u r s a t P L U . T h e $ 5 0 0 sch olarship i s n o t b as ed on need. A reci p i nt cannot be receiv i n g any o t h e r meri t awards of $500 o r m ore . A faculty c o m m i t tee will eva l u a t e recipient s on th bas i s o f t h e i r scholast ic a c h i e v e ment, s p ec i f i c tale nts, a nd u n usua l service to the com m u n i t y or the u n ive r si y . A r R FORCE ROTC SCHOLARSHIP reCipi e n ts ( 4-year, 3-year, or 2- year ) m a y " t t e n d Pac if ic Lutheran U n i v e rs i t y . AF R O TC da ss!'s a re held at t he Aerospace Studie s D part m e n t on t h e Un l e f 5 i t y of Puge t Sound c a m pu s, about 20 m i nutes d n v i n g t i m e f ro m the P l U ca m p us TA LENT AWARDS a re granted t s t u d e n t s with f i n a ncial need w ho have ex cep t i ona l " b i li t y in t h e fields of f oren . i s, dra m a, a r t , music, or a th l e t i cs . The c a n d i d a te mu t make arra ngem n t s with t he sc h ool or dep a r t m en t concerned for an a u d i t i o n a n d /or a pe rs on a l i n t erview. In some c a s e s a tape or film will be satisfactory. A recommendati n from a faculty me m b e r must be on fi le before a s t ude n t is consi ered for a Ta l e n t A w;! rd . UNI VERSITY G R A N TS a re awarded in com bi n a t i o n w i t h lo a n s and e m p l o y me n t to students w i th financial need who do not q ualify for 5ch larshi p a ss i st an c e . Mm�rity Grants a re available f r q uali fied m i no ri t y s t udent s i n a d d i t i o n to �JI o t h e r t ypes of f i na n c ia l aid described. For,,;g n St ud"" Grn,, " ate re s t- rieted to t h ose forei g n s t ud e n t'S who have provided t h e i r own resources ror a t lea t one ye a r o f a ttenda nce. Grants usually a m o u n t to le ss than o ne-t h i rd of t he cos t of a tt e n d a n c e .

MfNISTER'S DEPENDENT GRANTS a r e available to un­ ma rried, depen d e n t c h i ld re n of a r<gularly orda;"ed. a ti vt m i n i s t e r o r m i s s ionary o f a Chri s t ia n church. The m i nister's p r in c i pa l e m pl oy m e n t a n d primary source o f income m u s t b a re su l t o f ch u rch work. T h e m i n i m u m a n n u a l g r a n t is $ 2 0 0 b u t t his m a y be i n c re a s ed to $ 700 i f the eligible s t u de nt has a demon s t rated fi n ancial nee as d e t e r m i n e d from the Financial Aid Form. I f a FAF is s u b m i t t ed n sp ec i a l MDG a p plication is r e q u i re d . J u n e 1 i s t he de dli n e for requesting this gra n t . Req u es ts re c e i v ed t hereafter will be h o no red only as b ud g e te d f u n d s per m it . SPEC I A L GRANTS may be give n to d e p e n de n t s of P L U f ac u l t y and s t a f f . Ma r r ied c hi l d ren are n o t e l i g i b l e . T h e a m o u n t wil l be d e te r m i n ed at t h e t i m e f r egis t ra t io n . An application m u s t b(, s u b m i t t ed to t h e Personnel Office. A L U M N I DEPENDENT GRANTS of $ 1 00 for spnn g semester a re g iven to fulJ- ti me s t uden ts w ho s e p a r e n t ( s ) a t te nded PlU (PLC) for t w o se mes t ers or more . To be l iglble the a l u m n i depe n de n t m u s t h av e been a fu l l - time student t h e previous fall se m e s te r and com ple t e a n a p p l i c a t i o n in the Financial Aid Off ice by

Decem ber 1.

GRANTS i n the a m o u n t of $50 p e r semeste r s h a l l b e gIven to

each o f two o r more ful l -t i m e s t ude n t s from the same fa m i l y a t te n d i n g

P L U S i m u l t an e ous ly , prOVided t h a t t he m � in support for

both is f r m p a ren t s and provided they have not rec e i ve d any other univer i t y g ra n t o r award. MMr i e d s t udents a r e a l so eUgible w h e n oth a re f u l l - t im e s tudents. An application m u s t b f i l ed i n t h e

F i n a n ial Ai d Office at r eg i s t ra t io n or i m m edi a te l y t h erea fte r . The

g ra n t will be c re d i ted a f t e r eligibility is es ta bl i shed . In a d d i t i o n t o i t s o w n s ho l a rs h i p f u n d s , t h e u ni verS i ty ha

at its

d i spos a l the following res t rict e d funds, generally a w a rd ed to t h o s e students who complete the reg ular applica t i o n a n d who h a ve f in ished t h e i r freshman year: Aid A!>!lOLlIHioo fo r Lu t h\' fd n:t- S,holdr.ohip� A l l e n m o r � Fouod31ion 5 h o l arshi p

A l t ru!ld C l u b . T(lc�)m.a C h a p te r S c h n l . u > h i p l u m n i Scholo.l�hip F u n d A m e . n 3 M A.!ii � o()<ltiCln o f U n i v e r ':> l t y Wom n Sc h o l a r s h i p A m eTi eJ n L l u h e r d n C h u n:h - No rt h PaCI fic District Sc h o l a r s h i p Fiort'nce Spi n n t:' r Andel"lO n Mt:'mori31 SI.: h o l a r s h i p R u t h A ne n JOn Scholarship Ada K i l a n A n n i s Schol.l u h i p 1\s$('I("J a ted Crocers Scholarship

Funk S. B,Ji,:.er Sd101.ushJP Helton lift Bdl ScholiHShip B. E R.G. M i n o n t

Sc.holar;hi p

BlndN Memorh, J Scholarship

forunn B re i l(l nd Stholarshlp Fund

O.

Brown F u n d

D r . " n d M r s . W.B. B u r n s F u n d BurLl.lH Memo ri al Sc.hol.Hshir C<illi o r n i 3 Scholjluhlp �eralitJn - Scholarship h,r S'·.:IlbeJ.rers �i'lrl alk Me-mori<ll Scholarship C hene)" Foundation Edu 3 t i o o ., 1 5rholars h l p C h e vro n Me r i t Schol., ... C tu o - Li a n , --how Sc h(\1 .tr5 h i p C o rn �rC'o Sth o l.trllIh i p ldo A. D.y" F u nd

R� P.. rcht-r E l h n giO'\ Sc h o iM:l h l P Lel f En d", {, n Sc hoi d rwh l P Fd c u l t y Mt"m orial S..: h l) l il r s h l p FI.md Filhh l. ut h rsT.;I n C h llr h o f Portland S (- h o l llrship F u n d Heten F rolt Scno ll'lr!loh l p Rebll;'cc:", 5chu('nfE:'ld Gdrdner .,t n d IOleph G'lrdner 5ch l.ars h l p C . rltol l t'r P u y.a l l up .) II�::; Ch..l mb�r of C o m m�rl.� Schololt!o�llP 01...1 £ Hah-llr,rn SchlJl.. H !lo h l p

F IN A N C IA L A l D

13


W J--!

H n rd t kl!' �t·min.ary S t u d-: n t

Sch (', l a r "h l p F u n d

V l t' Hu rlt'y Sh.ldt-r'l t N U I:it' Sch o l ;}Ts-h i p F u n d

1erry /nvm S htJ l.J f'5h l P joh n 5' o nJl a r "on Sc h o l a r s h i p [{flY' K . l n K i l i a n M e m o r i a l F u n d ,\1,\Y m K lewe n o e m o r i ,l \ S ( h ( } l a r s h l p 1...1Idlt, L) f K. iv,·,l n i.. A w a r d Cn lll m : 1 Erwil1 T K o ( h A n n ulI l A\'\.�.HJ. .. · u J E l d e r Schol a r s h i p in Medical Te( h nolo�)' Dr... L l r$.O n, W iLk�. Rebe' tg e r ,, l. .. 1u Jv l g J n d Clara L a rson 5,�hol�H�h l p M r a n d M r s \"'l . H i l d i n g u n d bt:rg tn do\ved Schola r s h i p

Lu1r C l u b

S d'lnIH>hip

Lu thf r,w B t' o t h e r h ooo Lega.l R!'serl.'e l i f t· I n s u ra n ce Co. S ch o l.H3 h 1 r fne I"b rd'l i n t"k MtTI'Wfidl Sc h o l < Hsttip F u n d M u P hi E p-s l lo n . Tacorn..l Pro f(':)sioIl.)1 C h a p t e r . S d l 0 1 < H S' h i p fred 0 . M\l�Yl.,dH�r a ["ltl A�$'oc m t e$ - � h J.kt')·'!i P i l Z .! P a r l l 1 r � S ( h o la r � h i p M L JTld M " e u s H . N le n l a n Me.morJ.11 5 ( h Q I .1 r � h i p

M" rga(�t I\:j !ll ta d M.t! m o na l Scholar � h i p St!h T'1!! ,m d M.!gn u Nod l v t'd t S c h o l A rsh i p ROfi: t" r 1'.1N, 1 Mf1> m OrHI I S c h o l a rsh I p BIanchI: rnt1u m Sr h l.l 1 .n sh ip [' L U Fac.ui l v WIV(' '!' .sc ho l cl rs h i p [lo rtl.: n J A rc,", Al u mn i S( h o l .:lr�h i p W, l m.: t, of R o l .uv SchoLH':i n tp Du. Rich .J r d ,HH.! W 81 t � r Sd, wl n d t S c h o b r � h lJ) S l q l.lela n d Y('lJ l h Sc: h o I J f $h lp (N o r t h jJanfi( D i s t r i ct l u t h t! r Lt'"p, ut� ) S k i n n e r i"Qundlltia.n S c h o l u s h i p � TT1 1 t h E n drl'.'I! mr n t Sdl o b r Jih i p F u n d G u y S te n nf>rndJel'l Mt'I1HlrJa! Rl!v . .}.ntl M.rt H� l v o r T h Q r m oJ §i�. Hd S<.: h o l a ; s h l p (,:('IYI1 5 . Torve fl d SdH1lar.!·up TlJ be rru l Oii s r\.sSOC 18 t 10 n of Pit;'rce C o u n t y S c h o l .. H s h lJ:l E i len Vai l le Ml! m l l r i .1 1 Sld1ll I.H�hlp 1 1 IJ fl re r �1f' m o nil t O l !llit h Me ,t1 0 fl,iI I t lpd v l'; l"\ r t h lJ r Mt.:fl1 tlrial u\1 n .lfd A H ru.nne r Memorlill Mllrl.. Soli.lOliln Nh: m o n ,l l I r C:: � r I5 r n) m Sr h l lJ ari h l p L-L-,uis .1m! u .'on l.! i.!rnp S C'h n );H � h l p Cordon Pe .l rson Mt' m O r l 4 i W./,I lIIh l n g t o n 5 1 .:1 t l' AV t01t'l(lblk Decl l� rs Sdl o l J r ':l h l p W.aiJ. ll I n r; t o n COl1jl\ res ,> o � P. Ht= l l t s , Te;Jch t' n, a n d S r ud e n h

C O VE R NM ENTA L G R A NTS

THE

BASIC

E DUeA nONAL OPPORTUNITY G RANT PROGRAM (BEOG) i s a fede ral p ro g r a m d e s i g n e d t o provide t h e " f o u nd a t i o n " for a f i n a n c i a l a i d p a c k a g e . It is i n t e n d e d for s t ude n t s w i t h h i g h fi n a n c i a l n e e d . W h e n c o m p l e t i n g t h e F i n a n c i a l A i d F o r m ( F A ) ;' p p l i c a n t s s h o u l d i n d i c a t e t h a t t h e i n fo r m a t i o n i s t o be u s e d f o r d e t e r m i n i n g t h e i r e l i g i b i l i t y for t h e B E OG b y c h e c k i n g t h e a pp r o p r i a t e b o x . I f t h e S t ud e n t E l i g i b i l i t y Repo r t ( S E R ) y o u r e c e i v e

i n d i cat es el ig, b t l i t y , a l l t h ree c o p i e s s h o u ld be s e n t t o t h e F i n a n c i a l

A i d OFfice . Bus ic G r a n t s a r e a v a i la b l e i n a m o u n t s u p to $ 1 , 800 p e r yea r .

S U PPLEMEN TAL E D UC A TI O N AL OPPORTUNITY GRANTS (SEOG ) a re a v a i l a b l e to s t u d e n t s who h a v e e x c e p t i o n a l f i n a n c i a l n e e d . G r a n t s range f r o m $ 2 0 0 t o $ 1 , 50 0 p e r y e a r and

a

ma xi m u m o f $ 2 , 5 0 0 per y e a r are

$500 per acad e m ic year. S t u d e n ts

a re el igi ble i f accepted by o r

e n rolled i n t h e School of N u r s i n g ( n o t p re - n u rs i n g prog r a m s ) . F i n a n c i a l need m u s t b e d e m o n s t ra t e d .

LAW ENFORCEMENT EDUC ATION PROGRAM (lEEP) -

Loan

Grant and

-

L E E ? is a f e d e r a l p r o g r a m for f u l l - t i m e i n ­

s e r v i c e l a w e n force m e n t pe r s o n n e l .

No F i n a n c i a l A i d F o r m i s

r e q u i red . G r a n t s ran ' e u p t o $ 4 0 0 p e r s e m e s t e r f o r t u i t io n a n d b o o k s . Loa n s c o v e r t h e cost o f t u i t i on a n d m a n d a t o r y f e e s to a m a x i m u m of $2, 200 p e r y e a r .

STUDENT E M P L O Y M E N T T h e r e a re e m pk>ym en t oppor t u n i t i e s o n c a m p u s a n d i n t h e c o m m u n i t y t h a t can h e lp s t u d e n t s m e e t col l e g e e x p e n s e s . P r i o r i t y for p l a c e m e n t i s g i v e n to t h o s e s t u d e n t s w h o h a v e d e m o n s t ra ted f i n a n c i a l need a n d h a ve b e e n a w a rd e d

a work- s t u d y e l i g i b i l i t y .

O v e r 8 0 0 s t u d e n t s work on c a m p u s e a c h y e a r . Th e u n i v e r s i t y's ,1 n n u a l s t u d e n t p a y r o l l e x c e e d s $500,000. T h e ave rage o n - ca m p u s j o b a pprox i m a t e s t e n h o u r s p e r w e e k , a n d p r o d u c e s a r o u n d $ 8 0 0 d u ri n g a n a c a d e m i c y e a r . All

sl wi,n t placemnlts f o r o n -ca m p U5 a n d ofI- campus · o b s a re handled I!y t h e "",1 Placement OfFice. A c t u a l a s s ig n m e n t s f o r n e w

Car", Planning

s t u de n t s a r e made a t t h e beg i n n i n g o f t h e s c h o o l y e a r a n d a t o t h e r t i mes a s vaca ncies occu r . T h e f e d e r a l C o l lege Work- S t u d y Prog ram o f f e r s o f f - c a m p u s e mpl o y m e n t w i t h n o n - p ro fi t e m p l o y e r s . To p a r t i Ci p a t e , s t u d e n t s m u s t be e lt g i b l e fo r work-s t ud y . T h e S t a t e Wor k - S t u d y Pro g r a m o ff e rs o n l y O ff-C.l lll p U S work oppo r t u n i t i e s Pos i t i o n s

must

with

p ro f i t - m a k i n g

be r e la ted

and

non-profit

employers.

to s t u d e n t s ' a c a d e m i c i n t e re s t s . T o

p a r t ici p a t e , s t u d e n t s m u s t be e l i g i b l e for work-s t u d y .

LO;1NS

Many s t u d e n t s i n v e s t i n t h e i r f u t u re b y borro w i n g e d u c a t i o n a l hL n d s . Low i n t e re s t , d e f e r red l o a n s m a k e I t p u s s b l e t o p a y s o m e o f t h e c o s t o f e d u c a t ion a t a l a t e r t i m e . Loans a r e o f t e n i nc l u d e d w i t h g i f t a s s i s t a n c e a n d w o r k to form a f j n a n c i a l a i d p a c k a g e . T h ere a r e t h ree m a j o r s o u rces o f l o a n s a t P L U , N ATIONAL DIRECT STUDENT LOAN (NDSl )

-

El i g i b i l i t y is

d e t e r m i n e d by the F L U F i n a n c i a l A i d Office f r o m the F i n a n c i a l Aid F o r m a n d i s based o n need. M o s t loans a v e ra g e $900 a n n u a l l y , b u t c a n n o t exceed $ 2, 500 f o r t h e f i r s t t w o y e a r s o f s c h oo l , n o r a n a g g regate o f $ 5, 0 0 0 f o r a n u nd e rg r a d u a t e d e g r e e . No i n t e r e s t accrues a n d n o p a y m e n ts on p r i n c i p a l a r e necess a r y u n t i l n i n e m o n t h s a f t e r a rec ipie n t c e a s e s to be J h a l f - t i m e s t ud e n t e nr o l led i n an

eligible

i n s t i t u t io n .

S i m ple

interest

is

on

3% during

the

re p a y m e n t p e r i o d . U p t o 1 00 % c a n c e l l a t i o n is a v a i l a b l e f o r teac h i n g t h e h a n d i c a p ped o r i n c e r t a i n l o w i nc o m e a re a s . R e pa y m e n t m a y be d e f e rred because o f f u r t h e r f u l l - t i m e s t u d y o r s e r v i ce i n the a rm e d

ca n n o t e xceed o n e - h a l f the total a m o u n t o f f i n a n c i a l aid. T h e

f o r c e s , V I S TA, or t h e P e a c e C o r p s . E x i t i n t e r vi e w s a re req u i r e d b y

o t h e r k i n d s of aid

d i p l o m a a r e w i t h he l d .

S E OC m u s t be m a t c h ed w i t h a t least a n e q u i va l e n t a mo u n t of ( g ra n t, loan, o r e m p l o y m e n t ) . E l i g i b i l i t y is

dl'.te r m i n ed b y federal g u i d e li n e s .

W A S H I NGTON

STATE N E E D G RANTS a r e a v a i l a b l e t o

e l t g i bl e resid e n t s o f t h e S t a t e of Wa s h i ng t on w h o a t t e nd P L U . T h e s e g r a n t s a r e i n te n d e d f " r s t u d e n t s w i t h hig h n eed . O n t h e b J 5 1 S o f ' u i d e l i n e s e s ta b l i s h e d b y the C o u n c i l o n Pos t - S e c o n d a r y E d u c a t i o n , s t u d e n ts w i t h s p e c i f i e d n e e d a s c o m p u t e d f r o m t h e Financial

A i d F o r m a re s u b m i t t e d to t h e S t a t e f o r c o n s : d e ra t i o n .

Prese n t p roced u r e d o e s n o t req u i re a s e p a r a t e a p p l i c a t i o n .

14

NURSING G R A NTS t o

a v a i l a b l e , depe n d e n t o n federal f u n d i n g Awards u s ua l l y a vera�e

F I NA N C IAL A I D

t h e B u s i n e s s O f f i c e u p o n l e a v i n g P L U o r t ra n s c r i p t s , g r a d e s , a n d

NURSING S T U D E N T L OA N ( NSL ) - A f e d e r a l l o a n p r o g r a m

l i m i te d t o s t u d e n t s wi t h n e e d who a r e a c c e p t ed f o r e n ro L l m e n t O r a r e e n ro l l e d i n t h e S c h ool o f N u rs i n g (us u a l l y n o t b e fore t h e s o p h o m o re y e a r ) . T h e N S L h a s p r o v i s i o n s s i m i l a r to t h e N D S L . U p to $ 2 , 5 0 0 i s a v a i l a b l e , d e p e n d e n t O n fed e r a l f u n d i n g . Loans a ve r a g e

$500. R e p a y m e n t be g i n s o n e y e a r a H e r g ra d u a t i o n . P a r t i a l o r f u l l c a n c e l l a t i o n I S p o s s i b l e u n d e r c e r t a i n con d i t i o n s .


F E DE RAllY I NSU RED S T U DENT lOAN ( F ISt) - nder t h i s progra m , s t uden ts may bo rrow from banks, cred i t u n i o n s , a n d s a vings a n d lo� n associations. A s epa ra t e appli tion proced u r e i s req ui red a n d forms a re av a i l ab le fro m th P L U F i na n c ial Aid Of fice. As much a $2,500 can be borr wed each year b u t m o s t l e n d i n g i n s t i t ut ions are li m i t i n g l oa ns to $ 1 , 5 00. Repayme n t of principal is de ferred u n t il n ine m on t h s aft r a recipi n t ceases to be a half- t i m e stude n t emolled in an eligi ble i n s t i t u tio n. The in terest rate is 7% ;

I n te r e s t is paid by t h e fed e r a l government wh ile the r e ci p ie n t i s attendin g school. Short term I a n s a re available from va r i o u s res t ricted PL U loan funds w h i h in Iud : A l u m n i Assotia t i o n lo ... n F u n d Am('ricllri L u t h e r a n C h u rc h W u m t' n Lo']n Fund nderson loan F u n d

Anton

J o h n S . S.ker l o a n F u n d

J .P, c.-. r1s trom

M�morial Lo.)n Fund

De! ! ., K..t.ppa. C.a.mma Student Loan F u n d Uly C. 8:.ern Fund Mara' Hutb Loan Fund erhard K i rk e b o Memorial Loa!" Fund Jeolnrtte Olson - Ol .n a P')ul - Miriam Sto� Mernorial Student Loan F u n d J - P . Pflueger S t u d t' n t Loan Fund O.J. Stu�n A l u m n I lOlln F u n d o A . Tmglestad loan Fund Women ', Club of Taco m a R�volving loa_n Fund Verne Crahdm l oa n F u n d

VETERANS AffAIRS AND VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION

Pac i fic Lu theran Unive r s it y h as been app ro v e d b y the S tate Approving Agency a s one o f the qualifie d i n s t i t u t i o n s which veteran

m a y a ttend and

ceive

b en e f i t s . Vetera ns, widow , a n d

childre n of deceased veterans who w i s h t o i n q uire abo ut t h e i r

e ligibi li t y for ben efi ts should con tact t h e R e g i nal Office o f t h e Vet e r a n s Adm in i s t rat i o n, Federal B u il d i n g , 915 Second A ve n u e , Seat t l e, Washington 9 8 1 74. S t u den t s sh uld gain a dmis s i o n to the u n iversity before m aking appl ication for benefi t s . S t ude n t s are en o u r ged t,) reg iste r a t t h e u nive rs i ty's Ve terans Affairs Office before each term t i n s ure con t i n u o u s rec e i p t o f be n e f i t s .

FINAN C I AL AID

15


Costs TUITION Students at

fAMIl Y STUDENT HOUSING Pacific L u t h r a n U n i v e r s i t y p a y o n l y f o r t h ose

c o u r se s in w h ic h they ar e e n rol l ed . T u i tl n c h a rg e s a re d e t e r m i n ed by t he n u m ber of c red i t hours for w h i c h s t u d e n t s r e g i s t e r . T h e 1 9 79- 80 rate f o r o n e s m e l e r h o u r i s $ 1 1 1 . 0 0 . M o s t c o u r s e s c a r r y a v;allJ e o f f o u r s e m e s t e r h o u r s . A fe w s p e c i a l i ze d c o u r s e s , i . e " Physical Education, A r t , a n d Priva t e M u s ic L e s s o n s m a y r e q u i r e ex t r a cos t s w h i c h are l is t e d w i t h e a c h s e m e s t e r 's c o u r s e o f f e r i n g s .

SPECIAL F E E S ( 1979-80 RATES) L a t e re g i s t Ta t io n c lea ra nc e

A u d i t p e r course

. .

. . . . . . .

.

.

. . .

.

.

. . . .

. . . .

. . . . $25 . 0 0 2 5 % of t u i t i o n . . . . . . . . . 25.00

.

.

. .

.

. . _ .

'

. . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Credi t by exa m i n a t io n : De p a rt me n t a l e x a m .

.

. . .

S t u d e n t pa rk i n g :

Yea r permit

. . .

. . . . . . . .

Y e a r permit

( w h e n r e g i s t e r e d f o r l e s s than 1 0 h o u rs )

. . S t u d e n t h e a l t h a n d accident i n s u ra n ce (e s t im a ted . .

1 2.00

. . .

. 3.00

. . . . .

82.00

. . . .

fee; <l c t u a l fee m a y be h ig h e r ) (24 ho u rs , 12 m o n t h cove rage , op t i o n a l ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pri va te m u sic l e ss o n s ( p e r cred i t h o u r ) . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

. . . .

. 67.50

ROOM AND BOARD ( 1979-80 RATES) Room il n d board, per s e m e s t r, is

as f o l lows:

Fa ll Sem e s t e r Room & B oa rd : Dou b l e Occ u p a n c y Room Si n g le O c u p anc y Room In teri m R o o m & Boa rd :

B oa r d

$415.00 $ 5 1 5 . 00

$4 1 0 . 00 $ 4 1 0. 00

$0

$85.00

New S t u d e n ts,

Do u b le Occ u pa ncy

$75.00

$85.00

t a ki ng c l a , ses o r (ile a [,1,ln o f A c t i o n i n o r d e r to re m a i n o n c a m p u s d u ri n g I n t e ri m ) Sp r i ng m e s t e r Room & Bo� r d : D o u bl e Oc c u pa ncy R o o m H I S . OO $410.00 $4 1 5 . 0 0 $4 1 0 . 0 0 ccupancy Room �ingle A n a ppTopria t e f e e w i l l be a ss e s s e d f o r roo m s o c c u p i e d d u ri n g

' (Co n ti n u i n g s t ud e n t s m u s t b e

break a n d s p r i n g b r e a k .

" O n l y a I'rry s m a l l n u m b e r o f s i n g l e roo m s a r e a v a i l a b l e . T h e y a r e l i m i ted t o s t u d e n t s w i t h m e d ica l /p h ysical h il nd i c a p s w h i c h neces s i t a t e a s i ng l e room, a n d to u p p e r c l d s s s t ud e n t s . S t u d e n ts

new to P L U no rm a l l y do n o t receive s i ng le - room a s s i g n m e n t s . T h e above roo m a n d board rates include t h ree m e a l , p e r d a y , M o n d ay t h rough Sa t u rd ay , a nd b ru n c h a n d d i n n e r on S u n da y . M e a l s are not prLlvidcd d u ri ng T h a nk sg i v i n g , C h ri s t mas and E a s t r v aca t i o n" n o r a n y oth r d a y w h e n t h e re s i d nee h a l l s a re clos d . On-ca m p u s s t u de n t s a re re qu i red to e a t in the u ni v e r s i t y d i n i n g halls.

to e M mea l , O n seven d a y , or l un c h o n l y

Students living off-c a m p u s a re encouraged

ca m p u s . Two p l a n s are o f fe red; a l l

m ea ls ,

Mond a y t h ro u g h Friday.

and Spring (each semester)

Of f-ca m p u s f u l l

5 days

Off-ca m p u s f u l l

16

COSTS

d e l i ve r pay m e n t s to t h e P L U B u s i n e s s Office . C h ecks L u t h e ra n U n i v e r s i t y and t h e s tu d e n t's n a m e a n d iden t i f i c a t i o n n u m b e r s h o u l d b e s h o w n on t h e Ma i l o r

should be made p a ya ble to P a c i f i c

redi t

a r d s a re acce p t e d .

PAYMENT OPTIONS

1. P a y m e n t by s e m e s t e r . I f t h i s o p t i o n i s s e l ec t e d , t h e total co s t s o f e a c h s e m e t e r m u s t b e p a id b e f o r e t h e beg i n n i n g o f c l a s se s . 2 T h e P L U B u d g e t Plan a l l o ws for p a y i n g c e r t a i n s e l e c te d educa t i onal e x pe ns e s on a m on t h l y i n s t a l l m e n t b a s i s w i t h o u t in tere t or ervice c h a rge s . Qu a l i fy i ng c o s t s (excl udes books, f i nes, et . ) are e s t i m a t e d for th ('ntir academic y e a r a n d p a i d i n t we l ve i ns ta l lm e n t s b egi n n i ng May 1 0, w i t h t h e las t i n s t a l l m e n t April

10.

F o r s t ud e n t s

a t te nd i ng

only one semester

( e xcl ud i n g s u m m e r s e s s i o n a n d i n t e r i m ) t h

e_ t i m a ted cost is

paid i n six i n s t a l l m e n t s . Fa l l s e m e s t e r payme n t s beg i n M a y 1 0 a n d sp r i n g semester paym e n t s begin November 1 0. A B udge t Pl a n Agree m e n t m a y be o b t a i n ed from th

B u s i n e s Offic . The

is c o m p l e ted, s ig n e d , retu rned,

and a p p r o v e d b y the B u s i n e s s Office .

t u d e n t sl

O f f -c a m pus l u nch

PAYME NTS

ag r e e m e n t i s n o t v a l i d until it

Do u b l e Occu pancy

O f f- c a m pus l u nch In/frtm

o ccu p a n t v a c a t e s t h e a p a r t m e n t o r c a n c e l s t h e r�se r v a t i o n . O n e a d v .mce.

due

Room

o n t i n u i ng ' Fa l l S e m e s t e r

r.1I

the

m o n t h 's re n t f o r a p a r t m e n t s i s re q u i red i n

check. Bank

(when re gis t " red for 10 hours o r more)

C h rI st mas

Two-bed room ( 1 0 u n i t s ) , p e r m o n t h . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 7 0 . 0 0 T h ree - be d ro o m ( 4 u n i t s ), peT m o n t h . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 8 5 . 0 0 E v e r g r e e n C o u r t ( 12 u n i t s ) , two-bed roo m , i ncludes all utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1 25.00 A d e p os i t o f $ 7 0 . 0 0 m u s t acco m p a n y a res e r v a t i o n fo r f a m i l y s t ud e n t h o u s i n g . T h i S de po s i t w i l l be h e l d by t h e u n i v e r s i t y u n t i i

$ 4 1 0. 00 $ 1 5 5 . 00 $85 . 0 0

5 d a ys

$45 . 0 0

NOTE: E n r o l l m e n t is n ot c o m p l e t e accord a n c e

with

one

of

the

pa y m e n t s m a y be a s e ss ed a

o u t s t a n d i n g b a la n e .

1%

u n t i l p a y m "- n t

above

payment

is made i n

option s .

Late

m o n t h l y i n t e r e s t c h a rg e on a n y

ADVANCE PA YMENTS Ne w s t u d e r. ts a r

requi red t o m a ke a $ 7 5 . 0 0 A d v a n c e P a y m e n t i n

o r d e r to f i n a l i z e t h e i r o f fe r o f a d m i s s i o n . F o r f a l l a c ce p t a n c e t h i s i s

n o t re f u n d a ble a f t e r M a y '1 ( De ce m be r 1 5 f o r i n te r i m ; J a n u a ry 1 5 for spring s e m e s t l' r ) . A l l re t u rn i n g s t u de' n t s m ll s t m a k e a $ 7 5 . 0 0 A d v a nce P a y m e n t p r io r t o e a r l y class re g i s t ra t i o n a n d /o r reserva t i o n o f a r o o m f o r t h e ne x t a c a d e m i c y e a r . T h i s Ad vance P a y m e n t i s n o t re f u n da b l e a f t e r May 3 1 . S t u d e n t s w i l l n o t b e pe rm i t t e d t o f i n a l i z e r e g i s t r � t i o n a s l o n g a s

a n y b i l l r e m a i n s u n paid .

R ESTRICTIONS

T h e u n i v e rs i t y reserves t h e rig h t to w i t h h u l d s t a t e m e n t s o f d i s missal, g rad e reports, t r a n s c r i r, t o f records, o r d i p lo m a s , u n t i l a l l u n i v r s i t y bi l l s h a v e been p a i d . U n d e r ce r t a i n h on o r a b le

ci rc u m s t a nces ba l a nc e s .

student

pay

checks

ma y

be

a pplied

to

u n p ai d


-

REfUNDS

A f u ll t ui ti o n re f u nd (less $ 2 5 . 0 0 w i t h d rawal fee) w i l l be m ad e f o r f a l l a n d s p r i n g s e m e s t e r s w h e n a s t u d e n t w i t h d raws f r o m t h e u n ive r s i t y before t h e e nd o f t h e s e c o n d week; 2 5 % t u i t i o n r e f u n d s will be made for w i t h d ra w a l s d u r i ng t h e t h i rd a n d f o u r t h w e e k s ; n o r e f u n d s a re a l l o w e d a f t e r t h e f o u r t h w e e k . When a s t u d e n t w i t h d raws before t h e e n d o f t h e. f i r s t w e e k d u ring t h e I nte ri m , a f u l l t u i t ion refu n d (less $25 w i t h d ra wa l fee) will be made. No refu nd s a re a l lowed after the first week. Residen e hall re fu n d s will adhere to t h e terms of t h e Resid e n tial L i fe on tract. A p ro - r a t a board ref u n d will be made for necessary w i t h d ra w a l from t h e u n i v e r s i t y . Board r e f u n d s will not be made for a n y u n i v e r s i t y t ri p s , s u c h as c h o i r, band, o rc h e s t ra, a t h l e tics, a n d s o f o rt h . Re f u n d s o n room will n o t b e m a d e . No tice of w i t h d ra wa l m u s t b e made i n w r i t i n g to t h e Regi s t r a r o f Pacific L u t h e ra n U n i v e r s i t y , a n d r e eived before the d e a d l i n e s r a l requests are n o t acceptable. given above. Req u es t s for c o n s i d e r a t i o n o f e xception to t h e s e policies s h o u l d be addressed to t h e A s s i s ta n t Dean f o r Studen t L i f e .

C O STS 1 7


dent Life an

Th e qu I I t y of h f e c u l t i v a ted a n d fo s tered w i t n i n the u ni v ersity is esse n t i a l c o m p o n e n t of t h e acad e m i c c o m m u n i t y . The

is cond ucive to a life of vigorous an d c rea t i ve sc holarsh ip. I a l s o r e c o g n i ze s t h a t l i ber3 1 edu a tion is for t h e t o t d l person a n d t h a t a c omp le m e n t a ry rela t i o n s h i p ex i s t s between s tuden t · ' i n t el l e t u a l d e v e l o p m e n t and t h e s a t i sfac ti o n o f t h e i r ot her i n d i vid u a l nee d . In terac t i o n w i t h persons o f di f feri n g life st yles, a p p l i c a t i n o f classroom k now l ed ge t o pe r s o n a l goa l s nd a s p i r t i o n s , a n d non-academic experien es are a l l i n va l u a b l e a n d v i t a l co m po n e n t s of ed u ca ti n at P L U . I n a t im e when t h e re i s a need for meaningful c om m u n i t y , the ca m p u s facilita tes gen u i n e rela t io n s h i p s a m ng members of the u n i versity, fro m diverse rel ig io us , ra�iaL a n d c u l t u ral b ac kg r o u n d s . A l l f t h e serv ices and facilities pro v id ed are i n t e nd ed to co m p l e m e n t the acade mic progra m . The se rv i es provided re fl ec t c h a nging s tude n t n eed s, and t he oppor t u n i ties or s t ud e n t p a r t icipa tion i n cl u d e vi r t u a l l y a l l aspe t s of t h e univers i t y . Individ u a l a t t e n tion i s given t o every s t u d e n t c o n ce rn I n cl ud i n g a va ri e t y of s peci f i c services o ut l ined e nvir"nmen t p ro d uc e d

bel ow .

CAMPUS M I N IS TR Y Paci f ic

L ut her a n U n i ve r s i t y by i t s very na t u re is

p l ac e for t h e

i n te rac t ion b tween s t u d i e s a n d t h e C h n s t i a n fa i t h . Oppor t u n i t ies

for th e m u t u I ce leb r a t i o n o f t h a t f a i t h on c a m p u s are ri c h and

J i ve fse. C ha pe l

Monday, Wed n e s d a y, a n d Frid a y mo r n i ngs J u r i n g t h e semest r f or a l l w h o w i s h to participa t e. T h e U n i ve r s i t y Co n g rega tion meets in r egu l a r w o r s h i p a n d celebra tes t h e lord's S u pper each S u nd a y . Pastoral services o f t he U n i v e r s it y Pastors are a vailable to a l l s t u d e n ts w h o d esir t he m . Several d e n o m i n a t i o n s a n d rel i g i o us g r o u p s ha e o rg a n i zat i o n s on c a m p u s , a n d t he re a r n u m e ro u s s t ud e nt -i n i t ia ted B i bl St u d y a n d fe ll ows h i p g ro u p s . The a rnpU5 M i n i s t r y C o u n ci l , a n elected s t uden t and fac u l t y o m m i t tee, coord i n a t e s t h ese a c t i v ities in a s p i r i t of o pe n n e s s and m u t ua l respec t . w ors h i p

is

held

R ESPONSI BILITIES OF COMMUNfTY LIF E

In the close l i v i n g si t u a t i o n in t h e c a m p u s com m u n i t y c e r tain r g u l a t ion s ue necessa r y a n d t h e u n i ve rs i t y a d m i t s s t u d e n ts w i t h t h e u n d erst a nd i n g t h a I they w i l l c m p l y w i t h t he m . All s t ude n ts are expected to respect the rig h t s and i n tegr i t y of o the r s . Co n d u c t wh ich is d t r i me n ta l to s t u d e n t s , thei r c o l l e a g ues, o r t h e un i v e rs i t y , or w h ic h viola tes c i v i l la w, m a y b g ro u n ds f O f d i s m i ssa l from the u n ive r s i t y . S pe c i f ic r e g u l a t i o n s a n d g u i d e l i n e s a re out lined in t he Studtrlt Handbook, w h i c h is ava i l a ble at t h e S t u d e n t Life Hi e a n d is issued to a e p t e d t ud e n t s prece d i n g t he i r fr o h m a n year.

ACTIVITIES

The F L U S/utl'nl Handbook e n u m er a te s o v p r 50 a c a d e m ic a n d non­ academic o r gan i za t i o n s , lubs, s oc iet i e s , a n d i n terest g ro u p s , which t e s t i fies to t he d i versity of c a m p u s e x t ra-curric u l a r l i f e . Social act i o n , r e lig i o u s , and p l i ti ca l orga n i za t i o ns; i n t e re s t a n d spor t ing c l u b s ; a n d s e r vice, pr o fe s si o na l , a n d academic societies afe a m on g the opt i o n s from w h ic h to choose. Th a r t s a re f l o u r i s h i n g a t Pac ific L u t h e r a n U n i v e r s i t y . The C h o i r of the West , Concert Ba nd, the U n i versi t y S y m ph on y Orche s t ra, a j a zz ensemble, a r nowned colle g i a te sta ge , t wo art galle ries, an d the l it u rgi c a l Dance ensemble p ro v i d e generous oppo rt u ni ties fo r the performing s t u de n t . Pe r so n a l expres s i on is em phasi led i n d e b a t e , s t ud e n t governmen t , ca m pus radio K P L U ­ FM, t h e u ni ve rs i t y y e a r b ok, a n d t h e weekly s t u d e n t n e w spa pe r . Orga nized a n d i nd i vid u a l p h y s ic a l a c t i v ities are f r e ve ryo n e . Recre a ti o na l a n d compe t i t i ve prog r a m s i nc l u d e foo tba ll, crOss

c o u n t ry, basketball, s w i m m i n g, h i ki n g , c l i m bing, vo l l e yba l l ,

baseb'l l l , s o f t b a l l , ba d m i n t o n , field h key , t rack a n d field, w a t e r polo, s k i i n g , a n d row i ng . A t h let ics e m p h a size develo p m e n t o f t h e i n d i v i d u a l ra t h e r t h a n t h e search fo r a t h l etic g lor y , yet t h e u n ive r s i t y is p r o u d o f i t s va rs i t y c h a mpionships i n m a n y spo r t s .

RESIDENTIAL LIfE Residential li ving is an i n te g ra l p a r t o f t h e edu a t i o n a l p roc e s s a t

and the re idence h a l l s were con s t r uc t ed w i t h t h a t in m i n d . t h e commitment to t h e resid n t i a l concept. A l l s t u de n t s not l i v i n g at home w i t h p a r e n ts , g ua rd i a n , or s p o u se are re q u i red t o l i v in a resi d en c e h a l l u n t i l a ch i ev i n g se n io r s t a t us or t h e age of 22 years. PLU

U n ivers i t y p o lic y reflects

As a

residential ca m pu s , Pacific L u t h e r a n Un i ve rs i t y offers

s t u d e n t s a valuable experie nce in group li v i ng . The u n i ve rs i t y

recog n i z e s the i m portance of non-class room a c tiv i t ie s in providing a n ed u c a t io n for t h e whole pers o n . The ai m of re siden t i a l l i v i n g is to h e l p t u d e n t s g row as h u m a n bei n g s . C a m p u s re s i d e n ce h a l l s a re s m a l l . T h e y a re organized i n to c o m m u n i t ies in w h ich each i n d i v i d u a l cou n ts as a pe r so n . New k n owl e d ge s h a red wi t h fri e n d s i n t h e resid nee halls t a k e s on a very pe rsonal 01 a n i n g . Men a n d w o m n f m a n y ba kgr u nd s a n d c u l t u re s l i v e on c a m p u s ; the refore, s t u d e n t s i n reside nce have a u n i q ue o p po r t u n i t y t o b road e n t h e i r c u l t u r a l h o r i z on s. The u n i ve rsi t y cares ab o u t the q u a lit y vf l i fe o n cam p u s . The a t t ra c t i v e a nd c o m fo r t a b l e r e s i d e nce h a l ls e n ric h the q u a l i t y of l i fe a n d en a n ce t he lea r n i ng proce s s . The u ni ve r s i t y o f fe rs st u d e n t s h i g h - q ua lit y h o u s i ng p p o r t u n i t i i ncludi n g student l � a de r 5 h i p e-x perience s, f o r m a l a n d i n f o r m a l prog raP.l " a n d p e e r a s s ocia t i o n s . T h e s t u d e n t go ve r n i n g badies are s t ro n g a nd J c t i v I , participa te in i m p roving t h e progra m . A selection of m od e r n , a t tractive h a l ls , each w i t h i ts o w n t ra d i t i o n s a n d u n i q u e a d " n t a g 5 , o f fe r s t u d e n ts t h e o ppo rt u n i t y to es t a blis h a c o mf o rt a b le l i v i n g p a t t e r n . A l l h a l l s i n c lude i n for ma l l o u ng es , s t u d y roo m s , r ec re a t i o n a reas, a n d co m mo n k i t c h e n a n d l a u nd ry facili t i e s . M o s t o f t h e h a lls a r co-e d u ca t io n a l . A l t h o ug h t h ey a re h ouse d I n s e pa ra te wings, m e n a n d women in co-ed h a l l s s h a r e l o u nge a n d re c r e a tio n faci l i t ies, a nd com mon res i d e n c e gove rn m e n t , a n d participate j o i n t ly i n a U hall ac t i v it i e s . Ail -m en ', a nd a i l - WOOl e n's h a l l s a re re se rve d for those who d e s ire t h i s t y p e of l i v in g experience .

18

S T U D E N T LIF E

tennis,

g o l f, wres l i n g, p a d d l e b a l l , b o wl i n g , s q u a s h , h a n d ba l l, p i n g p ng,


F u r t he r i n forma tion regardi ng residence halls can be o b t a i n ed from t h e Residential Li f e Office. In addit io n t o housing for si ngle s tude n ts, the u niver s i t y m , i n t a i n s 26 apartments on c a m p u s f o r f a m ily s t uden t housing. Two-and t h ree-bedroom u nits a r e a vailable. Applica t i o n for these a p a r t m en ts can be m ad e t p rough the Office of Gen e r a l Services.

PROGRAM fOR COMMUTlNG STUDENTS

Ever y e f fort i s made to a s s u re co m m u ti n g s t udents enjoy t h e

well -rounded u n ive rsi t y experience as t h ose i n residen c e . First-year s t ud e n t s who w i l l be a t h o me are i n v i t e d to participate i n a special progra m which de a l s w i t h e n riching college for t h e m . Of cou rse, off-ca m p u s s t u d e n t s a re in vited and encou raged to pa rticipa te in the v a ried a nd fre q u e n t activi ties prog r a m s p l a n n e d f o r all s t uden t s . 5

me

E N V l RONS

T h e u n i versity's geographical s e t t i n g affords t h e s t u dent a wide va riety of both recrea t i o n a l and cultu ral e n t e r t a i n me n t optio n s . Recrea t i o n a l l y , the grande u r o f the Pacific N o r t h we s t country e ncou rages participation in hi king, ca m ping, c l i m b i n g , s kiing, boating and s wi mm i n g . T h e m o s t conspicuous n a tural m o n u men t i n t h e a rea i s M t . R ain ie r . In add i t i o n to Rainier, the di s tinct ive realms of the Cascade I y mpic mou n tain ranges, a nd fores t s of Douglas Fir complete a nd one of t h e most n a t u ra l l y t r a n q uil enviro n m e n t s in the U n i t ed

St atďż˝.

S t uden t s can also en lOY the aes t h e t ic offeri ngs of n ea rby Se.)ttle and Taco m a . These city centers h o s t a variety of performing and record ing a r ti s t s, dozens of g a l l eries and m u se u m s 35 well as u n i q u t' s hopping dnd d i n i n g expe rie nc e s .

S T U D E N T LIFE

19


STUDENT SERVICES The Student Health Center re tains t h e ser vices o f a f u l l - t i m e Medex and part-time Nu rse Practiti oner with a back up physician and D U ISes for basic medical care or refe rral. All s t u d e n t s a re e n t i t l e d to the services of t h e Ce n te r. Heillth and Accident Ins urance is offered by t h e un ive rsi t y on 11 Do/"niary basis. T h e group Accid e n t a n d Sickness Medical E x p e n s e Plan p rovides coverage 24 hours a day, 1 2 m o n t h s a y e a r , a n ywhere in the world. T h i s plan is available a t fall, in terim, or spring r eg i s t r a t ion o n l y . A broc h u re o u t l i n i n g the progra m is a v a i l a b l from t h e S t u d en t L i fe Office. A l l f o r e i g n stude n t s m ltsl take o u t t he school i ns u r a n ce . T h e Counseling and Testing Center a s s i s t s s t u d e n t s in coping with normal deve lopme n t a l probl e m s . Trained and e x p e rie nced cou n selors, i ncluding a s t a f f psychi a t ri s t , offer group and individual c o u n s e l i n g . A variety o f psychological tests and i n t e rest inven tories are a v a i l a b l e t o assist s t ud e n t s w i t h career p l a n n i ng, ed uca t i onal a dj u s t m e n t and personal proble m s . The M i no rity Affairs Office coord i n a t es a special p rogra m which seeks to co n t i n u a l l y provide for t h e academic a n d social n eeds of m i n o r i t y s tu d e n t s . S u pportive services include a d m is s i o n s as s i s t a nce, scholarship and f i n a n c i a l a i d a s s i s t ance, counseli ng, book fund, and convocation prog r a m s . The foreign Siudent Office p rovides f o r t h e various n e e d s o f foreign s t u d e n ts . Support services i. nclude ori e n t a t ion t o t h e U . S. a n d PLU, t h e H o s t F a m i l y Progr a m , a liaison w i t h I m m igration, cou nseling, and advising the In te rn a tional S tu d e n t Orga n i zation. food Service, owned and operated by Pac ific Lutheran University, is availa ble t o a l l s t udents, facul ty, s t a f f a n d their guests . Students l i ving o n campus a re req u i red to t a k e their meals i n o n e o f t w o c afete r i a s . No deductions a re m ad e for students ea ting fewe r t h a n t h ree meals per d a y u n less a conflict exists d u e to wor k . In case of a conflict, a s t u d e n t m u s t obtain a p p roval for a dedu t i o n a t t h e Food Service Office i n t h e U n iversity C e n t e r . S tudents w i t h special d i e t s , a p p roved i n w r i t i n g f r o m a doctor, can in most cases be accom modated by c o n t a c t ing t h e die t i ti a n . This service i s provided a t n o e x t r a cos t . S tudents l i v i n g off-ca m p u s a re encouraged t o select o n e o f t h e two meal plans offered . O n e p l a n provides 2 0 meals per week, 3 meals per d a y Monda y thr ough Satu rda y and 2 meals on Sunday. The o t h e r plan provides l u n c h o n l y Monday through Friday. S t u d e n t s may sign up for e i t h e r p l a n a t t h e Food Service Office. The Fo d Service opera tes two coffee s h o ps. On is located on lower cam pus in Col u m b i a C e n t e r a nd t h e o t h e r is loca ted in the U n i v e rs i t y C e n t e r . A dis counted meal card is available a t t h e B u s i ne s s Office a n d i s designed to be u s e d i n e i ther coffee s hop by stu den ts . Visitors m a y e a t in a n y of the fac i l i t i e s . O n l y t h e coffeesho p i n C o l u m b i a Ce n te r i s o pe n d u r i n g vaca tion periods.

20

S TUDENT SE RVICES

Scheduling Ser vi c e s a re m a i n t ai n ed in t h e U n i v e r s i t y Center. A l l un iversity a ctivi ties m u s t be sched uled t h rough t h is office. Sched u l i n g s t u d e n t activi ties is a j o i n t responsibi l i t y o f the Un iversity Center Director a nd t h e U n i v e r s i t y Sched u l i n g Committee. S t u de n . Government is a n i n tegral p a r t of s t u d e n t a c t i v i t ies a t P L U . T h e associa ted s t u de n t s e l e c t a s e n a t e t o g o v e r n t h e i r affairs a n d oversee an e x tensive c o m m i t tee program t h a t in volves h u nd reds of students in actively p l a n n i n g programs and re pres e n t i ng s t uden t opi nion o n va rious un ive r s i t y boards a n d com m i t t e e s . Pl U Bookstore i s ow ned a n d o p e r a t e d by Pacific L u t h e r a n U n iversity f o r t h e bene f i t o f s t u d e n t s , f a c u l t y , s t a ff , a n d t h e i r g u e s t s . T h e bookstore s e l l s t h e text books a n d s u p plies t h a t a re requi red or s ug g es ted by facu l t y me m b ers for t h e i r courses. Add i t ional re ading m a t t er, s u p plies, g i f t i t e m s, g re e t i n g cards, cloth in , f i l m proc essing, . toile t ries, and o t h e r conve n i e n t items are also a v a i l a b l e . The Career Planning and Placement Office seeks to f u l fi ll t h e P L U co m mi t m e n t to .1 developi n g program of c a r e e r a n d l i fe p l a n n i n g . S t u d e n t s are assis ted d u r i n g their educa t i on in mak ing m e a n i n g f u l a n d realistic decis ions a b o u t t heir l i fe and work a f ter g rad u a t ion t h rough con ferences w i t h profess i o n a l s t aff, work足 shops a n d s e m i n a rs, classroom and dorm p re s e n t a tions, a n d m a t e .rials housed in t h e C a reers R e s o u rce Cen t e r .

STUDENT E MPLOYM E NT

The C a reer Pl an n i n g and Pl aceme n t Office coord i n a t e s a l l s t u d n t part-time em ploy m e n t (inc l u d i n g College Work- S t ud y a n d off-c a m p u s Work S t u d y jobs), a n d l i s t s p a r t - t i m e and f u l l - t i m e empl o y m e n t o p p o r t u n i t ies, bo th o n and o f f c a m p u s . T h e office also l i s t s s u m m e r jobs, local a n d n a t ion-wide . The office staff ass i s t s s t udents and a l u m n i in developing job sea rch t ec h n i q u e s (also facul t y and staff b y special a r rangeme ntl. The of fice coord i n a t e s an on-ca m p u s ' n terviewing schedule of recruiters from i n d u s t ry , business, gover n m e n t , a n d gra d u a t e schools.


Advising

-

The u n i v e rs i t y e x pect s t h a t a l l s tu d e n ts, a t o n e time or a n o ther, will n e e d assis tance i n p l a n n i n g academic progra m s con s is t e n t w i t h t h ei r needs and goals. T o h e l p s t u d e n t s make their i n i t i a l a d J u s t m e n t to the aca d e m ic load a t P L U a n d to p r o v i d e occasional counse l t h rough o u t their academic careers, t h e u ni ve r s i t y h a s s ta b l i s h ed ,1 network of facul ty a d v i s e r s a n d a n Academic Ail vi sing s sistanc e Cent e r . and

FACULTY ADVISERS All s t u d e n t s i n de gree p rograms

h a ve f a c u l t y dvlse rs whose ove ral l re s p o n s i b i l i t y is to g u id e academic p rogre , I n t h e i r work w i t h i n d i v i d u a l s t u den ts, advisers ha ve the assislance of pers o n n e l in a nu mber o f s tude nt service o ffi c e s : the Aca d e m i c Advising a n d Assi s t a n c e Cen t e r , the Career Pl a n n i ng a n d Plac e m e n t Office, Cuunseling and H e a l t h Services, th e M i n or i ty Affa i rs Office, t h e Cam pus M i ni s try, the Foreign Student Adviser, and Reside nce H a l l Di rectors a n d Resi d e n t Assist a n t s . Genera l Advisers: At the ti me of e n try, each s t u d e n t i s a s s igned a gene ra l adviser on t h e basis of match ing s t u d e n t a n d a d vi ser in teres ts . S t udents w h o w i s h t u e x p l o re t h e general c u r r ic u l u m b e f r e deci ding on an i n t er e s t area are as i g ned to exploratory ad vi s rs. Those who h a ve d e f i n i t e i n t er es t areas a re assigned to illl,r.st advisers. Durin the first sem s ter, an advising file for each s t udent i s sen t to t h e adviser, a n d a Cold Book, t h e studen t's official record of a c ade m iC progress, is issued to t h e s t u d e n t . Major Advisers: U p o n f o r m a l declaration of a major, s tu d e n t s ,l r assigned m a j o r advisers to replace t h e i r ge nera I a d v i s e r s . Major advisers guide studen ts' progress toward their chosen degree goals. Si nce their academic needs and i nterests may shift or change d u ri ng f o u r years o f college, students a re allowed to change a dvise rs as may be a pp ropriate or n e ce s sa ry , using a si mp l e adviser c h a nge form. Stude n t s a n d advisers are expected to meet regul arly, thou g h t h e actual n u mber of meetings will v a r y accord i ng to in dividua.l n eed s . Minimally, thr e e meetings a re re q u i red d u ri n g t he fr e shma n year a n d one each year t he reaft e r , t h o u g h all st ud en ts a r e encou raged to meet with t h e i r advisers a s often a s s ems nece ssary or u s e f u l .

ACADE M IC ADVISING A N D ASSISTANCE CENTER

The cademic Advising and Assis t a nce Center is loca ted o n the ,econd floor of t h e Mortved t libra ry, and i s open M o n d ay t h ro u g h T h ursda y f r o m 9 a . m . to I I p . m . , Friday f r o m 9 a . m . t o 5 p . m . , a n d S u n d a y from 2 to 1 0 p . m . T h e Advising Center h a s u p-to-date i n form a tion o n P L U po l i c ies , procedures, a n d progra m s . Because o f i t s h o u rs, t h e center often serves as an i n for m a t i o n a n d t ro u b le-shooting reso u rce for e vening and weekend stu d e n t s . The Academic Ad vi s i n g a n d A s s i s t a nce C e n t e r a l so provides a n u m b er of academic aS3is tance resources for s t u d e n t s :

1 . academic coll nseling by tra i ned u p p e r-d ivi s i o n , ki l f s a s s i s t a n c e cou nselors a s s u r e s respons ive a n d p e r s o n a l assis tance w i t h mos t sorts of acade mic problems; 2 . t u t o r i ng i s a v a i l a ble for most l ower- d i v i s i on c o u rses ; 3. study skills are taught i n a series of n o n-credit s k i l l s m i n icourses o ff e red each semester; 4. rtading and 'illantitalive skills a re t a u g h t in non-credit speed reading/study readi n g c l asses a n d m a t h h e l p sessions; 5. writi"g i s t a ught by edi torial assist ance w i t h term papers, essays, and the l ike .

-

ADVISING

21


Academic Structure C OLL E G E OF ARTS AND S C I E N C E S Division of Humanities En lish Mode n a nd l a s s i c a l La n g u a g es Ph ilosophy

BACH E LOR OF ARTS ( B . A . ) A n t h ropology Art B io l ogy h e m is t r y lassics

Relig ion

Divisjon of Natura.! Sciences Biology

o m m u nica t i o n A r t s ( Broadca s t l J o u r n a l i s m, C o m m u n ic a t i o n , Theater) E a r t h Sciences

Chemistry

E r l h S iences Mat h ema ti cs a n d Compu t e r S c i e n c e Ph sics a n d E n g i ne e r i n g

Economics E n glish F re nch German

Division of Soci al Sciences E 'onomics

H i s tory

His t o r y

M a t h e m a t i cs

Pol i t i ca l Science

Music

P ychology 5 0 lology a n d A n t h ropology Social Work

Legal S t u d i e s

N rw e g i a n Phil sophy P h y s i cal E d uca tion

S C H OOL OF B US INE S S ADMINI STRA TION

(Concen t r a t i o n s : R e c r e a t i on, Therape u t i cs) Ph ysics Pol i t i c a l Sci e n c e Psychology

S C H OOL OF E DUCATION

R e l i g i on

S C H OOL Of FINE ARTS

Socia l W rk

Art

ca n d i n a v i a n A re a S t u dies Sociology

Spa n i s h

C o m m u nica t i o n A r t s

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (B.S. )

Music

Biology

S C H OOL OF NURSING

C h emis t r y

SC H O OL OF PHYSI CAL EDUCATION

E n g i n e e r in g - P h y s i c s E n gin eeri n g - Science ( 3 - 2 ) Mathematics

DIVISION OF G RADUATE STUDIES DEGREES OFFERED Bachelors Bac h elor of A r t s Bachelor of Science Bachelor of B u s i n S5

dmi n istration

Bachelor o f A r t s in E d u c a t i on B a c helor of F i ne Ar ts Bachelor in M u s ic

Bac h e l o r of S c ie n ce in N u r s i n g

Masters Ma s ter o f A r t s in E u a tion Ma s t-e r of Ar t s i n H u m . n i t i� 5 Mas te r o f A rt s i n Social SCie nces Ma.s �er of u s i n e ss A d m i n i s t r a t ion Ma ter o f M u s ic Master of Public A d m i n i s t r a t ion

22

MAJ ORS AVAILABLE

A C AD E M I C STR UCTURE

E a r t h Sciences (Geology Speci a l t y )

Physics


BAC H E LOR OF ARTS iN EDUCATION (B.A.E.) Concentrations in; rt

Biology Busi ne ss Education C h e m i stry C o m m u nication A r ts Eart h

Science s

Econo mi c s

English Fren c h Gen er. I SCI e nce erma n His t r y L ang u age A r t s

MathematiCs Music

Ph ysic a l

dura ti o n

Ph ysics

Poli tica l Sc i e n c e Social Sci e n c e

SOciology

Spa n ish

Speci •• 1 Education

BACHELOR OF BUSIN ESS ADMI NISTRATION (B.B.A.) Concentration in: Acco u n ting

F i na nce Marke ting Oper tions Ma n age m e n t P er� o n ne l and I n d u s t r i a l Re l ation s

BACHELOR OF f i N E ARTS ( B.F . A. ) Art Com muni c a t i o n Arts ( B roadcastljou rnali s m , Com m u nica t i o n , T h e a te r )

BACH ELOR OF MUSIC (8.M.) Pi ano Performan e Organ Performa nce Voca l e rfonnance In st r u me n t a l Pe r fo rm ance Theory and Compo s i tion

BACHELOR OF SC f E NCE IN NURSING ( B.S.N.)

M I N O R S AVAILABLE A n t h ro pol ogy Biology

Bus i ness A d m i n i st ra tion C h emistry Classic (Gree

and L a t i n )

Com m u nication Arts Broade s t/ jou rn a l i s m

C o m m u n i ca t ion T h e o r y & Rese r c h Th ea t e r Da nc e E a r t h Sciences Economics Ed u c a t i o n

Rea i n g

Lea rni ng Resourc Specia l E cl u a l i o n English

Specia l is t

Litera t u re E m p h a s i s W ri t i ng E m p h a s i s French Foreig n Area S t udies erman History Le g al Studies Math matics

Computer Scien c e

M a t h e m a tics (Cener3 i ) Norw eg ian Phi losophy Ph ysical Ed uca t i on C ach ng D ance Hea l t h Ph y s i Pol i t ical Science Psychology Public Affairs

Religion Sociology

S pa n i s h S t a t i s tics

Nursing

A C A D E MIC S TR U C T UR E

23


Academic

Proced res REG15TRATION

1 . P L U does

EARL Y REG ISTRA nON PROG RAM FOR fRESHMEN

CHANGES I N REGISTRA nON

T h e normal course load for f u l l - t i m e s t ude n t s i s 1 3 t o 17 hours p e r s e m e s ter, i n c l u d i n g p h ysical e d u c a t i o n . A n o r m a l s t u d e n t load d ur i ng the I n t e r i m is four h o u rs with a m a x i m u m of five h o u r s . The m i n i m u m s e m e s t e r l o a d for a f u l l - t i m e s t u d e n t i s ten h o u r s . O n l y a s t ud e n t w i t h a " B " (3. 00) average or h i g h e r m a y reg i s t e r for m o re t h a n 17 h o u r s p e r s e m e s t e r w i t h o u t the conse n t of t h e provos t. A s t u d e n t e ng a ged i n m u c h o u tside work for self-support m a y be res t ricted t o a reduced acad e m ic load. In t h e sp ring s e m e s t e r, s t u d e n t s who p l a n to return in t h e f a l l m a y p rereg i s ter by m a k i n g a $ 7 5 . 00 a d v a nce payme n t . S t u d e n t s m us t regi s t e r for e a c h new s e m e s te r on t h e d e s i g n a ted d a y s a n d a re not official l y e n r olled u n ti l t h e i r reg i s t r a t i o n h a s b e e n clea red by the B u s i n e s s Office and t h e i r Place of Residence form h a s been p rocessed.

W ell in adva nced of ar rival on c a m p u s for t h e f i r s t s e m e s t e r, all acce pted fresh men are s e n t reg i s t r a t i o n materials. Most students ha e t h E' opport u n i t y to work p e r s o n a l l y w i t h a n adviser as t h e y p l a n t h e i r sched u l e s . A l i m i ted n u m b e r o f s tu d e n t s reg i s t e r by m a i l , a n d t h e i r course selections are v e r i f i e d b y a c o u n s e l o r . Early regis tration for new fresh m e n occurs d u r i n g J u n e o r Ja n u a ry, depending on w h e th er s t u dents beg i n in t h e f a l l or s p ring semes t e r . Early reg i s t r a t i o n i s coord i n ated b y t h e Office of A d m is s i o n s .

COU RSE SELECTIONS fOR fRESHMEN

St uden t s should b e t horou g h l y .lcqu a i n t e d w i t h a l l reg i s t r a t i o n m a t e r i a l s , i n c l u d i n g the c u r re n t c a t a l og and s pecial i n fo r m a t i on sent by the Admissions Office. I t is i mp o r t a n t also to s t u dy t h e requ i r e m e n t s o f all aca d e m ic program s in wh ich o n e m a y e v e n t u a l l y declare a m a j o r . F i rs t s e m e s t e r fres h m e n a re a dvised t o p l a n a c l a s s schedu le t h a t d o e s n o t ex cee d 1 6 cre d i t h ou rs . A n o r m a l f i rs t s e m e s t e r s c h e d u l e will include t h ree cou rses o f 4 cred i t hours each, p l u s one or t w o of the follow i n g : P h YSical Education activity course (1 credit hour), m us i c en se m b le ( 1 credit hour), or a choice from a m o n g several 2 cred i t h o u r courses. (NOTE ; U n le s s o t h erwise sta ted in t h e c a t a l og or dass s c h edule , most courses are valued a t 4 c redit h o u r s . ) In o r d e r to i n s u re a p p r o p r i a t e acad e m i c progress, fre s h m e n s h o u l d plan to tak" an I n t e r i m COurse in J a n u a r y, and to c o m p l e t e 30 s m e s te r h o u r s d u r i n g t h eir f i r s t y e a r . T h e following w i l l i l l u s t rate sever I t y p ical first-year credit hour loads :

( 1)

Fall 13

Interim

4

S p r i ng

TOTA L

13

30 (2) B 5 13 31 ( ) 14 5 13 32 (4) 13 4 16 33 T h e n u m be r of c r e d i t h o u r s t a k e n may v a r y f r o m y e a r t o year, u s u a l l y within a range o f 3 0 to 34. However , in order to c o m p l e te t h e 1 28 h o u rs req u i red for g ra d u a t io n w i t h i n f o u r years, an a vera8' of 32 cred i t hours a y e a r is necessary.

24

A C A D E M I C PR O C E D U R E S

not haL" particular courses w h ich a re req u i mi of all fresh me" . The " G e n e ra l U ni ve r s i t y Req u i r e m e n t s " (or core) must be comple ted before g ra d u a t i o n . A n d the English w r i t i n g requ i r e m e n t m u s t b e fulfil led before t h e sen ior y e a r . 2 . St"de"ls a re responsiblr for selecting their [OurSe>. Coun s e l ors a n d fac u l t y a d v isers a re a lways a v a i l a b l e to a s s i s t w i t h p l a n n i n g and to make sugges t i o n s . 3 . St ude " ls w h o a r e s u rf of their major should b e ca reful t o include Ihose courses w h irh ins u re ro mplclio" of that major w i t h i n fo u r years. Some d e p a r t 足 m e n t s o r schools h a v e p rerequ i s i t e c o u r s e s w h ich m u st b e t a k e n before e n t ering u pon t h e major prog ram i t s e l f . 4 . Students w h o a re u ndecided a bo u t their major [Ou rse o f study s h o uld take the opportunity to explore opti""s. A good way to beg in is to take some courses t h a t meet the General U ni ve rs i t y Requirements while s e l e c t i n g several o t h e r s for ex ploration of special in tere s t s .

S t u d e n t s may a d d o r drop c l a sses w i t h f u l l r e f u n d d u r i n g t h e f i rs t t wo w e e k s of a term . Necessary forms a re a v a i l a b l e a t t h e R e g i s t rar's Office. D u ri ng t h e f i r s t w e e k there is a grace period w h e n no drop/add fee is c h a rged . After t h a t a fee of $5.00 is cha rged for any regis t ration cha nge that i n vol ves t h e dro p p i n g o f a class. S t u d e n t s m a y offic i a l l y wi thdraw from a c l a s s a f t er t h e f i rs t t w o w e e k s b y o b t a i n i n g the professor's s i g n a t u re on the cha nge form. T h e g rade of W w i l l a ppear on a s tu d e n t's grade report and t ra n s c ri p t . S t u d e n t s m a y a l so com pletely w i t h d r a w fo r med ical reaso n s . W r i t ten evidence f r o m a p h ysicia n m u s t su p p o r t a medical w i t h d r a wa l . The grade o f W M will appear On a s t u d e n t's grade repo r t a n d transcri p t . An u nofficial w i t h d ra w a l from a course w i l l b e recorded a s E . N o s t u d e n t may w i t h d r a w d u ri n g fi n a l e x a m i n a t i o n wee k .

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE TERM

S t u dents w i s h i n g to w i t h d r a w f r o m the ter m m u s t o b t a i n a w i t h d r a w a l form from t h e Office of the Reg i s t ra r . IT IS A L W A YS TO T H E S T U D E NTS A D V A NTAGE TO W I TH D RAW OF足 F l C I A L L y, S t u d e n t s wi t h d ra wing for a s pecified pe riod of time (for x a m pl e, one s e m e s t er to one year) m a y obtain a Le.we o f Abse nce f o r m . S t u d e n t s a re e n t i tled to h o n o r a b l e d i s m is s a l from t h e univerSity if t h e i r record of c o n d u c t i s sa tisfactory and if a l l f i n a n c i a l o b l i g a t i o n s a re s a t i s fi e d .

-..I


THE GRADING SYSTEM

t u d e n t s a r e graded according t o t h e following desig n a tion s : A -4 . 0 grade poi n t s per hour, cred i t given 6-3. 0 grade points per h o u r, cred it given C-2.0 grade points per h o u r, credit given 0 - 1 . 0 g rade poi n t pe r hour, cred i t given E - o grade poin ts per hour, no credit given The grades l i s ted below a re not u s ed in calc u l a t i n g grade pOi n t a erage. N o grade po i n t s a r e ea rned u n d e r t h e s e d e s i g n a t i o n s . H - red i t g i v e n (Honors) used o n l y f o r c o u rse s u n Ique to I n t e ri m P-credit given (Passing) F-no credit given (Fail u re ) I - n o credit g i v e n ( I nco m plete) I P-no credit given ( I n Progress; a p plicable o n l y to c e r t a i n courses whose work extends b e y o n d a reg u l a r t e r m ) A U -no cred i t g i ven ( A u d i t ) W - n o credit g i ve n (Wi t h d ra w a l ) W M -no credit given ( W i t h d r a wa l / Medical) I n co m p l e t e ( ! ) g rades i n d ic a t e t h a t s t u d e n t s h a v e been u n a b l e to c o m p l e e t h e i r work because of c i rc u m s ta nces beyond t h e i r c o n t rol . T o receive credit a n Incompl ete m u s t be converted t o a p assi n g g rade W I T H I N T H E F I R S T S I X W E E K S OF THE F LLOWING S E M E S T E R . Inco m p l e t e grades w h ich a re n o t con verted by r e m o v a l a re changed to the g rade i ndicated by t h e i n s t r uctor when t h e Incomplete is s u b m i t t ed. Medi al W i t h d rawal (WM) i s given when a course i s not completed d u e t o medical c a u s e . The WM d o e s n o t a ffect t h e g rade poi n t ave rage. In Progres s OP} s i g n i fies p rogress in a course w h ich n o r m a l l y r u n s more t h a n one s e. m e s t e r to c o m p l e t i o n . I n Progress c a r r i e s n o cred i t u n t i l replaced b y a p e r m a n e n t gra de . A n y c o u r s e may be repeated by an u n derg ra d u a te s t u d e n t . The higher of the two grades earned i s used i n computing the cu m u la t ive grade point average, but credit toward gradua tion is ,1 1 1 wed o n l y once.

INTERIM GRADING SYSTEM

The ins tructor of a 300- 320 I n te r i m (oursI' will indicate i n t h e catalog de s c r i p t i on w h ich o f t wo grading sys t e m s w i l l b e u s e d : 1 . H o n o r s ( H ) - f o r exceptional work; P a s s (P); n o c r e d i t - t h e re g i s t r a t i on w i l l not be recorded. ( H and P d o not a f f e c t t h e grade poi n t a v e r ag e . ) 2. T h e r eg u l a r l e t t e r g ra d e s : A, B,C,D,E. (Such grades contribute t o t he g rade poi n t average . ) S t u d e n t s in a "regular letter-grade" course may use one of t h e i r four pass-fail option s .

-

PASS-FAIL OPTION FOR UNDERG RADUATE STUDENTS

T h e p a s s - f a i l option pe r m i t s s t u d e n t s to e x plore s u bject a reas o u t s i d e t h e i r known a b i l i ties a n d t o add a broader range o f courses w i t h o u t b e i n g forced t o compete w i t h majors who a re speCi a l i z i n g in t h o s e a reas of s t u d y . 1 . The p a s s - f a i l o p t i o n i s l i m i ted t o a total o f f o u r co urses ( 1 6 h o u r s ) and t o n o m o re t h a n t wo courses ( 8 hou rs) p e r academic year. 2 . A s tudent may exercise the pass-fail option i n no more than two courses (8 hours) t a k e n to f u l f i l ! general u n i v e r s i t y req uire足 m e n t s, a n d t h e fo reig n la n g u age req u i re m e n t of t h e College o f A r t s a n d Scie nces . Oth er c o u r s es r e q u ire d f o r g r a d u a t i o n i n a degree prog r a m may not be t a ken u n d e r t h i s option except for a f i r s t course t h a t h a s been taken before a declara tion of a m a j o r . 3 . In c o u rses t a k e n u n d e r t h e pass-fail option, o n l y A, B , and C g rad e s s h a l l be re g ar d e d as "pa s s , " whereas 0 and E g rades s h a l l be r e g a r d e d a s " f a i l . " P a s s - f a i l grad es d o not a l t e r t h e g rade poi n t ave rage; b u t c r e d i t s earned count toward gra d u a t i on . 4. The pass-fail option agree m e n t M U S T be f iled w i t h t h e i n s tructor NO LATE R t h a n e i g h t w e e k s a fter t h e beg i n n i ng o f t h e semeste r . 5. Pass-fail s tuden ts a r e resp on s i bl e for a l l c o u r se work and e x a m i na t i o n s .

EXCLUSIVE PASS-FAll COURSES

Depa r t m e n t s o r schools m a y offer co urses in w h ic h o n l y pass-fail g rades a re g i v e n . These courses s h o u l d p u rs u e g o a l s p r i m a r i l y concerned w i t h a p p recia t io n s , v a l u e c o m m i t m e n ts , crea tive achieve m e n t s , or t h e like. Decisions to offer exclusive pass-fa i l courses a re r ep o rt e d to t h e provost a nd t h i s fact is m a d e known t o s t ud e n t s before t hey register f o r these courses. Exclusive pass-fail courses m a y not be used to meet major or u n iverS i t y require. m e n t s u n less t hey have been a pproved as s u c h b y t h e f a c u l ty . Ta king exclusive pas s - fa i l courses in no way a ffect s the s tu d e n t 's personal pass-fail option.

ACADEMIC PRaDA TlON

Warning slips m a y be given to a n y s t u d e n t s who a re doing "0" or "EO work a t the end of t h e sixth week. S t u d e n t s s h all receive a n academic warning i f they fail to keep t heir current grade poi n t average (immediately prec e d i n g s e m e s t e r ) a t o r above 2 . 00. S t u d e n t s a re placed o n aca d e m i c p robat i o n w i t h t ra n sc r i p t n o t a t io n i f t h e y fail t o k e e p t h e i r g ra d e po i n t a v e rage (c u m u l a t i v e l y ) at o r above 2 . 0 0 . Students receive officia l n o t ice o f s u c h a c t i o n . Proba ti o n a r y s t u d e n t s m a y be advi sed to red u ce t h e i r a c a d e m i c o r e x t ra-c u rr i c u l a r a c t i v i ties or bo t h . T h e e n ro l l m e n t o f a s t ud e n t on p robation w h o f a i l s to e a r n a c u m u la t i v e average of 2 . 0 0 by th e e n d of a p robationary semester is ter m i n a te d . A termina ted s t udt'n t may a pp l y for rei n s tatemen t by s u b m i t t i n g a l e t t e r of petition to the Registra r's Office and securing a facu l t y sponsor. T h e pe ti tion a n d sponsors h i p le t ters are s u b m i t ted to t h e Fa c u l t y C o m m i t t e e on Ad m i s s i o n a n d R e t e n tion of S t u d e n t s fu r a c t ion . A s t u d e n t whose p e t i t i o n for rei n s ta t e m e n t h a s been d e n i e d m a y a p p l y for rea d m i s s ion a f t e r t h e e x pira tion of one s e m e s t e r u n l e s s i n fo r med o t h e r w i s e .

A C A D E M I C P R OC E D U R E S

25


d, fu l l- t I m e s t ude n t ( t e n h o u r s ) i s e l igible fo r pa rt i':! pa t i o n i n u nivers ity ac tiv i t i e s . U m i t a t Ions on a s t uden t 's ac ti vi tie s based u p o n a cadem ic perfo r m a n ce m a y be s e t by A n y reg u larly e n r o t I

indi v i d u a l schools, d e p a r t me n t s , O r org a n i za ti on s . A s t ude n t on

aca d e m i c p ro b a t i o n is not e l ig ible f o r i n te rs c h o l a s tic c o m pe t i t i o n a n d m a y also be a dvised t o c u r t a i l p a r ti ci p a t i o n in ex tTa -curri c u i a r ac ti vi t i e s .

CLASSIFICA nON OF STUDENTS

F reshme n : s t u den ts who h a v e m e t e n t ra nce req u i re m e n t s . Sop h o mo re s : s t u den ts w h o h a v e satisfac t o r i l y c o m p le t e d 3 0 hours a n d have a c u m u l a t i ve g rade poin t a v e rage o f 2 . 00. J u n iors; re g u la r s t u d e n t s w h tJ have f u l fi l led lowe r di vi sion req u i rem e n ts a n d h a v e sati fac t o r i l y c o m p l t e d 60 h o u r s a n d have a cumula tive grade p oi n t average of 2 . 00. Sen io rs ' reg u b r s t u de n t s who have s a t i s factorily c o m p le ted 9 0 h o u rs a n d h a v e a c u m u l a t i ve g ra d e pDin t average of 2.00.

of

b y certai n

d e pa rt m e n t s f o r s t ude n t s

s u pe ri o r academic ,.bilr t y . Reg i s t r a t i o n is by i n vi t a t i o n

only .

The S PE G A L H O N O R S P R O G R A M for j u n i o r s and s e n i o r s

offers s t uden t s an o p po r t u n i t y t o d e ve lo p <1 t o t a l a c a d e m i c p ro g r a m

to reflec t t h eir s pec i a l i n t e re s t s a n d ca pabiliti es . The s t u de n t will pTopoSe a t o t a l p l a n o f s t u d y for t he t i m e re m a i n i n g u n t i l t h e g ran ti n g o f a deg ree; it m a y i n c l u d e a n y a m o u n t o f t he s t a n d a rd d egree prog ram. With t h e ap p ro v a l of a f a c u l t y sponsor a n d t h e Ho nors C o u n ci l ( i n t h a t o r d e r ) , the plan i tsE' l f s h a l l bec (l m e t h e d egree requi r e m e n t of t h e unive r s i t y i n t h e cas e of t h i s h o n o r s tude n t . T h e e s sen t i al s of a n y pla n o f s t u d y Me a c l e a r to p ic al ra t i o n a l e and s i g n i f i ca n t w o rk b e y o n d r g u l a r c u u r s e s c o m p r e h en s i v e exams, i nd e pen d e n t s t ud y proj e c t s , i n t e rdis­ cipl i na ry bach elor's de gree t h e s is , etc I n t rested s t u d e n t s s h o u l d i nq u i r e a t the Provos t's O f f i c e f o r f u r t h e r i r. f o r m a t i o n .

G RADUA nON HONORS

Oeg re!!s wi t h o n o r s of r u m lUlu/e. magna 111 m la ude . a n d s u m ma ( u rn la udt are gra. n t e d . A s t u d e n t m u s t e a r n an a 'e.rage of 3 . 3 0 fo r (11m la lldr, 3 . 0 f or magna [11m lallde, a n d 3. 90 for s u m m a (li n! l" lulc. Physi ca l ed ucil t lo n ac t i v i t ie s a re n o t i n c l uded in t h e d t e r m i n i ng of h onors.

C REDIT BY EXA MINATION

S t uden t s a r e p e r m i t ted , w i t h i n l i m i t s , to o b tai n cre d i t b y exam i n a t i o n in l i e u of reg u l a r e n r o l l men t a n d c l a s s a t t e n d a nce . No more t-han 7 Y, co u rs e s ( 3 0 s e. m e s t e r h o u r s ) m a y be c o u n t e d toward grad u a t i o n , w h e t h e r it be College L 'v e l E x a m i n a t i o n Prog r a m or a n y ot her exam i n a t i o n . xceptions to this r u l e for cer ta i n g r o u p s of s t ud e n t s or p rog r a m s may be m ade, s u b j ec t t o r e c o m m e nd a t i on by the E d u ca tion a l Policie.s C o m m i t tee and a p p rov a l by t h e f a c u l ty . Cred i t by exa m i n a t i o n i s o pe n to fo r rn a l l y a d m i t t e d , reg u l a r s t a t ll S s t ud e n t s only.

Ar ra ngem e n t s for de p a rt m e n t a l CTe it e x a m i n a t io n s m u s t be

m a d e b y s t ude n t s w i t h r e s p c' c t i ve depa r t m e n t a l c h a i rs, deans, O r

directors . E v id e n ce o f a p pr o val

a n d o f pa y me n t o f

the fee s h o u ld be

prese n ted b y a s t ud e n t t o t h e i n s t r u c t o r who a d m i n i s te r s t h e exa m i n a t i o n .

26

de p a rt m en t,

m a y,

.

n o r m a l l y p a y for t h e c o u r s e .

T h e va rio us s c h ools, di vi sion s a n d d e pa r t m e n t s

A C A DE M I C PROC E DURE S

shall d ete rm i n e

t h e s pe c i f i c C L E P e x a m i nation s w h ich m a y f u l. f i l l req uire me n ts for

Ge ner.) ! U n i v e r s i t y Req u i re m e [1 ts i n t he i r area s . These .. x a m i n a t i o n s a re s u bj e c t to recom me nd a t ion s by the Ed uca t i onal Polic ies C o m mi t t ee a n d m a j o rs , p rog ra m s , o r res pec t i ve acad em ic

approval b y t h e fac u l t y .

Th e m i n i m u m pas, i n g level f o r C L E P ex.a rn i n at i u n s t a k e n a t PaCi f ic L u t h ran U n iver s i t y s h a l l b e t h e fi f t i e t h pe rce n tile . C L E P c re d i t s g ra n te d by o t h e r u n i v e r s i t i e s , co l leges, a n d c o m m u n i t y co l l e g e s , w h ich r ' e a rn e d b e fo re e n t r a nce, sh a l l b e h o nored b y Pa c i f ic L u theran lJ n i ver ity. The app l i a l i o n of t h ose c re d i t s

m aj o rs ,

t o w a rd

prog r a m s ,

R e q u i re men t s s h a l l be co ns i s te n t

HONORS PROGRAMS Honors cou r ses a re offe r ed

w i t h t h e a p p rova l of t h e i n s t rm; t o r o r t h e g a i n c red i t f o r a n a ud i t ed cour s e w h i c h t h e y h a ve n o t pr.,v i o u s l y take n for c re d i t by passi n g a n e x a m i n a t i o n s e t by t h e i n s t r uc to r o r depa r t men t . Th e fee ror s uc h eX iI m i n a t i o n i s t h e d i ffe re nce b e t ween t h e au d i t i n g fee a n d the t u i t i o n s t ude n ts w o u l d S t u den ts

E L I G I BI L ITY FOR STU D E NT ACTI VITIES

e n e ral

and

U n i v e rs i t y

w i t h s c h o o l , d i vi s io na l , a n d

d e pa rt men t p o l i c i e s a n d s t a n dar d s .

The u n i v e r s i t y

does not

g ra n t c r e d i t f o r c o l l e g e l e v e l G E O t e s t s .

INFORMAL STUD Y

T o e nco u rag e l i be ra l l e a rn i n g

e n ro l l m e n t

in

cou rses

lead i n g

of a l l kinds, t o w a rd

o v e r a n d beyond

f o rma l

degrees, t h e

u n iv e r s i t y p ffers a va n e t y o f o p p o r t u n i t i e 5 fo r i n f o r m a l s t ud y :

C " esl 0 1

Univcrsily

5111111>:

Te ac he rs

a nd

o f fic i a l s

of

other

i n s t i t u t i o n s , v i s i t i n g schol a r s a n d a r t i s t s , a n d o t h e r p r o f e s s i o n a l

pe rsl1 n s w h o w i s h t o u Se u n i ve r s i t y facil i t i e s for I nde p e n de n t I li d y mil

a p p l y to t h e p r o v o s t f o r c a r d s d e s i g n a t i n g t h e m as G u e s t s o f

t h e U n i v r s i t y . S u c h pe r so n s ,

in t h e i r u se of f a c i l i t i e s .. w i l l

d e f e r to

t h e nee d s of s t ud e n t s a n d f a c u l t y m e m bers .

A wlilinR Course,:

To a u d i t a c o u rs e is to e n ro l l , w i t h the p e r m i s s i o n o n a n ()I1 - c r ed i t bas i s . An a ud i t o r i s e n c o u ra ge d t o p a r l i c i pa t e f u l l y in ,- l a s s ac t i "i ties b u t is n o t h e l d a cc o u n ta b le for e x a m i n a t i o n s o r o t h e r W rI t t en w o r k a n d does n o t r e e e i ,'" a g ra d e . I f

o f t h e i n s t r u c t o r,

t h e i n s t r u c t o r a p p roves,

t h e c o u rse m a y be e n t ered u pon t h e

t T a n s c ri p t a s " A u di t . " W i t h

t h e a p p roval o f t h e

i n s t ru c to r o r t h e

d e p a r t me n t, t h e s t u d e n t m a y g a i n c r e d i t for a n a u d i t e d c o u rse b y

an e x a m i n a t i o n s e t by t h e i n s t r u c to r o r t h c' d e p a r t m e n t . f o r s u c h e xam i n a t io n is t h e d i f fe rence b e t wee n t h e a u d i t i n g fee a n d t he t ui t Ion t h e s tu d e n t w o u l d p a y f o r t h e c o u rs e . \li.'ili ",ďż˝ Clas5e" M " m b " rs of t h e a c a d e m i c c o rn m u n i t y are e n c o u ra g e d t o visit c l a s s e s which i n teres t t h e m . No f e i5 c h a rged

p a s s i ng The

fee

for the p r i v i le g ., . Beca u s e reg u la rly e n ro l l e d s t u d e n t s must b e g i v e n

f i rs t c o n S ide r a t i o n , p e r s o n s des i ri n g to v i S i t c l a s s e s a re re q u i r ed t o a s k per m i , si on

o f the i n s t r u c t o r . Vi s i t ors a re g u e s t s of t h e cl a sses

a n d m u s t c o n d u c t t h e m s e i v e s a cc o rdi n gl y .


DEGREE REQUIREMENTS B II C

A L!l Ul� u\ TE D E C R E ES

conferred on st ude n ts who have Bacc al a u rea te d e g r es ar co m pl e ted a m i n i m u m of 1 2 8 s e m e s t e r hours (32 cours e s ) w i t h a g ra de pO i n t �verage of 2 , 0 0 (School of B u s i n e s s Ad m i nis t ra tion 2 , 50; School of Educa t io n - 2, 2 5 ) and who have m e t t h following req u ire m e n ts for g r a d u a t i o n : 1 T h e cam p i t i o n of a m a i o r as d etailed by each school or depar t m n t , consisting of a m i n i m u m o f 2 4 sem e s t e r h o u r s (6 ('ourses) with a minimum of 8 s e m e s t e r h ou r s (2 courses) i n re s ide nce . 2. The completion of a m i n i m u m of 4 0 s e m e s t er hours ( l O courses) n u m bered 321 o r above. 3 . T h e c m pl e t i o n o f two 4 - s e m e s t e r - h o u r 300-320 I n t e r i m c u rses. O nl y on 300 - 3 2 0 I n terim cou rse designated a s "advanced" m a y b e used to meet t h is req u i r e m e n t . (Ju n i o r a n d sen ior t ra nsfer s t u de n ts m u st complete o n l y one 300-320 In teri m cou rse and it may b , one which is "ad va n e d . " ) 4 . The co m pl e tion of 28 se mester h o u rs ( 7 courses) in reside nce d uring the s e n ior year. (Special prog r a m s such a s 3- 1 , 3-2, a n d Medical Te ch n o l o gy excl ud e d . ) 5 T h e completion o f a l l cou rses coun ted toward a m a i o r o r a m i n o r w i t h grades of C or h i g h e r .

GENERAL UNIVER SITY REQUIREMENTS

A L I (jI N D I D A T[S FOR B A C C A L A U R EA TE D E C R EES MUST FLl LF I I.L THE FO U O W I N G R E Q UI R EM ENTS W R ITIN , - 1 course (4 h o u r s ) - Met by E n g l i s h 1 0 1 Or an

-

e q iva l e n t p 5 writing course (for x a m ple, E n g l i s h 2 0 1 , 328, or 3 4 1 ). Beca u se the abilitv " to write well i s e s s e n t i a l for uccess in college, and l a t e r , a l l s t u d e n t s are e x pected to f u l f i l l t h i s r q u i re m e n t a s e a r l y a s possible - preferably in t h e i r f i r s t o r second s e rn e s t r . PHYSI AL E D U ATI N - 4 h o u r s - M e t b y four 1 h o u r a c t i v i t y cOurses, i n clud ing P E 1 00. T h i s r e q u i re m e n t s h o u l d n o rm a l l y b fulfi l led by the e n d of the s o p h o m o r e y e a r . All a ti v i t ies a re g raded on the basis of A , Pass, or Fail. INTER 1 M - 2 courses ( 4 hours eac h ) - n l y cou rse� n u m bered 3 0- 3 20 sa tis f y t h i s req u i re m e n t . J u n ior a n d sen Ior transfer s tudents need t o c o m plet e only o n e 300-320 I n t e r i m CO Ufse . Ln a d d i t ion to the f regoing ge n eral req u i r e m e n t s , all baccalaureate c a n d i d a t es must complete a core curricu J u m . S t u d e n t s h a ve the option o f m e e t i n g t h i s require m e n t by c o m p l e t i n g e i t h e r the D i s t ri butive Core ( i m m e d i a t e l y foll OWing), or by t a k i n g the In tegra ted Studies P r o g r a m k n o w n a s Cor I I .

DISTRIBUTI VE CORE FIN

-

2 8 hours

AR TS - 1 course ( 4 h ours) - Met b y a course in art,

('om m u n ication ar ts, or m u s ic, as follows: Art - a n y cou rse except those i n teaching m e t h o d s . Com m u n i a t ion A r ts - a n y of the f o l l o w i n g : 1 5 1 , 1 62, 2 4 1 , 250, 363, 364, 4 5 8 , 4 5 9 . MU ' ic - a n y course ex cept those i n teach i n g methods. H ISTO R Y / L I T E R A T U R E - 1 co ur se (4 h o u r s ) - M e t by a n y cou rse i n history, i n li t e ra ture ( De pa r t m e n t o f Mod e r n a n d C l assical Languages), o r i n E n g l ish (e xcept 1 0 1 , 328, 4 00, 4 0 3). NATURAL S IE C E S I M A T H E M A T I C S - 1 cou rse ( 4 h o u rs) - Met b y any cou rse in b i o l ogy, c h e m istry, ea r t h sciences (except [ 0 1 ), p h y s i cs and engi neering, or m a t h e m a tics /c o m p u t e r science.

PH I L O S O PHY - 1 course (4 hours) - Met by any ph ilosophy course except 1 2 1 , 233, 328, and 85. R E L I G I O N - 2 cour (8 h ou rs) - A lower di vision course should be t a k e n befor the end of t h e s o p h o more yea r . The second required course ma y be c h o s e n f r o m e i t h e r lower or upper divis ion o fferings, or from the in terd isciplinary Senior Seminar. J u n i r o r s e n i o r tra n s fer s t u d e n t s n e e d to complete only one cour s e , O n l y O n e o f t h e foll o w i n g m a y b e t a k e n to f u l f i l l t h e u n i v e r s i t y core requi rem e n t : 261, 3 6 1 , o r 3 62 . S O C I A L S C I E N C E S - 1 course (4 h o u r s ) - Met by a n y c o u r s e i n a n t h ro pology (except 2 2 1 ) , econ o m i c s , politicaJ s c i e n e, psychology (except 1 1 0) , or s ociology.

CORE n (INTEGRATED STUDIES PROGRAM) - 28 hours

Th In t eg rated S t u d i e s Prog r a m is e s pe c i a l ly d e s ig n e d as an a l t er nativ e mode of s a t i s fy i n g the core curricu l u m require m e n t. Consisting of a cons t ella tion of i n t erdiscipli na ry courses, t h e p r o g r a m a s a w h o l e expl ores a central t h e m e , " T h e D yn a m i c s o f C h a ng e , " from a variety of perspectives . A s t u d e n t w h o chooses Core I I t o m e e t t h e Gen e ra l niversity Requ i r e m e n t s will begi n w i t h S e q u ence I, w i t h a n y two S e q u e nces c h o s e n fro m I I, I I I , or IV t a ken s u bsequently o r con c u rre n t ly, a n d conclude the Prog ra.m w i t h t h e S e m i n a r which wo u ld be taken a f te r , or con c u r re n tl y with, completion o f t h e last course in the Sequences s elected . Ind ividual courses in each Sequenc e are equiva l e n t to f o u r semester hours of c re d i t each, For f u r t h e r details see page 76 of t h i s catalog. A brochure is a l s o ava ilable from t h e Office of Ad mis sions o r t h e Registrar. A b r i e f s u m mary of the prog r a m fol l o w s .

The Dynamics Sequence I :

of

Change

The Idea of Progress IS 2 1 1 Cou[�e 1 : N a t u re a n d Sup ern a t u re I S 2 1 2 Cuu r 5 e 2: From F i n i te to [ n f i n i t e

Sequence 11: H u ma n Respo n s i b i l i t y IS 2 2 1 Cou rse 1 : The Developing I n d i v i d u a l IS 2 2 2 Cou rse 2 : T h e B u rden of H u m a n R e s p o n s i b i l i t y p tion 1: . . . 20th C e n t u r y E u rope Option 2 : . . . 2Oth Century Asia Seq ,mICe

111:

Word a n d World : Exploring t h e C reative I m agin ation [ S 231 C o u rse 1: S y mbol, L a n g uage, M y th IS 2 3 2 Cou rse 2: Model a n d Metaph o r : I n v e n t i n g t h e World

Seq u,n[e 1 V ; L i m i t s to Growth I S 2 4 1 Course 1 : The Technological Soci e t y a n d the thrust fo r Growth I S 2 4 2 C o u rse 2 : T h e Tec h nological Soc i e t y a n d t h e L i m i t s to G rowth

5em itlar: IS 25 1

Se m i n a r

A C A D E M I C PROC E D U R E S

27

-


L I M T T A nONS - A L L BACCALAUREATE DEGREES l.

N o t more t h a n 40 h ours ( 1 0 co u rs e s ) e a rned i n o n e d e p a r t m e n t

ma y be appl ied to t h e B . A . or B . S . degree . I n t e r i m c o u r s e s a re excepted. 2 . N o n - m u sic m a j o rs may cou n t t o w a rd graduation r e q u i r e m e n t s not m o re t h a n e i g h t s e m e s t e r h o u rs i n ,n u s i c e n s e m b l e s .

3 . A m a x i m u m o f 24 h o u r s ( 6 c o u r s e s ) i n accredited c o r r e s ­ p o n d e n ce or e x t e n s i on s t u d i e s m a y be c redi ted toward de g ree r e q u i r e m e n t s , co n t i ng e n t on a p p roval by the r e g i s t r a r . 4 . A m a x i m u m of 64 h o u r s ( 1 6 c o u r s e s ) w i l l be a ccep te d by t ra n s f e r fr o m an accredi ted co m m u n i t y college.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUT RE M ENTS See u n d e r

o ll ege of A r t s a n d S c i e n c e s .

GRADUATION S t u d n ts e x pect i ng to fulfill deg ree r e q u i r e m e n t s W I T ďż˝ I N T H E A C D E M I C Y E A R ( i nc l u d i n g A ug u s t ) are required to f i l e a p pl ic a t i on fo r g rad uation with the Office o f t h e Registra r by

Oc t o b e r l .

T h e re a re four degree-co m p le tion da te s (end o f f a l l s e m e s ter, i n terim, spring semes ter, a n d second su mmer session ) . Degrees a r e for m a l l y conferred a t Ma y a n d A u g u s t C o m m e n c e m e n t s . S ta t e m e n t s o f c o m p le tion a re iss ued upon request to s t u d e n t s w h o q u a l i fy f o r graduation a t t he e n d o f fall s e m e s t e r a n d i n te ri m . Th e actual d a t e o f grad uation w i l l be recorded o n t h e p e r m a n e n t records.

A s t u d e n t may be awarded more t h a n one bachelor's degree s i m u l t a n e o u s l y , p rovided t h a t at l e a s t 2 8 A D DITION A L ho u rs a re e a r n e d for t h e second degree. A t o t a l of 1 5 6 a cc e p t a b l e ho urs a re req u i red for t wo s i m u l t a n e o u s bacca l a u r e a te d e g r e e s . S t u d e n t s w h o a re w i t h i n 4 h o u rs of m e e t i n g all req u i r e me n ts may p a r t ic i p a t e i n M a y C o m m e n c e m e n t provided a specific p la n for e a rn i ng re m a i n i n g cred i t w i t h i n t e n we e k s has b e e n a p proved by t h e provo s t . The i r s t a t u s will be d e s i g n a t e d on the co m me n c e m e n t

program and thei r d i plomas w i l l be d a t e d i n A u g u s t . S t u d e n t s w h o p l a n to t ra n s f e r b a c k to Pacific L u t h e ra n U n i v e r s i t y f o r a deg ree ( m a t h , p h y si c s , e ng i n e e ri n g p rogra m s ) m u s t a pp l y f o r g ra d u d t i on before or d u ri n g t h e f i r s t s e m e s t e r o f t h e i r j u n i o r y e a r s o t h a t deficiencie s m a y b e m e t before t hey leave ca m p us, A t te n d a n ce at commence m e n t exercises is expected u n less t h e c a n d i d a t e i s e xcused by t h e provos t .

28

C OL L E G E O F ARTS & S C I E N C E S

C O L L E G E O F A R T S & SCI E N C E S

Di vision o f Humanities E n g li s h ' M cl e m a n d C l a s s i c a l L a n g u a g e s Philosophy R ligion

Division of Natural Sciences Biology Chemistry E a r t h Sciences M a t h e m a t i c s and C o m p u t e r Science P h y sics a n d E n g i n e e r i ng

Division of Social Sciences Economics H i s t ory

Poli tical Sci nee Psychology S oc i o log y a n d A n t h ropo log y Soc i a l W rk

Degrees Offered Ba c h e l or o f Ar t s B a c. h e l or of Sci e n c e

MAJOR REQUIREM ENT

A m aj o r is a seq u e nce of c o u r s e s i n o n e . Hea, u s u a l l y i n one d e p a r t m e n t . A major s h o u l d be s e l e c t e d by the end o f t h e so p h om or e yea r . T h e c h oice m u s t b e a p p rov ed b y t h e d e p a r t m e n t c h a i r (or i n t h e c a s e o f s p e ci a l academic progra m s , t h e program coo rd i n a t o r ) . Major req u i re. m " n t s are specified in this catalog. The q ua l i t y of work must b e 2 . 00 o r better. D grades m ay be c ount ed toward gradua tion b u t not t o w ard a m a j o r . Recognized majors a r e : a n t h ropology

legal s t udies

art biology c h e m i s t ry classics com m u n ic a t ion a r t s

m athematics music

o r vveg i a n p h i lo s o p h y p h ysical ed uea t i o n e a r t h sciences ph y s i c s p o l i t i c a l science econom ics ps ychology e n g i n e e ri n g religion English F re n c h Sca n d i n a v i a n a r e a s t ud i e s G e rm an sociology social work h i s to ry S pa n i s h N o t m o r e t ha n 4 0 s e m e s t e r h o u r s e a r n e d i n o n e d e pa r t m e n t m ay b e a p pl i e d toward t h e b a c h e l o r's d eg ree i n t he C o ll e ge .


"-

F O R E I G N l A N G UAGE / A L TERNATI V E REQUIREMENTS: In add i t io n to meeting General Un ive rsi ty Req u i re m e n t s , candidates i n t h e College m u s t mee t t h e req u i re m e n t s o f

Option L II or I l l : I 1 6 semester h o u r s i n o n e foreign l a n g u age ' I I . 8 semester h o u r s in one foreign l a n g u a ge ' 4 s e m e ste r h o u r s in logi . m a th / computer science. or s t a t i tics 4 s e m e s t e r hours in histo ry, l i terat ure, Or language III. 4 s emes ter h o u rs in hist or y , l i te ra t u r e. or lang uage <I semester h O UTS i n social science. w h i c h mav include geography .j seme ter h o u r s i n n a t u ral science. eluding m a t h 4 s e m e s t e r h o u r s i n l o g i c , m a t h /c o m p u t e r science, o r s ta t i s tics p t ion I may be s a t i s fied by fOllr ears of high sc h o o l s t u d y i n o n e fore i g n l a n g uage. If s t udents h a ve l e s s t h a n f ur years, place m e n t a n d c r e d i t s ho u ld be d e t e r m i n e d by e x a m i n a t i o n . Fres h m e n planning to c o n t i n u e in a foreign l a n g u a g beg u n i n h i gh scho ol s h o u l d take t h e Col lege Board P l a c e m e n t T e t offered d u r i n g orie n ta t io n . ( T h i s t e s t is requi red · o f those e rm a n . French, or S pa n i s h . ) fresh m en who p l a n to s t udy o n t i n u a t io n o f a foreign l a n g u age s h o u l d not be deferred. S\ud e n ts with 2-3 years of h ig h school l a n g u a ge who wish t o cClI1 t i n u l' s hould reg i s t e r f o r t h e second y e a r course. S t u d e n t s may recei ve ned i t fo r a n y langua ge course in whi ch t h e y are placed w i t h o u t regard t o h i g h s c h ool cred i t . F i n a l decision of place m e n t i s m a d e by t h e Depa r t m e n t of Mod e r n and O a ssical l..l nguage�. S t u d e n t s m a y not receive credit if t h e y vol u n t a r i l y seiec t a cou r s e l e v e l k) wer t h a n t h a t i n \v h i c h t h e depa r t m e n t p laces t h e m . T h e fo r e i g n l a n g u a g e req u i re m e n t i n O p t i o n I I m a y be m e t b y sa t i s Fil ctory scor�s on a prof icie ncy exa m i n a t i o n or b y more than t wo vear s of h i g h c hao I work in a s i n g l e language. Two years a re s u ffic i e n t if t h e. grade po i n t a v e rage for t h e t o t a l units in that l a n g u ,1se i s 3.00. Candidates for t h e B.A. i n English, o r for t h e B . A . in ' d u c a t i o n wi t h conce n t ra t i o n in English, m u s t m e e t Option I . No c o u rse w i l l be a l lowed t o meet b o t h G e n e r a l U n i versity Re q u i r e m e n ts and Col lege re q u i re m e n t s . Where possibie, cou rse ' t ake n to fulfill req u i r e m e n t s s h a l l be i n d i f f e r e n t a reas. For e -<a m p le, s t u d e n t s f u lf i l l i n g t h e un iversity history O r li te ra t u re req U i r e m e n t w i t h a cou rse i n h i s tory, i f t h e y elect Option I I. should choose a CO urse i.1 l i t e r a t u re or lang uage to meet the req u i re m e n t o f th C o l l e g e .

DE PARTMENTS AND SCHOOlS ­ SPECIFIC DEGREE REQUIR EME NTS A N D COURSE OffE RIN G S Lis ted i n the following section are course descriptions a n d s u m m a r i e s of degree requirem e n t s for m ajors a n d prog r a m s i n t h e College of A r t s a n d Sciences a nd t h e Schools of B u s i n e s s A d m inistration, E d u c a t i o n , F i n e Arts, Nursi ng, and Ph ysical E d u c a t i o n . Detailed d"gree require m e n t s , often i n cluding su pple­ m e n t a ry s a m ple prog r a m s , are available in the offices of the i n d i vi d u a l schools a n d depa r t m e n ts .

C O URSE NUMBERINGS

1 00-200 Lo w e r Di vision Courses : Open to fres h m e n a n d s o p h o m o re ' un less ot he rwise rest ri c t e d . 300-320 I n t e r i m Cour ses 3 2 1 - 4 9 9 U p per D i v i s i on Courses: G e n e r a l l y open to j u niors and s e n i o rs unless ot h e r w i se specified. Also open to g r a d u a t e s t u d e n ts, a n d m a y b e conside red part of a g r a d u a t e prog r a m p rovided t h e y are n o t specific req uire mt' n ts i n pre p a ra tion for g ra d u a t e s t u d y . 500-599 G ra d u a t e C o u r s e s : N o r m a l l y open t o g ra d u a t e s t u d e n t s o n l y . U pper d i vi s i o n s t u d e n t s may b e per m i t ted to e n roll w i t h t h e p e r m ission of the chair. d i re c tor, or dean of t h e academic u n i t o f f e ri ng the course if a l l p r e re q u i s i t e s have been met and the s tu d e n t h a s a n above-average acad e m ic record. ' U pon approval of t h e i r a d v i s e r and c o u r s e i n s t r uc t o r s , lower d i vision s t ud e n t s m a y be assign ed t o upper d i vision Courses i f prerequisi t e s h a v e b e e n m e t .

COURSE OFFERlNGS

M ost lis ted courses a re o f f e r e d every year. A s y s t e m of a l te rna ting upper divi s ion courses is pract iced in some depart­ ments, t h ereby a s s u ri n g a broadpr c u r r ic u l u m . The u n i v e r s i t y reserves t h e righ t t o modify s p e c i f i c c o u r s e requ i r e m e n t s , t o d isc o n t i n u e cla sses in w h i c h t h e reg i s t r a t i o n i s rega rded a s i n s u ffici e n t . a n d t o w i t h d r a w courses.

E XPlANA nON OF SYMBOL S

Most cou rses have t h e value of 4 s e m e s t e r h o u r s . Pare n t h e ti c a l n u m bers i m m e d ia t e l y a f t e r t h e course descriptions i n d ic a t e t h e s e m e s t er h o u r cred i t g i v e n . O t h e r s y m bols a re e x p l a i n e d as follows : I - Cou rse offered f i r s t s e m e s t e r II - C ourse offered second semes t e r I , I I - Cou rse offered f i r , t a n d s e c o n d s e m e s t e r in s e q u e nce I I I - Course offe red e i t h e r s e m e s t e r 5 - Course offered i n t h e s u m m e r a /y - Cou rse oHe red i n a l t e r n a t e yea rs a ls - o u rse offered i n a l t e r n a t e s u m m ers G - Cou rse may be used o n g ra d u a t e progr a m s a s a m a jor

DEPART M E N T S A ND S C H O O L S

29


Art I n a t i m e o f rapidly changing concept s a n d a n almos t d a i l y emerg e nce of n e w m e dia, e m phasis m us t be placed o n a variety of experiences and c reat ive flexibilit y. S t uden t s with profe ss ional concerns must be prepared to meet t h e challenges of the modern world w i t h bot h tech nical ski lls a n d capacity f o r i nnovation. The prog ram t herefore s tresses individualized develop m e n t ra ther t h a n voc a t ional tools which q u ickly becom e bsol e t e . There is a n ex plici t rela tionship between an a r t depa r t men t's facilities a n d i t s q uali ty of cu rricu l u m . The s pacious s tu d i o areas o f the u n i versi t y's art depart men t afford an ins t ru c tio nal capa bi l it y w h ich is u n pa ra lleled by a n y priv a e ins t i t ution i n the Pacific N or thwes t . These faci l i t ies include: pa int ing studio , draw i ng studio, p I'ill t m aking studio, sCII {ptu re stu dio, ceram ics studio, film m a ki ng and p h otogra phy workshop, des ign workshop, metal shop, killl yard, fOlm d ry, darkroo m , sem ill a r roams, sl ide l i brary, the Wekell G a llery, a n d stu dfllt exh i bition areas.

FACULT Y Schwidder, Ch a i r; Elwell, Keyes, Kittleson, Ro kos, Tomsic. Artists- in- Residence: D. Cox and Torrens.

T h e depa r t m e n t has sought t o m i n i m ize prereq uisites, e n a bling students t o elect courses rel a t i n g t o t heir i n t erests as early as possible. [t is reco m m e n ded t ha t s t u d e n t s i n t erested in m a j o ring i n art declare their major early t o i ns u r e proper advising. Tra nsfer s t u d e n ts' s t a t us shall be d e t e r m i n e d a t t h e i r t i m e of e n t rance. T h e depa r t m e n t rese rves t h e rig h t to r e t a i n , e x h i b i t , and reproduce s t u d e n t work s u b m i t ted for c r e d i t i n any of its co u rs es o r programs. Use of m a t e r i a l s fee required i n c e r t a i n courses. BACHElOR OF ARTS MAJOR: M i n i m u m of 2 8 s e m e s t e r hou rs, i n c l u d i n g 1 1 0, 1 60, 2 5 0 , 2 3 0 or 3 5 0, 3 6 5 , 3 70, a n d 4 s e m e s t e r h o u r s in a r t h is t o r y . A maxi m u m of 40 s e m es t e r h o u rs m a y be applied t o w a r d t h is degree. C a n d i d a tes are regis t e red i n t h e C \lege o f Arts and Sciences and m u s t c o m p l e t e all req u i r e m e n t s . BACHELOR O F F I N E ARTS: M i n i m u m o f 56 s e m e s ter hou rs, i n c l u d i n g 1 1 0, 1 60, 250, 280, and 499 with a m i n i m u m of 8 h o u rs i n pictOrial m edia (dra w i n g, design, pri n t making, pa i n t i ng, film a rt s ), a m i n i m u m of 8 h o u rs i n m a t erials media (sc u l p t u re, cera.mics, jewelry, fibers, crafts), t w o period courses i n a r t h is tory or t he o ry , as approved, a n d electives i n areas o f e m ph a s i s to c o m p l e t e req u i r e m e n t s . Courses i n a rt t e aching methods may not be included. Students are encouraged t o choose a n a r e a o f e m p h a s is by t h e i r j u n ior year i n o n e o f t h e pictorial o r m a te rials m e d ia, design, or a r t h i s tory. BACHE LOR Of ARTS I N E O UCA nON: S e e School of Education.

30

ART


C OURSE OFfERING S

335

r t fo r m s Al te rn a t i n g s e c t i ll n i n n o n - l o o m w o r k a n d l o o m w e a v i n g . M a y b r e p e a t e d EM c r e d i t . I I (4)

S t udio 160

34]

DRAWING AND COMPOSITION

A co u r se dea l ing w i t h t h e basi ' p i c ro r i a l c o n e r n s o f fo r m ,

o m p s i t io n a n d co lo r a s well as ech ni q u e

d ra w i n g . I I I

(4)

nd m e d i a o f

2 1 5 C R AFTS A s t udio s u rv e y o f c ntemporary cra f t t ec h n i q u es . Assigned p roble m s i n a van ty of m e d i a i nclu di ng fu sed an d leaded glass, e na me .! on metal and t e ' iles . May b re ea t ed for credi t . (4) 2 1 6 JEWELRY A s t u d y o f fo rm a nd t e c h n ique i n t he d e s i g n and exe u l i on of jewelry biect s . in lude; stone s e t t i n g, fabn a t i n , a n d cas t i n g . M a y b e rep ea t ed f o r cred i t . ( 4 )

230

C E RA M I C S I

Cera m ic m ate r i al s a n d te h n i q ues i n c l ud i n g ha nd -bu m and

wheel· t h r wn me th d s, lay a n d gl az. e fo r m a t i o n . I n J u de s a s u rvey o f cer a m ic art . I I I (4)

250

SC UlPTURE I te h n i q u es a n d

Vari us

m a t e r ial s of sc u l pt ure and t h e i r

i n fl ue n ce o n t h ree-d i mens i o n a l for m . I I I

(4)

260 LIFE ORA WING A m u l t i -m d i a explora tion o f h u m an for m. M a y b e r e pea t e d for cre d i t. Pre req ui i t e : 1 6 0 or o n s e n t . I rr ( 4 ) 2 9 b DES1G N I n t roduction t o d e s i g n t h ro u g h t h e s t u d y of s U L h b a si c con erns as co l o r , form, k i n t i cs, t ac t i l i t y a n d l i g h t as ap pl i ed to va rious areas w i t h i n the f i e l d i n c l u d i n g i l l us t ra t ion , g r a p h i c s a n d i nd u s r i a l des ig n . I I ( 4 )

32b, 4 26 PH OTOG RAPHY I, I I A stud IO o u rse i n p h o tog ra phy a s a n a r t f o r m . Pri m a r y concen t ra t i n o n ca m e ra t e c h n i q u 5 a n d u s e of d a rk roo m . S t u d e n t production o f s l ide a n d p r i n t po r t folios, w i t h a n e m p hasis u p o n c rea ti ve and e x p r s s i ve e x pe ri m e n tat i o n . 32 6 m u s t b taken p r i o r to 4 2 6; 426 m ay be t ake n t w i c e . ( 4 ,

4)

328

FILM MAK ING

A s t u d io co u r se i n f i l m m ak i n g as a n a r t for m . A s t u d y of t h e m ate r i al s a n d

of e

s t ud n t

t

8

c h n iq u es mm.

and

f f i l m m ak i n g a n d t h e

16

mm.

pe r i m n ta l f i l m � w i l l be s u rveyed.

CERAMlCS I I ,

films.

(4)

r

du tion

Classic

and

m Tec h n i q u e s i n cera mic co ns t r u c t io n a n d e xp e r i m en t s in gl az e F or mali n . 3 30 m u s t be t a k e n p r i o r to 430, and n e i t h e r may be t a k en m o re t h a n o n ce. Prereq u i s i t e : 2 3 0 . I I I (4, 4 )

330, 4 3 0

F IB E R S

E x p l o r a t i o n a n d d e v e l o p m e n t of f i b e r s t r u c t u res a n d s o f t

E LEM EN TAR Y ART EDUCATION p r o j e c t s a n d m , d ia s u i t a b l f o r t h e i n s t r u c t i o n

Va r i o u

of

art i n e l m e n t ary s c h o o l ; e m p h a s i s o n d ev e lo p m e n ta l t he o r y . I [] ( 2 )

SCU L PTURE II. ill o n a p a r t i c u la r

350, 450

o n ce n t ra t ion

med i u m

of

scu l p t u re .

A l te r n a t i n g s e m e s t e r s i n me ta l , wood, o r l) t h e r m e d i a . 3 5 0 m U !j t

be t a k t n p r i o r t o -'I s O; <1 " 0 m a y b e t a k e n twice.

rereq u i " i t e ; 2 5 0 . 1 II

(4,4)

PAI NTING r, IJ

365, 465

M ed i a a nd tech n i q u e s of p a i n t i n g in o i l o r a c ry l i cs . 3 6 5 m u s t b e t ak e n p r i o r t o 46 5; 465 m a y b e t a k en t w i c e . Prer q u i s i t e : 1 60. I I I ( , 4 )

PRINTMAKING I, rr

3 70, 4 70

M t h ods a n d m e d i ,1 o f F i n a r t p r i n t m a k i n g ; bo t h h a n d a n d p h to p roces ses i n v o l v i n g l i t h o g r a p h i c , i n t a g l io a n d s reen p r i n t i n g . 370 m u s t be taken p r i o r to 4 70; 470 m a y be t ken twi e . P re re q u i s i te : 100 o r cons e n t . I I I (4, 4 ) 390

DESIGN: GRAPHICS

D e s i g n a n d exec u t i o n of p r i n t e d m a t e r i a l s ; e m p h a s i s o n n d p r o b l e m s i n m a s s G, m m u n i c a t io n .

tech n i c a l p r o -ed u res P r req u i s i t e : 1 60 . I I

.3 9 5

(4)

DESIG N: RESI DENT I AL

P r o j e c t s i n r es i d n l i<J 1 d e s i g n w i t h p a r t i c u l a r e m p h a s i s o n p l a n n i n g p roceJ u re s , lo g i s t i c a l factors , a n d tech n i c a l i l l u s t ra t i o n . ( 2 )

398

DESI G N : I t l U STRATION

Projects

in

various

type '

of i l l u s t r a t i o n

a d v e r t i s i n g . P rereq u i s i t e : 1 6 0.

49]

(4)

f r o m s t o r y to

DESIG N: WORKSHOP

A t u torial o u r s e w h i c h m a y d e a l w i t h a n y of seve r d l a s p ects o f t he d es i g n f i e l d w i t h p a r t i cu l a r c o n c e r n for b u i l d i n g a p o r t f c l i o . Pr n e q u is i l e c o n s e n t . ( 2 )

4 9 2 STUDIO PROJECTS A t u t u r i a l co u r se w i t h i n d i v i d u <1 1 i n v e s t i g a t i o n o f a pa r t ic u l a r m ed i u m , for m a j o r s t u d e n t s o n l y . M a y be reppat d f o r cred i t . I' re req u i s i te : s e n i o r s t a t u s a n d con s e n t o f i n s t rLl · t 0 r a n d dep a r t m e n t c h a i r . M a t e r ia l s 0r u s e fee w h e re n e cess a r y . I II

499

(4)

B.F.A. C ANDIDACY E X H I B mON

E x h i b i t i o n of u n d e rg r a d u a t e work by B . F . A . c a n d i d a t e s i n s t udio

a re a s ;

students

, re

res pon s i b le

for

sched u l i n g

i n s t a l l M i o n , p u b l i c i t y J n d f i n a l d i s pos i t i o n o f w(1 rk I I I ( n o cred i t )

A RT

31


His tory and Theory 110

TH E VISUAL ARTS

Western m a n's e x p ressi n in t h e visual arts seen t h rough t h e p e rspec tive of historical develo p m e n t . I I I (4)

280

TW E NTIETH CE NTURY ART

The v i s u a l arts i n the t w e n t i e t h cen t u ry i n troduction t a e s t h e tical t h eory . f l ( 4 ) 294

and

in teriors

In

318 371 380 the

IMAGERY AND SYMBOLISM

A su rvey o f s y m bolic, pictorial, a n d p l a s t i c e x p ressions i n

We t rn tradition, from t h e p e rspe t ive o f t h e i r philos足 o p h i cal and t h eologic, I i m pl ic a t ion s . E m p h a s i s o n the develop men t of the C h r i s t i a n c u l t u s . (4)

382

ANCIENT ART

A r t of the ancient N ea r East, Greece, and R o m e . I a l y (4)

383

MEDIEVAL ART

Western E u ro p e a n s ty les f r o m t h e d e c l i n e o f Rome to t h e begi n n i ng of t h e Renaissance . I I a l y ( 4 )

384

RENAISSANCE ART

E u ropean a r t of t h e fifte e n t h a n d s i x t e e n t h cen t u ries, w i t h a n e m p h as is on I ta l i a n developm e n t s . I a ly ( 4 ) 385

BAROQUE ART

St y le s in E u ro p an a r t fr m the La te s i x t e e n t h c e n t u r y t h ro u g h t h e period of t h e Rococo. I I a l y (4) 440

SEMINAR I N ART EOUCATlON

A s t u d y of ins t r u c t i o n i n t h e secondary sc hool i n c l u d i n g ap propriate media a n d c u rricu l u m develop m e n t . II (2)

487

NINETEE NTH CENTURY ART

A r t o f t h e n i n e tee n t h c e n t ury f r o m neo-cla s i c i s m t h ro u g h Post I m p res s i o n is m. I (4)

490

SEMINAR

Selected top ics cons id e r i n g s o m e a s p e c t of t h e visual a rt s . Ma y be r pea t e d f o r c re d i t . Prereq u i s i t e : c o n s e n t . (4)

497

RESEARCH I N ART H ISTORY

A tu torial course for major s t u d e n t s w i t h researc h i n t o a p a r t i c u l a r p eriod or area of a r t h is tory. M a y be repeated for cred i t . rereq u i s i t e s : senior s t a t u s and con s e n t o f i n s t r uctor a n d d e p a r t m e n t chair. I I I ( 4 )

597

RESEARCH

F o r m a s ter o f a rts n d i d a tes w h o elect to write a research paper i n a r t . I II (4)

32

ART

215 302 307

an

TWENTIETH C E NTURY DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE

Deve lop me n t s i n arch i t e c t u re t w e n t i e t h c e n t u ry . 1 ( 4 )

380

with

C OU R S E S OFFERED IN THE 1 979 INTERIM CR AfTS SCULPTU R E : fROM RODIN TO NOW A CULTURAL E XPERIENCE IN THE ARTS IN N E W YORK C ITY UFE SCU LPTURE FABRIC PRINTING WORKSHOP IMA GERY AND SYMBOliSM


Biology T h e Depa r t men t of B i ology i s dedicated to a tea c h i n g p rocess, n o t j u s t a d e l i v e r y of fac t s . F a c t s fo r m t h e fou nd a t i o n o f s c i e n ce b u t a p proach i n f i n i t y i n n u m b e r . There fore, t h e bioI g y fac u l t y s t re s s e s t h e g a t h ering, p roces s i ng, r e t r i e v i n g a n d i n te r p re t i ng o f t hese fac t s . T h e biology facu l t y believes i n t h e n o t i o n t h a t o n e o f t h e m o s t p r o fo u n d req u i rem e n t s i n science i s l e a r n i n g to a s k t h e r i g h t q ue s t i o n s a n d t o recognize t h e a n s w e r s . T h e d e pa r t m e n t i s t h e re fo re dedica ted to pe r m i t t i n g s t ud e n t s t o l e a rn science i n t h e o n l y w a y t h a t i t c a n be e f f e c t i v e l y made a p a r t o f t h e i r t h i n k i n g : to i nd e p e n d e n t l y q u e s t ion i t , probe i t, t ry it o u t, e x pe r i m e n t w i t h i t, e x perie nce i t . I n a d d i t ion to diverse fac u l t y a n d b a l a nced c u rricu J u m, the depa r t m e n t p r v i d e s n u m e r o u s faci l i t ies for i t s s t u d e n t s , i nc l u d i n g : h e r b a ri u m, i n ve r te bra t e a n d vertebra t e m u se u m s , gre n ho use, v i v a ri u m a n d surgery roo m , clima te con trol roo m s , grow t h c h a m bers, v e r t e b r a t e p h y siology a n d c e l l p h y s i ology l a bora t r i e s , a field s t a t i o n l o c a t e d o n S tate of W a s h i n g t n P a r k s l a n d , a n d a boa t eq u i p ped for s t u d ies of Puget S o u n d . Q u a l i f i ed s tu de n t s a r e i n v i ted t o u s e t hese faci l i t i e s in i n de p e n de n t s t u d y o r par t i c i p a t i o n i n o n g oi n g fa c u l t y r esea rch .

fAC UlTY M ain, C h a i r; Al exan der, J . Carlson, Crayton, Gee, Hansen, J. J ensen, Kn udsen, Lerum , D.}. Martin, Matthias, McGinnis.

B i ology m aj o rs d e v e l o p t h e i r academic prog ram i n cons u l t a t i o n w i t h a depa r t m e n t a l adviser. A depa r t m e n t a l a d v i s e r m u s t be c o ns u l t ed p r i o r t o c o m p l e t io n of B i ology 2. 5 3 , t h e f i n a l c o u r s e i n t h e i ni t i al t h ree s e m es t e r c o r e courses req u i red o f all biology majors, for g uidance i n the selection of a n a p p ropriate u pper division program o f s t u d y . All biology majors a re req u i red t o take the G raduate Record E x a m i na t i o n w i t h i n t wo semest ers before g r a d u a tion.

BACHElOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 2.8 semester h o u rs, including 1 55, 1 56, 2.53, dnd 1 6 hours chosen i n c o n s u l t a t ion w i t h depart mental adviser. R e q u i red su pporti n g : C h e m is t ry 1 1 5, 1 1 6, 3 3 1 , 3 3 2., 333, 3 34, and M a t h 1 3 3 o r e q u i v a l e n t . A d d i t i o n a l courses in p hysics, earth sciences, a n d /or m a t h e m atics are recom me n d ed a s appropriate i n cons u l t ation w i t h ad v i s er . A m axi m u m of 40 s e m es t er h o u rs o f b i o l o g y c o u r s es m ay b e coun ted t ow a r d graduation. I nt e r i m c o u r s e s (300- 3 2. 0) cannot be coun ted toward t h e major.

B I O LOG Y

33


BACH ELOR OF S O IN C E M AJ O R : 40 seme t r h o u rs, m c l u d ing 155, 156, 253, and 2 8 hours chosen in consul tation with depar t m!' n ta l ad vi5f'r. Req u i red s u pp,)rt i ng : Che mi st ry 1 1 5, 1 1 6, 33 1 , 332, 3 3 3, 334; One year of physics; and m a t h e matics t h rough 1 5 1 . A max i m u m of 40 s e m es t e r hours f b io i gy cou rses may be co u nt e d f r gradua tion . I n terim o u r se s (300-320) . c�nnot be u n ted toward t h e maJO r.

201 INTRODUCTORY MICROB IOLOGY T h e gro w th , control, p h y i log y, isola t i o n , a n d i d e n t i fica­ t i n of m icroorga n i s ms, es peci a l l y th se w h i c h ffect h u m a n bei n g s . I nc l u de s l a b o r at o ry . Pre req u i SIte s : I I I a n d C h e m i stry 1 0 3 or co n en ! . T h i s course is su i t a ble for n u rs e a nd o t h e r non -s cience maj ors; not open to bi o l og y m a jors . I

BACHELOR Education .

205, 206

OF

A R TS

rN

EDUCATION:

ee

chool

of

M I NOR: At l e as t 20 semester h u rs select ed from a n y biology co urses except those n u m bered 300-3 20 (I n t e ri m )' in wh ich a g rad e of C or hig h e r is ea r ned . Pass - fa i l c u rses m ay not be CO U ll t ed.

Prere q u is i tes m u s t be m t'! u n less a w r i t t e n waiver is obt ai n ed i n adv a n ce from bot h t h e i nstru t o r a n d t h e depa r t m en t c h a i r . A pp l icabi l i ty of no n - F'L U b i o l ogy red i t s w i l l be d e t e r m i n e d b t he d e pa rt m e n t ch a i r . on s u l t t h e c h a i r for assign me n t Df a m i n or adV iser

(4)

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYS10LOG Y

F i rst sem este r : m a t t e r , cel l s a n d t issu es; n e r vo u s , e nd oc rine, ske l e t a l , a n d m u sc u l a r sys tems. L a bo ra to ry includes c t d i s sectio n a n d ex pe r i m e n t s i n m u scle p h ys io l ogy a n d re fl exes . Second se m este r : ci rc u l a tory , re s pi r a t o ry , d iges t i v e ,

met

xcretory, and r e p ro d u c t i v e sy

te m s;

b l i s m, t em pe r a t u re reg u l a t i o n a n d st ress. Lab ra tory

t ncl udes ca t d issect io n, ph y s iology exp ri m e n t s and s t u d y d e ve l o p i ng o rgani s ms . S a t i s fies C e n ral U n i v e r i t y Req u i rem en t , b u t does not co u n t toward the b i o l og y major except w i t h the pe r m iS Sion o f t he de p a r t m e n t c h a i r . 2 0 5 ( ( ) prereq uisite to 2 0 6 ( I J ) . ( 4 , 4 )

of

C OURSE OFF E R I N G S 11]

BI OLOG Y A N D THE MODERN WORLD

A l i bera l art c u rse f r n o n - bi ol ogy majors; selected top i c s f h u m a n i t y d nd to h u m a n a r t a n d well -bei ng; t he e n v i ro n m e n t , r p rod u c t i on n t ro l, p op u la t i o n , h e red it y , evol u t ion a n d a nd b i rt h bio log Ical co n t Tol s. Lect u res, l abora tories, and d i scu ssion J II (4) w h ich re l a t e to t h e h i s t o ry a n d f u t u re

1 55

PRINClPLES OF B I OLOGY I : POPULAT I O N BIOLOGY AND DIVE RSITY OF l.l F E

I n t rod uction to sciencE' a nd IE-vels o f o r g a n i za t i o n i n bi o l og y ; Men de l i a n genet ics and p o p u l a ti on bio I gy; h Istory a n J d i ve rs i ry f l i Fe, Requ i r d of a l l bi ol og y m a l r5. l n d u des la bora tory .

Co- regis t ra t i o n rec m me n d e d I ( 4)

] 56

in

c h e m is t ry

IS

s t r ngly

PRlNCfPLES OF BI OLOG Y II: THE C E L L AND B IO-ENERGETICS

C e l l u l a r a n d m l ec u l a r levels of bi l ogi ca l orga n iz a t i o n ; c e l l u l t (a - � t r u t u r e a n d p h ysiol og y , molecu l a r g e n e t i cs, energy t r ,1 n sd u tion; en rgy flow and n utri e n t c y c l e s i n ec s y s t e m s . R eq u i red l) f a l l b i rJ l og y m jor . I n c l udes l a bora ­ t u r v . A s :. u m es com p letion of one semes t e r of co l lege ch 'm i s t r y ( 1 04 or 1 1 5 ) . Pre req u is i te. 1 55 II ( 4 )

253 he

PRlNC I PL E S Of B10LOG Y I l l : BIOLOGY OF THE STEADY STATE bas i c

pr ob l e m s

faced

by

pl a n t s

and

a n i mals

in

m a i n t a i n i n g t he m selves; s t ruct u ra l adaptations, homeo­

s ta s i s , i n ternal r e g u l a t i o n , water and t e mperat u re c o n t rol ,

gas excha nge, vascular sy stems , a n d in te rac t i on be t ween o rga n i s m s . R e q u i red of a l l bi o logy m a j ors . I n c l u des laboratory. Prere q u i s i t e s : 1 5 5, 156 and f i r st - y ea r c h e m i s ­ t ry. I

(4)

ORN ITHOLOG Y 32 1 The s t u d y f bir� w i th em p h a s i s on loca l s pe c i es; d es ig n ed for s tu d e n ts w i t h h o b b y in teTe ts a s well a for adv need biolog y s t ude n t s . Fiel d t n p s . I ncl u d es l a b o r a t o ry . Pre­ r q u i s l te : 2 53 or c o n s e n t . II ( 2 ) 322

M l C ROBIOLOGY

p h ys i ol gy, gene t i cs, meta bol is m and e co l o gy of m i c ro r a n is m s . Incl udes lab ratory . Pr ­ req u Isi t e : 2 5 3 or (o n se n t ; one s e m e s t e r org a n iC ch em istry reco m m ended . I I ( 4 )

T he

s tnJct u re ,

324 NATURAL H I STORY Of VE RTEBRATE S C l a s s i f ica t ion , n a t u ra l h i s t o r y a n d economic i m p r t a n ce of ve r t e bra te w i t h t h e excep t io n of bi rds . ield t r i p s a n d l abo ra t ory . Prerequ is i t e : 2 5 3 a l y 1 979- 8 0 (4) 326 ANIMAL BEHAVIOR D e s c ri p t io n , c l as si fica tion , c a u s e , f u n ction a n d d e v e l o p ­ m en t of t he be h a v io r of a n i m a l s . L e ctu r e w i l l m p h a si ze a n e t h o log ica l ap p roac h t o t h e s t u dy o f be h a v io r f o u i n g u po n co m pa rison s a mong species, as w e l l a s phy siolog ica l, eco l o g ic a l a n d e ol u t ion a ry a spect s o f b e h a v io r . L a bora tory i s n o t r i g i d ly sched u l ed and will co nsis t o f a be ha v ior a l i n ves t iga t ion of t h e st ud en ts' c h oos i n g . Prereq u is i te : 253 o r consen t o f i n s t r u c t o r . a l y 1 980- 8 1 . I I ( 4 )

34

B I O L OG Y


331

G E N E TICS

Basic concepts including consideration of molec ular basis of gene expression, recombin ation, g e n e t ic va riabili ty, a n d c onsidera tion of cytogene tics and pop ula tion genetics. I n c l u des laboratory. Prereq u is i t e : 253 1 (4)

340

PLANT DI VERSITY AND DISTRIBUTION

A systematic i n t roduction to p l a n t d i v e r s i t y . I n teraction between plants, th eories o f vegetational d is t ri b u t io n . E m phasis on h i g h e r p l a n t t a x o n o m y . I n c l u d e s la boratory and field trips. Prereq u i s i t e : 253. II (4) 346

CELLULAR PHYSIO LOG Y

De als with how ceUs a re organized to s t a y alive; enzyme kinetics and regul atory mechanisms; s t r u c t u re and s y n t hesis of p rotein s and n ucleic acids; energy metabolism; m e m brane s t r u c t u re, permeability a n d transport phenom­ e na; functional u l t rastructure. Prequ i s i t e s : 2 5 3 and Org a n i c Chemis try. I (4)

347

C E LLULAR PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY

Accompanies C e l l u l a r Physiology; experience in techniques and types of i n s t r u me n t a t ion including cell fract ionation, d etermination of me tabolic seque nces, use of radio t racers, pro tein assay, membrane phenomena, ul trace n t r i fugation, spectrophotome try, Warburg respirom e t r y . May be elected only by s t u d e n t s with a serious i n terest a n d need for this type of training. Coreq u i s i t e : 346 and con s e n t . I ( 1 )

357

PLANT FORM AND FUNCTION

Plant a n a tomy, function and reprod uction; emphasis o n seed-prod ucing g roups. I n c l u d e s laboratory. Prerequisites: 253 a n d C he m i s t r y 1 1 6. O rganic C he m i s t ry reco mmended. I (4)

358

PLANT PHYSIOLOGY

Pl a n t g rowth from seed t o flower; seed germina tion, water relations, respiration, mineral n u t ri tion, growth regula­ tors, photos y n t h esis and o t h e r l i g h t e ffects o n p l a n t cycl e s . Incl udes laboratory. Prereq u i s i te s : 253 a n d Organic Chemistry. Cellular Physiology stro n g l y recommended. ,

(4)

36 1

COMPARATIVE ANA TOMY OF THE VERTEBRA TE S

Taught from a p h y loge ne tic viewpo i n t , considers how a n d w h y living vertebrates a t tained their present s t ructure. A t te m p ts not o n ly to l earn vertebrate a n a t o my, b u t also to u nderstand it. Prereq u i S i t e : 253. I ( 4 )

371

I N VERTE BRATE ZOO LOG Y

I n t ro d uc t ion to the form, function, n a t u ra l h i s tory a n d p hylogeny of the m a j o r p h y l a of invertebrates. L a boratory e x e rcises will include dissections, field s t u dies and ollections. Prereq u isite: 253 or con s e n t of i n s tructor. a/y 1 9 79-80 II (4)

372

G ENERAL EN TOMOLOGY

A n i n t roduction to insect ana tomy, ph ysiology, on togeny and behavior. Laboratory includes gross dissection, field s t udy and the collection and classification o f insects. Prereq uisite: 253. a / y 1 9 80- 8 1 . I (4)

375

BIOLOG Y OF PARASITISM

Parasi tism a s a m ode of life: the n a t u re of the parasite a n d of the host-parasite assoc ia t ion a n d h o s t respon ses, w i t h s pecial reference to a n t igens a n d a n ti bodies, host-an tigen i n teract i o n, factors i n f l uenCing lymphoid cells, a n d h u moral a n d cellular response mechan isms. The g a m u t o f parasitic forms includes v i r u ses, other m icroorg a n i s m s , h e l m i n t hs a n d insects as they affect p l a n t a n d a n i mal hos t s . I n c l u d e s l a bora tory . Prereq u i s i t e : 253. a/y 1 9 79-80. I I (4)

403

DEVELOPMEN TAL BIOLOGY

Consideration of the develop m e n t o f m u l ticel l u l a r orga n ­ i s m s , foc u s i n g o n the molecular bases f o r develop men t . Topics i n c l u de morphogenic movements, c e l l d e t e r m i n a­ tion and diffe re n t iation, p a t tern for m a t ion, ce, H in teractions in development, chem ical messengers in d evelopment, and genetic reg u l a t i o n of develop m e n t . Laboratory i ncludes experimen tal problems a n d descriptive embryology. Pre­ req u is i t e: 253. II (4)

411

HlSTOLOG Y

Microscopic study of norma� cells, tiss ues and organs of vertebrates. This s t udy is both s t ructurally and physi­ ologically oriented. Prereq uisi te: 253. I I (4)

424

ECOLOGY

Org a n i s m s in rel a t i o n to t heir e n v i r o n m e n t, including organ i s m a l adaptations, pop u la tion growth a n d i n ter­ actions, and ecosystem st ructure and function. Pre­ req u i s i t e : 253. I I (4)

425

BIO LOG I C A L OCEANOGRAPHY

The ocean J S enviro n m e n t for p l a n t a n d animal li fe; an in troduction to t h e st r u c t u re , dyna mics a n d his tory of marine ecosys t e m s . Lab, field t rips, and term project in addi tion to lecture. Prereq uisite: 253. I I (4)

426

F I E LD METHODS IN ECOLOGY

S a m p l i ng techniques and a n a l y s i s o f n a t u r a l ecosys t e m s . Independent project required. Prereq uisites: 253 a n d 4 2 4 o r consent of i n st r uctor. II (2)

441

MAMMALIAN PHYSIOLOG Y

F u nctions of prinCipal m a m malian organ systems empha­ s i z i n g co n t rol mechan isms and homeos t a tic relationships. Hu man-orien ted laboratory i n c.!udes work i n circu l a t ion, cardiography, psychophys iology, temp era t u re reg u l a t i o n , a n d o t h e r a reas. S t u d e n t s a re req u i red to d e s i g n a n d e x e c u te a maj o r e x p e r i m e n t of their own . Prerequ isites: 253 a n d C he m i s t ry 3 3 2. A n a tomy a n d B ioche m i s t r y recom­ mended. I (4).

BIOLOGY

35


E VOLUTION

475

Evo l u t i o n

as

ove r c o m i n g

a

p roce s s :

genetic

sources

i n e r tia

in

of

v a r i a t io n ;

populations;

forces

specia tion.

Evol u t i o n of g e n e t ic s y s t e m s a n d o f l i f e i n r e l a t i o n t o ecological t h e o r y a n d e a r t h h i s to r y . Le c t u r e a n d discu s s i o n . Te rm p a p e r a n d m i n i - s e m i n a r re q u i re d . Pre req u i s i t e : a/y

1 980- 8 1 . (4)

490

253.

I

SEMINAR

S e l e c t e d top ics i n biology b a s e d o n ,l i t e r a t u re a n d lor o r i g i n a l r e s e a r c h . O p e n t o j u n i o r a n d s e n io r biology m a j o r s .

49 1 , 4 9 2

(1)

I NDEPE NDENT STUD Y

I n ves t i g a t i o n s or r e s e a r c h in a reas of s p e c i a l i n t e re s t n o t cov red by re g u l a r c o u rses; o p e n to q u a l i fi e d j u n i o r a n d s e n i or majo rs; s t u d e n t s s h o u ld not e l e c t i nd e p e n d e n t s t ud y u n l e s s t h ey k n ow i n adva nce t he s p e c i f i c a re a t h ey w i s h t o investigate

and

can

demonstrate

a serious i n terest in

p u rs u i n g i t . I t i s s u g g e s t e d t h a t t h e s t u d e n t s p e n d o n e s e m e s t e r r e s e a r c h i n g t h e l i t e r a t u re a n d w r i t i n g a p ro p o s a l (for

1

s e m . h r. o f credit) a n d t h e n e x t s e m e s t e r a c t u a l l y

ca r r y i n g o u t t h e p ro j e c t (for a n o t h e r 1 s e m . h r . of c re d i t ) . S t u d e n t s w i l l n o t b e p e r m i t ted to u s e

49 1 - 4 9 2 f o r f i l l i n g i n a

deficiency i n t h e i r p rog r a m . Prereq u i s i t e : w r i t t e n pro p o s a l

for t h e pro j e c t a p p roved by a facu l t y s p o n s o r a n d t h e depa r t m e n t c h a i r .

( 1-4)

C O U RSE S OFFERED I N THE 1979 INTERIM 302 304

308 311 318

36

HUMANI STIC BOTANY DEVELOPMENT: THE CYCLE OF L I F E L ANDSCAPE A R T F O R THE FUN O F IT NATURAL HISTORY O F PUG ET SOUND MODELS IN BIOLOGY

BIOLOGY


Business Adntinistration SCHOOL OF

In oncert w i t h genera l u nivers i t y requ i re m e n t s, the b u s i ne s s cu rric u l u m prepares graduates for responsible positions i n business, educa tion, a nd govern m e n t . Optiona l concentrations a r e offe red in t h e fields o f accou n ti n g, fi n a nce, m a rketing, operations ma nagem en t, and pe rsonnel a n d i ndu s trial relations. f A C U LT Y

King, Deal1; Bancroft, Barndt, Ba rnowe, Carvey, Crooks, Hegstad, Hutcheon, lauer, McNabb, C . Peterson, Schafer, Sepic, Turner, V a n Wyhe, A. Walton, C . Walton, J. Wells, Woolley, Zulauf.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS Six ty-four semester hours o r one-half of the m i n i m u m total degree requ ir em en t s ar e t ak en i n fields outside the School of Business A d m i n i s t r a t i o n . At l e a s t 40 s em es t er hours are taken i n required a n d elective business subjec t s . T h e Bache[or o f B u s i n e s s A d m i n i s t ration degree program consis t s of 1 28 s e m e s t e r hours to be t a ken over a four-year period, an d to be completed with an over-all grade poi n t average of 2 . 5 or above a s well a s a 2 . 5 grade point average separately i n business courses. D grades i n business a d m i n i s t r a tion core courses (including t h e t wo upper division business e lectives) will not meet the BBA gradua tion requi reme n t s . In practice, the work can be accele rated by t a ki ng a heavier t h a n average load and by participa t i n g in s u m m e r sessions . O n t h e o t h e r h an d, m a n y s tu d en t s f i n d i t useful t o exceed th e m in im u m req uire m e n t s by i ncluding rela ted or addi tio n al advanced work i n t h eir undergraduate s tu d i e s .

BACHELOR OF BUSINESS ADMIN ISTRATION:

230,

2 8 1 , 2 8 2, 350, 364, 370, 4 53 , 4 5 5, and 8 s em es ter h o u rs of

ADM ISSION The professional Bachelor of Business A d m i n i s t r a t io n degree p rogra m is composed o f a n upper division business cu rriculum w i th a s t rong base i n libera l arts. Undergra d u a t e s t u d e n t s are a d m i t ted to th e School o f Business A d m i n i s t ra t ion upon t h e successful completion o f at l e a s t 24 semester hours w i t h a c u m u la tive gra de poi n t average of 2.5 r a bove. and the declaration of business a d m i n i s t ra t ion a s t h m a j o r field of s t u d y . Transfer stu dents are requi red to have m a i n t ained t he grade poi n t a verage of 2.5 s e p a r a t e l y in both business and non-business cou r s e s . The s t ud e n t 's i nterest t o acquire a professional compe tence is desired a nd the assig n m e n t of a business faculty adviser i s req uired. Students considering gradua te-level s tudy should seek early p la n n i n ad"'ice fro m the fac u l t y concern ing appropria t e undergra d uat e course se lection. Graduate students are a d m i tted to the School of B usi ness A d m i n I s t ra t ion w h e n t h e y me e t th e req uire m e n t s specified i n t h e proced ures a v a i l a b l e f r o m the D e a n o f G r a d u a t e S t udies.

AHILIA TlONS The S hoot of B u s i n e s s A d m i n i s t ra t ion o f Pacific Lu theran

Univers i t y is a m e m be r of th e A merica n Assembly o f Collegiate S hoots f B usi n e s s . B . B . A . a n d M . B . A . prog ra ms are na tionally accredited b y t he Accreditation C uncil of the A A C S B . Pacific Lu t he ra n U niversity i s aco'edited regionally by t h e Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges. The School o f B u s i n e s s A d m i n i s t ration is also a me mber o f t h e North west Uni versities' B us i ness Ad m i n i s t r a t io n C on ference, t h e Wes t ern Association of Collegiate Schools o f Business, an d the Na t ion a[ Associa t io n o f Schoo ls of Public Affa i rs a nd A d m i n i s t r a t i o n .

upper division business electives. Required supporting: Econ 1 5 0, Math 1 28 (or 1 .2 7 an d 1 5 1 ) (or 151 an d 331), S t a t 2 3 1 , a nd

o n e upper division economics course. NO M O R E T H A N 5 0 P E R C E NT OF T H E H O U R S M A Y B E B U S I N E S S C O U R SE S . T h e elective courses a r e chose n to support t h e s tuden ts' profe S S ional career objec tives or gradua t e study plans. They m a y re flect business a d m i n i s t rat ion conc e n t ra t i o n (s ) or selections from e n tirely different field (s). The l a t t e r may include work i n other p rofessional schools or prog r a m s .

CONCENTRATIONS: C e r tificates o f conce n t ratio n a re is sued upon com pletion of specialized s t u d i e s . The conce n t ration i s noted o n t he s tu d e n t 's transcript. A t least 16 hours of upper division courses i n an area of specialization m u s t be completed w i t h a 2 . 5 g rade poi n t average. Acco u ,, /ing - 381; 385; 387; 4 8 2; 383 or 484. Finance - 364; 3 6 7; 4 6 4; 3 8 1 , 4 6 0 or 4 6 1 . S tu d e n t s must take Econ 352 or 3 6 1 a s an u pp er division economics e l ec tive. Marketing - 370; 4 72 or 4 73; 4 71; 4 70 . Operation5 Ma"agement - 3 5 0 ; 4 5 0; 4 5 1 ; 385. Person nel a n d Industrial Relations - 350; 453; 4 6 0; Psych 450. S t udents must take Econ 3 2 1 as a n upper division economics

elec t iv e.

MJNOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION:

E co n 1 50; Ma t h

1 28 (or 1 27 an d 1 5 1 ) (or 1 5 1 an d 3 3 1 ); S t a t 2 3 1 ; B A 2 8 1 , 350, 364, 370.

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINI STRATION:

See Graduate

C a talog.

MASTER OF PUBLIC ADM IN ISTRA nON:

S ee Gradua t e

C a t al og .

B U S I N E S S A DM IN I S TRATION

37


BUSI NESS A D M I N I STRATI ON COURSES C o urses n u m bered 100-299 are available t o all s t u d e n t s . Courses n u m bered 300-499 are open to s t u d e n t s w i t h j u n i o r standing and t h e required prerequ i s i t e s . C o u r s e s n u m bered 5 0 0 - 5 9 9 a re reserved f o r s t uden t s in t h e M B A and M PA programs and s t u d e n t s i n o ther grad u a t e program s w h o h a v e an approved f i e l d i n b u s i n e s s . The m id d le d i g i t of the course n u m b e r indica tes t h e fie l d o f conce n t ra tion: 3 - l aw 4 - general service 5 - personnel and i n d u s t rial m a n ag e m e n t 6 - fina nce m a rketing 8 - accoun ting and i n fo r m ation systems 9 - specialized a nd p re d o m i n a n t l y inde pen d e n t s t u dies. 7

-

C OURSE OFFERINGS 2 3 0 LAW AND SOCIETY A s t udy o f t h e legal system in the United States a n d the regulation of rel a t i o n sh i p s be t ween i n d i v i d u a l c i t izens, groups, and the gover n m e n ta l agencies a n d branches . Review of the r i g h t s a n d obligations of indi vidual citizens a n d corpora t io n s , a d m i n i s t ra t ive law, a n d the proced u res a n d practices of the courts in a modern society. I II (4) 241

BUSINESS COMMUNI CATIONS

Deve lop ment o f applied w r i t i ng skills a n d tech niques in business communication s . Incl uded are letters o f i n q u i ry, orders and acknowledgeme n t s, sales and p romotional c o m m u nications, claims and adjustments correspondence, credit a n d collectio n s l edgers, briefing a n d business repo rts, resumes, a n d applic ation l e t t e r s . (4)

243

PER SONAL FI NANCE

Consumer saving, spending and p l a n n i ng tec h n iques; i n tellige n t buying a n d budgeting, estate a n d tax p l a n n i ng, i n s u ra nce a n d i n ve s t m e n t prog r a m s , retirement p l a n n i ng; et hical issues in govern ment a n d business from the consumer viewpoi n t ; con s u m e r organization a n d i n f l uence i n fina nce, marke t i ng and production . ( 4)

281

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTI NG

An i n t rod uction to accoun t i n g concepts a n d principles. Prepara tion a n d a n a l ysis of financial repor t s . I I I (4)

282

ACC OUNTING I NFORMATION SYSTE MS

I n t roduction to m a n a g e m e n t i n f o r m a t i o n s y s t e m s . E m ­ p h a s i s on t h e a n a J ysis a n d i n t e rp retation o f acco u n ti n g a n d economic data a n d t h e i r u s e i n pla n n i ng a n d cont ro l . Applica tions u tilizing compu ter t e r m i n a l . P r e requ i s i t e : 2 8 1 . I n (4)

38

B U SI N E S S A D M I N I S T R A T I O N

350

MANAGEMENT

A c ritical e x a m i n a ti o n o f the p ri n ciples and processes of a d m i n i s t ra t i o n . Management tech n iques a n d t h e f u n c t ions of planni ng, orga nizing, d i rection, a n d control are discussed from both the class ical and t h e behavioral points of view. Study of the concep t s and characteris tics of the production functio n . I n t roduction t o case a n a ly s i s a n d p roblem-solving tech n i q u e s . Prerequisites : Econ 1 5 0, Math 1 2 8 (or equiva l e n t ) (may be concurre n t ) , Stat 231 (may be concurrent), and S A 2 8 1 . J u ni o r s t a n d i n g . I I I (4)

364

MANAGERIAL FINA NCE

Concen t ra t e d study of t h e tools of financial a n alysis: Funds and cash flows, critical a n a lysis o f financial s t a t e m e n t s and o t h er financial i n format,ion, techniques of financial plan n i ng a n d budgeting, a n d the concepts rela ted t o capital expen d i t u re budgeti ng, and t h e cost of capital. An i n t roduction to financial s t ra tegies and decision- making for f i nancing, ·expansion, a n d dividend policie s . Required for business majors. Prereq u is i te s : Econ I S O, Mat h 1 28 (or equivale n t ) , Stat 2 3 1 , and SA 281. Ju nior s t a n d i n g . r I I (4)

367

FINANCIAL MARKETS

Analysis of the c h a racteristics and d e t e r m i n a n t s of an efficient fina ncial s y s tem; pricing of capital assets; s u p p l y a n d d e m a n d for l o a n a b l e f u n d s a n d t h e l e v e l a n d s t ru c t u re of i nterest ra te s; savings-inves t m e n t process a n d financial i n termediaries; i n s u ra n ce and rei n s u rance mark e t s; com­ modit y markets, a n d in ternational finance. Prerequisites: Econ I S O, Ma t h 1 28 (or equivalent), Stat 231, SA 2 8 1 , BA

364 . ( 4)

370

MARKETING SYSTEMS

The flows of goods and s e rvices in the economy, eco nomic and behavioral app roaches t o the a n a l ysis of demand; the role of t h e marketing functions i n a business f i r m . Det e r m i n a tion o f a marketing m i x - prod uc t policy, pricing, c h a n n el s of d istribu tion, a n d marketing c o m m u n i ­ cations. Prereq u i s i t e s : E c o n I S O, Math 1 2 8 (or equivalent), Stat 231, a n d SA 281. Junior standing. I I I (4)

381

INTERM E DI ATE ACCO UNTI N G

Conce n t rated s t u d y of t h e val ua t ion t heories for assets a n d liabilities. Analysis o f related effects o n i ncome determi­ n a t i o n . Prereq u i s i t e : 281. I II (4)

383

I NCOME TAXATION

Comprehens ive study of income tax concepts, reg ulations, a n d t a x plann ing principles. E m phasis o n individual a n d corporate i ncome t a x a t i o n . Prerequisite: 2 8 1 . (4)

385

CO ST ACCOUNTING

Basic and advanced concepts of costs i n developing information for management use in the d e t e rm i n a tion of income, eval uation of capital\ i n ve s t m e n t a l t e r n a tives, and the measurement of performance. P r e requ i s i t e s : 281 and 282. I (4)

-


387

DATA PROC ESSING SYSTEMS

A computer- laboratory-orien ted course which i ncl udes basic pr gram and system a n a lys i s a n d flow charting, i n tensiv s tudy of program m i ng languages with emphasis on BASIC, and the development of a w o r k i ng know ledge with comp ute r hardware and software system s. Pre ­ requisites: 281 and 282. I [] ( 4)

392

I NTERNSHlP

A prog ram of full t i m e e x pe r i e n c e close ly rela ted t o the studen t's specific career a nd aca de m ic interes ts. The s tudent i s expected to develop the i n ternship oppor t u n i ty with a firm or organizat ion , a n d the Scho I will prepare an in terns h i p ag re e me n t T his agreement identifies the problems t o be researched, experience to b ga ined, and related readings to be accom plished . Monthly progress reports a n d other measu res of ach ieveme n t w l l l be lIsed to determ i n e the grade . Not more than 2 hours of credit will be gran ted for a f u l l month of i n ternsh ip, nd n t more t h a n 8 hours of accum ula ted cr d i t w i l l be gra n ted for the inte rnships taken . The i n terns hip ca n not be used to meet the mi ni m u m requi remen t for 2 bu siness admin istra tion elec tive cours es, a nd it m ust be comple ted prior to the last semester be fore gradua tion . Prerequisi t es: BA 281, 282, 350; Econ 150; S ta t 2 3 1 ; one additional ou rse 1 0 the s t uden t's area of c ncentration . (2 or 4).

435

BUSIN E SS LAW

Proced ure s , con tracts, agencie s , negotia ble i n s trume n t s , business orga n iza tions, pro erty, trusts a n d wills, tra n s­ portation, i n sur a n ce a n d e m ployme n t. I I (4)

450

M A N UFACTURING MANAGEMENT

455

BUSINESS POL ICY

Formulation of policies to in tegrate all func tions of business . Social, e thical, relig io us , economic, educa tional and intern a tional mplica tions i n t he formu lati on of busi ness pol icies a nd objectives . I ncludes comprehen sive case a nalyses . Required for busi ness majors. PrereqUisites: Senior s t a n di ng; 281 , 282, 350, 364 a nd 370. I I I (4)

456

HONORS SEMINAR

460

E MPLOYEE BENEfIT PLANS

In tensive a nalysis of em pi yee benefit plans; pro f i t s h a ri ng pla n s , pe nsion pla n s, group health and hfe i n s u ra nce; structure and effec t of governmen tal reg u l ation of v arious benefit pl an s. Prereq uisites: Econ 1 50, Mat h 1 28 (or equ ivalent ), S t a t 231, BA 28 1 , BA 364 . (4)

461

PORTFOLIO MAN A G E M E NT

Discussion of sound portfolio management tech n iq ues: Secllri ty selection and cons truc tion of efficient asset po r t foli os ; meas uring inves t men t performance; capital m a rket efficiency; selected rece n t develo pmen t s i n por�folio analysis. Emphasis on risk and re t u rn rela tion sh ips of secu rities a nd portfolios . Prerequisite : Econ 150, Math 128 (or equiva lent) , Stat 231, BA 28 1 , BA 364. (4) 404

FINANCIAL PLA N N ING AND CONTROL

Intensive ana lysis of major fi na ncia l decisions; financial pla n n i ng a n d b u dgetary control; mergers and acq uisitions; prediction or corpo ra te fa i l u re; bond refu n d i ng; new guity issues; recen t developments in capital str uct ure t h eory as applied to financial decisions. Emph asis on decision-making. Prereq uisites : Eco ISO, Math 128 (or equ iva l nt), Stat 2 3 1 , BA 281 , BA 364 . ( 4 )

PrinCiples of scie ntific management; plan ning products, ph ys ica l facili ties, equipme n t and ma terials for production; met hods and techniques of supervi sion and control of person nel; prod uc tion con t rol; purchasing and inve ntory m a n agem ent . The cou rse includes s upervi s ed s t ud e n t projects a nd major case st udies . Prereq uisite: 350 ( 4 )

Analytical approaches for the sol u tion of m arke ti ng problems, developi n g s t ra tegies, planning a nd ad m i ni s­ tering comprehe nsive m a rketing progra ms; evaluation a nd c o n trol of marke ting operations. rereq uisite: 370. I (4)

45 1

471

OPERA nONS A N A LYSIS

In troduction t o a n d the examina tion of selected decision sciences techniq ues and their applications to acco u n t i g , finance, management, marketing, and production . Topics include modeling, i n ve n to ry con trol, reso u rce aUoca tion , project pl a n ning, forecasting, a nd l ogist ics . Prereq uisites : BA 281, 282, 3 0 ; Econ 1 5 0; Stat 231 (4)

453

PERSO N N E L A N D I N DUSTRIAL RELATIONS

Detailed examination o f behavioral processes of i ndividuals and groups i n business organization s . E m phasis on policy issues a n d sp cific problems i n managing h u m a n resou rces with focus on modern practices of i ndustrial relations a n d personne l ma nagement in i n d u trial and other organiza­ t io n s . Prerequisite: 350. J II (4)

470

MARKETING MANAGEMENT

MARKETING RESEARCH A N D CONSUMeR BEH AVIOR

Tech n iq u es and uses of marketing research in the busine s s deci sion - mak ing process. E m phasis is placed on research design , various survey methods, research instrumen ts, a nd sampl ing plans as t hey relate to marketing COn sumer products a nd services i n a changing e nviron ment . Contemporary behaVIOral science co n c e pt s to be examin d a nd i ncorporated in se lected marketing p rojects. Pre­ requis i te : 3 70. (4

472

ADVERTISING A N D S A L E S MA NAG EMENT

Role of advertising and personal selling in the marke ting progra m; a n a l ysis of market ta rgets; developing ma rket pot en t i a l s; medja selection; design i ng the promotional message; eva l u a t ion and cont rol of the promotional mix. Prereq uisite: 370. I n ( 4 )

B U S I N E S S A D M I N I S TRATION

39


473

I ND US TRIAL MA RKETING AND PURCHASING

Analysis o f the i n d u s trial buying and selli n g process; pu rchasing pol icies and procedures; selection o f sources of supp ly; co n t ract analysis and neg o t i a t ion; marketing problems o f m a n u fa c t u rers of i n d u s t ri a l goods; developing and i m pleme n ting i n d u s t r i a l marketing s t ra tegies, Pre 足 requisi tes: 3 5 0 and 3 7 0 , 1 \ ( 4 ) 48 2

AD VANCED ACCOUNTING

Co m prehensi ve s t ud y of accounting for corpora tion s, including the accou n t i ng aspects of consolidations a n d mergers, and par tnerships; t rea t m e n t of i ncomplete data; specialized accou n t i ng concepts related to funds a n d c a s h flows, s t a t e m e n t na lysis, and acco u n t i ng for esta tes and trusts, Prereq u i s i t e s : 281 and 381. I I (4)

484

A UDITING

The pri nciples and p roced u res of a u d i t i ng as they apply t o t h e m a j o r balance sheet and i ncome accoun ts; generally ac epted a u d i t i ng s t a n d a rds u sed by C P A's; professional ethics, Prereq uisites : 281, 381 and 4 8 2 , I I ( 4 )

490

SEMINAR

49 1

DIRITTE D STUDY

e m i n a r o n speCifical l y. selected topics i n business, Offe red on d e m a n d , Prereq u i s i t e : conse n t of the i n s t r uctor. (4) Individual s tudi es; readings on selected topics approved and su pervised by t h e i n s t ructor, Prerequisi t e : cons e n t o f the i n s t r uctor, ( 1 -4) 501

FUNDA M E NTALS OF ACCOUNTING AND HNANC E

Fundamental a s s u m pt ions, principles, and proced ures u nderlying acco u n ting; tran saction analysis a n d the fu nda me nt al acco u n t i ng model; matching of expenses with r venue; measure m e n t a n d reporting of i ncome s t a te m e n t and bala nce s h ee t accou nts; consolidated s t a te m e n ts; a n d using and in t e rpret ing f i n a nc i a l s t a t e m e n t s , Theore tica l fra m e work for financial decisions; decision theory relative to working capital management, short- and i n termediate 足 term financing, capi t a l i nvestm e n t s a n d v a l u a t i o n , capital st ruc t u re a nd dividend policy, a n d long-term fina ncing , (4)

502

FUNDAM ENTALS OF MANAGEMENT AND MARKETING

Pr i nciples and processes of a d m i n i s t ra tion, Techniques and fu nctions of p la n n ing, organizing, directing and con足 t rolli ng, The flows of goods a nd services in the economy; economic and behavioral approaches to the analysis of demand; the marketing functions in business f i r m s , Dete rmination of t h e m a r k e t i n g mi x. (4)

40

B U S I N E S S A D M I N I STRATION

550

ORGANIZA T l O N A L BEHAVIOR A N D ENVI RONMENT

The s t u d y o f open sociotec hnical s y s t e m s w i t h in which a manager m u s t ope ra te , It e ncompasses t h ree major pers pec tives : the ex t e r n a l orga n i zation environment, including legal, e t h ical, social, economic and poli tical i n fl uences; the organization i tself as an e n t i t y; and the i n tern I orga n iza tion en viron m e n t . Prereq u i s i t e : 350 (or 502)_ I II ( 4 )

551

S E M I NA R IN OPERA TIONS MANAGE M E NT

Analytical approaches to operational management; the relationship of produ c t i o n t o other functions and ex ternal fact ors; case s t udies of modern tec h n i q u e s / m e t hodologies as a pplied in selected situa tions and i n d u s tries; q u a n t i tative models, systems design and compute r s , Prereq uisites: 350 (or 502), 5 5 0, S t a t i s t ics and Econ 543, [ J [ (4)

552

APPLIED DECISION A N ALYSIS

Use and a p p l i c a tion o f selected d e c i s i o n science techniq ues t o project s , The focus is on the examination of man agerial decision s i t uations and t h e developme n t of decision analysis methods for the manager. Applications includ e forecasting, resource alloc a t i o n , project planning, d a t a analysis, and s i m u lation_ Prereq u i s i t e : Econ 543_ (4)

553

CONTEMPORARY ISS UE S IN MANAGEMENT

I nvestiga t i o n of the roles of managers in the modern socie t y , The exploration i nc l udes, b u t is not I'imited to the topics of corporate responsibility, e t hical issues i n management, and the i m p a c t o f technolog ic a l cha nge o n organizations a n d soc iety, T h e workshop approach to these topics combine s the use o f cases, readings, d iscussions, and sim ulations, Prereq u i s i t e s : BA 550; Econ 504, o r equivalen t _ (4)

555

BUSI NESS STRATEGY AND POLICY

Management func tions of planning, organi z at ion and cont roL Prerequ i s i te s : 551, 564 and 570_ I n (4)

557

SEMINAR IN POL ICY SCIENCES

Integrate conceptu a l e l e m e n t s a n d decision-making t ech足 niques, Develop m e n t and i m p l e men ta ti on of specific s t r a tegies a ppropriate to public sector program s_ Case st udies and field work used to expl o re importa n t policy issues a nd m anagem nt i n te r faces to for m u l a te managerial i mprove m e n t s , Prerequisites: 551, 5 6 7, P S 4 5 7, (4)

564

SEMINAR I N FINANCIAl M A NAGEMENT

M nage me n t 's role in framing financial policies; case studies in the determina t ion of needs, sources and uses of funds; the developme n t of financial structu res, eva l ua t ion of a l t e r n a t i ve financial pLms and al location of funds within the fi rm, t h e control of financial resource s , Prereq u i S i t e s : 364 ( o r 5 0 1 ) and Eeon 504 and 543_ [ n (4)


567

S E M I N AR I N PUBLIC FINANCIAL M A NAGEM ENT

Explora tion of budgeting concepts and procedu res in the public sector. Conside ra tion o f recent develop m e n ts and the hanging f u nc tions of public budgeti ng; the roles of p a r t icipa n t s in the budget p rocess; a n d s t ra tegies and coun ters t r a tegies in developing and gaining a pproval of bu dgets. Financial management topics i n c l u d e : cash, debt, reve n u e and expendi ture manage m e n t; expend i t u re con足 trol programs; evalua tion of performance. Pre req u i s i t e : S A 587 or 5 8 2 . (4)

570

S E M I NA R IN MARKETING M ANAGE M E NT

Marketing management policies a n d programs; i n te r related elements of the marketing m i x a nd t h e rela tionship of marketing to other internal f u nc tions; changing social and legal e n v i ro n m e n t, i n novation and modern marketing ph i l osophies. Prere q u i s i t e s : 3 7 0 (or 502) a n d Econ 504 and 543. I I f (4) 581

S E M I N AR IN F I NANCIAL ACCOUNTING THEORY

Ad v an ce d acco u nting concepts and stan d a rd s ; c u r r e n t problems and t r e n d s reflected in accou n t i n g litera t u re; desig ned for professional acco u n tan t s . Prere q u i s i t e : 4 8 2 or con s e n t . (4)

582

596

RESEARCH COLLOQUIUM

Research a p p roaches and uses i n the a d m i nis trative decision making proces s . Emphasis i s placed on the various a spec ts of re search des i g n : secondary data so urces, s u rvey me thods, research i n s trumen ts, s a m p l i ng plans, data a n a lysis, and reporting of res u l t s . Both qualita tive a nd q ua n t i ta tive research approaches are e x a m ined in terms of t h e i r a pplica tion to exploratory, descriptive, causal and proble m-solving s t ud i e s . Prereq uisi tes : Sta tis tics and two soo-Ievel business courses . (4)

C OU R S E S OFFERED I N THE 1 979 INTERI M 305 309 456

553

MANAGERS AT WORK MON'EY GAME I I I (NEW YORK, LONDON, BRUSSELS, PARIS) HONORS SE MINAR: HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY WITH A SCANDINAVIAN E MPHASIS S E MI NAR ON CONTE MPORAR Y ISSUES I N M ANAG E M E NT

AC COUNTING I NFORMATI ON AND CONTROL

Applications o f acco u n ting i n forma tion, services and s y s tems to ma nage m e n t problems. S t u d e n t s e xc used from t his course a re ex pected to complete 5 8 1 or other advanced acco u n t ing studies. Prereq u i s i t e : 281 (or 5 0 1 ) . ( 4 )

587

GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTING SYST E M S

Managem e n t i nfor m a t ion systems; acco u n t i ng a n d eco足 nomic d a ta and their use in govern men t agencies. Recent t rends in fund acco un ting, a n d a n a lys i s of acco u n ting requ irements and tech n i ques in prog ram manage m e n t. C se s tu die s. Prerequ i s i t e : Econ 504. (4)

590

SPEC IAL SEMINAR

Selected ad va nced topics; offered o n d e m a n d . (4)

591

INDE PE NDE NT STUDY

Individual reading and s tudies on selected topics; m i n i m u m su pervision a f t e r i n i t i a l p l a n n i ng of s t ud e n t's work. Prere q u i s i t e : cons e n t . ( 1-4)

593

THESIS

Research study t o mee t T h e s i s O p t i o n req u i r e m e n t for elective in the MBA or MPA degree prog ra m s . ( 4 )

B U S I N E S S AD MI N I S TR A TrON

41


Chemishy T h e advance of civilization i s in separa ble from the develop m e n t of c h e m j s t r y . Chemist r y seeks to un de rst and the fundamen tal nat u re of m a t t e r, cha nges in its compos i tion, and the energy cha nges accompanying t hese c h anges. Utilization of this knowledge i n fluences o u r lives in many profound ways. Whether i n terested i n c h e m i s t ry I t sel f, molecu l a r biology, or studying the i n fluences of science and tech nology n the e n v i r o n m e n t and socie ty, s t ude n t s wiH find prog ra ms to meet their needs. The co u rse s, c urnc u l u m, fac u l ty, a nd faci l i t ies are approved by the American C h emica l Societ y. D j vers i ty in areer pla n n i ng is a key word in the c h e m i s t ry curric ul u m . Prog ra m s are available which a re broadly applicable to the health, biological, physical, envi ron m e n t a l and the fundamenta l ch e m ical sciences . A staff knowledgeable in the many areas of c h e m i s t ry using modern equipment for teachjng a n d rese a rch h i g h l i g h t the oppo r t u n i t i es availabl e. Major research and teaching eq uip ment inclu des: ll u c/£'ar mug/leli alo m ;c

crb

riSo/lIW

e,

illfrawi, II/t ra-v ;oir/, T1Isi l,le,

o r pl i o ll , flame p h oto me l ry , em ;:; iOIl ,

ami

ell! trOll

s p i rl resonance spectro meters; X- ray crysta l /og rllph i

diffracto meler; ga s and liq u id c ll rom alograpit5; pre isi 0 1I refrae/omeler: dipolo m eler; scirlli/ll1tioll collllirr;

onE

a n d a rom p lex mlc yoprO CfS o r system ,

refi ner:

Faculty researc p rojects in olv ing s t udent participation a r e in progress in many impor t a n t fields o f ch e m is try . Some of t h e ge n e ra l a reas are: polymer 5tYl� dll re

i/nd

p ropertIes, sY 'li /tesis of izeterocyclic

co/11 /10Il n d5, st ruc t u ra l a/lll magNetic stu dies of i ,lO rgll ll ;c co mp lexes, o rgi/tlic

kil/dies,

p ll O to(/remiCl1i reac/ io rl s, 'HId drug

effects on hir'" (oll l rol.

FAC ULTY Anderson, Chair: Gi ddings, Swank, Tobiason, Tonn. C.

Huestis,

Nesset,

Degrees in che rn . t r y a re t h e Ba c h o r of A r ts a n d t h Bachelor o f SdenC f o r 5 u de n t wishing to � t r u c t u re their undergraduate educat ion a rou n d d full che m l t r y m aj or. The B . A . program .s the minimum preparation ' uitable for u r t h e r pmfessional t udies Jnd i ' often co m bi n ed wi t h extensi e s t u d y o r a second major i n an al lied Fie.ld , The B . S . rn g ra m involves add i t ional c hemi s try co u rs e s a n d serve b t h s t udents going d i rectly in to em p loymen t O n grad u a t ion a n d t hose g<J i n g i n t o gr.1duate prOllrams, It i offered w i th emphasi s i n che m is t ry,

42

C HE MISTRY


b l () c he m i s t ry, or c h e m i c a l p h y s ics. T h e f i r s t o p t ion is a n Ame r ica n C h m ic a l So c i e t y c e r t i f i e d prog r a m . T h e l a t t e r two o p t i o n s a re " f fer-ed i n coo p e r a t ion wit h the. bi"logy a n d physics d e pa r t m e n s for s t ude n t s w i h i ng t o , ark ,I t the i n te r faces c h e m i s t ry a n d biology or ph y s i cs . S t u d e n t s c o n t e m p l a t i n g a m a j o r in c h e m is t TY a r e i n v i ted to

between

d i s c u s s t he i r i n t erests a n d pl a n s with m e m bers o f t h e c h l! m is t ry f a c u l t y at t h e e a r l i e s t p o ss ib l e t i m e . S t u d e n ts d e c id i ng to m a j o r i n c h e m i s t ry s h ou l d officially a t e r h a v i n g co m p l e ted C h e m b t ry 3 3 1 and after c o n s u l t a t i o n with a fa c u l t y adviser i n t h e c h e m i s t ry depart m e n t . T r a n s f e r s t u d e n ts d e s i ri n g t o m a j o r i n c he m i s t ry

de lare their i n t e n t

s h ou l d n t a t a d e p ,l r t m e n t a l a d v iser no l a t r t h a n t h e beg i n n i ng o f t h e i u n i o r year. T h foreign l a n g u a g e req u i r e m e n t of the C l iege o f A r t s a n d

Sc i e n ces

s h o u l d prefer,l b l y be m e t i n G e r m a n o r R u s s i a n .

h e m i s t r y 1 1 5, l l b , 32 L 3 3 1 , 3 3 2, 3 33, 3 3 4 , 3 4 1 , 3 4 2 , 3 4 3 , 4 6 0 . Req u i red s u p por t i n g : P h y i e s 1 4 7, 1 4 8, 1 5 3, 1 5 4; M a t h 1 5 1 , 1 5 2.

BACHELOR O f A R T S MAJOR:

BACAt:LOR Of SCIENCE MAIOR <three alternatives):

" lInaJ - I\ mrrican (},'miml Society crrli lcalioll: h e m i t ry 1 1 5, 1 1 t>, 3 2 1 , 3 1 , 3 3 2, 3 3 3, 3 34, 3 4 1 , 3 4 2, 3 4 3 , 3 4 4, 4 3 5, 450, ,1 60, 490; P h ysics 1 4 7, 1 4 8, 1 53, 1 5 4; Math 1 5 1 , 1 5 2. 2. Biolftrllli;lr." t " "I,nsi Ch mi try 1 1 5, 1 1 6, 3 2 1, 3 3 1 , 3 3 2, 3 3 3 , 3 3 4 . 3 4 1 , 4 3, 4 0 4 , 43 5, 4 60; B iol og y 1 5 5, 1 56, 2 5 3; t w o cou rses s e l ec t e d from B i o l o g y 3 2 2, 3 3 1 . 3 4 b - 3 4 7 ( c o u n t s a s o n e c o ur s ) , 3 5 8 , 403, a n d C h e m i s t ry 3 4 2; P h y s ics 1 4 7, 1 4 8, ] 53, 1 5 4 ; M a t h 1 5 1 . 1 5 2 .

1.

3

C"",,"nti - p h ysics 01l pha5l5: C h e m i s t ry 1 1 5, 1 1 6 , 3 3 1 , 3 3 2, 3 3 3 , 33 4, 3 4 1 , 34 2, 343, 3 4 4 , 460; P h y s i c s 1 4 7, 1 4 8, 1 5 3, 1 54 , 331 , 332, 336,

56; M a t h 1 5 1 , 1 5 2, 2 5 3 .

General ized C hemi s t ry Curriculum for t he B.S. Degree F.A LI

SPRING

Fres h men Chem. 1 1 5 Math 1 5 1 Fo reign l a n g u a g e ( o r core c o u r s e ) P E 1 00 or a c t i v i t y ( 1 3 h o u rs )

So p h o m o r e C h e m . 33 1 , 3 3 3 P hy� i c s 1 4 7, 1 5 3 F ore i g n l a n g u a g e

PE activity Core cou n;e

( 1 5- 1 9 hours)

Chem. 1 16 Math 1 52 F o reign l a ng u age Cor cou rse PE 1 00 o r a c t i v i t y ( 1 7 h u rs) C h e m . 3 3 2, 3 3 4

P h ys ics 1 4 8, 1 5 4 Fureign language P E a c t iv i t y C o re cou rse ( 1 5 - 1 9 huurs)

J u nior

Chem. 3 4 1 , 343 .hem. 3 2 1 or

c o u rs e

E l ed ive

C h e m . 342, 3 4 4 ore C(l U r s e Elective Elective

Senior Chem. 4b

C h e m . 490 E l e c t iv es

hem. 435 E l e c t ives

BACHElOR Of ARTS IN EDUCATION: S t u d e n t s i n teres t ed in t h is degree d e v e l o p t h eir che m i s t ry p rogra m t h rough t h e departml' n t i n c o n j u n c t ion w i t h t h e S c h o i \Jf Education . See School of E duc a t io n 5�ct io n . MINOR: 22 semester h o u rs, i n c lu d ing 1 1 5, 1 1 6, 3 2 1 , 33 1 , 3 3 2, 333, and 33 4, completed with grades o f C r h igh e r .

C OURSE OFFERI N G S 1 0 3 C H EMISTRY O F lIfE Ge ne T a l, o r ga n i c , and biochem i s t ry per t i n e n t to chem ical pro esses in the h u m a n rga n is m ; s u i lable for l iberal ar t s s t u d e n t s , n u r s i n g s t u d en t s , a n d p rospect i ve teach e rs . S t u d en t s w h o have not co m ple ted h igh s c ho o l c h e m i s t ry are en c o u rag e d t o t a k e 1 04 befo r e t a k i n g 1 03 . 1 1 104 ENVI RONMENTAL CHEM ISTRY Basi c p r i nc i pl es o f c h em ic a l s t ructu re a nd react io ns , w i t h a pp L ica t i o n s t o h u man a tiv i ti es a nd t he nat ural environ­ men t No p rereq u is i te; � t u d e n t with u t h ig h s c h oo l h e m i s t ry a re e n co u r age d to ta ke 10 before t aki ng 1 0 3 or 1 1 s. P hys i ca l t h era p y a n d m i l i t ary n u rsrng progra ms re q u i ri n g a yea r o f chemistry s h o ul J i nclude 1 04 a n d 1 03. A l s o s u i t a ble for en v i ron m e n t a l s t u d i e s , g e n e ra l sci en ce t ea her s , B . A. in e a rt h sc i en ce s , and general u nivers i t y core re q u i re m e n t s or Co l l ege of Arts a n d Sc ien es opt i n m . J 108 MANKIND AND MOLECULES The role o f i e nce i n s oc i et y a nd t h e pa r t icu l a r i n fl u e n e o f ch e m i s t ry on o u r c i v i l i � a t ion . S u ch t opics as med ici ne , n u t r i t i o n , food addit ive , p e t ro l e u m p rod u ct s, a n d ch e m ical warfare a re d i s ussed. A non - l a bor a to r y l i beral a r t s based course w i t h no m a t h backg r u n d o Meets general u n i ve r - i � y c r r quir ments.

] 1 5, 1 1 6 G E NERAL CHEM1STRY Fir t s e me s t e r top i c s i n c. l ude t h e t ruct u re o f rn a t t e r , a to m i c a n d m o l e u l a r t h l.' o r y , ta tes of m a t te r a n d q u a n t i ta t iv e re l a t io n h i p s Second semester topics i n clude k ine t ics, c h e m i c al eq u i l i bri u m , t he r m c h e m i s t ry , s t udy of t he elem e n ts g ro u ped accord i ng to t h e pe rIo dic t able,

ra d io c h e m i s t ry a n d i n o rg n i C' q u al i t a t i v e a n a ly i s : des i g n e d major in b i olog y , p r i m a r i l y for s t u d e n ts w ho w a n t t r p h y s ics . I n c l udes a l l c h e m i t ry, e ngi nee ri n g, geology , p r em ed i ca l , preden tal. p h a rm ac y , m e ieal tec h nology s t ud en t s , a nd s t ud e n t s pl a nn i ng to t ra n s fer to s me u n i v e r s i ty d e n t a l h ygiene p ro g r a m s . H i g h school ch e m is t ry o r per m is s i o n o f i n s t r u c tor requ i re d . S t u den ts w i t h n o h i g h sch ool c h e m i s t ry or eak m a t h e m a t ical b ac kg rou n d s hou ld t a ke 1 04 before t h i s c o u r , . A n ho nors l aborato ry is ava i l a bl e t o s t u d e n t s by s e l e c t i o n o f (ac u l y d u r i n g t he s p r i n g . Core q u is i t e : M a t. h e m a t ics 1 33. Prereq u is i t es : 1 1 5 for l l b; [ fo r 1 1 5 , n for 1 j 6.

(4, 4)

CHEMISTRY

43


210

BASIC N UTRITION AND PHARMACOLOG Y

B asic m e ta bolism processes, b as i c endocri nology, u s e o f d r u g s to modify, supplement, e n h a n ce, or block biological processes, psycho l o g ic a l l b e h aviora l a s p e c ts o f drug u s e . The disc ussion o f nu tri tion w i l l i nc l u d e topics of " t h e bala nced meal p h ilosophy," food prepara t i o n a n d re t e n t i o n l development of n u t r i t i ve v a l u e, a n d env i ron m e n tal /so cie t a l in f l u e nces on d i e t a n d n u t r i t i o n . Prere q u i s i t e : C h e m i s t ry 1 03 or eq u ivale n t ; d e s i g n e d for biology, c h e m i s try, p sy c ho l ogy , social work, sociology, n u r s i ng, heal t h and p h ysical educat ion majors, c o n t i n u i n g education n u rs e s . I (exper i m e n t a l course to be o ff e r ed fall 1 979) ( 2 )

321

Q U ANTIT ATIVE ANALYSIS

m e t hods o f q u a n t i t a t i ve a n a l y s i s , i n c l u d i n g vol u me t ric, gravime tric, and selected i n s t r u m e n ta l meth­ ods. Prereq uisites: 1 1 6 and M a t h e m a t ics 1 3 3 . I C h e m ical

3 3 1 , 332

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

A n i n terpretation of properties a n d reactions o f a l i p h a t i c a n d aromatic compounds o n t he b a s i s o f current c he m ical theory. Prerequisites: 1 1 5 or t he c o m b i n a t i o n o f 1 0 3 a n d 1 04. Pre- or core q u i s i t e : 1 1 6 . C o r eq u i s i tes : 333, 334. I H

333, 334

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LABORATORY

Reactions a n d conv e n t io n a l a n d modern t e c h n i q u e s o f

sy n the s i s , separa tion, a n d a nal y s i s o f o rg a n i c co m p o u n d s . M u s t a c c o mpany 3 3 1 , 3 3 2 . I II ( 1, 1 )

336

HONORS ORGANIC CHEM ISTRY LABOR ATOR Y

Advanced

m e t hods of s y n t hesis a n d prope r t y d e t e r ­ m i n a t ion applied to o r g a n i c compo u n d s . T e c h n i q ues a n d applications from the l i te r a t u re to be e m p h a s i z ed . M a y b e t a k e n b y d e p a r t m e n t a l i n v i t a t i o n i n p l ace o f 3 3 4 . n ( 1 )

34 1, 342

PHYSICAL C HEMISTRY

The r e l a t i o n s h i p between s t ructu re, e ne rgy content, a n d physical and c h e m i c a l properties of c he m ic a l syste m s . Topics in thermodynamics, s ta tistical t hermodyna miCS, q u a n t u m mechan ics, a to m ic and molecular s t r u c t u re, spectroscopy a n d kine tics a re covered . M a n y e x a mples are r e l a ted to biologi al systems. Pr e req u i s i tes : 115, Math 1 52, Physics 1 5 4 . I II

3 4 3, 344

PHYSICAL CHE M I STRY LA BORATORY

E x pe r i m e n t s in thermo d y n a m i c s , s o l u t i o n b" havior, and molecul ar structure designed t o acq u a i n t s t u d e n t s w i t h i n s t r u me n ta tion, data h a n d l i n g , corre l a t i o n s w i t h t h eory, and da ta reli abi l i t y . Computer u s ag e is e n c o u r a g e d . C oreq u i s i t e or p r e re q u i s i t e : 3 4 1 , 3 4 2 . I II ( 1 , 1 )

44

C H E MI ST R Y

350

I N STRUM E NT A nON FOR THE LIFE SCI ENC E S

Course d e s i g n e d to e x a m i n e i n s t r u me n ts from the s t a n dp o i n t o f how a n d w h y t h e y work, a pp l i c a tio n s, and l i m i t a ti ons . S o m e of t h e i n s t r u m e n t a l te c h n i q u es to be covered a re a t o m i c a b s o r p t i o n , gas ch roma togr a phy, ul tra­ violet, visible a n d i n frared s pe c t ro p h o t o m e try, and flame photometry. Prereq u i s i te s : 1 1 6 and B iol ogy 155.

404

BIOCH E MI STR Y

An overview of t h e field including m i neral and general metabolism, bioc h e m ical s t r u c t u re, and discussion o f d rugs and pharm acology. Laboratory is designed to s t i m u la t e problem-solving tec h ni q u e s . Prereq u i s i t e s : 332 a n d 3 3 4 . I

435

I N STRU M ENTAL ANALYSIS

Theory a n d practice o f i n s t r u m e n tal m e thods along w i t h basic e l ectronics. S p e c i a l e m p h a sis w i l l be p l a c e d o n rad io­ c h e m ical, mass spec t ro m e t ric, c h ro m a tographic, a n d electrometric m e t hods. Prereq u i s i t e s : 3 4 1 and 343. I I

450

INORGANIC C H E MI STRY

Tec h n iq u e s of s t r u c t u r a l d e t e r m i n a t io n ( J R , UV, V I S, N M R , X-ray, E P R ) , b o n d i n g p r i n ci p le s , non-metal com­ pounds, coo r d i n a t i o n c h e m i s t ry, o r g a n o m e t a 'l l i cs, donorl acceptor concepts, reaction p a t h ways a n d bioc h e m ical applications a re covered. L a bora tory w i l l include s y n t hesis and a n i n - d ep t h e x p l o r a t i o n o f t h e p hy s i c a l prope r t i e s of non-metal, coord i n a t i o n a n d o r g a n o m e t a l l i c compounds. Prereq u i s i t e s : 33 1, 3 3 2 .

460

SEM I NAR

P resentation by s t u d e n t s o f k no w l e d g e gai ned by pe rsonal library or la b o r ato ry research, supplemented with seminars by practicing scien tists. Participation of all senior chemistry majors is required a n d all other c h e m i s t ry-orien ted s t u de n ts a re encouraged to participate. S e m i n a r program will be held d u r i n g t he e n t i re year b u t formal r e g i s tr a t i on w i l l be in t he spring s e mester. I II ( I )

490

INTRODUCTION T O R E SEARCH

A co u rse designed to i n t rod uce t h e s t u d e n t t o laboratory research techniq ues, u s e of t he c h e m ic a l 'l i t e r a t u re, research proposal and report w r i t i n g . E m p h a s i s w i l l be on t h e s t u de n t developing a n d making progress o n an i n depen d e n t c h e m ic a l research proble m c ho s e n in con s u l ­ tation w i t h m e m be r of t h e c h e m i s t ry f a c u l t y . I (2)


--

491

I N D EPENDENT STUDY

Library and/or laboratory s t udy of topics not incl uded in regu larly o ffered courses. Proposed project must be approved by departmental chair and s upervisory respon足 sibility accepted by an i n s t r uctor. May be t a ken more t h a n o n c e . I n (1, 2 or 4 )

497

RESEARCH

Experimen tal or theoretical i nvestigation o p e n to upper d ivision s tudents with consent o f department chair. May be taken more than once. Genera l l y will cons i s t o f a n expanded study of the research project developed in 490. I I I ( 1, 2 0r 4)

5 9 7, 598

GRADUATE RESEARCH

Open to m a ster's degree candidates only. Prereq uisite: n sent of depa r t m e n t chair. I U (2-4)

COURSES OFfERED IN THE 1 979 INTE R I M 115 300 312 316 350

GENERAL C H E M I STRY SCIENTIFIC G LASSBLOWING ON BECOMING H UMAN RADIOACTIVITY & NUCLEAR MEDICINE I NSTRUMENTATION FOR THE LIfE SC I E NC E S

C H E M I S TR Y

45


Co municat 路 on Arts The c o m m u n ication a r t s progra m i s c o n e r n ed w i t h i m p r o v i n g i n t e rpe rso n al , g roup, a nd p u b l i c c m m u n ica t i o n t h rou g h

m a s t ry of b a s i c

rhe torica l p r ocesses a n d a compre h e n s io n of t h e n a t ure of the m a ss m e d i a a s w e l l a s offering c u l t ural

and artistic o p port u n i t i e s in the field of

t h ea t e r . The d e p a r t m e n t offe r s a p rac t i c a l

u nd e r s ta nd i ng of t h i s h u ma n p rocess to a l l s t u d e n t s a n d p re pa re s i t s m a j o rs for p a r t i c i p a t i on a n d teach i n g i.n t h e a re a s of thea t e r, com m u ni c a t i o n a n d b roa dcas t / j o u rn a l i s m .

F ACULTY Wilson, C h a i r; Bartanen, Becvar, Dough ty, Nordholm, Parker. Spicer. R. WeUs; assisted by Rowe.

A l l s tude n ts i n com m u nication arts will pa r t ic i pa t e in some p h ase of d ra m a tic, fore n s i c a n d broadca s t i n g co-curricular a c t i v i t i e s , a n d will be req u i red to take two pra c t i c u m s . BACH ELOR OF ARTS MAIOR: At least 3 2 s e m e s t e r h o u rs plus 2 practicums i n o n e o r a c o m bi n a t io n of t h e t h ree a reas of conce n t ration of wh ich Co m m u n ica t io n A rts 1 2 3 is req u i re d : Broadc as t / Jo urna l i s m , Requi red course s : 1 2 3, 1 7 1 , 2 7 2, 2 75, 374, 283, 3 84, p l u s 10 semester h o u r s se lec ted in con s u l ta t i on w i t h adviser. om m u n i cll t io n : R eq u i red cou r s e , 1 2 3, 233, 326 plus 2 0 se mester h o u rs selec ted i n con s u l t a t i o n w i t h ad vise r . Theater: Req u i re d c o u rses : 1 23 , 1 5 1 , 2 4 1 , 2 5 0, 363 or 3 6 4 , p l u s 1 2 sem sler h o u r s selec ted in c o n s u l t a t i o n w i t h adviser.

I n addition to require m e n ts l i s ted above, candida tes for t h e B. A . deg ree m u s t meet t h e foreign l a nguage requ i r e m e n t i n t h e Col l ege of Art s a n d S c i e nces . BAC HELOR OF F I N E ARTS MAJOR: At l e a s t 52 s e m e s t e r h o u rs p l u s 2 pract icu ms i n o n e Or a c o m b i n a tion of t h e t h ree a re d S o f conce nt ra t i o n of wh ich C o m m u n ic a t i o n A r t s 1 23 is requi red. Broadc a, tl/ou r n a li s m : R e q u i r ed courses: 1 2 3, 1 7 1 , 272, 2 7 5 , 3 7 4 , 283, 384, plus 2 4 s em ester h o u rs selected i n ( O n s u l t a t ion with advise r . C o m m u n ication : Req u i r e m e n ts s a me a s Bachelor o f A r t s plus n a dd i t i o n a l 40 semester h o u r s s e l e c t ed in c o n s u l t a t i o n w i t h adviser. Thea t e r : Requi red (OUrses: 1 23 , 1 5 1 , 2 4 1 , 2 5 0 , 363 O r 3 6 4 , 4 5 2 (,r 4 5 4 , p l u s 28 s e m ester hours s e l e c t e d i n c o n s u l t a t i o n w i t h dd v i ser .

BACHE LOR OF A RTS IN EDUCATION: See School o f E d uca t i o n .

46

C OM M U NICATION ARTS


MINORS PROGRAMS B r03d ca s t l Jo urnaJis m: 18 - l 9 semester hours. including 1 7 1 , 2 7 5, 28 3, 374, a n d one course f ro m 378, 384 , and 4 7 5

Co m m u n ication Theory and Research : 2 0 semester houTs,

i nclu d i ng 1 2 3, 233, and t h ree courses from 1 2 8, 326, 435, a nd

436.

Th eater : 20 semester hours, includ i n g 1 61 , 24 1 . 250, 358, a n d 4 5 4. The Dan I' Minllf i s noss- refere nced with the Sc ho I of Ph ys ica l Eduat i n . See the descri ptio n of the Dance Mi nor in that sch oo l's sect Ion of t h i s ca talog. On ly t h e foil wing cour . es From Co m m u n ication A rt s m ay be used to meet t h t General Unive rs i t y Requirement in Fine Arts: 1 5 1, 162, 241, 2 5 0, 363, 364, 4 58, 459. A l l Comm u nicati on Arts ma jo rs sh uld f u l fi l l t he General U n i versi t y Requiremen t w i t h a ourse from another deparlment in the Sc hool of Fine Arts.

COURSE OFFERINGS 123

FUNDAM ENTALS O F O R A L COMMUNICATION

Fo u ndations course dealing wi t h basic t heories o f oral com m un icati o n , Emphasis on group activity w i t h some platform work . I II S (4)

128

ARGUMENT AtION

Method s for ev id ence r sea rch , a rg u m e n ta t io n , proof and f a rg u m e n t to co m 足 the adaptat i o n a n d a pp l ication m unication Va rious debate models , their preparat ion and pres e n ta tion are used . I (4)

1 51 STAGE TECHNOLOGY Basic t heory a nd procedure f tec h nical aspect i n s e t b u i ld i n g , cos t u m e con s t ru c t ion , basic drafti ng, scenery, t he a s se mblI ng, handling , m a n agement of t h e stage, and e x te n sive s hop work. I (4)

162

HISTORY OF AMERICAN frLM

Conce n t ra tes o n t h e development a n d growth o f the motion pic t ure in h e U n i ted S t a te s from 1 895 to the pres e n t . E m p h asi s is pl aced on the film d i rector , whose i m plemen t at io n of fi l m tech n iq u e a nd th eory serves as the for mative ar tis tic force i.n the i n e m a . Societal i n fl u ences s uc h a s economic factors, p u b l ic a t t itudes a nd mores, and po l i t ical po s i t ions re flected i n t he Uni ted S t a tes throughout t h e past 75 years w h ich provide t he fi l m media with s h a pe and thematic focu s w i l l provide parallel poi n t s of reference.

(4 )

171

MASS MEDIA I N CONTEMPORAR Y SOCITTY

S u rvey of the mass media , i ncl uding newspapers, maga z i n es, books , televisi0n a n d the cinema, History, orga n i z.ation and mechan ics of pri nted and elect ronic m edia . Role of t h e mass com m u nication in developing the po l i t ica l, social , nd economic fabrics of a democratic so iety. A n alysis of the jou rnali s t's audie nce, j ou rn alis t ic voca tions and social and legal res pon si bi l i ties of the media,

22 5 , 425

COMMUNICA nON ARTS PRACTICUM

One semester hour credit may be earned each semeste r, but

o n l y 4 semeter ho u rs may be used to meet Universi t y re q uire m e n t s . Majors are req uired to take at least two practicu m s in one or a co mbina tion of t h e t h ree areas of in terest. l n s t r uctor's Co nsent required, I II

233

fOU N DA TIONS OF COM MUNICATION THEORY

Contemporary

t heories on

he

n a t u r e,

processes and

ef fects of i ndividual and mass com mu nica tion behaviors, (4)

241

ORAL INTERPR ETATION Of LITERATURE

T h e a r t o f com m u nicating the essence of a piece of l i te ra t u re to an a udience, i n terpre ti ng i t expe rien t i al l y, log i c a l l y , a n d e m ot i o n a l l y . I n d i v i d u a l a n d g r o u p performan e. I n ( 4 )

250 FUNDAMENT ALS OF AC TING A n examination of the work of actors and ac tresses , t h e i r n a t u ral and learned skills; exercises in me mory, I magina t io n , a nd obser a ti on; i m p rovisations and scenes from modern plays; t heory and practice of s tage m a ke- up . I

(4)

272

THE BROADCASTER AND SOUND

The theory and st ructure of sound for the broadcaster; instruction a nd practice i n the use of audi -con trol equipment i n radio a nd recording. I (2)

275

RADIO PRODUCTlON

Element s of radio produc tio n; a n alysis of program design , wri t i ng fo r radio and prod uction tools and tec h n ique s . ect u re a nd la bo ra tory . I (4)

283

NEWS R EPORTING

Tec h n i q u e s of basic news and fea t u re writ i ng for the m edia . Newspaper and broadcast-media, news orga n i za t io n, proced u res a nd l ibel Preparation of varied s tories , a nalys i s of n e w s sources, tech n i q ues o f i n terviewing a n d esse n tia l fa t gatheri ng . T yp i n g a bil ity hi g h ly preferred, P re足 req u i si te: 1 7 1 or COncurrent e nroll m ent . S tudent m u s t register f o r Newspaper or Radio News prac ticum laboratory a t the same t i m e . I (3)

326

G ROUP COMMUNICA TlON

S u rvey ,l n d analysis of s m a l l g ro u p co m m u n i cation t h eo ry and resea rc h . II (4)

344

ADVANCED INTERPRET A nON OF UTERATURE

Projects a nd exercises directed toward program pla n n in g . Adva nced s k i l l s i n the co m m u n ica t ion o f the experience of a piece of li terat u re t h roug h perform an e. Pre.r equisite: 24 1 . 1 1 (4)

(4)

C O M M U NI C A T I O N ARTS

47


356

STA G E L I G HTING

S tage l i g h t i n g f r o m the b a s i c development of electricity a n d lighting i n s t r u m e n ts to the complete design of ligh ting a show. II ( 4 )

358

AD VANCED ACTING

Study o f the work o f a n a c tor; character a n a l ysis a n d em bodi m e n t , using i m provi s a t i o n s a n d s c e n e s from plays; includes s t y l e s of acting. Prere q u i s i t e : 250. II (4) 363

HISTORY Of THE THEATER: AESCHYLUS THROUG H TURGENIEV

T h e a t e r as i t evo l ved from i ts p r i m i tive origin t h rough repre s e n t a t i ve socie ties; A n c i e n t G reece, Rome, Renais足 s nce, modern E uropea n a n d American. E m ph a s is is u pon religious, p h i losophical, a n d poli t i c a l though t as reflected i n the d r a m a of e a c h period. I ( 4 ) 364

HISTORY OF T H E THEATER: IBSEN THROUGH TO THE PRESENT

Th e a t e r a s i t evolved f rom its p rimitive origin t h rough repres e n t a tive societies; Ancient G reece, Rome, Renais足 s a nce, mode rn Eu ropea n and A m e rica n . Emphasis is upon religious, philosophical, a nd poli tical thoug h t a s reflected in the d ra m a of each period. II (4)

374

TEL E V I SION PRODUCTION

Analysis of prog r a m design, writing and p roduc tion tools a nd t e c h n i q ues, lecture and labora tory; e x tensive use of K P L U-TV s tudios. I (4)

378

RADIO-TEL E VISION N EWS REPORT I N G

Provides s tu d e n t s with some o f t h e basic techniques a n d problems o f radio a n d television j o u r n a l i s m . The course p rovides f u nd a m e n tals upon w h ich f u r t h e r study i n Broa dcastlJo u r n a l i s m c a n b u i l d . I t is a n adva nced journalism course a s s uming prior proven a b i l i t y i n news writing and repo r t i n g . Prere q u i s i t e : C A 283. II (4)

384

ADVANCED NEWS REPORTING

In-d e p t h reporting, i n v e s t iga tive news writing a n d p ractice in h a ndling a d va n c e d news reporting assig n m e n t s i n t h e e n vi ron m e n t of t h e newsroo m . Typog raphy, h e a d l i n e writing, c o p y e d i t i ng as well a s p r i n t i ng proc e s s e s . Prereq u i s i t e s : J 71 a n d 2 8 3 . I I (3)

402

COMMUNICATION ARTS IN THE E L E ME NTARY CL ASSROOM

C o m m unication arts p rob l e m s and opport unities which confront the teacher i n grades one t h rough eight. Offered o n p a s s / fa i l basis only. I (2)

404

COMMUNlCA T I O N ARTS I N THE SECONDARY SCHOOL

C u rric u l u m c n s t r uction; com m u n ication a rts p h i losophy; co-curricular activities; a d m i n i s t ra tion o f d ra m a , radio a n d foren sic a c t ivi t i e s . Offered on p a s s / f a i l b a s i s o n l y . I ( 2 )

48

C O M M UNICATION AR T S

435

ORGANIZATIONAL CO M M UN ICA TI ON

C o m m u n ica tion s y s t e m s a n d s t udies w i t h i n formal org a n i za ti o n . Foc used on theory a n d research of i n forma足 tional a n d d i rective c o m m u nication a s r e l a ted to c h a n n e l s , s t ructures, s ta t us, i n volve men ts, mora le a n d l e a d e r s h i p . Pre req u i s i t e : 2 3 3 . ( 4 ) 436

PERSUASION

A n a l y s i s a n d e v a l u a tion o f t h e d i m e nsions o f pe r s u a sion i n com m u n ic a tion e mpha sizing con t e m porary theoretical models a n d research. I n v e s t i g a t ion of how resea rch and models m a y be applied In con te m porary settings. Prer e q u i s i t e : 2 3 3 . ( 4 )

452

SCENIC DE SIG N

A rtis tic a nd techn ical development of abilities in designing scenery, cos t u mes and m a ke - u p for plays of a l l periods; various styles a n d periods as we l l a s p repara t ion of models, renderings, working d rawings a nd scenic p a i n t i n g . Prereq u i s i t e : 2 5 1 . II ( 4 )

454

PLAY DIRECTION

The role of t h e d irector, h is torically a n d critically; a n i n t e n s i v e s tu d y t h a t is bo th practical and theoretical i n its a pproach to t h e a rt of the play director. M a n y differe n t d irecting p h ilosophies a r e s t u d ied a nd each s tuden t is required to d i rect scenes from p l a y s repre s e n t a tive of a l l periods of t h e a t e r h i s tory. Prerequ i s i t e s : 250, 2 5 1 , a n d j unior s ta t u s . I I ( 4 )

458

CREATIVE DRAMATIC S

This course is d esigned t o acq u a i n t t h e s tu d e n t with m a te r i a l s , tech niques, a n d t h eories of creative d r a m a t i c s . S t u d e n t s will pa rticipate i n c r e a t i v e d r a m a tics . This course is i n tended for e l e m e n t a ry and j unior h igh school teachers or prospective teachers; t h e a t e r majors, religious leaders, you t h and camp counselors, d a y care workers, soc i a l a n d psychological workers, a n d co m m u n i t y t h e a t e r leaders interested i n working with children. S (4)

459

SUMMER DRAMA WORKSHOP

O n e session of i n tensive work in d ra ma, acting, s t a g e m a n a g e m e n t, lighting ins t ruction a n d a l l o t h e r phases o f prod uctio n . S ( 4 )


TELEV ISION AND THE CLASSROOM TEACHER

474

Tel visi n a s a t e a c h i n g tool; g e neral ri te r ia f o r t ech n o l og y in teachi ng and specific cri teria for the use f televi s i o n i n t h e classroom . I I ( 2 )

47 5 DIR ECTING FOR BROADCAST MEDIA A n a na l ysis of t h e s ruc t u re, form, a n d t ec h n iq ue o f d i recting for t h e Broadcast Media - e x t e n s i ve u se o f Radio and TV s t u d i

478

fac i l i t ie s . II (4)

SUMMER TELEVISION WORK SHOP

C reative and produ tion tec h n iq u e s o f television progra m足 m i n ; e x t e n s i v e use of K P L U-TV s t u d i s; for the ma t u re st ude n t . S (4)

490

SEMINAR IN B ROADCAST/JOURNALISM

Se lected

topi

s

in

roadc a s t lJourna l i s m .

depa r t m e n t a l p e r m i s s i o n .

491,

92, 493

Prereq u i s i t e :

(2)

SPECIAL STUDIES I N COMMUNICA TlON A RTS

I nvestigation r re se a r h i n area of s pecial in teres t no cove red by regular cou rses; open t o q ual ified j u nior or senior s t u d e n t s . A s t u de n t should n t beg i n reg is tration for i ndepe nd e n t s t udy u n t i l t h e spec i fi area for i ve tigation has been appro v e d by a d epa r t m e n t a l spon sor. ( 1 -4)

596-598 For

RESEARCH I N COMMUN ICATION ARTS gr aduate s t u d e n t s only. ( 1 -4)

COURSES OFFERED I N THE 1 979 INTERIM 303

307 309

311

31 9

TELEVISION DAYTI ME DRAMA ("THE SOAP OPERA"): MAR KETING THE NEUROSES OF OUR TWENTI ETH C ENTURY A C U t TURAL EXPERIENCE I N T H E ARTS IN NEW YORK CITY ORCANIZATIONAL COMMUNI CATION INTERNSHIP: STA LKING THE WILD ORGANIZA nON ETHICS AND THE PRESS CHILD R EN'S THEATRE WORKSHOP

C O M M U N I C ATION AR TS

49


Earth Sciences E a r th Sci en ces e x p l ore t h e co m pon e n t s of the p h y s ica l u n iv e r s e from h u m a n i ty 's e x i s t i n g h a b i t a t to t h e fou n d a t i o n s of t h e e a r t h , a n d beyond to t h e planets a n d the s t a r s . A p r og r am of s t u d i e s i n t h e s e fields acq u a i n t s s t u d e n t s w i t h t h e i r ph y sic a l world and provides p e r s pe c t iv e o n h u m a n d e v e l op m e n t in t i m e a n d space. E n v i ro n m e n t a l p ro b l e m s a l s o a r e a p p roached t h rou g h t h e e a r t h sciences, w h i h i m part a reali s t i c apprec i a t ion o f soc i e t y 's d e p e n d e n c e on ea r t h 's p h ys i cal resou rces. In pr ov i d i n g s uc h a pe r s p e c t i v e

t h e d e pa r t m e n t a v a r i e t y o f s t u d e n t s s e e k i n g to b roaden t h e i r l i b e r al a r ts ed u c a t i o n , a n d also ,

f u l fills t h e needs o f

provides more spe C i a li z ed knowledge in s u pport o f

particula rly for minor or m ajor s t u d ies leading to c a ree r s in resou rces a n d e n v i r o n m e n t a l m a n a g e m n t o r s c i e n t i fi c res e a rch .

s e v e r a l fields,

S i t ua t e d betwe e n t h e O l y m p i c M u n t a i n s a nd t h e C a scade Range, t h e d e pa r t m e n t is ideally l oca t e d to xa mine geolog ic a nd m a r i n e e n v i ron men ts, which a r e u ns u rp a ssed for te a c h i n g a n d l e a r n i ng p u r p o s es .

FAC Ul TY L owes, Chllir; C hau ff; assi sted by Huestis.

T h e d ep J r t m e n t ' p r o g r a m s r e m a i n flexible, a l l o w i n g fairly easy scheduling of courses. However, students should n o t ice t h a t upper d i v i s io n courses are offered u n a two-year cycle. E a rly decla r a t i o n of m ajors o r m i nLlrs i n e a r t h scien("('s w i l J facilit a t e develop m e n t o f individu a l p r o g r a m s and avoid con flicts.

BACHELOR OF SCI ENCE (GEOLOGY SPEC IA LTY) MAJOR: 4 0 s e m e s ter h o u r s in geology, i nc l u d i n g 1 3 1 , 1 3 2, 3 2 3, 324, 3 2 5 , 3 2 7, 3 2 8, and at least two courses from 326, 360, 365,

and 491; a lso req u i red i s a p p ro ved e x perie nce in field s tu dy tech n iqu es. Nece s s a r y s u p porting courses i n c l u d e : C h e mi s t r y 1 1 5, 1 1 6; recom mended f o r pe trologists a re C h e m i s t r y 3 4 1 , 3 4 2; PhyS ic s 1 2 5 , 1 26 , 1 4 7, a n d 1 4 8 (or P h ysics 1 5 3, 1 5 4 a n d l a b s ); reco m m e nded - Physics 22 3; M a t h e m a t ics 1 5 1 , 1 5 2; biology courses a re recom mended w h e r e paleon tology i s e l e c t e d majo r intere s t .

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 3 2 s e m e s t e r hou rs, incl u d i n g 1 3 1 , 1 3 2, 1 36, 202, 3 2 4 , 3 2 7, p l u s a t l e a s t two u pp e r d i v i s i o n

e a r t h scien 'e c o u r s e s . A f i e l d c o u r s e s u c h as 3 5 1 , 360, or 365 i s reco m me n d ed . R e q u i red supporting c o u r s e s i n c l u d e : C h e m i s t r y 1 0 3, 1 0 4 O r 1 1 5, 1 1 6, P h y s ics 1 25 , 1 26, 1 4 7, 1 4 8; M a t h e m a t i c s 1 5 1 , recom mended 1 5 2; a p p r o p r i a t e bioillgy cou rses a l s o recomm e nded . O p t i o n s r e flect a s tudent's e a r t h s c i e nce in t e r e s t s and are dis u s s e d w i t h an ad"iser.

so

E ARTH S CIENC ES


....

BACHE LOR or A RTS I N EOUCA nON:

See School of

Edu ation.

MINOR: 20 s e m ester h o u rs o f e a r t h science cou rses, excl u d i n g 1 22 and Interim cou rses, com p leted w i t h g rades o f C or higher.

(4) 1 22 I NTRODUCTION TO PHYSICA L SCIENCE A n i n tegra tion of t h e sciences of c h e m i s t ry , geology, me eorology a n d p h y s ics w h ich c o n s i d e rs the physical n a t u re f t h e e a r t h : i t s m a t e ri a l s , p rocesses, h i s tory a n d enviro n me n t ; i n t en ded for s t u d e n t s w i t h n o previous b ckg ro u n d i n c h e m i s t TY, physics, o r geology. I (4)

EA RTH PROCESSES

A n i n trodu ct ry c o u rse d e a l i n g w i t h t h e h u m a n geologic h a b i t a t, both at pres e n t and as i t h a s dev eloped t h rough tt m e; materials of e a r t h ( a n d l u n a r) c r u s t s , t h e i r d e r i v a t ion t h ro u g h major earth p rocesses a n d fo r m a t i o n o f s u rface fea t u res - w i t h e m p h a s i s on t h e i r s i g n i fica n ce to c u l t u ral devel p me n t and c i v i l i z a t i n; labo ra to ry s t udy of rocks, m i n e r Is, a nd geologic m a p p i ng; field trips are a r r a n g e d . I

(4)

1 3 2 H I STORICAL G EOLOGY A s eq u el to 1 3 1 w h ich concen t r a t e s particularly t he formation o f the con t i n e n t : s ed i m e n ta ry Tocks, foss ils record are related to tectonic u p h e a v a l tri ps a re a rra nged . II ( 4 )

136

on e a r t h history, N o r t h A me rica n a n d s t r a t i g r a p h ic a n d g rowth; field

DESCRlPT I V E ASTRONOMY

The I11oo n , the s o l a r s y s t e m , the coord i n a t e s y s t e m s for locat i n g stellar objects and c h a ra c t e r i s t ics of s ta rs . (4)

2 0 2 GENERAL OC EA NOG RAPHY Ocea nog raphy a n d its relation s h ip to o t h e r fields; physical, che mical. biological, c l i m a tic a n d g e ological a s pec t s o f the s ea; field trips. I I (4) 222

PETROLOGY

(4)

WORLD G EOGRAPHY

P a t t e r n s o f phys ical. c l i m a tic, a n d ecological fea t ures a n d the i r relati o n s h i p t o t h e develo p m e n t of h u m a n c u l t u re s . 1 0 1 d o e s not m e e t t b e n a t u ra l s c i e n c e s core require m e n t . I

1 31

324

The occ u rrence and classi fica t i o n o f c o m m o n rock typ es; p rocesses by w h ich t h e y w e re formed w i t h refere nce to t h e o r e t i c a l principles, Prereq u i s i t e s : 1 3 1 o r con s e n t . II a ly

C OURSE OFFERIN G S 101

323 M I N ERALOG Y C r y s t a llography a n d m i n e r a logy, bot h o re- a n d rock足 form i n g m i n e r a l s . P rereq u i s i t e s : 1 3 1 and high school c h e m i s t ry or co n s e n t . A v a i l a ble period i c a l ly, o r at UPS I (4)

CONSERV A n O N OF NATURAL RESOURCES

P r i n ciples a n d probl e m s of pu blic a n d p ri v a te s te w a r d s h i p of o u r resources w i t h special r e f e r e n c e to t h e Pacific Nort h w e s t . ( 2)

325

STRUCTURAL G EOLOGY

T h e form and s p a t i a l rela t i o n s h i p s o f various rock m a sses and a n i n t roduction to rock defo r m a t i o n ; con si d e ra t i on o f b a s ic p roce s e s t o u n d e rs t a n d m o u n t a i n b u i l d i n g a n d con t i n e nta l for m a t i o n ; l a boratory e m p h a s i z e s p ractical t e c h n i q ues w h i c h enable s t u d e n ts to a n a l y z e reg i o n a l s t ructu ral p a t t e r n s , Prereq u i s i t e : 1 3 1 o r c o n s e n t . 1 1 a / y

1 9 79-80 (4)

326

OPTIC AL M I NERA L OG Y

T h e o ry a n d practice o f m i n eral s t ud i e s u s i ng t h e petrog ra p h i c m i croscope, i n cl u d i ng i m m e r s i o n o i l t e c h 足 n i q u e s , prod u c tion of t h i n s e c t i o n s a n d d e t e r m i n a t ion of m i n e r a l s by m e a n s of their optical prope r t i e s . T h i s p rovides a n i n trod u c t i o n to t h e broader s u bject of pe trog r a p h y . I (4) 327

STRATIG RAPHY AND SEDIMENTATION

Formational p r i nciples of s u rface-accu m u lated rocks, a n d t he i r i ncorporation i n t h e s t ra ti g ra p h i c record, T h i s s u bj e c t i s basic to f i e l d m a p p i n g a n d s t ru c t u r a l i n t e r p r e t a t i o n . I a / y 1 980-81 ( 4 )

3 2 8 PALEONTO LOG Y A s y s t e m a t i c s t ud y of t h e fossil record, c o m b i n i n g p ri n ciples o f e v ol u t io n a ry develo p m e n t, paleoha b i t a ts a n d p re s e rv a t i o n , w i t h practical ex perie nce of speci m e n i d e n ti fica t i o n . T h e s e s t u d i e s a r e f u nd a m e n t a l to t h e u nder足 s ta n d i n g of s t ra t igraphy a n d t h e geologic time sca le, I a /y

1 9 79-80 ( 4 )

351

NATURAL HISTORY OF TH E PACIFIC NORTH WE ST

A field a n d l a boratory cou rse e x a m i n i n g regi o n a l n a t u ra l h is tory; a n outdoor workshop designed for science teache rs at e l e m e n t a ry a nd j u n i o r h i g h levels, N o t to be cou n t ed t o w a rd a m a j o r or g r a d u a te c r e d i t i n biology. P r e req u i s i t e : con s e n t : S (6) 360 GEOLOG Y The m i n e ra l s , rocks and geological h i s to ry of t he region e x te n d i ng from t h e Col u m bia P l a t e a u to t h e P a c i f i c Ocea n . [ nc l u d e s f i e l d t ri p s . P rere q u is i te : o n e y e a r o f col lege i a b o r J t o ry science o r conse n t . S

EARTH SCIE N C E S

51


3 6 5 GLACIAL G EOLOGY G l a c i a l ice, deposits and land forms resul ting from the Pleis tocene g l a c ia tion in North A m e rica. Field trips in lu ded . Prere q uisite: one yea r of college laboratory

science or conse n t . S 490

( 1 -2 ) 491, (1-4)

S E MINAR 492

I NDEP EN DENT STUDY

597 GRADUATE R ESE AR C H ( 1 -8)

COURSE OFFERED I N THE 1 9 79 I NTERIM 30 1

52

SOURCE BEDS OF ENERGY - THE ECONOMIC GEOLOGY Of PETROLEUM

E ARTH S C I E N C E S


Economics " Wli n t is

a

growing gia n t w lr o m tire colli of Have

ellouglr to covt r. "

-

10115

never large

Ralph Wald o E merson

Economics is t h e s t ud y of how people est ab lis h s ocia l arrange m e n ts for produci ng a n d di s tributi ng good s and services t o sustain and enh a nce h u m a n life . I t s m a i n objective i s to determine a wise u s e o f l i m i t ed economic re source s so t h a t peopl rece i ve t h e ma x i m u m possibl e be nefit a t the low e s t cos t. The econo mic d isci p l i n e embra ces a body of tech niques a n d concep t u al t ols t h a t are u s e ful for u n d e r s t a n d i ng a n d a n alyzi ng o u r co mplex economic syst e m . Career aven ues for g ra d u a t e s a r e n u merous, since t h e i r u nd e r s tanding of the eco n o m y a n d t h e i r problem -sol v i ng a n d th i nkin g abil i ties aTe applicable to a wide range f activities i n b u s i ness a nd / or gove rnmen t .

FACULTY R. Jensen, Cha ir: An krim, Brue, Mil ler, Vinje, Wentworth.

BACHELOR OF A RTS MAJOR: M in i m u m of 36 s e m e s t e r h o urs. including 1 5 0 . 35 1 . 3 5 2 . 486. a n d 8 h o u r s selected f r o m 3 4 3 . 344. Statistics 2 3 1 . M a t h 1 4 0. 1 4 4 . 3 3 4 . 3 4 1 , and B u s i ness A d m i n i s t ration 2 8 1 . a n d 1 2 h ou rs of electi ves i n econo mics. MINOR: 2 0 semes t e r h o u r s . i nc l u d i n g 1 5 0 . 3 5 1 or 352. and

1 2 addit ional h o u rs of elec t i ves. 4 of wh ich m a y be in s t a t i s tics . BACHELOR Of ARTS IN EDUCATION: See School of Educa tion .

331

(4)

343

150

PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS

I n t rod u c t ion to t h e scope of eco nomics, i n c l u d i n g Macro and M icro Economics; a na l ysis of U . S . economic system; mp h a s is on cu rre n t eco n o m i po licy. (4) 290

C ONTEMPORARY ECONOM IC PROBLEM S

C u rrent economi c issues; unemployment, i n f l a tion, pov足 ert y , and pollution; i n t e rests of the class determine speci fic topics . Prer e q u i ite: 1 5 0 or c o n s e n t . (4)

321

L ABOR ECONOMICS, L ABOR RE LATI ONS, AND HUMAN RESOURCES

The n a t u re a n d tr ea t m e nt of h u m a n reso urce p r o b l e m s i n the U n i ted Sta tes; wage determina tion, u n i o n i s m , collective barga ining, u ne m p l o y m e n t . poverty and discri m i n a tion, inves tm e n t in hu m a n c a p i ta l a n d ma npower poLicies. Pre requis it e : 150 or consen . (4)

OPERATIONS R ESEARCH

Qua n t i t a t i ve method s f o r decision prob l e m s . E mp h a s i s o n l i n e a r prog r a m m i n g a n d other d e t e r m i n i s t i c mod e l s . Prereq uisite: Sta t i s tics 2 3 1 o r equivalen t . (2)

344

APPL IED REGRESSION ANALYSIS

S i m p l e a n d m u l tiple regression <l nalysis a s invest,i g a tive tools. C o u rse st resses constr uction of e l e m e n t a ry l i n e a r m o d e l s and in terpre ta tion o f reg ression re s u l t s . P re足 req u i s i t e : Statistics 231 or e q u i v a l e n t . (2)

351

I NTER MEDIATE MACRO ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

N a t i o n a l i n come determ i n a t ion i n c l u d i n g poLicy impli足 ca tions within the institutional framework of t h e U . S . eco n o m y . Prereq u i s i t e : I S O (4)

352

INTERMEDI ATE MICRO EC ONOMIC ANALYSIS

Theory of con s u m e r behavior; product and factor prices under conditions of monopoly, competition a n d i n ter足 mediate ma rkets; we l f are economics. Prereq u i S i t e : 1 5 0. (4)

36 1

MONEY AND BAN KI NG

The n a t u re a n d r o l e o f money; t h e c o m m e rcial b a n k i n g s y s t e m ; t h e Federa l Rese rve S y s t e m ; t h eory of c r e d i t a n d money s u p p l y con trol; K e yn e s i a n a n d M o n e t a ri s t t h eories of monetary i m pacts on i n flation, i n terest rates, and national i n come. Pre req uisite: 150. (4)

362

COURSE Off ERINGS

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

Regional and in te rn a t i o n a l specia l i z a t i o n , comparat ive costs, i n t e r n a t i o n a l p a y m e n t s and exchange ra tes; national policies which promote or restrict trade. Prere q u i s i t e : 1 5 0.

PUBLIC FINANCE

Public t a x a tion and ex pend i t u re at a l l govern m e n t a l l eve ls; the i ncidence o f t a x es, the p u blic debt and t h e provision o f p u b l i c g o o d s such a s na tional d e f e n s e , e d u c a t i o n , pure air and water. Prereq u i s i t e : 1 5 0 . (4)

381

COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS

A n a n a l YSis a n d comparison of major conte mporary economic s y s t e m s . I ncludes a n ex a m i n a tion o f capi t a l i s m , m a r k e t socia lism, centrally p l a n ned economies, and systems used i n selected countries. Prereq u i s i t e : Economics 1 5 0 o r co n s e n t . ( 4 )

399

I NTER NSHIP

A rese a rch and writing proj ect in connection w i t h a s t u d e n t's approved o f f -c a m pus activity. T h e p r i m a r y goal is to gain i n s ig h t i n t o a pplications o f the id ea s a n d methodologies o f eco n o m i c s . Prer equisite: sophomore s t a nding plus o n e cou rse in econom ics, a n d consent of t h e depa r t m e n t . ( 1 -6 )

E C ON O M I C S

S3


432

URBAN A ND REG IONAL ECONOMICS

Econo mic g rowth process i n developing regi on s of t h e U . S .; the i n ter-relation s h i p of political. econ o mic, c u l t u r a l a n d i n s ti t u tional factors i n t h e g r o w t h proce s s . Prereq uisite: 150. (4)

434

INDUSTR I A L ORGANIZATION AND PUBLIC POLICY

A n a n a lysis of t h e s t ru c t u re, conduct, a n d performance of American i n d u s t ry and t h e public polic.ies t h a t foster and al ter i n d u s t rial structure a n d behavior. Topics i n c l ude the econo m ics o f firm size, motivations of the firm, concen t ration, mergers, patents, a n ti t r u s t , p u blic u ti l i ty reg ulation, public e n t e rprise, a n d s u bsidization . Pre足 requisite: Econ o m ics 150 or co n s e n t . (4)

486

SEMI NAR

Se min.ar i n economic p roblems a n d policies with emphasis on encou ragi n g the student to in egrate problem-solving m e t hodology w i t h tools of economic a n a lysis. Topic(s) selected by class pa r ticipa n ts and i n st r u c to r . Prereq u i s i t e : onsen t . (4)

4 9 1, 492, 4 93

INDEPEND ENT STUDY

Prereq uisite: conse n t . ( 1 -4 )

500

APPLIED S T A TISTICAL ANALYSIS

A n i n tensive i n troduction t o s t a t i s t ical m e thods for grad uate students who h a ve not p reviously taken I nt rodu tory S ta t istics. Em phasis will be on the a pplication of i nfere n ti a l s t at i stics to concrete si t u a tions. Topics covered will i n c l u d e : m e a s u res of loca tion and variation, probability, e s t i m a t i o n , h y po t hesis tests, a n d regression . (4)

502

SOCIAL SC IENCE THEORY

A n analysis of social explana tion and t h e social scie n tific frame of reference. (4)

504

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS AND POLICY DECISIONS

B a s i c eco n o m ic concepts a p p l i e d t o policy f o r m a t i o n a n d operat i n g decisions. (4)

505

SOC IAL SCIENCE R ES E ARCH METHODS

Basic research concepts applied t o l a bora tory, field, and bibliographic studies. Topics include formulat i ng research ques tions, resear h designs, d a ta-g a thering techniques, analysis of d a ta and theory co ns truction. E m phasis i s placed on u nderstanding and eva l u a t ing rather than conducting resea rch . (4)

54

QUANTITATIVE M ETHODS

The concepts of proba bility, sampling, s t a t is t ical decision theory, linear programming and other deterministic models applied to managerial problems. Prereq u isite: Sta tistics 2 3 1 o r 34 l . (4)

591

DIRE CTED STUDY

( 1 -4 )

595

GRADUATE READlNGS

In dependent s t u d y card req ui red . (4)

597, 5 9 8

RES EARCH PROJECT

(4)

599

THESIS

(J - 4 )

E VOL UTI ON OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT

Economic thought from ancient to modern tim es; emp hasis n the pe riod from Adam S m ith to J .M. Key nes; the classical eco n o m i s t s, t h e socialists, t h e marginalists, t h e neoclassical econ om ists, and t h e Keynesian s . (4)

490

543

ECONOMICS

COUR SES OFFERED IN THE 1 9 79 INTERIM 150 308 312

PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS ECONOMIC D EC I S IONS: COMPETING lN A MARKET G A M E ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS: AN E XCHANGE OF I DEAS - THE MARKETPLACE OR G OVERNM ENT CONTROL


SCHOOL OF

Education T h e School of E d u ation offers progra m s of s t u d y le a d i n g to ce r ti fica ti on for e l e m e n ta r y a nd secon d a r y t eac he rs , co u n selors, nu rse , a nd adm i n is tra t ors . T h e

curri u i li m is de signed to a ble nd ing of t h e l i b Tal

provid e gra d u a r e s wi t h

a r ts a nd a va ri e ty of prac tical ex pos ures to gu ided field expe riences beg inning early i n the e d u ca t i o n a l se q ue n ce . T h e fa c u l t y is co m m i t te d to t h e de ve lo pme n t of ed uca tional pe rsonn e l s e n s i t ive to the

varie d i nd ividua l needs of learn e r s .

FACUl.TY Joh nston. Dell n ; Baughman. Brochtrup. C h u rney. L. Cox. DeBower. Fletcher. M. Hanson, Mat hers. Minetti, Moe, Nokl eberg, F. Olson, Pederson, R i ckabaugh. S m i t h , S tein, Wen tworth. W i l l i a mson.

T h e S hooi o f Education i s accred i ted b y the National Council for Accred itation of Teacher Education ( N C ATE)' the Northwest A ssociation of

choo l s and Colleg es, and the

Wash ington State Board of E d ucation for the pre par tion of elementary and secondary teachers, princ i p a l s and guidance counselors, with t h e Master of Arts the hig hest degree approved. The a credita tion gives PLU graduates reciprOCity i n twent y-ei g h t states.

Programs for the preparation o f school librarians, school chool co unselors, administrators, supervisory

nurses,

personnel, and special education teachers a re available. The School offers course wo r k toward the conversion, renewal or reinsta te ment of teaching certifica tes . The School of Ed u catio n offers graduate degre e s in Elementa ry Education, Secondary Education, Rea d ing, School Administr tion, and Co unse ling and Guidance. Informat , n regarding these programs is available th rough the Dean o f Gradua t

S tudies.

ADMISSION REQ U i REM ENTS In the sophomore ye r, students with a cumulative grade point avera ge of 2 . 1 5 O r above may r e g i st r for Ed. 2 5 1 . Students wi\! mak

a p p lication for admission t o t h e School of

Education during t h e semester enrolled i n Ed. 2 5 1 . Prior to Ed. 251 s t u dents s h ould meet the follOWing requirements, 1. T h ey must have "

" or better grades in Eng l i s h 101 and

Psychology 1 0 1 o r Sociology 1 0 1 . 2 . T h e y must have completed

A 1 2 3.

Transfer stud e nts who may h v e h a d edu a t i en courses in oth r institutions s h ould m ee t with an educa tion adviser for evaluation o f work completed and must arrange for screening into the School of Education. Students who h a v e earned a bachelor's degree at PLU or another inst itution, und who contemplate meeting certification req u i rements a re expected to meet the same requirements for admi5sion and certificat i on. The cer tification sequen e w i l l n ormally req u i re a summer session a n d two or three semesters.

EDUCA TION

55


BAE and/or C E RT I D CATION REQUrREM ENTS Stude n ts become n did <ltes for ce rti fica t i o n w h e n t h e y have sat is f ied the fo l l o w i n g, 1 . Have ,l cu m u la t ive GPA of 2.25 2 Have c m ple t ed t h � Pro fe s s i n a l E d uca t i o n Seq uence . 3. lave com pl ted a p p rove d teac h i n g m a j o r ( s ) or conCl' nt r a t io n s (se re u i re m en ts �s l i s te d u nder Academic

5.

Com pi Ie PE 295. Complete a l l OUIS€S in education a n d

f D a re a p p l i cab l e

to wa r d a degree but n o t for e x cess hours t o w a r d

ifth y e a r

p rog ra ms .

TEACHffi C E RTlACATION Guid el ines f r t h e prepa r a t i o n and cert ific.!tion of teac h e r s have been es ta b l i . hed by t h e State Boa rd of E d u c a t i On . The recomm nded progra m p l tern inc\udl's: broad l i beral ed u c a ti on, 35 per len t , s u b j ct m a t t!!. r prepa r a t i o n , 35 p� e n t ; profeSS i o n a l s t u dy. 2 0 p e r ce n t ; n d el e c t i ve s, 10 pe r cen t . Tht! four-year cu rr ic u l u m Il'ads t o t he Ba h e l or of A rt s in e. r t i f ic a t , an i n i t i a l Educat ion degree and t h e Provis i o n a l license to teac h , I ss ued fOT a pe r i od of t h ree y ea r s. PLU reco m me n ds ca n d id a te s fo r t h e i r first te a c h i ng posi tion on t h e basis of t he i r p repara t ion Students m ay e il r n a bile laureate de g ree in an aca de mic field an d q u � l i f y f or a tea c.h i ng cr ed e n t i al upon c o m pletion of teac h e r e r ti F i ca ti o n requ ire men t s . These re u i re m e n t s i nc l u d e major a s des ri bed u n de r "Academi

P repa r a t i on " ( m a j o r

E d . 326

M a t h e mat ics in t h e E l e m e n t a ry S c h o o l (2)

Art 3 4 1

E l e m e n t a r y Art E d u c a t ion ( 2 )

( P r e req u i s i t e : Math 3 2 3 or e q u i va l e n t )

Eleefiues --

re,] u i s l t ; Ed 2 5 1 or .32 1 ) Gener I Me lh oJ

(UpPN [ll' m n t ary L e vel ) (2 2 5

G P A; prere q u i s i t ; Ed 2� 1 o r 3 2 1 ) r 324

G e n e r a l Me th ()d · k le m en t a ry Euucation M o d e l l ( 2 . 2 5 GPA. p re req u is i t

Ed. 430

Ed 2 5 1 � tude n t Te"chlJlg (Primar

- 1 0 h o u rs ( 2 25 32.6) St lJde nt Teaching ( U pper E le m en ta ry ) - t o h o u r s ( 2 . 2 5 erA. pr e re qu i s i t e s : Gen e r a l M e t h od s , Ed. 3 25 and 320) r rof es ;i onal Sem i n a r - 2 h o u rs ( m u s t be taken con­

G r A ; pre r{'4 u i s i tes :

or

Ed . 432

Ed 435

or 32 1 )

LeveJ)

ene r a l Met h"ds, Ed 325 a n d

c u r r e n t l y w i t h Ed 4 30 or 4 3 2 )

56

E D U CATI ON

hours

L a n g u ag e A r t s in t h e Ele men tary S c h o o l ( 2 )

E d . 410

S ci enc e in t h e E l e m e n t a r y S c h ool ( 2 )

Ed. 4 1 2

Soc i a l S t u d i e s i n E l e m e n t a r y School ( 2 )

Ed. 457

P r e pa rat i o n a n d U t i l i za t i o n of Media ( 3 - 4 )

E d . 4 8 3 P r i m a r y R ed di n g ( 2 ) E n g l i s h 3 2 3 C h i l d re n 's L i t e ra t u re ( 4 ) I' 3 2 2 PE i n t h e E l e m e n t a r y S c h o o l ( 2 ) Add i t io n a l h o ices i n c o ns u l t a t i o n w i t h e d u c a t i o n a d v i s e r. SECON D A R Y PR E PA RA n ON Professional Sequence (minimum of 24 hours) Lea r n e r and Socie t y ( G P A 2. 1 5 req u i red; sop h o more E d . 25 1 l e ve l co urse; prereq u i s i t e s : Ps y 1 0 1 . CA 1 2 3 . CA 1 2 3 may be t ak e n concu r r e n t l y ) ( 4 )

E d P s y 4 6 8 Educa t io n a l Psyc hology ( p r e re q u is i t e : E d . 2 5 1 ) ( 4 ) Ed. 425

G e n e r a l M e t h od s - S ec o nd a r y ( p r e re q u i s i t e s : E d . 2 5 1 , E d P s y 4 6 8 ) ( 2 ) , a nd E N G L I S H u s e E d . 4 4 4 , E n g. in S ec . School ( 2 ); or

SCIE

CE use E d . 4 4 7, S c i . in Sec. School ( 2 ) ; or

S OC I A L S T U DI ES use Ed . 448, Soc. S t u d . in Sec.

t he c a t a l o g .

or

Mu sic i n t h e Ele m e n t a ry S c h o o l ( 2 ) 4 st'mf5ier

Ed. 408

an d m i n o r s )

m u s t be met ; 1 HIs tory 4 0 0 , re u i r ed of a l l ele m e n ta r y teac he r a n d idate s . 2. ES 1 0 1 , World Geography, o r A n t h r opo logy 1 0 1 , re q u i r ed o f 1 1 e leme n t a ry tN e her a nd i d a tes . 3 . Prospect i ve e le me n t a ry teach e rs us ually m e e t t h e sci nc ge neral ed u ca t i o n req u i re me nt by c o m pl e ti ng Biology I l l , o r an o t h r l i Fe scie n e c ou rse , a n d E S 1 2 2 A year c o u r s e in O n e I bo r a te, ry sci n e may be s u bsti t u t e d by t h ose w ho have ade q lLl te h i g h school background i n t he other science . E d . 25 1 Lea r ne r a n d Sode t y ( 2 1 5 G rA req U i r d; so p h <.l mor leve l ; prereq u i sites : Psy 1 0 1 or Soc 1 0 1 , CA 1 2 3 , and Eng l O l l , e n e ral Ml'th d s W r i ma ry Ll!vei) ( 2 . 2 5 PA; preEd. 322

Ed.

hOUT5

Read i n g i n t h e E l e m e n t a r y School ( 4 )

School ( 2); or

E L E M E NTA RY PREPARATrON I n a d d i t io n to th g n era l u n i ver .ity c u rses requ ired ill a l l cu rri c ula , ce rt a i n specific re q u i r e m e n t s i n ge nera l e d uca t i o n

Ed. 323

� semts/u

Ed . 3 2 5

M u s i c 34 1 In ma jo r and m i n o r

fields w i t h grades of C or h i g h e r . G rades

as l i s t e d in t h i s s e c t i o n of

Rt·q ui rflj -

or

Prepa ra tion) . 4.

Professional Subject M inor (Requir e d o f a l l ele.mentilrY ca.ndldates)

u p to 2. s e m e s t e r h o u rs m a y be t a ke n o u t s i d e o f t h e Sch o o l o f E d u c a t i o n i n t hose acad e m i c m a jors o t h e r t h a n t h e a bove ( E ng . , S c i . S o c . Sci . ) . Ed. 434

Ed. 467

S t u d e n t Teach i ng - S eco n da ry ( G P A 2 . 25 req u i red; prerequisi t e s : E d . 25 1 , Ed Psy 4 6 8, E d . 4 2 5 , a n d peci a l M e t h ods) ( l o ) E va l u a t i o n ( p r e r e q u i s i t e : E d . 4 25; m a y be t a k e n c o n c u r r e n t l y w i t h Ed . 4 3 4 ) ( 2 ) Pro fess ional Se m e s t e r ( S e n i o r Y e a r ) - S t u d e n t s m u s t c o n t a c t t h e Sch ool of Ed uca t ion for ap pli­ cation proced u re s . Appl i c a t i o n s m ll s t b e s u b m i t t e d no l a t e r t h a n six we.,ks before t h e e nd of t h e p r e c e d i ng se. m e s t e r .

S P E C l A L PROGRAMS T h e f o l l o w i n g spec i a l i z e d e nd o rse m e n ts i n education a re a v a i l a ble to a l l s t u d e n ts p u r s u i n g t e a c h e r ce r t i fi c a t i o n . S t udents de si r i n g to work t o w a rd a special ized e n d o rseme n t s h o u l d c n s ul t an adviser in the Schoul of Educa tion for ;I s sis t a n c e i n p l a n n i n g t h e i r p r o g ra m . READrNG - 1 4 semester hours Pre re q u i s i te : Ed. 325 Reading in t h e Ele m e n tMy S c h o o l R eq u i r e d L a n g u a g e Arts i n t h e E l e m e n tary S c h o o l (2) Ed. 408 rrimary Reading (2) E d . 483 E J . 4 7 9 D i a g nOSis a n d Practic u m i n R e a d i n g


" E le c t i ves

PE. 40 1 CA 402 d . 456

-

m i n i m u m of 6 s e m e s t e r hours

PREPA R ATION F O R SENIOR H I G H SCHOOL TEACHING: S t u d e n t s pr paring for senior high teaching m u s t

Percept u a l Motor Skills ( I ) C o m m u n ica t ion A rt s in the E l e m e n t a r y Cla ssroom ( 2 )

complete a p p ro x i m a t e l y 4 4 - 4 8 semester ho urs i n t h e academic

S t orytelling ( 4 )

a rea in which they plan to teach. A minor in a second t e a c h i n g

E n g l ish 323

路 h i l d re n 's L i t e r a t u re

a rea is reco m m e n de d . S t ud nts may also f i n d i t a d v a n t ageous t o

(4)

"Ot he r s i m i l a r courses may b e used as electives i f ap proved b y he progra m advis r b e fore reg i s t r a tion is c o m p l t e d .

SPEC I A L EDUCATION - Teaching major: 3 0 s m e s t e r h o u r s . Teaching mi nor. 1 6 s e m e s t e r h o u r s . See p a g e

their c a r e e r g o a l s t o 1 ) develop s k i l l s in one or more coaching a reas i n response t o T i t le IX leg i s l a t ion, and 2) develop compete ncies i n specia l ed uca tion i n response t o federal special educa tion legisla tion. I n a l l cases , s t u dents must discuss their progra m with an adviser from t h e School of Education.

LEAR N l NG R ESOURCE SPECIALIST (Preparation of School librarians) 1 6 e m e s t e r hours S t udents i n te rested in preparing for the responsibili ty of

second a ry leve ls. Deta iled i n forma tion reg a rd i ng K 1 2

" d m i n i s t ra t i o n o f a school libra ry may m et sugges t ed s t a ndards

c r t ification is a va i lable in t h e Scho I of E d uc a ti o n office.

through the following prog ra m : Select a m i n i m u m of one course fr m e ch o f the following divisions: Book IIna M . dia Selectior! 56

St ryteJling ( 4 )

Ed.

5 ..

Selection of Learning Resource M a t e r ials (2) h i ld re n 's Literil t u re (4)

Adm ln i s/ mlion Ed. 4 5 1

A d m i n i s t r a tion o f

t h e School L i b ra r y

(2)

ataloging Ed. 453

Processing School library Ma terials (2)

R,{trtllfe Ed. '1 52

Basic Reference M terials ( 2 )

Mtdia Utilizalion and Proa uctio " Ed

457

-

ART Senior High Teaching Major:

46 s e m e s t e r h o u r s 路 req u i red:

p l u s electives.

Junior High Teaching Major: 30 s e m ester hours required: Art n o, 1 60, 2 3 0 , 2 5 0 , 3 5 , 4 4 0 plus elec t i v e s . Teac hing Minor: 20 s e m e s t e r h o u rs req uired: A r t 1 1 0, 1 6 0, 230, 2 5 0 an d 3 6 5 .

Elementary Teacnjng M.ajor: 1 1 0, 1 6 0, 250, 3 4 1 , a n d

24 s e m e s t e r h o u rs required: Art

i g h t semester hours of 230, 365 or

370. Teaching M i n o r : 12 semester hours a s de termi ned by the School o f Edu ca tion. 'Up to t h ree s u pporting courses m a y be reco m m e nded.

Preparation lind Utili zation of Media ( 3 - 4 )

BIOLOGY Senior High Teaching Major:

C u r r ic u l u m Develop ment ( 2 )

Biology 1 55, 1 56 , 253, 322, 340; a choice of fo u r s e m e s t e r hours

Curric u lu m E d . 580

s t u d e n t t e a c h i ng experience on bo th the eleme n t a ry a nd

A r t l I D, 1 60, 230, 250, 365, 3 70, 440, two cour ses in art history

.

Ed.

English 3 2 3

PREPARATION FOR .K-12 TE ACHl NG: Students pre paring for K - 1 2 teach i n g n art, music , or p hysical educa tion must have

ACADEMIC PREPARATION A major from those lis ted mu;t be completed. C o m p l e t ion of a teaching major/ m i n o r i n a second aca d e m ic a rea i s s trongly

ree m mended. ( S t ud e n t s do not major in educa t io n . ) Teach i n g m a j o r s are offered i n t h e following areas: a r t , biology, b u s i ness education, che m i s t ry, co m m u n ica tion arts, e a r t h a n d general

sciences, economics, E nglish, French, G e r m a n , h i s t o r y , l a ng u age arts, m a t hema tics, m u sic, physi al e d ucati n, p h ysics, politic a l scien e, social sciences, SOCiology, a n d Spanish

4 4 s e m e s t e r hours requi red :

from Biology 324, 3 7 1 , or 3 7 2 and fo u r s e m e s t e r hours from Biology 3 4 6, 358, or 4 4 1; 12 s e m e s t e r hours i n C h e m i s t ry ( l l 5, 3 3 1 , 332, 333, 3 3 4 ) ; Ma t h 1 3 3. Reco m m e nded: Che mistry 1 1 6,

E a r t h Sciences 1 3 1 , 1 32, Ma t h 1 5 1 .

Elementary Teach ing Major:

24 s e m e s t e r h o u rs requ ired:

Biology 1 55, 1 5 6 , 253; C h e m is t ry 1 1 5, 1 1 6, p l u s

lectives.

Tea c h i ng M i n o r : 1 2 s e m e s t e r h o u rs : 1 55, 1 5 6, 2 5 3 .

BUSIN ESS EDUCA Tl0N Senior Hjgh Teaching Major.

4 8 s e m e s t e r hours required:

PREPA R ATION FOR E L E M E N TARY TEACHl NG: A s tu de n t preparing for e l e m e n t a r y school teaching m u s t

Econ 1 50; BA 24 1 , 2 4 3, 281, 350, 387, 4 3 5; adva nced typing;

complete 24 s e m e s t e r hours i n a m a j o r teaching area, a n d two

select at least one a rea o f concen tration from accou n t i ng,

m i n o rs co nsisting of 1 2 s e m e s t e r h o u rs ea h. One o f the m i no rs

secretarial. or d i s t r i b u t i ve educa tion . Acc o u n t i n g : B A 38 1 , 383.

m u s t be in th

profe ssional s ub j e c ts and one in a te c h i n g field

Secre t a ri a l : advanced shorthand; records m a n a g e m e n t ; machine

o t h e r t ha n t h a t covered in t he 2 4 s e m e s t e r hour conce n t ra t i o n .

t rans cription; Ed 4 4 1 . Dis trib u tive Education: B A 370, 4 7 1 , 4 7 2 .

T h e courses i ncluded i n t h e t w

minors a r e to b e d e t e rm ined i n

c n s u l t a t ion w i t h the School o f E d u c a t i o n .

PRE PARATION FOR JUNIOR HIGH TE ACHING: S t u d e n ts prepa r ing f r teaching on t h e j u n ior high lev!'l a re required to om ple te a teaching major of a pproxi m a tely 2 4 - 3 2 s e m e s t e r h u r s . A t e a c h i n g minor is a l so required. S t u d e n ts m u s t c o n s u l t an educatio n adviser rega rding t e a c h i n g major a nd min or c o m b i n a t io n s .

b u s i n ess machines; Ed 341, 342. EJch s t u d e n t i s req uired to

Typing, b u s iness machines, shor t h a n d , records m a n a g e m e n t , and machine tran scrip tion a re not offered o n campus. These courses may be taken at a c o m m u n i t y college t o meet degree req u i r e m e n t s .

C H E M ISTRY Senior High Teac hing Major: 4 9 s e m e s t e r hours req uired : Che m i s t ry 1 1 5, 1 1 6, 3 2 1 , 3 3 1 , 3 3 2, 333, 3 34 , 3 4 1 , 34Z, a n d 343; Physics 1 4 7, 1 4 8, 153, a nd 1 5 4; M a t h 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 .

Elementary Teaching Major: 2 4 s e m e s t e r h o u rs req u i r e d :

16

h o u r s o f a p proved c h e m i s t r y a n d 8 hou rs a s d e t ermined b y t h e School o f Educa tion . Teaching M i n or: 1 2 hours a s deter mined by t h e School of Eduea tion.

ED UCATION

57


C O M M U N I CATION ARTS Senior High Teaching Major: 401 s e m e s t e r hours req u i red : 1 6 sem e s ter h o u rs o f C o m m u n ica tion A rt s 1 2 3, 1 2 8 o r 250, 2 4 1

a n d 4 0 4 , p l u s 1 2-29 s e m e s t e r hours chosen i n con s u l ta tion with t h e m a j o r a d v i s er. Suppor t i n g classes: A l t e rn a tive of 1 6 - 2 0 se mester h o u rs i n E n g l i s h or m od e rn or c l a ssical l a n g uag e, J u nior Hjgh T ea chin g Major: 2 4 - 2 8 s e m e s t e r h o u rs re q u i red : 1 2 s e m e s t e r h o u rs of C o m m u n ication Arts 1 23, 1 2 8 o r 2 5 0, 2 4 1 a n d 4 0 4, plus a d d i t io n a l 8 hours in C o m m u n ica tion Arts . Add i t i o n a l 8- 1 2 s e m e s t e r hours to be d e t e r m i n e d with depa r t m e n t a n d School of Educ a t i o n . Teaching Minor: 1 6- 2 0 se mester hours req u i re d : C o m m u nication A r t s 1 23 a n d 2 4 1 , plus 8- 1 2 l e c t i ve s e m e s t e r h o u r s . Elementary Teac h i n g Major: 2 4 s e m e s t e r h o u rs required : Co m m u n i c a t io n A r t s 1 2 3 and 4 0 2, plus 8 s e m e s t e r h o u r s i n C m m u n ic ati on Arts a n d 8 s e m e s t e r h o u r i n E n g l i s h . Teaching M in o r : 1 2 s e m stc r hours t o be d e t e r m i ne d i n con s u l t a t i on w i t h t h e School of Educa t i o n . EA RTH S C l E N C£S Senior High Teaching Major: ( Ea r t h Sciences) 4 4 s e m e s t e r h o u r s required, including 1 3 1 , 1 3 2 , 1 3 6, 2 0 2, 324 or 32 5; p l u s one ad d i t i o n a l course i n ES, preferably a field course s u c h a s : 3 5 1 , 360 or 3 6 5 . R e q uired s u pporting : C h e m i s t ry 1 0 3, 1 0 4 or 1 1 5, 1 16; Physics 1 2 5 , 1 2 6 (and l a b s ) or 1 5 3 , 1 5 4 (and l a bs); Math 1 3 3; appropriate biolog cours e s . Additional supporting courses should be d i sc u ssed with adviser. Junior High Teaching Major: (Earth Scie nces) 28 semeste r hours required, including: 1 3 1 , 1 3 2, 1 36, 2 02., 3 2 4 or 3 25; p l u s one add i t i o n a l c o u rse i n E S . A fi e l d course s u c h as 3 5 1 , 3 6 0 or 365 is reco m mend ed. Suggested su ppo r t i n g : C h emistry 1 04 or 1 1 5 , 1 1 6 ; Physics 1 2 5 , 1 2 6 ( a n d l a b s ) or 1 5 3, 1 5 4 (and labs); M ath 1 3 3; appropria te b iology co urses. Additional sup porting Cuurs�s s ho u ld be dIscussed with adviser. Elementary Tea.c hi ng Maj or: ( E a r th Sciences) 2 4 s e m e s t e r h o u r s requ i r e d : ES 1 3 1 , 1 32 , 1 3 6 and 2 0 2 ; C h e m i s t r y 1 0 4 o r l I S a n d o n e upper d i v i s i on science course. Teaching M i n o r : 1 2 s "' m e s ter h o u rs i n ea r t h a n d p hysica l s c i e n c e s . E C ON OMlCS Senior High Teach in g Major: 44 semester hours r e q u i red: E c n o mics 1 5 0, 3 5 1 , 352, 4 8 6 ; 1 2 semester h ours from the following : Econ 3 2 1 , 3 3 1 , 3 6 1 , 3 6 2, 434; His tory 4 6 0 plus 1 2 s e m es ter h o u rs d i s t r i b u ted over areas o f sociology, political s c i e nce, or a n t h ropo logy. ( R ecom m e n d e d : Ed. 448 to m e e t profes s i o n a l education requi reme n t . ) Junior High Tuch i n g Ma j or : 28 se mes ter hours req uire d : E o no mics 1 5 0, 434, 486; 4 h o u r s f r o m : E c o n 3 2 1 , 3 3 1 , 3 5 1 , 3 6 1 , 4 3 2; H i s t o ry 4 6 0 p l us 8 s e m e s t e r hours distribute d o v e r

area s of sociology or p o l i t ical science. Te achin g Minor: 1 2 s e m s t e r h o u rs require d : E c o n 1 50, plus 1 2 h o u rs of upper division economics. Ed. 4 4 8 t o meet profes s i o n a l educa t ion requ i rem e n t . Elementary Teaching Major: 2 4 s e m e s t e r h o u rs req u i r e d : Economics 1 5 0, 434, 4 86; 4 s e m e s t e r hours f ro m : E c o n 3 2 1 , 3 3 1 , 3 5 1 , 3 5 2, 3 6 1 , 3 6 2, 4 3 2 ; History 460, 4 s e m e s t e r h o u rs from t h e areas of sociology o r poli t i c a l science. Teac h i n g M i n o r : 1 2 se m e s ter hou rs required: Economics 1 5 0 and 8 hours o f upper d ivi iOI eco n o m ics . Ed. 4 1 2 to meet profess ional I'd uca tion re q uirem ent .

58

E D U C ATI O N

ENGLISH SenioT High Te ac h i ng Major: A m i n i m u m of 3 2 s e m e s t e r h o u r s , 1 6 of w h i c h a r e to be upper d i v i s i o n , is required b e yond 1 0 1 a nd with the fo llowing d i s t r i b u t i o n : (a) one course i n A m e rican litera t u re; ( b ) two cours 5 i n Bri t i s h li t e ra t u re (one before 1700 and one a f t e r ) ; (c) one c o u rse i n ad vanced c o m po s i t i o n , English 3 28; a n d ( d ) o n e co urse from 382, 4 0 0 o r 4 0 3 . A l l maj ors m u s t pre sen t tw o years o f o n e foreign l a n g u a g e at t h e c o l l e g e l e vel o r show e q u i va l e n t profi ciency . E d . 4 4 4 is re qu i red t o meet professional educa tion re q u i r e m e n t . Reco m mended: CA 4 0 4 or M C l 4 4 5 and E d . 4 2 0 . Junior High Teach ing M aj or: A m i n i m u m of 3 2 s e m e s t e r h o u r s i n E n g l i s h beyond 1 0 1 as st ate d i n S e n io r H i g h Te a c h i ng Major a bove in cluding t h e dis t ribu tio n require m e n t s . Majors

m u s t prese n t two years of o n e foreign l a n g u ag e at t h e col l ege level or s h o w e q u i v a l e n t proficiency and m u s t take Ed. 44-1 to meet profe ssional educa t i o n require m e n t . E lementar y Teaching Concentration: 2 4 s e m e s t e r hou rs; 1 2 h u r s i n English di tri but ed a s i n ( a ) and ( b ) u n d e r Senior High Teachin M a j o r a bove, a n d 1 2 a dd i ti o n a l hours i n E n g l i s h as d e t e r m i ned by the School of Educa tion . Reco m m ended : E n g l i s h 3 2 3, T e c h i n g Minor: 1 2 h o u rs re q u i red, as determined b y t h e School of Educa t i o n . fRENCH Senior High Teac h i ng Major: 44 s e m e s t e r hours required: French 2 0 1 , 202 (or equiva l e n t ) , 3 2 1 , 3 5 1 , 352, 4 4 5 a n d 1 2 additional hour s; 4 4 5 w i l l m e e t p a r t o f t h e professional educa tion elective require m e n t . Supporting courses: 12 h o u rs in related a.reas selected with the a p p roval o f the d e p a r t m e n t . J u n i o r H igb Teach.l ng Major: 28 s e m e s t e r h o u r s req u i red a s lis ted f o r s e n i o r h i g h prepara tion; s u pporting courses chosen i n cons u l ta tion with m a j o r a d v i s e r . Secundary Teac h i n g M i n o r : 1 6 s e mes te r hours a bove 200 I vel. Elementary Teach ing Major: 24 semester h o u rs required, i n c l u ding 20 hour s i n French and 4 a d d i t i o n a l' hours selected in c o n s u l t a t ion with t h e depa r t m e n t and the School of Education. Teaching Minor: 1 2 h o u rs requi red, as d e t e r m i ned by t h e de p a r t m e n t a n d t h e School of Educa t i on . G E NERAL S C l E N C E

( S ee ad viser.l

GE R M A N

Senjor High Teaching Major: 4 4 s e m e s t e r hours req u i red : German 2 0 1 , 2 0 2 (OT e q u iva l e n t ) , 3 2 1 , 3 5 1 , 3 5 2, 4 4 5 a n d 1 2 additional hours; 4 4 5 w i l l m e e t pa r t o f t h e professional educa tion elective require m e n t . S u pp o r t i n g courses: 12 s e m e s t e r hours i n rela ted a re a s selected w i t h t h e approval of t h e depa r t m e n t . J u n ior High Teach ing Major: 28 se mester hours requi red as l is ted for s e n i o r high prepa r a t i o n ; su p p o r t i n g courses chosen i n consultation w i t h m a j o r adviser. Secondary Teaching M i no r : 1 6 s e m es te r h o u r s a bove 2 0 0 l e v e l . Elementar y Teaching Major: 24 s e m e s t e r h o u rs required, i n c l u d i n g 20 hours i n G e r m a n and 4 additional hours selected in con s u l ta t i o n with the depa r t m e n t and the School of E d u ca t io n . Te aching M i nor: 1 2 hours req u i red, as d e t e r m i ne d by the d e p a r t m e n t and t h e School of E d uca t i o n .


-

HISTORY Senior High Teaching Major: 4 4 semester hours required: His tory 1 0 7 r 10 9; 108 or 1 1 0; 8 h o u r s o f 2 5 1 . 252 and 253; 路i60 and 1 2 add i t i o n a l upper divisi n h o u r s in his tory including a sen ior s e m i n a r . S u pporting courses : 12 addit ional semester

Secondary Teaching Major - I nstrumental : 51 se mester hours re q u i red : M u s ic 1 1 1 , 1 23 , 1 24 , 1 2 5, 1 26 , 1 3 2, 1 2 3, 2 2 4 ,

2 2 5 , 226, 2 3 1 , 2 3 2 , six h o u rs from 2 4 1 /242, 2 4 3 / 2 4 4 , 2 45/246, 247, and .326; t e n h o u rs o f la rge en semble, t w o h o u r s o f pia no lessons ( m i n i m u m class level 4)', seve n h o u r s of pri v a t e

hours selected from economics, geog r a p h y , political science, psychology, a n d sociology. eco m me n d e d : E d . 420, E d . 448 to

i n st ruction o n principal i n s t r u me n t , 3 4 5 , 4 4 5 . M u s i c 4 4 4 i s re q u i red f o r t h e Professional Education s e q u n c e f o r

m et profess i o n a l ed ucation require m e n t s .

certifica tion. Recom mended f o r s t r i n g m a j o r s : M u sic 4 5 4 . Junior High Teaching Major: 2 8 s e m e s t e r h o u r s required: Music 1 1 1, 1 23, 1 2 4, 1 2 5, 1 2 6, 132, 223, 224, 225, 226, 23 1 , 232, 345, two hours o f la rge e n semb le, a n d two h o u rs o f piano lessons ( m i n i m u m class I vel 4 ) ' . Recom m e n d e d : two h o u rs of p rivate l e s s o n s in principal i n s t r u m e n t o r voice and t w o h o u rs in class g u i tar. Two t o fo u r s e me s ter hours of Music 443 and 4 4 4 are required i n t h e Profess iona l Educat ion s e q ue n c e for

LANG UAGE ARTS J unior High Teaching Major: 32 sem ter h o u rs req u i red : English 328; 4 h o u rs of English 40.3 or LInguistic s 400; 4 h o u r s of u p per d i vision l i t e r a t u r e (in addi tion to c o u r s e taken t o m e e t ge ne r al educat i o n requirement); CA 241 o r 326, a n d CA 404; E d . 4 4 4 and 12 semester h o u r s from a reas o f E n g l i s h , jo urn a l i s m , C A or foreign l a n g u age b路 yond fres h m a n level ( a t least 8 of t h e 1 2 hours m u s t b e i n t h e s a m e disci plI ne. a nd 4 h o u rs m u s t be u pper d i v i s i o n ) . Tea ching Minor: 1 6 emester h o u rs required, select ed from offering s in E ng l i s h , journalism, C A or fore i g n language beyond Fres h ma n l e v e l ; E n g l i s h 328 i s req u i r ed , Recom mended: Ed. 420. Elementary Teachjng Major: 24 semester hou r s r e q u i red: English 32 , one of E nglish 403 or Ling uistics 400; En glish 323,

CA 402 a nd one o f CA 2 4 1 o r 326 or 4 36; 2 courses selected fr m on of t h e fo l l OWing a reas: E ng l i s h , CA o r foreign

Iiln uage beyond fres h m a n level. Te a c h i n g MInor: 1 2 s e m e t e r hours req u i red a s determi ned by t h e School o f E d u c a t i o n . English 32 8 i s req u i red.

MA THEMA TICS Senior High Teaching Major: 4 4 s e m e s t e r h o u rs requued in addi t i o n t Math 446. Prere q u i s i te : Math 1 3 3 or e q u i v a l e n t . Re q u i red: ComSci 1 3 9- 1 4 0 o r 1 44, Math 1 5 1 , 1 5 2, 3 3 1 , 43 3, 4 4 6; 3 2 1 or 4 3 4 or 4 5 5; four additional upper division h o u rs in m a t h ! o m p u t r scit'nce; eigh t h o u rs of chemistry or ph ysics; and four additional science hours . Junior High Teaching Major: 24 s e m e s t e r hours req u i red. Prereq u i s i t e : M a t h 1 33 o r eq u ival n t . R e q u i red : omSci 1 391 4 0 o r 1 4 4, Ma l h 1 5 1, 1 5 2, 3 3 1 , 4 33, 4 6. Tea c h i ng M t n or : 1 6 se mester h o u rs req u i red i n dddition t o Math 4 4 6 . P rereq ui sit e:

Math 1 33 or equivale n t . Req u i r e d : M a t h 1 5 1 , 1 5 2; 1 2 7 or Com Sc i 1 4 4 or m a t h 3 3 1 ; 3 2 1 or 4 33 ; 4 4 6 . C o m Sci 1 3 9 - 1 4 0 is rec om m ended i f 1 4 4 i s not t a ke n . Elementary Teilching Mal or: 24 s('mester h o u rs . R e q u i red : M a t h 1 3 3 or equivalent; 1 2 7, 1 5 1 . 1 5 2; 323 or equ i v a l e n t ; 324 or eq ui valen t . C o m Sci 1 3 9 - 1 4 0 o r 1 4 4 i s a l s o s t rongl recomm e nde . Tea c h i n g Minor: 12 semester h ou r s R q ui r e d : om Sci 1 39 - 1 4 0 i s s t ro n gly M a t h 323 or e q u i v a l n t; 3 2 4 . re o m m e nded.

MUSIC Secondary Teaching Major - Choral: 4 9 semester h ou rs r eq u i red : M u s ic 1 1 1 . 1 2 3, 1 24 , 1 25, 1 26, 1 3 2, 2 2 3, 224, 2 2 5, 226, 231, 232, 3 4 3, 345, 366, 445, 453, eig h t h o u rs of large

en se m b l e, four h o u rs of piano lessons ( m i n i m u m class level 6)", f voice lessons, and two hours o f g u i t a r lesso n s . si x h ur M us i c 44 1 and 443 a r e req uired i n t h e Professional Education seq uence for

e rt i fica t i o n . Recomme nded : M u sic 343.

certifica t ion . Teach ing Minor: two t o four s e m e s t e r h o u rs from Music 341, 44 1 , plus 20 h o u rs to be d e t e r m i ned in con s u l t a tion with t h e School of Education a n d t h e Depa r t m e n t of M usic. Elementary Music Specialist - Chon l: Music 1 1 1 , 1 23 , 1 24 , 1 2 5, 1 26, 1 3 2 , 2 23, 224, 2 2 5 , 226, 23 1 , 2 3 2 , 3 4 5 , 4 5 3 , e i g h t h o u rs of l a rge e n s e m ble, f o u r h o u rs o f piano lessons ( m i n i m u m

class level 8 ) ' , s i x h o u rs voie lessons, two hour s g u i t a r lesso n s . M u s ic 34 1 a n d 4 4 1 a r e req u i re d i n t h e Prof essional Education

sequence for certifica tion . 'See Depa rt m e n t of M u s ic H a n dbook for descriptions of class p i a n o level s .

Elementary Music Specialist - Instrumental : See Seco nd a ry

Teaching M a j o r - I n s t r u m e n t a l above.

Elementary Teaching Major: Two t o four s e m e s ter h o u rs f r o m Mu sic 34 1 , 4 4 1 , plus 24 h o u rs to be d e t e r m i n ed i n

consul tation w i t h t h e School o f E d u c a t i o n a n d t h e Depa r t m e n t of M u sic. Ele m e n ta r y Teac h i n g M i n o r : T w o t o f o u r s e m e s t e r h o u rs f r o m M u s i c 34 1 a n d 4 4 1 p l u s 12 h o u rs to b e d e t e r m i ned in cons u l t a tion w i t h the School of Education and the Depa r t m e n t of M u sic.

PHYSICAL EDUCA TlON Secondary Teaching Major (44 hours): Required ( 24 h o u rs ) : PE 277, 3 2 8, 4 7 8, 4 8 1 , 4 8 2, a n d 485; Bio logy 205- 206; participation in a va rS i t y o r club spor t . Elec ti v e s : 20 h o u rs from am ong t h e fo llowing: PE 275, 282, 283, 285, 286, 287, 332, 36 0, 362, 484, and 4 9 1 . S t u d e n t s desiring K- 1 2 certifica tion m u s t complet P E 2 8 3 , 286, 322, and 3 6 2 i n addi tion t o meeting re u i reme n t s a set forth by the School of Educatio n .

Secondary Teach ing Minor (18 hours): R e q u i re d : P E 27 7, 334, and 4 8 5 and 12 h o u rs o f electives from a m o n g t h e follow i n g : PE 283, 285, 286, 287, and 328. Elementary T e aching Major (24 hours): Requ i re d : PE 2 7 7, 283, 286, 322, 334, 362, and 4 hour s of electives in p h y s ical

educat ion with approval o f school d i rector.

Elementary Teaching Minor (12 hours): PE 322 and 8 ho urs from a mo n g the follow i n g : 283, 286, and 362.

K-6 Physical Educatian Specialist and K路6 CIa sroom Teacher (32 hou r s ): Required: PE 277, 283, 286, 322, 4 8 1 , 482, 4 8 5; Biology 205-206. Elementary School Physical Education Specialist: Req u i red: P E 277, 283, 286, 3 22, 360, 4 8 1 , 482, 484, 485; Biology 205-206, and eigh t h o u rs of electives ( E d uca t i o n 457 and Music 34 1 a re recom mended ) .

E D UC A T I O N

S9


PHYSICS Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester hours requi red: Physics 1 06, 1 4 7, 1 4 8, 1 53, 1 5 4, 205, 223, 355, 421 (2 se mester hours); Math 1 5 1 , 1 52; 4 hours of c h e m i s t r y . Junior H i g h Teaching Major: 28 se mes ter h o u rs required: Physics 10 or 355, 1 2 5', 1 26 ' , 1 4 7, 1 4 8, 205, 2 2 3, 2 72, 4 2 1 (2 s em este r h o u rs), a n d 8 h o u rs from the following: 1 06, 205, 223,

272, 355. 153 a n d 1 54 may be taken i n stead o f 1 25 a n d 1 2 6, with concurrent O T prior reg istration i n M a t h 1 5 1 or 152.

' Ph ysics

POLInCAL SCIENCE Senior High Teac hing Major: 44 semester hours required: Political Science 1 0 1 , 1 5 1, 331, plus 1 6 hours o f poli t ical science electives; His! ry 46 0; 1 2 h o u r s from the following su pporting aTeas : economics, geograph y, h i s tory, sociology, a n t hropology, or psychology. Ed. 448 to meet professional e d uc a ti o n req u i r e m e n t .

SCIENC E (GENERAL) See Ea rt h Sciences.

SOCI A L SCIENCE Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester hours r q u i red: 4 h IIrs f ro m H i s t ry 251, 252, 253; History 460; 4 h o u rs from each of t h following area s : a n t h ropology, economics, geogra p h y , political science, psych logy, a n d sociology; 12 upper divi si on hours from two of the following a re a s : economics, political science, and sociology. Ed. 448 to meet professional education require m e n t . Junior H igh Teaching Major: 28 s e m ester h o u rs req u i red: 4 hours from History 251, 252, 253; Hi st ory 460; 4 h o u rs from t h ree of t he following ar eas: a n t h ropology, economics, geog r ap h y , pol i tical science, psychology, and sociology; 8 u p p e r division hours f r o m two o f t h e following are a s : economics, political science, a n d sociology. Teaching Mi nor: 1 6 hours req u i red: 4 hours from Histor y 251, 252, 253; History 4 60; and 8 hours from economics, political cience, a nd sociology. E d . 448 to meet professional e d ucation req ui rem e n t . Reco m m e n de d : E d .

420. Element ary Teaching Major: 24 semester h o u rs req u i re d : 4 h ur

fr m His tory 251, 252, 253; History 460; a nd 1 6 h o u r s f r o m t h e followi n g : a n t h ropology, economics, political science, ps yc h ol ogy, sociology, and geog raphy. Teaching Mi nor: 12 se m es te r hours re u i red, a determined by the School o f Educa ti on . E d . 4 1 2 to meet professional e d uc a t i o n r e q u i reme n t .

SOaOLOGY Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester h urs requi red : Sociol gy 1 0 1 or 331; 24 h u r s of sociology; History 4 60; 12. sem s t e r hours d i s t r i b u ted over t h re e areas of other social s i nees Ed. 448 to m e t profeSSio n a l educa t ion requi r e m e n t . N O T E : St udents may elect one o f the specialized areas i n sociology.

SPANISH Senior High Teaching Major: 44 semester hours required: Spa n i sh 201, 202 (or equiva l e n t ), 3 2 1 , 35 1 , 352, 4 4 5 a n d U add i t ioR<11 hours; 4 4 5 will m eet part of the professional education elective req uirement. Supporti ng courses: 12 h o u rs i n r e l a t e d areas selected with t h e a pproval of t h e depart m e n t .

Junior H i gh Teaching Major: 28 s e m e s t e r h o u r s req u i r ed, as listed for seni r h i gh pr paration; s u p porting cou rses chosen i n con s u l tation with major adviser. Secondary Teaching Minor: 1 6 semester h o u rs above 200 l e v e l . Elemen tary Teaching Malor: 2 4 s e m e s t e r h o u rs required, i n c l u d i ng 20 hours i n Spa n i s h a n d 4 additional hours selected in con s u l t a t ion with the depa r t m e n t a n d the School o f E d ucatio n .

SPECIAL EDUCATION This 30 semester hour teaching major must be taken in conjunction with a n o t h e r academic teac h i n g major. The scree n i ng process for the teaching major in special educat ion m u s t be completed in addition to the scre e n i n g procedure in t h e reg u l a r education prog r a m . S tu d e n ts s h o u l d m a ke a p plication for a d m i s sion to the special educa t i o n pr gram du ring the first semester of the trai n i ng s e q u e n c e . This should occ ur d u ring m a tric u l a t ion in E d . 4 9 0 o r 4 9 2. Application forms may be obtained from the School of E d u c a t i o n . Prerequisites: Elementary - Ed. 2 5 1 , 325, 326, 322, 323, or 324; Math 323; Psychology 1 0 1 . Secondary - E d . 251, 325, 326; 423 or 4 2 5; M a t h 323; Psychology 1 0 1 . S t u d e n t teaching in r gular e d u c a t i o n must be taken before s t u d e n t teach ing in special education. Ele.mentary Major - 30 s e mester h o u rs total. 2 2 semester hours req u i re d : Ed 4 73, 490, 4 94, 530 (or 533 and 534), 5 3 1 , and 5 3 7 . 8 s e m e s t e r h o u rs

f electives from Ed 479, 4 9 1 , 495, 5 32, 533, 5 34, 5 35, 536, 591, Psy 401, or P E 4 0 1 . Secondary Major - 3 0 semester hours total. 26 semester hours re quired: Ed 4 7 3, 490, 4 94, 530 (or 533 and 534), 531, 532, and 537. 4 s e m e s t e r hours o f electives from E d 4 79, 4 9 1 , 4 95, 533, 534, 535, 536, 5 9 1 , P s y 4 0 1 , o r PE 4 0 1 . Minor - 1 6 semester h o u r total. 8 s e m e s t e r hou rs req u i red from Ed 4 9 0, 4 9 4 . 8 s e m e s t e r h o u r of electives from E d 4 7 3, 479, 491, 4 95, Psy 401, or PE 4 0 1 .

illTH-YEAR AND STANDARD CERTIF ICATION The fifth-year of tea her e d u a t io n is to follow a period of ne year of i ni ti a l teaching experience. S t u de n ts m u s t complete a m i n i m u m of eight semester hou rs applicable toward t h e fifth year, before the be g i n n i n g of t h e fou r th year of teaching. Thirty semester hours i n an approved program m u s t b e comple ted before t h e beg i n n i n g o f the s e v en t h year o f teach i n g . S tudents m a y choose the i n s t i t u t ion i n which t h ey w i s h to take advanced work as follows:

1 . If they choose t o work a t PLU

r any o t her of the teacher education i n s t i t u t ions i n the State of Washingt on, that i n s t i t ution s h a ll be responsible for reco m m e nd i n g them for t h e Standard Certificate upon completion of the fifth-year progra m .

2 . I f P L U g r a d ua tes w i s h to u ndert�ke t h e fifth y e a r i n a n o u t ­ of-state i n s t i t u tion, P L U will be responsible for recom m e n d i n g them for the S ta ndard C e r t i fica te. S tu d e n t s m u s t sec ure g e n e r a l approval of t h e i r plan f r o m the u n ivers i t y i n advance. There are four provisions gove r n i n g the fifth-year p a t tern of work, according to t h e S tate Board of Reg ulations:

1 . T h e fifth y e a r m u s t include a m i ni m u m of 30 s e m e s t e r h o u rs of w h ich at least f i f t y per c e n t m u s t be upper diviSIOn a n d l or g raduate cou rses .

2. No more t h a n t h ree semester hou rs of co rresponde nce s t u d y m a y be approved a s a pa rt of t h e 30 se mes t e r h u rs i n t h e s t udent's fifth-year progra m .

60

EDUCATION


3. P l U gra d u a tes m u s t ta k" 1 5 s e m e s t e r n o u r s o f tn f i f t h yea r in residence at P l U . A n on - P l U s t u d e n t w n o w i s hes to be recommended by Pl m u s t t a k e a m i n i m u m of 20 s e m e s t e r h o u rs i n re sid e n c e a t PlU. 4 . Students m a y take 1 5 of the re uired 30 s e m e s t e r h o u rs

prior to or d u ri n t h e first y e a r o f teaching experie nce w i t h p r i o r permission of t he School of Eduction. Folio i n g are req u i rements and procedure for t h e a p p r ov a l of fi fth-year programs of work a t P l U : 1 . S pec i fi course req u i r e m e n t s are: Ele men tary a. R equi r ed c o u rse: E d 467, Evalua tion ( 2 h o u rs) b. ne req ui red fr m the following (4 hou rs ) : EdPsy 535, Fou ndati n s o f Guida nce; EdPsy 5 78, B e ha vioral Problems of t u de n t s ; EdPsy 575, Mental Heal t h . e . 2 hours f r o m t h e following s ugge s t e d course s : E d 4 7 3, Pare n t - Te cher R e l a t i o n hips; E d 5 0 1 , Sex R Ie S t e reo­ ty pi n g i n Ed u c a ti o n ; E d Psy 5 3 7, Reality D i s c u s si on Techniques; EdPsy 5 3 6, A f f e c t i v e Oassroom Tec h n iques; 50 1 W rks h o p s , for example, Discipline in t h e C la s s r oo m , E n co u r agin g P ro c e s s . Secondary a . R e q u i r d (ours 5 ( 4 hours): Ed 4 2 0, Problems of Reading i n t h Secondary School; E d 4 6 7, E v a l u a t io n . b. Ele l i vl' ( 4 h o u r s ) : Group II - 2 h o u r s - courses i n a t h eo ret i c a l or in terpersonal f ra me wo r k - Ed 473, P a re n t Teacher Re la tlo n s n i ps ; Ed 5 0 1 , Se x Ro l t e re o t y p i n g I n d u c a t i n ; E d P s y 5 3 7, Real i t y D i s c u s s i o n Tec n n i q u es; or appro riate sub s t i t u t ions; Croup B - 2 nours - co urses in a m e t h odological or i n s t ru c t io n a l f r a mework S i m u la t ion, F i l m , I n te rac t i o n A n a l ysis , Prog r a m Ideas i n t h e J u nior H i g h School, Pla n ts of t h e Pacific o rt h � es t, et c . 2. A n y c o u r s e s recomme nded for t h e i n d i vidual s t u d e n t p rior to th gran ting of t h e bachelor's d g ree m u s t be co m plet e d . Tnese m a y be reco mmen ded by either tne u n de rg ra d u a t e ad v ise r or tne S c n o o l of E d u c a t i o n . 3. An y course work requ.ired by t n e u n d e r grad u a t e i n s t i t u tion and/or the e m pl ying school d i s t rict must be comple ted. 4 . C ou r s e s taken s h ould s t rengthen areas of concen tration and build s t ronger g neral educa t. ion b a kgr und as well as fill needs in t he professional field. Tnis program o f s t u d i e s i s t o b e sel cted b s t u d e n t s w i t n t n e g u i da nce of t hose w n o n a v e worked w i t h t h e m d u r i n g t h eir p e r i o d o f i n i t i a l t e a c n i n g a n d t h e a d v i s e r s at the reco m m e n d i n g i ns t i t u t i o n s . 5 . S t u d e n t s secu re a p p r o v a l o f t n e reco m m e n d i n g i n s t i t u t i o n f o r work taken else w n ere before t n w o r k i s begu n . Some o f t h e w o rk t a k e n d u n ng t n e fifth year m a y a lso a pp l y t o wa rd a mas ter's d eg re e . G r a d ua t e s t u d e n t s m a y u nd e r t a k e a pro r m l:oord i n a t i n g req uire m e n ts for s t a n d a rd certification n d t n m a s t e r ' s d e g ree upOn t h approval of t n .,i r o m m i t tee chair a n d t h e coord i n a t or of fiftn-year progra m s .

PRINCI PAL'S CREDENTIALS" C a n d i d a tes f o r h

p r i ncipal's cred e n t i a l s will b e guided by t n e

follow i n g :

1 . T ney m ust meet g rad ua t e s t a n d a rd s for t n e m a s t e r 's degre

2 . Tney m us t

3 . T n e y m u s t com p lete experience a nd st u d y re q u i r e m e n t s for the S ta ndard Principal's Credential at t he i r cnosen level. To rec e iv e tnis t h e y need to h a ve ( 1 ) had a d m i n i s t rative experie nce, (2) ea rned a m i n i m u m of eig n t more semester hours since i s s u a nce o f t h e Provisional Certificate, a n d (3) e a r n e d t h e m a s t e r 's de g r ee . S t u d e n t s wno i n te n d to work tow a rd t n e m a s t e r's in t n e field of e du c a t i o n m u s t a p p l y for a d m i s s i o n to tne Grad u a t e Division and m e e t tne req u ir e m e n t s o u tl i ned b y tnat d i v isio n . C a n d i d a t e s s h ou l d s e e t n e c o u rs e req u i r e m e n t s as s e t for t h i n the Graduate C a t a log . - ' Details o f t n e prog r a m are a vailable a t t n e School of E d u c a t i o n upon requ e st . . . A v a i l a ble a t t n e office of t n e Dean o f G r a d u a t e S t udies upon reque s t . CE RTIFICATION REQUl R E M E N T S FOR SCHOOL COUNS E l O RS AND SCHOOL NU R S E (Subject 10 new certification requirements as of October 197.1) E d u c a t i o n a l S t a f f A s s o ci a t e c e r t i fil· a t i o n for school c o u n se l o rs r s ( n o o l n u rses is i n d i v i d u a l l y desig n ed t h rough a c o n sort i u m consisting of a school d i s t ric t, rela ted professional associations, a n d Pacific L u t h e r a n University. Additional i n forma t i on on t h e I' prog r a m s can be obta i n ed by co n t ac t i n g t h e D e a n of t h e School of d u cati o n .

C OURSE OffERINGS 251

LEARNER AND SOC I ETY: GR OWTH AND D E VELOPMENT

Orientation to contemporary schools; h u m a n developm e n t in relation to individ uals and g roups i n a n edu a tional s e t t i n g . Public s h 01 observa t ion requi red w ekly w i t h s t u d e n t s responsible for t h e i r o w n transportation. Prerequisi es: Psy 101 or S c 1 0 1 , Eng 1 0 1 , CA 1 23, sopho more s tanding, 2 . 1 5 C P (4)

321

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

E motional. social, i n telle tual a n d physiological de velop­ m e n t from in fancy t hrough adolesce nce . A weekly two­ hour observation i n t h e pu blic school is req u i red. Ondividu l I y assig ned.) S t u d e n ts res ponsible for their own t ra n s porta tion . Prere q u i s i t es : Psy 1 0 1 o r Soc 1 0 1 , E ng 1 0 1 , C A 1 23, j u nior s tandi ng, 2 . 1 5 CP A . ( 4 )

322

G ENERAL METHODS - PRIMARY

Competencies will b developed f o r teaching i n g rades K - 3, w i t h observation a n d pa rticipa tio n in p u b l ic schools. Prerequisi tes: 25 1 or 3 2 1 . 2 . 25 CPA. ( 4 )

323

G EN ERAL METHODS UPPE R E L EM ENTARY

C mpete ncies will be developed for teac ing i n g rades 4-6, with observation a nd participation i n p u blic s hools. Prere q u i s i t e s : 251 o r 3 2 1 . 2 . 25 P A . (4)

co m p l e te c o u r s a n d i n t e r n s h i p req u iremen t s for tne p rovisional p ri n c i p a l ' s crede n t ials at tneir chosen l e v e l . T re ce i ve t nis t h ey m us t have co m ple t ed work for their S ta ndard Teachin g C er t ifi a t e p l u s six semester h o u rs .

E D U C ATION

61


GENERAL METHODS ElEMENT ARY MODEL

324

420

Com pe t e nc i e s w i l l be deve l o pe d for teaching in g ra d es K- 6 . E x tended expe r i e n c e a n d pa rticipa tion i n p u blic school clas sroo ms wUI be provid e d . Pre req u i s i t es : 251 o r 3 2 1 , M a t h 323, a n d conc u r re n t e n rolhne n t i n E E M block co u rse s , 3 25, 326, 4 0 8 , 4 1 0, 4 1 2 . 2 . 25 C PA .

(4)

PROBLEMS O f READING I N T H E SECONDARY SCHOOL

Te a c h i ng secondary read i ng i n c o n t e n t a reas; a t ten tion to reading problems; m a teri a l s, m e t h ods, tech niques, proc e d u res and some observation a nd d i agn os i s of reading d i f fic u l t i e s . Pre re q u i s i t e : 2 5 1 ; take n con­ c u rr e n t l y w i t h 425 a n d 434. (2) d evelo p m e n t a l

32 5 READ ING IN THE E L E M E NTARY SC HOOL Tea c h i ng read i ng i n e l e m e n tary g rades, i nduding modern

C urricu l u m, m a te ri a l s , a n d me t ho d s of s e cond a ry t eac hing;

ap p roach e s, m a te r i a l s , me thods, tec h n i q u e s , proced u r e s

o bserva t i o n and disc u s si o n . Prere q u i s i t e s :

a n d s o m e d i a g n o s i s of read i ng di ffic u l ti e s . Prere q u i s i tes :

CPA. ( 2 )

25 1

or 3 2 1 . 2 . 2 5 CPA (4)

326

G E NERAL METHODS - SECONDARY 251, 4 6 8 . 2.25

4 3 0 STUDENT TEAClflNG - PRIMARY Teac h i n g i n t h e p u blic schools u nd e r t h e direc t i on a n d s u pervision of c l a s s room a n d u n iv e r s i t y teac h e r s . Pre­

MA THEMA TICS I N THE ElEMENTARY SCHOOL

B a s i c m a t h e m a ti ca l skill s and abi l i t i e s n e e d ed by e l e m e n ta ry school teache r; rec e n t d e ve l o p m en t s and ma teri a l s . Prereq u i s i t e s : Ma th 3 2 3 or 324, o r e q u i v a l e n t . 2 . 2 5 C P A . ( 2 ) 341

425

P ffilOSOPHY OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

req uis i t e s : 2 5 1 or 3 2 1 , 3 2 2 or 3 2 4, 325, 3 2 6 ; 2 . 2 5 C P A . Con c u r re n t e n rol l m e n t i n 4 3 5 . ( 1 0) 432

STUDENT TEACHING UPPER E L EMENTARY

T e a c h i n g i n t h e pu blic s c h o o l s u nd e r t h e direc tion and u n i versi t y teache rs . P r e ­

Objectives of h i g h school b u s i n e s s ed uca tion p r g r a m s , t h e

s u pe rvision of c l a ss r oom a n d

b u s- i ne s s c u r r i c ul u m , l a y o u t a n d faci l i ti es p l a n n in g , the

req u i s i t e s : 2 5 1 or 3 2 1 , 3 2 3 or 324, 3 2 5, 3 26; 2 . 2 5 C PA .

e v a l u a ti o n

C o nc u rre n t e n ro l l m e n t in 4 3 5 .

b u s i ness SOll rces

of

business

occ u pa tio n s . and

CUIrent

and

compete nce

for

Exa m ina tion

teachers

of

i n for m a t i o n

re­

thought

business

in

e d u ca t ion,

coope ra tive e d u c a t io n, a n d d i s t r i b u t i v e e d u c a t i o n . Pre­ requ i s i te : Ed 4 25 i s reco m mend e d . ( 2 ) 342

METHODS OF TEACHING TYPING AND BOO KKEEPING

A p p l ica tion o f research fin di ngs a n d p s y c h ologica l p r i n ­ ciples

to

the

t eac h i ng

Prereq u i s i t e s : B A

of

t y p i ng

and

bo kkeeping.

281 and advanced t yp i n g ; E d '1 2 5 i s

reco m me nded . ( 2 ) 40 1

LANG UAGE ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL l i t e ra t u re ,

r e q u i s i t e s : 2 5 1 , 425, a n d 4 6 8 . 2 . 2 5 CPA. May be t a k e n c o n c: u H e n t l y w it h E d

435

467. ( 1 0)

PROfESSIONAL SEMINAR

An opport u n i t y for s t u d e n t s to s h a re e xperiences w i t h a n

e xchange of ideas on p u p i l be havior, c u rricul u m prac tices, and ways of im prov in g teac h i ng pe rfor m a n c e . ( M u s t be

d ra m a tization,

spelling,

g ra m m a r,

h a nd w rit i n g , ch i l d re n 's lall g u a g e s t u d y , voca b u l a r y d e vel­ o p m e n t and l e xicogra p h y . 2.2 5 CPA

(2)

4 1 0 SCIENCE I N THE ELE MENTARY SCHOOL A h u m a n i s t ic a p p roach w i t h e m p h a s i s o n those k i n d s of m a t eria l s a n d " h a n d s o n " a c t ivi ti e s n eeded to a c h i e v e t h e obj ec ti ves of science. P rerequisi t e : 2 . 2 5 G P A . ( 2 )

SOCIAL STUDIES I N THE E L EMENTARY SCHOOL O bjectives , ma t e r i a l s a n d m e t h ods of

ALTERNATIVE LEVEL STUDENT TEACHI NG - E L EMENT ARY

a n d s t u d y of c h i l d re n , s u bj e c t m a t ter fiel d s , a nd m a te r i a l s i n t h e s t ud e n t's a l t e r n a t e t e a c h i n g l e v e l p l u s s t u d e n t tea c h i n g on t h a t level. S t u d e n t s w h o have c o m p l e t e d secondary pre ferred co u. rs e .

437

(4)

level

s t udent

teaching

should

e n r o l l in

this

Al TERNA TE LEVEL STUDENT TEA C H I NG - SECONDARY

A c o u r s e d es i g n e d to g i v e s o m e k now l e d g e , u n d e r s ta nd i ng, a n d s t u d y of c h il d r e n , s u bj e c t matter f i e l d s , a n d m a t e r i a l s in t h e s t u d e n t's a l te r n a t e t e a c h i n g level p l u s s t u d e n t teac h i n g on tha t l e v e l . S t u d e n ts w h o have completed e l e m e n ta ry

41 2

teaching the social

s t u d i e s , reco m m e n d e d to s t u d e n t t e a c h e r s and e x pe ri e n ced t e a c h e r s . Prereq u i s i t e : 2 . 2 5 C P A . (2)

436

A course designed to give some k n Clwledge, u n d e r s ta nd i n g ,

Th e f u n tio na l teaching o f co m m u n ic a t i o n skUl s, g r a d e s K6; a reas i n c l u d e : oral a n d w r i t t e n e x p re s s io n , l i s te n i ng,

reading,

s u pervisio n of c l a s s room a n d u n iversi t y teachers . Pre­

taken c o n c u r r e n t l y with 4 3 0 or 4 3 2 . ) ( 2 )

WORKSHOPS

Works ho ps i n special fields for va rying periods of t i m e . ( 1 - 6 )

408

( 1 0)

4 3 4 STUD E NT TEACHING - SECONDARY Teaching in t h e p u b l ic schools u n d e r t h e direc tion a n d

preferred l e v e l s t u d e n t t e a c h i n g s hould e n roll i n t h i s co u r s e . I n d e p e n d e n t s t u d y c a rd r e q u i r e d . ( 4 ) 44 0 - 4 4 8

SPECIAL M ETHODS I N TEACHING SECONDARY SCHOOL S U BJ ECTS

C u rr i c u l u m , m e t h o d s a n d m a t e ri a ls of i n s t ru c ti o n in a variety of s u bjects; m a y be t a k e n for grad u a te c red i t .

62

E D UCA TI ON


440

SEMINAR I N SECONDARY A R T ED UCATION ( 2 )

44 1

METHODS O f TEACHING SECRET ARIAl SUBJ ECTS

455

456

Applic tion of research findings and psychol ogical prin­ ciples to t he teaching of shortha nd, o ffice practice, s i m ulation, work p rocessi ng, and related subjects. Pre­ req u isites : adva nced typing and advanced s h o r t h a n d . ( 2 )

442

METHODS OF TEACHING GE NERAL BUSINESS SUBJ ECTS

Application of researc h findings and p sych ological prin­ ciples to t h e teachin g of genera l business, con s u m e r e onom ics, e conom ics, b u s i n e s s l a w, b u s i n e s s m a t h e m atics, a n d b u s i n e s s commu nications s u bjects. Prere q u i s i tes: Econ 1 5 0, BA 281, Ed 3 4 1 , Ed 342. ( 2 )

443

CH EMISTRY IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (2)

444

ENGLISH I N T H E SECONDARY SCHOOL

M ETHODS IN TEACHING FOREIGN lANG UAG ES

Theor a nd tec h n iques of fore i g n l a nguage teach ing; s peci al problems in the studen t's major l a n g u age, em phasis on a udioli ngual tec h niques. G (2)

446

MA THEMA TICS IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (2)

447

SCIENC E IN THE SECONDARY SCH OOL (2)

448

SOC IAL STUDIES IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL (2)

451

ADMI NISTRATION Of THE SCHOOL liBRARY

452

BASIC REFEREN CE MATERIALS

Those services of a school l i b r a r i a n re lated to the preservation of all materials which form the sources reference. G (2)

453

PROCESSING SCHOOL LIBRARY MATE RIALS

Classifica tion, cataloging mate rials . G ( 2 )

454

and

technic a l

457

processing

of

SELE CTION Of lE ARNING RESOURC E MATERIALS

Criteria, professional litera t u re and tec h niques of e v a � u ­ a tion of library m a te rials ( p r i n t a n d n o n - p r i n t ) ; t h e l ibraria n 's responsibili t y to faculty, s t u d e n ts a n d t h e gene ra l p u b l i c . G (2)

PRE PARATIO N AND UTILIZA TlON OF MEDIA

The production a n d use of a v a r i e t y of i n s t r u c t i o n a l materials, flat p i c t u res, cha rts, maps a n d t h e 3 5 m m ca mera; partici p a n t s produce i tems useful in i n s truction. $ 1 0 .00 lab fee is c h a rged. G (3 o r 4 )

E V ALUA nON

Evaluation of school ex periences; problems i n connection with developm e n t , o rganization and a d m i n i s t ra tion of tests ( s ta nda rdized a n d teache r-made). Requi red of fifth-year s t u d e n t s . Pre requisite: s t udent teaching or teach ing experience. Ed 2 5 1 -EdPsy 468. May be taken concur re n t l y w i t h s t u dent teac h i n g . G ( 2 )

4 73

PAR E NT-TE ACHER RElATIONSHIPS

An e x a m i nation o f the ph ilosophy and i m p l e m e n tation of parent-teacher con ferencing. Rela ted issues such as the parental role in education, home visits, and the role of the s t u d e n t i n the confe re ncing process a re also conside red . L i s t e n i n g and com m u n ication s k i l l s u s e f u l i n confe re ncing are st udied and practiced. Provisions for t he needs of pare n t s of the handica pped will be s t udied by s t u d e n t s in t h e special education prog ram . Prerequisi te: s t ude n t teach i n g o r teaching e x perience. ( 2 )

479

Libra r y org a n ization and adminis tration in the elem e n t a ry school. (2)

STOR YTEl l ING

A combi n a t ion o f discovery and pra c t ic u m i n the a r t of st orytell i ng . I n ves tiga tes the values a n d background of st oryte l l i ng, the various types and forms of stories; tec h n iques o f choosing and o f tell ing stories . Some off­ c a m p u s practice. De monstra tions and j o i n t s torytelling by and with i n s t ructor. (4)

467

De ve l pm n t of teaching aids and met hods; demon­ s t ra tions of met hods and s trategy of master teachers. (2)

445

INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS

A udio and visual m a terials and aids, their use, o rga niza t i o n , and a d minis t ra tion. G ( 2 )

SPEC IAL TECH IQUES I N READING

I n d i v i d u a l d iagnostic asse s s m e n t o f reading p roble ms using both formal a n d i n formal testing tec h n iq ue s . S pecial inst ructional methods for remediation for both Title I and S pecial Edu cation c h i l d r e n . Practicum req uired. Pre­ requ i s i t e : Ed 325 or e q u i v a l e n t . (4)

483

PRIMARY R E ADING

Materials a n d methods of t he primary readi n g p r o g r a m and its re lation to other activitie s . Prereq u is i t e : teaching experience. G (2)

485

TH E G U TED CHILD

A s t udy of t h e gifted c h i l d , c h a racteri stics a n d problems, and school p roced u res desig ned to further developme n t . G (2)

488

READING C ENTER WORKSHOP

C l in ical s t u d y o f reading pr blems a n d suggested co rrective meas ures; t o be taken concurre n t l y with 489. Prerequisite: teaching experien c e . S G (2)

E DU C ATION

63


489

DIRECTED TEAC H [ NG I N READING CENTE RS

Directed obs er va ti o n and t eac h i ng in s u m mer remedial classes in public schools; to be taken conc urre n t l y w i t h 4 8 8 . Prereq uisi t e : t e ac hi ng e x perience . 5 G (4)

490

I NTRODUCTION TO SPECIAL E D UCATION

De fini tions, c h a racteristics a n d psychological aspects of a l l tegories of exce p t iona l i t y . Federal and state l e g i s l a t i o n . C u rrent issues a n d practices in d eli v eri n g services to hand ica p ped people. Th e classroom teache r's role i n main s treaming . Practi c u m re q uired . Prere q u i s i tes: Ed 25I.

(4) 491

SEMINAR I N SPEC IAL E DUCATION

Specific topic s on the tea ch ing f h a n d icapped c h i ldren. Prereq uis i te : Ed 4 9 0 or equivale n t . (2)

494

LEARNING DISABILITIES: PROG R A M M l NG

D i agno s ti c informa tion is used as t h e basis for wri ting a n r E P (individualized ed ucati n a l plan) . C o u r se includes b e h a v ioral objectives, task analysis, le a r ni n g seque.nces, beh.avior modification, a n d eva l ua t ion of learn i ng u s i n prec ision teach i ng tech n i q u e s . P r ac tic u m req u ire d . Pr req uisi te : Ed 4 9 0 or con c u r re n t enrollment or per m i ssion of in s t ru c tor . (4)

495

LANG UAG E PROB LEMS Of EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN

Pri n ciples o f receptive a nd ex p res s iv e lang uage develop足 men t inclu d i ng speech, word mean ing, dialect, a nd read i n g . Assess men t a n d remediation s t ra t eg i es for reg u l a r and s p ec i a l ed uca tion teachers. Prer q u i s i te : E d 25 1 . (4)

496

LABORATOR Y WORKSHOP

Practica l cou rse using elemen tary-age c h i ldren in a cl ssroom s i tu a tio n working out specific problems; provision wiU b m a d e for some active pa rticipa tion of t h e un iversi t y s t ude n t s . Prerequisite: co n fe re nc e w i t h the inst ructor or the Dean of t h e Sch 01 f Educatio n . G

497

SPECIAL PROJECT

Individual s t udy and r sea rc h on educational problems o r additional la bora tory expe rience in public s ch oo l class足 roo m s . Prere q u i s i t e : co nsent o f the Dea n . G ( 1 - 4) 50 1 WORKSHOPS G radua te wo r ks h o p s in spec i a l f i e l d s for varying leng t h s o f

t i m e . ( 1- 4)

525

CURRENT PRACTICES A N D 1SSUES I N READING

To examine c u r re n t practices a n d issues i n t h e field of reading as desc r i bed t h rough education a l research. The res arch f i n d ings will be ap p l ied to curren t classroom practices. S t u d e n ts wil l be e ncou raged to p u rsue speci fic areas o f i n te re s t within the broad area of r e a din g ins t r uction. Prere q u i s i t e : 325 or q u i v a l e n t and te ac h i ng experience. (2-4)

527

PSYCHOLOG Y Of READING

Principles of r e a d i n g , perception, word recog ni ti o n , concept d e ve l o p m e n t and meaning i n reading wi l l be e x p l o red . The p sych ological a n d p h ys iolog ical aspects of the rea d i n g act will be e xa m i ned i n re l ati on sh ip to successful reading achieve m e n t . Prere q u i s i t e : 325 or quivalent and t e ach i ng experie n ce .

530

(2)

CHARACTERISTICS Of LEARNING DISAB ILITI E S

C u rre n t issues, practices and r esea r c h in l e a r n i n g d i sabilities. E m p h a s i s w i l l b e on s pecial i n s t r u c tional te c h n i q u e s to accommod te t h. i s type of c h il d 's special need s . P r a c t ic u m req uired. Prereq uisite : Teac h i n g cred e n 足 tial or per m i s s ion f i n s tr uctor. ( 4)

531

L E A RN I N G DISABIlITIES: DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURES

A b ro ad range of s creening a n d diag nostic proced ures will be s t u died. 0 t a from o t h e r p r ofe S S i o n a l s suc.h as the school psych olog i s t , com m u n ic a t i o n d i sorder speci a li. s t, occupa足 tional the r a p i s t , and medical doct or will be used to prepare a h yp o t h e s i s reg a rd i n g t he ch i l d ' s disa b i l i t i e s . Vari u s educational tests, formal a n d teacher-made, wil l b u s e d to d e t e r m i n e w h e r e a child i s f u n t i o ning aca d e m i a l l y . P r a ticum r eq u i r ed . Prereq u i s i t e : Tea c h i n g cred e n t i a l o r per m i ss ion of i n s t r u c t o r . ( 4 )

532

C URRICULUM fOR E XC EPTI ONAL STUDENTS I N THE SECONDARY SCHOOL

C u rric ul u m con te n t and planning i n c l u di n g academic s u bjects, lif adj u s t m en ts, and career counseling for exce p tional adolescen t s and ad u l t s . Focus of t h e c o u r s e will be f o r the learn i ng disabled and th r m i ld l y h a ndic.ap ping co nd itions . Prer e q u i s i tes: Ed 490, 530, or perm ission of instruct r. (4.)

533

SEMINAR IN MENTAL RETARDATION

C u r rent i s s u e s a n d problems rela ted to the e d u c a t io n of ch i l d r e n w i t h m e n ta l r e t a r d a t i n. Prereq u i s i t e : teaching credential or permission of i n s t r u c tor . ( 2 )

534

SEMINAR I N BEHAVIOR DISORDERS

Cu r re n t i s s u e s and proble m s rela te d to the educa t i o n of c h ildren wi t h m e n t a l re t a r d a t i o n . Prerequisite; teac hi ng cre de n ti a l or permi ss io n of i n s tructor. (2)

64

E DU C A T I O N


5 3 5 ARTS FOR THE HANDICAPPED A s t u d y of artis tic e ndeavors and leisu re time

pu rs u i ts for the ha ndicap ped . Activi ti es for the c m m u nity, cla ssroom, h me, gr p home, a nd i ns t i t u tion will b studied . Each pa rticipan t Will com plete a proje t fo r use wi t h the handicapped . Prerequisi te : eaching credential or per­ mission of i ns t r uc to r. (2) TEAC H I NG HANDICAPPED C H ILDREN I N REGULAR C LASSROOMS A n examination of teaching strategies to include e xcep­ ti nal child ren in regular lassroom se t ti ngs. E mp hasis on th!.' need of excep tional c h ildre n , r gr m m difica t ions , and c lassroom managemen t . P re re q u i si t e : teaching cre­ denti I or permis. ion of i n s t r uc t o r. ( 2 ) 536

SPECIAL EDVCA TlON: STUDENT TEAC H [ NG eaching i n pu tic schools Special Educa t i o n lassrooms under the direct ion a nd supe rvisi n of c1assr om a n d u niversity tec1chers. Pre re q u is i tes : Ed 494 and p rmission of ins truc t r. (4) 5 4 5 METHODS AND TECHNI Q UES Of RESEARCH S minar in r search method and techn ique i n educa tion w i t h e m phasis n designing resear h project i n the student's a rea of in terest. Req u i red f o r M. A . Prereq uisi te : Consu l tation wi t h student's advise r and admit tance to t he g raduate prog ra m . (2) 537

.I-.

i-

SCHOOL FINANCE ocal, slate and federal con t ribu tors 0 sc hool fi nance, its philosophy and development; the development and administration of a school budget. ( 2 ) 550

_

'-

5 5 2 PUBLIC SCHOOL ADMINlSTRA nON Ad ministration nd s upervision of sch 01 pe rs o nne l, plant and program ; the truc t u re and rganiza tion f the sch 01 syste m . Prereq u i It : tea ch i n g experience or consent of the D n . (3) 5 5 4 HIGH SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATJ ON Plann i ng a n d organ izi ng the h ig h school c urriculum, sch eduli n g, ext ra -c urricula r a c t i v i t i e , teachers' m ee ti ngs , publi accountin a n d con trol, fi nance a nd rep rts. PrerequisIte : 552. (2)

ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION WORKSHOP Pr jects di ussed determined by the class; typi al rojects i nclude I.:urriculum planning a nd d j u s t me n t, pub l ic relat ions programs, pe rso n nel employ ment and i n-service trai ning; fi na ncing building and d ucat i onal progra ms. rereq uisi te : one course in adm i n istration <l nd /ur super­ Vision, ( 2 ) 555

SECONDARY AND MIDDLE SC HOOL CURRICULUM A va riety of facets of secondary and middle school progra m s : finance, c u rriculum, discipline, ev luation, cla ssroom management, the ba ic education bill, legisla tive changes, and spec i a l educat ion. Devel opmen t of secondary and middle schools from thei r beginnings to the present . Cri tical issues in the educa tion scene today . (3) 556

ADMIN ISTRA T £ V E INTERNSHIP I n ternship in school adminstra t ion planned with the School f Education in coopera tion with s lected school ad minis­ tra tors. Prereq uisite: co u rse work in scho I adm i n is tration and ad miSSIOn to the graduate progra m . ( 2-4)

558

H J 5TORY AND PHflOSOPHY O F HIGHER E DUCATION H is to rical perspective and current sta t u�; development of fu nctio ns and structu res; issues i n cu rricu l u m ; ph i l o ophy of ad ministration; case studies. (4) 571

STUDENT PERSONNEL WORK IN HIGffiR EDUCATION Student pers nnel services in higher educat ion; use of person nel data; co-curric ular a tivi ties; stud n t welfare; co n tem porary trends in counseling problems rela ted to st udent life . (4) 573

DIAGNOSIS AND REMEDIA n O N I N READING Causative factors relating t readin difficul ties; some opportunity to apply remed ia tion tech mques; open to t hose with te h i ng exp rience ( 2 ) 579

C URRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Types of curricu l u m orga nizations, program s and tech­ niq ues of c u rri ulum devel pmen t , ( ) 580

EDUCA TlONAL ISSUES AND PROBLEMS I ndi vid ua l reading, investigation, research a n d /o r a p ra ticum expe rience in school or agencies. ( 1 -4) 585 C OMPARATI V E EDUCATION Comp rison and i n v e s ti g ation of ertain ma terials a nd ultur I systems of educa ion t h rough ut the world . ( 2) 586 SOC IOLOGY OF EDUCATI O N The nature and fun tioning of the educa t ional system wIll be exami ned fr m a sociological erspec tive TopiCS will include: educa ti n, s t ra t i fica t ion, an d social cha nge; the school as a com plex organi za tion ; the school as a social instit u tion; a nd the s ciology of learn i ng . ( 4 ) 583

5 8 7 H I STORY O F EDUCA nON Great educa l rs, d ucational t heories a nd sys t e m s from a ntiqui ty t the present. ( 2 )

PHl lOSPHY OF E D U C An O N Ph ilosophical a nd theoret! I foundations

eJuca t iona l

589

f educilt ion (3)

E DUCATION

65


590 G RADUATE SEMINAR A workshop for all Master of Arts ca ndidates in the School of Education which provides a forum for exch nge of research ideas a nd problems; cand idates should register for this seminar f r assistance in fulfilling requireme n t . No cred i t i given, nor is t u ition assessed . (0) 591 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN SPEC IAL EDUCATION Review of current research on selected topicS i n special education. ( 2 )

R ESEARCH STUD IES I N IDUCA TION For Master of Art s candidates who elect to write two research papers instead of a t hesis. (One pap r may be in the candidate's minor field u nder the s upervision f the minor adviser.) Ca ndidates will be required to rev iew their resear h papers before their Graduate Committe e ( ee G raduate Catalog ) . (I) 596

RESEARCH STUD IIS IN EDUCATION See Education 596. (z) 597

THESIS For Master of Arts ca nd idate who elect to WTi te a thesis Instead of two research papers. The thesis problem will be chosen from t h e candida te's major fi Id of concen tration and must be approved by the candida te's G raduate Commi ttee. Ca ndida tes will be expected to defend their thesis i n a final oral examination condu ted by their commi ttee. ( -4) 599

EOVCA T I ONAL PSYC H O L O G Y GROUP PROCESS A N D T H E INDI VIDUAL A h uman i nteraction laboratory to facilitate the exploration of the self concept through the mechanisms of in ter­ personal interactions and feedback . Emphasis placed on the acq uisi tion of skill in self-explora t ion, role iden tification and cli mate-making. G ( 2 ) 461

E DUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY Priciples a nd research in human learning and their i m plications for curriculum and ins t ru ct ion . Pre requisite: 251. (4) 468

WORK S HOPS Gradua te workshops in special fields for varying lengths of time. ( 1 -4 ) 501

FOUNDATIONS OF G UI DANCE The focus is on devel ping an understanding of the services and processes availa ble to assist individu als in making plans and dedsions accordi ng to their own life pattern. G (4) 535

AFFECTlVI C LASSROOM TECH N IQUES This course will explore va rious t ec h niques designed to facilitate unders ta nding of self and others; me th ds for working wi t h students. Prereq uisi te: student t aching or graduate s tatus. Laboratory experience as a rranged. G (2) 536

53 7 REALITY DISCUSSION TEC HNIQUES The use of R eality Therapy in a helping relationship schools, social agencies, mental health clinics, u niversity residences, etc. Laboratory experience as a rranged. G (4)

REFLECTIVE SKILLS PRACTICUM A mjni-practic um in the t chniques of cou nseling; enrollmen t l imited to s t uden ts beginning the master's degree program in Counseling and G uidance, and is a prerequisi te to adm ission on regular sta t us to the Co nseling a nd Guidance master's progra m . The practicum makes use of couns ling sessions with clients u t ili zing verbal nd non-verbal a t tending behavior. ( 1) 560A

SOC IAL LEARNING-MODE LING PRACTICU M A mini-practicu m i n t h e th eory and t ech niques of social learning a nd role m deli ng . Prerequisite: 5 OA. ( 1 ) 5608

G ESTA t T THERAPY PRACTICUM A mini-prac licu m in c u nseii ng with emphasis on Ge talt therapy t echniques and theory. Prereq uisi tes: 5608 and 560C

56 1 . ( 1 )

REA LITY THERAPY PRACTICUM A min i -practic u m in co unseling usi ng the theory and tech nique of reality therapy. Prereq uisites: 5608 and 5 6 1 .

560D

(I)

BASIC RELATIONSHIPS I N COUNSELING A study of the theory, process, tec hniques and ch arac­ teristics of the counseling rela ti nship. A basic course for M . A . s t uden t s in the Counseli ng and G uidan program. (Formerly Cou nseling The ry). (4)

561

PRACTICUM I N G ROUP PROCESS AND LEADERSHIP A h u man inte raction laboratory which explores inter­ personal ope rations in groups a nd faci h tates the develop ­ m e n t of self-i nsight; emphasis on leadership a nd develop­ men t of skill in diagnosing i ndjvidual, group and organizati nal behavior pa t terns and infl uences. Students will co-facilitate a laboratory group. Prerequisite: 461. (2) 563

565 S EMINAR : NON-TEST APPRAISAL Assessme n t of personal characteristics a nd behavioral patterns to better understand the individual; use of non­ test data (sociometric sca les, case st udies, a utobiographies, in terviews, interaction a nalysis). Prerequisites : student teach ing, graduate status. (4) 569 CAREER G UIDANC E A tudy of careers, th eories of choice and gUidance tech­ niques . (4)

66

E DUCATI ON


F I E LDWORK I N COUNSEUNG AN D G U IDANCE A culminating practicum of fie.ld expeTience in schools or age ncies using t heory, skills. a nd tech niques previou sly le a rned A variety of work experiences with both indi viduals and groups. S tudents will lncocporat e on 5ultation experience following the Adlerian m odel . (4) 570

575

MENTAL HEALTH

Basic men tal health principles rel a tio n s h i p s . Focus upon self e x periences as arranged. (4)

as related to i n terpersonal understanding. Laboratory

578 BEHA VIORAL PROBLE MS OF STUDEN TS Adlerian concepts provide basis for observation . moti- vation. modification, and life style assessment. Skills for assi ting stude n ts develop responsibility for their own behavior is focus . Laboratory experience as a rranged. (4

- C OURSE S OFFERED I N THE 1 979 INTER I M 路 303 307 318 320 583

C LASSROOM PHOTOG RAPHY C REATIVE M E DI A PROBLEM-SOL V I NG INDEPENDENT STUDY READINGS IN EDUCATIONAL ISSUES AND PROBLEMS

E D UC A TI O N

67


English As a disc i p l i n e E n g l i s h a s s i s t s s t ud e n t s in ami vi ng excelle nce in w r i t i n g d i scern men t in read i ng, apprecia t io n of h um a n experience a nd aes the tic values, and unders a nding of t h e proce sses of c ri tical a nd crea tive expre s si n . ,

Speci a l p rogra m s inc lu de concen t ra t i ons i n lite ra tu re, w r i t i ng, a nd p u bl i s h i ng . The E n g l is h Depa rt m e n t a l so s u ppor t s t h e London Semes t e r and ften offers an i n te ri m s t u d y t o u r to t he B ri t i s h Isles.

FAC ULTY Van Tassel, Chair: Ben ton, Bergman, L. Johnson, Jones, Klopsch, D.M. Martin, Rei gs tad, Seal.

BACHE LOR OF ARTS MAJOR: 2 8 t o 40 s e m e s te r h o u r o f Engli s h b y o n d E ngli h 1 0 1 , incl u d i n g : 4 h o u r s in A m e rican literature, 4 h o u r s in B r i t i s h l i te r a t u re be fore 1 700, a n d 4 h o u r s in Bri t i s h l i t e ra t u re afte r 1 70 0 . At lea s ! 1 6 h ou r s s h o u ld be upper divisi n . lndividual progra m s Me designed b y stud en ts and their adviser , w i t h a pproval by t h e f u l l depa rtme n t i n a review d u ri ng lhe j u n i o r year . Advanced courses in w r i t i n g or g ra m m a r may be required. M I NOR: 1 6 s e m s ter h o u rs , excl u d i ng c o u r se s f r i n te rim c re d i t , of which a t le a s t 8 h o u r s s h o u l d be u ppe r divisio n . hese ou rses should i n c l u d e 4 h ur in Ame ri c a n l i te ra t u re, 4 h o urs i n B ri t is h l i tera t u re before 1 7 0 0, and 4 h OLL rs i n B ri tis h l i t ra t l l r a f ter 1 700. MINOR ( E M PHASIS ON WRITI NG):

16

se m este r h o u rs ,

exc l u d i n g c o u rs e s for i n t e r i m c r e d i t , of w h i c h a t l e a s t 8 h o u rs " h ou l d be upper d ivision T hese cou rses s h ou ld i n c l ud e 4 h o u r s i n B ri t i s h l i t e ra t u re beFore 1 700, 4 h o u rs i n A m r iu n o r B n t i s h li t era t u re after 1 700, a nd from 2 0 1 .

8 h o u r s i n wri t ing COliises d rawn

2 2 7 , 3 2 7, 3 2 8, 341, a n d 403 .

FOREIGN L A NGUAGE REQUI R E M E NT: Al l Eng l i s h m a i o rs

m u s t com plete at lea s t t wo yeilrs , a l l E n g l i s h m i nors a t least y e a r, of a fore ign l angLLag a t t h e u n iversity leve l . o r t he

one

eq u i val n t . PUBLI SHING PROG RAM: S t ud e n t s i n terested in possible ca n take a se ries o f i n te r 足 depa r t m n t a l C O U f ses, wh ich i n c l u d e s t h C U T5es l i s t e d a bo v e for t h e E n g l i s h m i n O f (e m ph a s i s on wri t i n g ) , p l u s E n g l i h 3 2.1 a n d c ou c se s 1 7 1 , 283, 378, a n d 3 8 4 i n Co m m u n ica t ion A r t s . P u b l i h l n g i n ternships a re o f fered i n t h e s u m m li' r. Cou rse ' i n graphics (in A r t ) a n d ma rket i ng ( i n B usiness Ad m i n is t ra ti n ) are h i g h l y reco m me n d e d .

careers in various p u b l i s h ing a ct ivi tie

B A C H E L O R OF ARTS I N EDUCATION: S e e School o f Ed ucation.

68

E NG L I S H


COURSE OFFERINGS A M E R IC A N L I T E R ATURE 24 1 I N T R ODUCTION TO A M E R I C A N LITERATURE 4 4 1 A M E R IC A N ROMANTIC LITER ATURE, 1 820- 1880 442 A ME R I C A N REALISM AND NATU RALl SM, 1 8 80- 1 9 1 5 443 A M E R I C A N LITERATURE S I N C E 1 9 1 5 BRITISH L I T ERATURE 251 I N TRODUCTION TO E N GLISH L I TERATURE: B EG I N N I NG S TO 1 750 252 I NTRODUCTION TO ENGLTSH LITERATUR E : AfTER 1 750 3 8 2 C H A U C E R AND \-US AGE 383 SHAKESPEARE 388 M I LTON AND H I S AGE 389 ENGLISH SATl R E AND S E N SI B I LI TY, 1 660-1 800 '- 3 90 THE ENGUSH ROMANTIC MOVEMENT 39 1 LI TE RATURE OF VICTORIAN ENGLAND 392 TWE NTIETH CENTURY BRmSH LIT E R ATURE GENRE A N D SPEC I A L STUDIES 2 1 6 IN TRODUCTION TO POETR Y 2 1 7 SHORT STORY 221 LITERARY FORMS A N D ANALYSIS 2 3 0 INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY L I TERATURE 2 3 1 M ASTERPIECES Of EUROPEAN L ITERATURE 323 C H ILDREN 'S L I TE RATURE 325 FANTASY AND FAIRY TALES 349 MODERN POETR Y 35 1 MODERN DRAMA 358 T H E B R I TISH NOVEL 491 , 492 INDEPENDENT READI N G AND R E S EA RCH 5 9 7 GRADUATE RESEARCH W R I TI NG, LANGUAGE A N D P U B L I S H I NG 101 COLLEGE ENGLISH 20 1 I NTERMIDIA TE W RITING 227 I M A G I N AT I V E W R I TI NG I 32 1 THE WORLD OF THE BOOK 32 7 I M AGINATIVE W R I TING I I 328 ADVANCED COM POSITION 34 1 f R E E L A N C E W R I T I NG 400 L L NGUISTICS MODERN ENGLISH G R A M M A R 40

101

COLLEG E ENGLISH

De velops 3 st u de n t 's p wers to re3d, thi nk, an d w r i t e e f fec t i ve l y . E m p h3sis on short papers a n d g u i d e d revi s i o n . Includes a u n i t on l ib ra ry research tec h n i q u e s . I I I (4)

201

INTERMEDIATE WRITING

O p p o r tu n i ties to p ractice a nd dev e l op wri ting by e x pl ori n g sell' ted t o pics from va r i o u s d isc i pli ne s . Some e m p h asis on

rewri t i n g - focu s i ng the material a n d adjusting t h e s t y l e for d i f f e re n t a ud l e n es. ( Pre r q ui s i te : E n g lis h 1 0 1 or i t s equivale n t, Advanced Place m e n t, or i n s t r u ct or ' s conse n t . ) I II

(4)

216

INTRODUCTION TO POETR Y

A s t udy of po e m s a n d conven tions of p o e t ry from the Greek c lassics to m d e m pT j e c t i v e verse. I n te n ded to d e v e lop the read er 's a bil i ty to res po n d with se n s i t ivity 3nd dis­ cri m in a t ion t a ric h v a r i e ty of poetic forms . I (4)

217

SHORT STORY

Examine s t he de velop me n t of s h o r t fiction, conce n t r a t i ng on t h e m e s a n d tec h n i q u e s of the g e n re. Includes s t ories by A merica n, B r i t i s h and C on t i ne n ta l wri ters. 11 (4)

221

LITERARY FORMS AND AN ALYSIS

Designe d to fa mi liarize s t u d e n t s w i t h f o r m s of l i te r a t u re

(poe t r y, fictton, d r a m a ) , basic l i t era r y terms, a n d m a j o r cr i t i al appr ache s . " (4)

IM AGINATIV E WRITING I 227 A beg i n ni n g workshop in w r i t i n g poe t ry and s hort fic tion . In c l udes a s t u dy of te h n iq u es a n d fo r m s to de ve lop cri tical s tan d a r d s and an u n d e r t a n d i n g of the wri ting proc e s s . (Prere q u i s i te : E ng l i s h 1 0 1 or i t s e q U i v a l e n t , A d v a nced Plac ement, or i n s t r u c tor's conse n t . ) I (4) 230

INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE E m p h a s i s on A m r i a n f i c t i O n si nce 1 9 50. II (4) 231

MASTERPIECES Of EUROPEAN L ITE RATURE

Rep re se n tati ve wo rks o f t h e li tera t u re of Wes t e r n E u ro p e, es p e c ially l a5sical, medieval, and Renaissance. 11 (4)

241

INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN LI TERATURE

The c n t i n uity of t h emes a n d fo r m s i n American prose, poet ry, and £i tion from co loni z.ati o n to the F i rs t World War. E m ph a s i s on m a j o r w rks of the 1 9t h c en t u ry . [ 11 (4)

25 1

I NTRODUCTION TO ENG LISH LI TE RATURE: B E G I N NLNGS TO

1 750 E m p ha s i s o n t h e con t i n u it y a nd v a riet y of English l i terat ure from Beow ul f th ro ug h Neoclassicism and the early novel. I

(4)

E N GL I S H

69


252

INTRODUCTION TO E NG llSH LIT ERATURE: AfTER 1 7 50

English literatu re, especia l ly poetry , from the em rgence of rom a n ticism to tn 20th century. II ( 4 )

321

THE WORlD Of TH E BOOK

An I n t roduct ion to the o r ga n i z a t io n and voca bu l a ry of the publishI ng indus try. t he history of t h e book and presses, and the basic skill o f c opy edi ti n g and design layout - in short , the com plex process by which m a n uscr i p t copy is br ugh t to finished p r i n t [ (4) I E x penm n ta l l

383 SHAKESPEARE Ten to twelve representa tive plays. Recom mended a s bac kg rou nd : 251. I ( 4 ) 3BB

MILTON AND H ]S AGE

389

ENGLTSH SATIRE AND SENSIBILITY, 1 6601 800

A s t u d y o f Mi l to n ' s work, especially Pnrndis. Los/ , a n d t h e work of ot he r major a u t h o rs (such as Don n e a nd Herbert) of t h e 1 7th cen t u ry, the golden age o f re l ig i o u s poetry i n England . I I (4)

.

An i n trod uction to a rich li t e ra ry t radi tion to g u ide readi n g and book selech n i n t he sch o l � and the fa mily. 1 I I (4)

A s t ud y o f neo-classic wri tings and the developing ocia l awareness of the pre - ro man tic age: Dryden and Po pe to Johnson a n d Blak . I ( 4 )

325

390

323

CHILDR EN'S LITE RATURE

fAIRY TALES AND FANTASY

Selected f ai ry tales are told. and varlous ways to i n t erp r t lhem a re e x p lored Fan ta sy is s t udied as a genre , b u t the em phasis IS on particular te t s : C.S, Lewis , Herbert, Tolkien, r (4) [ Experimenta l ] .

327

IMAGINATIVE WRITING I l

ADVANCED COM POSITION

A study of rhetorical prinClples used in wri t i ng persuasively and i mag.inativel y . Required for certification by the School of Educa t ion I II ( 4)

34 1

FREELANCE WRITING

A course i n wri t ing for publica tion, with pri mary emphasis on the feat u re article. I n te n d ed to h e l p s t ud e n t s deve lop

L ITE RATURE or VICTORIAN ENGLAND Selected a u tho r s (i ncludi ng Ca rl yl e Tenn yson , Dickens ,

39 1

a nd Hardy) and topics from a period m ome nt o us s oci al cha nge TI ( 4 )

of

ra pid a n d

.

392

TWENTIETH CEN T U RY BRITISH LITERATURE

Selected playwrig h ts from Shaw to Beckelt; poet ry of Yeats, H a rdy, T h omas . a nd A uden; fiction of loyce, Woolf , Lawrence. G reene, Lessi ng , and othe rs . n (4)

400

LI NGUISTICS

403

MODERN E N G L ISH G RAMMAR

See Modern and e l a s ical La n g ua ge s .

research and editorial skills; t o he l p them prod uce wri ting that is clear, informative, and expressive; to en hance their sense of audience; and to in troduce t h e m to p roce d u re s for s u b m i t t ing for magazine p u blication I ( 4 )

A s t u d y of th ree major approaches to gra m mar : t h e tradi tiona l, the structural. and t h e t ransfo rmational. Includes i n t roduction to the history of the English l a n g uage . [ ( 4)

349

MODERN POETRY

351

MODERN DRAMA

AM ERICAN ROMA NTTC LITE RATURE, 1 820- 1 880 S t ud ies in l i te ra ry rom a n ticism from Cooper to Ja mes, with 44 1

E m p h a s i s o n A m e rican poetry si nce 1 950. I I ( 4 ) A st udy of m odern classics from Ibsen to lonesco: Sca ndinavian. German, French, I talian, S pa n i s h RUSSia n, Englis h , Irish, and A m erica n n (4) ,

.

358

Joyce, a nd the mode rns . U (4)

382

em phasis o n the Age of Eme rson , Readi n s � in Thorea u, Whit m a n, Poe, M I v i l l a n d Hawt horn e. I (4) •

442

THE BRITfSH NOVEL

A s t u dy of the form from Defoe and Fielding t o Lawrence.

CHAUCER AND IDS AGE

A s tudy of C h a uce r s major works. espeCi a l l y Thr Canlerbury Tal,s. i n t heir lively 1 4th c e n t u ry set t i n g , I ncl u de s an i n t roduction to the develop me n t of the English lang uage. II '

(4)

70

,

,

A n adva n ce d \vorksh op in w ri t m g poetry and short nction . Some a t te n tion will be g i ven to proced ures for s u bmitting m a n uscript for p ub li c a ti o n II (J)

328

THE ENGLISH ROMANTIC MOVEMENT

A s t ud y of t he romantic awakening i n Engla nd : Bl ake , Wordsworth. Coleridge, Shelley, K e a t s , Byr o n a nd othe rs . 1 (4 )

ENG LISH

AMERICAN REA LlSM A N D NATURALISM , 1 880- 1 91 5

Fiction and cri t i cism in t he years of America's u rba niza Lion and emergence as a n industrial power: Twa i n , l ames , Cra ne, Norris, Dreiser, II (4

443

A M ERlCAN liTE RATURE SINCE 1915

In trod uction to t h e modern tradi tion i n poetry (Frost, Willi a m s , Pou n d ) and fiction ( F i tz gera l d , He m i ngway , F a u l k ne r ) 1 (4) .

-J


INDEPENDENT READING AND R E S EARCH A n i n ten si ve co u rse i n readi ng . May incl ude a I n t e nded for uppe r-d i v ision majors . I U ( 1 - 4 )

4 9 1 , 492

597

( 1- 4 )

thesis .

G RA DUATE R E S EARCH

C OURSES OF FERED IN THE 1 979 INTERIM 10 1 303

JOS 307

310 312

313

388 442

C Ol l E GE ENGLISH THE NEW WORLD: I MMIG RATION TO AMERICA I N THE SCANDINA VlAN足 AMERICAN NOVEl DREAMS H VING I N GOD'S SILENCE: TH E FILMS Of BERGMAN WIT.O R EA D I N G : THE LITERA TURf AND E XPER I E NC E OF NATURE T H E WORLD O f T H E BOOK SMALL PRESSES A N D LITTLE MAGAZINE S THOU M A YEST (OR FREEDOM Of THE WI LL) AMERICAN REALISM A N D NATURALISM

E NG L I S H

71


S C HOOL OF

ine Arts The School of Fine A r t s o f Paci fic L u t hera n U n ivers i t y i s a com m u n i t y of a r t is t s d edica t ed : to p r ovid e ene rg i e s and fa cilit ies for the focu sed refi neme n t of crea tive act i vi t y;

to opera te i n the vanguard of artistic un derstanding a n d to a s s u m e an a d d i tive rather t h an i m i t a t ive po s i ti o n r e l ative to t ha t unde rstanding; to pursue study of both the h is torica l and t heoretic a l a sp ec t s of our c re a t i v e legacy; to recognize c h a nge i n a r t i s tic cri teria without deva l u ing t he t rad i tio n a l co ncepts o f di s ci pli n e, c ra ft s m a n sh i p, a nd academic p rofe sio n al is m; to foste r activity f re e f r o m the ca price of t h e m a rke t p la c e but, by virtue of i t s s u b s t a n c e , n o t a loof from n o r i mcompa ti ble with p ractica l conc e r n s ; to a n i m a te a n d "h u mani ze" the a c a d e m i c cli ma te of P a cific l u t h eran Un i versi t y via the creati ve p resence by sponsoring a rich and varied p rog ram of even t s in he a rts;

a nd to p r o v i d e the st uden t s of Paci fic Lu theran

U n i ve rSi ty an oppor t u n i t y to experience fi r s t hand the u n iq u e "c hem is t ry" of the c reative pro ess .

FAC U LTY Moe, Oel!l1 ; faculty me mbers of the Departments of Art, Communication Arts, and Music.

De g re es of fe red by t he Schoo! of Fine A Tt s i nc l ude the B . F. A. (Bachelor of Fi ne Arts) i n a r t o r in com m u n i cat io n ar 5. t h e B . M . (B,lCh elor of MUSIc). and t h e 1. M . ( M a 5 tt! r of M u s i c ) .

S t u d e n t s m a y a l s o e a r n t h e B . A . (Bachelor o f A r t s ) , b u t t h i s deg ree is aw�rded t h ro u g h th College of A rts and Sci e n c e s . C a n d idate. for t h e 8. F.A a n d 8 . M. a s as t h B . A . i n a r t , com m u n ica ti on a rts, or m u s i c m u s t m g e n r a .l u n i v e rs i t y

wel l et

req ui remen t s a n d t h e 5 p cific re q u i re m e n t of t h e D pa r t m e n ts of Art, Com m u n i c a t i on Arts, or M u s i c . For de ta ils abou t t h e B . A . E . (Bach lor of A rt s i n Educa t i o n ) i n a r t , com m u nication ar ts, or m us ic, see th School of Edu a t i n .

For o u rse offerings, degree req u i re m e n t s , a n d prog r a m s i n o o f F i n e A rt s, S e e :

t h e Sc h o l

ART

C OMM UN IC ATI ON A M SIC

72

FINE A R T S

T


Histoty The depa r t m e n t is in t e re ted in providi n g s t u d e n t s wi th the tools of c r i t Ical t houg h t a nd a p p ro p riate m e t hods for fi ndi ng a nd tes t i ng evidence, for weighing values, and for d iscove r i n g tru th . Th h is t ory faculty pu rsues these goals t h rough co rses and d irected research both on and off c a m p u s , t h rough j int fac u lty-s tuden t p rojects, a nd through p u blic workshops, lec t u r e s , a n d t h e r eve n t s . A s a n acade mic i n q uiry w hich empha s izes the develop m e n t of a n a ly tical skills, the s t udy of h i s tory depend s on the vaila b i l i t y of a wide va riety of pri m a ry a n d secon a ry 5 u rce m a terial. H i s torica l hold ing s i n the Robert A . L . Mor tved t Libra ry a re s trong and diverse, includi ng s ig n i fica n t resou rces in A me ri a n , E urope a n , a n d n on -Wes tern field . Reg iona l a rch ival m a terial i s hou sed i n t h e N i s q ual ly P l a i n s R oom of t h e L i br a r y .

FACULTY Mart inson, Cizair; B ro w n i n g, Halseth, Nordq uist, Randall, Rozanski

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: M i n i m u m of 3 2 s e m e s t e r h o u rs, i n c l u d i ng 4 h o urs - A m e ri .I n field, 4 h o u r s E u ropean field. a n d " h urs - no n-Western fiel d . S t u d e n t s a re x pect d to work dosl'ly w i t h t h e departmen t's fa c u l t y advisers to i ns u re the most personal i ze d p r rams a n d i n s t r u c t ion possible. Majors a r e u rged to m e e t t h e fo r e i g n language req u i re m e n t s of t h e allege of r t s and Sci e nces u n der e i t h e r p l ion I or p l i o n I I . T h o s e m a j o r s who a r e preparing for public sch o o l t e ac hin Cdn m e et the s tate hi_tory c e r t i fica tion re q u i re m e n t by enrolling in History 460. All s e n ior m a jors are r eq u i re d to ta ke fo u r h o u rs o f s e m i n a r cre d i t .

MINOR: 2 0 sem e s ter h o u r s . 1 2 h o u rs f r o m c o u rses n u mbered above 300. The m i n o r i n h i s tory e m p h a s i zes a "program foc us" <l n d J "program pi n . " w h i c h is a rr a n ge d by th

t u d e n t in co ns u l t a tion w i t h a departmen ta l adviser.

BACH ELOR OF ARTS IN E DUCATION: S e e Schoo l of d uca t i o n .

HISTORY

73


C OURSE OFF E R I N G S Courses i n t h e Depart m e n t of H i s tory are

F I lm'l i ng a reaS:

1 09, n o ffered i n t h e

AMERICAN FInD 25 1

252

253 356 451 460 471 404

COLON IAL MERICAN HISTORY N I N ETEENTH CENTU R Y AME RICAN H ISTORY TWENTIETH C E NTURY AMERICAN HJSTORY HISTORY OF AMERICAN fOR EIGN POLICY AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL H1STORY WEST AND NORTHW EST HISTORY O F AMERICAN THOUGHT AND CULTURE SEMINAR: AMERICAN H ISTORY

EUROPEAN HELD 1 0 7, 1 0 8 H IS TORY OF WESTERN 32 1 ClASSICAL CIVILIZATION 323 THE MIDDLE AGES 324 RENAISSANCE 325

328

329

3 3 2334 34 1 34 2 495

CTVILIZATION

R EfORMAT10N N I NETEENTII CENTU R Y ruROPE TWENTI ETH C ENTURY EUROPE ENGLAND: TUDORS AND STUARTS MODERN G ERMANY, 1 846- 1 945 SEVENTEENTH CENTURY FRANCE THE fRENCH R EVOLUTION SEMINAR: EUROPEAN H ISTORY

NON路WESTERN FIELD ] 0 9, n o

HISTORY O F EASTERN CIVILIZATION R EVOLUTIONARY RUSSIA 335 LATIN AMERICAN H ISTORY 340 MODERN CHINA AND JAPAN

.333

The h is torical evolu tion of the civiliza tion of Ch l na, Japan, and India, Fi rs t semes ter focuses on c u ltu ral. polit ical. an d social devel pmen ts; second se m es te r e xa min es wes tern i mperia l is m, the rise of Asian n a tionalism and c lonial revolu tion, a n d A s ia's com mun is t and n o n-com m un is t roads to moderni tion. I II ( 4 , 4 ) 25 1

C OLONI A L A MERIC AN H ISTORY

i n s t i tu tions f ro m c lonial times to th e 1 790's; the g r wth of the colon ies and t heir relationship to the British im p.erial sy t e m . ( 4 ) America n

252 From

N I N ETEE NTH C ENTURY AMERICAN HI STORY J fferson to T h odore Roosevelt; i n t e rpre ta tion of

era s from social, poli tical, economic, a n d biogra phical vie wpoin ts . ( 4 )

TW ENTIETH C E NTURY AMER ICAN HISTORY Tren d s a nd e ents i n domestic and foreign a ffair since J 900; affl u e nce, u rban growth, and social con t ras ts. (4) 253

3 2.1

CLASSICAL ClVTLIZAnON

The a ncie n t Medi terranean world with e m phasis u po n

G reek and Roman Civilization s . ( 4 )

323

THE M I DDLE AGES

E u rope from t h e disin teg ra t ion of the R o m a n E m pi re to 1 300; reading a n d r search in med ieval m a t e rials. (4 ) 324

RENAISSANCE

E u rope in an age

All fiELDS

325

399

Political

492

406 502 505

591 595 59 7,

599

I NTERNSHIP D I R ECTED STUDY SEMINAR: HISTOR Y AND l-DSTORIANS SOC I AL SCIENCE TH EORY SOCI AL SCJENCE RESEAR C H METHODS I N DEPENDENT STU DY GRADUATE R EADINGS 5 98 RESEARC H PROJECT THESIS

H ISTORY Of EASTER N CI VI L IZATIONS

f

t ra n s ition

-

1 300 to 1 500.

(4)

REFORMA TrON and

re ligious cri s i s i n the 1 6 t h cen t u ry : Zwi ngUan is m, A ngl ica nis m, An aba ptism, Ca lvi n ism, Roman Ca t holic reform; Weber t he sis, the begin n i ngs o f Ba roque art. (4) L u t h e ra n is m ,

328

N I N ETEENTH C ENTURY E UROPE

(4 ) 329

TWENTrETH C ENTURY E UROPE

T h e expa nsion o f E u ropean civilization from 1 800 to 1 9 1 4.

World War I; r volu tion and re t urn to "norma lcy"; depression and the rise of fascism; World War I I . ( 4 )

1 0 7, lOB

H ISTORY OF WESTERN C I V J LlZATION

Analysis of in s tit u tion s and idea o f selected civil iza tio ns. Mesopotamia, Egypt. the Hebrews, Greece, Rome, the rise of Chri t ia n i ty, and Med ieva l E u rope in the fir t sem s te r; E u rope from he Renaissance to lhe prese nt in t h e second semes ter. I II (4,4)

3 3 2 ENGLAND: TU DORS AND STUARTS P l i t ica l . social. economic, leg J , and c ul tu ra l developme n t s .

(4 ) 333

(4)

74

H ISTORY

REVOLUTIONARY RUSSIA

Post-P t e r t h e Great R u s s ia; the e s t a blis h m e n t of Cza ris t a u tocracy; the G reat Reforms of the 1 9th centu ry; the rise of the revolution a ries; Bolshevism, Lenin, a n d the Revolu tion s of 1 9 1 7; t h e c n solida tion of the Soviet state.


334

MODERN G E RMANY, 1 848-1945

495

SEMINAR: EUROPEAN H ISTORY

496 (4)

SEMINAR: HISTORY AND H I STORIANS

The Revolutions of 1 84 8 and unification of Germany; Bis marckian a n d Wilhelmian empires; Weimar Republic and the rise of National Socialism; the Th ird Reich . (4)

(4)

335 L A TlN AMERICAN H I STORY A s u rvey of the major a spects of Latin American history from colonial to modem times. Spanish and Portuguese insti t u tions, i nter- American relations, and case studies of Mexico, Argentina, B razil, and C uba. ( 4 )

502 SOCIAL SCIENCE THEORY A n a n a lysis of social explanation a nd the social sci n tifie frame of reference ( 4 )

3 4 0 MODERN C H I NA AND JAPAN The moder n transformation of E as t Asia: Western imperialism and dynas tic dedine; Japa n's " m i racle" modern足 ization; C hi n a's semi-colonialism, nationalis m , and Repub足 lica n revol u t ion; the rise of Mao a n d com m.unist revolution; Japan's militarism and the road to Pearl Ha rbor. ( 4 ) 3 4 1 S E V ENTEENTH CENTURY FRANCE S tructure of s de ty, development of abs lutism, protest of popular classes, role of France i n i nternational affairs, origin s of the E nligh tenmen t. (2) 342 THE FRENCH REVOLUTlON S t ructure of society, origins a n d course of the Revolution, and its i m pact on France and E u rope. (2)

356 HISTORY OF AMERICAN fOREIGN POLlCY

5 0 5 SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH METHODS Basic re earch concepts applied to laboratory, field, and bibliographic st udies. Topics include form ulati ng resea r h questions, rese a rch design s, da ta-ga t hering techniques, analysis of data a n t heory con truct ion . E m pha i s is placed on unders tanding and eva l uating rather than cond ucting research . ( 4 ) 591 DIR ECTED STUDY (1-4) 595 G RADUATE READINGS I ndepend e n t Study C a rd Required . ( 4) 597, 598 (1-4) 599 (4)

RESEARCH PROJ ECT

THESIS

The practice, function, and tructure of A merican foreign policy with particular e mphasis on the t we n tieth century . (4)

COURSES OFFERED I N THE 1 979 INTERIM

3 9 9 INTERNSHIP A research a nd writing project i n connection with a student's approved off-cam pus work or travel activity. Primary goal is to gain historical perspective on s uch activity, or a dimension of i t. Prerequisite: sophomore standing plus one course in history, and consent of the depart ment. ( 1 -6)

306

31 3 315

HOLOCAUST: THE DESTRUCTION Of THE EUROPEAN JEWS C H I NESE CONVERSAn ON, CALLIGRAPHY AND CUISINE THE C O M I NG OF 1984: C AN T H E I ND I VI D U AL SURVIVE?

45 1 AMERI CAN CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY Dim ensions of American l a w as it relates to changing his torical periods . (4) 460 WEST AND NORTHWEST The A merican West in the 19th a n d 20th centuries . F rontier and regional perspectives. Interpretive, dlustrative history, and opportuni ties for off-campus research . ( 4 ) 471

H ISTORY O f AMERICAN THOUGHT AND CULTURE

Dimensions of American social a nd i ntellectual his tory . (4) 492 I NDEPENDENT STUDY ( 1 -4 ) 494 (4)

SEMINAR: AMERICA N HISTORY

HISTORY

75


ntegrated Studies Program The I n tegra ted S tudies Program i e s pecially designed as a n alternative mode of s a t i s fying the core curric u l u m req u i re m e n t . C ons is t i ng of a constellation of i n te rdi sciplinary cou rses, t h e p rogram a s a w h o l e explores a c e n t r a l t h e me, " T h e Dynamics o f C ha nge," from a variety of perspec tives.

FACU LTY Huber, D i rec/or; selected facult y from the disciplines of the arts and sciences, including Anthropology, Art, Biology, Chemist ry, Communication Arts, Economics, E nglish, History, Mathematics, Modern and C lassical Languages, Phi losophy, Physics, Pol itical Science, Psychology, Religion, and Sociology .

A s t u den t who c h ooses C o re n to meet t h e C e n ral Un ivers i t y Requirem e n ts wi l l b gi n w i t h Sequ nee l , w i t h a n y t w o Seque nces chosen from [ I , m , o r I V ta ke n s ubsequen tl y or cuncurre n t ly, and c nel ude the Program wIth the Seminar w hich w ou ld be t a ken a fter, or co ncurrently with, comple tion of t h e l a s t c o u r s e i n the Sequences selected . I n d i vidual cou rse s i n each Seq u e nc e a re eq uivalent t o f o u r semester h o u rs of c r ed it each . A bro h a re w i t h f u rt h er details is avail ble f rom t h e Office o f Adm iSSIO n s ur t h e Reg i s t ra r . A b r i e f s u m mary of t h e progra m follows. THE DYNAMICS or C HANGE SEQU ENCE I: The Id e a o f Progress 1 5 2 1 1 Cou rse 1 : N a t ure from Superna t u r e IS 2 1 2 Course 2 : F r o m F i n i t e to I n fi n i te

SEQUENCE U : H u m a n Re-po n 5 i bi l i t y Cou rse 1 : T h e Developi n g I n d i vid u a l I S 2 2 2 Cou rse 2 : T h e B u rd e n of H u m a n R e s pon s i b i l i t y Op tion 1 . . . . 2 0 t h Cen t u ry E u rope O pt i o n 2: . . . 2 0 t h C e n t u ry A s i a IS 2 2 1

SEQUENCE I ll ;

Word a n d World E x p l o ri n g t h e C rea t ive I m a g i n a tion I S 2.31 C o u r s e 1 : S y m bol, Langua ge, M y t h [S 232 C ou rs e 2: M odel and Me ta ph or: I n v e n t i n g t h e World

76

I N T E G RATE D S T UD I E S


SEQUENCE lV:

li mi ts to Grow t h I S 24 1 Cou rse l ' T h e Tech nological Society a n d t h e Thr us t for Growt h 15 2 4 2 Course 2: T h e Tec h no log i al S oc i e ty a n d t h e L i m i t s t o G rowt h

SEMINAR:

I S 251 Seminar R E G ULATIONS G O V E R N I N G COR E I I 1 . S eq u e n ce I i s prerequisite o r coreq u i s i t e to a l l followi ng sequences. w a i v e r of t h is sequence may be allowed fo r a student w hose p re vi ous work in l ibera l s t ud i 5 is j u d g e d to

have been s u ffIciently broad a n d re l ev a n t 0 the pri ncipal com mi t tee ide as to be s tu d i e d In the rem a i n i n sequences. of t h e Progra m 's facu l t y will evaluate such a wa iver r e q u e s t . 2. Sequences I I, In, or IV may b e t a ke n i nde pe n d e n t l y of enroll me n t in the Progra m as a w h o l e, b u t w i l l not sa t is f y any p o r tlo n of t h e Ge nera l U n i v e rsi t y Requ irements . C r ed i t will be given for s u h o u rses, h wever, a n d may cou n t as elective cred i t OT credit toward a major if a cou rse i s s p ec i f i -ally a l lo we d b y the a pp r o p r i a t e dep a r t me n t ( s ) . reason, st udent s who en rol l ed In the Program do not rom p le t e i t, a T ransfer Com m i ttee ( co m pos e d of the t h ree Divi s i o n a l Chairs and t h e Dean f the Seh 01 of Fine

3, I f, for ilny

Arts) wi ll eva l uat e their work in the li gh t of its scope a n d in view of the Ge n e ra l University Req Uirements to m a ke a

concern i ng what a reas o f study such s t ud n l s m us t stili take to satisfy the regula r Genl?ral University

decis io n

Requirements.

co nc l u d i n g Sem i n a r is op n onl y to st u d e n t s w h o .:; m pl e t e Sequence I a nd a ny two of II-IV, o r

4. E n rollment in the

a n y t w o o f I I - I V w it h a waive r of S e q u e nc e I . 5.

S e q u e n c e I may be taken in the f r e s h m a n yea r, a nd a n y two

es I I-IV may be t aken in the f re sh ma n , so p ho more, a nd lor j unio r years . The co ncl ud i ng Se min a r

of Se qu en

ma y be t a k e n a fter or conc u r re n tl y with t h e last c o u rse i n

t h e Seq uences . 6. S t u den ts s uccess fu l l y comple ting t h e compon nts of t h i s Progra m

as

outli ned a bove will b e regarded as h a v i ng

f u l f i l led a l l the General U n i ersity Req uiremenh exce p t

co u rses in W ri t i ng and Physical Education a n d t h e Interim

re q u i r e m e n t . 7. S l nce ne of t h l' e m p has e s

f this P r og ra m is to d evel o p t h e writing, cntical a nd analytical sk i l l s of s tude n ts, participation i n the act ua l course work and discu s ian is es s en t i a l . courses in the P rog ra m m ay not be

Therefore, c ompone n t

ta ke n by m a n s of c h a l l ge examinations, nor will CLE P credit, w or k - M u dy or o t he r academic xp ri nee be su bs tit u t a ble for course credit 1 0 this Prog ra m . S . Pass- fail credit m a y n o t be elected by s t ud e n ts e n rolled i n

h i s P rog ra m i n a n y seque nce of co u rs e s after the f i rs t or I n t he Sem i na r. N o c o m p (> o e n t c u rse m ay b e o f fered b y the i n s t ructi o n a l 5t ff as a n ex lus i ve pa ss-fa i l course. 9. S i nce a seque nce of courses is espe cia l l y designed as a consecutive and i n ter rela ted whole, the f i r s t course in each sequence is prereq uis i te to the secon d . They may n o t , t herefore, be i n terchanged .

IS 2 1 1

NATUR E AND SUPERNATURE Student of the cre a ti v e and reactionary responses of t h e R e n a i s s a n e, Reformation, and ea rly Enligh ten ment to the au thori ta ria n Medieval ment a lit y . L u t h e r, Galileo, New足 tOn , Locke, and H ume a r e giv e n s p e c i a l e m p ha sis toge ther with developments in art and pol i t icaJ h i s t or y . Anal y sis of th e emerging idea o f p rogres s . P re req u i s i te to 2 1 2, Fr m Fini te to rnfi nite.

IS 2 1 2

(4)

fROM fiNITE TO I N fINITE

Developme nts in l i te ra ture, politics and in d u s trializa t ion in the 1 8 t h a nd 1 9 t h cen t u rie s . E m p h a sis i s given t o t h e i 11 f l u e n ce of t h e E n l ig h t e n m e n t on t h e d ev e l o p m e n t of t he idea o f progres s, and to the formation of Da rw in is m , the R oma n tic movemen t and M a rX i s m . (4)

[S 221

TffE DE VELOPING IN DIVIDUAL

The dev el o p m e n t of moral values a n d conscience are s t udied from a biol ogical, p h i l o s o ph i c a l and soc i ol o g i c a l point o f view, in connection with contemporary moral iss ues . Part ic ula r atten tion is g i v en to crimlnal behavior a n d g e n e m a n i pula i o n a n d the pe r t i n e n t moral and socia l ques tion s raised by these p h e n o m e n a . Prereq ui site to 222, Burden of H u m a n Re spo n sibil i t y . (4)

IS 222

THE BURDEN OF HUMAN R ESPO N SmlL lTY Opt ion 1: ... 20th C ENTURY E UROPE Topics i n h i story a nd literature selected f ro m the seq u ence of even t s fro m ind ust ri a l iza tion to t h e Second World War are examined. E m p h as i s lies on the crises of v a l u es posed by r a pid i nd u s tri <l li z a t i on and tec hn logical g row t h . NaIve d et e rm i n i s t ic notions of prog re ss ar co n trasted w i t h the experie nce in the co a l mines o f North e rn F ra n ce and t h e t re nche i n World War I . T w o contras t i ng Marxis t models of revolu tion, those of Len in and Rosa Luxemburg, are s t udied. The c ul tural expe ri me n ta tion f t he Twen ties is sh wn to be a search for new values, the iconoclastic work of artist and writers reveal s itself as an exercise of res onsi b ili t y . Finally, the moral dilemmas posed by German N a tional S o c i a l i s m and World War rr a re considered. a f y (y)

Option 2: . . . 20th C ENTURY ASIA The m ode rn i z a t i o n of Asia is c ri t i ca l l y ex a m ined, u si ng t h e l i f e s tr u gg l e s of "pa radigma tic individuals" such as G h a n d i and Mao T se-tu ng, and emph asizing t h e i r efforts to t ransform India a n d C h ina . J a pan will be t re a te d s i m ilarly . Do ina n t t h e m es i nclude c o lo n ia l i sm , westerniza tion versus m ode r n iza tio n , t he rise of n ati o nalis m and r vol u t i on, nat iona l i ntegration and t he individ ual i n t e n si o n between p a s t a nd fu t ure, a J y (4)

I NTEGRATED STUDI E S

77


IS 2 3 1

SYMB OL, LANGUAGE A N D MYTH

IS 232

MODEL AND MITAPHOR: INVE NTING THE WORLD

The phenomenon of la ng uag e is examined t h ro u g h a study of i ts role in shapi ng knowledge, i t s history as a symbolic system , and its n a l U Te as a d e p os i tory of c u l t u r a l traits. The nat ure of sym bo lic syst e m s generally. incl uding num e rica l sys tems, a nd the role of my th as a genre for expressing "reality" a re g i ven e m pha s i s . Prere q uisite to 232, M ode l and Me taphor Inven ting the World. (4)

T h i s course takes t h e language, n u m ber a nd ri tual djscussed In IS 231 a n d shows how t h e y can be u sed to construc t larger s t ructures of though t , feeling, and perception that no t only describe the w or l d, but to some extent i n vent i t . Model and me t aph or are seen as tools which, through t h e practice of va rious di sci plines ( social, ma t he ma t ical and artistic) , g i ve u s a varie t y of pe rspec tives upon selves and worlds which are se en increasingly to be in terpret ive rather th an given . (4)

15 2 4 1

THE TEC HNOLOGIC A L SOC IETY AND THE TH RUST FOR G ROWTH

An ana lysis of the impact of technology on modern society and of the e m ergen t concept of secularism is d eve l o p e d i n an effort to u nderstand con temporary culture. Problems of the in terface of technology w i t h c u l t UTe are examined from phi losoph ical, re l igious, biologica.l and economic pOints of view . Prereq u isite to IS 24 2, The Tech nological Society and the li m i ts to G rowth. (4)

THE TECHNOLOGICAL SOC IETY AND THE L I MITS TO G ROWTH exploration o f c rea t i v e futures beyond a tech nological

IS 24 2 An

socie ty. Emphasis is given to a s tud y of the l i m i t s to growth in connection with food product ion, energy, poll ution and m a te ria l reso urces . T h e mora l choices i n volved i n a l terna tive fut u res a r e exa m i ned to get he r W I th aesthetic val ues and t heir i mplications for f u t u re social order. ( 4 )

IS 251

SEMINAR

(4 )

78

INT E G RA TE D S TUDI E S


Mathetnatics and Cotnputer Science The Depa r t m e n t of Mathema tics and Computer Science offers a variety of maj ors and minors. A Bach el or of Arts or Bachelor of Science major i s available i n m a t h e m a tics . A Bache l r of Art s in Edu a tion w i t h a major i n mathe matics is also offere d . A minor i com puter scie n ce i available with ei ther a m a t hematics, engi neeri ng, a n d science t rack or a busi n ess i n for ma tion track . A s t a t i s tics mi nor is also ava ila ble . The need for persons wi th q ua n t itative skills is drama tic a s the world grows mo re complex . Mathema tician s and compu ter scien t i s ts have employme nt opportun i ti es i n business, industry, gove rnment, and teac hing. Persons p l a n n i n g c a re e rs i n al most a ny field w i l l f i n d their opport unities for in teres ting a nd challenging career e n h anced by the s tudy of ma thema tics a nd com p u t e r science. It is generally true that t h e persons w h o develop their q u a n ti ta tive skills i ncrease their ability to a t tack t h e more complex p roble ms of society. Advances in SCie nce, tech nology, the social sciences, busine s s, i nd u stry, a nd gover nme n t become more a n d more depe n d e n t upon precise a n a l y s i s a nd t h e e x t raction of i n forma tion from l a rge qua ntities o f d a t a . Many proble m s require careful a nalysis by person s (or tea ms of pe rsons) with skills in mat hema tiCS, s ta ti s tics , and co m p u t e r scie nce as well as business, chemist ry, e n gineering, physics, econom ics, and many other fields.

_

M a t hema tics i s a many faceted subject t h a t is ex tremely u s e f u l i n i ts a pplication, b u t a t the same time is fascinating and beau t i f u l i n the abs tra c t . I t i s a n i nd i spe n sa ble tool f o r i n d u s t ry, science, gove r n m e n t, a nd the business world, while the elegance of its logic a nd bea u t y of form h av e i n t rig ued schol a rs, ph ilosophe rs, a n d artists s ince earliest t i me s .

The m a t h e m a tics program a t Pacific Lu th eran - Unive rsity i s designed t o se rve five m a i n objective : (1) to provide backgrounds f o r other disci plin es, (2) to provide a com pre h e ns i ve preprofessional program for t hose directly en teri ng t h e fields of teach i n g a n d applied ma t he m a tics, (3) to provide a nucleus of essential co u rses which will develop the bread t h a nd ma t u ri ty of m a t he m a tica l - thought for con t i n ued s tudy of m t hema t ic s a t t h e _

graduate level, (4) to develop t h e m e n t al skills necessary for t he c re a tion, analysis, a nd cri t i q u e of m a t h e ma tical logic w i t h i n the con t e x t of math ema tical topic s, and (5) to provide a view of math ema tics as a par t of h u m a ni s tic en deavo r . C o m p u t e r science i s a s tead ily growi ng a rea of h u m a n e ndeavor; its im pact is felt in nearly every part o f societ y . It p rovi de s oppo r t u ni ty for e m p lo y m e n t in business, indus try, governme nt, and teach i n g . I t a lso provide s a wealth of problems of i n tellectual i nterest. Like mathe m a tics, co mpu ter science is a n a rea i n which kno wledge may be com bined with t h o u g h t to create achieve m e n t s of both aesthe tical and practical sig ni ficance . The c u rri c u l u m i n computer science, in a d di tion to the usua l in trod uctory cou rse s, offer s courses in assembly language, sof twa re design, di screte s t r u c t u res, mathemat ical models, a n d data structures. Computer sci e nce i s a n i n te rd iscipli n a ry program which is taught with the coop eratio n of other depa r t m e n ts a nd schools, including E ngi nee ring , Business Ad m in is tratio n, and Econo mics. C o m p u te r scien e s t u d e n t s are enco u raged to gain considerable compe t ence in a field i n which compu ter applica tion pJays a role ( fo r example, accoun t ing, economics, e ng i neeri ng, business ad m i n i s t ration, m a t h e m a tics) . E m ployme n t oppor t u nities are e n hanced b y such a course of s t u d y . Two t ra cks a re available w i t h i n the computer science minor, a m ath / en g inee ri ng / science t rack a nd a business i n formation track .

fACU LTY G. Peterson, C h a i r ; E. Anderson, Bat ker, Brink, Herzog, Liebelt, N.C. Meyer, Yiu

M A THEMA TICS PROGRAM T h e foundation f the m a t he ma tics pro g ram for maj r s is the four sem stu cillc u l u s a n d linear a lg eb ra sequence, M ath 1 5 1,

1 5 2, 253, and 331 . These courses are usually taken in sequence

the first four se mesters. S t ude n t s with a ca l u l u s backgr un d i n high school m a y receive adva nced placement i n to t h e appropriate course in the s eq ue n c e . Upper division work includes courses i n modern algebra, a n a l ysis, s t a t i s t ics, applied ma t hematic , a nd t pology.

MA THEMA TICS & C OMPUTE R SCIENCE

79


Students may earn a Bachelo r of Arts or a Bachelor o f Scie nce degree i n the C ol l ege of P.rts and Sc i � nc es majoring in m a t he matics or a B ache l o r f Art s in Education degree majoring or minoring i n m a t h e m a t i cs . Minors in mathematics or st atis tics a re .lIs available. St udents maj ring in mat hematics a re encou raged to c o m p le t e several ourses in compu ter s c i e nc e . So m e kn o wl edg e of p r og ra m m i ng in ei t her BASIC or FORTRAN (s u as t h a t gained in C m Sci 139 or Co m S' i 1 4 4 ) i s assu med in a l l ma t h e ma tics courses n u m bered 1 5 2 a nd above with the exception of M ath 323 and Math 324. Students p lan nin g to t a ke Ma t h 1 5 2 s hould take Com Sci 1 3 9 or C mSci 1 4 4 bef o re or during the semester f e n rollme n t i n Math 1 5 2 (effe c t i ve s p r i ng 1 981 ) . D ur ing t h e i r s o p h o more yea r , s tu de nts i n tending 1 0 major i n m a t hema tic s should co mplete a n ap pli ation for m availa ble f rom the de p a r t me n t a l secretary If a cc e pted , they will be a s s igned t an a dv i se r on t h e math m a t l c s facul ty

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: M i ni m u m of 28 s e mes te r hours In ma thematics ou r ses n u m be red a bove 1 0, including 331, 433, 455, 486, and ei th e r 4 3 4 or 456. The 434 pr 456 c hoic e may be re pl aced by ta ki ng 8 s e m este r hours f ro m 3 2 1 , 3 4 1 , 345- .34 6, 35 1, a nd 460. 8 s e m e s te r hours in p h y s ic s are st ro ng l y reco mme nded . Students planning t o do raduate work in mathe ma t i s sh o u l d co m p le t e both 434 and 456. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJ OR: 40 se m es te r hours, incl ud ing 331 and 4 86 a n d a t lea s t 20 se me s t e r hours f upper d ivis ion ma th ematics or co m pu te r science ( o u rse s . J 2 h ou rs o f t he u p pe r division re q u in:, ment s must come f rom 43 3, 455, and 456. Req uired s u p port ing ' 8 se me s te r hour in p h y si 5 . PhysiCS 356 may b substi t u t ed for o ne c urs vf u pper division ma t hemah s. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCA nON: See Sc h o I o f Education.

MA TH £MA ncs MINOR: 20 semest e r hours o f m a thema t ic s cou rses, in l ucli n g 1 5 1 , 1 5 2, 253 a n d two upper divi ion c u rses. I n te n m c u rses and 323, 324, and 446 m ay not be co un t e d towa rd t h e mathematics minor.

COMPU TER SCI ENCE MI NOR: See co mput er science program section below.

STATISTICS MINOR: Se e statisti s sec t IO n of t hjs a talog. COMPUTER SOENCE PROG RAM The compu ter is con t i n u i ng to revo l u t ionize n ea rl y every part o f o u r so lety. Some kno w le dg e of the co m p u te r is req u i red 1 0 order to u n de rs t a n d and p a r t ic i ate in te l l ige n t ly i n more and more fi Ids of i n teres t The compu ter science program is t n ten d ed to allow i ndivi d uals to ob t a i n the necessary understanding of the computer i n o rd e r to relat to it e ffec tivel y in heir area of in tere st . O ne or m or e of the B SIC courses, C o m p u te r Science 1 30, 1 40, 1 4 1 , wiU mee t t h m i n i m u m req u i rements of many fields. However, s t udents In terested 10 o bt a i n in g il d ee pe r in ight may p r e fe r the more thorough in t roductory c o u rse , Computer Science 1 44 . Compu te r Science 248 is des ig ned as a second cou rse for pe rso ns from e it her of these seq uences . S t udents with so m e solid BASIC l a n gu a g e ski ll s may re ce i ve dvan ced p l ac em e n t in t h e 1 3 9· 1 40- 1 4 1 se q u e nce or m a y enroll In 144 in o rd e r to study FORTR A N a nd obtain ol s ol id I n t rod u t lo n to om p u ter science.

80

The compu ter science m i nor is de si g n ed to he l p those who h a ve a more th o ro ug h knowledge of the co m pu te r , whether their major i n terest is in mathe matics, science, engineer i ng, business a d ministra tion, r other fields . It ca n also be used to en ter the computer field d i rec t l y upon g-radu<ltion or to e nter a gr a d ua te campu.t r s ci nce p rog ra m. Because co m p u te r science is interdiSCIpli nary i n natu re, certain courses in mathema tics, statistics, engineering, business a d m i n i s tration, and eco no m ics pl a y an important role In a o m p u te r 5cien e prog ra m . A list o f such ( urses i5 included a t t h e end o f t h e de sc ri p tio n f t h e computer sci e n e m i nor. w a n t to

COMPUTER SOENCE M I NOR: 1 8 hou rs , o f which at leas t 1 2 are n um be red 24 or higher, inc lu di ng 1 4 4 ( r 1 4 1) and 248 a nd one of t h e followi ng tracks : Math, Engineering, and Science Track - at I a s t one from each f the fo l l ow i n g groups: ( 1 ) C om Sci 244, 344, 444 ; (2) Com5ci 348, Math 345, Math 351; (3) Ma th 346, Mat h lStat 334, E ng i n ee r i n g 3 5 2 . Ma t h 1 5 1 and 152 a re required supp rting c o u rses .

Business Information Track - a t least one from each of t h e fo l lOW i ng grou p s : ( 1 ) C m S c i 2.44, 344, 444; (2) M<l th lStat 334, E o n / Stat 344, C m ci 348, Math 345; (3) BA 2 8 2, 387. Math 1 5 1 , Math 1 2 7 or Math 3 31 , B A 281, and Stat 2 3 1 or .341 <Ire req ui red suppor ti ng c urses . In a dd itio n I a mpu t e r science courses, the fol lowi ng courses may be cou nted towa rd the c o m pu t e r science m inor: Math .3 4, 345, 346, Engineering 352, B A 282 and 38 7, Econ 344. M a t h 35 1 coun ts as 2 hours t owa rd the m i n o r . tudents wishing to do graduate wo rk III com pu ter sCIence sh uld take Com Sci 1 44, 244, 248, 344 , 348, 4 4 4, and M a t h 345 -3 46.

COOPERATIVE PROGRAMS Pacific Lutheran U iverslty ha s coopera tive program s with t w other unive-rsit,es. A 3- 2 program a n Engin e ri ng/ Co m p u t e r Science is described in the Physics / Engi neering s ec t i o n of this catalog a nd i n terested students should consult with en ineering f a cul ty i n regard to t h is program . The Ma t h e m atics De pa rt m e n t has two coop rative programs in Compu ter Science and in A p p lied Math matics in cooperation with Wa5hington State Un iversi ty . ( 1 ) a - 1 program l ea d i n g to a B . A . o r B . S. degree i n Ma the mat ics /Com pu te r SCience or Appl ied M a t he ma t i cs from PLU; J n d ( 2 ) a 3-2 p rog r a m leading to a B . A. or B . S . degree in Mathe ma tics from PLU a nd a B . S. or M . S . degree in Compu ter Science or Ap pl i ed Mathema tics from Was h i n gt o n State University. S t u dents in the se pr og ram s m u s t s a ti s fy t h e P l U requ i re me n t s f o r a B . A . degree i n Mathematics except f o r t h e Senior Semi nar. The req u ir ed courses together with rec omm e n de d SeInest rs and years fo r t a king them are a s follows· Ma th 1 5 1 : A nalytic Geometry an d Calculus - Fr I C o m 5ci 1 4 4 : In troduction t o Co mpu ter Science - Fr I Math 152: Ana lyt ic Geometry and Ca lc ul us - Fr II Ma th 253: Multivariable Cal ulu9 and Differentia l E q u at ions 50 I ComSci 248 : So ft wa re DeSign - Fr 11 l'hys 1 53 : General Ph ys ics - 0 I Math 3 3 1 : l in ea r Algebra and Calculus - 50 n Phys 1 54: Ge ne ra l Physics - 50 II

MATHE M ATI C S & C O MPUTER S C I E N C E


Math 4 3 3 ; M od e rn Algebra - Jr [ Math 351; Ap p l i d Mathe ma tic s - Ir I

152

e

Ma th / Egr 34 5: I ntroduction to Nu meric al Analysis

-

Jr l (or

So I ) MathlEgr 34 6 : u m erical An a l ys i s - Jr I (or So I ) Egr 354 : Eng ineering A na lys is - J r I I Foul'" a d d i ti nal ho u r s o f o mp u t r science are a l s required a n d

c

c a n be schedu led as appro pnate.

e

SENIOR YEAR AT WASHI NGTON STATE UNIVER S1TY; Com puter Science Option: 6- 1 2 ho ur ' o f math, incl udi n g A d va n ed Ca lc u l us, a nd 1 2 hours of Comp ut er Science. Applied Math Option: 6- 1 2 hours of ma t h , I n cluding A dv a n ce d Calculus, and 1 2 h ou r s of s upport ing a pplied courses. The re m ai n ing courses at PLU m u s t be h ose n to f u l f i l l General UnIversity R equl reme nrs, I n terim requ iremen t s, and one o f the t h ree farcign l a n g u g o pt ion s. St udents in this program must sched u le t h ir courses ca r e f u l l y and are u rged to c on t ac t the Ma�hematics Depa rtment e a rl y in their col lege " a reeT , prefenlbly in their fi rst e m es t er , to des ig n an a pp ropri a t e s ched u le.

c

a e

COURSE OFFERINGS Mathematics 101

INTERM EDIATE ALG E BRA

FINITE MATHEMATICS

T r u t h tables, s e t s , e l e m e n t a r y proba bili t y, m a t rices, l i near program m i ng , Markov cha i n s . Prereq uisi tes : h ig h school a lgebra a nd geometry . I U (4)

MATHEMATICS FOR BUSINESS AND THE BEHAVIORAL SC I E N C ES

Rev iew of a lgebra , m a t ri x t heory and lin ar progra m m i ng, proba bili ty theory, i n t roduction to d i f ferential and i n tegra l calcuJ u . Concepts a re developed i n t o iti ve l y with a p plica­ t i ons . The use of m a t h e m a tical to I s is s tressed t h roug ho u t t he course. Prerequ i sit e : high school a lgebra or 1 01 . I II ( 4 )

1 33

2)

253

M UL TI VARlABLE CALCULUS AND DIffERE NTIAL E Q UA nONS

An i ntroduct i on to vectors , m u l tidimensional calc u l u s , an d di.ffere nt i al equati ns. Em phasis will b e on using thes e topics as tool s for sol Ving physica l probl e ms . Prereq uis i te : 152. I II (4)

G EOMETRY

323

MODERN E L EMENTARY M ATH EMATICS

Concepts u nd e rly i ng traditional comp ut at ional te Lhniq ues; a systemati c a n alysis of a ri th metic ; an i n t u i ti ve a pproach to algebra and geom etry . I n te nded for elementa ry teaching majors. Prereq uiSite to E d . 326. Prereq u i s i te : consen t . I II 5

(4) 324

ALG EBRA AND G EOMETRY FOR THE ELE MENTARY SCHOO L TEACHER

Properties of real n u mbers, l i near a nd q uadratic equa tions and i ne q ua lit ies, co mplex n u m bers , p Iy no mi als , a lgebraic st ru ct u res, Func ti ons ; a s t ud y of i nformal geome try f rom a ma t u re viewpo in t u s i ng modern vocabulary nd nota t ion . Geo metry topics I nclude congruence, SI mi l a r i ty , sym metry, properties of geometry figu res uch a q uad ri l a tera ls a nd ci rcles , and relationships a mong geome t ri al fig u re s . Prerequi si te ; 323 or by place men t exam . n (4)

331

LiNEAR AL GEBRA AND CALCULUS

Vec tors a n d vector spaces, m a t rices, q uadrati c fo rms, linear t ran sformatio n s, m ul tiva riable ca lcu l us . Pre req uisite: 1 5 2 .

II ( 4 )

334

C OLL EG E ALGEBRA A N D TRI GONOMETRY

So l i ng q ua tions , fu ncti o n s, exp n en tials, logari t h m , radia n measure , t rigono met ric identi ties , g rap h i n g a nd o t h er t opics s uc h as c m plex n um bers . Prereq ui s ites : t wo years of h i g h 5 hool al gebra or 1 0 1 o r co n sent . I II (4)

151

DIRECTED R EADING

Foundations of geometry and basic th eory in E ucl idean , projective a n d no n- Eucl idea n geomet ry . Prerequis i te : 1 5 2 or con sen t . a ly 1 980- 8 1 (4)

1 1 2 PLANE TRIGONOMETRY Radian measure , trigo no m et ric a nd inverse trigo n o m e t ric functio n s, i de n t i ties, gra p h i n g , so l u tion of tri a n gles, and complex n u m bers . Prerequisite: t wo years of hig h s hool a lgebra . S t u d e n t s wi t h only one year of h ig h school algebra should take 1 33. I II (2)

128

199

Supervised st udy of topics selec ted t meet the in divid ual's needs or i n terests ; primari l y for s tu de n t s awarded adva.nced placem en t . Adm is sion only by departme n ta l In vi tatio n . ( 1 -

32]

A t h orough review of f i rs t year high school algebra and mate rial beyond qua dratic.s . Doe5 not cou n t toward u n ivers i ty core req u i re m e n t s . I n (2)

'- 127

A N AL YT IC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS

I n t egrat ions, app l ica tion s, a nd tech niq ues of in tegrati on, tran scendental f un ct ions, polar coordi na te , i mproper i n tegra ls , l'Hospital's Rule , infinite series, mat ri ces, applica t ion of computer to t hese a nd related topics. Prereq ui s i t e : Math 1 5 1 , pre- or coreq uisite (effective s p ri n g 198 1 ) : Com Sci 1 39 or o m Sc i 144 r equivalent progra m m ing s k i l ls. I II (4)

ANA LYTIC G E OMETRY AND C A LC ULUS

An l y ti c geom e try, f u nc tio ns , li mi ts, deri va t i ves a nd i n tegral s wi t h a pplica tion s . Prerequi si te: two years of h ig h school algebra a n d trigonome try (o r conc urrent regist ra tion in 1 1 2 ) o r 133 or equ ivale n t . I U (4)

ANALY SIS OF VARIANCE AND E XPERiME NTAL DESIGN R a n do m s a m p l ing, fa tor s which destroy exp erimenta l

desi g n , one-way analysis of variance, two - wa y ana l y s i s o f variance, factored deSig n, bloc k and l a h n sq uare desig n . Stud nts wiU al so critique p u bl i shed e x per i m ent s a n d perform a n experi me n ta l design p roj ec t . Pre requ i site s : St a ti s t i cs 2 3 1 or eq uival ent. I I (2)

---------

M A THE M A TIC S & C O MP UTE R S C I E N C E

81


341

490

MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS

P ro babi li ty t he ory, discrete and con ti n uou s dis tribu tion f u n c t ions, momen t generating f u nctio n s , sa mpli n g dis ­ t ri but i on s and h y pothesis-testi ng; in troduction to re ­ gression, correl a tion , and a na l ysis of variance. Prere q uis i te ;

Math 1 52. II

345

a ly 980- 81 ( 4 )

I NTRODUCTION TO NUMERICAL ANALYSIS

NUM ERICAL ANALYSIS Con tinua t ion of 345, i ncl ud i ng n u merical 346

theory a n d appl ications in t h e a reas of m a t rix t h e ory , nu merica l diffe rentia tion and i n t egra tion , and solution of differ n tia l equations. Prereq uisite: 253 a n d 345 o r consent . I aly 1 97980 taugh t d u ri ng second ha l f of semester) ( 2 )

DIffERENTIAL E Q UATIONS

An i n t rodUCtion to differe n t ial equation s emp ha si z ing the a pp l ie d aspect . First and second ord e r differential equa tions, boundary -val ue and eige nv alue proble ms , power series solu tions, non lin ea r differential eq ua tions , n u mer ica l me thod s , the LaPlace transformat ion. Pre ­ requisi te: Ma th 253. [ a l y 1 980-81 (4)

433, 434

MODERN ALGEBRA

linear Algebra, groups, rings , mod u les, fields, field ex tensions. Pre requisi te : 331, 433 offered [ each year; 434 off ered n aly 1 979-80 (4)

446

MA THEMA TICS I N THE SECONDARY SCHOOL

Methods a nd matena l s in se c o nd ary school m a th teac h i ng . Basic mathe m at ica l conce pt s; principles of n u mbe r op era ti on , relat io n , proof, and problem sol Vi n g in th e co ntext of ari th metic, algebra, and geo metry . Prerequisite: 253 or 331 or equ i v a l e n t . I (2)

455, 456

MA THEMA nCAt ANALYSIS

Ex. tended tr atmen t of topics i ntroduced in el e men tary calcu l u s. Prereq ui site : 253. 455 offered I each year; 456 offere d I I a l y 1 980-8 1 (4)

460

E L E ME NTARY TOPOLOGY

A n i n t roduction to poi nt-set consen t . II a / y 1 979- 80 ( 4 )

486

topology.

Prerequisite ;

SENIOR SEM I NAR

Prese n tation by s t udents of knowledge g a ined i n research under the direc tion of an assigned p rofessor . Required of a l l s e n o r m a t h majors seeking a B.A. or B . S . de gr ee . S e m i n a r program w i l l be held b o t h se mesters, b u t formal regis ­ tration will be in the spring semeste r . Prerequ iSite : sen ior math major or consent of d e p a rt m e n t chai r . U ( 1 )

82

4 9 1 , 492

INDEPE NDENT STUDY

Prereq uisite;

597, 598

c

n s e n t of d e p a r t m e n t c h a i r . I U ( 1- 4 )

G RADUATE RESEARCH

O p e n to mast er's d eg ree ca ndidate s only. Prerequis it e ; con sent of d ep ar tm e n t chai r. I J I ( 1 -4)

N u merical t h eory and a p pli ca ti o n s i n the areas of sol u t ions of equa tions, l i near syste ms, i n ter po l at ion , and approx i ­ m a H o n . Prerequis i te ; 1 52 a n d ( 144 o r 1 4 0) or conse n t . I a / y 1 979- 80 ( taug h t d u ri ng fi rst hal f of semester) ( 2)

35 1

SEMfNAR

Prerequisi te : consent of dep ar t m e nt chair. ( 1- 4 )

C OURSE OFFERINGS Com puter Science 1 39

BASIC I

140

BASIC n

In t rod uc tion t o i n t er ac t i v e comp u t ing, bran ch i ng, looping, s u b scrip ts, a nd func tio n s i n the co ntex t of the BASIC language . (Students wi s hi n g proficiency in BA S I C should also take Com Sci 1 40) . I 1 \ a n d I n teri m ( l) Con t i n ua t ion of 1 39 i ncl ud i ng inpu tloutpu t, character va ri a b les, subrou tines a n d s i m ple file tech niques in BASIC. (Students m a y enroll i n 1 3 9 a nd 1 4 0 d u ri ng the same semes ter or d i f ferent se mes ters ) . Prerequis i te ; 139 or equi valent or i n s t ructor's conse n t . I U and Lnterim ( 1 )

1 4 1 BASIC I I I Co m p u t e r science a n d extended BA S IC i n cluding adva nced character string and file ma ni p u l a t ion s , com uter orga n i ­ zation , progra m mi ng a ppl ica tions . Prereq u i s i t e ; 1 4 0 or e qu iva len t . ( Students c a n not receive credit for both 1 4 1 a n d 1 44 ) II ( 1 ) 144

INTROD UCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENC E

Co m pu ter science a n d a worklng knowledge o f FORTRAN for both n u meric and no nn u m e r i c p urpose u s i n g bot h in teractive and batch m odes , in trod uc tion t o fil e use, organizalion, p rogram m in g a pp l ica t i ons to complement stude n ts' i ntere s t. Prerequ isi te ; Ma th 1 2 7, 128, or 133 or equivalent. Previous progra m m i ng experience uch as C om Sc i 1 3 9 recommended for non­ science studen t s . [ II (4)

co m p ute r

199

DIRECTE D READING

242

COBOL

Sup ervi sed s tu dy of topics select d to meet the individu l's need or in tere s ts; pri m a ri l y for s t ude n t s a wa rded adva nced plac eme n t i n comp uter science. Admission on l y by dep a r t me n ta l i nv i ta tion . ( 1 -2)

COBOL p rog ram m i n g with e m phasis o n bu si ness app li­ cation s including use of a u x i l iary storage. Prereq ujsi te: 140 or 1 4 4 . 1 1 aly 1 97 9- 80 (2) 244

ASSEMBt Y LANG UAG E PROG RAMMING

Computer a s s e mbly lang uage, i nst ru ction exec ution, addreSSi ng tec h ni q ues , re presen ta t ion of da ta, macro defi n i tio n, program segmentation and l i nk.1g e . Pre­ req ui s i te : 144 r 1 4 1 o r c on s e n t . I I a ly 198 0- 81 (2)

MATHE M ATIC S & C O M P UT E R S C I E N C E


248 Study

I NTRODUCTION TO SOfTWARE D E S I G N of

various

computa tion al

searc hi ng,

sorting,

r a n dom

me thods

processes,

and

including sta tistical

calcula tio n s . Prereq ui sites: C o m sci 1 4 0 o r 1 4 4 , Math 1 2 8 o r

1 5 1 . II ( 2 ) 344

I NTRODUCTION TO DISCRETE STRUCTU R E S

I n troduction s t ructure s,

and

a pplica tions

e lementary

logic,

of and

set

theory,

d i sc re te

combi n a t o r i c s .

Pre足

req u i s i t e : 1 4 4, 2 4 8 . I a / y 1 9 8 1 - 8 2 (2)

348 MATHEMATICAL MODELS St u d y of devel o p m e n t of ma t h e m a tical models used in various fi elds of a p plica tion . Prereq u i s i t e s : Ma t h 1 5 2, Com Sci 248 ( C o u n t s towa rd m a t h major) . LI a Iy 1 980- 8 1 ( 2 ) 444 DATA STRUCTURES Study f data structures incl uding s t rings, l i s t s , queues, s tack s, tre e s , a n d files; a log r i t h m s for search a n d sorting data struct ures, me thods of memory m a n a g e m e n t . Prere q u i s i te ; Com S c i ( 1 4 1 or 1 4 4 ) a n d 248. I a / y 1 9 80-81 ( 2 )

4 9 1, 492 I ND E PE N D E N T STUDY Prereq uisite : C o n s e n t of depa r t mental c h a i r . ( 1 - 4 )

C OU RSES OFFERED IN THE 1 979 INTERIM 308 316 319

FINANCIAL MATH E MATI CS C OMPUTER S A N D SOCJETY A H lSTORY O F MATHEMATI C S

MATHE MATI C S & C OMPUT E R S C I E N C E

83


Modern and Classica a guages Foreign l anguage learning provides an urgen tl y nee ded element i n our dome st ic a n d gl oba l comm u n i t y : the ability to com m u n icate effectively with and w i t h i n other cult ures . Th roug h the med i u m of la nguage, students increase their kn owledge of the contribu tio ns other peoples have made to civiliza tion , history, l i te ra t u re , and the arts and sc.ie nc es . The De partmen t o f Modern a nd dassical L a ng uages in coope ration w i th s ev e ral E u rope an uni ve rs it ies p rovides s pecific students wi th a n opport u n i t y t o s tud y abroad i n F rance, Spain, Ge rman y, Aus tria (Vienna), and Sca ndinavia. FACU LTY

Spangler, C!r a ; r; R. Brown, Carleton, faye, Payne, Predmore, Rasmussen, Reavis, Sudermann, R . Swenson, Toven, Webster; assisted by Pilgri m.

There a re n o depa r tm e n t a l p rerequisites for t h e study of fore ig n la nguages . Pote n t i a l m jors are, howeve r, encouraged to o b ta i n as m uch high sc hool p.epa ration as po ss ible . St udents

w i t h pre vi o u s experience may qualify for placement into i n termedia te or d v a nced courseďż˝. To determine t h e approp riate leve l s t u d e n t s are encou.age d to take t h e language p lace men t exa mination at the begi n n in g of th fall semes t e r or to con s u l t w it h a departmental ad vise r. Tho se qualifying for a d v a nced placem nt may also recei v e redit t oward the m aj or for ork co m pl e t ed in h igh s c hool, t h u s enabling them to pursue a second maj r . M a j o r and m i n o r p.ogTams a r e a va i lab l e in Classics, F.ench, Ge r m a n , Nor wegia n a nd p a n ish . De par tmen ta l cou rses a re a primary component in the I n terdiscip l i nary majors ffered i n C l a ssics a n d Scandinavian Area S t udies. Minors a re also offer d in Greek a nd La tin . BACHELOR OF A RTS: M ajor in F rench , Gem",n or S p a n i s h - Mi nim um of 3 2 semester hours beyond 1 0 1 - 1 02, including 201, 202, 3 2 1 , 3 5 1 , 352, p l u s u p pe r -d i v is ion electi ves, including at lea s t fo u r semester h o u r s o f literat ure. Spa n ish 3 2 2 may be subs t i t u t e d for Spanish 321 Maj or in Norwegian - M i n i m u m o f 32 s e m e . ter hour. , in l ud i n g J 01, 1 02, 201, 202, 351, 352, and a t I a s t one o f t h e 400-level lIterature cou r s e s from Sca ndina vi a n S t ud ies .

84

MODE R N & C L ASSICAL LANGUA G E S


Maior in Cla ssics - 40 se mester hours, including eight seme � t r hours f Gr eek and eight semeste r hours of La tin and an addi tional eight hours of either Greek or La t i n . Rem a i ning co rses are s ele c ted in consu ltati n wit h the lassies Coordi na tor. Maj or in Scandinavian Area Studies - 40

se mester hours, including sixteen semester hours i n Da nish, Norwegian, or Swedish and four semester hours each in Scand inavian literature and Scandinavian history. Remaining courses are sele ted in cons ultation with the program coo rdina tor. See the Special Progr ams section of t his catalog for addition a l informa tion about the i nterdepart mental maj r ......

programs in Classics and Scandinavian Area S tudies.

MINOR I N FRENCH, G E RMAN, NORWEG I A N, OR SPANISH - 24 s e mester hours, including 1 0 1 , 102, 201, 202,

3 5 1, and one othe r upper division course. MlNOR TN CLASSICS (GREEK O R LATIN) - 20 semester hours which ma y include 1 0 1 - 1 0 2. Courses In all minors programs will be chosen in consulta tion with a departmental adviser. Advan ed place ment may be gran ted .

BACH ElOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION: Students enrolled in this progra m ar required to take 445. For further details, s e School of Edu a tion.

C OU RSE OFFERING S

2 0 1 , 202 INITR M E DIATE F R E N C H A con ti n u ation of elemen t a ry French ; readi ng selections w hich re.flec t the F r nch c ul tu ral h eri tage as well as con temp rary m a te r i a l s . Laboratory attendance req u i re d . I II (4, 4)

205, 206

321

C IVll lZATION A N D CULTURE

Presen t-da y France as reflected i n c u r r e n t litera t u re, periodicals, television and films, wri t ten c m posi tion s a n d ora l reports; cond ucted i n French . Prere q u i s i t e : French 202. (4)

35 1 , 352

1 00

E NG LISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE

COM POSITION AND CONVERSA TION

Ad a nced gra m mar, s tylistics, composition and conver­ sation on curre n t topics; conducted in Fre n c h . P r e­ requisite: 202. I 1I ( 4 , 4)

4 21 , 422 L-

FRENCH CONVERSATION

Offers the opport unity for practice in F rench con versa tion i n a n informal setting d u ring the n oon lunch hour. All s tudents w i t h a basic knowledge of Fren ch a re invited to participa te. Conversa tion may i nclude recent news events, con temp rary life, or other topics o f s tude n t interest . Pass lFail n l y . I II (1)

M ASTERPI-rCE S OF FRENCH LITERATURE

A co urse adapted to the needs of students whose native language is not English. Course content will emphasize idiom, especially American usage, vocabulary bujlding, comprehen sion, a n d i n tonation. Considerable oral practice, with goal of improving fluency i n speaking. (4)

Au thors repres n ta ti v of major periods from the Middle Ages through the n i n etee n t h century; the s tyle and s tructure and the moral and artistic i n te ntions of such u thors as Rabelais, Montaig ne, Moliere, Cornei lIe, Pascal , Vol ta i re, Rousseau, Hugo a n d Ba udelaire. Prer e q ui site: 202. I II a ly ( 4, 4)

400

431, 432

STRUCTURAL LINGUISTICS

he study of the n a tu re of language; principles and tec h ni q ues of descripti e l a ng uage a n l ysis; ele men ta ry a ppl ica tion of l inguistic analysis to selected m a terials. N o prerequisi tes . (4)

445

M E THODOLOGY OF TEACHlNG FOREIG N LANG UAG ES

Theory a nd te c hniqu e s of fo reign language teaching ; spec.ia l problems in the s t uden t's major ta n guage; e m phasis on audio-ling ua l tech nique s. (2)

4 91, 492 (1-4)

lNDEP-rNDENT STUDY

Major twentieth century writers; emphasis o n the period i nce W rid War I I . Prereq uisite: 202. I II a l y (4, 4)

442

HISTORY OF ROMA NCE LANGUAGES

Th e h i s torical develo ment of Roma nce Languages with refe rence to c u rre n t la nguage s; same a s Spanish 442. I I aly

(4).

4 9 1, 492

I N DEPENDENT STUDY

( 2- 4 )

597, 598

G RA DUATE RESEARCH

(2-4)

French 1 0 1, 1 02

TWENTI ETH CENTURY F RE N C H LITERATURE

ELEMENTARY fRENCH

Essen tials of p ron u ncia tion, i n tona tion and s tructure; basic skil l s i n Lstening, speaking, readi ng and writing. Labora­ tory a ttendance re qui red . I II (4, 4)

German 1 0 1, 102

E LE M E NTARY GERMAN

In troduction to the Ge rma n la ng u age. Basic skill of oral and written comm u nica tion in c lassroom and labora tory p ractice. Use of materials refl e cti n g con tempora ry German life. Meets five hours wee I y . I II (4, 4)

M O D E R N & C L A S SI C A L L A N G UAG E S

85


201, 202 INTERMEDlA TE G ERMAN Contin ued practice i n o r a l and writ t en comm unication i n c i a sroom and labora tory. U s e of ma terials which reflect con temporary life as well as the German c u l t ural heritage. C ncur re n t e n roll m e n t in German 205 ( 206) is encouraged . Meets four hours weekly. I U (4, 4)

491, 4 9 2 (2-4)

INDEPENDENT STUDY

59 7, 598 (2-4)

G RA DUATE STUDY

205, 206 G ERMAN CONVE RSATION Offers t h e opportuni ty for practice in German con er­ sati n i n a n i n formal set t i ng d u ring the n on lunch h o u r . A l l s t u e n t s w i t h a ba ic knowledge f G e r m a n are in vited to pa rticipa te. C onversa t ion may i nclude recent news events, con te m po ra ry life, or o t h e r topics of s t udent in te rest . Pass / F a i l only . [ n ( 1 )

G reek

3 2 1 G E RMAN C lVIUZA TION Germ n cul t ural a n d l i nguis tic h istory from the 1 7t h ce n t u ry to t h e prese n t . A e s t he tic and his torica J considera­ t ion of represen ta t i ve works Fr m the E n l ig h te n m e n t , the Age of Goe the, the 1 9t h a nd 20th enturies. Prereq uis ite: 202 or equival n t . 11 a /y (4)

201, 202 INTERMEDIATE GREE K Selected ko ine readings from Hellenistic G reek l i te r a t u re with major e m phasis on the New Testa men t . I Il (4, 4 )

35 1 , 3 5 2

C OM POSITION AND CONVERSA TION

In tensive review of g ra m m a r with emphasi on idiomatic u sage; use of con temporary aut ors as models of style. Conversati n O n topics of student in tere t . Conducted i n G e r m a n . Prerequ i si te : 2 0 2 or equivale n t . [ II (4, 4) 42 1

G E RMAN LITERATURE: THE AGE OF G O ETHE

Represe n tative works from the Enligh tenment to Goethe's death, circa 1 750- 1 832, in l uding torm a nd S t ress, Classicism and Romanticism. Prerequisite: 202 or equiv­ a le n t . I a / y ( 4 ) 422

GERMAN LITERATURE: THE N I N ETEENTH C E NTURY

R e resen ta t ive works from the various l i t e rary move m e n ts of the n i ne teen t h ce n t u ry, 1820- 1 890, i ncluding Bieder­ meier, Young Germany and Realis m . Prerequi si te : 2 0 2 o r e q u i valen t. I I a / y (4) 431

GERMAN L ITERATURE: THE TWENTIETH C ENTURY

Rep resen ta ti ve work of German l i tera t u re from Na t u ­ ralism to E x pression ism, 1 890- 1 92 5 . Prerequisite: 202 or equivalent. [ a / y ( 4 ) 4 3 2 CONTEMPORARY G ERMAN LITERATURE Re presen ta tive works from 1 925 to the present; au thors Fr m East nd West Germany, A u s tria and S wi tzerland. P rerequisite: 202 or equivalent. II a/y (4) 4 4 2 HISTORY OF THE GERMAN LANGUAGE H istorical development of G e rman with reference t o conte mporary language; conducted in German. Pre­ requisite: 202. II a / y ( 4 )

86

C u rrently offered cooperatively w i t h t h e U n i v e r s i t y of Puget Sound on o u r c a m p u s .

1 0 1 , 1 02 ELEME NTARY GREEK Basic s k i l l s in read ing C lassical, Koine, and Pa tristic G reek. I [J (4, 4 )

4 2 1 , 422

M ASTERPIECES OF G R E E K LITERATURE

Available through con s u l tation Prereq uisites: 1 0 1, 1 02 . I I I ( 4 , 4 ) 4 9 1 , 4 92 (2-4)

with

the depa r t m e n t .

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Latin u rrently offered coope ratively w i t h t h e Universit y of Puget Sound o n o u r campus.

1 0 1 , 1 02

ELEM ENTARY LATIN AND ENGLISH WORD BUILDrNG

Basic s k i l l s in reading L a tin; excursions i n to Roma n h is tory and my h logy; English vocabulary b u ilding from Latin a nd E nglish word cons truction from L a t i n a te prefixes and s u ffixes a re e m pha ized. [ II ( 4 , 4) 201, 202 INTERMEDIATE LATIN L yric a n d e pic poet ry, its tra nsla tion a n d adaptation by English a n d A merican poets; the second semester includes t h e reading of an I ta lian a u t ho r . I L l (4, 4) 4-9 1 , 492 (2-4)

I N DEPENDENT STU D Y

Norwegian 1 0 1 , 1 02 E L E MENTARY NORWEGIAN I n trod uces t h e s t udents to the pleasure of speaking, readu1g and w riting a foreign lang uage. These skills are developed t h rough a conve rsa tional approach, using songs and o t her c u l t ural m a terials, s well as a u dio-visual media. I I I (4, 4) 201, 202 I NTERME DI ATE NORWEGIAN Develops the students' command of t h e language w h i le f u r ther acq u a i n ti ng them w i th the Norwegian cul tural heritage. Reading selections in trod uce the 'Students to I orwegian short stories, poetry, novels, and plays. I II (4, 4 )

MODERN & CLASSICAL LANGUAGES


351

CONVERSA nON A N D C OMPOSITION: FOLKTALES

201, 202

Develops the s t uden ts' abili ty to express thems�lves well in the la nguage. orall y and in writing . Selected folktales and other material will be used as mode l s of style and usage. Prerequisite: 202 or e q u i v alen t ( 4 ) .

352

ADVANC ED CONVERSAnON AN D C O MPOSITION: BALLADS AND POETRY

Develops the s tuden ts' command of the language by empha s izing the fi ner poi n ts of s t ru c t u re s t y l e . and good t aste . T h e subject ma tter will be selected poetry fro m the beg i nnin g to the presen t . Prerequisi t e : 351 or equivalen t . (4 ) ,

4 9 1 . 4 92

(2-4)

INDEPENDENT STUDY

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH

A continuation of eleme n t a ry Spanish ; reading selections w h ich reflect the Hispanic cultural heritage as w e l l as contemporary mate rials . Labor tory attenda nce req uired . I J1 ( 4 , 4)

205, 206

SPA N IS H CONVERSATION

Offers the opportunity f o r practice i n S panish conversation i n an i n formal s e t ting d u rin g the noon l u n ch hou r. All

students with a basic knowledge of Spanis h are i nvi ted to participate. C on v e rsa tion may include recen t news ev n ts, con tempora ry l i fe, or other to p ic s of student i n terest. Pass l Fail onl y I II ( 1 ) .

3 2 1 CIVIL IZA nON A N D CULTURE Historic and artistic ele men ts which have shaped Spanish thou g h t a n d behavior from the b e g i n n i n g s to the present; conducted in Span is h Prerequisite : 202 J (4) .

322

3 2 1 VIKINGS AND EMIGR ANTS Highlights of Scandinavian history, from the beginning to the present. E mphasis on period s a n d ways in w h ich Scandi navia has con tributed to world his tory . Readings i n th e origi n al for majors; class conducted i n E n g li s h I aly (4)

Historic, art is tic, l i te r a ry sociological a n d geog raphic elements shaping th e development of t h e Spa nish-speaking New World. Both H ispanic and non-Hi spanic elements will be studied. Prerequisi te : 202 or four years of high school Spanish . II (4)

.

322 '-

LATIN AMERICAN CIVILiZATION AND C ULTURE

Scandinavian

MODERN SCANDINAVIAN CIVILIZA TION

351, 352

Scandinavian cu ltura l h i story from the beg i n n i ng to the presen t. Discussion of litera tu re, m usic, visual arts, and their backg rou n ds , as we ll as soci a l a n d political issues. Readings In the origi n a l for m a j o r s ; class conducted i n ngl i sh d i y (4)

421

I BSEN, STRINDBERG, AND THEIR CO NTEM PORARIES

Selected authors from the roman tic a n d r ea l is t ic periods i n Scandinavian l i te ra ture. R eadin g s in the original for majors; c lass conducted in E n g l i s h a l y (4) 422

CONT EMPORARY SCANDINAVIAN L ITERATURE

L i tera tu re in all ge n res, re flect i ng curre n t trends and issues i n Scandinavia. Readings in the ori g i n al for majors; class cond ucted in E nglish. aly ( 4 ) 4 9 1 . 492 (1-4)

I N DEPENDENT STU D Y

1 0 1, 102 E L E M ENTARY SPANISH Esse n tials of pron unciatio n, i n tonation and s tructure, basic skill in l isten i ng. spe aki n g reading and w riti ng. Labora­ tory at tenda nce re q u ired 1 n ( 4 , 4) .

COMPOSITION AND CONVE RSA TION

Topics of curre n t interest as a basis fo r i mproved oral and written expression; conducted in Spani h . Prerequisite: 202. I II (4. 4) 421, 422

M ASTERPIECES O F mSPANfC LITE RATUR E

A l l genre s of major l i terary works from t h e POrntll del Cid. to 1 8 98; forces which produced the literature; appreciation of l i terature as a work of art, Pre requis ite; 202. I n a l y (4, 4 ) 431, 432

TWENTIETH CENTURY HISPANIC LITERATURE

The first semester deals with the litera ture of Spain from the " Generacion de '98" to the presen t . The second emes ter deals with the litera ture o f Spanish America from the modemista m ovemen t ( 1 888) to the present. E m phasis on period will vary . (4, 4) 442 HISTORY OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES Hi s loncal developme n t of Romance l anguages w i t h reference t o current l a ng uage; same as French 442. I I a l y (4)

Spanish

,

.

4 9 1 , 4 92 ( 2- 4 )

IND EPENDE N T STUDY

COURSES OffERED IN THE 1 979 INTERIM 303 305

GERMAN DECADENCE: INTELLECT AND POLITICS IN WEIMAR G ER M A NY I NTRODUCTION TO SPOKE N SPANISH

M O D E RN & C L A S SI C A L L A N G UAGE S

87


Mus·c The m usic d e pa r t m e n t offers prog r a ms for s tude n ts seeking in tensive train ing i n m us ic history a n d l i t e ra t u re, t h eo ry and co m posi tion, sac red m u si c , a n d performance. The curricu Ju m is a l so des igned for s t u d e n t s plan ning careers in m u s i c educa tion, as well as t hose s t ude n t s who wish to increase their gene ral m usical knowledge and a ppreciation. Pacific L utheran Universi ty's Depart men t o f M us ic is noted bo t h regio nally and n ationally for i t s pe rforming ensembles, which incl udes C hoir of the Wes t, U n i ve rsity C h orale, Conce r t Choir, U n iversity Si n gers, Vocal Jazz E n s e m bl e, U niversi ty W i nd E nse m ble, U n i versi t y Concert Band, Jazz E ns e mble, U n i versity Sy m phony Orche st r a , a n d Conte m porary D i rections E n s emble.

fACULTY Skones, Cha ir; Dahl, Farner, Card, C. Gilbertson, Humic, Hoffman, C. K napp, Kracht, L. Meyer, B. Poulshock, Robbins, Tremaine, Vaught; assisted by S. Anderson, Byrnes, Frohnmayer, G rainger, Harty, Irwin-Brandon, S. Knapp, Kruse, Leavens, McCarty, Moore, Pease-Clark, S. Peterson, N. Poulshock, Schi ndler, Schulman, Shapiro Smith, Thom pson, Timmerman, Ziegenfelder.

S tude n ts i n t e n d i n g to major in m usic s hould begin the major m usic seq uences i n the first year. Fail ure to do so may mean an ex t r a s e m este r or year to complete the majo r p rogra m .

Music majors should fill o u t a declaration o f major form d u ri ng their first semester of e n roll m en t in the program and be assigned to a music fa culty adviser.

Only grades of "C" o r bet ter in m u s ic cou rses may be counted t owa rd a m u sic major. Co u rses in which the s t u d e n t r�ejve5 l o w e r t h a n a "C" m u s t be repea ted u n l e s s s u bs t i t u te course work is au thori 1.ed by the depa r t me n t . BACHElOR Of ARTS MAJOR: Ma x i m u m of 40 semester hou Ts including 1 1 1 , 1 2 3, 1 2 4, 1 25, 1 26, 1 3 2, 223, 2 2 4 , 225, 2 26 , 231 , 2 32 plu s 4 hours of ense m ble; 6 hours of literatu re / theory electives f r o m 32.7-339, 4 2 6 - 43 8 ; 8 hours o f privat'e i n s t r uc tion, piano (m ini m u m class level 2). [n addition to requirements j.isted above, a ndid ates fo r the B.A. deg ree must meet t he fo rei g n la nguage r e q u ire m e n t in t h e College of Arts and Sciences.

BB

MUSIC


BACHElOR Of ARTS IN EDUCATION: Consu l t the School

o f Ed uca tion a n d the Drparlm",1 of Music pr 1. 2. 3.

T he depa r t m en t of g ra ms: B a c h e lor of M usic B a helor o f M usic Bach�lor o f Music Bachelor of M u s ic

Handbook.

m u s ic also offers the following degree in in in in

Piano Performance Organ Performance Vocal Performance I n s t ru me n t a l Perform a n c e

5 . Sa h e l o r of M u sic in T h e o r y and C o m p o s i tion 6 . B ach e l o r of Arts in EducOltion - E l e m e n t a ry M us ic S pecialist 7 . B ache l o r o f Arts in E d ucation - Se onda ry and Elemen tary I n s t r u me n t al 8 B ach e l r o f Arts i n E d uca t ion - Se c o n d a r y Choral 9 . M a s ter of M u s i c Ed ucation Con s u l t t h e Deparlmenl of M usic Handbook. a vailable in the m u sic o ffice, for com ple te det a i l s concern i n g r e q u i r ed courses, re co m men d e d four-year pro g r a m s b y the semes ter, p rogress ch a rt s and o t h e r p e rt i n e n t i n fo r m a ti o n . Con s u l t tne Graduale Cala /08 f o r d e t a i l s of t h e Master o f M usic

progra m .

C OURSE OFFER I N G S 101

INTRODUCTION T O MUSIC

I n trod uction to m usic l i terat u re with e m p hasis on li s t e n i ng, structure, peTiod and style. De s ig n ed to enhance the enj y me n t a n d u n de rs ta n d i n g of m u s i c . Not op n t o m a ; r s . (4)

132

201

CLASS INSTRUCTION PIANO (1)

202

PRI VATE INSTRUCTION: PIANO (1-4)

20 3

PRI V A TE INSTRUCTION: ORGAN ( 1 -4)

204

PRI VATE AND CLASS I NSTRUCTION: VOICE (1-4)

205

PRI VATE INSTRUCTION: VIOLIN /VIOLA ( 1-4)

206

PRI VATE INSTRUCTION: CELLO/BASS (1-4)

207

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: F L UTE (1-4)

208

PRI VATE INSTRUCTION: OBOE / E NG LISH HORN (1 -4)

209

PRIVATE INSTR UCTION : BASSOON (1-4)

210

PR1 VATE I N STRUCTION: CLARINET ( 1-4)

211

PRIVATE I NSTRUCTION: SAXOPHONE ( 1 4)

212

PRIVATE I NSTR UCTION: TRUMPET (1 -4)

213

PRIVATE I NSTR UCTION: F RENCH HORN ( 1 -4 )

214

PRIV A TE INSTRUCTION: TROM BONE/B ARITONE ( 1-4)

215

PRI VATE INSTRUCTION: TUBA ( 1-4)

216

PRI VATE INSTRUCTION: PERC USSION (1-4)

21 7

PRIVATE AND CLASS INSTR UCTION: GUIT AR (1-4)

218

PRI VATE INSTRUCTION: HARP ( 1 -4)

219

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: HARPS I CHORD (1-4)

111

MUSIC SURVEY An overview o f m u si ca l language, m u sical forms, and t h e evolut ion of m us ical s t yle , the cou rse pr vldes an opport u n ity to eva lu ate m u s ic a s a possible major and

career. The e n t i r e m usic facul t y w i l l be u t ilized to help provide fou ndation for a l l o t h e r m usic courses. Open to ma; rs and prospe t i ve majors, and required for enteri ng fre h men w h o will be cont inu i ng i n any m usic u rric u l u m . (2) 123

THEORY 1

T h e t u d y of m usical terms, fund a men tals , notat ion, melody wri t i n g , and harmonization th rou g h a n a l y s i s a n d writing. ( 2 ) 124

THE OR Y 11

A c o n t i n u a t i on of M u s ic 123. ( 2 ) 1 2 5 EAR TRAINING I Developme nt of a u ral skills in s i mple rhyth mic dicta tion, i n terva ls , s ig h t -si ng i ng using progressive exercises con­ sisting o f short melodies. (1) 126

EAR TRAINING II

Con ti n ued deVI'l pment of a u ral skills i n sigh t-singing, melodic and rhyth mic dicta tion. Elementary h a rmonic dicta t i o n . ( 1 )

MUSIC HISTORY I

The evolu tion of Western m usic from t h e early C hristian era through the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Prerequisite: A rabic rn . ( 2 )

O n e h a l f - h o u r priva te, or two o n e - h o u r c l a s s l e s s o n s p e r w e e k i n a d d i t i o n to daily ou tside practice. S t udents receiving p er m ission t o register for t w o se mester h o u rs of cred i t will receive two one-h al f hour private lessons p er week. S t u d e n t s in p ian o, voice and g u i ta r m a y be assigned to class i n s t r uc t io n a t t h e d iscretion of t h e music facul t y . S p ecial fee i n addition t o t u i tion.

2 2 3 TH EORY I I I S y s t e m a tiC s t u d y of emergent t heoretical c o n s t r u c ts from

the 18th and 1 9 t h c e n t u ry a s repres ented in litera t u re of t h a t peTiod . ( 2 )

M U SI C

89


224 TH EORY I V Systematic s t udy o f e mergent theoretical constructs from the 20th century as represented in litera tu re o f that period. (2) 225 EAR TRAINING ill Advanced a u ral skills t h rough ex tended rhyt h m s and melodies. E m ph asis on harmonic d ictation. ( 1 ) 2 2 6 EAR TRAINING I V Sigh t-singing, includlng pan-tonal melodies . Harmonic dictation of modulatory chord progressions i nvolving chromatic alteration . Advanced Ihythmic dictation. ( 1 ) 23 1 MUSIC l-D STORY 11 T h e evolu h o n of m u s i c i n Baroque a n d Classical Eras ( 1 6001827 . Prerequisite; Arabic l i t . (3) 2 3 2 MUSIC H I STORY III The evolution of m usic i n the Romantic Era . Literature of the 20th Century: Early development and curre n t trends. Prerequisite : Arabic m. (3) 24 1 -242 STRING L ABORATOR Y Me thods a nd m a terials of teaching and playing string instrume n ts in the p u blic schools. ( 1, 1) 24 3-244 WOODW IND LABORATORY Methods and ma terials o f teac hing and playing woodwind instruments in the public schools. ( 1, 1) 24 5-2 4 6 BRASS LABORATORY Methods and mate ria ls of teaching and playing brass instruments in the public schooL . ( 1 , 1 ) 247 PERC USSI O N LA BORATORY Methods and materials of teaching and playing percussion instruments in the public schools. ( 1) 249

ELECTRONIC MUSIC LABORATORY

A laboratory experience dealing with m a terials and methods of element a ry Elec tronic music synthesis . Real足 time experience in the electronic Music S t udio, as well as discussion of various popular syn t hesizers, electronic m usic aesthetics, and the use o f electronic instru ments in secondary educa tion. ( 1 ) 3 2 3 L IN E ARITY I linear-structural analysis of literat u re of the 20th and 1 9t h cen tu ries; in tIoduction to Schenkerian a n alysis; writing and performance experience in the contrapuntal styles of these periods . (2) 324 L I N E AR ITY IJ L inear-structural a nalysis of litera t u re of the 1 8th a n d 16th centuries; further refi nement of analytical techniques, w riting a nd performance experience in the contrapuntal styles of these periods. Prereq uisite: Music 323. ( 2) 325 KEYBOARD HARMONY Development of a functional use of harmony a t the keyboard. I mprovisation and score reading. aly (2)

90

M U SI C

326 ORCHESTRA nON The range, transposition, sound and technical character足 istics of instru me n ts . Notation, scori ng and arrangi ng for conventional and u nique instrument g roupings. Pre 足 requisite : Music 224 . aly (2) 3 2 7 C OMPOSITION A systematic approach to con tempora ry mu sical co m足 pos ition; s tudents create and notate works for solo, small and large ensembles. May be repeated for addition a l credi t . ( 1-4) All musi c l i te r... t u re courses n u m bered from 331 to 33 9 are open to all university e n roll ment wi t h o u t prerequ isi te.

331 MUSIC Of JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH A s tudy o f selected works representing each of the primary areas o f the creative genius o f ) . S . Bach . aly (2) 332

ORNAM ENTATION AND PERfORMANCE PRACTICES OF THE BAROQUE

A p ractical study of vocal and i nstrumenta l orna me ntation as i t evolved in the 1 7th a n d 1 8 t h ce nturi es . aly (2) 333

MUSIC OF HAYDN AND MOZART

Sc ofe analysis and s tudy of t h e h istorical significance o f

selec ted works of Haydn a n d Mozart . aly ( 2 ) 3 3 4 MUSIC Of BEETHOVEN A general s u rvey with in-depth study o f selected works . aly (2) 3 3 5 LATE NIN ETEENTH CE NTURY MUSIC A s u rvey of selected m usic of Wagner, B r uckner, Mahler a nd Strauss. a l y ( 2 ) 336 CHAMBER MUSIC LITERATURE A gene ral survey with in-depth t udy of selected cha m ber works for representative genres. aly (2) 337 THE N I N ET E E NTH C ENTURY ART SONG A study o f selected art song literature of Sch u bert, S humann, Brahms, Wolf, S tra uss, Beethoven, Fau re, Debussy, and DuParc . Style analysis and in terpretation with performance in class. a ly (Z) 338 H I STORY OF OPERA A general s u rvey with in-deptb study of selected opera scores. aly (2) 339 H I STORY OF J AZZ STYLES A su rvey of the evolution of jar.z from 1 900 to p rese n t, including early developmen t and trends . al y ( 2 ) 34 1 MUSIC IN THE ELEM ENTARY SCHOOL Methods and procedures for the classroom teacher In developing the v a rious m usic activities in the elementary school. Offered in the Fall Semester for s tudents p repa ring to become Music Special ists. Offered in t he S pring Semester for those students preparing for eleme n t a ry classroom teaching . (2)


343

VOCAL J AZZ TECHNIQUES

M e th ods , li te ra t u r e , s ty l e and tech nique for the ocal jazz ense mb le . E m p ha si s on t h e acquisit ion of s kills n eces sa ry for teach ing vocal j a zz in t h e secon d ary s c hool. ( 1 )

3 4 4 J AZZ LABORATORY E N S E M BL E R ehearsa l and study of rep re se nt a t ive jazz l i teratu re, d es ig n e d for s t ud e n ts u n famili a r w i t h j azz i d ioms . Prereq uisite : Consent of the instructor. ( 1 ) 345

BASIC CONDUCTING

In trod u tion to b a s ic p a t tern s , gestu res a n d con d uc t i ng tech n iq ues; ap p l i c a t io n to appropri a t e vocal and in s t r u 足 me.n t a l scores. ( 2 ) 349

E L ECTRONI C MUSIC PRACTICUM

A pp li c. a t ion of e l ectro n i t ec hn iq u e s to comp si tional p ro ce s s . For non-composi tion ma j o r s o n l y . A s signed s t udio time on a reg u la r ba s i s . P re re qu i s i t e : M u s ic 24 9. ( 1 ) 351

ACCOMPANYING

P ract i ce in ac o mpany i ng: represen t a t ive i n s t r u m e n ta l s o l o l i t er a t u re from all p e riods . 35 2

vocal

and

(1)

ORGAN IMPROVISATION

B a s ic tech n i q ue s f i mprovisation, par t ic u l a rly as r e la t ed to hymn t u n e s a/y ( 2 )

353

S O L O VOCAL llTERA T U R E

Su rvey o f sol 354

vocal litera t u r . ( 2 )

PERFORMANCE TECHNIQUES s tag e

presence a n d p roced u re s for pe.rforming vocal a n d i n s t r u m e. n t a l m u s ic . I ncludes the h i tonea l a s p e ts of per fo r m a n ce , progra m p l a n n i ng, wa rd robe, s tage poise a n d m e m o r i z i ng . a/y (2)

T e h niq ues

of

3 6 0 CHOIR OF THE WEST A t ud y o f c ho r al l i t r a t u re a n d tec h n i q u e t h r o u g h re h ea rs a l and p e r f orm a n ce of both s a c re d and sec u l a r m u sic. A udi t i o n s a t t h e begi n n i n g of F a l l S e m e s t e r . ( 1 ) 36 1

UN1V ERSITY CHORALE

chora l litera t u re a n d tec h ni q u e t h ro ug h rehea r sal and p e r f o r m an e of both sa cre d a n d secu la r m u sic. E m p h a s i s on i ndividual vo al d e velop m e n t t h r ug h choral s in g i n g . A u d i tions at t h e beginning of Fall Semes t r . A

s t udy

of

(1 )

362 CONCERT CHOIR A s tu d y o f ch f a l l i tera t u re a n d tech ni q u e t h ro u g h re hea rsa l and pe r fo rma n ce of bo t h sacred a n d s ec u l a r m n s i c . E m p h a si s on i n d i v id u al v a l develo p m e n t t h ro u g h c h o ra l s i n g i n g . A ud i t io n s a t t h e beg i n n i. ng of F a l l S e me s te r . (1) 363

UN IVERSITY SINGERS

A s t udy o f c h o ral li terat u re and t ec h ni qu e th ro ugh reh e a r sa l a nd p er f rmance of bo t h s a c red and secular mu ie. Emphasis on individual v oca l de ve l op m e n t th r o u g h c hora l s i ng i ng . Open to all s t u de n t s in the Uni e r s i t y n d i n t e r e s te d c o m m u n i t y m u s ic i a n s re ga rd l es s of p re v io us

3 64. MADRIG AL A s t udy of sec u la r performance . ( 1 ) 366

p art

s o ng

t h rough

rea d i ng

and

OPERA WORKSHOP

Stage prod uction o f op e ra , cha m ber opera and opera scenes. Pa rticipation in a l l fac ets of production . Prerequisite; Conse n t of t h e i n s t r uc tor . ( 1 ) 3 70

UN1VERSITY BAND

Stud y of selected W i nd ensemble l i tera ture through rehea rsal a n d performa nce. M e m be rs h i p by a u d ition . ( 1 )

U N I VERSITY JAZZ ENSEMBLE S tudy of sele'ted jazz Utera t u re t h rough rehearsal and performa nce . Membership by a ud i t ion . ( 1) ection A - In stru mental; Sec tion B - In s t r u me n ta l ; 372

Sec t i o n C

-

Voca l

380 U N I V E RSITY SYM PHONY ORC H E STRA S t ud y of selected rc h e st r a l literat u re t h r ugh rehearsal and performa nce . Membership by audition . ( 1 ) 381 C HAMBER ENSEMBLE Readi ng, rehearsal, a nd pe rfo r ma n ce of s e l ec ted in s tru足 mental cha mber m u s i c . Prerequi s i t e : Con se n t of Ch a m ber

Mu si c Coordi n a t or. ( 1 ) Section A - Stri ng ; Section B Wo od wi n d 382

-

Brass; Sec tion C -

CONTEMPORARY DIRECTIONS ENSE MB L E

Publ ic a n d labora tory performance of conte m pora ry music .

(1)

383

TWO PIANO ENSEMBLE

Tec h n iques a nd prac t ice i n the per formance of two- p iano and pian duet l i t e r a t u re ; i n c l udes s i g h t reading and prog r a m pl a n n i n g . ( 1 ) 402

PR[VATE I NSTRUCTION: PlANO ( 1 -4)

403

PRI VATI I NSTRUCTION: ORGAN ( 1 - 4)

404

PRJVA TE l N STRUCTION: VOICE ( 1-4) PRIVA TE I NSTRUCTION: VIOL I N / V I OLA ( 1 -4)

405 406

PRIV ATE I NSTRUCTI ON: C E l.LO/BASS (1-4)

407

PRfV ATE I N STRUCTION: FLUTE ( 1-4)

408

PRI VATI I N STRUC TION: OBOE r E NGlISH H ORN ( 1 - 4)

409

PRI VATE I NSTRUCTION: BASSOON ( 1 -4)

410

PRI VATE I NSTRUCTION: Cl.ARINET ( 1- 4) PRI VATE I NSTRUCTI ON: SAXOPHONE (1-4)

411

mu sical experience. ( 1 )

MUSIC

91


412

PRIVATE I NSTRUCTION: TR UMPET ( 1 -4)

413

PRI VATE INSTRUCTION: FRENC H HORN ( 1-4)

414

PRI VATE I NSTRUCTION: TROMBONE/BARITONE ( 1 -4)

415

PRIVATE I NSTRUC TION: TUBA ( 1 -4)

416

417

PRI VATE INSTRUCTION : PERCUSSI ON ( 1-4) PRI VATE I NSTRUCTION: GUITAR ( 1-4)

418

PRI VATE INSTRUCTION: HARP ( 1-4)

419

PRIVATE I NSTRUCTION: HARPSICHORD (1-4)

O n e h a l f- h o u r l e s s o n p e r week. S t ud en t s receiving permission to register for 2-4 seme s te r h o u rs o f credit will receive t wo one-h a l f h ou r private less o n s per week Specia l f e e i n addition to t u i t i o n . A l l 4 0 0 series private i n s truction req u i res permission from t h e M u sic Depa rt men t before reg i s t ra tion .

4 2 3 FORM I Advanced analysis of l i t e ra ture from Classic, Early a nd Middle Roman tic s tyles in represe nta tive genres and medi a . aly (2) 4 2 4 fOR M n Adva n ed a nalysis of l i tera t u re from la te Roman tic, I m pression i s t and Nationalis tic s tyles in representa tive genres and media. Pre requisite: Music 423. aly (2) 425

fORM I I I

Adva nced analysis of l i te ra t u re from Modern a n d Contemporary s tyles i n represe nta tive g e n res a nd media . P rereq u i s i t e : Music 4 2 3 . a l y (2) 4 2 6 ADV ANCED ORCHESTRATION Direct ed s t udy a nd scoring of selected piano works for large e nse mble; i nd e pe nd e n t s t udy, may be repeated for additional c red i t . Offered on d e m a n d . ( 2) All m u sic l i te ra tu re cou rses n u mbered from

431

to

438

are open t o

all u niverSity e n ro l l me n t w i t h ou t prere q u i s i t e .

431

H I STORY Of PIANO LITERATURE A N D PERFORMANCE

A s t ud y of representa tive piano com posi tions of a U p e riod s . aly (2) 4 3 3 MUSIC OF BELA BARTOK A st udy of representa tive works of various periods of Ba rtok. a l y ( 2 ) 4 3 4 SCANDINAVIAN MUSIC A s u rvey of selected music of various Scandinavian com pose rs; folk m usic i nfluences a n d na t ionalistic elemen t . a ly ( 2 )

435

MUSIC IN THE UNITED STATES: A H ISTORICAL INTRODUCTION

A s u rvey from the Colonial period to the prese n t covering both the c u l ti vated a nd the vernacular traditions. a l y (2) 436 HlSTORY OF ORGAN BUILDING A two-fold stu d y , i nvolving b o t h the tech n ical evol u tion of the pipe orga n (key-ac tions, windche s t designs, pipework varieties and cons t ruction, the organ case) a s well a s t h e historical evolu tion of the various conce p t s of tonal design as these relate to t h e performance of organ l itera ture. a l y (2) 4 3 7 SACRED MUSIC LITER ATUR E A s u rvey of church m usic p ri marily t hrough the s tudy of represen ta tive major works. a l y (2) 438

HYMNOLOGY AND TH E MUSIC O F THE L ITURGY

A survey of Christian hymnody, con s idered from both a m usical and poetic viewpoin t . Also considered will be the concept and performance of music for the l itu rgy, both historic and on te mporary, primarily from the Roma , A nglican a nd Lu theran t raditions. a l y (2) 441

RECENT TECHNIQUES FOR ELEMENT ARY MUSIC

T h e concern o f t h e u pper e l e m e n t a ry and middle s ch o m u sic teac h e r, including Orff and Kodaly tech n iques. (2) 443

M ETHODS A N D MATERIALS F O R S ECONDARY C HORAL MUSIC

The orga nization and administration of t h e secondary school music cu rriculum with particul a r a t te ntion to the n e ds of t h e choral program . Organization, ma n ageme n t, teaching m e thods, rehearsal techn iques and choral literature appropria te for th e various age and experience levels of s t udents in grades 7-1 2 . ( 2 ) 444

METHODS A ND M ATERIALS fOR SCHOOL I NSTR UMENTAL MU SIC

The organization and ad m inis tra t ion of the seco nd a ry school m usic curriculum with particular atten tion to the needs of the instrumental prog ra m . Orga n ization, man ageme n t, teaching m e thods, rehearsa l techniques a nd i n s t r u m ental li tera t u re approp ria te for t h e various age and experie nce levels of s t udents i n grades 4 -12. 4 4 5 ADVANC E D CON DUCTING Refin e m e n t of patterns, gestures and cond ucting tech.niques; applica tion to appropriate vocal and i n s t ru足 m en tal score s . Prerequisite: Music 345. ( 2) 451

PIANO PEDAGOGY

Teach.ing techniques for prospective tea h e rs of piano, i ncluding techniq ues of private and class piano in s tr uc tio n . M e thods and materials from begin n ing through advanced leve l s . (2) Section A - Basic; S e c t i on B - Lower

E le men tary; Section C - Uppe r Ele m en tary; S ection 0 Advanced

92

M U S IC

-


4 5 2 ORGAN PEDAGOG Y AND REPERTOIRE Met hod s and techniques of private organ i n struction, including s u pervised practical experience. A s u rvey of organ l i terature representative of all major composers a n d style pe riods . a l y (2) 4 5 3 VOCAL P EDAGOGY Physiological, psychological and pedagogi al aspects of inging . (2) 454 STRING PEDAGOGY The phys iological and psychological approach to s t ring playing and teaching. Includes dis u ssion and demon足 stration of instru m e n t a n d bow t echniqaes, private lesson approach and materials , ge n e r a l and specific string problems. a l y (2) 4 91-492 INDEPENDENT STUDY Prerequi s i t e : Conse n t o f t h e i n s t r u c t or. May be repeated for additio nal cred i t . ( 1-4) 502

503 504 505 506 507 508

509 510 511 5U

513 514 SIS

516 51 7 518

519

527

COMPOSITION

A s y s te m a t ic approach to contemporary m us ical com足 posi tion; students crea te, notate a n d perform works for solo, small and large ensembles. May be repeated for cred i t .

(1-4)

532

MUSIC BIBLIOGRAPHY AND RESEARCH TECHNI Q UES

S urvey of t h e m a i n research tools a va ilable f o r a dva nced work i n m usic. Course con tent can be adapted to needs of s tu d e n t s in m usic educa tion, theory or performance. a l y ( 2 ) 545

SE MI NAR I N ADVANCED CON DUCTIN G : CONTEMPORARY L ITERATURE

D i rected study of selected conte mporary scores con t a i n i ng cond ucting problems u n i q u e to recen t compositions in a wide range of g e n res a n d media, i ncluding electronics, con t rolled i m provisa tion, m u l ti media, and texture for large and sma ll e n s e mbles, vocal and i n s t r u m e n ta l . (2)

GRADUATE SEMINAR (1-4)

PRI VATI I NSTRUCTION: PIANO (1-4)

590

PRI VATE I NSTRUCTION: ORGAN ( 1-4) PRIVATE I NSTRUC TION : VOICE ( 1-4)

596

R ESEARCH IN MUSIC ( 1-4)

599

THESIS (2-4)

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: VIOLI N /VIOLA ( 1-4) PRIVATE I NSTRUCTION: CELLO/ BASS ( 1-4) PRIVATE I NSTRUCTION: f LUTE (1-4) PRIVATE I N STRUCTION: OBOE/ENGLISH HORN (1-4) PRI VATE INSTRUCTION: B ASSOON ( 1-4) PRIVATE I NSTRUCTION: CLARINET ( 1 -4) PRIVAT E INSTRUCTION: SAXOPHON E ( 1-4) PRIVATE I NSTRUCTION: TRUMPET (1-4) PRIVATE INSTRUCTION: FRENCH HORN ( 1 -4) PRIV ATE INSTRUCTION: TROMBONE /BARITONE (1 -4) PRI VATE INSTRUCTION: TUBA ( 1-4) PRI VATE [NSTRUCTION: PERCUSSION (1-4) PRIVATE r NSTRUCTION: GUITAR ( 1-4) PRI VATE I NSTRUCTION: HARP (1-4) PRIVATE I NSTRUCTION: H ARPSICHORD ( 1-4)

C OURSE S OFFERED IN THE 1 979 I NTERI M 303 305 307 317 318

I NTRODUCTION TO PIANO BEGINNERS BAND A C ULTURAL E X PE RIE NC E I N T H E ARTS I N NEW YORK CITY INTENS IVE PER fORM ANCE INTENSIVE STUDY A N D PERfORMANCE OF CHORA L / ORCHESTRAL L ITE RATURE

O n e h a l f- hou r lesson per week. S tudents receiving permission to reg i ste r for 2 - 4 semester hours of credit will rece i v e two o n e -h al f hour private lessons per week. Special fee in add i t i o n to tu ition. All sao se ri s private instruction requ i res permission from the M u s ic Depa.rt ment before reg i s t r a tion.

MUSIC

93


SCHOOL OF

Nursing A n ursing ca reer offers g reat opportu nity for a rich a nd rewarding p rofessional life. It affords virt uaJly unlim ited choice of location, e nvironmen t, and type of se rvice. The p h ysical, mental, social, and spi ri tual heal th of people is of u niversal conce rn, and t ho se p repa red to m a intain thei. r good health are i n con s t a n t demand. The School o f N ursing i s a professional school wh ich combines p rofess ional and libe ral a rts s t udies in assi s t i ng s t ude n ts to develop a sense of respons i bility fo r acqui ring t h e a tti t ude s, knowledge, and skill necessary for m e e ting n ursing needs of the com m u n i t y . T h e generic program is designed f o r s t ud e n t s w h o have h a d no previous prepara tion i n n u rs i n g, and g raduates of this program w h o SUCCE'ssfully complete the State Board examinations (Registered Nu rse) a re prE'pared for begin ni n g posi tions in profession al n ursi ng . The School also offers a s pec ial p rogram to regi s tered n urses w h o wish to com p lete requirem en ts for the Bachelor of Science i n N ursing and prepa re for leade rship pos itions. Gradua tes from ei ther program a re prepa red for con t i n uing their fo rmal educatio n a t the g rad uate level . T h e School of N u rSing i s accredited by the Washington State Board of N u rsing and by t he N a tional League for N ursing. I t i s a charter member o f t he W E's te rn Council o n H igher Educa tion for N u rsing. U nder t h E' di rE'c t s upervisio of i t s fac u l t y members, the School u s e s facilities of hospital health agenci e s , and schools in t h e com m u n i ty i n providing optimal clinical learning ex perience for its st ud e n ts . J

fACULTY Stucke, D i rector; Aikin, Bradford, Carpenter, Carper, Carter, Cone, G illett, G ough, Hefty, Hostetter, Jacobson, E. Johnson, Klein, lizzi, M ason, L. Olson, Page, Roediger, Thompson, Wei rick, Yeargan.

A D M I SSION A N D CONTI N U A nON POLJCIES

S tu den ts see ki ng admis sion to e i t h e r th generic program or the speci .1 1 program for regis tered n u rses m u s t m a ke f o r m a l application to b o t h the u n ive rsi t y a n d t h e School o f N ursing. Applications for admission to the School of NUTsing are to be submitted between Ja n uary 1 and Feb ruary 15, a n d are c o n s idered for the following academic year o n ly i f the applican t has been offered a d mission to t h e university and h a s provided t ranscripts and Allied H e a l t h Professions A d m ission Test scores

94

NURSING


as requested by the Admissions Committee. Information about the Allied Health Professions Admission Test may be sec u red from the School ea r l y in the fall. When there re more q ual i fied applicants than the School can accep t, selection is made on a competitive bas is. [n making the selection, the School of N u rsi ng Admi ss ions Committe uses grades as the major means of eval ua tion . but a l so considers such other relevant factors as selected score s received on the Allied Health Pro fess ions Admission Test. prior e>tperience in n u rsi ng, previous study at PLU, significant co- urricular activities (schoot com mun i t y. church. etc.) and othe r pertinen! extenuating or extraordi nary ci rcumstances. Generic students are admitted to begin their n u rsing program i n either the fa l l or spring semester, and selection for both terms is made the previous spring. generally by May 1. Insofar as p05sibl , students are a d m itted for t h e term of their choice. When there are too many desiring a given term, determination of which students will be ddmitted for fdll and which for spring i made by random selection. Time normally req u ired to c mplete requirements for the Ba c helor of Science in N u rsing is SIX semesters from the time of enrolling in the first nursing course regardless of the number of college credits earned previously . The School of Nursing reserves the right to request Wi thdrawal of a nursing student who fails to demonstrate competency or who fails to maintain profeSSional conduc t. Minimum criteria for admission t or continuation in the School of Nursing are as follows: 1. Admiss ion to the univerSity. Applicants must have been admi t ted t Pacific Lutheran Un iversity prior to March 1 of the year i n which they wish to have their application processed. However, admission to the univers i ty does not guarantee admission to the School of N u rsing. 2. CompletJon of or current enrollment in Psychology 101 ( [ n t roduction t Psych logy) and t h ree of the following: Biology 1 1 1 ( Biology and the Modem World), Biology 201 ( I n troductory Microbiology), Chemistry 103 (Chemistry of Life), a nd Socio l og y 101 ( I n troduction to Sociology ) . (The remai n ing courses will be completed after enroiling in the nursing progra m . ) 3 . C mpletlon o f a m i n i m u m of 26 semester credit hours. Some of these may be in rog ress a t time of application. 4 A minunum grade of 2.00 in all required nursing and pre­ reqUisite courses . A stude n t rece iving a grade of less than 2. 00 in any COUTS which i s a prerequisite for a nUfsing course may not con tinue in that n ur si ng course until the prerequisite course is repeated with a grade of 2.00 or above. 5. A minimum cumulative g. p.a. of 2.00. 6. Physical health a n d stamma necessary to withstand the demands of n ursing. 7. Emotional stability su fficient to cope with the stresses inherent in I> ming and practicing n u rs in g. Registered n u rses are ad mi tted t begin their nursing program i n the raU se mester, and are e.nrolled fujI time for a total of sixteen months. The registe red nurse student must have completed I I no n-n ursing course pre requ isites and a minimum f 24 semester credits of the core reqUIrements a nd electives for a total of 56 semester credits . Other minimum criteria fo r admission to or continuation in the nursing prog ra m are a s outlined above for the generic student . The registered nurse who i s con sidering making appl ica t ion for admission to the nursing program is advised to conta.: the School of Nu rsing for advice about prerequisites to be comp leted, other requiremen ts to be met. and the program to pursue after ad mission .

HEA LTH The nu rsing student is responsible for milln taining op ti mal heal t h ilnd is a teacher of h ea lt h . Physical exa mination. x-rays, and i m m u niza.tions are required before o1dmis ion to t he climcal areas and periodically thereafter and are the responsibility of the s tuden t . Each s tudent must carry personal health i nsura nce . ADDITIONAL COSTS [n addi t ion to regu lar un iversity costs, students are to prOVide t h ei r own tTansport ation between t he llOiversity campus and the cl i n ica l laboratory areas beginning with the firs t n urs ing co rse. Available public tra nsporta tion is li m ited. 50 provi s ion for private tran sportat ion i s essential. Students are required to carry profeSSional liability in urance during all periods of lini al exper ience. This is available under a grou p plan a t a nomi na l cost to the student. Health exa m i nation fees , s t uden t u n i forms (approxima.tely $ 70. 00). and eq u ipme nt (wristwatch, sc is so rs, stetho cope) are also t h e responsibility of the st udent . C E RTlFlCA TION FOR SCHOOL NURSING Educational Staff Assodate Ce rt if ication for school nurses is indiVidually designed t h roug h a consort i u m consisting of a school district, related professional assoc iat ion and Pacifi' Lut heran Uni verS i t y . Ad dit iona l in forma t ion on t h is prog ra m c a n be obtalned by contacting the Dean of the School of Education or the Di rect or of the chool of N u rs i n g . RESOURCES A N D FAOUTIES Good Samaritan Hospital. Puyallup, WA 1 1 7 0 beds } David K. Hamry. M . H . A . Ene uti .., Dimtor Mary Jane Troeh. R . N. . Di mto r of NUY\III Lakewood G neral Hosp i t al. Tacoma . WA I / o o beds} Peggy Dawson. R .N Dirertor of Nursing .•

Madigan Army Medical Center. Taco ma . WA (536 beds) Brigadier Gene ral William R. Dwyer, M . D .. Com mlmding Officer Colonel Essie Wilson. R N B. S. N .. M.S.. hitJ. Dtpn rtm tit of Nursing ..

Mary Bridge Ch ildre n's Health Center. Tacoma, WA (08 htdsl Frederick A . Pritch ar d. M. B.A . . Adminis trator Karen Lynch. R . N . B.S.N. A i<tanl Adminislralor for Paflenl .

Str1'i

is

Puget Sou nd Hospital, Tacoma. WA 1 1 4 5 b,dsJ James He lla nd, M. B.A.. Admi n ist rator Syd Purdue. R . N . B . S.N .. D i m/or of Nur51ng St . Joseph Hos pi ta l, Taco ma , WA 12 5 0 b,ds i D� niel Russell. B. _ . . M . H . A . . Admini�lra tor Hazel Hurst. R N . B.S . . M N . . As5;,I,1II 1 Ad minlsl ralo r {or Nursirr Srrt'I[f St. Peter Hospit I, Olympia, WA ( 1 5 0 htdsl David L. Bjornson, M. H . I1. . Admlllisirator Ann Bertoli n . R N B . N . . Dirr£lor of Nursing Sfrvia .

.

..

.

Tacoma General Hospital Tacoma, WA ( 2 9 9 brds J E uge ne K. Pren tice , B.S . . M.S. H . A . . Pmlarot Betty Hoffman, R.N T�coma-Pierce Cou n t

..

B. S. N .. Dirfctor of Nursing Stroice

Health Department, Tacoma, WA Wdlter R. Herron, M. D M. P . H D i m/or. Taco ma· Pierce CO U lltl/ .

HtGlth

. .

.•

Drpa rtmro/

Nancy C herry, R . N . . M.P.H . . Co-Di m/o r. Tacoma-Pitrer Co unty Hrilit h Drpart",,,,/ Tac ma Public Schools, Tacoma. W A Roger Meyer, M . D . . M . P . H . . Jldminislra tiur Dimlor. Dit'Hlon of Hea lth

NUR S I N G

95


The Doctors Hos pit al, Tacoma, WA ( 7 0 beds! Fr derick A P r i tchard, lvI, 8 , A " A d rn i'l istrator H a r riet H u H m a n , R , N " D i rector of Nl<rsi'lg Veterans A d m i nist ration H o s p i t a l , Tacoma, W A ( 9 0 4 beds! Robert B, R y n e a rs o n , B , S " D i rector loa n S tout, R , N " 8 , 5 N" lv/ , N , A " Ch ief. N l< rsi rtg Service Western State H o s p i t a l. S te i lacoom, W A ( 9 5 0 beds! i u l i o Di F u r i a , lvI, D" S U l'eri'lierJdeni C h a rles R u e l L R, " 8 , 5 , , lv/ , S " D ireclor of N u rsi rtg

S pr i n g S e m e s t e r Bi o l o g y 206 " '

Fali S e mester N u rsi n g 334

NurSing 344 ' * � F i n e A r t s elective ., '

time t h ey

semes t e r, N u rs i n g courses m us t be taken concurren tly a n d in sequence ag i n d ica ted i n t h e s a mple c u r r i c u l u m , a n d n o r m a l ly e. t e n d over s i x s e m esters, A sam p l e c u rr i c u l u m for the s t ud e n t accepted for fall

4 4 4 4 16

434 Nursing 444

N u r s i n g C e n t r u m IT! C l i nica l P r blems !II urs.ing Peacti u rn I I

. . ' R e l i g i o n ele five

4 4 4 1

4 4

' Sociology 1 0 1 P. E , A c t i v i t y

N u rsing Cen t r u m II C l i n i cal Problems I

N u rsi ng Practi c u m I " 'litera t u re or His tory elective

N u r si ng

13

C ollege E ng li s h I n trod u c tion to SOCiology

0-4 0- 4

S p ri ng Sem e s t e r N u r s i n g 354 N u rs in g 384 N ur s i n g 394

Fall Semester N u rS i n g 4 2 4

I n terim

C h e mis try of L i fe

O p tional e l ec t i ve

F OU R TH Y E AR

s e me s t e r e n ro l l m e n t i s as follows:

" ' English 1 0 1

P h i losop h y elective

4 4 4 4 16

are neede d , A s c h ed u le of cou rses is developed i n d i v i d u a l l y w i t h each st u d e nt who begins the n u rsing cou rses i n the s p ring

S p ri ng S e m e s ter C h e mi s try 1 03

N u rsing C e n t r u m I H e a l t h P ro b l ems

Interim

Science i n N u rsing degree s h o u ld con tact the School o f N u r s i n g and be g i n t h e c o u r s e sequence upo n e n t r a n e to t h e u niversity, For spring semester e n ro l l m e n t t h e c u rricu l u m generally follows t h e f a l l semester form a t wi th modifica tions a s necessa ry

Elective

4 8 17

direction on th e part of the s t ud e n t , In addition to the n u rsing req u i re me n ts, th e s tu d e n t i s ex pected to meet u n iv e r s i ty req u i rem e n ts . Nu rsing courses are seque n t i a l in n a t u re and a l l have prerequisites. A s t u d e n t i n terested i n t h e B ach e lor o f

FIRST YEAR - Pre-N u r s i n g F a l l S e mes t e r Biology a n d t h e M o d e rn W orld ' B i o lo g y 1 1 1 • ' R eligion elec tive In trod uction to Ps y ch ol o g y ' Psychology 1 0 1 • ' P,E, 100 Personalized F i t n e s s P r o g r a m s

N u rs i n g I I : H e a lt h A sess m e n t

TH I R D Y E A R

The cu rri cul u m p l a n and i t s i mp l e m e n t a t i o n a re designed to be growt h - f s tering a n d to e n coura ge i n i t i a tive a n d s e l f­

completion of a ll p rere qu i si te cou rses by th

4

P,E, Act i v i ty

BACHElOR Of SCJINCE I N N URSING

to assure

E l e c t i ve N LI rsing 228

Human Anatomy and P h ys iology I I

4 4 4 1 13

4 4 4 4 16

Int rim O p t i on a l elective

0- 4 0- 4

S p r i n g S e m es t e r N u rsin g 464 N u r s in g 4 7 8

N u r s i n g C entru m I V Senior Practicum

4 12

' M a y be t ak e n e i t h e r s e m e s t e r " May be taken e i th er fre s h ma n or s op ho m o r e yea r .. ' M a y be t a k e n a n y t i m e

C OURSE OfFERIN G S

SECOND YEAR

Fall Semester

Biology 20 1 Biology 205

' Psy c holo gy 335 o r Ed uca tion 321 ur s i n g 2 1 4

I n t rod u tory M icrobiology H u m a n A na t o my a nd Phys iol o gy I De vel o pmen t : In fancy to Maturity H u ma n Devel p m e n t N u r s i n g ! : Socialization t o Nursing

4 4 4

4

P,E, Activity

I n te r i m E l e c tive

17 4 4

96

NURSING

NURSlNG I : SOC IAL IZATION T O NURSING Con pts regarding self a nd soc i e t y , rela ti n , com­ m u nic tions, lea rning, and levels of we ll ness , I n t rod uces histo rical m i l stones of nursing and t rends i n n u rsing ed uca tion, Prerequisites: Psychology 1 0 1 , and prior or concurrent enrollment in 50ciolo y 1 0 1 and B i logy 1 1 1 . ( 4 ) 214


228

NURS[NG II: H EALTH ASSESSMENT

Asses sment of h e a l t h status of i nd ivid uals, fami lies, and com mu n i ties . Attention is given to the utili za tion of health resources, the infl uence of the eco-system, and t he role of t h e health team in maintaining wellness. Includes selected c l i n ical e x periences with the newborn, well ch ild, adolescent, and elderly. Emphasis is on beg i n ning techn ique s and assessment a s part of the n ursi ng pro ess. Prere q u i s i te s : Biology 201 and 2 0 S , Chemistry 1 0 3 and N u r i ng 2 1 4, a nd prior or concurre n t registra tion in Psychology 335 (or Educa t ion 3 2 1 ), and BioI gy 206. (8)

334

NURSING CENTRUM I

An i n t r duction t o t h e less complex medical-surgical s i t ua tions of children a n d ad u l ts, the preg n a n t family, and p reve n tat ive a pects of psychiatric n u rsing. Drug and diet therapy a nd theories of physic a l and psychosocial develop m e n t a re i n c luded . Prereq uisites: Biology 206 and N u r s i ng 2 28, a n d conc urrent regi s t r a t ion i n N ursing 3 4 4 . (4)

344

HEALTH PROBLEMS

Medical -s urgical problems f a l e s s s tressful n a t u re a n d a ppropriate n u rsing action t o facilitate adapta tion . i n c l u d s e x perie nce wi th · a pregn a n t fa mily through the p e r i n a t a l period, and applica tion of principles of crisis in te rven tion in dealing w i t h health proble m s in selected c l inical experie nces. Prerequisites: Biology 206 nd Nu rsing 2 28 , a nd concurre.nt registration in Nursing 334. (4)

354

NURSING CE NTRUM I I

The more complex medic al-surgical a n d psychiat ric s i t u a tion s . E m p h a s i s is placed n the pathop hysiologica l and psych opathological aspects and thei r a p p l ication to the n u rsi n g process in the care of children a n d adults. Prereq uisi tes: N u rs i ng 3 3 4 and 344, a n d co ncu rre n t reg i s t ration in N u rsing 3 8 4 a n d 3 9 4 . (4)

384

C L I NICAL PROB LEMS I

Psychia tric and medical - s u rgical problems of a s t re s s f u l n at u re with the appropria te n u r ing actions to facil. i tate a d a ptation or restorati n to a hig her level o f wellness. P rereq u is i tes : Concurrent regis tration i n N u rsing 354 a n d 39 4 . (4)

394

NURSING PRACTI C U M I

C l i nical applications of N ursing 354 an d 384. The student is ex pec te d to a pply t heoretica l principles based n pat ho­ physiological and psych opat ho logi al concepts in the clinical setting, u t ilizing int erp rsonal a nd tech n ical skills. Pre­ req u i s i t e s : Concurre n t registration in Nu rsing 354 and 3 8 4 .

(4) 424

434

CLINICAL PROBLEMS 1 1

I ntroduction to n ursing actions appropriate to s tressful medical, s u rgical and psychiat ric probl e m s a nd t o t h e newer parameters o f n u rsing. Issues in nu rsing a nd changes i n health care systems a re exa m ined. Prerequisites: Nurs ing 354, 384, a n d 394, a n d concurrent regis tra tion in N ursing <124 and 4 4 4 . (4)

444

NURSING PRACT I C U M II

a pp l ication of pa thophysiological and psych ­ pathol ogical concep t s i n critical c a r e n u rsing, i n c l ud ing utiliza tion of i n terpersonal and sophisticated technical skills. Prerequisites: Nu r s i ng 354, 384, and 3 94, and concurre n t reg is t ra tion in Nursing 4 2 4 and 4 3 4 . ( 4 ) Oin ica l

464

NURSING C ENTRUM IV

Preparation for f u t u re professional roles o f the nu rse in t h e h e a l t h delivery s y s t e m . E m p h a s i s i s on leaders hip a nd management skills, professional j udgment, decision mak­ i ng, and the n urse as a change agen t. S t ude nts exa mine legislation, economic security, professional grow th and the ut ilization of health a nd welfa re resources. Prerequisites: N ursi ng 4 2 4 , 434, and 444 and concurrent regis tra tion i n N u rs i ng 4 78 . ( 4 )

478

SEN IOR PRACTI CUM

C l i n ical application of professional a nd tech n ical skills i n primary o r secondary n u rsing settings. Each st udent i s ex pected to f u nction i n a staff n u rse r o l e and progress t o a leadership role. P re requis ite: Nursing 424, 434, a n d 4 4 4 , and concurrent regi stration in N ursing 464. (8)

491, 492

I N DEPENDENT STU DY

Prerequisite: Pennission of the Director. (1-4)

COURSES OFFERED I N THE 1979 INTERIM 309

C ROSS C ULTURAL PERSPECTIVES DEATH AND DYING 3 1 1 SURG ICAL INTERVENTION 31 4 HAWAH I I : A TRANSCU LTURAL WORKS HOP 3 16 RADIOACTI VITY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE

ON

NURSING C ENTRUM 1 I 1

l n t r d uction to ac ute devia nt behavior patterns and to life t h r e a tening med ical-s urgical problems of c h i ldren a n d a d u l t s . E m p h a s i s i s placed on co mplex pathophysiological a n d psychopathologica l aspects and their i mplica ti n s for the n u rsing p rocess. Prerequ i s i t e s : Nursing 354, 384, and 394, a n d concurrent re gi s t rat ion in Nursing 434 a nd 4 4 4.

(4 )

N U RS IN G

97


Phi o sophy Phi losophy is t h e pare n t a ca d emic d i s c ipline which gave birth to today's va riet y of a r t s a n d scienc e s . I t analyzes ba i c issues in aU fields and seeks to u ndersta nd t he in tercon nections am ong the various face ts of h u m a n l i fe and expe r i e nce . Are a s of co ncern include t h e scope and cha racter o f h u m a n knowledge; mo r al aesthetic, a n d religiou s values; h u m a n n a t u re a n d its p l a c i n the un i verse; and t h e ul t i ma te n a t u re of re al i t y . A c ourse of s tu d y in philosophy a cquai n ts st uden ts w i t h major rival world views and value s y s t e ms, encourages them in the habit of a n a l yt ic a nd s ys t emat ic t hough t, and h e l ps them to see life critically, apprecia tively, and whole. ,

fACULTY Arbaugh , Cha ir; Huber, P. Menzel, Myrbo, Nordby.

USES OF PHlLOSOPHY C o u rses i n ph ilosophy a re designed

to mee t t h e needs l1f

a

variety of s t u den ts : ( 1 ) those who desire s o m e k nowledge of philoso p h y as a basic e l e m e n t in wh

a

w i s h t o p ur s u e some special

l i be ral e d u cation; (2) those

i n tere s t , f o r example, i n

of peopl e s ; ( 3 ) t h ose who wish to s u pport their

ethics, science, religion, t h e h i s tory of t h ugh t, or the ideas particular m en o r

work i n other fie ld s, for e x a m ple, literat ure, h i story, r e l igion, t h e sci nees, educa t io n, or b u s iness; ( 4 ) those who plan to u s e a major in p h il oso p h y as preparation for g rad u a te or profession a l study

i n another field, for exa m pl e , theol ogy or law; a n d (5) i n p h i losophy i tself, u s u a l l y

thos e who plan to do graduate work

w i t h the i n te n t io n of teach i n g i n t h e field. Undergradu te study i n philo sophy does not train one s p ecifically for a first job. I t does provide e s s e n t i a l perspectives,

a

a s well as b sic skills

in a n al y s i s and i n terpretation, t h o ug h t a n d

problem solVing, research and writi n g . T h es e - u s u a l l y

i n other d isc i pl i n e s - (it one a great variety of positions of vocational responsibility.

coupled w i t h specia lized trainin fo r

Pe rs n s w i t h the g re a te I upward mobility in fields s u c h as b u siness manage m e n t, l a w. education, engineering, o per a t iom rese a rc h , data proc e s s i n g, or social work, ue g e n er a l l y not t h ose with the most spe cia l ized training, but t h ose with broad perspec tives, fI x i b i l i t y a nd d epth, and skill s i n thoug h t and c o m m u nication.

SUPPORTING PROG R A M S IN PHILOSOPHY FOR OTHER FIE LDS Philosophy provides a solid foundation for a variety o f s tudies and c a re rs. S t u d e n ts using

i t t o s upport primary work in s o me t h e r

other fi el d s m a y ele t a m i nor or major or co m bin at ion

of courses of interest. Those w i t h double m a j o rs modification or r e d u c t ion of t h e r eq u i r e m e n t s for

may requ es t a

t h e s ta n d a rd major.

98

P H I L O S O PHY


Recom men ded p r o g r a m s of st udy in philosophy to s u p port

work in a variety of other disciplines a n d for a variety of

careers a re described in separate brochures available in t h e dl!pa rtmental office. These i n c l u d e b U S i n e s s , e d u c a t i o n , health p rofessions, Jaw, parish ministry and theological s t udies, social work, fine arts, h u m a n i t ies, and social and n a t u r a l sciences.

A QUALITY PROGRAM PlU's depart ment of p h i losophy offers a distinctive cou rse of p h i losophical studies . The m e m be rs of the dep a r t m e n t a l l hold t h e doctorate, have s t udied a t leading i n s t i t u tions in this c o u n t ry and a b r oad, a n d have participated i n professional p rograms in the Uni ted Sta tes a nd E u rope. The excellence of t h e depa r t m e n t is evidenced by g r a n ts recei ved and b y the s ucc e s s of i t s graduates at major g raduate and p rofessional schools t h roughout the count ry. The depa r t m e n t s trongly e m ph a si zes ,md h a s received recog nition for the q ua l i t y o f its tea c hing . A l l s tu d e nts, b u t especially those with major or minor progra ms, receive s u b s t a n t ial i n d ividual a tt e n tion a n d assistance in t h e p u r s u i t o f t h e i r stu dies.

I NTER I M OFFERI NGS Special i n terim courses at PlU ex plore a variety of topics and c u l t ural perspec tives. C u l tural s t u d ie have been conducted in foreign coun tries such as Greece, Italy, Spain, a n d Norway. On­ campus studies have been concerned with themes of social and - legal p h i los p h y , g a m e theory, war and morality, j u s tice, love, capitalism and b u s iness, and bio-medical e t hics. The e n e ra l u n i v e rsity core req ui Te m e n t of one cou rse in philosophy may be sa tisfied by any course offered exce p t 1 2 1 , Critical Thi"king and Writing. 233, Logic. 3 2 8 , Ph ilosophy o f i..Jl w. or 3 8 5, Health Ca rt Ethics. T h e i nitial course in the s u bject i s custo m a rily 2 0 1 o r 2 2. 1 , t h o u g h neither o f these cou rses is a prerequisite for any other course. 300-level c o u rses are e speci a l l y sui ted for s t u d e n t s with particu l a r i n terests. Depa r t m e n t conse n t may be required for some c o u r ses.

MINOR:

semester hours. A minor in philosophy con s i s ts of four approved c o u rs es. Stude nts considering a m i n o r s h o u ld discuss their personal goals with depart mental fac ulty. If they elect a minor in the field, they s h o u ld formally declare this with t h e regis trar a n d t h e d e p a r t m e n t chair. Mi nors m a y e i t h e r cho s e for th m s e l v e s or be assig ned an adviser, i n con s u l ta tion with whom they s h o u l d plan their prog ra m . 16

BACH ELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: M i n i m u m of 2 8 se mester hours. S t udents i n tending to major i n philosophy must formally declare this w i t h the regi s t r a r a nd the depa r t m e n t c h a i r . They m a y either ch ose a depa r t m e n t a l adviser or be as signed one and should pl a n their prog rams i n cons u l tation with this a d viser. A person maj oring i n the department w i l l : 1.

complete a m i n i m u m o f s i x regu lar cou rses i n p h i losophy, i n c l u d i n g one co u r se in logic a nd any two of the four courses i n the h i s tory o f philosophy sequence ( 3 3 1 , A n ci,,,t Philosophy. 332, M,d i,,'nl Philosophy. 333, Moden, Philosophy. 3 3 5 , Co"temporary Philosophy).

2. c o m p l e te 4 9 3 , s",ior Indepmderd st"dy. which i n v olves writing a resei Hch pa per un der t h e s u pervision of one or more fac u l ty m e m bers a n d t a k i ng a comprehe nsive senior e x a m i n a t i o n . T h e exa mina tion i s l a r g e l y diagnos tic i n n a t u re . a n d i t is n o t necessary f o r a s t u d e n t to a c h i e v e a s p e c i f i e d level o f perform a n ce t o com plete the m a j o r o r t o g ra d u a t e . Per formance o n t h i s exa mi na tion will determine one t h i rd o f t h e s t uden t's g r a d e i n t h e sm'or l"dtp ndellt Study.

3. com plete the depa rtm e n ta l reading p rog ra m . Quality programs i n the arts and sciences d o not rely exclusiv e l y o n lecturing and group study or on secondary works, but also on one-to-one t u torial i n struction i n p r i m a ry sou rces. Majors in philosophy at Pacific l u theran University are expected to read and discuss a n u m b e r o f classical works u n d e r the personal s u pervision of various m e m b e rs of the depa r t m ental facult y . Not all works will be additions to co u rs e m a te ria ls; some will a lso be covered i n reg u l a r cou rses, a nd t h ese m a y be read and discu ssed s i m u l t aneously w i t h class study . With departmenta l a pproval, t h e standard l i s t m a y b e modified i n accordance w i t h special n e e d s or i n terests, o r reduced fo r th ose with double m a j o r s . The l i s t s h o u ld be secured at an e a rly date from the depa r t m e n ta l office, and one's reading prog ram should be developed in c o n s u l t a tion with an adviser. It is best that the reading p rogram not b e c o n ce n t ra ted i n t o a s i ngle semester b u t p u rsued at a l e i s u r e l y pace over an ex tended period. I t is recommended that s t udents fa miliarize the mselves with m a i n themes of the h i s tory o f western philosophy a n d w i t h major s c h o o l s o f p h i loso p h i c a l t h o u g h , f o r e x a m p l e , p ra g m a t i s m , r e a l i s m , l i n g u i s tic a n a lysis, pos i t i v i s m , dialectical m a te r i a li s m , and e x i s t e n t i a l i s m . F o r t h i s p u rpose s t udents s h o u ld m a ke u�e of major h i s tories a n d o t h e r secondary sou rces s u c h a s t h e Encyclopedia o f Philosophy. It is also ex pected that t h e y will m e e t regularly b u t i n f o r m a l l y with b o t h fac u lty a nd o t h e r advanced s tu d e n ts to discuss and thereby facilitate a n d en rich their work i n the field.

C OURSE OFfER INGS 121

C RITIC AL THlNKING AND WRITING

Deve lopme n t of the ability to organ ize and write clear, direct English, to evaluate e xplanations critically, and t o dis tinguish acceptable from d e fective explanations. E x a m i ­ n a t i o n of accepted explana tions o f , f o r example, the J F K assassina tion, e v e n t s in t h e B e r m u d a Triang le, t h e Rosenberg spy t r i a l , and o t h e r topics o f i n t e r e s t . O n e section e a c h s e m e s t e r satisfies the g e n e r a l u niversity core requiremen t i n writing. Does not sa tisfy the ge nera l un iversity core require m e n t in philosophy. 1 1 1 (4)

201

PH ILOSOPHIC A L ISSU E S

Perenn i a l p h ilosophical issues, systems and t h i n kers; the natu re o f knowledge, t h e function of science, values , h u m a n na ture and its social i mplications, religion a n d kno wledge of G o d . Develop m e n t of critical a n d systematic p h ilosophical t h i nking about a l l issues. I II ( 4 )

221

MORAL PHILOSOPHY

Major moral systems of Western c i v i liza tion; in tensive examination of some contemporary moral theories; critical a pplication to selected moral prob l e m s . I II (4)

PHIL O S O P H Y

99


2 3 3 LOGIC Princip les o f a r g u m en t a n d proo f; de d u c tive, i n d uc tive a n d sy m b ol ic l o g i c; the n a t u re and fu n c t i on s of la n g u age , proble m s of seman t ics, t h e p h i losophy o f logic. I (4)

324

PHILOSOPHICAL ANA LYSIS OF SOCIAL PROBLEMS

a ut h o r i t y, com m u n i ty, l i ber t y , j u s tice. Applica t ion of these con cep t s in a d i scussio n of con t e mpor a ry social I O st i tu t ion s and t h e i r proble ms : war, rac i s m , poverty , crime. (4) h u m a n na t u re, society ,

eq ua l i ty,

328 PHILOSOPHY OF LAW The n a t u re il n d j us t i fi ca t ion of leg I a u thority a nd legal obligations; " na t ural l a w " and "legal posi t i vism "; t h eo ri e s of n a t u ra l rights a n d social iu t iel'; the relation of those t h e or i es to court d ec i s i O n s relati ng , e .g . , to a ff i rma ti ve

ac tio n, sex d i scrimin a t i on , welfare, freedom of speec h , a n d educational fi nancing ; the j u s t i fic a t ion of disobedience of l a w ; t h e rationale of le g al p u n is h m e n t and o f pa r t i cu l a r pract ices of capital p u n i s h me n t , l e g a l lia b i l i t i e s for the and

the

i n sa n ity

Not

d efe n se .

for g en era l

3 3 1 A NCIE NT PHILOSOPHY T h e developm e n t o f ph iloso p h ica l t h o u g h t a n d meth o d f rom t he Presoc ra tic pe rio d to the e n d of the fou rt h cen t u ry A . D . Spec ia l e m phasis is given t o th e ph i losophies of Pla to

332

I a / y (4)

M ED I EVAL PHl LOSOPHY

deve lopmen t of Ockha m . Scrutiny o f The

ph i l o s op hy from Augus t i ne to the sources and nat ure of t h e

Thomistic syn t h esi s, a n d the reacti on to i t

D u ns Scotu 5 a n d W i l l i a m Oc k h a m . I aly

333

in th e

( 4)

work o f

MODER N PH[ LOSOPHY develo p m e n t of philosophy from

The the seve n tee n t h t h rough the e a r l y ninetee n th ce n turies; co n t i n e n t a l rat i onali s m , British e m pi ri c i s m a n d German ideal i s m ; Desca rtes , Spi n oza, L ei b niz, Locke, Berkeley, H u m e, Kant, Fich te, Sch ope n h a uer and Hegel. 11 a l y

335

(4)

CONTE M POR ARY PH ILOSOPHY

T he developm e n t of p h i l osoph y from t h e La te n i n e t ee n t h cen t u ry to the p rese n t; may i nclude pragmatis m, em pi rici s m , process p h i l os op h y , ex is te n tia lis m a n d analys i s

as dev e l o ped b y Mill, J a mes, Dewey , Wh i e head, S a rt re,

R u ssell, Ayer an d Wil tgenste i n . U a l y

(4)

3 6 5 K I E RKEGAARD AND E XISTE NTIAL IS M Mode rn existe n ti lism, i ts m a in t h e me s and t h e i r rela tion to other p h i losoph i c a l trad i tio n s; i t s i m pac t on such fields as l it e ra t u re a n d psychology; l i fe and though t of two key fig u res: Soren Kierkegaard and J e a n - Pa u l Sart re; rel a ted thi n ke r s i nc l ud i n g Nietzsc he, Heidegge r, Ja spers , Ber足 dyaev, Una m u no a n d M a rce l . r a l y ( 4 )

1 00

P H I L O S OPHY

i t s re l a t ion s h i p to the f i ne a rt s , l i tera t u re, sci ence a n d m o ra l i t y; t h e c ri te ria and co n c e p ts emplo ye d i n a r t i s t i c e x p r e s s i o n a n d ae s t h e t i c eval u a t i on . II a ly (4)

THEORY OF VALUE

T h e n a t u re o f h u m a n va l u e s ; con te m po ra ry d i sc u s s i o n s co n ce rn i n g t h e s u bject i ve or objective, a bsol u te or re l a ti v e c h a rac t e r of s uc h v a l ue s as t h e good a n d t he r ig h t , t h e bea u t i f u l a nd t he h o ly; t h e o ri g i n o f v a l u e s , t h e i r p l a c e I n a wor l d of fact, h u m a n k n ow le d g e o f t he m , t he ch a racle r a n d u se of t he lang uage of eva l u a t i o n . I I a l y

385

(4)

H E A LTH CARE ETillC S

An a n a l y s i s of s e l e c t ed m o r a l pro b l e m s i n m e ci ical rela tionships, u si n g basic d i sti nc tion s a n d norm a ti ve t h e o ries d e vel o pe d i n ph i losop h i cal e t h ics . G e ne ra l iSSUES o f t h e va lue of l i f e and t h e disvalue o f s u ffe ri ng, t he n ece s s a ry C Q n d i ti t i o n s of h u m a n rig h t s , the d i s t i nct ion be twee n wro ngs of co m m ission a n d wrong s of omis s io n , except i o n s

to

ru les,

a n d asses s m e n t of

risks f o r oth e rs .

Specific

pro b l m s o f i n for med co n se n t, eu t hanas ia, alloca ti o n of sca rce me dical reSO LUces, rig h t s to hea l t h care, pa t i e n t

university core req u L rement. ( 4 )

and Ari s totle .

A ESTHETI C S

Ana l ys i s of t h e a es the tic ex pe ri e n ce a n d

3t H

A n exa m i n a t ion of f u n damen ta l con c e p t s o f socia l t h o u g h t :

inn cen t,

3 7l

respo n s i bili t y for h e a l th , tru t h - t e l l i ng a n d con fid en tial i t y , g e n e t i c cou n se l i ng a nd scree n i n g , etc. F o r t he general s t uden t a s w e l l a s s t u de n t s in the h ea l t h scie nces . N o t f o r ge n e r al u n i ve rS i t y co re req u i re me n t . P rereq u iSi te : consent

of the i n s tru t o r . I I a l y

(4)

393

PHILOSOPHY Of RELIG ION

395

PHILOSOPHY Of SCIENCE

C l a ss ical and co n te m porary views o f t r a di t i o n a l re l ig i ou s probl em s : the exi s t e nce of God, r e l i g i o u s e peri e nce, reve l a t io n , i m m ortal i t y a nd o t h e r s . II (4) T h e g e n e ra l c h a rac ter, f u n da m e n t.a l c o ncep t s, m e t h d s a n d s ig n i fica nce of modern sc ie n ce : som e a t te n t ion to speci f ic a reas of science; p h ys i ca l , biol ogical soei I; t h e i m p l i ca ti on s of science and s ci e n t i fic me thodology for e t hica l , aesthetic a n d re l ig i o u s va l u es . I a l y (4)

4 2 7 PHILOSOPHY A N D C U R R ENT PROBL EMS A re ad i n g a n d d i s cus s i o ll COUIse con d uc ted by o n e or more staff m e m b e r s . S t u d e n t s w i l l rea d in to p ica l a reas of c u r ren t i nterest in wh i c h p h i losophical l i tera t u re h a s been de ve l o p ed for co m pa ri son and a n a l ysi s . Top ics e n v is ioned a re such as free en terp ri se. eco log y and e n v i ro n m e n t, a ffi rm a t i ve a c tion a n d dis c r i m i n a t ion , p ub l ic a nd priva te ed uca t ion , d e m cra tic p l u ralism a n d the problem o f a u t hority .

(4)


433 ADVANCED LOGIC Deve lopmen t of a n u nders ta nd i n g of t h e nature of t h e log ic , m a the mat ic s a n d re la t i o n s h i ps a m ong formal sdent ifi c met hod, and deve lo p me n t of more a d vance d problem -sol vi n g skill in various form a l s y s t e m s . Focus on ph i losoph ica l issues ra ised by formal se m a n t i c s for fi rst ord e r and mod a l logics, the r e l a b n s hi p s a m o n g log i c , set theory and m a t h e m a t iC s , ilnd the t r a d i t io n a l p roblem of Scie n t ific i n d u c t i o n . (4)

435

ADVANCED SEM I N A R IN P H I LOSOPHY

Topic to be an no u n ced a t t h e t i m e t h e course i s offe red, normally some a spect of c o n t e m porary p h i losop h y . Prerequi s i te ; con sent . I a l y (4)

I N DEPENDENT R E A D I NG AND RES EARCH Prere q ui si te : d e p a rt m e n tal co n s e n t . I I f ( 1 - 4 )

4 9 1, 492

4 9 3 S E N IOR IND EPENDENT STUDY Prepa ra t ion for a co m p rehens i ve s e n i o r ex a m i n a t i on a n d t h e writing of a majo r research pape r . P re pa r a t i o n of t h e resea rch pape r co n s t i t u tes t w o - t h i rds o f t h e c o u rse; read i ng for the c o m p re h e n s i v e exa m i n a t i o n the re m ai n i n g t h i rd . Pa p e r d u e Nove m be r 1 or Ma rc h 1 5; e x a m i n a t i o n to be taken by Dec e m ber 1 or A p r i l 2 0. Fo r p h i l o s o p h y m a j o rs o n ly . P r e r e q u i si t e : at l ea s t 4 courses in p h i l o s o p h y . I IT ( 4 )

C OURSE S OFFERE D I N THE 1 979 I NTERIM 301

324 38 5

E V ID E NCE AND LOGICAL PROB A B I L ITY: CRITICAL TH INKlNG A BOUT THE J.E.K. A SSASSINA nON P H ILOSOPH ICAL ANALYSIS OF SOC I A L PROBLEM S HEA LTH CARE ETHICS I I : C H OOS ING DEATH

-

P HI L O S OP H Y

101


S C H OOL OF

Physical E ucation The unive rsit y's physica l ed uca ti on prog ram seeks to i ngrain in each student a f u n da me n tal respect for t he role of physical activ i t y in livi ng. P ro fe ssional l y , i t p repares pros p ect i ve leaders for c a re e rs in p h y sical education, health, recreat i o n , a t hletics, a n d the r apeut ics . I ns t r uc ti on is o f fered in a p prox i m a t el y 30 di ffere n t physic a l ed uca tion a c t i v i t i e s . The activity prog ra m is u n i q u e l y c harac terized by a ti mel y response to s t udent i n te r e s t s in recreationa l op po r t u n itie s a v a i l a ble i n t h e Pacific No rthwe s t .

fAC ULTY D. Olson, Direc/or; E. Anderson, Aupi ng, R. Carlson, C hase, Hacker, Hoseth, Lundgaard, McG ill, Officer, Westering; assisted by Adams, Asher, Benson, A. Da hl, Eastman, Hemion, Iverson, Johnson, KHtil sby, Nicholson, alstead, Phil lips, Peterson, Poppen, Steilberg, and Thieman.

UNrvERSITY REQUIREM ENT: Fo u r one-hour cou rses, i n c l u ding PE 1 0 0, a re requi red for g ra d u a t i o n . E i g h t one-hour activity cou rses may be coun ted toward gradua tion. S t ud e n t s are encouraged to select a variety of activities a t a p p ropria te skill level s . A l l ph ysical e d u c a tion activity courses a re graded on the basis of "A", "Pass," o r "Fail" a n d a re taught on a coed uca tional b a s i s .

BACH ELOR OF ARTS (Recreation Concentrat ion) : 40 semester h o u rs , i n c l u di n g P E 277, 330, 4 83, 497, Psychology 335; 4 s e m e s t e r h o u rs of P E 481, 482, 4 8 5, 285-287; 10 h o u rs o f A r t 230-330, 250 or 350, 326, 3 4 1 , 365, 370, M u s i c 3 4 1 , PE 292, 322, 365; 8 h o u rs o f B A 230, 2 8 1 , 350, Political Science 356, 4 5 7, Psychology 243, 340, 4 1 0, Sociology 260, 336, 3 4 2, 344.

BACHElOR OF ARTS (Therapeutic Concentration): 48 s e m e s t e r h o u rs i n c l u d i n g PE 277, 292, 360, 391, 392, 478, 481, 482, 484, 485, 49 7; Biology 205-206; Psychology 1 0 1 , 2 2 1 , p l u s t w o h o u r s o f a p s ychology elective.

HE A LTH MINOR: ( 20 semester hours) The following courses a re r e q u i r e d : H E 292, 295, 324, 326. COACH I NG M INOR (Men and Women): 1 8 s e m e s t e r h o u rs inc l u ding : PE 2 77, 281, 334, 4 85, p a rticipa tion in a v a rs i t y or club sport, a n d a m i ni m u m of 10 h o u rs selected fr m a m o ng t h e following: PE 3 3 1 , 361, 370, 3 7 1 , 372, 373, 374, and 478. Interim a n d s u m me r cou rses m a y be included a s electives w i t h the a p p roval of t h e d i rector.

102

PHYSICAL E D UCAT I ON


DANCE M I NOR: 20 hours req u i re d PE .362, 282, or 4 9 1 , h o u rs from t h fo llOWIng: PE 240, 2 4 2, 2 4 3 ( m � y be rt>pl'ated ) . 2 4, a nd e i g h t h o u r s f r o m t h e foU o w i n g � PE 0 8, 360, M LIS I C 1 3 1 - 1 3 2, A r t 1 1 0, 280, a n d Biology 205- 206. Th e d a n c e m i n o r i s c ross- referen ced with Com m u n i c a tion A r t s . our

B,A. I N EDUCATION - SECONDARY SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHING M AJOR (44 holUs): Req u i red ; (2.4 h o u r ) : PE 2 7 7 , 328, 47 8, 4 8 1 , 4 8 2, and 485, Biol og y 205 a n d 206, and pa rt icipation in a vars i t y U( c l u b s po rt . E l ec t ives : 20 ho uTs f r o m a m o n g t h e f lIowi n g ; PE 275, 282, 285, 286, 287, 332, 3 6 0, 36 2, 484, nd 491. S t u d e n t s desiring K- 1 2 Certifica t i o n m L15 1 tomplete PE 2 8 , 322, .362, and 284 o r 2.88 i n add i t i o n t o m e e t i n !! req u i re m e n t s a s s e t fort h b y t h e Sch ool of Educati o n .

B . A . I N EDUCATIO - ELEMENTA RY SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION TI ACHING MAJOR (24 hours)� The f o l l o w i n g L O u rses a re req u i r ed; PE 2 7 7, 283, 2 8 6, 3 2 2, 3 3 4 , 0 2 a n d 4 hOLlrs of 1' 1 c l i vI's i n p h ysicJI education with the a pproval of the director. SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHING M INOR (18 hou(5)� PE 277, 3 3 4 , and 485 and 1 2 hours of e lec t ive5 from a m ong the following: PE 282, 283, 283, 286, 28 7, n d 3 28. The fo llo w ing couxses a re requ ir e d :

ELEMEN TARY SCHOOL TEACH I N G M I NOR ( 1 2 hours): 8 hOLlrs from a m ong the fol low i n g: 283 , 286, and 362. PE 322 and

K-6 PHYSICAL EDUCATION SPE CIALIST AND K -6 CLASSROOM TEAC H E R (32 hours): T h e fol lowing co u rses are re q u i red� PE 277, 283, 286, 3 2 2, 48 1 , 4 8 2 , 4 8 5 and Biology 205-206. ElEMENTARY SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION SPECIALIST: The followin cou rses a re re q u ir ed : PE 2 7 7, 283, �86, 322, 360, 4 8 1 , 4 82, 4 84 , 4 85; Biology 20 5-206; a n d 8 hours of e l ectives (Ed. 457 and Music 341 are reco m m ended ) .

COURSE OFFER I N G S '-

Courses i n t h e School o f PhySIcal E du ca t io n a.re offered i n t he

following area s ;

H E A L T H EDUCATION 281 I NJURY PREVENTION AND THERAPEUTIC CARE 2 Q2 f I RST AlD 295 SCHOOL HEALTH 324 PERSONAL HEA LTH 326 COMMUNITY HEALTH REC REATION 3 3 0 RECREATtON PROG R A M M I NG 483 R ECREATION ADMlNl STRA nON PHYSICAL EDUCATION 275 WATER SAfETY I N STRUCTION 2 77 FOUNDATION Of PHYSICAL EDUCATION 2 82 PROFE SSIONAL ACTIVIT I E S: DANCE 283 PROfESSIONAL ACTI V I T I E S: G YM N A STICS 285 PROfESSIONAL ACTI VITIES: INDIVIDUAL AND DUAL SPORTS

PROfESSIONAL ACTIV I T IES: T E A M SPORTS PROFESSIONAL ACTIVI l ES : RECRE ATIO N ACTIVITIES 3 3 2 PHYSICAL E DUCATION I N THE ELEM ENTARY SCHOOL 328 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT AND ADMINISTRATlON 332 OFFIOATING 334 SCIENTIFIC BASIS FOR TR AINING 360, 3 6 1 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICUM, COACHING PRACTICUM 362 RHYT H MS AND DANCE 37 0- 37 5 COA C H I NG TH EORY 3 9 1 , 392 THERAPEUTIC EXERCIS E, AMBUlA TlON TECHN IQUES 4 0 1 WORKSHOP 4 7 8 PSYCHOLOGICAL CONCEP TS OF PHYSICAL E DUCATION A N D ATHLETICS 481 EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY 482 K I N ES I OLOGY 484 M EASUREM ENT AND EVALUATION IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 485 BIOMECHAN ICS 49 1 I N D EPENDENT STUDY 501 GRADUATE WORKSHOPS 597 GRADUATE RESEARCH

286

287

100 PERSONA LIZED FITNESS PROG RAMS T o sti m ulate s t u dent i n t e rest i n f u n c t ional persona lly­ f physical acti vi ty; ass e s s m e n t o f d esi g n e d prog r a m s physical co nd i tion a n d s k i l l s ; reco m me nd a t- i() n of specific progra m s for m a i n t a m i n g and i mp rovi ng p h y s ical h ea l t h . Sh ould b e taken a s a f resh m a n . I I I ( 1 )

200-229

IND IVIDUAL AND D U AL ACTIVITIES

201 (Begin n i ng Golf), 202 ( I n te rmedia t e a n d Adva nced Golf), 203 ( A rc h e ry ) , 204 ( B o w l i n g ) , 207 ( Begi nn ing Gy mnastics), 208 ( S k i i n g ) , 209 (i n te rme di a te G y m n asti 5 ) ,

2 l 0 W (Slimnastics), 2 1 1 (Be g i n n i ng Bad m i n ton ), 2 1 2 ( In te rm ed iate Bad m i n t n l . 2 1 3 ( Pe r sonal De fense), 2 14 (Beg i nni ng Te n n i s ) . 2 1 5 ( I n termediate T e n n i s ) , 2 1 6 ( Begi n n i n g I e S ka t i n g ) ' 2 1 8 ( Back packi n g ) , 2 1 9 ( Ca n oei ng) , 2 2 2 ( Ha nd ball, Squash, a nd Racke tba l l ) , 22 3 ( S q u a h a nd Racketba J l ) , 225 (Aerobics), 227 ( Weight Trai n i n g ) , 228 (Basic Mo u n t a i neeri ng), 229 (Equitation). ( 1 )

230-239 AQUATICS 230 ( Beg i n n i ng Swi m m i n g ) , 23 1 ( I n t ermedia te S w i m m i ng ) ,

232 (Advan e d S wi m mi ng ), 234 (Ad va nced L i f e Savi ng), (S y nc h ron ized S w i m m i n g ) , 237 ( S k i n a n d Scuba Di vi ng ) . ( 1 ) 236

240-249

RHYTH M S

2 4 0 (Begi n n in g M d e m D nee), 242 (In termediate Mode r n Dance), 243 ( A d v a nc e d M o d e m Dance). 244 (Folk a n d Soci a l Danc e)

(1)

PHYSICAL E D UCATION

1 03


TE AM ACTIVITIES

2 5 0-25 9

292

25 1 W (V l I e y b a l l a n d Field Hockey), 2 5 2 W ( B asketb a l l a nd Softba l l ) . 253M ( S occer a n d Volleyba l l ), 2 5 4 M ( B asketball

a n d S o f t ba l l ) ,

America n Red C ross Water S a fety I n s t ructor's C o u r s e .

prog r a m , i n c l uding i n s t r u c t i o n , se rvices a n d e n v i ron m e n t; t h e r e l a t i o n s h i p betwee n he a l t h a n d a l l l e v e l s of educa t ion .

N t reco m m e n ded for f re s h m e n . I II ( 2 )

FOUND ATIONS Of PHYSIC A L EDUCATION

322

T h e rel at io n s h ip of physical education to e d ucation; t h e biolog ica l ,

sociolog i c a l ,

principles Should b

u n de r l y i n g

psychological

p h ysical

and

e d u ca t i o n

mechanical

and

a t h le t ics.

the i n i t i a l p r ofessio n a l c o u rs e t a k e n in the Sch 01

o f Ph ysical E d uca t i o n . II (2)

s u s t a i n ed

5

in

a t h le t ics;

p h ys i cal

t h e ra p y

by

chanical devices. I (2)

28 2

P l a nn i n g ,

teaching

and

m o ve m e n t ski l l

for

eva l ua t i ng d a n c e .

ducation

a c t i v i ties,

Encompasses cond i t i on i ng

e l e m e n t a ry

school

age

and

olde r .

Prereq u i s i t e : I n t e rmediate s k i l l l e v e l o r c o m p l e t i o n o f a beg i n n i ng a c t i v i t y course, PE 2 77. I I a l y ( 4 )

283

skill

d eve l op me n t,

teaching

expe r t i s e ,

i s designed for both e l e m e n t a r y a n d high

cou rse

s c h o o l ages.

PreTeq u i s i t e : I n t ermediate skill l e v e l or completion of a beg i n n i ng a c t i v i t y course, PE 2 7 7 . I ( 4 )

bad m i n ton, t r a c k a nd f ie l d . Prereq u i s i t e : I n t e r m d i a t

skill

m p l e t i o n o f a beg i n ni n g a c t i v i t y c o u rse, PE 2 7 7 . I

(4) 286

P l a n n i n g , teach i n g , and e v a l u a t i n g these tea m actiVities soccer,

volley b a l l ,

wTes t l i n g ,

softba l l, touch foot b a l l , s p e d b a l l .

(4)

field

h oc key ,

PROfESSIONAL ACTIVITIES: RECREATION ACTIVITIES P l a n n i n g , teac h i ng a n d e v a l u a t i n g t h e fol l o w i n g : a rc h e r y , bo w l i ng , g I f , outd D r educ tion a n d v a r i o u s recrea t i o n a l 287

s p o r t s . P r ere q u i si t e : P E 2 7 7 . II (4)

1 04

repe rtoire of a c t i v i t i e s .

p rogressiv e PE

2 7 7 is

PERSON AL HEALTH

COMMU N ITY HEALTH with

pu blic

health

and their

desig n ed f o r h e a l t h m i n o r s t u d e n t s . n a / y (4)

328

CURRICULUM DE V ELOPM E NT AND ADMINISTRA nON

O rg a n i z ation a n d a d m i nis tra tion o f physical ed ucation a n d a t h l e tics ( 7- 1 2); c ur ri c u l u m developm e n t i m p le m e n ta t ion .

REC REAT ION PROG RAMMING

Super v i s i n g a n d a d m i n i s t e ri ng rec r e a t i o n a l p rograms for the school or

332

o m m u n ity. I ( 4 )

OFHGATlNG

R u les a n d offici a t i n g te ch n i q u e s o f v o l l e y b a l l , b a s k e t ba l l; design ed to train q u a li f ied officia l s . R e c o m m e n d e d as a n

SCI ENTIFIC BASIS FOR TRAINING

Pre s e n t s ph ysical

phys iolog ic training.

and

Topics

m u s c u l a r s t re n g t h a n d

k i n e siologic i n c l ude

the

a pplicatio ns

to

devel p m e n t

of

n d u ra nce, and the rela tions h i p o f

n u t ri t i o n , e n v i ro n m n t , s e x , a g e and e rgogenic aids t o a t h l etic perfo r m a n c e . Pre req u i s i t e : P E 277. I ( 2 )

PROfESSIONAL ACTIVITIES: TEAM SPORTS

baske t b a l l ,

326

334

Pl a n n i n g , t e a hing and e v a l u ating t hese activi tie s : t e n n i s , c

d e v e lo p m e n t al

and

elective f o r ma jors a nd m i n o r s . I a l y ( 2 )

PROfESSIONAL ACTI VITIES: INDIVIDUAL AND DUA L SPORTS

l e v e l or

a

foundation for u n d e rs t a nd i n g h e a l t h behavior. P r i m a r i l y d e s i g n ed for h e a l t h m i n o r s t ude n t s . II a l y (4)

330

p l a n n i n g , and safety tech n i q u e s in g y m n a s t i c s . T h e cou rse

285

l a rg e

of

s eq u e n t i a l

K-6;

Pre r e q u i s i t e : 2 7 7 . 1 ( 4 )

PROfESSIONAL ACTIVITIES: G YM NASTIC S

I n c J udes

progra m m i n g;

a d m i n i tration

i mp l i c a t i o n s f o r c o m m u n i ty h e a l t h proble m s . P r i m a r i l y

exe rc ises , and t h e de ve lopme n t of mode rn, soc i a l and folk d a n ce

g rades

for

O rga n i z a t i o n s a s socia ted

PROfESSIONAL ACTI VITIES: DANC E

specific

and

prog r a m

Practical a pplica t i o n o f h e a l t h k n owledge to d a i l y l iv i n g; a

e mploym e n t of e l e c t ri c i t y, massage, exercise, l i g h t , ice a n d m

Orga n i z a t ion

324

P r e e n tion, tre t m e n t a nd re h ab i l i ta t ion of a l l c o m m o n injuri

PHYSICAL EDUCA nON IN THE EL EMENTARY SCHOO L

reco m m e n d e d . I ( 2 or 4)

INJURY PREVE NTI ON A N D THERAPEUTIC CARE

2 81

SCHOOL HEALTH

Hea l t h conce p t s w h ich r e l a te to t h e tota l school h e a l t h

Prereq uisite : 2 3 4 . II ( 2 )

277

C ross S t a ndard First Aid a n d Perso n a l S a fe t y . n ( 2 )

295

WATER SAF ETY INSTRUCTION

275 Th

(1)

F I RST AID

T h i s cou rse meets req u i rem e n t s f o r t h e A m e r i c a n Red

P H Y S I C A L E D UCATI ON

360, 3 6 1

PROFESSIONA L PRACTICUM, COACHING PRACTICUM

A s s i st a n t

oac h i n g

tea c h i ng

e x p e ri e nces;

planning and

c o n d u c t i n g i n t e rc o l l e g i a te a t h letics a n d p h y s ical education i n s t r uction; s t ude n ts work u n d e r s u pervision of t h e head coach or p hysical education i n s tructors . P rere q u i s it e : one course i n professional a c t i v i t i e s , d e pa r t m e n tal a p p roval. ( II

(2)


..

362

RHYTHMS AND DANCE

His tori a l backgrou n d , establishment and onduc t o f d nee prog ra m tea h i n g techniques od a o m pa n i m e n t , p l a n 足 n i n a nd prese n ta t i o n o f da nce ; modern da nce tech n iques . I I a ly ( 4 ) ,

370- 3 75

'

COACHING THEORY

Tech niques, systems, t ra i n i n g m e t h ds, s t rategy a n d ps chol g y of co a c h ing ; 370 ( B a s k e t ball), 371 (F o ot ba l l ), 372 (Track a nd F i e l d ) , 373 (Bas b a l l ) , 374 ( W restling ) . ) II a l y (2)

39 1, 392

THERAPEUTIC EXE RCISE, AMBUlA TION TECHNIQUES

A

orrec tive t h e r a p y , c 1 i n i ai-training p rogram i n c l uding I c tu re, l a bo ra t or y experiences a n d clin ical practices. Prer uisi t e : depart m e n tal approval (rna i m u m e n ro l l m e n t S). I II

401

WORKSHOPS

Workshops in special fields for varying period s . (1 -4)

478

PSYCHOLOG ICAL CONC E PTS Of PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS

A s tudy of t h e im port a n t psychological factors (me thods o f co m m u n ica ting, u s e o f te a chi ng aids, learn i ng s t ra t egies, motivati ns, etc.) in t h e lea rning and te a c h i n g o f g r 5 5 motor sk i l ls , Pr e r e q u is i t : PE 2 7 7. I ( 4 )

481

EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY

Scien tifi

ba sis f o r t r a i n i n g a n d physio log ic al effect of

exerc i se o n th

hu man b o dy Prerequisite: Biology 20S-206. .

I ( 2 or 4 )

482

KI NESIOLOGY

Deals with the structural and mecha n i c a l f u n ction o f t h e muscu loske letal sys tem. T h e kin si olog ic a l a p pl i c a ti o ns o f anatomical i nfor ma tion a re g i v e n p r i m e consideration. Prereq u i s i t e : Biology 20S-20 6 . I I ( 2 )

483

RECREATION ADMI NlSTRA TION

491

I NDEPENDENT STUDY

501

WOR KS HOPS

Prereq u i s i t e : con s e n t of t he d i rector. I II 5 ( 1 -4) Graduate workshops in special fields for varying peri d s . ( 1 -4)

597

G RADUATE RESEARCH

Open to g raduate s t u d e n ts whose minor i s in t h field of physical educatio n . Prerequisite: con s e n t of t h e i n s tructo r . I II 5

( 1 -4 )

C OURSES O F F E R ED I N THE 1979 INTERIM 2 0 2 I NTERME DIATE A N D ADVANCE D GOLF 204 BOWLING 208 SKIING 210 SUM NASTlCS 225 C O-ED VOLLEYBALL 2 3 7 S K I N AND S C U B A DIVING 245 SQUARE DANCING 303 LEADERSHIP FOR OUTDOOR M I N I STRIES 308 SPORTS MOTIV AnON 309 ORIENT A nON TO HOSPITAL REHABIL ITATION 3 1 0 MODERN DANCE TECHNIQU E AND CHOREOGRAPHY 3 1 1 fAMILY CENTERED CHILDBIRTH 3 1 5 PROFESSIONAL RECREATION OPPORTUNITIES 3 1 8 ATHlETES-ACTIVITY AND READI N G 3 1 9 ADVANCED ATHLETIC TRAI N ING 334 SCJ ENTIFIC BASIS fOR TRA INING 497 CORRECTIVE THERAPY, D I RECTED STUDY, VETERANS A D M I NlSTRA nON HOSPIT At, AMERICAN LAKE

The o rganizat ion , managem e n t a n d direction of r c r a tio n a l s e rvi e s c l ega l basis, a d m i n i s t ra t i e procedures, fina ncial aspects, pers nnel mana e m e n t, fac i l i t i e s a n d i n t e r n a l org a n Iz.ation . I I (4)

484

MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION I N PHYSICAL ED UCATION

The selecti n, c o n s truction a nd i n terpreta tion of eva l u 足 atory t e c h n i q u e s related t o t h e physical education progra m . II a l y ( 2 )

485

BIOMECHANICS

An appl i c a t i o n of p h ysi ca l l a w s t sports activities. Pri n ipl s of motion, force, a nd eq uilibri um a re s t ressed. An l yses of various s p r t s s k i l l s are m a d e . I I (2)

PHYSICAL E D U CATION

105


Physics and Engineer路 ng Physics is a basic s c i e nce holding two prom i nen t pos i tions in con temporary soci e t y . First, p h ysics is a n i m p o r ta n t co r n e rs to ne of o t h e r d iscipl i n e s such a s c h e m i s t ry, geology , a n d b iology; and it is the fou nda tion fo r our f a m i l i a r techno logies o f comm u n i a t i n , t ra n s portation, n d n e rg y con ver sio n . Secondly, t h r u g h i t s inqu i ri ng principles a n d t h rough t h e re vo l u ti ona r y basic concepts of n a t u re it in trod uc e s , physics d ra m a ti cally a ffe t s the h u m a n vision of n a t u re a n d cri t ica l ph ilosoph i c a l thoug h t . I n i t s engineering p rog ra m t h e depa r t m e n t i s com m i t t e d to provide a n ed ucation f s u f ficie n tly fu nda menta l n a t u re to p rmit rapid a da p ta t io n to new t ech n ic al probl e m s a n d opport u n i t ies and of s u f fi c i e n t l y liberal sc pe to provide a w a r e n e s s of th broa d social r spo n s i b i l i ties i mplici t in en gi n ee r i ng. The depa r t ment seeks to promo te t h e i n teraction be tween h u ma n valucs a n d t h e tech n ica l works of h u m a n k i n d a n d the f u n d a m e n t a l e n g i neering scie n c e s . The depa r t m e n t o f f e r s B . S . level degree w o r k in e n g i n ee ri n g - physics and a 3-2 e n g i ne e ri ng d u a l degree p rogra m j oi n t l y w i t h t h e Sch ools of E n g i ne e r i ng and App l ied Science of Col u m bia Un i ve r s i t y and S t a n f r d U n i ve rs i t y . A d m ission to Col u m bia is a u to m a t i c upon recom mend a t ion; a d m i s sio n to S t a n fo rd , ho weve r, is compe t i t i v e . Conce n t ra t ions in elect r ic a l and me h a nic a l e ngi neeri n g sciences a re a v a i l a ble w i t h i n each d e g ree p rogra m .

FAC U LTY Heeren, Cha i r ;

Adams, Clark, Haueisen, Nornes,

Tang.

The B . s . physics m a j o r s e q u e n ce offers a c h a l l e n g i n g prog ram e m p h a s i z i n g a low s t u d e n t -teacher r a t i o w t i h u n de rgrad uate resea rch partiCipa t i o n . Several s t u den t pub lica t ions resu l ting from such resea rch h a v e appeared i n professiona l j o u r n a l s of i n t er na t io na l re p u t a t i o n . Tw i n t ro d u c t o ry seq u e n ces are offered to m a j o r s : C"lIege Phvs i[5 a n d Crlleml Physics. Th ese sequ n ces d i ffe r in the l e v e l of m a t h e m a t i c s used, as s t a ted in t h e ourse desc r i p t i ns. They also differ s o m e w h a t in em p h a S I S, w i th C" III'rod PhysIC; i n vo l v i n g more c o m p re h e n s i v e analy e .

1 06

P H Y S I C S & E N G I NE E R I N G

_


T h e department also offers a B . A . degree i n p h ysics for science-oriented l i beral a r ts s t udents, re q u i r i ng only s i x courses

A specially designed course for non-science majors, Tht rh�slcal Universe. and one for mu sic majors, Musical Acoust ics. are also offered . S t udents i n tending to major in the department are advised early to take note of t h e i n t e r r e l a t i o n s h ips between t h e c a reer fields of science (ph ysics), engineering, and tech nology (also called engine ering- tec h n ology). Sci e n t i s t s are m otiva ted b y Taw c u riosity . They a s k t h e "why" questions and st r i ve t o answer t h e m; t h eir concern i s w i t h t h e n a t u r a l world. Pure science is dedica ted to a cq u i r i n g new knowledge, which may in i t self h a ve no i m m e d i a te applica tion . E n g i neering is basically concerned w i t h u s i n g scientific knowledge for t h e benefit and comfort o f people. W h ile science, p a r t i c u l a r l y p hysics, d e a l s w i t h t h e n a t u r a l world, engin eering foc uses u p o n the world const ructed by pI' pIe. M a t h e m a t ics is the langu ge of c o m m u n ic a t ion i n both physics and engineering. W i t h o u t scientists, engineers would have n o acc um ula ted store h o u s e of scien t i f ic knowledge from wh im to d ra w in crea t i n g e n g i n e e r i n g designs, and wit h o u t en ineers scien tific know ledge would seldom be applied to solve practical proble m s . Engineers take the insights, facts, and formulas discovered by sci e n t is t s and us t h e m i n i nventing des i g n s to sol ve problems posed i n the context of our socio­ economic-technical society. PLU has degree progra m s i n scien tific fields a s w e l l as programs i n e ngineering . However, PLU h a s no academic progra m in engi neering-techn ology, a career field concerned w i t h h a nds-on aspects of r o u t i n e t e s t i ng, construc tion, and m a i n tena nce o f h ar dware designed by i n physics.

enginee rs .

PHYSICS PROG RAM BACHElOR OF SClENCE MAJOR: 32 semester hours: 1 4 7, 1 48, 1 53, 223, 3 3 1 , 3 32, 3 36 , 3 5 6, 4 2 1 , 4 2 2 . 4 9 7-498 m a y be substitu ted for 4 2 1 - 4 2 2 w i t h consent of t h e d e p a r t m e n t . Eight

-

add i ti o n a l semester h o u r s may be desirable, depending on t h e s t u d e n t's p rofessional objectiv s . F o r exa mple, i t i s r comm nded t h a t pre - Ph . D . s t u d e n t s take 4 0 1 a n d 4 0 6 . C o n s ul t t he departmen t for specific recom mendations. Required su ppor t i n g courses: M a t h 1 5 1 , 1 5 2, 253; Engineering 354; C h e m i s t ry 1 1 5; plus e i t h e r C h e m i s t r y 3 4 1 o r Engineering 35 1 .

BACHELOR Of A RTS MAJOR: 2 4 s e m e s ter hou rs: 1 4 7, 1 4 8, 1 53, 1 5 4, 2 23 , p l u s ten semester hours. U n d e r s pecial ci rc u m s t a n ces 1 25 - 1 26 may be substit u t ed for the 1 5 3- 1 5 4 s q uence . This requires t h e consent o f the depa r t m e n t . Add i t ional cou r ses m a y be d e s i ra ble, depending on t h e st udent's professional objectives. o n s u l t t h e department for speci fic recom me nda t ion s. Required supporting courses: M a t h 1 5 1 , 1 5 2.

M I N O R: 2 2 semester h ours, i n c l u d i n g 1 4 7- 1 4 8 (on e-h o u r l a b s ) , 1 53, 1 54 (or 1 2 5, 1 26 ) ; t h r e e a d d i t i o n a l courses , o f w h i c h a t l east two m u s t be upper d ivision.

O U TLINE.' BACH ELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICS

FRESHMAN Fall:

1 53 147

Math 151

Spring :

1 54 148

Math 1 5 2

SOPHOMORE Fall: 223

Math 2 5 3

231 336 354

Spring:

J U N IOR Fall:

331 356 '351 Chem

341

332

Spring:

'272

General P h ysics Lab Analy tic Geometry and Calculus General P h y s ics Lab A n a l y tic Geometry and C a l c u l u s Ele m e n t a r y Modern P h y s ic s M u l t i variable Calcu lus a n d Diffe ren tial E q u a t ions Sta tics Mechanics E n g i n e e r i n g Analysis Electroma g n e t ic Theory M a t h e m a tical Physics T h e rmodynamics or P h y s ic a l C h e m i s t r y

Elect roma gn e ti c Waves and P h y sical Opt ics Solid S t a t e Electronic Devices

SEN IOR Fall: S pri n g :

" 401 421 "406 422

Quantum Advanced Adva nced Adva nced

Mech a n ic s La bora tory Modern Phys ics L a boratory

'Optional "Optional, reco m me n d ed for g r aduate school c a n d id a t e s

O U TLINE BAC H E LOR OF A RTS IN PHYSICS

Fall:

153 147

Math 151 Spring:

154

G eneral Phy sics Lab Analytic Geometry a n d Calculus G e n e r a l P h y s ics

1 48

Lab A n alytic Geometry a n d Calculus Fall: 223 E l e m e n ta r y Modern Phy sics PLUS 1 0 additional semest er hours Math 152

COURSE OFF ERING S - Physics 1 06

THE PH YS IC A L UN I V ERSE

A n examination of the la rge-scale s t r u c t u re o f t h e u n iverse dir ected towa rd an underst anding of the ori in o f the u niverse as well as i ts eventual fate. Disc u ssion topics include galaxies, quasars, s t e l l a r evolution, black hol es, relativity, and nuclear energy. The prese n ta tion is non­ m a t h e m a tical and high school p h ysics is not a pre req uisi t e . I n te nded prim aril y for the libera l a r t s s t u d e n t . I (4)

PHYSIC S & E N G I N E E R I N G

107


1 25, 1 26 COllEGE PHYSICS This course p ro vides a n i n troduct ion to the f u ndamen t a l topics o f phy s ic s . It is a non - alcul u s se q uence , i n volving only the use of trigonom e t ry and college algebra. Co ncurre n t registration in 1 47, 1 4 8 is re q ui r d . I, II (4, 4)

1 4 7, 148

I NTRODUCTORY PHYSICS LABORATORY Basic labo ra t ry experi men t s a re p rformed in c nj uncti n with the Gene ra l and College Ph y s i cs sequences. Concu rre nt regist ra tion in 1 25, 1 26 r 1 53, 1 54 is req u i red. 1. I I ( l )

1 53, 1 54 G EN ER AL PHYSICS A calculus-le vel s u rvey of th ge n e r a l fields 0 ph y s i c s , including c l ass ic a l mech a ni c s, thermod y n a m ics, electricity and mag net ism a n d optics. Co ncu rren t reg i s t ra tion i n 1 4 7, 1 4 8 nd prior or oncu rren t regist ra t ion in Math ] 5 1 , 1 5 2 is req u i red. I. II (4, 4) 205 MUSICAL ACOUSTICS A study of m u s ical sou n d u sing ph ysics met h od s : vibrating system ; simple ha rmonic mo t i n; wave moti o n ; complex waves; wave gen ration in m usical i n struments; p h Y SIOlogy of heari ng; architectural acous tic ; electr nic re ord ing nd reprodu tion . la b ora tory and g r u p tours. No prereq u i s i te courses in ei the r ma t he m a tic s or ph y s i c s a re assu med . 1 1 ( 4 ) 2 2 3 E L E M E N TARY MODERN PHYSICS This cou rse co ers the v a r i o u s ph e n o m e n a where claSSIcal m e th ods of p h y s i c s f a i l . Con temp rary in terpr tations of t hese phenomena a re devel oped at a n elementary level . Pre­ req ui ite: 1 54 r 1 26 o r consent of Instructor. I ( 4 )

3 5 1 THERMODYNAMIC S ee Eng i n ee r in g 35 l . 3 5 4 E N G I N E E R I N G ANALYSIS S e e E ng i nee ri n g 3 5 4 . 3 5 5 TEACH I N G Of PHYSICS New developments i n secondary cu r r i c u l u m . teaching techniq u es a nd teaching media i n t h e p h y si ca l sciences; coun te d toward a d eg ree for only t r\O s e s t u d en t s receiving ce rtificatio n . (4) 356 MA THEMA TICAL PHYS IC S Bo unda r y va l ue p r ob l ms, sp ial functi n s , matrices nd te n s o rs , p roba b i l i ty t h e o r y , ei g e n va l ue p robl e m s , co m p l ex v a r ia b l o nto u r int g r a t i o n a n d th ir a pplicati o ns to p h ysics . Con t i n u a ti o n of E n g i n e e r i ng 354. I (4) _ ,

401

I NTROD UCTION TO QUANTUM MECHANICS

T h e ideas and techniques of q u a n t u m me c ha n i c · a r e de v el o p ed Variou q ua n t u m mech a n i a l systems a n d phenomena are s t udied i n o r d e r t o demonstrate these ideas and tech n iq ues. I (4) 4 06 ADVANCED MODERN PHYSICS describe topics of -1 dern t heories a re u sed cont mp rary imp rlance such a t om i c and s u b-atomic phenomena, plasmas, sol ids, and a s t roph ys ica l eve n t s . The a pplica tion of q u a n t u m mecha nical tec hniques a re e mph asized when appropria t e . Pre r equ i s i te : 4 0 1 . n ( 4 )

42 1 , 4 2 2

A D V A N C E D L A BORATORY

L 11 ( 1)

272 SOLID STATE E LE CTRONIC D EV I C E S See ngineeri ng 2 7 2 .

4 9 1 , 492 ( 1 -4)

I NDEPENDENT STUDY

3 3 1 E L ECTROMAG NETIC THEORY E le t rost a t i c s , dipole fields . fi e l ds i n dielectri materia ls , electromagnetic i n d uctIon, magnetic propertie of matter, genera ti n a nd propaga tion of lectr magne t i waves w i t h an e mpha si s o n t he re l a tio n s h i p with ph YSIcal optics. Prereq uisite : 1 53, 1 54; co re q ui s i t e : 356 or conse n t . I (4)

4 97, 4.98 (1-4)

RESEARCH

E l ECTRO M A G N ETIC WAVES AND PHYSICAL OPTICS A s udy of the genera tion a n d propagation of e lect ro­ mag ne tic waves. The ma t hema t i ca l des cr i pt i o n and the ph y sica l u nde rsta nd i ng of elec tr magnetic rad i a t i on a re dis ussed w i t h a n e mphasis on i ts re l a t io n sh i p w i t h p h y s i ca l optICS. Pre r e q u i s i te : 3 3 1 . I I ( 4 ) 332

3 3 6 MECHANICS Fu ndamen tal me e h a n l s ; m a t h e rna tical for m u l a tion of p h y s i al problem ; mo t i o n of pa r t icles in one, two o r t h ree dimen i ns; motions of systems of pa rt ic l es ; dynami s and sta t i f rigid b dies; m ving coordi n a te s y s te ms; Lag range's equations a n d H a m i l tonian form ulation of mechan ics. Cor quisite: 354 or c o n s e n t . II (4)

1 08

PHYSIC S & E N G I N E E R I N G

E N G I N E E R I N G PROG RAM A s m a ll e r u n ivers i t y lik P L i s u n i q u e l y s ui ted t o f o s t e r a s t u den t's personal devel o p me n t w h i l e m a k i n g a f i r m b u t not p re m d t u re c o m m i t m e n t to professional a n d ca reer goa l s . S uch a set t i n g a l so hel p s a s t ude n t to c l a r i f y the s oc i a l context in w h i c h engineers fun tion. A major sc ho o l of engineering like C l u rnbia o r tan ford e m p h asi7.es a d va nced s t u d i es . res e a rch. a nd interaction w i t h i nd u s t r y . Thus, PL 's 3 - 2 program gives s t ude n t s th e best of two setlin s - breadth at PLU nd e p t h i n a n e n g i neer i n g specia l t y at C o l u m b i a or t a n ford S t u d e n t s h <l v e a i sQ b en i n v o i v e d i n 3 - 2 p rogram s a t the U n iverS i t y of Wash i n g t o n or o t he r s ta t e u n i vc rs i t i 5 i n the Pacific N o rt h , e s t .


D u r i n g t h e f i rs t t h r�e yea rs of t h i s p rog r a m s t uden ts m us t 1) a l l ge n e r a l u n i versi ty core req u i rem e n t s , 2) two i n t e r i m s , 3) a l l ba s ic e ie n ee a n d m a t h e m a tics req u i re m e n t ;; , 4 ) a n d s i x co u rse s i n e ngi nee ri ng . One ,1 clear s e n se f d i r e c t ion wi t h i n an eng i n eeri n g s pecia l t is g a i ned , a reco m m e n d a t i o n to o i u m b i a 1.1r Stan ford may be gran ted . A d m i s i o n to C ol u m b ia is a u l o m a t iL upon rec o m menci.ltion; � d m is ion .0 5t n ford, h oweve r . I co m pe t i t i ve . D e t a i l s of transfer ad m iss ion are made a v.l i la bl i n t h fall of t h e third yea r. Normal l y t w additional years a re ne essary t finish engineering pecialty . ou r s es a t Col u m bia or S ta n fo rd . com p l et e

P L U also offers a four-year progr m in e ngi neering-p hysics . Beca use t he universi ty does not o f f e r a st a n d a rd e ng i nee r ing degree, s tu de nts electing to re mai n at P L U t h ro u g h o u t t hei r col lege ca ree r , or for wham t h - - 2 eng i n eeri ng prog r il m i s I na pprop rra te t h ough t h e y a r e d r a w n t o a n engineering career, find t h is program at tracti ve. I t is more practical t h an a physics d eg re e while at t he same time more t h e o retical t ha n the ll5Uai e n gi n e e r i ng deg ree. The B. S . degree in eng- i neerr ng - ph ysics prepares s t uden ts for emp loym en t in m a n y diverse i n d u s t r i s or d i rect l y for g ra d u a t e s t u d y In nearly all fjelds of eng ineering. Strength m a y be built in electnca l r m ec h a n ica l e ng r neeri ng sciences by c a re f u l selection of u p pe r clivisi n course . 5tudents arc u rge d to d e v e lop .l mjnor i n e i t h e r mathema tics or com p u te r science , pa r l i u l a rly i f a sp i ra t i o n to g ra d u a te s t u d y i n en g i n ee ri ng i s pa rt of their -c a ree r p la n . A minor I n b u s i n es s a d m i n i , t ra h on is parti c u l a rly ap prop ri a te for worki n g i n I ndustry i m m e di a t I a ft e r g rad ua t ion . For m ax I m u m fleXi b i l i t y I n upper di viSi on c o u rse s , s t uden ts aspi ri ng to the eng i n ee r i n g ­ phys cs deg re e should sched u le th ir f i r s t tw yeilrs ide n tically to t ho se fo r d ua l degree 3� 2 engrneering . JunIOr and se ni or year sched ules a re d et er m i n ed by upper d i vi s ion req uirements a n d by s t u d e n t s ' object ives . A suggested schedule i s shown be lo w . Regardless of even tua i specialt y , both E G R 2 3 1 Statics nd EG R 2 7 1 ltC/rica I irry i/s should be t a ke n . T h e s e should be foil wed by EGR 232 M�c/lanic< of Solids for t uden ts in the mechanical e ngineerinp; con entra tion or by EGR 272 Solid 51alt EltC/ronir Dr�iw for t h ose with I n t e rest in electricd l engineering . T h e n a t u r a l sciences core requirement is a u t o m a t i .lily sati fied by engineering s t u de n t s as i s the second part of op tion I I of t h e foreign l a n g u a ge req uirement i n t h e C ol l e g e of A r t s and Sci ences . U n l es s t hey a u tomatically q u a ll f y for fulfi l l i n g option I of the fo re i g n l ang uage req u i re me n t on the bils i , of t her r hIgh school w ork, studen ts an' e n c o u raged to satis fy this requ i re men t by m e a ns of option II. Hours freed by satisfaction of the foreign language re q u i re m e n t on the bas is of h ig h school w o r k m a y p rofi tably be used f o r taking a nother core req u i re me n t (e.g . , hlstaryll teTil tu re or so c ia l sciences) or for taking m a the mat ics beyo n d calculus (e.g . , C O M S C I 244 Assembly Ulnguagt. MTH 331 Linla r Alg,bra . MTH 345 In/rorlu lion /0 Nllmtrica/ Analysis, o r MTH 351 Applied Mathtmalid. Particula r a t ten tIOn sh ou ld be given to the I ntegrated StudIes Prog ra m , known as Core I I , a n d to i t s Jpphcabllity for engi neers in o u r t ech no log ica l society.

S t u d e n t s with s trong prepa r at i o n ( A 's a n d S's ) In h ig h s c h ool m a t h ma t ics at least t h ro u g h t ri g o n o m try/functions a s

well as

i n sC Ie nce t h ro u g h physics and with SAT mat h S((lres n O l ower

t h a n 550 s h o u l d sched ul e thei r cia ses as in d Icated below. Those

w i t h less ad eq u a t e prepar tion i n m a t he m a t i cs and scien ces, particula r l y math ma tics, h ould consider s t reng thenin g t h e i r backgrou n d w i t h c m m u n it y college work i n t h e s u m me r before e n r o l l m e n t at P L U and should postpone the physics seque n e u n t i l their second yedr. An a p p ro p ria te first yea r schedul£ i n l u des : Fa l l - EGR 1 5 1 Visual Tlll lliring MTH 1 5 1 Calflllus. CHM 1 1 5 Ciwnis/rll, a g e n e ral u n i vers i ty LOre r qui rem e n t , a n d P E 1 0 0 r a PE act iv i t y co u rse; S P R ING - E G R 1 8 2 ./vi Il'ri"/, . MTH 1 5 2 Calculu>, CO M S C I 144 Cumpllirr SmIlCf, a c or e re q u i re m e nt , ilnd a PE a c t i v i t y c o urse (or P E 1 00 ) . 3 - 2 D U A L DEG RE E :

u a l B . S . degrees fr m P l U a n d

Colu m bia, S ta n ford o r other E C P D (c redi ted En gi neeri ng Schoo l . Th ree f u l l -t i me yea rs at P L U pl u s 2. ... ddi t ional f u l l - t i m e years t Col u m bia o r S t a n f o r d . P L B . S . i n Engine ri n g - S c ie n e

is g ra n t ed after f j r t year ill Col u m bia or S t a nfo rd ; B. S. i n Engineeri ng Spec i a l t y (E.E., M . E . , e t c . ) gra n ted b y Columbia or S t a n fo rd il t the end f fifth y e a r PHYS: 1 4 h o u rs, 1 4 7, 14 , 1 53, 1 5 4, 2 2 3 . E CR B A S I C S : 1 0 h o urs , 1 5 1, 1 82, 354 . EG R CONCENTRATION (3 elections '): 1 0 ho u rs Eleetri a l : 27 1 , 2 7 2, 352, 4 4 1; Mech a n ical: 2 3 1 , 232 (or P H Y S

336), 3 5 1 , 4 4 2 .

· Courses s e l ec t e d on t h e basis of t h e s t u d e n t's career obJ ect i lie s .

Re q u i red s u p p o r t i n

1 44; C h e m i s tr y 1 1 5.

c o u r s es : Ma t h , 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 , 2 5 3; C O MSCI

B.S. DEC R E E IN E N G I N E E R r NG·PHYSICS: Si mi l a r to th e 3program wi t h dditional course work at PLU i n e ngin ee ri ng and physics; 4 years al PlU PHYS: 24 hours, 1 4 7, 1 48, 1 5 3, 1 54, 2c23, 3 3 1; 3 3 6 (optional ); 2

356, 421, 422.

f G R BASICS: 10 h o u rs , 1 5 1 , 1 8 2., 354. EGR C O C E N TRATION ( 4 selections'): 12 hours E1ee t ri a l : 271, 2'72, 35 2, 4 4 1 ; Me c ha n i a l : 2 3 1 , 2. 2. (or PHYS 336), 3 5 1 , 4 4 2 . ·Courses selec ted o n basis of t h e st ud e n t 's caree r object i ves .

Re q u i red s u p po r t i n g cou rses : M a t h 1 44 , 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 , 253; C h e m is try ] ] 5. St udents wish i ng to mdjor in physics or engi neen n g are encourilged to contact the d e par t me n t ea rl y in their coli ge CMeer, prefe ra bl y before e n tering as fres h me n . Early c o n s u l ta t ion p ro vi de s greater flexibi li ty I n d e sig n i ng one's p rog r a m .

P H Y S I C S & E NG I N E E R ING

1 09


Spring :

O U TLIN E : BAC H EL O R Of S C I E N C E

in Engineering-Science (3-2) and Engi neeTi ng-Physics

Mech. o f S o l i d s

4

EG R 3 5 4

E n g . Analysis

4

OMSCI 1 4 4

F I R ST Y A R Fal l : EGR 1 5 1

Visual Thinking

2

PHYS 153

General P h ys ics

4

PHYS 147

La boratory

MATH 1 5 1

Calculus

CORE PE

PE

1

17

4

3 - 2 E n g i n e e ring

Elect rical Engineering Conce n t ra t ion

1

Fall:

E G R 182

I n t ro . Materials

4

PHYS 1 54

General Physics

4

PHYS 1 48

Laboratory

EGR 231

Stat ics

2

CHM 1 1 5

Gen. Chern.

4

CORE

4

CORE

4

PE

1 15

4

CORE

4

PE

1 18

SECOND Y E A R

Spring : 4

CORE CORE

4

CORE

4 12

Ele ct rical Engineering Concent ration Mechanical Engineeri ng Conce n t ra t ion

Fall:

Fa l l :

EG R 271

Elee. C i r c u i t

2

P H Y S 223

E l e m . Modern

4

EGR 271

Elec. C i rcuits

2

MATH 2 5 3

Calculus

4

C H M 1 15

Gen. C h e m i s t r y

4

CORE

4

COR E

4

CO R E

4 ___

CORE

4

18

PE

1 15

SprI ng: Spring:

EGR 2 7 2

S o l i d State

4

E GR 3 5 4

E n g . Analysis

4

CORE

4

4

CORE

4

4

CORE

CO M SC I 1 44

C o m p o Science

CORE PE

4 12

1

__

17

Engi neeri ng -P h y sics Fall:

Mec h a nical Engineering Conce n t r a t i o n

PHYS 331

EM [

4

EGR 2 3 1

S t a t ics

2

P H YS 3 5 6

Math. Phys.

4

PHYS 2.2 3

E[e m . M od e rn

4

EG R 351 o r

T h e r mo

MA T H 2 5 3

Calculus

4

EGR 3 5 2

A I D C i rc u i t s

Fal l :

CORE

4

C OR E

4 18

110

4 4

4

Spring:

Calculus

C o m p o Science

CORE

THIRD YEAR

16

M ATH 1 5 2

E G R 232

PHYSIC S & E NG IN E ERING

4

Spri n g : PHYS 336" or

Mecha nics

PHYS 332"

E M 1I

4

CORE

4

CORE

4


FO U R T H COLLEGE Y E A R 3-2 E n g i neering

Jun ior e ng i n e e r i n g s t a n d i n g at C o l u m bia, S t a n ford, o r a reg io n a l

s t a t e u n i v e r s i t y . A d m i s s i o n t o C o l umbia i s a u to m a t i c upon recom m e n d a tion by the depa r t m e n t . Admission to S t a n ford is com petitive.

28 a d d i tional s e m es t e r h o u rs i n upper division engineering at Col u m bia or S t a n ford (e . g . , E . E . , M.E., C . E . ,

specialty course

e tc . ) t o q u a l i fy for a degree of B . S . in E n g i n ee ri ng -Science from P L U . The degree is a w a rd ed a f t e r p rese n t a tion of

a signed gold

book a nd a t ra n s c r i p t from C o l u mbia or S t a n fo r d . E ng i n eeri n g - Ph ysics Fall: PHYS 421

Adv. Lab.

E G R 44 1 · or

Ne tworks

EG

Tra n s po r t

442·

CORE

4

P H Y S 422

Adv. Lab.

OR E

4 4

F I F T H C O L L E G E Y E AR

­

conductors, magnetics, alloys, polymers), t h e i r re la tions h i p to ch e m is try and · ph ysics, and i mplications fOT modern technological socie t y D i sc u s s ion of wh a t useful properties engineering materia ls h ave a n d how t hese properties can be a l te red by a d j u s ti n g i n ternal micro-s t r u c t u re . A pa r t i ­ c u l a r l y u s e f u l en try poin t f o r t h e s t u d y o f electrical a n d mecha nical e ngineeri n g . Ba kgr u nd o one course in chemistry. Il (4) .

354 4

Spri ng ·

C ORE

I NTRODUC TION TO MA TERIAlS SC I E N C E F u n d a m e n tals of s y n t he tic ma teria l s (dielec t rics, s e m i 182

E N G I N E E R I NG ANALYSIS

I n t roduction to vector and ten sor calculus , f u nc tions of a comple x variable, Laplace and F ou r i e r t ra nsforms, and u n d e t e r m i n ed m u l ti p l i e rs . Compr hens ive a nd illu s tra t i ve exa m p l e s from t h e fie lds of e l ec t rom ag n e t is m , waves, t ra n spor t , v i bra tions, a n d mecha n ics. May be taken as a package with PHYS 356. Req uire m en t s : M a t h ema tics 2 5 3 . II (4)

3- 2 Engi n eering Complete e n g i neer i n g speci a l t y ( E . E., M E , C . E . , e t c . ) a t o l u m b i a , S t a n ford, O r a reg ional s t a t e u n i v e rs i t y t h ereby e a r n i n g t h a t school's B . S . d e g r e e . A t S t a n ford it is a l s o possible to

be ad m i t ted to

a c o t e r m i n a l M . S . prog ram and e a r n a

m a s te r's degree in an e n g i neering s peci a l t y s i m u l t a n e o u s l y w i t h t h e bachelo r's d e g r e e . ·Optional

C OURSE O FF E R I N G S Engineering Mat hemat ical Systems I NTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE See Compu ter Scie nce 1 44 1 44

345 J.-

I NTRODUCTION TO NUMERICAL A N ALYSIS

S e e Ma t he m a t ics 3 4 5 .

346

N UM ERIC AL ANALYSIS See M a t h e m a t ics 346.

Engineering Basics 151

VISUAL THINKING

Three d i m e n sional v i s u a l i z a t io n , ort hogra p h ic a n d iso­ met ric pers pectives, relationship o f visual graphic t h i n k i n g to t h e c r a t i ve process, pre l i m i nary design; o f va l u e to n o t o n l y engi neers b u t also t h e science m a j o r who m u s t be a b l e t o t h i nk t h ree d i mensionally as d emanded i n mechanics or s t r u tural chemistry. E m phasis u pon fluent and flex ible idea prod uc tion. I (2)

Elec trical Engineering Science 271

E L ECTRICAL C I RC U lTS

f u n d a m .0 tal concepts of elect r ical s c ience a n d i t s u t i l iza tion in c i rcuits, com ponents, a nd devices. Require­ me n ts: C u rren t regi s t ra tion in Phys ics 1 54. I ( 2 ) 272

SOL I D ST A TI ELECTRONIC DEVICES

352

A NA LOG AND DIGITAL E L ECTRONIC C I RC U ITS

Use f ul properties of semicond uc t o rs as related to elect ronic devices; pn -junct ion diodes a n d transistors; F E T a n d M O S s t ructures; solid s late lasers. R e q u i re m e n t : E ngineering 2 7 1 . II (4)

Active s lid s ta te circuit . A na l og : AC -DC con verters, a mplifie rs, oscillators. Dig i t a l : Boolea n algebra, sequen tial logic circ u i t s , s wi t c hin g n e t wo rk s . Req u irement: Engi­ neering 271 or 272. I (4) 441

N ETWORK ANALYSIS

Analysis of elect rical circuits in t r an s ien t a nd s teady s t a te mod 5; formulation f network e q uati ns and theorems, i mpedance m a tch ing and fundamentals o f n e t work topology, t ransfer functions, d eve l opme n t of Laplace transforms and Fourier series; t i me a n d freq uency-do m a i n analysis. Req ui re men t : E n g i n e e r i n g 2 7 1 . I I ( 4 ) -

491

I N DEPENDENT STUDY

Se lected topics o f mu t ua l in t e r e s t to s tu d e n t and i n s tructor. E n ro l l m e n t i s l i m i ted and open only to s tudents who have disc ussed a proposed topic or c o u rse o f stu y i n considerable depth w i t h i n s tructor. Req u i re m e n t : m u t u a .! i n t e res t . ( 1 -4)

P H Y S I C S & E NG I N E E RI N G

111


Mechanical E ngineering Science 2 3 1 STATICS F u nda m en ta l e ng i nee ri ng s t a t ic s u i ng vector algebra; co n di tio n s f r equi l ibri u m , resultant force syst ms, cen troid and center o f gravi ty, meth d s o f virtual work, fric tio n . Require m e n t : Ph ys ic 153. r (2)

232

MECHANICS Of SOLIDS

Mecha nics f deforma ble solid bodie s; de fo r ma tion, s t re s s , con s ti tu ti ve e q u a tio n s f o r elastic m a te ri als, t h rmo 足 ela sticity, te nsion, flexure, torsion, s tabil i t y of eq uilibriu m . Req ui re men t : Engi nee ring 231 . n ( 4 )

351

THERMODYNA M I C S

f c1as ica!. macrosc pic t he rmo 足 Conc ep t s a nd eq uati on d y na m ics.; the rmodynamic cycles, flow a n d non - flow s ystems, proper ties a n m a t hema tical re la tio n s of pure s u b s ta nces, mi x t ure s and sol utiOns, phase tra ns i ti on and ch em ical reac t ions; a n el e m e n ta ry trea t m e n t of sta tistical thermody n a m iCS Req uire m e n t : Physic 154 . L I (4)

442

TRANSPORT: MOMENTUM, ENERG Y AND MASS

U n ifying concepts of the transpo r t of m o m e n t u m , ene rg y, a nd mass in planar, c yli nd ric a l and s p h e r ical geom e tries ; ma t hem a t ic a l as pe c t s of fl u id m ec ha nics; boundary layers ; transport coe f ficie n ts -v iscosit y, t h e r m a l conducti v i t y, mass d iffu siv i t y; an elementary treat men t o f t ur bul en t flow. Req u i remen t : Eng i neering 351 or c o n s e n t o f i ns t ruc to r I .

.

(4) 492

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Selected topics o f m u tu al in teres t to s t u d e n t a n d i n s t r u c tor.

E n ro l l me n t is limited and open only to s t udents who have discussed a proposed topiC or c u rse of s t ud y in considerable d ept h w i t h inst ructo r . Req ui re m e n t : m u t ua l in teres t . ( 1-4)

C OURSES OFFERE D I N T H E 1979 I NTE R I M 300 316

112

1979 SOLAR EC LIPSE RADIOACTIVITY AND NUC LEAR MEDICINE

P H YS I C S & E N G I N E E RI N G


Political Science Pol i ti ca l s c i e n c

add re s s e s o n e o f t h e m o s t d i ffic ul t,

y e t f u n d a m e n t a l l y i m po r t a n t h u ma n e ndea vo r s , t h e gove r n a nce of people a n d of oci e t i e s . T h e s t u d e n t o f pol i t ics se e ks to u n d e r s t a n d how gove r n m e n t s a re o rga n i.zed and s t r u c t u red, how political p roce sses a re

em ployed , a n d t he

relatio n s h i p of s t r u c t u res a n d proce s s e s to soci e ta l p u r pose s . Recog n i z i n g t h a t gove r n m e n t a n d

enc ou rages a c t i v e s t u d e n t p a r t ic i p a t i o n i n po l i t ic a l li f e t h ro u g h c l a s s a c t i v i t i e s a n d t h rough s u c h ca m p u s o r g a n i z a t i o n s a s t h e Y o u n g Republica n s a n d Y o u n g D e m oc ra t s . Th e p o l i t i c a l sc ie n ce fa c u l t y a t Pacific L u t h e r a n U n i v e r s i t y s h a r e a b rea d t h o f e x pe ri e n c e i n teach i n g a n d re s ea rch , i n pro feSS i on al a s s oci a t ion s a n d c o n fe r e n ce. s i n t h e U n i t ed S t a tes a n d a b road,

n d i n g o ve r n m e n t decision m a k i n g f r o m the local

t o the int m a ti o n a l level. There are n o prerequisites for political s c i e n ce co u r s e s , except a s n ot e d . Prior cons u l t a t io n w i t h t h e i n s t r uctor o f any advan ced

pol i ti c a l a c t i v i t y m a y e m bod y a n d re flec t t h e f u l l

co u r se is i n vi ted. S t u d e n ts w i s h i n g to p u rs u e

ra n g e o f h u m a n

i n po l i t i ca l s c i e n ce a re r e q u e s t e d to d ec l a re t h e m aj o r o r m i n o r

values, t h e s t u d y of po l i t i c s m u s t

e n deavor t o u nd e r s t a n d t h e rea l i t i e s of pol i ti c s w h i l e at t h e s a m e t i m e a s k i n g h o w w e l l

politi a t

o u g h t t o be served, a n d w h a t e ffects re s u l t f ro m pol i t i c al s y s t e m s work, w h a t p u r pos e s a re a n d

p h e n om e n a . P Ii t ic a l s c i e n e e n c u r a g e s a c r i tical u nd e rs ta n d i ng o f gove r n m e n t a nd p o l i tics i n the be l i e f that

a k nowledgeable, i n t e re s ted, a n d a wa re

c i tize n ry is t h e root s t re n g t h a n d n e e s s i t y of a

major

a

or m i n o r

w i t h t h e d ep a r t m e n t chair a s s o o n as p o s s i b l e .

BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR: M i n i m u m of 3 2 s e m e s t e r h o u rs, i n c l u d i n g 1 0 1 , 1 5 1 , 3 2 5 . M a j o r prog ra m s a r e p l a n n e d i n c o n s u l t a t i o n w i t h a d e p a r t m e n t,11 a d vi s e r . M I NOR: Mini m u m o f 2 0 s e m e s t e r h o u rs i n c l u d i ng 1 0 1 o r 1 5 1 . M i n o r pro g r a m s a r e p l a n n ed i n c o n s u l t a t i o n w i t h a de pa r t m e n ta l ad v i s e r . MAJOR in legal Studies: 3 7 4 , 4 5 1 , Phtlosophy

3 2 semester h o urs, i nc l ud i n g 3 7 1 ,

328, and Sociology 4 5 6, a n d 1 2 h o u r s

d e m oc ra t i c s oci e t y .

c h osen in c o n s u l t a t i o n w i t h t h E' program coord i na tor.

FACUlTY U l b r i c ht , Chair ; At kinson, Farmer, Spencer; assis ted by B ricker.

a n d 1 6 h o u rs f r o m t h ree d i f f e re n t f i e l d s p a r t i c i p a t i n g i n t h e L e g a l S t u d i e s Prog r a m , chosen i n co n s u l t a t i o n w i t h t h e p r o g r a m coordi n a t o r .

MINOR i n Legal Studies:

MINOR in Publ ic Affairs:

The , t u d y o f p o l i t i ca l science h e l ps t o p r e p a r e s t u d e n t s for x e re i s e o f t h e i r r i g h t s , d u t i es, and opport u n i ties a s e i t tze n s by giving them a b e t t e r u n d e rs t a n d i n of A m e rican pol i t ical processe, a n d of " I t e r n a t i ve systems Courses i n p o l i t ic a l science explore various topics i n A mencan govern m e n t and pol i t ics, the

i n te r n a t ional rel a t ions a n d foreign policy, co m pa ra t i ve govern m e n t a n d area s t u d ies, po l i t i cal p h i l o s o p h y a n d t h eo r y ,

an p u b lic p o l i cy a n d l u w . The d e p a rt m e n t p r ov i d e s pre-profe s i o n a l t r a i n i n g lead i n g to . nee rs in t e a c h i n g , l a w , g o v e r n m e n t , a n d rel a t e d fie l d s .

For t h e n o n - m a j o r , pol i t i c a l s c i e n ce c o u r s e s p m v i d e us e f u l s t u d y f o r a n y s t u den t gener a l l y i n t e r e s t e d i n p u b l i c a f f a i r s a n d t h e w r k i n g s o f govern m e n t . Moreover, the s t u d y of p o l i t i c s is s u p p o r t i ve of a ny d i sc i p l i n e o r p ro f e s s i o n a l prog r a m w h ose s u b s t a n ce beco m e s a m a t t e r )f l p u b l i c p o l k y . As ďż˝ u c h , p o l i t i c a l science c o m p l e m e n t s s uc h f i e l d s t h e n a t u r a l s c i e n ces, soc i o logy, b u s i ness , e d u c a t i o n , a n d eco n o m ics. Th s t u d y of p o l i t ics touch es upon o t h e r d i s ci pl i n e s w h ic h i n q u i r e i n t h u m a n behavior a n d d e v e l o p m e n t , r a n g i ng from h i s l o r y anJ p h ilosophy t o p s yc h olo g y , com m u n ic a t i o n , a n d cross-cul t u ra l s t udi s . S t ud e n t o f p,)l i t i c a l s c i e n ce h a v e t h e o p po r t u n i t y to c o m b i n e t h e a c a d e m i c s t u d y o f gove r n m e n t a n d p o l i t i c s w i t h pra t i c a l expe rie n ce. b y p a r t i c i p a t i o n i n o n e o f t h e i n t e r n s h i p p r o g r a m s

sponsl1 f d b y t h e d e p a rt m e n t . A t p re s e n t t h ese a re a v a i l a b l e i n p u b l ic a d m i n i s t ra t i o n , public l a w , a n d the l eg i s l a t i v e p rocess. T h e d e pa r t m e n t of po l i t i c a l sc i e n c e i - a f f i l i a ted w i t h 5 ver a l orga n i z a t i o n s p r o v i d i n g f o r a v a r i e t y o f s t u d e n t i n v o l v e m e n t . These organ i za t i o n s i n c l ude t h e Mod e l U n i t e d N a t i o n s , C e n t e r for t h e S t u d y o f Public P o l i c y , . n d P o l i t ical Science S t uden t A s (ia t i on . The d e p a r t m n t f u rt h e r s p o n s r s r o t h e r w i s e

2 0 s e m e s t e r h o u rs i nc l u d i n g 3 7 1

24

s

mes t e r h o u rs , i n c l u d i n g

345

(req u i red ) a n d 2 0 h o u r s f ro m pc)l i t i c a l s c i e nce, e c o n o m i c s , s o c i o l o g y , d n d b u s i n e s s a d m i n i s t ra t i o n . o r s p e c i f i c r q u i r e m e n t s a n d c o u rse o p t i o n s for t h e P u b l i c Affa i r s m i n o r, se t h e sec t i o n of t h is ca t a l og on ' ross- Disc i p l i n a ry Ca reer Prog r a m s and co n s u l t w i t h the depart m e n t 's P u b l i c A f fa i r s adv i s e r .

MINOR in International Affair (a thematic module within the Foreign Area Studies Program): 20 to 2 4 s e m e s t er h o u rs

f r o m t h ree di f fer e n t d i sri p l i n e s , i n c l u di n g

( r e q u i re d ) 3 3 1 or 3 3 8

a n d ( o p t i o n a l ) 3 8 4 , 3 8 6, H i s t o r y 335 or S p a n i s h 3 2 2 , H i s t or y 4 0 , Eco n o m i c s 3 3 1 or 3 8 1 , a n d I n d e p e n d e n t S t u d y . F o r i n fo r m a t i o n o n t h e Pre - L a w prog r a m , s

e

the section of

t h i s c a t a l o g O n P r e - p ro fes s i o n a l P r o g ra m s .

BACHELOR O F A RTS I N EDUCATION: See

Educatton.

S c h o o l of

C O URSE OFF E R I N G S 101

I NTRODUCTION T O POLITICAL S C I E N C E

A n i n t ro d u c t i o n t o fields

of

systems.

tudy

the

m a j o r conce p t s , t h eo ri e s , i d e a s a n d

re l a t i n g

to

poli t i s

a n d g o e rn me n t I

E x p lo res g o ve rn m e n t a l s t r u c t u re s a n d pro

sses,

po l i t i ca l p o w e r a n d a u t h ori ty, c o n f l i c t , d e c i s i o n - m a k i ng , p o l i c y , a n d s t a b i l i ty a n d c h a ng e .

(4)

P O L I TICA L S C I E NC E

113


1 5 1 A M E R I C A N G O V E R N M E NT A survey of the con s ti t u tional foundations of t h e A merican political system a n d of i n s t i tu tions, processes, and p ractices rel a t i ng to participa tion, decision-making, a n d public policy i n A me ric a n nat ional gove r n m e n t . (4)

3 5 2 AM E R I C AN STATE GOVERNMENT S t u d y of governmen tal s t r u c t u res, processes, problems, a n d p u blic policy a t the state level . Special topics and field study may be arranged as appropria t e . Particular a tten tion to the state of Wash i n g t o n . (4)

2 8 2. C OMPARA T I V E G O V E R N M E NT Exa mination of poli tical systems from a comparative perspective. Pri ncipal foc u s i s on contemporar y issues, the societal setting a n d policy for m a t ion i n selected cou n t ries a t various s tage s o f political and economic develop m e n t . (4)

356 U R B A N G OVE R N M ENT A N D POLIC Y Exami nation of American government at t h e commun i ty and m e tropolitan level, political s t ructures and processes, u rban p roble m s and policies, a n d rela t ion s h i ps with other levels of gove rnme n t . Special topics a nd field s t ud y as appropriate. (4)

321

SCOPE A N D M ETHODS OF POL I TI C AL S C I E N C E An exa mi na tion of a n a l y t i c frameworks, researc h m e t hods and tech niques, and i n formation sources i n poli tical science . (4) 3 2 5 POLITICAL THOUGHT A s u rvey of t h e o rigin a n d evolution of major political concepts i n ancien t, medieval, a n d early modern times. Such ideas a s state, obligation, a u t hority, communi ty, law and freedom will be s t udied developm e n t a l l y . (4) 326 R E C E NT POLITICAL THOUGHT A cri tical e x a m i n a tion of t h e major ideologies of the modern world : de mocracy, conserva t i s m , capi talism, socialism, a n a rcho-syndicalism, com m u n i s m, racial a nd political eli t 足 is m , nationalism, libera lism, Christian political t houg h t , a n d contempora ry prob l e m s . (4) 3 3 1 I NTERNATIONAL R E L A TI O NS A n a l y s i s of concepts a n d vocabulary of i n ternational rela tion s; con temporary i n t e rnational problems a n d for足 eign policies. (4)

INTERNATIONAL ORGA N IZATI O N AND LAW Cooperatio n and conflict i n i n t e rn a tional i n s t i t u tions. Issues before t h e U ni ted Nat ions a nd other i n t e rnational o rga n i zations. The role of i n t e rnational l a w i n i nterstate rela tions. (4) 336

338 A M ERICAN FOREIGN POLICY The role of the United States i n i n t e rn a tional affai r s . A n a nalysis of the m a j o r factors i n t h e form ulation a nd execution of United States foreign policy a nd i t s i mpact on other powe rs . (4) 345 G O V E RN M E N T A N D PUBLIC POLlCY An i nt eg ra ted a p p roach to t h e n a t ure of p ublic policy, wi t h e mphasi s on s u b s t a nt ive probl e m s , t h e developm e n t o f policy responses by political i n s t i t utions, and the i m pacts o f policies. Special a ttention to policy a t the A merican national or subnational levels, i n i n ternational politics, or from a comparative perspective, as a n no u nced by t h e depa r t m e n t .

(4)

114

P O L I TI C A L S C I E N C E

361 AM E R I C A N POLITICAL PARTl E S A n e x a m i n a t ion i n t h eory a nd practice of American political parties a nd in terest g roups; special a t ten tion to party leadership a n d recrui t m e n t , i nd ividual poli tical socializa tion a n d participation, elec toral processes, a nd to t h e r Ie of i n terest groups i n A merican pol i tics. (4) POLITICAL C O M M UNICATION AND OPI N I O N I nq ui r y in to the rela tionship between p u b l i c will a n d public policy i n A m erica. E x a m i ne s democra tic values i n t h e con tex ts of opin ion formation, e xpression, a n d effects. Par tic ular a t te n t ion to political c u l t u re, p u blic opinion polls, the mass media, and govern men tal secrecy a nd i n fo rmation ma nageme n t. (4) 363

3 6 4 THE LEGI S LA TIVI PROCESS A s t ud y o f t heory, organization, a n d proced ure of the Congress and ther legislative bodies in t h e U n i ted States; special emphasis on the dynamics of conflict and compromise i n the legislative a rena including citizen and i n t e re s t group participation and lobbying. (4) 368 THE A M E R I C A N P R E S I D E N C Y S t udy of the na t ion's h i g h e s t pol it ical office i n terms of the roles and e x pecta tions of t h e office, s tyles of leadership, Presidential deci sion-making, t h e powe rs a nd l i m i tations of the office, a nd the i n teraction of personality and i n s t i tution.

(4)

3 7 1 J UD I CI A L PROCE S S A N D BEHAVIOR An e x a m i n a tion of the natu re of law, j udicial org a nization, and j ud icial roles. Parti c u l a r emphasis is given to the political n a t u re of the j ud iciary a nd the m u tual i mpac ts of law and the political s y s t e m . (4) 372 C ONSTITUTIONAL LAW The con s t i t utional basis of gove rnmental powers in the U n ited States with special emphasis given to j udicial review, separation of powe rs, federalism, and i n teTState commerc e . Incl udes a n e x a m i na tion o f the political and constit utionaJ res t rictions on governmental powe r. ( 4 ) 373 C IV IL LmERTIES Con s t i t utional rights and liberties w i t h speci a l a t tention given to freedom of expression and a s sociation, religious freedom, righ t s i n c ri m i n a l proce d u re, due process and equal protection . (4)


374 LEGAL RESEARCH Introd uction to various methods of legal a n a lysis and research . Inclu des an examina tion of primary doc u m e n ts and res a rch sys t e m s . (4) 381 COMPARATIVE LEGAL SYSTEMS A compa ra tive e x a m i n a tion of legal systems i ncluding c mmon law, Roman law, and n o n - Western sys te m s . a l y (4) 383 THE WESTM I NSTER MODEl A n examina tion o f t h e evolution of t h e political system of the United Kingdom and i t s t ransplantation to the states of the British Commonwealth including Canada, Aus tralia, and New Zealand. (4) 384 C OM M U N IST POLInCAl SYSTEMS Comparative exa m i nation of Marxist political systems, particularly the U. S . S . R . , eastern E u rope, China, and C uba. Spedal a t ten tion will be given to ideology and to the role of the Communist Party. ( 4 ) 3 8 6 AfRICAN POLInC AL SYSTEM S Comparative e x a m i n a tion of t h e poli tical systems of sub足 Saharan Africa . Exposition of pre-colonial, colonial, and conte mporary i nfluences with speci a l a ttention to p roblems of decolonization, nation-building, and develo p m e n t . (4) 4 0 1 S E M I NAR IN POL ITIC S Selected topics i n the st udy of govern m e n t and politic s as an nounced by the depar t me n t . (4)

457

PUBLIC ADMINISTRA nON

Management a s occ urs in the affairs of s t a t e ; the na ture of h u m an behavior in org anizations; ad minis trative law and q uasi-j udici I practices; civi l service, budget and fiscal cont rol, cen tralization, coordi nation in a d mini st rative areas. (4) 458

INTERNSHIP I N PUBLIC ADMINISTRA TION

47l

INTERNSHIP IN PUBLIC LAW

A n i n ternship with a state or l o c a l g o v e r n m e n t unit e ngaged in public law e n force ment and l i tigation . (By conse n t of the depa r t m e n t only. ) ( 4 - 1 2 )

491, 492

INDEPENDENT READING AND RE SEARCH

(By con sen t of the department only.) ( 1 - 4 )

502

SOC IAL SCIENCE THEORY

An analysis o f social e x p l a n a tion and the social scien tific frame of reference. (4)

50S

SOC IAL SCIENCE RESEARCH METHODS

Basic research concepts applied to l a bo r a tory, field, and bibliographic s tudies. Topics include formulating research questions, research designs, data-ga thering techniques, a nalysis of d a ta and theory construction. Emphasis is placed on unders ta nding and evaluating ra ther than co nducting research. (4)

591

DIRECTED STUDY

(1-4)

595

G RADUATE READING S

Independen t study card req u i red. (4)

5 9 7, 598

RESEARCH PROJECT

(4)

599

THESIS

(4)

C OURSES OFFERED IN THE 1 9 79 INTER I M 301 303

POL ITICAL H UMOR A N D SATI R E S UB-SAHARAN AFRICA

A n i n ternship with a department of local or state government; planned and supe rvised j ointly by a super足 vising govern m e n t offici a l and a me mber of the political science fac u l ty. (By consent of the depa r t m e n t only.) (4-12) 464

INTER N SHIP IN THE LEG I STlA TIVE PROC ESS

A n oppo r t u nity to s tudy the process from the i nside by working di rec tly with legislative p a rticipants at the state or local leveL By department con sent only. ( I n te rnships with the Washing ton State Leg i s l a t u re are open only to j u n i ors and seniors with at least one year at PLU who have taken or take concurrently 364 . ) ( 4 - 1 2 )

POLITICAL S C I E N C E

1 15


Th rough i t s curri c ul u m , use of com m u n i t y resou rces, a n d researc h prog ra m s, t h e psych ology d e pa r t m en t provides s t ud e n t s w i t h a co mpre h e n s i ve a nd ba l a nced ex pos u re to psych ology as a disci p l in e, a sc i e n ce, a nd a p rofession , T h e major prepa res st ude n ts fo r gra d u a te work i n psychology o r for i m m edia te e m p loy men t after g ra d u a t ion i n a wide vari ety of set ti n gs , I n addi t i on t h e psychol ogy m a j or is p u rs ued b y so me s t u d e n t s w h o p l a n 0 d o grad u a te work i n fields ou tside o f psyc h ology s uc h as soc i a l work, l a w, busi ness a d m i n i s t ra t i o n, or t h eolog y . The m i n o r i n psychology i s de�igned to b e a s u p pl e m e n t t o a n o t h e r major i n t he l ibe ral a rts or to a d e g ree p rogram in a profeSSiona l school . The psychology depa r t m e n t a l so offe rs a broad range of o u rses w h ic h ca n be i n divi dua l l y selected by a stud e n t once t h e I n t roduction t o Psyc hology cou rse h a s bee n completed. As a s u ppleme n t to aca d e m ic lea r n i ng, the depa r t m e n t offers oppor t u ni t i e s for s t u d e n t s t o h ave ex perience of a field-work n a t u re i n a wide va riety of s e t t i n g s i n the g rea t e r Tacoma a rea , s u c h as : American Lake Vetera n s Hos pi ta l , Wes t e r n State Hospi t a l ( i n c l u d i ng t h e C h ild S t u d y a n d T rea t m e n t Cen t r), Cascadia Diag n os tic Center ( j u ven i le d e l i n q u e n t s), Ra i ni e r S ta te School (menta l l y re ta rded ) , mental h e a l t h cl i nics, speci a l se rvices d e pa r t m e n t s of loca l school di s t ricts , a n d so on , The l a bo ra t ory c lasses offered b y the depa rt me n t a re sm a l l i n s i ze w i t h m a x i m u m I m po rt a n ce a t t a ched to indiv i d u a lized i n st r u c t io n .

F A C U l TY Severtson, Ch lli r, Adachi, Fiedler, La rsga a rd, Lejeune, Moritsugu, Nolph .

BACH ELOR O F A RTS MAJOR: 3 2 se mes t e r ho u rs , i n c l u d i n g 1 0 1 , 243, 3 4 0, � () O In J d d i l l u n . S ta t i st ics 23 1 i- req u i red , T h e UnJergraJuate R", o rd Exam 1 5 req U I red c1f � I I 1S raci u a t i ng majors, M I OR: 20 semes t e r h ( u rs , 5 t a ti�t ics 2 3 1 m , y be i nd uded WIth depa r t ment I ('onsen t 1 1 0 and 2 2 1 may n u t be counted toward t h e major or m i n o r , Courses .. t t h e 500 leve l a re pri ma ri l y f o r g ra d u a t e s t u d e n t s; h oweve r, thl!Y may be taken by ad va n ced lIndergradU,1tes w h receIve t h e l n s t r u to r's on s e n t ,

116

PSYCHOLOG Y


C OURSE OFFERINGS

403

1 01

Physical, i ntellect u a l, emotion I and social deve] pment of the i nd ividual From t he p re - n ,l t I peri d 1 adolescence; pr ble ms of behaVior a n d adj u s t m e n t . Prerequ i sit e : 335. (2)

INTRODUCTION TO PSYC HOLOGY

A n i n t rod u ct ion to the scienti fic study of behavio r; scie nt I fi c m e t hods for t udying th be h a v i o r of l i vi ng orga n i s m s ; topics such as m t i vation, lea r n i ng, e m o t ion, I n tel ligenc e, pe rson a li ty , adj u s t m e n t , and cial b e h avior . I I I (4)

110

STU DY S K I LLS

To assist i n the im pro ve m en t of read i ng skills and o th er t ec h n i ques for effec t i ve s t udy; c l a s s work s u pple m e n te d by i nd ivid ua l c u n s e l i n g . ( May no� be count ed in the major or m i n or . ) I I I (2)

22 1

THE PSYCHOLOG Y Of ADJ USTM E NT

ADOLESCENT PSYC HOLOGY

Physical de elop m e n l , m e n t a l tr I ts , social cha racteri s t ics and in terests of ado lesce n ts ; a d j u s t m e n t s in home, school and co m m u n i t y . Prerequ is i te : 335. I I (2)

420

PERSON ALITY THEORIES

St rateg ies For the study of pe rsonality th eories . Tech n iques of measurement and i m plications for counseling <l nd /o r psychotherapy. Prereq uisi te: 101. I 1 / (4)

421

ABNORMAL PSYC HOLOGY

Pr ble m s in person al a dj ust m ent in eve ryda y l i vin g . Prerequ is i t e : 1 0 1 . ( May not be c Qu n ted in the m a j o r or m i no r . ) I [1 (2)

Et iology and tre a t m e n t of a bnormal beh a vio r; special e m phasis on psychosocial Factors. Prereq u i s i t e : 1 0 1 . I Il (4)

243

450

SCIENTIFIC METHODS

Ba i

re sea rch design and theory con st r uct ion; a ppli cati ns to both lab ratory a nd fiel d . S cial e m phasi i s p la ced on perce p t i o n and cog n i t i n . Lec t u re and labo ratory . Majo rs mu t take fo u r c re di t hour opti n . rereq u i i te ; 1 01 . I I I (2

or

4)

3 25

H U M AN SEXUAL ITY-E MOTIONAUTY

psyc holog ica l , b io log i cal, and c ul tu ra l S t udy o f th om p( nents [ h u m a n se x u al and e mot i o na l behavi or. Topics to i n c l ude se ua l i den ti ty, t y p ical a nd a t ypi al e u al behavior, reprou uction, cou r t sh i p, a n d a f fect i on . Pre­ req u i s i t e : 1 01 . (4)

3 30

-

405

THE PSYC HOLOG Y OF INfANCY AND CHIL DHOOD

SOC lAL PSYCHOLOGY

Res a rc h and theory con ce rn in g the in terac tion between g ro u ps ilnd the i n d i vidua l . Language, a t t i t u de , aggres s ion, lea de rs h ip, peron perception, and rel a te to pi c ar e x a m i ned and t heir re lationship to v a r i o u s t ypes of social hange and I n f l u ence a re d i sc ussed . P rereq u i s i t e : 1 0 1 11 (4)

335

DEVELOPME NT: I Nf ANCY TO MATU RITY

Phy s i ca l, i n t ellec t u al , s o i I, and emoti n a l growth from i n f an cy t h r ou gh ad ol e s cen e 1 0 maturi y. P rereq u isi t e : 1 0 1 . I I I (4)

40

HUMAN N E U RO PSYCHOLOGY

The s t ud y o f bra i n - beha vio r re la t ions h i ps . TopICS i nclude n e u r ana ml al a n d n e u ro hy si logi cal mec han is ms u n ­ J e r l y i n g h u m a n beh<lvior; psych logical effec ts of bra i n da mage; p hYS i ol og ical corre la t es o f Ian uages , se n s ry and motor f u nc t ion s . and e m o t io n ; e l c t rical st i m ul at i n o f t h e b ra m . Prereq u is it e : 243. I ( 4 )

399

I NTER N S H I P

A pra l ie u m experience i n t h l' o m m u n i t y i n t h e cli nic a l , soc i al . a n d / o r ex peri me n tal ol r a s . Prereq u i ite: Soph omore s t a nd in g plus O n e course in psyc hol ogy a n d 'on se n t f the d epar tme n t . ( 1 - 6)

401

PSYC HOLOG ICAL TESTING

S u rvey of standard i zed tests; m e t h ods of develo p me n t . s t a n d a rdiza t ion; l i m itations a nd i n te rp retations of tes t s . Prereq u i s i te: 2 4 3 o r a o u rse i n s t a t i s ti . I ( 4 )

460

LEARNING: RESEARCH AND THEORY

E peri men tal s t udies a nd t heories of lea rn i ng . Lec t u re and laboratory. Prereq uisi t e : a m i n i m u m of 12 hou rs i n psychology including 243. I (4)

490

SYSTE MATIC THOUGHT I N PSYCHO LOG Y

Historica l development, con tempo r a ry for m s, and basi c a s s u m ptions of t he major psych ological t heor ies and t rad i ti ons . Pri marily for adva nced ma j ors a nd g raduate s l udents. I (4)

491, 492

I NDEPENDENT STUDY

A supervised reading, f i e l d or research project o f s p e i a l i n t e rest for advanced under raduate or graduate student s . Prerequisite; depa rt m e n t a l conse n t . I 1 1 ( 1 -4)

493

S E M I NA R

Selected topics i n psychology a s a n nou nced . Prere q u i ite; i n s t r uc to r's consent.

501

WORKSHOP

502

SOCl A L SCIENCE THEORY

An analysis of social explana t io n a n d t h e social scien tifi c fra me of reference . (4)

505

SOC I A L SCIENCE RESEARCH METHODS

Basic research concepts applied t laboratory, field, and bibliograph ical s t u d ies. Topic i nc l ude f r m u l a t i n g resea rc h qu estions, research desig ns , data-gat hering tec h n iq ues, analYSIS of da ta and theory cons truc tion . E m phasis is placed on understanding and e v aluatin g ra t h e r than conducting research . (4)

WORKSHOP

Selecte

to ic ' i n p ychology as a n n o u n ce d .

PSYCHOLOGY

117


515

PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT

I n t e llectual a n d pe rso n a l i t y asses s m e n t . For t h e f o r m e r p a r t , t h e s t udy of s uch t e s t s as t h e Wec h sler Preschool and Prim ary

Scale

of

Intel lige nce,

the

Revi sed

Wechsler

I n telligence Scale for C h i fd ren, and the Wechsler Ad u l t I n t el l i gence Scale; f o r t h e la t t er, in t e rview techniques, self 足 report t e s t s such as the M M PI and projec tive me thods. Prereq uisite :

540

450.

II

(4)

C O U N S E L I N G METHODS

C o u n s e l i n g process from i n i t i a l contact t h rough termi足 nation.

E m phasis

on cas e conc e p t u a li z a t ion, c o m m u n i 足

ca tion skills, a n d i n s t r uction in c u rrent tech niq ues v i a role play an d video tape feedback. Prereq uisi t e :

550

420.

1 II

(4)

G ROUP C O U N S E L I NG

Couns eling theories and m e thods applied to t h e g r o u p c o n t e x t . Prereq uisi t e : Psychology 540. (4)

570

PRACTICUM I N COUNSELING A N D / O R ASSESSMENT

A n oppo r t u n i t y to develop couns eling and/or a s s e s s m e n t skills in a se t t ing i n w h i c h t h ese professional services are offe red . Prere q u i s i t e :

577

515

and/or

540.

I II

(4)

ADVANCED PRACTICUM IN C O U N S E L I NG AND/OR ASSESSMENT

A n opp o r t u n i t y for t h e more advanc ed s t u d e n t to w o r k i n the a reas of counseling a n d / o r asse s s m e n t in a s e t ti ng i n which

these

req u i s i t e :

590

570.

professional I II

(4)

se rvices

a re

provided.

Pre足

G RADUATE SEMINAR

Selec ted topics i n psychology as a n n o u n ced. Prerequisi t e : i n s t ructor's consen t .

(1-4)

591 D I R ECTE D STU D Y (1-4) 595

G RADUATE R E A D I N G S

I n depende nt s t udy card req u ired.

597, 598 (4) 599

(4)

RES EARCH PROJ ECT

THESIS

(4)

COU RSE S OFFERED IN THE 1979 INTERIM 309 311 314

118

PSYCHOLOG Y AND THE L A W C O N S U M E R PSYCHOL OG Y HAWA I I I I : A TRANSCULTURAL WORKSHOP

PSYCHOLOGY


Religion The religio us h er i t age of h u m a n i ty, pa r t i c u l a r l y the Ju daeo-C h ris ti a n tradi tion, is c ri ti c a l ly e x a m i ned for t h e p u rposes of preserving a n d a p p l y i ng i t s acc u m u la ti n g wisdom . T h e depa rt me n t's prog ra m exa m i nes religious dimensions e ncou n tered i n other d i sciplines and serves s t u d e n t s who elect r e ligi on a s their academic or vocat i o n a l s pec i a l t y .

C OURSE OFFE RINGS

T h e P L U Religion Depa r t m e n t s h a r e s acade mic courses nd e x c h a nge s p rofe sors i n a series of courses offered and s h a red by Pacific Lu theran Un i v e rs it y a n d St. M a r t i n 's College as pa r t of i t s i n v o l ve m e n t i n t h e ecu menical move men t a nd t h e u n i ty of t h e h u m a n fa mily.

241

L u t h era n I ns t i t ute for Theolog ical E d uca tion (UTE ) : The Rebgion Depa r t m e n t also pa rticipates i n a program of cont i n ui ng t heological education for clergy and laity i n t h e Pacific o r t h we s t . D r . W a l t er Pilg ri m of the Re ligio n Depa r t m e n t directs t h e LITE prog ra m . For f u r t h e r d e t a ils co n t a c t Dr. Pi lgri m .

FAC U LTY Gehrke, C h a i r; Christopherson, Ek lund, Govig, I ngra m, Knutson, Petersen, Pilgrim, S t ivers.

131

Biblical, historical and theological reference to contemporary issues. (4)

BACHELOR OF A RTS MAJOR: 28 semester hou rs, with 12. concentrated in o n e of five a reas ( B i b l ical S t u d ies; History o f C h n stia n i t y ; H i s t o r y of Religion ; Th e ol ogy a n d E th ics; a n d Religion. C u l t u r e. Socie ty. a n d the I n d i v i d u a l ) . a n d 1 6 d i s t r i b u ted so t h a t a t least 4 hours are tak [1 i n each of two other area s . Transf r majors m u s t take a t least 12 h o u r s in re · i dence. S t u d e n t s may apply for t h e Con t ract Major. w i t h o u t prev iously specified req u ir e m e n t s . designed t o e ncourage student freedom. n i t ia t ive. a n d responsibility. See depa r t m e n t h a i r for d e t a i l s o n t h e five a reas or t h e co n tact major. Majors s h o uld plan their program e a r l y i n cons u l tation w i t h de pa rt me n tal facu l t y . Closely related c o u r e s t a u g h t in other d ep a rt me n t s may be conside red to apply toward t h e m a j o r i n C'On s u l ta t i o n w i t h t h e s t a f f. MINOR: one

-

s�mester h ou r,. with n o more t h a n 8 h o u r s i n of t h e five a reas l i s t e d a b o ve . l6

foundations

with

BIBLICAL LIT ERATURE

Literary, historical a nd theological d i mensions of the Bible, including perspective o n contemporary probl ms. (4)

251

I NTRODUCTION TO THE OLOG Y

Basic questions of the C h ri s tian faith approached topically. Questions such as what does C h r i s tianity mean by "God" will be conside red t h rough Biblical, h i s torical and contemporary resource s . Some a t te n tion given to chal­ l e nges to the Christian fai th a nd i t s in te rac tion with o t h e r pers pectives . ( 4 )

261

R E L I G IONS OF THE WORLD

A cri tical in troduction to the study of the religions o f the world, e m phasizjng h i s torical o rigins a n d cul tural develop­ m e n t s . Readings cen tered u po n primary sources in tra n s l a t i o n . (4) NOTE: Only one of the following courses may be taken to f u l fi l l t h e General University Req ui re m e n t : 2 6 1 . 3 6 1 . or 362.

262

U N I V E RSITY REQUIREME NTS: semester h o u rs for s t u d e T1 t s e n teri.ns a5 freshmen or s phomores. Four lower division hours s h a l l be taken before the end o f the sophomore year. T h t' 5 cond 4 h o u rs may be sel cted from most of t h e other offerings i n the religion curric u l u m . Transfer stud e n t s e n tering as ju niors or s e n i o r s a re req u ired t o take 4 semester hours of r Iigion u nless p res e n t i ng eight tran sfer hours of religion from oth r accre d i ted colleges or univ rsities.

J UD EAO-CHRISTIAN L I T E AND THOUGHT

MYTH, R ITUAL AND SYMBOL

An e x a m i n a t i o n o f the n a t u re of myth and its expression t hrough ymbol a nd ri t u a l . A t t e n tion given to pre-literate mythology, Asian mythology, and Occide n tal my thology and the role these mythological trad i t i o n s have played in the development of modern ethical, social, and religiOUS values. (4)

341

OLD TESTAMENT STU DI ES

M a j o r areas o f i n q u i r y : t h e Prophets, Psa l m s and Wisdom Litera t u re or Mythology a nd Theology. Prerequisi te; 241 or conse n t o f i n s t ructor. (4)

342

NEW TESTA ME NT ST UDIES

M a j o r areas o f i nq uiry, s uch as i n tertestamen tal. synoptic. Joh a n n i ne or Pa u l i n e li terature. Prereq u i s i t e ; 241 or c o ns e n t of inst ructor. ( 4 )

343

THE LIFE OF JESUS

A s t u dy o f the l i fe a n d teachings of Jesus; a his torical su rvey of "Life of Jesus" research, form and red action criticism of the Gospel trad i tion; the religious d i m e n s i o n s of Jesus' life a n d thoug h t . Prerequisite; o n e lower division course or c o n s e n t of ins tructor. (4)

35]

CHRISTIAN ETH ICS

An in trod u c tion to the personal a n d social e t hical dimensions of C h ristian life a n d th ough t with a t t e n tion t o pri m a r y t h eological positions and speci fic problem a re a s . Prereq uisite; one l o w e r d i v i s i o n course or Cl1 n S e n t of i n s t ructor. (4)

RELIGION

119


PHILSOPHI C AL AND RELIGIOU S TRADITIONS O F INDlA

361

381

STUD IES I N CHURCH MINISTRY

Toward a f u nc t io n a l viewpoint of t h e c h uTch's m i n i s t ry :

E m p h as is

wors h i p a nd e d u c a t i on , prog r a m s for the y o u t h a nd t h e

NOTE: O n l y o n e o f t h e following courses m a y b e taken to fulfill the G e n e r a l U niversi t y Requ irement: 261, 361, o r 362.

A n i n t n s iv e , i n- d e p t h e x pl o r a t i o n f r o m t h e pe r s p e c t i v e o f Ch ristian t he ol o g y a n d e t h ics of o n e or two c u r r e n t social issues. Prereq uisite: one l o w e r d i v i s i o n c o u r s e o r c o n s e n t o f i n s t ructor. ( 4 )

on V ed ic a nd U pa n i sh a d i c t radi tions, B H A C A V AD-GJT A, "six ort hodox 5ch oo l s, " Bu d d h i s m , a nd contemporary I n d i a n p h i l o s o p h ical a n d re l i g io us d eve l o pmen t s . R ea d i ng s c e n t e red on p r i ma r y sources i n tra ns l a t i o n . P r e r e q u i s i te : R e l i g i o n 261 o r conse n t of instructor. ( 4 )

PHILOSOPHICAL AND RELI G IO US TRADITIONS OF CHINA

362

C l a s s i c a l and modern p h i l osop h i c a l a n d re l i g i o us t ra d i t io ns f China ( t h e s i x " cl as s i c a l schools," t h e neo- Taois t, and neo-Confucian t ra d i t i o n s ) , C h i n ese Buddh i s m , and h o w

these sc hool s relate t o contem porary Chi na's Marxist足 co m m u n i s t ideolo g y . R e ad i n g s c e n t e r on pri mary s u rees in tra n sl a ti on , P re r e q u i s i t e : Re li g i o n 2 6 1 or co n s e nt of i n st ructor. (4) NOTE: the

O n l y o n e of t h e

eneral

follOWing c o u rs e s mdY be t a k e n to fulfill

n i v e r s ity Re quire m en t : 261, 3 6 1, or 362.

JUDAISM

367

c m mi t m e n t ,

s t r u c t u re and d y n a mi c s, as expressed in this major Western religion, in l ud ing s t udies Hebrew B ible, t he ol ogi c a l of in terp re t a t i n o f the e mp h as e s , re l i g i o u s o b se rvances, his to r i c a l develop men ts, m od er n g roups, a n d J ewi s h -Ch r i s t i a n di a l o gu e . (4)

Faith

371

and

ANCIENT CHURCH HISTORY

The o ri gins , thought and e x p an s i on of t h e Christian Ch urch; r i se o f t he P a p a c y, expansion i n E u rope a n d t h e g ro w th of C h ristian involvement in c u l t u re; t o the e n d o f the Papacy of Gregory I ( 6 0 4 ) . P r ere q u i s i t e : o n e lower division course o r cons e n t of i n s t r uc to r . I aly ( 4 ) 372

MODERN CHURCH HISTORY

Begin ning with the Peace of We s tp ha l i a ( 1 648), i n t e rac tio n of t h e C h ri stian fai t h w i t h modern p o l i t i c s , scie nce and ph i l o s ophy ; expansion in the world, modern mov e m e n t s . Pre req u i si te : R e l i gio n 1 3 1 0r o n s e n t of i n s tr uc to r . n ( 4 )

373

AMER ICAN CHURCHES

The d ev e l o p me n t of t r e n d s of C h ri s ti a n i t y i n t h e United Sta tes . Prereq uisite : R e lig i o n 1 3 1 or co n s e n t of i n st ru c t o r. (4 )

375

C H U RC H Hl STORY STUDIES

A se l ec t ed area o f inquiry, s u ch a s the C h a r i s m a t i c Moveme n t , the E c u m e nical Mo e men t , the L utheran Con fessions, o r Ame rica n - Sc a ndi na via n C h u rc h H i s tory . P re req u is i te: one r e l i gi o n cou rse o r con s e n t of i n s t r uc t o r . (4)

120

R ELIGION

elderly, counseli ng, and a d m i n i s t ra ti o n . F i r s t - h a n d o b 足 se r va tio n o f s e l e c te d m in i s t ri e s. Prere q u i s i t e : o n e l o w e r d i v is i o n course or consent of i n s t r u c t o r . (4) 3 82

383

C HR I STIANITY AND THE SOC IAL CRISIS

RELIG IOUS E X PERI E NC E AMONG AMERICAN MI NORITIE S

Conce n t ra t ing on t h e religious expe riences and CO ntri 足 bu tions of t h o s e s ec t or s i n Am e ri c an s oc i e t y t h a t h a v e a mi no ri t y id e n tit y a n d a re often not i n c l uded i n t h e u s u a l s t u d y of A me ri ca n churches, t h i s course w i l l in d i ffere n t eme sters fo c us o n d i ff e r en t m i n o ri ties s u c h as B l ac ks , I n d i a n s , C h i c a n o s . P re re q u i s i t e : o n e lower d ivisi on c o u rse o r co n s e n t of i n s t ructor. (4)

391

L UTHER

The man a n d his times, with m a jo r e m p h a s i s on his writing

a n d creative th e ol ogy, such a s t h e rad ica l c e n t ra l i t y o f t h e Go s p e l a nd f a i t h , t h e Word a n d Scri p t u re, t h e s a c r a m e n ts , Ch u rch a n d S t a te . P r e r e q u i s i te : o n e l ow e r d ivision course or c o nse n t of i n s t r u c t o r . 1 1 aly (4) 392 CHRISTIAN CLASSICS Ch ristian l i tera t u r e : devotion, b io gr a p h y, t h e o l o gy , poe t ry ; A u g u s t i n e, T h o m a s a K e m p i s , Dan te, L u t h e r , C a l v i n , Pa se 1 , Wes le y, Ki er kega a rd and ot h e r s ; group core p l u s s e m i n a r r e p o r t s . Prereq u i s i t e : one l o w e r d i v ision c o u r s e o r c n sen t of i n s t r u c t o r . II a l y ( 4 )

451

CHRISTIAN THOUGHT AND MODERN CONSC IOUSNESS

Con te mp orary issues

and

p r o b l em s in

t heology

with

refere nce to B i b l ic a l a n d h i s torical r e s o u rc e s an d r e c e n t un de rs t a n d i ng s of h u m a n i ty and t h e w o r l d . Rea d i n g s selected from B a r t h , B o nhoeffer, B u b e r , B u l t m a n n , Cox, Mo l t ma n n, t h e N i e bu h r s, Pa n n en be r g , Teilhard de C h a rd i n , and Ti l l i c h . P rere quis i t e : o n e l o w e r d ivis i o n course or c on s en t of i n s t r u c t o r . (4)

485

CHR ISTIAN ITY AND THE ARTS

Rela tio n s h i ps

of Christi a n

thought

co n te n t s of various m e d i a of a rtist i c

to

the

fo rms

and

re a t i v i t y . I I a l y (4)


490

SEN IOR SEMINAR I N RELIGION to s e n i o r s J n d g r a d ua te s tude nt s. ) (4)

(Open on ly

a.

H u m a n Sexunlity The p s ych ological, soci o logical, ethical a nd t heol gic. I di me n s i o ns of s e x u a l i t b. Reli:;:iVtI (Hid Psyr h o logy An i nves tiga t i o n of p sy c h o l og i c a l stud ies w h ic h co n v e r g on a n u n d e r s t a nd i n g of h u m a n pers ona l i t y f r o m t h e viewpoi n t of re J i g i o n and t h e C h ri s t ia n 'i e w o f h u m a n i t y; t h e i n f l u e nce of psychology on h u m a n self足 unders t a nd i ng . c. Rl'l i iOIl a lid Polit i[s n i n q u i ry i n to h o w t h e se d i s ci p l i nes rel a t e to each o t h e r w i t h i n t h e l ife of t h e h u rc h, t h e l i fe o f t h s t a te , a n d i n c h u rc h - s t ate re l a t i o n s h i p s .

d . O f' (l t h nlla Dying H u m n d e a t h ex a m i n ed from a va r i e t y of pe rspec t i es

with s p e c i a l e m ph a sis o n m ea n i n g o f d e a t h .

theological d i m e n s i o n s a n d the

3 . Litera t u r e n rla Theolog y A study of sig n i ficant l i t e ra t u r e f r o m both a l i t e r a r y a n d a t h e o l og i c al p rspective. Basically di r ec l e d toward 1 9 t h an d 2 0 t h cen t u ry A m eri a n and E u ropean l it e ra t u re .

491, 492

I NDEPENDENT STUDY

I nte nded for rel i g i o n m a j o rs , ildva nced a n d g ra d u a t e s t u d e n t s ; co nsent of t h depa r tm n t is req u i red .

493

MAJOR CHR I STIAN AND OTHER RELIG IOUS THINKE RS The i n -depth and i n t e nsive s t ud y of one o r two major

f i g u r e s i n C h ri s t i a n t he o l og y or other re l i g i o u s thought, P.g., Aug u s t i ne, Bonhoeffer, B u b e r, B u l t m a n n , N i e b u h r , R d h a k ri s h n a n , Til lic h . P r e req u i s i t e : o n e l o w e r d i v i s i o n c o u r se c) r c o n se n t o f i n s t ructor. (4)

495

ADVANCED SEMINAR I N R EL IGION

Selec t ed topics to b e a n n o u n ced . F o r m a j o rs, m i n o rs , a n d s t ude n t s w i t h at l e a s t t h re e courses i n relig i o n . P ri o r i t y t o

m a jors and m i no r s . ( 4 )

C OURSES OFFERED IN THE 1 979 INTERIM 307

309

312 34 2 351

L I V I N G I N GOD'S S I L ENCE: T H E F i l M S OF BERGMAN ENTERING THE PATH OF ENLIGHTENM ENT: AN I NTRODUCTION TO BUDDHISM ON BECOMIN G HUMA N NIW TESTAMENT STUDI ES: "GUIDELINES FOR FAITH, THE L ETTER TO THE ROMANS" CHRISTIAN ETHICS

RE LIGION

121


Sociology and Anthropology The Depa rtment o f Sociology a n d A n th ropol gy aims to provide s tudents with knowledge about the structure, req u i rements, a nd p urposes of the discip lines w i t h i n i ts domai n . Its overall goals are to produce s t uden t s who can u nders t a n d t hem selves, society, a n d the wo rl d, the relations h i p a mong them , and t h e moral c o n t e x t of that rela tion s h i p. By expanding their knowledge and deve loping their skills, s t u d e n t s enha nce their ability to make i n formed deCisions, to exercise their capacity for self-criticism and self-evaluation, to f u nction effectively as knowledgeable and respon s ib le ci tizens, to know a nd accep t t h e m selves and their special s treng t h s and l i m i ta tions, to e x h i bi t i n te rpe rsonal a nd i nterc ult ura l tolerance, a nd t o display their acq u i sition of b o t h basic a nd sop h i s t ica ted acade mic skills. The depa rtment's c u rriculum is Aexi ble and respon s i ve to individual, u niversi t y , a nd socie tal needs and changes . It reflects liberal arts purposes, is planned to develop skills a nd achieve excellence, and seeks i n tegra tion while sponsoring di vers i ty . Through a distingu ished facul ty who a re willing not only to i n fo r m o t h ers bu t also 10 be i n formed, the departmen t a i m s for regional recog ni tion of i t s e fforts and s t re n g t h s . FACUlTY

Jobst, Chair; Biblarz, Blumhagen, Dumor, Oberholtzer, Schil ler, Willis.

Soci o logy BAC HÂŁlOR'bl ARTS: General Major:

36 semester hours , i ncluding 1 0 1

or

331; 4

hours at t h e 200 level; 8 hours at the 300 level; 8 h urs at the 4 0 level; 399 (2 hours); 4 1 0; 4 70; a n d Statistics 2 3 1 . Major with Specialization In Crime and Society: 36 semester h u r a , incl uding 1 0 1 or 33 1; 336; 8 h o u rs s e lecte d trom 2 4 0, 340, 456, 460, 493; 399 (2 hours); 4 1 0; and 470; plus 1 2 hours selected f ro m An t hropo logy 440; Hi s tor y 451; Pol i t ic a l Science 336, 3 7 1 , 372, 3 73; Psychology 4 2 1 <.lr So ial W rk 442. Major with SpeciaLintion in famiJy and Gender Studies: 36 semester hours, tncludin 1 0 1 or 331; 342; 8 h ours selected

from 260, 381, 4 0 , 493; 399 ( 2 hours); 4 1 0; and 4 70; p l u s 1 2 h o u rs selected from Anthropology 334, 430; Psychology 335, 403, 405, 420; or Social Work 4 4 2 .

122

S OC I O L O G Y & A N T H R O P O L O G Y


Major with Specialiution in Social Organization:

36

semester hou rs, including 1 0 1 o r 3.31; 345; 8 hours selected from 343, 4 22, 4.30, 4 4 3 , 45 6, �65, 4 9 3; 3 9 9 ( 2 hours); 4 1 0; a n d 4 7 0 ; p l u s 1 2 hour s selected from A n t h ropology 4 1 5, 440; Economics 432,

434; Political Science 3 4 5, 361, or Social Work 4 4 2. Major with Specialization in Ethnic and Minority Structures: 3 6 semes ter ho urs, i n c l u d i ng 1 0 1 or 3 3 1 ; 3 64 ; 8 hours selected from 28 344, 390, 4 4 1 , 4 93; 399 (2 hours); 4 1 0; and 470; plus 12 ho ur selected from A n t h ropology 321, 322, 323, 324, 326, 4 1 5, 420; Economics 290, 32 1, 33 1 , 381, History 4 7 1 ; Political Science 386 or Social Work 4 4 2. ,

,

NOTE: 1 0 1

r 3 3 1 reco mmended prerequisite to all 300 and 400

level courses.

M I NOR: 16 s e m e s t e r h o u rs, i ncluding 1 0 1 or 331, one course a t t h e 300 le vel, one course at the 400 level, a nd one additional course c hosen in c o n s u Jtation with the dep a r t m e n t . BACHELOR OF A RTS I N EDUCATION: S e e School o f Edu atian.

C O URSE OFFERINGS - Sociology 1 01

I NTRODUCTION TO SOC IOLOG Y

An i nt roduction to the principles, concepts, a nd a reas of SOCiology as well a s t he an alysis tools u sed i n s t u dying social behavior. ( 4 )

240

SOC rAl PRO BLEMS

Analysis of various theories a n d social responses to several c u rrent social problems. TopiCS inc l u d e : mental heal th, p verty, crime, family d i s rga nization, and work aliena­ tion. (4) 260

INTE RPERSON AL RELATIONSHIPS AND G ROUP BEHA Vl0R

An exami nation of proce ss es of i n teraction that the person experiences i n s m a l l g roup settings and the i m plications t h a t has for in terpersonal behavior and self-concep tions. ( 4 )

280

I NTRODUCTION TO RACE RElATIONS

Th h i s tory of American race rel a t i o n s . Factors acco u nting for hanges in relatio n s h i ps between whites a n d non­ whites. ri tical areas o f conflict a mong the race s . (4)

331

PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY

An ad vanced i n t rodu c tory cou rse s t res sing the major concepts a n d f u n d a mental processes opera tive in all areas o f social rel a tio n s h i p s . N o t o p e n to s t udents w h o have taken 1 0 1 o r it q ui v a l e n t . (4)

336

DEVIANT BEHA V lOR

An explorati n of nonconforming behavior such as d rug u , h mosex u a l i ty, c u i tic religion with p a rticu lar at ten tion to the dialectical process o f i t s g rad ual emergence a n d its social rejec tion. ( 4 )

340

CRIME AND D E L I NQUENCY

A n a l y s i s o f a d u l t c r i m a n d j u v e n i l e d e l i nq uency with a t t ention t o their social roots, development, and social impact. (4)

342

SOC IOLOGY OF THE FAM ILY

Analysis of the family as a system of social roles a n d a socia l i nsti t u tion. Topics include: courtship, ma rriage a n d pa rentho d, personality development, changing family role patterns, a n d a l ternate family forms. (4)

343

SOC I A L MOVEMENTS AND CHANGE

An exam i na tion of the t heories of social change i n th understanding o f social movemen ts; factors accoun ti n g f r the emergence and persistence of soci a l mov ments; emphasis on political proces ses a n d change s . (4)

344

CONFLICT RESOLUTI ON

Factors acco u nt ing for in terpersonal an d i n tergroup tensions . l n terpersonal, i ntergroup, national, and in ter­ national methods of resol u t i o n . (4)

345

SOCIOLOGY OF ORGAN lZA TIONS

AnalysiS f s t ructure s, proce s ses, and change in bu re ll ­ cratic org a n i za tions; their effects u pon the individual and the organiza tion; i n te rrelationships between s ciety and orga n i z.atio n s . (4)

364

ETHNJCITY IN PLURAL S OC IETIES

An e x a m i n a tion of t h e nature of e t h nic groups (racial, tribal, c u l t u ra l , etc.); the s t r u c t u re of ethnic g ro ups in plura l societies, the m a n i p u l a t ion o f symbols by e t h n i c g roups, e t hnic division of labor, ethnic politics, a n d t h effects of colonial and post-colonial in ternational systems on ethnic re lations. (cros s-referenced w i th Anth. 364) (4)

381

SOC I A LIZATION

An e x a m i n a tion of how individuals learn social roles and role competency t h rough the socialization and re­ socia lization pr ess. Emphasis on adolesce n t and a d u l t sociali za tion w i t h i n the c o n t e x t of i n s t i t u ti o n s, orga ni­ zations, and society. ( 4 )

390

SOCIOLOGY OF POVERTY

Sou rces of inequality; ana lysis of li fes tyles a nd beha vior of g roups i n society which exp ri nee inequality. ( 4 )

399

INTERNSHIP

Demonstration of the i mp lication s of SOCiology, combining on s i te w o r wi th i n class lea r n i n g . The artful skill of using theory to solve problems and of h a n d l i ng the pract ical i ties of working in agencies a n d burea ucracies. Plac e m e n t s : probation work, courts, p l a n n i n g agencies, social agencies, local and s t a te gove rnmental agencies, i n d u s tries, and social action research. Prereq uisite: depa r t m e n ta l consen t . NOTE: Majors a re req u i red t o reg i s t e r concurrently f o r 39 (2 hours) and 4 1 0, preferably in their j u n ior year. ( 1 - 4)

406

SEX ROLES AND SOC IETY

An e x a mination o f the roles pe rformed by men a nd women in socie ty , Treatm nt of both traditional a n d n n­ traditional roles a nd t h e c u l t u r a l variables influencing t h is a s s i g n m e n t . Particular at tention to u rre n t changing sex roles for both men a nd women and how i n s t i t u tions s uch as the fa mily, c h u rch, and s hools a re involved i n these c h a nges. (4)

S OC I O L O G Y & A N T H R O P O L O G Y

1 23


-------- - - ----- --------- ----- -- ------------

410

APPUED SOC IO LOGY

Introd uction to t he variou� methods

f sod I gi al analy is

a d research. Methods c on si dered : 5 i a l su rvey s, parti­ ci.pa nt observa tion . i n ter viewi ng , data p �ese n t a tion _ and In terpre ta tion _ NOTE; Majors a re requIred t regIster concurre n t l y for 399 (2 h o u rs ) and 4 1 0, preferably i n their J u nior yea r . (2)

422

SOC IOLOGY Of OCCUPATIONS AND PROf ESSIONS

An e x a m i na tion f the n a t u re o f work in society as a social role and a s pa rt or the so ial s t r uc t u re . A n a l ys i s of j b sa ti sfact io n, une mp loymen t, u se f l ei s u re , a n d t re nds i n labor fo rce c ompo s i ti o n . (4)

430

SOC iOLOGY Of RELIGION

A m u lti -c ul t u ra l inve stigation o f re ligious experience, belief. and r i t u a l i n re lation to their social s e t t i ng s with particular a t ten tion to new forms f religi n i n A m e rica. (4)

441

RACE, REVOLUTION AND THE DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

An i n vestig a t ion of racism a n d st ratifica tion processes within t h e developing cou n t ries and between the developed and developing count rie s; its consequences and im plia ti on s; the sign ificance of America n no n -wh i te mino rities .

(4)

442

SOC IAL POLICY AND ORG ANlZATIO N

Analysi of h w societies hav e defin ed social and person al needs and developed a n d organ i zed re s ponses to thos n eeds . S pe ci a l emph a si s will American society. (4)

443

e g iven to the response of

SOCIOLOGY Of E DUCATJON

The n a t u re a n d functioning of the educa t io na l s y s te m will be examined from a soc i o logical persp c tive . Topics will includ e: edu cation, s trat i fica t ion , and s o lal cha nge; t he school as a complex o rga n i zati n; t h e school as a s cial insti t u tions and t h e s cio \ogy of lea rning. ( 4 )

456

SOC IOLOG Y OF LAW

A n examination of t h e social con t ro l functions F l a w and legal in sti tutio n s; the i nfluence of c u l l ure and social organiza tion on l a w , legal ch a n ge , a n d the admin ist ra tion of ju stice . (4)

460

PENOLOGY AND CORRECTIONS

An xamina tion of hi s t orica l a n d con t e m porary systems of adj udication a n d i n s ti t u t ionaliza t i n 0 offe nders . Con­ sideration of recent I ternative non-in st i t u tio nal and d i versi n a ry p rogra m s . ( 4 )

465

SOC IOLOGY Of MEDICINE

A n e a mina tion of t h e social processes af fec ti ng co n d i t i n of health a nd disease and of the cluster of s ocial rela ti o n s h i p s a n d orga niza tions t h a t com prise the i n s t i ­

t u t ion of medici n e.

(4)

470

SOC IOLOG ICAL THOUG HT

491

I N DEPENDENT STUDY

Ba si s iological concepts and th or i 5 . P r i m a ry empha i s o n con t e m porar y conceptual approaches t o SOCIal behaVior a n d their h i st orical a n t ec ede n t s . (4) Readi ngs or fieldwork in spec i f i c ar as or iss ue

u nder supervision of a fac u l ty member. depa r t m e n t a l consen t. (] -4)

0

s

ci o Jogy

Prereq uisite:

493

SEMINAR IN SOC IOLOGY

502

SOC I A L SCIENCE THEORY

5 03

GROUP PROCESS

505

SOC IAL SC IENCE RESEARCH METHODS

51 1

THE C RI M I N A L JUSTICE SYSTEM

Stud en t o r fac u l ty i n i tia ted seminar i n one of fo ur f u n d am en ta l a rea s i n 5 0 c io log : ( ) Con te mpo ra r y ) sues and Problems; (b) Social Process and C h a n ge; (c) Soc i a l S t ruct u re; a nd (d ) Theory a n d Method . Pre requ i si te : depa r t m e n t a l conse n t . ( 1-4) A n a nalysis o f socia l explan a t i on and the so i a l sc ien t i f ic f ra me of refe rence . (4) A h u m a n i n te ra c t i o n l a borato ry t o faci lita te t h explora t i o n of th self c o n e p t t h rough th e mecha n i s m o f i n t er­ pers nal i n t erac t i o n s a n d feedback. ( 4) Basic research concep t s appl ied to laboratory, field, nd b i bliog ra phic s t ud ies . TopiCS include fo r m u l a ti ng research q ues tion , research de ig ns , da ta -ga t he r i n g t ech n iques , a n a l y s i s o f d a t a a n d t heory co ns t r uc t io n . E m p ha s i s i s placed n unders tanding and e a l ua t i n g ra t h r t ha n c ndu cting research. (4) Socio l gical analysis of the seg m e n t s of the criminal j u st ice system, their in terrela tions h ips, a n d their rel a t ion sh i ps to crime p reve n tion , so i a l con t rol. co r rec t i n , and re­ ha bi li ti ta t io n . ( 4 )

512

REHAB I L IT A nON MODELS

S t udy o f variOlts models t h a t str i ve to help Hender re t u r n t o a productive role i n societ y : i n s ti t u t io na lizatio n mode ls, social a ct ion mode ls, com m u n i ty ba sed models, etc . ( )

513

SOC IOLOGY OF HUMAN SERVICE S YSTEM S, PLANNING AND CHANGE

A n a l YSis of h u m a n service sy t e m s u c h a s rrec tional i nsti t u t ions , probat i n and par Ie agencies and social servi e agencies to u nder t a nd planning processes dnd ch a n ge . (4)

521

SOC IAL SYSTE MS INTERVENTION

A survey o f the pn)Cesses o f social change, i nc l ud i n g an a m i n a t i o n of S OC ia l con di tion s w h ic h create t h e n e e d for i n te rve ntion , Offered in the H u m a n Relations Prog ra m . (4)

531

MINORITY-MAJORJTY RELATIONS

T h e hi story a n d c ul t u re o f minority groups i n Ame rica n 5 ciety , exam i ned wit h i n th e context of t h e in teracti n between m i nority- rna ) rity group s a n d po p ulation a n d omposi tion move ment of t hese gr u ps. Offered i n the H u m a n Relations Prog ra m . (4)

124

S O C I O L O G Y & A N T H R O P O L OGY


54 1

SOCIAl. STRATI fIC ATION I N SOCIAL SYSTEMS

22 1

The econo m ic , soc ial, and p ol i t i ca l s y s t e m s i n A m erica a re ex plored to gam some b as ic u n ders ta n. ding of how cla ss,

s t a t us , and power o pe ra te i n society . Offered in t h e H u m a n Relations Progra m . ( 4 )

5 9 0 SEMINAR S t ude n t Or f a cu l t y i n i t i a ted se m i n a r in selected a rea 5 .

599

Re q u i remen t .

0 - 4)

Amer ica . T h e theory a nd met h ods of archaeology.

CULTURES A N D PEOPL E S Of AfRICA A compa rative s t u d y of t h e Black Af rica n c u l t u re s so u t h o f t h e Sa h a ra; the Heets of th colonia l era o n t radi tional

RESEARCH PROJECT

A f rica n c u l t u re a n d t h e posi t i on of these c ult u re s modem world . (4)

THESIS

322

An th ropology BAC H ELOR O f ARTS MAJOR: 3 2 se mester hou rs, i n c l uding 220, 221, 222, 4 70, d n d 1 0 a d d i t i o n a l ho u rs i n a n t h rop l og y c h osen in consu l t a t ion with the depa rt men t .

1 0 1 or 2 2 0 reco m mended p rereq u isite to a l l level co u rse s .

NOTE

300

a n d 400

te m porary s ocia l science t h eory .

323

Survey

of

324

p h y s i ca l a n t h ropology, a rchaeol ogy , l i n ­ g u i stics), u s i n g t he concep t s of ph y sica l anJ c u l t u. r a l evo l u l i o n . B r i e f su rv ey o f ge n e t ics a n d p r t m a te evol u t ion,

i n c l u d i n g vol u t i o n o f pro t o - h u mans i n to mode r n homo sapie n s; ea r l y c u l l u ra l beg i n n i ngs in t h e Paleol i t h ic E ra; Neolithic deve lopme n ts; archaeolog ical methods and maj o r discove ries; t h e development a n d d i s t r i b u t io n o f basic soc i a l a n d c u l t u r a l insti t u t i ons; the evol u t io n of co m p l e x s oc i a l forms f rom s i m p l e r ones ( 4 )

WORLD ETHNOLOG Y

A su rv e y of the major cul t u re a re a s of t h e wo rld, a n a lysis a nd co m pari so n of eco no m i L, soc i a \ , pol i t i c a l , a n d re l ig i o u s sys t e m s f rom a variety of societies, I n c l u d i n g our own . N o t

open t o fres h men .

the

peoples

and

c u l t u res

of

Mel a n eS ia ..

and Po l y n es ia i n c l uding n a tive Ha wa i i ; o f s oc ial i n s t i t u tion s l hro ugh s t udies of

eth nog rap h i S ; an exa m i n a tio n o f t heore t i c a l i ssues w h ic h have ari se n from fie l d s t udies i n Ocea n i a. ( 4)

-

Su rvey of l he mai n s u b-areas of a n t h ropo logy (c u l t u ral

(4)

C ULTU R E S A ND PEOPLES O F T H E PAC i F I C

C O URSE OFFERING S Anthropology

a n t h ropo logy ,

t he

CULTURES AND PEOPLES Of ASIA

Micronesia, co m pa rison

E VOL UTION AND C UL TU R E : A G E N E RA L INTRODUCTION TO ANTH ROPOLOGY

III

S u rvey o f S o u t h , Sou t heas t . a nd East As i a , w i t h e m p h a s i s on t h e social in st i t u t ion s of t h e reg i o n s oc ie tal, econom i C , pol i t ical , and re hglous - in l igh t of con­

M I N O R : 1 6 semester ho u rs , j "e l uding 1 0 1 or 22 0, one course a t the 3 00 le ve l , one c o u rse a t the 4 0 0 I ve l , and one ad di tio!1 �1 cou rse c h osen , n consul t at ion with the d e pa r t me n t .

220

(4)

321

(4)

101

(4)

A RC H A EOLOGY AND THE EVOLUTION Of C U t TURE

T h e deve lopmen t of cu l t ure, e m p h a s i z i n g the adaptive role of u l t u re i n a va r iet y of e n v i ro n m e n t a l s e t t i n g s . T h e ri se o f the s t a te in Mesopotamia , Eg ypt, Asia, Mi d d l e a n d Sou t h

5 9 5 G RA DUATE R E ADINGS [ndepe n d e n t s t u d y card required. ( 4 )

(4)

theory , fossil evidence of human d e velo p me n t , the l i vi ng p n mates, p rese n t -d a y h u man as a bi ol ogica l c r e a t u r e . Does n o t meet Social Science G n e ra l U n ivers ity

non-h u ma n

222

5 9 1 DIR ECTED STU DY ( 1 -4)

597, 5gB

PHYSICAL A NT H ROPOLOG Y

H u ma n biology in evolu t ionary perspect i ve; evolu tionary

CULTURES AND PEOPLES OF SOUTH/C ENTRAL A M ERICA

Begi n n i ng wit h t he anc ien t Maya, Aztec, 3-Ild Inca e m p ires, t h i s cou rse i s a om pa ra t ive st udy of t h e t ra d i t i on a l folk

c u l t u re s of

Latin

Ame rica and a n e x a m i n a tion of t h e

pos i t ion of t hese c u l t u res i n t h e m o d e r n wo r l d ( 4 )

326

C U LTURES AND PEOPLES Of NATIVE NORTH A M E R I C A

A co mpara t i ve s t ud y of A m e rica n I n dian cu l t u res a t t h e t i m e o f E u ropean

co n t a c t ,

t h e e f fects o f w h i te con t ac t upon

t radi t i onal A m e rican Indian c u l t u res ; a n e x a m i nation of co n t e m p o rary Nat i ve A m e ri ca n i ss ues , i nl l ud i ng t r i b a l sovereign l y , trea ty - ba sed f i sh i ng fig h ts, a n d l nd i a n J a w . (4)

334

KINSHIP AND MARR IA G E

C ross-c u l t u ra l st udy o f l he fa mily i n i ts m a n y f orm s; t h e e la bo ra t i o n s of l a rger ki n s h i p u n i ts and the fu n c t J on s o f � uch g ro u p s i n s oc i e t y ; the rol of k i n s h i p and marriage a s an u n de r l y i n g p r i n c i pl e i n s t ru c t u r i n g soc ie t y; t he analYSIS o f k i n s h i p ter m i no log y . (4 )

(4 )

S OC I O L O G Y & ANTHR OPO L O G Y

1 25


364

ETHNICITY I N PLURAL SOCIETIES

An e x a m ina tion of the n a tu r e of ethnic g ro ups (racial, tri bal, cul t u ral, e t c . ) ; the s tructure of e t h n i c groups i n plural soci e t i s, the ma n i pul a t i o n of s ym bo l by e thnic groups, ethnic d i vision of labor, ethnic p o l i t ics, and t h e effects o f colo nia l and p os t -c o lo n i a l i n t e rn a t ional systems on ethnic r el a t i o n s . (c ross -re fere nced w i t h SOCiology 364) (4)

415

TH E DYNAMICS Of SOC IOCULTURAL CHANGE An t h ropological app roach es to t h e s t u d y of social, economic, a n d c u l t ur I cha n g e with partic ula r emphasis on the i m pact of the western world on non-wes tern societies. (4) ,

420

ECO NOMI C A NTHROPOLOGY Theore tica l a p p r o a c h e s within a n t hropology to t h e s tudy of eco n o m ic systems i n pre-li te ra t e and pea s a n t societies, a n d to the e f fec t of colonialis m o n t hose system . ( 4) 4 3 0 PSYCHOLOGI C A L A NTHROPOLOGY A review of t h e basic concepts a n d co n tributions of this sub­ field of an th ropol og y; t h e i nAuen e of c u l t u re on the de v el op m e n t of personal i t y; investigation o f recen t w o r k i n cog n i t io n , i nc l u ding �axonomic s y s t e m s , componential a nalysis, and the relationship be t ween cult ure, cog n i t io n , a n d behavior. (4)

440

POLITICAL A NT HROPOLOGY

The s t ud y of p ol i t i ca l s t ructures a n d processes in traditional so c i e t y ; t h e or i 5 of the evolution o f p o l i t i c al form s ; t rad i tio na l con c e p t s of po wer, au thority, and law; political

co mpetition a m o n g ethnic g rou ps in new sta tes. (4) 470

ANTHROPOLOGICAL I N Q UI RY

A sys te m a tic s t u d y of t h e theoretical foundati os of s ocioc u lt u ral a n thro pology; re s e a rc h met hods; how t heory and m e thods are used to establish a n t h ropological k nowledg e . (4)

I ND EP E N D E NT STUDY: UNDERG RADUATE R E A D I N G S Reading i n s p ec i fic a reas or i s s u e s o f an t h ro pol og y u n der s u pervision of a f ac u l t y member. Pr e re q u i site : d e par t ­ me n ta l c on sen t (1-4) 491

.

I N D EPENDENT STUDY: UNDERGRADUATE F I E L D WORK S tudy o f s pe c i f ic areas or issues in a n t h rop ology throu g h i n - f i e l d m ethod s of a n a lys i s and re s e a r c h s u ppo rted b y a pp ropr ia te r ea d ing under supervi s io n of a facul t y me mber. Prerequisi t e s : A n t h . 470 and d e p artmen ta l conse n t . (1-4) 492

126

S OC I O L O G Y & ANTHROP O L O G Y

493

SEMINAR I N A NTHROPOLOGY

S t uden t o r faculty i n i t i a t e d seminar in one o f fou r fundamental a reas in a nth ropology : (a) Contemporary Issues and Pr o b l e m s ; (b) Social Process a n d Change; (c)

Social S tructure; and ( d ) Theory a n d Method . Prereq u i s i t e : d e p a r t m e n t a l con s e n t . ( 1 - 4 )

C O U R S E S OFFERED I N THE 1 979 I N TERIM 305 307 406

THE PUGET S O U N D SALMON FISHING I NDUSTRY OTH ER REAL ITIES: A N EXPLORATION O F TH E CONSCIOUSNESS MOV EM E NT SEX ROLES AND SOCIETY


Social Work Social work is a practice-orie nt ed d iscipline educating s t ud e n ts for partici pation i n a variety of h u man service progra m s . The major progra m also provides s t rong preparation for subseq u e n t g rad uate educa tion in social work . Al though basically a professional progra m, the curric u l u m is s t rongly based in the libe ral arts. E mphasis i s placed on providi ng s t u d e n t s wi th knowledge a nd skills i n various models of i n terven tion a mong t rou bled i ndi vid ua ls, fa milie , s m a l l g roups, a nd larger segments of society. I n additi on, t h e curri c u l u m s t resses mastery of social research methodology, h u man g rowth and devel opm en t, and poli tica l and economic factors wh ich a ffect social wel fare progra m s within socie ty. A major st rength of the cu rricu l u m is the field expe rience componen t. Senior students a re given opportu n i t y over two semesters t o pa rticipa te in t h e trea t m e n t program of an agency, i n st i t ution , or clinic of their choice. Place ments e m phasizing com m u ni ty orga n ization are also available. Superv i si on is provided by professio n a l l y trained staff social workers. Additional opportu n i ties for field work, other t han the req uired field experience courses, are available i n the Com m u llily Services cou rse, which provides an initial e xpos u re to social services for f reshmen and sophomores, and i n the block placem e n t program, which a l lows s t ud e n t s t o work t h i r ty h o u r s a week i n an age ncy of t h e i r choice while receiving academic cred i t . The social work program is accredited b y the C o u ncil on Social Work Education. FAC ULTY W. Gilbertson, Ch a i r;

Briar, V. Hanson, T. Payne.

Schiller

BACHELOR O f A R T S MAJOR: 4 4 semester hour , i ncluding 2 7 1 , 333, 365, 4 4 2, 4 72 , 4 76, and 4 84, and 12 additional h ou rs chose n from each of the following t h ree a reas: ( 1 ) either

Political Scien e 1 0 1 or 373; ( 2 ) either Economics 1 5 0 or 3 2 1 or e i t h er Psychology 335 or 5 ciology 381 . nless otherWIse s t ated, 271 or cons e n t is a pre requiS i te for all co u rses i n social w rk.

3 6 2; (3)

NORK

127


4 8 4 SOC I A L R E SEARCH P r i ncipl e s of re se a rc h d esign a nd asses s m e n t

C OURSE O F f E RI N G S 222

COMMUN ITY SERVICES

Designed t o provide a n opport u ni t y f o r fres h m a n a n d sophomore level s t u de n ts t o t e s t t h e i r i n te rest in th e field of social work th roug h a five to ten h o u r per week par ticipan t ­ obse rva tion experience in a local agency . The p u rposes are to prOVide pport u n i t y for a self-eval uation of one's a p t i t u d e for and i n terest in the field. a n d secondly, t o i n t roduce t h e idea of eval uating t h e e f fectiv e n e ss of the agency in terms of achieving its s ta ted goals . No pre­ requisites. Will not meet general u nive rsi ty r eq u i remen ts .

(2-4 ) 271

I NTRODUCTION TO SOC I A L WORK

T h e h i s tory. p h i losoph ical roots, practice m e t hods a nd "settings" (i .e ., adoptions, public schools . public assis t an ce. c orrect i ons , psych i at ri c hospi tals and c l i n ics) of professional social work; oppo rtunities for observational experie nces . No prereq uisi tes: 1 II ( 4 )

333

I NT E R V I EW I NG

social welfare, clergy, n u rsi ng. ph ysicians . parish workers, person nel officers No pre req u i sites. ( 4)

SOC I A L I NTE R V E NTION

Processes of social change; socia l the need for i n te rve n tion, the i nd i v i d u a l s a n d g ro u ps , f u nction affecting change; i n tervention s tra tegi es. Prere q u i site: 271

442

or

cond i tions which create dynamics of chang e i n of social movemen t s i n method s . tactics. a n d

c o n s e n t 1 (\ ( 4 ) .

SOC IAL PO L l C Y AND ORGANIZA nON

An alysis of h o w soci e ties h a v e defined social and persona l needs a nd developed a n d orga nized responses to t hose need s Special e m phasis will be given to the response of America n socie t y . (4)

458

lAW AND THE HUMAN SERVICES

A n e x a m i n a t ion f t h e legal fou nd a t ions of h u m a n service wi t h e m phasis o n domestic relations, correction s , and j uvenile j u s tice Special e m phasis on t h e rig h t s o f o f fenders. j u ven i les , depe n den t c h i ldren, the h a ndica pped . and oth ers se rved by t h e social sector. a / y (4)

472

491

I NDEPENDENT STUDY

501

S E M I NA R I N J AMIl Y G ROUP THER APY

Prereq u i s i t e : d e pa rt m e n t a l c n s n t .

(1-4)

Th i s s e m i na r seeks to e x a m i n e t h e cu rrent fa m i ly ori en ta t i o n as it re la t e s to beh a v io r a l s c ie n ce t h e o ry a n d p racti c e wi t h fa m i l i e s t h r o u g h a n a n a l y s i s o f t h e t h e o r e t i c a l and pra c t i ca l considera tions t h a t s h a p e delivery of s er v i c e s to fa m i l ie . The r e l a t i o n b e t ween t h e t h i n k i n g a n d d o i n g i n f a m i l y t h e ra p y w i l l b e c l a ri fied a n d ex pa n ded u p o n . (4)

502

S OC I A L SCIENCE THEORY

frame o f reference . (4)

503

FAMlL Y THERAPY PRACTTCUM

T h i s se m i n ar s e k s t o p ro v i de s t u d e n t s with a meaningful proce s a nd structure by which fa m i l y t h rapy i s learned at

the p ra c t i c u m I ve l . Theore tical conce p t s w i l l a l s o be e xa m i ne d i n t h e terms of diagnosis and t re a t m e n t i m plic a t io n s i n t he d e l i ve r y of ser ,ices to f a m il y systems. (4)

505

SOC IAL S C I E N C E RESEARC H METHODS

Ba s ic research con cep t s a pp l i e d to labor a t o r y . field, a n d bibl iog ra p h ic s t u d i e s . Topics i n c l u d e for m u l a t i n g r e s e a r c h q u es t i o n s , re se a rc h d e s ig n s . d a t a -g a t h e ring techni ques. a n l ys i s of d a t a a n d t h e o ry c o n s t ruc t i o n . E m ph a s i s is pl a c ed on un d e r s t a n d i ng and e v a l u a t i n g ra t h e r t h a n con d u c t i ng

resea rch . ( 4 )

591 DIRECTED STUDY (1-4) 5 9 5 G R ADUATE R E ADINGS Indep e nd en t s t udy c a r d r e q u i r ed . (4) 59 7, 598 (4) 599 (4)

R E S E A RC H PROJ ECT

THESrS

SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE

T h e p rofession of social work exam i ned w i t h i n t h e g r o u p of helping professions; the k n owle d g e base, princi ples, m e t hods a n d v a l u e s generic to soci a l work prac tice; bs erva t ion of proble m -solving st ruc tures a nd processes . P re req ui.9 i t es : 271 a n d con se n t . 11 (4)

475, 4 76

FIElD EXPERIENCE

S u perv i sed f i e l d w o r k wi t h i n a n a g e n c y or i nst i t u tion ; applica tionlin tegratlon of k n owled ge , theory and u nder­ s t a n d i ng; developm e n t of tech n iques common to the social work field. Prere q u i s i te : 271 a nd conse n t . I n (4, 4)

1 28

490 SEMINAR Prereq uisi t e : departmen tal conse n t . (1-4)

An a n a l ys i s o f social e x p l a n a tion ,1 n d t h e soci a l s c i e n t i fic

Concepts, pri nciples, and tech niq ues i n trinsic to i n ter­ vlewmg: " h elpin g," p roblem-solvi ng. o r "clinica l" in te r­ viewi ng for persons i n �he helping professio n s : social workl

365

of vario u s

research methods. Evalua tion research will b e g i v e n s p e c i a l a t te n tion_ Primary e m p h a s i s w i l l be p la c e d u po n under­ s t a ndi ng n d c rit i ca l l y e x a m i n i ng actual r e s earc h . (4)

S OC I A L W O R K

C O URSES OFf E R E D I N THE 1 9 79 I NTERIM 303 31 5

T H E H U M A N SERVICES M I E T I NG fAMIUE S' NEEDS


Stati s tic s

Pro grant

S t a t is tics , a branch of appl ied mathematics, has become, a nd is e x pected to con tin u e a s an i nc rea ingly i m porta n t a rea of i nq uiry . As socie ty becomes more complex , the a b i l i ty to gather, s u m marize, and eva l ua t e data becomes more necessary for e fficie n t and i n telligent decision maki ng . FACULTY Selected facul ty from the Depart ments of Economics, Mathematics and Computer Sci ence, and Psychology.

STATISllCS MINOR: A minimum of 1 0 semester hours, consisting of Statistics 23 1 , Math 3 4 1, e i th r Com Sci 139- 1 4 0 or 1 , plus electives selected from the remalnmg c ur es in statistics. Students in teres ted in statist ics should contact the respect i ve heads of t h e Departm n ts of Economics, Mat hematics and C m puter Science, or Psych logy,

C OURSE OffERIN G S 1 3 9 BASIC I (Com Sci 1 39) I n t roducti o n to in terac ti v compu t i ng, bra nching, loopi ng, s u bscri pts, a nd f u nctions in the con tex t of t h e BASIC l a n g uage. ( Stude n t s wishing proficiency i n BASIC s h u ld a lso take Com Sci 1 4 0) . I, n and Interim ( 1 ) 1 4 0 B A S I C I I (Com Sci 1 40) Con tinuat ion of 139 i ncludi ng i n put /o u tp u t, character variables, subrou t ines a nd simple file tec h n i ues in BASIC. (Students may e n roll in 1 39 and 1 4 0 d u ri n g the same semester or differen t semesters ) . Prerequisite : 1 39 or equivalent o r i ns t r uctor's con se n t . T n a nd I n terim ( 1 ) 144

I NTRODUCTION T O COMPUTER SCfENCE (ComSci 1 44) Computer science and a working knowledge of FORTR A N f o r both n u meric a n d nonn umeric pu rposes u s i n g both in te ractive and batch modes, i n t roduction t file use, computer organ ization , progra m m ing applica tion s to complement s t uden ts' i n terest . Prerequisite: Math 1 27, 1 28, or 1 33 or e uivalen t . Previous program ming experience s uch as Com Sci 139 recom me nded for n n足 sCience s tudents. I [l (4) 2 3 1 INTRODUCTORY STATI STICS Descriptive sta tis tics: mea s u res of cen tral tendency and dis persion . In fere n tial statis tics : generaliza tions about popu la tion s from sa mples by pa ra me t riC and non足 pa rametnc tech niques . Methods covered will i ncl ude es timation, h ypotheSis-test i ng, simple corr",la tion a n al ysis , l i near expression and chi square a n a l ysis . ( Not applicable to mathematics cred i t . ) I II (4)

STATI S TI C S

129


334

ANALYSIS Of VARIANCE AND EXPERIM ENTAL DESIGN (Math 334)

Ra nd om sampling, factors which d e s t r oy ex pe ri me n ta l design, on e w a y a n a lysis of v a r ia n ce , t wo- wa y a na l ys i s of variance , fac tored d esi gn, block a n d la t in square desig n . S tude nts will a lso c ri t i q u e pu b l is h e d experiments and perf rm an experimental design proje c t . Prerequisi t es : Sta tis tics 23 1 or eq u i va le n t . U (2) -

341

MATHEMATICAL STATI STIC S (Math 341)

Proba b i l i ty t h e o r y disc re t e and contin uous dis tribution f unct ions, momen t gene ra tin g functions, sampling dis足 tribu t ions a n d hypothesis -te s t i n g; i n t ro d u c t i on to re 足 g ression , cor-relation, and a n a l y sis of va ri a n ce . Pre足 req uis i t e : Math 1 5 2 . I I a/y 1 980-81 (4) ,

343

OPERATIONS RESEARCH (Economi cs 343)

Quan ti t ative m e t h ods for decision p ro bl em s E m ph a si s o n linear programm ing and othe.r det rm i nistic models. Prerequ i si te : Sta t istics 231 or equival e n t . (2) .

344

APPLIED REGRESSION ANAL YSIS (Economics 344)