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SUMMER SESSIONS 1968

First Session

*

June

Second Session

*

July 22

17

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July

19

August 23


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*

SUMMER SESSIONS 1968 First Session

*

17 - July 19

June

Second Session * July

22 - August 23

PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY BULLETIN VOLUME XlVIII

MARCH

1968

NUMBER

3

Published six times annually by Pacific Lutheran University P. O. Box

2068, Tacoma. Washington 98447

Seoond Class Postage Paid at Tacoma, Washington


1 UNIVERSITY CALENDAR

Summer Session, 1968 Registration begins 8:30 a.m. ________._... _............. _._........_ ............. Saturday, Ju ne Classes begin 7:30 a.m .......____ ....... ___ ......... _._............. __............... __Monday, June Vacation .. _ .. ________...___ .. __ .... ___....... _..__ ................_ ........ _._ ..... _..........Thursday, July Saturday, July Vacation Make-up_____.....__ .__ .... _...... __ .... _.. ___ .....__ .... _.. _ .. First Term ends______ ........._ ......................................._ ....._ ..._ ............ __Friday , July Regis tration-2 nd Term..__.. ___.. _._ .... ______ ...... __ ..___......__... _ . . ____......_Saturday, July .. ._......._ ....

15 17 4 6 19 20

Classes begin-2nd Term.... _. ._._.__...____ ..... _____..... _. .__ ._. ._ ......... ____ ._.. Monday, July 2 2 Summer Session closes __ .. _ .. _....___ ... _ .. _____. ._ ...... _....... __ ................_. .Friday, August 23 Baccalaureate / Comrnencemen L . .. . ._ ................._ ...... .......Friday, Augus t 23 ..._.

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First Semester, 1 968-69 Orientation Days__. ......_._ ......._Sunday, September 8 - Wednesday, September Registration ....... __ ....... _........... Monday, September 9 - Wednesday, September Cla.sses begin 7 :50 a.m ............................._ .......__..............Thursday, September Last date for adding a course_...... ___ .__........_ .................. Wednesday, September Last date for discontinuiug a course without receiving a grade .. __._ .. .. _. . . . _ .......... Wednesday, October Mid-semester ____ .....____.......__. . __ ...... __ . .. . .. Friday, November Thanksgiving.Recess begins 12:30 p . m.... ___ . . Wednesday, November . . .. _.... Monday, December' Thanks giving Recess ends 7:50 a.m . Christmas Re cess begins 10:00 p . m ... .. Friday, De cember .... ._ .. ..

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1969 Christmas Re cess ends 7 :50 a.m .. _......._ ... .. . Monday January 6 , Exami nations ____ ....................._ .............. Monday, January 20 - Friday, January 24 Semester ends ....... _................................. _........ .. . Friday, January 24 ... . _ .... .... . .. ._.

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Second Semester, 1 968-69 Registration..... ____ ..... ______ .....___ ...... __ Wednesday, January 29 Classes begin 7 :50 a.m ...__ ._ ...... ____ ......... _................ __

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Last date for adding a course .............................. _

......... _.

Last date for discontinuing a course without re ceiving a grade____ ........ __....... _ ............... _ . ......

Mid-semester___.......___ ........ _........... ........ _ . ..

Easter Recess begins 6:00 p.m

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. . Monday, F ebruary .

... Thursday, february 27

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Friday,

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March 21

F riday, March 28

Easter Recess ends 7:50 a.m ................ _._ ................................_.Tuesday, April Examinations_ .. _ ........._......... _ .

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. Monday, May 26 - Friday, May 30

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.Sunday, June .sunday, June

..._ .... ._.........•.. _.. _ ..

1


2 SPECIAL FEATURES

SEMlNAR IN EDUCATIONAL PLANNING June 17 to July 5 EDUCA TIONAL PLANNING INSTITUTE July 8 to July 12 KINDERGAR TEN WORKSHOP July 22 to August 23 HUMAN RELATIONS WORKSHOP June 17 to July 5 WORKSHOP IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION July 22 to August 23 WORKSHOP IN THE PREPARATION AND UTILIZATION OF INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS June 17 to July 19 CONSERVATION EDUCATION WORKSHOP June 24 to July 5 ADVANCED DRIVER EDUCATION June 17 to July 5 READING CENTER WORKSHOP June 17 to July 19 MATHEMATICS CENTER WORKSHOP June 17 to July 19 EXPERIENCED TEACHER INSTITUTE IN HISTORY t1 THE SOCIAL SCIENCES: AN INDUCTIVE APPROACH June 10 to July 19 EDUCA TIONAL ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION WORKSHOP June 17 to July 19 SACRED MUSIC INSTITUTE June 24 to June 2 8 METHODS O F TEACHING PIANO June I 0 to June 14


3 WORKSHOP IN THE PIANO LITERATURE OF DEBUSSY June 10 to June 14 CHORAL LITERATURE AND STYLE July 1 5 to July 19 KODALY METHODS MUSIC WORKSHOP July 1 5 to July 19 PRACTICUMS IN COUNSELING AND TESTING June 17 to August 23 DRAMA WORKSHOP July 22 to August 23 TELEVISION WORKSHOP June 17 to July 19

FOREIGN STUDY TOURS

AR T OF WESTERN EUROPE June 12 to July 12 HISTORY STUDY TOUR IN EUROPE (INCLUDES RUSSIA) June 10 to July 1 5

SUMMER STUDIES FOR

Those desiring special �tudies in Liberal Am.

Teachers who wish to meet requirements for certification and/or admini­ strative creden �ials or who desire additional training for promotion and self-improvement.

Graduates working toward the Master of Arts degree.

Unde�graduate working toward the Master of Arts degree.

Entering freshmen who desire to initiate their college careers.

School Admin:strators seeking practical courses which will aid them in their specialized tasks.

For infonnation, contact: Director of Summer Sessions Pacific Lutheran University Tacoma, Washington

98447


4 ADMINISTRATIVE AND OTHER OFFICERS 1967-68

PresidenL ....................... ..................................................... Robert A. L. Mortvedt Administrative AssistanL.................................................... Lucille G. Giroux Academic Administration Academic Vice PresidenL ............................ . ............ .......Thomas H. Langevin Director of Graduate Studies and Summer Session Registrar... .....Charles T. Nelson Assistant Registrar .. __ . ....Loleta G. Espeseth __

__ ..........................__ ......__ ......__ ......__ ..........__ ..____

....... __ .__

.

. ________._ _.. __.______.... __......... __

Director of Broadcas t Services and Instructional Materials Production

______________.______________ .____

Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences

Judd C. Doughty

.Charies D. Anderson

____ ..____.____..______

Dean of the College of Professional Studies

.Richard D. Moe

__ .......... __ .._ _.________

Director of the School of Business Administration. Director of the School of Education...

....

____ . ... __

.... ...............

...Gundar J. King

Kenneth A. Johnston

__ ..

Director of the School of Fine and Applied Arts (Acting) ....Richard D. Moe Director of the School of Nursing..........

.Doris G. Stucke

.. __..__ .....__ .____ ...__.... __

Director of Teacher PlacemenL.

Arne K. Pederson

. ____________________ ____ .____....__...

Librarian....

Frank H. Haley

__ ........ __ . ____ . ____. ____. ____....... __. __. __. __________ ...............__.......

Business Administration Vice President-Business and Finance Assistant Controller..

A. Dean Buchanan

________ .______________ ... ________

...... ______ .__ .....__.__________________ .. __ .__....__ .__..

Business Manager

-Jerry C. Haralson

Howard L. Vedell

__ .. __ ........____.......__..________.__ .......__ ... __ .__.......

Manager of the Bookstore. Director of Food Service.........

Doris McCarty .....Edith Dougherty

____________ .________ .__ . .__.... ____ ...____ ..____..

__ .... __ ..__ .. __... __...__ ....____ ..__

Assistant Director of Food Service.. ......

Mary Hegtvedt

__.__.......... __...__..__....

Acting Director of Athletics..

....__ .. ____________ .....__________________

.H. Joseph Broeker

Director of Data Processing

________. ______________________________________________

.Paul Askland

Development Vice President for DevelopmenL.

Clayton B. Peterson

__ .__.______.... __ ..........__ .________

Associate in DevelopmenL.

Arthur O. Pedersen

__________ .______ .......__._ _... __..__.....____

U niversi ty

Relations

Vice President-University Relations Director of Admissions....

__________________ ...... ______ ..... __

.Milton L. Nesvig

____ ..__ ................ ________........__ ........... __

.J. E. Danielson

Assistant Director of Admissions and Financial Aids Officer..

..M. James Van Beek

__......__ .____ ..____ ......______..__.____

Assistant Director of Admissions.. Admissions Counselor.........

Ronald C. Coltom

.. __ ..............____.......__...

. ..._.

__. _ _...____. __

.

.. ... ............. Mark E. Andersen

____

Director of Alumni Relations.........

Jon B. Olson

____. .__ .. __.....____.____..__ ... ____....____

Director of Chnrch Relations

__ ...____________.__ .____.__ .. ______________

News Bureau ChieL

______ .____ .____.__.________.____________________________

Student Personnel Service Vice President-Student Affairs..

..............__.......____

Dean of Men............

Harvey J. Neufeld

.E. Joseph Schneider

........ .........Daniel R. Leasure

.... .......William W. Sandler, Jr.

_ _... __...____..__...............______

Dean of Women

....

.....

.Margaret D. Wickstrom

__ ........__........__ .......____...__ ......____

Assistant Dean of Women..

........Mary Jane Heisler

_ _.......__ .__..__ ......______..________

Director of Counseling and Testing Service...... .... Director of Housing.

..... ...Seiichi Adachi

__........

.Leighland Johnson

__ ......____. __.________ ........._ _. _ _..__________.__ ...__

Psychometrist

.Gary Minetti

__. __........____ ..__.. __.... __............ __________ .__ .__.. __ ...... __......_ _

Acting Director, Health Services.

___.......______..__.. ______.__ ..__ .

..Paul Bondo, M.D.

Chief Nurse

.Gladys Bergum

.. __ ....... ____....__.__ .....__.............................____.____. __ .__.. __

Student Congregation University Chaplain.. . ..

. ..

John O. Larsgaard .... Morris V. Dalton

__..__ ...__..______ . __ ..__.__.____ .....____........ ____.______

Assistant Pastor ... .

. __ ...... ______ ... __ ................. __ ... __....... ______ .__


5 SUMMER SESSION FACULTY-1968

Adachi, Seiichi, Ed.D ............... Assistant Professor of Psychology and Education Akre, Elvin M., M.A ................................................. Associate P rofessor of History Alseth, Richard A., B.S ......... ............................ Instructor in Physical Education Anderson, Charles D., Ph.D ............................ .............. ..... Professor of Chemistry Anderson, Joseph L., Ph.D ..................................... Assistant Professor of Religion Bassett, Abe J., Ph.D ................................................. Assistan t Professor of Speech Blomquist, Grace E . , M.A ..... ......................... ......... Associate Professor of English Carlson, Roy E., M.S .............................Assistant Professor of Physical Education Chambers, Alice-Marie B., M.A ......................... Assistant Professor of Education Creso, Irene 0., M . S ............................ ............... ...... Assistant Professor of Biology Culver, Lowell W., Ph.D ................. ....... . . . Assistant Professor of Political Science D avis, James, M.S ................... ................... .........................Instructor in Economics DeBower, Carrol E., Ed.D ........................ ......... Associate Professor of Education Doughty, Judd C ., M.A ............................. . . . . . . . . . . ...... Assistant Professor of Speech Elwell, George R., M.A ............ . . .. . .. . __ ...... . ....... . ...... . . ..... . Assistant Professor of Art Farmcr, Donald R., Ph.D......................................... Professor of Political Science Genda, Ronald W., M.A ..................................... Assistant Professor of Economics Gilbertson, Gordon 0., M.M .....................................Associate Professor of Music Govig, Stewart D., Ph.D ............................ . ............ Associate Professor of Religion Hagen, Arnold J., Ed.D ............................. .......... Associate Professor of Education Halseth, James A., M . A ....................................... .................. Instructor in History Herzog, John 0., Ph.D ................................... Associate Professor of Mathematics Holman, Gary L., M.A .......................... ............. Assistant Professor of Economics Hol mberg, Branton K., M .Ed ............ ............................. I n structor in Psychology Jobst, Richard

].,

M .A .........................................................Instructor in Sociology

Johnson, Lucille M . , Ed.D .................. .............. .......Associate Professor of English Johnston, Kenneth A ., E d .D ............. .................................. Professor of Education Jones, Albert H., Ph.D ...................... ...... ............. Assistant Professor of Education Karl, Theodore O. H., M.A ............................ ......................... Professor of Speech King, Gundar J., Ph.D ............................. ...... Professor of Business Administration Kittleson, Lars E., M . S . , M . F . A ............. ....... ................. Assistant Professor of Art Klopsch, Raymond A., Ph.D . .................................. Associate Professor of English Knapp, Calvin H., M.S ............................................... Assistant Professor of Music Knudson, Anne E., M.A ............................. ..............Associate Professor of E nglish L eraas, Harold J., Ph.D . , D.D.S . . . .. . . . . . . . . . ............................... Professor of Biology Martinson, Arthur D., Ph.D ............ . . . . . . . . . . ............. Assistant Professor of History Monroe, Katharine E., M . A ... . . . . . . ............................ Assistant Professor of French Napjus, Alice J., M.A . . ......................................... Assistant Professor of Education Nesset, Burton L., Ph.D .............................. .........Assistant Professor of Chemistry Olsen, Robert C., Ph.D ................ ......................................... Professor o f Chemistry Orvik, Florence A., M.A .......................... ............. Assistant Professor of Education Ostenson, Burton T., Ph.D ....................................................... Professor of Biology Pederson, Arne K., M . A ................... .... .............. Associate Professor of Education Peterson, Gary D., M . S ............ ....................................... Instructor in Mathematics Ringe, Louis D., M .S ............................................... Assistant Professor of Geology Roskos, George M., M.A .. .................... ........................... Assocaite Professor of Art Schiller, Johannes A., Ph.D .. . . ďż˝ ........ . ... ............. .. . ..... ...........Professor of Sociology Schnackenberg, Walter C . , Ph.D .............................................Professor of History Severtson, S. Erving, Ph.D................................. Assistant Professor of Psychology Sj oding, Theodore C., Ph.D, .... , . . . . .. . . .. , ..._.. , ... ,,,,,,, .. .......... . . . prgfessor of Education


6 Skones, Maurice H., M.M.Ed ...................................Associate Professor of MusIc Sole, Jimmie L., M.A ............................................... Assistant Professor of English Stein, Lynn S., Ed.D .. . . . . .. . Associate Professor of Education ..

......

..... .......... _ .

..

.. ....

Stintzi, Vernon L., M.B.A ............. Assistant Professor of Business Administration Tollefson, Dorothy M., M.Ed................................. Assistant Professor of Nursing Urness, David E., M.A...............................................Assistant Professor of Music Utzinger, Vernon A., Ph.D.......................................................Professor of Speech Williamson, Jane, Ed.D .......................................Associate Professor of Education Zulauf, Dwight ]., Ph.D...............................Professor of Business Administration

VISITING FACULTY

Berger, Jean, Ph.D Professor of Music, University of Colorado

.......... .............................................................

Lecturer in Music

Curtis, Gerald A., B.A ....... Assistant Lecturer in Health and Physical Education Physical Education Instructor, Bethel School District Douglass, Fenner, M.M............................................................... Lecturer in Music Professor of Organ, Oberlin College Conservatory of Music Ehlers, Wayne H., M.L ......................................... Assistant Lecturer in Education Librarian, Audio Visual, Franklin Pierce School District Fulkerson, Russell D., B.A ..................................... Assistant Lecturer in Education Mathematics Instructor, Secondary Schools, Franklin Pierce School District Gray, Harold, M.A............................................................... Lecturer in Education Assistant Superintendent, Clover Park School District Henninghaus, Ellen, M.A.....................................Assistant Lecturer in Education Director of Secondary Curriculum, Pierce County Schools Hill, Edward E., Ed.D.........................................Associate Lecturer in Education Superintendent, Franklin Pierce School District Holden, Leonard, Ph.D ......................................... Associate Lecturer in Education Research Department Coordinator, Tacoma School District Johnson, Luella, M.A .............................................Assistant Lecturer in Education Kindergarten Teacher, Clover Park School District Keblbek, Margaret, M.A.......................................Associate Lecturer in Education School Psychologist, Tacoma Public Schools Laughlin, Donn W., B.S., Art Ed ................................... Assistant Lecturer in Art Chairman of the Art Department, Charles Wright Academy Ruth, June, M.S .........................................................Assistant Lecturer in Nursing Public Health Nurse, Wenatchee, Washington Schimke, Albert E., B.A .......................................Assistant Lecturer in Education Special Education, Franklin Pierce School District Souza, Louis ]., M.S ...........Assistant Lecturer in Health and Physical Education . Corrective Therapist and Clinical Training Supervisor, American Lake Hospital Sullivan, Elizabeth, B.A . . . ....

.

. .. .

. . .... ....... .

.

....

.

Assistant Lecturer in Education

.. _ ...

Elementary Science Teacher, Franklin Pierce School District Warren, Roy, M.A................................................................. Lecturer in Education Lecturer in Education, Pacific Lutheran University Weeks, Norman E., M.A............................................................. Lecturer in Music Music Consultant, Seattle School District von Bredow, Margrit A., M.A...............................Assistant Professor. in German Instructor in German, Tacoma Community College'


7 GENERAL INFORMATION

Location Pacific Lutheran University, the only degree-granting school of the Lutheran Church in the Pacific Northwest, is located in Tacoma, Washington, an attrac­ tive city of about 156,000 inhabitants. It is on Puget Sound and near Mount Rainier and the Olympic National Parks. The 125-acte university campus is situated in the heart of the Evergreen playground where there is a healthful climate and beautiful scenery. Railroads and highways make the university easily accessible from all parts of the coun­ try. Tacoma city buses run regularly to and from downtown and stop in front of the campus. Accreditation Pacific Lutheran University is fully accredited by the Northwest Association of Secondary and Higher Schools as a four-year institution of higher education. In addition, the University is accredited by the Washington State Board of Education and by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education for the preparation of elementary and secondary teachers with the Master'. Degree as the highest degree approved. This accreditation gives Pacific Lu­ theran graduates clear reciprocity in many other states. Pacific Lutheran University recommends its graduates to the State Superin­ tendent of Public Instruction for certificates. The University is a member of the Association of American Colleges, the American Council of Education, and the National Lutheran Educational Conference.

Registrat ion Advance registration by mail is encouraged. Please see the appropriate forms on pages

40 and 41.

Alternatively, students may register on campus June 15 or by appointment during June 10-14. Students who desire a transcript to be evaluated and a progress chart created or brought up to date should make their request by mail or by personal ap­ pointment, preferably prior to June 10. Registration for the first session must be completed by Tuesday, June 18. Registration for the second session must be completed by Tuesday, June 23. Students planning to attend the entire summer session should complete registration for both sessions at the time of the initial registration. Please refer to the calendar on page one for opening dates of classes.

Change of Registration, Withdrawals Any addition or withdrawal from a course must be made in the Registrar's office. A fee of $5.00 is charged for a schedule change made after completion of registration unless such change is requested by the University authorities. Students who register for first session only and later decide to enroll for the second session may do so by adding the desired courses and paying the balance of the full session fees. Students registered for both sessions who decide not to


8 continue in the second session must make an official withdrawal from the second session course . Official withdrawals, with a grade of "WP," will be given any time during a session if the student is doing satisfactory work. If a student withdraws who is not doing satisfactory work he is given a "WE," which has the same effect on grade point average as an "E." Dropping a course at any time without in足 forming the Registrar's Office will be classified on the record as a failing grade, which is an "E." Expenses Tuition, per credit hOuL

______________________ ______________________________________________________

Matriculation (paid only by students entering for first time) Audit fee, per credit hOuL

________________

______ __________________________________________________________________

Diploma and graduation fee for each degree

____________________________________________

Private instruction in piano, organ or instrument, per Y2 hour lesson (for credit, minimum of

16

lessons)*

__________________________________________

R ent for piano

________ . ___________________ _________ .____________________________________ ____________________

Rent fee for orga n

_____________________________________________________________________________ .__________

Board only, per session

(15

meals per week)

Room only, per session (2 in room) Room only, per session

(1

in room)

Board and room, per session Board and room, per session

___________ . ________________________________

45.00 2.00 5.00 75.00 50.00 75.00 125.00 150.00

____________________ . ___________. ________________________

__________________________________________________________

( 2 in room) (15 meals per week)

(I

$35.00 5.00 10.00 15.00

in room)

*Students may register for fewer lessons at

(IS

$3.00

meals per week)

______________

______________

per lesson if no credit is desired.

Refunds Partial tuition refund of fifty per cent may be made only during the first week when withdrawal from the

University results

from sickness or causes

beyond the control of the student. No room refund is given.

A pro rata refund will be made for board after

one week of absence. No fees are refunded. Student Load For undergraduate students, six credits constitute a normal full load for either summer term. Additional credit may be taken with the consent of the appro足 priate dean. Any requests for waiver of academic requirements should also be made to the dean of the college in which the student is registerd. Credits earned at Pacific Lutheran University are semester credits. (A two semester credit hour course is equivalent to three quarter credit hours.)

Class Hours All classes will meet daily except when specified. Building Symbols Administration Building.

A AB

Art Building.

EC

Eastvold Chapel.

G

Gymnasium.

L R X

Library.

Ramstad Hall. Xavier Hall.


9 ADMISSION Freshmen Graduates of an accredited high school in the State of Washington should fill out the general application blank, available i n high school principals' offices. Alternatively, the Admissions Office at the University will supply the blanks. In addition, the University requires two character references from individuals who are personally acquainted with the applicant. These forms too may be obtained by writing to the Admissions Office.

Regular Students, Advanced Standing Regular students of Pacific Lutheran University are admitted under the rules that apply for any semester. Students who have done work in another accred­ ited college will be granted advanced standing for previous' work. Such credits will be accepted toward a degree insofar as work taken is equivalent to the curriculum i n which the student wishes to graduate. Transcripts of work from other institutions should be sent to the Registrar's office, where an evaluation of credits will be made on request. Please see the above section on "Registra­ tion."

N on-degree Students Non-degree students who enroll for the summer session only, without inten­ tion of working toward a degree from this institution or for a teaching certifi­ cate, will not be required to file transcripts from other institutions attended. Instead they may file a letter of academic standing from the last previous insti­ tution attended or give other evidence of being prepared for college work. They may enroll i n any course for which they have the necessary prerequisites and qualify in terms of classification.

UNIVERSITY FACILITIES University Housing The University requires all undergraduate single students attending summcr school to live in residence halls unless living at home. Students who will be 2 3 years of age o r more b y the first day o f summer school may live off campus if they desire. Apply for residence hall accommodations to the Director of Housing. A room deposit is not required but occupants will be held responsible for breakage or damage to the room or its furnishings. A key deposit of $ 5 . 0 0 will be required when moving into the residence hall. Two students will be assigned to a room. Single room requests will be hon­ ored if space is available. Students will continue throughout the summer i n thc same rooms unless the University closes a section of a residence hall. Residence hall rooms are furnished with single beds, chests of drawers, study desks, desk lamps and chairs. Students provide their own pillows, blankets, sheets, pillow-cases, towels and other furnishings to their own taste. Electrical appliances which are permitted are: clocks, small radios and record players, and typewriters. Other electrical items must have the approval of the Head Resi-


10 dent. Such items as sun lamps, TV's, hot plates and other cooking appliances are NOT permitted. Women's Residence Hall Stuen Hall, a new three-story brick and steel building, has been set aside for the use of summer school 6tudents. Each room will accommodate two stu足 dents, but single occupancy may be requested. Facilities include lounges with kitchens, typing rooms and a self-service laundry.

Men's Residence Hall Pflueger Hall will house men attending the summer session. Each room will accommodate two students, but single occupancy may be requested. Facilities include lounges, typing rooms and a self-service laundry.

Housing for Married Studenu The University maintains 17 apartments on the campus for married students. Other apartments are available in Parkland and Tacoma. The University can足 not guarantee housing for its married students; however, every effort will be made to have sufficient housing available. Students desiring housing Ihould write to the Director of Housing before June l.

Food Service All students living in the University residence halls are required to eat in the University dining hall in the College Union Building. No meals are served on Saturdays or Sundays.

Coffee Shops The coffee shop located In the College Union Building is open Monday through Friday. The coffee shop in Columbia Center (The Golf Shop) day of the week from 6:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.

will be open every

Recreation The Pacific Lutheran University campus enjoys the geographical advantage of being in the Eenter of a large recreation area. The University is just two blocks off the main highway to Mt. Rainier, internationally known mountain resort. Ski areas, salt or fresh water swimming, picnic grounds, and outdoor athletic facilities are accessible. The indoor swimming pool will be open to students. Chapel

Exercise5

Chapel exercises will be held at 10:45 each Tuesday and Thursday morning in the Jacob Samuelson Chapel. Attendance is voluntary. Convocations may be held on other days and will be announced.

Bookstore For the convenience of the students the University maintains a bookstore where books, stationery and school supplies may be obtained. The bookstore is located in the College Union Building. All sales are on a strictly cash basis.

Outdoor Sports Facilities One feature of the campus is a beautiful nine-hole golf course which is open to students all summer. For tennis players there are four hard-surfaced CO\lrts.


11 Beaches on lakes and Puget Sound are within a short driving distance of the University.

Automobiles and Other Vehicles The use of automobiles and other motor vehicles in the campus area is a matter of privilege and not of right. All who use an automobile or other motor vehicle while attending the University must register said vehicle at the same time as registering for classes. If vehicle is acquired AFTER registration for classes, registration of vehicle will be accomplished at the Security Office lo足 cated on lower campus in the Office of the Plant Manager. Purchased decal will be affixed to the vehicle as directed.

VETERANS' INFORMATION The University is approved by the Veterans Administration as an institution of higher education for veterans and invites veterans to use its facilities in acquiring and completing their education. Students who receive aid through the Veterans Administration should inform the Registrar's office so that their enrollment may be certified. Those who plan to attend the University under the benefits of the public laws for veterans or for orphans of veterans must secure a certificate of eligi足 bility from the regional office of the Veterans Administration and present this certificate at the time of registration. Transfer students who have been using public law benefits should contact their previous institution to obtain eligibility for the new place of training well in advance' of the beginning date of classes in order that loss of pay may not result. In order to obtain full subsistence, veterans and eligible orphans of veterans must carry five or more semester hours per term. Veterans who have completed liberal arts courses through USAFI will receive credit as recommended by the American Council on Education.

CERTIFICATION IN THE STATE OF WASHINGTON

Information Concerning the Standard Certificate and Renewal of the Provisional Certificate I. Fift h College Year of the Program for the Standard Certificate: The fifth college year of teacher education is to be planned carefully in the light of the teacher's first teaching experience and/or professional goals. This year of study provides an opportunity for further strengthening teach足 ing competence and for specialized study. A. The fifth year of teacher education is to be completed following a period of at least one year of initial teaching experience. The teacher may complete this study during an academic year or summer sessions in an approved institution of his choice as follows: 1. In a Washington institution with an approved teacher education pro足 gram. The institution chosen shall be responsible for recommending the teacher for the standard certificate.

2. In an approved out-of-state institution. The teacher's pre.service


12 institution shall be responsible for recommending" him for "the stand­ ard certificate. Prior approval of the teacher's program by his pre­ service institution is required to conformity with the fifth year pat­ tern of study outlined in B below. B. The fifth year pattern of study: 1. The teacher's fifth year program shall be approved by the recom­ mending institu tion: a. The pre-service institution may designate fifth year requirements to the extent of one-half the program subject to the approval of the recommending institution. b. Study shall be in both academic and professional fields. ( 1) The fifth year shall include a minimum of 30 semester hours of which at least 50 per cent are in studies of the third, fourth, and post-graduate yean. (2) Not more than 8 semester hours of extension and/or corr.:­ spondence study may be approved. (3) A minimum of one-half of the fifth year shall be taken in residence in the recommending institution or in an approved out-of-state institution. Pacific Lutheran University requires 20 semester hours of residence for transfer students. (4) It is recommended that only 10 of the 30 required semester hours be completed prior to or during the first year of teach­ ing experience. Teacher education institutions may permit individual students to take as many as 20 semester hours of the fifth year prior to teaching experience. c. Two years of satisfactory teaching experience are required for the issuance of the Standard Certificate. The candidate should request letters vertifying successful experience be forwarded to School of Education, Pacific Lutheran University. C. Specific requirements and procedures: 1. Specific course requirements: a. Education 557, Evaluation, or is equivalent. (Education 416, Par­ ent-Teacher Conference may be used by elementary teachers.) b. Education 571" School Guidance Program, or Education 370, Principles of Guidance. 2. Any courses recommended for the individual student prior to the granting of the Bachelor's degree must be taken. These may be rec­ ommended by either the area adviser or the School of Education. 3. Courses taken should strengthen areas of concentration and build stronger general education background as well as fill needs in the professional field. This program of studies is to be selected by the student with the guidance of those who have worked with him dur­ ing his period of initial teaching and the advisers at the recommend­ ing institutions. 4. The student secures approval of the recommending institution for work taken elsewhere before the work is begun. Some of the work taken during the fifth year may also apply toward the Master of Arts degree for those who meet the requirements. A student must not plan that these two curricula shall coincide. The program as set up for the fifth year shall take precedence and must be finished first.


13 II. Renewal of Provisional Certificate: A. Provisional certificates, based on satisfactory completion of a four-year pre-service program, are issued for a period of three years upon recom­ mendation of teacher education institutions. They are renewable once through the State Superintendent's office for a three-year period as follows:

1. On completion of 12 quarter hours (8 semester hours) of the fifth­ year college program and one year of successful teaching. 2. On application for persons who have not taught during the three­ year life of the certificate. Principal's Credentials Requirements·� The candidate for the principal's credentials will be guided by the following:

1. He must meet graduate standards for the Master's degree. 2. He must work toward the provisional principal's credentials at his chosen level. To receive this it is required that he have completed work for his Standard Teaching Certificate plus six semester hours. 3. He must complete experience and study requirements for the Standard Principal's Credential at his chosen level. To receive this he needs t� have

(1)

had administrative experience, (2) earned a minimum of eigh t

more semester hours, and (3) earned his Master of Arts degree. Students who intend to work toward the Master of Arts degree in the field of education must apply for admission to the Division of Graduate Studies and meet the requirements outlined by that Division. Candidates should see the course requi'rements as' set forth in the Master of Arts brochure. *Details of the program are available at the School of Education upon request.

DIVISION OF GRADUATE STUDIES

Purpose The Division of Graduate Studies is an all-University division co-ordinating and integrating the work of the undergraduate schools and colleges, which through their various departments provide graduate level work. Its general objective is to further the basic objectives of the University by providing ad­ vanced graduate level academic and professional work. Its specific objectives are: (11 to increase the breadth and depth of understanding of the graduate student in one or more of the liberal arts disciplines, (2) to increase the stu­ dent's knowledge of the research being done in his field of concentration and to increase his ability to read the professional journals of his area of interest, (3) to develop the student's ability to do independent study and research, and

(4) to prepare students through the upper division and graduate division, and through the University'S professional schools, for entry into a vocation directly, or to enter other graduate schools for further advanced study leading to the Doctor's degree.

Admission Students holding a Bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university who attain an undergraduate scholastic honor-point ratio of 3.0 may be admit­ ted and granted regular status in the Division of Graduate Studies. Those with less than an average of 3.0 will not be considered for regular status until they


14 have demonstrated their :ability to do graduate work by completing 10 semester hours work with a minimum grade point average of 3.0. Students majoring in an area of professional education must have met alI requirements for teaching certification. All students expecting to enter the Division of Graduate Studies will be expected to take an admission examination at the University's Counsel­ ing and Testing Center or present evidence of prior examination, and have the results forwarded to the Graduate Office. Further supporting evidence in the forrn of personal recommendations may be requested. Students applying for admission to graduate study should submit to the Division of Graduate Studies the completed application blank (available from the Graduate Office) plus two official copies of transcripts of all previous col­ lege work. This should be done before the first session of registration in gradu­ all: courses. In order to insure consideration for entrance in a given term, applications should be made by August 15, December 15, and May 1. A t"n­ dollar non-refundable application fee should accompany the application. This is a service fee and is not applied to the �tudent's account. Checks or money orders should be made payable to Pacific Lutheran University and sent to the Director of Admissions. Approval of admission to the Division of Graduate Studies does not imply admission to candidacy for the degree. Final admission approval is determined by the Director of Graduate Studies in consultation with the appropriate Graduate Council Committee. Classification of StudenB 1. Those student� approved for unqualified admission to graduate study by their respective Graduate Council Committees are granted regular status. Students who fail to qualify for regular status may be granted provisional �tatus. 2. Students who wish to pursue course work with no intention of qualifying for an advanced degree, and those who are transient registrants, will be classified as non-degree students. ASSIGNMENT TO ADVISER Regular status students are assigned a major adviser by the Director of Graduate Studies in consultation with the appropriate Graduate Council Com­ mittee. Provisional status stude nts are advised by the chairman or director of the student's major department or school. Master', Degrees Offered

Master of Arts* 1. Education (a) Elementary or Secondary School Adm inistration--The student who wishes to qualify for the provisional or standard principal's credential ( elementary or secondary or general) will take a major in this field and a minor in one of the academic departments of the University. Students may major in this field without qualifying for a principal's credential. ( b ) School Counselor Program*-For students who wish to qualify as public school counselors. -Details

of this progr am may be obta i ne d from the office of the Director of

G raduate Studies.


15 ( c ) Elementary Classroom Teaching$-This program is for those stu­ dents who wish to qualify as elementary school supervisors or con­ sultants, Along with the major in this field the student is required to complete an academic minor.

( d ) Secondary C lassroom Teachin�*-This program is for those stu­ dents who wish to increase their preparation for teaching in an area of social science. 2.

Humanities*-This degree program is designed for librarians, ministers of the gospel, teachers and others who wish to extend and broaden their understanding and appreciation of the various fields of the Humanities.

3. Social Sciences*-This degree program is designed for personnel work­

ers in industry, welfare workers, librarians, ministers of the gospel, teachers, and others who wish to extend and broaden their understand­ ing and appreciation of the various fields of the Social Sciences. Master of Business Administration*-This degree program is designed to provide, through education, a foundation for responsible leadership in business. Master of Natural Science"-This degree program is designed especially for teachers who need to extend and broaden their knowledge in the fields of science and mathematics. The total graduate program, including approval of the student's research work, is supervised by a student advisory committee composed of the major adviser and two other facu lty members as determined by the appropriate Graduate Council Committee. A minimum of thirty semester hours is required. Six semester hours of graduate work may be taken at another institution, pro­ vided that approval has been given by the student advisory committee. Regular status students must have their proposed programs of courses ap­ proved by their respective student advisory committees before or during the first session of registration as a regular status student. Standards of Work The minimum standard accC'ptable for regular status students is a grade point average of 3 . 0 in his major field and an overall average of 3.0 in his graduate work. Research Requirements As an important part of his Master's program, the student is required to show that he can do independent research. In some programs a thesis is re­ quired. In other programs he may elect to follow one of two plans: compkte a thesis or write two or three research papers. Whichever plan he follows, before embarking on his research, the candidate must present an outline of his pro­ posed research to his advisory committee for approval. This outline should fol­ Iow a prescribed plan obtainable u pon request. After his proposal for research has been approved, he must report to the appropriate adviser periodically for evaluation of his work. The research in its final fonn must be presented to the student advisory committee for its approval. This must be done at least six weeks before awarding of the degree. Where a thesis is required it must be written in the major field of concentration. Where a thesis is not required, the

*Details of this program may be obtained from the office of the Director of Craduate Studies.


16 research may a l l b e done i n the major or partly in the major and partly in th e minor. Under the thesis plan, the student is required to submit two typewritten copies of t hi s thesis ( to be bound later) , the original for deposit in the Uni­ ver�ity library and the first carbon copy for the Division of Graduate Stu d ie s . The student will be expected to present evidence that he has paid the necessary binding fees for the thesis at the Business Office. No binding fees are c ha rged

for research papers. Under the re s earch paper plan, the student must dep os i t one typewritten copy of each paper with the Division of Graduate Stu d iel .

E xaminat iom

A wri t te n comprehensive e xami nation and/or oral examination over the stu­ dent's program of studies, as well as an oral examination on the thesis or re­ search papers, is required. These examinations over the student's program of studies are under the direction of the major adviser and/or the student advisory committee and must be successfully passed not later than six weeks prior to commencement. The oral examination over the thesis or research is under the direction of the student advisory committee and must be c o mpl e ted not later

than four weeks prior to commencement. Time Limit All requirements for the M as ter's degree must be completed

within seven

ye a rs. The seven-year period covers all work submitted for the completion of the Master's degree regardless of whether the work wru taken under provisional or r egu la r status, a s well as ,credit transferred from anther institution, c ompre · h e nsi ve exa mina tio n , thesis, and final ora l examination. Residence Requirement

AU can did ates for the Master's degree must complete a mmlmum of 24hOUr! in re s ide nce . This requirement may be fulfilled by either one full aca­ demic year in attendance or three full summers.

In cert a in fields students may meet the requi rem ent s for the Master's de gree on a full-time basis by attending one full a cademi c year and one summer les­ sion. The requirements may al so be met by attending summer sessions onl y or on a part-time basis during the regular academic year.


0

During the official registration dates Not later than the semester before the commencement in which student takes his degree Periodic evaluation and approval Not later than the last registration date before the semester in which student takes his degree At beginning of semester in which student expects to earn his degree During final year but not later than six weeks before commencement in which student takes his degree During final year but not later than six weeks before commencement

Major Adviser Student Advisory Committee

Major Adviser Registrar's Office

Registrar's Office Major Adviser and/or Student Advisory Committee Student Advisory Committee Student Advisory Committee Business Office Director of Graduate Studies

Approval of each registration

Selection and approval of thesis problems or problems for research papera

Progress reports on thesis or research papers

Registration for thesis or research papers

Application for graduation

Comprehensive written and/or oral examination over student's program of studies

Filing of thesis or research papers

Final oral examination on thesis or research papers

Graduation fee and fee for binding thesis

Recommendation to the faculty for the award ing of the degree.

Not later than three weeks prior to commencement

During final year but not later than four weeks beJore commencement

During final year but not later than four weeks before commencement

S

During the first session of registration as a regular ltatu& student

Student Advisory C ommittee

Approval of degree program

t::l t!1 �

rJl

0 :=

"l

rJl

� c:: �

"'d := 0 (")

"l

� �

c::

rJl

Before the first session of registration as a regular statu& student

Director of Graduate Studies and Graduate Council C ommittee

Approval of admission

Date Before the fint session of registration .s a regular statu& student

Under the Direction of Director of Graduate Studies

Procedura

Application for admiss ion to the Division of Graduate Studies

......


18 COURSES O F INSTRUCTION

Courses open to freshmen and sophomores are numbered 1 0 1 -299 and are considered lower division subjects. C ourses open to juniors and seniors are numbered 3 00-499 and are regarded as upper d ivision subjects. Courses num­ bered 500 or above are graduate courses. Courses numbered in the 300's and 400's are open both to graduates and upper division undergraduates. Such courses ma y be a part of the graduate program provided they are not specific requirements in preparation for graduate study. Upper division students may be enrolled in a 500-level course if, at the time of registration, they provide written permission from the Chairman or D irector of the academic unit that offers the course. It is u nderstood that any student given such permission will have met all assumed or specifically indicated pre­ requisites and will have an above average academic record. Independent study may be authorized in certain specific cases i f arranged by the department and approved by the Director of the Summer Session and the Dean concerned. Lower division students may take upper division courses and have them ap­ ply toward the 40 hour requirement provided that prerequisites have been met. The University reserves the right to modify specific course requirements, to discontinue classes in which the registration i s regarded as insufficient, and to withdraw courses. All classes meet daily e� cept when specified. Number after course title indicates semester hours credit given.

ART

1 60

Drawing

I

3

First Session

Introduction to basic media and techniques of drawing. A systematic series of exercises structured to develop observation, perception, and draftsman­ Mr. Laughlin ship. 1 2 : 5 0 to 4 : 0 0 p.m., AB. 230

Ceramics

I

3

First

Session

Techniques of shaping forms for decorative, expressive, and functional use by hand-built and wheel-thrown methods. Study includes preparation of clay bodies, oxides, and glaze formulations as an integral part of the course. Mr. Roskos 7 : 3 0 to 1 0 :40 a.m., ABb. 250

Sculpture

I

3

First Session

I n troductio n to visual expre£sion in dimensional forms with the several sculptural media and the techniques of modeling, carving and construc­ Mr. Roskos tion. 1 2 : 5 0 to 4:00 p.m., ABb. 265

Painting I

3

Second Session

Introduction to basic studio media and techniques with emphasis on paint­ ing methods and fundamental experiences with form and imagery. Pre­ M r. E lwell requisite: Art 1 60. 12 : 5 0 to 4:00 p.m., A - l OS .


19 340 Art Education: Elementary

2

First Session

A course planned for those who intend to teach in the elementary grades. Appropriate projects in drawing, design, and construction are deve loped in various media to illustrate the types of work which are suitable to the i n terest and abilities of these pupils. 7 : 30 to 9 :40 a.m., A- l OS . Mr. Laughlin

485 Art of Western Europe

June 12 to July 1 2

4

E u ropean architecture, painting and sculpture seen within i t s original con­ text. The tour will include trips to Rome, Florence, Venice, Verona, Milan, Paris, Tours, Lemans, and London. Anyone wishing to remain in the Brit­ ish Isles or the continent for further travel may do so. The cost of the tour is $ 1 ,670.00 and includes all transportation and accommodations with bath i n comfortable hotels and meals half-pension ( breakfast and one meal of your choice ) . Informal meetings will be held in preparation for travel and sites to be visited. Registration forms for this tour will be sent upon re­ Director: Mr. Kittleson quest.

488 Twenti eth Century Art

3

Second Session

Movements in twentieth century art and architecture such as Fauvism, Cubism, Expressionism, Surrealism and other styles of major consequence. 9 : 10 to 1 0 :40 a.m., A- l OS. M r . Elwell

490 Studio

III

2-8

Either Session

A turtorial course with individual investigation in the area of emphasis for major students only. Project thesis is to be submitted in writing to the instructor and chairman of the department. Students must register in a regularly scheduled section of an appropriate course to receive credit for this work. A maximum of 4 credits may be earned per session. Prerequi­ site: Senior standing and consent of the chairman of the department. To be arranged with staff.

BIOLOGY

141 General Botany

First Session

4

A survey of the plant kingdom and structures, and a study of life history and ecology of plants. Lectures, laboratory and field trips. Lecture and laboratory, 8 :00 to 1 0 :40 a.m. and 1 1 : 1 0 a.m. to 1 2 : 1 0 p.m., R-203. Mrs. Creso

S3S1 Natural History of the Pacific Northwest

6

Second Session

An extensive field and laboratory course covering major phases of the natural history of the region. Designed as a workshop i n outdoor educa­ tion especially for teachers of science at elementary and junior high levels. Lectures, laboratory studies, and field work. Not to be counted toward a major in biology. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Lecture, 9 : 1 0 a.m. to 1 0 :40 a.m., R- I 08 . Laboratory, 1 1 : 1 0 a.m. to 1 2 : 1 0 p.m., and 1 2 :50 to 3 : 3 0 p.m., R-2 1 1 . Mr. Ostenson

�64 Vertebrate Embryology

4

First Session

The development of the vertebrate embryo from the germ cell through the


20 embryological states until birth. Prerequisite: Biology 1 0 2 or 1 32 . Lectul"e and laboratory, 8:00 to 1 0 :40 a.m. and 1 1 : 1 0 a.m. to 1 2 : 1 0 p.m., R-2 1 1 . ' Mr. Leraas 497, 498 Independent Study

1-2

Either Session

Investigations in fields of special interest not covered by a regular course. Open to qualified students majoring in biology. Prerequisite: Consent of the chairman of the department. To be arranged. StaIf 502

Graduate Research

1-3

Either Session

To be arranged.

Staff

BUSINESS ADMIN ISTRATION

441 Statistical

Methods

3

Either Session

(See Economics 44 1 1 . 499

Major Conference

1-4

Either Session

To be arranged with Mr. Stintzi. 512 Accounting Information and Control

3

July 15

to August 23

Develops the use of accounting data and systems for inventory costing, cost control, profit planning, and decision making. Prerequisite: BA 2 1 1 or permission of the School of Business Administration. MW, 6:00 to 8:40 p.m., A-2 2 1 . Mr. Zulauf 550 Organization.al Behavior

3

June 3 to July 12

The science and art of management is explored with special emphasis on the contributions from induSti'ial psychology and sociology. This course is centered on thc study of groups and work teams as related to the func足 tions of directing and controlling. Prerequ isite: BA 3 5 1 or permission of the School of Business Administration. MW 6:00 to 8:40 p.m., A-2 2 1 . Mr. King 590 Case Studies in Business

3

Either Session

Intensive study of the case collection process and problem solving ap足 proaches. Individuals or teams expected to complete casc research accep足 table for inclusion in the Intercollegi ate Case Clearing House Bibliography. To be arranged with Mr. King. 595

Methods and Techniques of Research

3

First Session

A study of the various methods and techniques of research. Prerequisite: one semester of statistics. 1 1 : 1 0 a.m. to 1 2 :40 p.m., A-22 1 . Mr. Sjoding 596 Research in Business I

1-2

Either Session

For those Master of Business Administration candidates who elect to write two research papers rather than a thesis. Candidates will be required to review their research papers before the Graduate Student's Advisory Com足 mittee. Time to be arranged with Mr. King.


Ginkgo State Pork feelur .. pelrlliďż˝ log_

The State of Washington The Evergreen woler beaches provide varied ,ecreolion beach combing.

f is h I n g

and camping.

M a n y "ale a n d f"deral pork. a n d camping area. are found Ihroughoul the areo

Solman fl'hing is ex,ellenl in

Ocean "'0


Hond

carved Indion

throughout the

!otem p oles Pacific

ore loco ,ed

Northwest.

Playgro u nd In addition to th. Unl"enlty'. nln.hole golf caune, th.r. or. public cou"., In th. area.

Nearby maunlain " ope. are grand for hiking and picnicking.

_ny


21 597 Research

in Business II

1-2

Either Session

See BA 596. Time to be arranged with Mr. King. 598 Thesis

3-4

Either Session

Time to be arranged with Mr. King. 599 Independent Res ea rch

1 3

Either Session

-

To be arranged with Mr. King.

CHEMISTRY

300 Descriptive Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry

3

First Session

Study of the elements grouped according to the periodic table and of clas足 sical qualitative analysis. Prerequisite : Chemistry 1 09, 1 10 or equivalent. Lecture, 9 : 1 0 to 1 0 : 1 0 a.m. Daily, R-108. Laboratory, 1 :00 to 4:30 p.m., Mr. Olsen TWTh, R-3 l 2. 301 Descriptive Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry

3

Second Session

Quantitative analysis. Prerequisite: Chemistry 300 or equivalent. Lecture, 9 : 1 0 to 1 0 : 1 0, MWF, R-2 10. Laboratory, 1 :00 to 5 : 1 5 p.m., TWThF, M r . Olsen R-3 1 2 . 304

Biochemistry

4

Ten Weeks

Introduction to the chemistry of biological systems. Prerequisite: Chem足 istry 204. Lecture, MTWTh, 7:30 to 8:30 a.m., R-307. Laboratory, M, Mr. Nesset 1 : 00 to 5 : 1 5 p.m., R-3 0 1 . 1

309 Chemical Literature

Second Sess ion

Study of systematic procedures for library research. Prerequisites : Chem足 istry 204 and reading knowledge of German. 9 : 1 0 to 10 :25, TTh, R-307. Mr. Anderson

ECONOMICS

441 Statistical Methods

3

Ei ther Session

Descriptive statistics: measures of pOSItIOn, dispersion, and proportions. Inferential statistics: estimation and the testing of hypotheses by parametric and nonparametric techniques. Regression and correlation analysis. 7 : 3 0 t o 9:00 a.m., A-2 19. First Session, M r . Davis; Second Session, M r . Holman 491 Experienced Teacher I nst i tu te in H is t ory and the Social Sciences: An Inductive Approach ( G ) 5

June 10 to July 19

Pacific Lutheran University presents a teacher institute developed coopera足 tively by the School of Education and the American Economy Program with the assistance of the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory. The institute will introduce the teacher to inductive or discovery methods of instruction, as well as new developments in history, economics, and other


22 social sciences. Particular emphasis will be placed upon an integrated­ multi-approach to the teaching of social studies. Participants will receive instruction in inductive methodology and the content of the "New Social Sciences." They will then have the opportunity to apply these new techniques in a cooperating school district classroom. The main objective of the institute is to encourage teachers to acquire competence i n inductive methods of instruction applied to academic sub­ ject matter. E lementary, junior high and secondary school teachers and principals are invited to attend the institute. A $ 1 0.00 non-refundable deposit must be made by May 24 in order to hold a reservation in the workshop. Since the institute is subsidized by cooperat­ ing school districts, the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory and Pacific Lutheran Universtiy's American Economy Program, the cost to the individual student is $ 1 2 5.00. First class session 9 : 0 0 a.m., June 1 0, Room A-204. Mr. Warren, M r . Genda, and Staff EDUCATION 201 Introduction to Education

3

Second Session

survey of educational problems and issues to orient new students to the profession. A study of the State Manual and a "project" involving actual experience with childre.n is included. 7 :30 to 9:00 a.m., A-200. Mr. Jones A

312 The Teaching of Reading-Elementary

3

Second Session

survey of teaching reading in the elementary grades, including the pro­ grams in the newer app r oaches. 11aterials, methods, techniques, procedures, and some diagnosis of reading difficulties. Prerequisite: satisfactory com­ pletion of Education 20 1 or consent of instructor. 7 : 3 0 to 9:00 a.m., A- 1 I 5. Miss Orvik A

314 The Teaching of Reading-Secondary

2

First Session

survey of teaching reading in the secondary school, including attention to the developmental reading programs. Materials, methods, techniques, procedures, and some observation and diagnosis of reading difficulties. Mrs. Napjus 1 2 :50 to 1 : 50 p.m., A- 1 I 5 . A

315 Instructional Materials

2

Second Session

survey of audio and visual materials and aids, their use, organization and administration in the school. 7 : 3 0 to 8:30 a.m., A-l 1 7. Mr. Hagen A

3 1 9 The Teaching of Arithmetic

3

First Session

An over-all study of the basic mathematical skills and abilities needed by the teacher in the elementary school. Recent developments and materials Mr. DeBower are considered. 1 1 : 1 0 a.m. to 1 2 :40 p.m., A- 1 I 5 . 340 Art Education: Elementary

2

First Session

( See Art 340 . ) 413 S cience i n the Elementary School

2

First Session

course designed to acquaint the student with the objectives, materials and methods of teaching science in an integrated program. 9 : 1 0 to 1 0 : 1 0 a.m., A-206. Mr. Stein A


23 4 1 4 Social Studies in the Elementary School

2

Second Session

A course designed to acquaint the student with the objectives, materials and methods of teaching the social studies in an i n tegrated program. Open to experienced teachers only. 9 : 1 0 to 1 0 : 1 0 a.m., A-2 1 1 . Mr. Pederson

4 1 6 Parent-Teacher Conference

2

First Session

A study of the principles and techniques of parent-teacher conferences. Procedures for introducing a parent-teacher conference program to the school and community. Evaluation of various grading systems. Open only to experienced teachers and students who have completed student teaching. Mrs. Keblbek 7 : 30 t o 8 : 3 0 a.m., A-2 1 3 .

4 1 9 Administration of

the

School Library

2

Second Session

Organization and administration of the school library for teacher-librarians in the elementary schools.

1 1 : 1 0 a.m. to 1 2 : 1 0 p.m., L- I 06.

420 Processing School Library Materials

2

Mr. Ehlers

Second Session

Simplified procedures for the classification, cataloging, and technical pro­ cessing of school library materials. 7 :3 0 to 8 : 3 0 a.m., L- I 06. Mr. Ehlers

423 Language Arts in

the

Elementary School

2

Second Session

A course designed to give the elementary teacher, grade s one through six, an understanding of how to teach the language arts in a functional man­ ner. The areas covered and skills studied will be in the fields of reading, writil)g, grammar and usage, penmanship, spelling, speaking, listening, Miss Orvik vocabulary building. 9 : 1 0 to 1 0 : 1 0 a.m., A-1 1 5 .

426 Primary Reading

2

First Session

A study of the materials and methods of the modern primary reading pro­ gram and its relation to other activities. Open to experienced teachers only. 7 :3 0 to 8 : 3 0 a.m., A - 2 0 2 . M r s . Napjus

428 Kindergarten

2

Second Session

A study of the kindergarten child and his adjustment problems. Special emphasis on activities and procedures for his development. 9 : 1 0 to 1 0 : 1 0 M rs. Johnson a.m., A-l l 7 .

436 Human Relations Workshop

3

June 1 7 to July 5

This intergroup relations workshop will have as its theme, "Classroom Approaches in Teaching the Disadvantaged." It is designed for school teachers and administrators, clergymen of all faiths, social workers, P-TA leaders, and other community leaders. Topics considered will include intergroup problems, issues and implica­ tions; group processes and dynamics; planning effective personal and group programs. Sub-topics include such things as race and racism, ethnic pat­ terns and outlooks, class and caste, roots of prej udice. There will be field trips and interest groups activities. Dr. Kenneth Johnston and Dr. J . A . Schiller will co-direct t h e workshop. Resou rce people from public agencies and community leaders will take part. 9 : 0 0 a.m. to 3 : 0 0 p.m., A-2 0 7 . M r . Johnston, Mr. Schiller


24 437 Early Childhood Education

2

Second Session

A course designed to study the needs of young children, their ways of learning and materials for learning, emphasis upon activities developed Mrs. Johnson for 4 to 8 year olds. 1 1 : 1 0 a.m. to 1 2 : 1 0 p.m., A - l 1 7. 438 Workshop in Preparation and Utilization of Instructional Materials 3

First Session

The purpose of this workshop will be to help teachers to become familiar with the production and use of a variety of ins tructional materials. Trans­ parencies for the overhead projector will be produced by the diazo and fix methods and experience gained i n their use. Flat pictures will be mounted by the wet and dry processes. Students should have a camera available for personal use. Field trips are planned to familiarize students with local resources. Students will produce items useful in the classrooms. A $ 1 0.00 lab fee will be charged. 1 1 : 1 0 a.m. to 1 2 :40 p.m., Library, Mr. Stein Graphics Studio. 439 Conservation Education Workshop

2

June 24 to July 5

This course will deal with resource management, stressing the inter-rela­ tionship of resources and the basis of conflict and harmony in resource use in Western Washington. There will be field trips for "on the spot" observation to give teachers an opportunity to see and study first-hand such resources as soils, water, forests and wild life in natural settings. Attention will be given to content and method of presentation for classroom use, sup­ plemented by teaching aids. Resource persons from government agencies, industry and education will instruct. E nrollment will be limited to 35 stu­ dents. Two scmester hours upper and lower division credit will be given. Cost: Tuition $70.00, of which $ 1 0.00 must be in the form of non-refund­ able deposit in order to hold a reservation. Registration must be before June 24. Mrs. Ellen Herminghaus is the director of this workshop. 8 : 00 Mrs. Herminghaus a.m. to 4:00 p.m., A-204. 439a Experienced Teacher Ins ti tu te in History and the So cial

Sciences: An Inductive

Approach

(G)

5

June 10 to July 1 9

Pacific Lutheran University presents a teacher institute developed coop­ eratively by the School of Education and the American Economy Program with the assistance of the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory. The i.n stitute will introduce the teacher to inductive or discovery methods of instruction, as well as new developments in his tory, economics, and other social sciences. Particular emphasis will be placed upon an i n tegrated­ multi-approach to the teaching of social studies. Participants will receive instruction in inductive methodology and the con­ tent of the "New Social Sciences." They will then have the opportunity to apply these new techniques in a cooperating school district classroom. The main objective of the institute is to encourage teachers to acquire compe­ tence in inductive methods of instruction applied to academic subject mat­ ter. Elementary, junior high and secondary school teachers and principals are invited to attend the insti tute. A $ 1 0.00 non-refundable deposit must be made by May 24 in order to hold a reservation in the workshop. Since the institute is subsidized by coop­ erating school districts, the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory and Pacific Lu theran University's American Economy P rogram, the cost

.

.


2S to the individual student is $ 1 2 5.00. First class session 9:00 a.m., June 1 0 , Mr. Warren, Mr. Genda, and S taif Room A-204. 440c English in the Secondary School

2

First Session Mrs. Napjus

9 : 1 0 to 1 0 : 1 0 a.m., A-21 1 . 441 Statistical Methods

3

Either Session

( See Economics 441 ) . 448 Driver and Traffic SaIety Education II-Advanced

2

June 17 to July 5

This course is designed for personnel who have had Driver and Traffic Safety Education and continues the de velopment of new and broader teach­ ing competencies in traffic. Laboratory work in simulators, multiple-car areas, and teaching experience i n practice driving i� included. 7 :00 to 1 0 :00 p.m., Franklin Pierce High School. Mr. Schimke 449 Workshop

First Session

2

Mrs. Chambers, Mrs. Sullivan

S I Workshop-Reading Center

( Puyallup and Franklin Pierce) 1 : 30 to 2 : 30 p.m., A-2 1 3. S2 Workshop-Mathematics Center

Mr. Fulkerson

( Franklin Pierce) 1 :3 0 to 2 : 30 p.m., A-2 0 2 . Experienced teachers w h o are looking for practical courses during the summer srssions. They want something that can be used directly in the classroom. This should be of partic u lar value to teachers wishing help in the teaching of reading or mathematics for the child who has had dif­ ficulty. Clinical study of reading or mathematical problems and su ggested corrective measure s . To be taken concurrently with Educ. 469. 465 Individual Study

Either Session

1·5

Approval of Adviser and Director of the School of Edu cation .............. Staff 4

First Session

S I Reading Center

Mrs. Chambers, Mrs. Sullivan

469 Directed Teaching

( Puyallup and Franklin Pierce) 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. S 2 Mathematics Center

Mr. Fulkerson

( Franklin Pierce) 8:00 a.m. to 1 2 :00 noon. Directed observa tion and teaching in summer remedial classes in public schools. To be taken concurrently with Educ. 449. 472 Vo cati onal and Educational Guidance

2

First Session

This course is design e d for those who are interested in the vocational guid­ ance of young people. Special emphasis is placed upon the sources, analy­ sis, filing, and methods of disseminating occupational information. 11 : 1 0 M r . Holden a . m . t o 12 :40 p.m., A-2 0 2 . 505 Philosophy of Edu cation

3

Second Session

A comparative study of the backgrounds, developments, trends, and prob. lems of major national systems of education. 1 1 : 10 a.m. to 12 :40 p.m., ,-\-200. Mr. Jonel


26 507 Advanced Education Psychology

2

First Session

Prin ciples and research in human learning and their implications for cur­ Mr. Holden riculum and instruction. 9 : 1 0 to 1 0 : 1 0 a.m., A-2 02.

536 Seminar in Educational P la nni ng

June 1 7 t o July 5

3

This seminar is planned to accomplish three objectives: ( 1 ) Provide an overview of planning and organization techniques by which current edu­ cational problems may be solved, ( 2 ) Involve participants in the practical field appli cation of these techniques to specific school district problems. These field problems will be drawn from school districts having administra­ tors participating in the seminar, ( 3 ) Establish the basis for a continuous educational planning program in which all resources available to the dis­ trict will be utilized. Through new field service activities the University will coordinate various aspects of the planning program. Open to graduate students, school administrators, and others by permission. 9:00 a.m. to 1 2 :00 noon, A- I 1 7 . Mr. Hill 537 Educational Planning Institute ( one we ek)

July 8

t o July 1 2

This institute will involve some leading local and national resource persons in the review, analysis and evaluation of current trends and issues in Ameri­ can education. It should allow teachers, school administrators, school board members, architects, and lay citizens to gain considerable perspective to­ ward solution of pressing local problems. 9 :00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., A- 1 l 7 . Mr. Hill 540 C ounse fi ng Theory and Practice ( See Psychology 540 ) . 557 Evaluation

Second Session

3

2

First Session

Evaluation of the outcomes of school experiences. Problems that arise in connection with development, organization, and administration of te�ts ( both standardized and teacher made) will be studied. Required of all secondary fifth year students. Prerequisite: student teaching or teaching Mr. Sjoding experience. 7 : 3 0 to 8 : 3 0 a.m., A-2 1 7 . 571 School Guidance Program ( E lementary )

2

First Session

A survey study of the guidance program as organized and conducted by a public school system with emphasis on the role of the teacher. 9 : 1 0 to Miss Williamson 1 0 : 1 0 a.m., A- 1 1 5. 571 School Guidance Program (Secondary)

2

First Session

A

survey study of the guidance program as organized and conducted by a public school system with emp ha sis on the role of the teacher. 7 : 3 0 to Miss William�on 8 : 3 0 a.m . , A- 1 1 5 .

582 Administrative Internship

2-4

Either Session

Internship in school administration planned by the School of Education in cooperation with selected school administrator�. Prerequisite: course work in school administration and a dm i ss ion to gradu ate program. To be Mr. Johns toI) arranged, A- 1 2 1 .


27 586 School Finance

F irs t Session

2

Local, st:lte, and federal contributions to school f i na nc e , i ts philosophy and d eve l o p m e n t. Special emphasis on the development and administration Mr. Gray of a school budget. 7 :00 to 8 :40 p.m., TWTh, A- 1 1 5. 594 Administration and Supervision Workshop

3

First Se ssion

The workshop will chiefly be devoted to projects that grow out of indi­ vidual interests and needs of the participants. Typical projects are curricu­ lum p l ann i n g and adjustments i n line with present needs, public relations programs, personnel employment and i n-se rv i c e t rai n i n g , and financing b\Ji lding and educational programs. Special emphasis will be given to the human relations dimension i n educational ad min i s t ra t i o n . The workshop will me et the requirement of Educ. 5 8 1 for masters candidates and is par­ ticularly appropriate to prospective and practicing elementary and secon­ M r . DeBower dary administrators. 9 : I O ta 1 0 :40 a.m., A-22 1 . '595 1'.1ethods and Techniques of Research stu d y

of the va r io u s

3

First Session

te c hni q u e s of res earch with applica­ tions and illustrations drawn from the field s of Edu cation and Psychology, and from such fields as Economics, History, Political Science and Sociol­ ogy. Some prac tice in research i s provided. 1 1 : 1 0 a.m. to 12 :40 p.m., Mr. Sjoding A-22 1 .

A

methods and

1 -2

596, 597 Research Studies in Education

Either Session

For tnose Master

of Arts candidates who elect to write two research papers. ( One re sear c h paper may be in the candidate's minor field written under the supervision of the m i n or adviser.l Candidates will be req ui re d to re­ view their research papers before their Graduate Committee. To be arMajor Adviser ranged, A-1 2 1 . 598 Thesis

Either Session

3-4

For those Master

of Arts candidates who elect to write a thesis. The thesis problem will be chosen from the candidate's majo r area of concentration and must be approved b y his G ra du a te Committee. The candidate will be expected to defend his thesis in a final oral examination conducted by hi s Major Adviser Committee. To be arranged, A- 1 2 1 .

ENGLISH 302 History of the English La ngu age

3

A study of the development of the E n glish languag e, to the presen t . 7:30 to 9:00 a.m., A-208. 321 Chi ld ren's Literature

3

Second Session from i t s beginn i ng

Miss Knudson Second Session

A study of ch ild ren ' s literature and j uve n i l e l i terature as a r i c h body of literature in itself and as a guide for book sel e cti on in the elementary grades and in j u n i o r high sc h ool . 9 : 1 0 to 10:40 a.m., A-208. Miss Blomquist


28 322 Advanced Children's Literature

3

Second Session

A continuation of the study of children's books with emphasis on the early writing for children and on the juvenile literature of the last five years; special problems in book selecton. Prerequsite: English 3 2 1 . 1 2 : 5 0 to 2 : 2 0 Miss Blomquist p.m., A-20B.

357 Modem Drama

3

First StsSion

Selected plays representing the development of modern drama from realism to the thcatre of the absurd. 1 1 : 1 0 a . m. to 1 2:40 p.m., A-20B. M r . Klopsch

441

The American

Renaissance

3

Hawthorne, Thoreau, Whitman.

403 Modem English Grammar

Second Session 1 1 : 1 0 a.m. to 1 2 :40 p.m., A-20B. Miss Knudson

First Session

3

A study of the grammar of modern English utilizing the approaches of the three major theories: Traditional, structural, and transformational. 1 2 :50 to 2 : 20 p.m., A-20B. Mrs. Johnson

404

Literary

Criticism

First Session

3

A study of the problems of creating and evaluating literature as discussed by the great critics, especially those of the past century, together with the writing of brief and extensive criticisms of poems, fiction and drama. 9: 1 0 to 1 0 :40 a.m., A-2 1 0. Mrs. Johnson 452 The English Novel

First Session

3

A study of major novels, selected to represent the main developments in this genre from the late nineteenth century to the present. 7 :30 to 9 :00 a.m., A-20B.

Mr. Klopsch

494 Twentieth Centu路ry American

Literature

First StsSion

3

A study of selected writings from 1 9 3 0 to the present: novels, poetry, and drama. 7 : 3 0 to 9 : 00 a.m., A-2 1 0 . Mr. Sole

F RENC H 201, 202 Intermediate French

3, 3

Ten

Grammar, readings, laboratory attendance.

9 : 1 0 to

Mrs. 221, 222 Introduction to French Civilization

2, 2

Weeks

1 0 :40 a.m., A-2 1 4. M onroe

Ten

Weeks

Readings in cultural materials and a selection of edited novels, with some conversation practice. May accompany French 2 0 1 , 2 0 2 . To be arranged. Mrs. Monroe

GEOLOGY 360 Geology of Western Washington

4

First Session

A study of the minerals, rocks and geological history of the area between the C olumbia Plateau and the Pacific Ocean. Lectures laboratory sessions /


29 and field trips. Prerequisite: one year of college laboratory science or per足 mission. Lecture, 1 1 : 1 0 a.m to 1 2 : 1 0 p.m., X- 1 1 2. Laboratory, 12 :50 to 3 : 00 p .m., X-1 1 2 . Mr. Ringe 497 Independent Study

1 -3

First Session

Independent research paper or project selected by the student with the approval of the instructor. Designed to enhance the student's knowledge in a field or area not normally covered in routine classroom study. Can be taken concurrently with Geology 360. To be arranged with Mr. Ringe.

GERMAN

2 0 1 , 202 Intermediate German

3, 3

Ten Weeks 1 2 : 50 to 2 : 2 0

Grammar review, selected readings, laboratory attendance. p.m., A-2 1 4 .

Staff

HEALTH A.l'lD PHYS ICAL EDUCATION

201 Beginning Golf

Second Session

Activity ( Men and Women ) . 7 :30 to 8 : 3 0 a.m., Golf Course. 234 American Red Cross Life Saving Cou rse

Mr. Carlson

Second Session

1 1 : 1 0 a.m. t o 1 2 : 1 0 p .m., Pool. 275 Methods in Teac hing Wrestling

Second Session

2

7 :30 to 8:30 a.m., Gym.

Mr. Carlson

312 Physical Education in the Elementary School

2

First Session

Progressive series of games and other activities, including physical fitness testing, for the elementary grades. Required for men, majoring in health and physical education, who plan to teach in the elementary school. 7 :30 to 8 : 3 0 a.m., Gym. Mr. Curtis 325 Corrective Physical Education

2

First Session

Survey of common deviations of posture, functional disturbances, and crip足 pling conditions foun d in school children. Consideration of the extent and limitations of the teacher's responsibility for their improvement. 7 : 30 to 8 : 3 0 a.m., G- l . Mr. Souza 337 Water Safety Instruction

2

Second Session

The American Red Cross Water-Safety Instructor's Course. Prerequisite: Health and Physical Education 2 34. 1 1 : 1 0 a.m. to 1 2 : 1 0 p.m., Pool. 341 Methods in Folk Dancing

2

First Session

A study of basic steps and movement patterns together with the application of these steps in a variety of folk, couple, square, and mixer dances. 9: 1 0 Mr. Curtis t o 1 0 :40 a.m., Gym.


30 473 History of Physical Education

2

Second Session

9 : 1 0 to 1 0 : 1 0 a.m., G- ! .

Staff

HISTORY

203 American History

3

First Session

The origin and development of the American nation, from colonial times to the Civil War. Emphasis upon the factors that have influenced and con足 tributed to the American Institu tons. 7 : 3 0 to 9 : 00 a.m., X- 1 1 2 .

Mr. Halaeth

204 American Hj.,tory

3

Second Session

From the Civil War to the pre!ent. Emphasis upon the factors that have influenced and contributed to the American institutions and ways of life. 7 : 3 0 to 9 :00 a.m., X- 1 1 2 . Mr . .Al:.re 2 1 0 The Pacific Northwest

3

First Seuion

A survey of the discoveries, exploration! and settlements of the Pacific Northwest. The internatonal rivalries; the missionary, economic and politi足 cal background; the establishment of the state and local governments. Mr. M artinson 9 : 1 0 to 1 0 :40 a.m., A-2 1 2 .

S300 History Study Tour in Europe

3

June 10 to July 1 5

An extensive program o f observations of European civilization, pa!t and present. The tour will include trips to Copenhagen, Helsinki, Leningrad, Moscow, Warsaw, Prague,

Vienna,

Salzburg,

Cortina, Verona, Veni ce ,

Ravenna, Rome, Florence, Milan, Lu gano, Ge neva. The cost is $ 1 ,500.00 and includes all transportation, three meals a day (except an evening meal in Vienna, Salzburg, and Rome where free choice is especially interesting) and all accommodations from date of departure to return.

Director: Mr. Schnackenberg

372 Recent American History

3

First Session

A study of the political, social, economic and cultural structure and insti足 tutions of the United States since 1 9 1 4. Emphasis upon involvement in world affairs. Readings and research. Prerequisite: History 203, 204. 9 : 1 0 t o 1 0:40 a.m., X- I 07.

Mr. Habeth

375 History of American Thought and Culture

3

First Session

A study of the evolution of American political, economic, religious and philowphical ideas, the development of American culture and its agencies. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

456 H j.,to ry of American Diplomacy

7:30 to 9 : 00 a.m., A-2 1 2 . Mr. M art inson

3

Second Session

The basic factors and policies in the foreign relations of the United States: isolation, neutrality, Monroe Doctrine, the United States as a world power. Prerequisite: History 203, 204 and consent of instructor.

1 2 :40 p.m., X - I 0 7.

1 1 : 1 0 a m. to Mr. Akre .


31 MATIIEMATICS 131

3

College Algebra

Second Session

Linear, quadratic, exponential, and l ogarithmic functions, sets, determin­ ants, progressions, binomial theorem. Prerequisite: Mathematics 1 0 1 or equivalent. 9 : 1 0 to 1 0 :40 a.m., A-2 1 2 . M r . Peterson

1 5 1 Analytic Geometry and Calculus

4

Ten Weeks

An introduction to analytic geometry and conics, functions, limits, deriva­ tives, with applications, and a review of trigonometry. Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra, trigonometry, or Mathematics 1 3 1 and 1 1 2, or the equivalent. 1 2 :50 t o 1 :50 p.m., A-2 1 O . 319

Modem Elementary Mathematics

3

M r . Peterson

First Session

An introduction to the mathematical concepts underlying the traditional computational techniques, and offering a systematic analysis of arithmetic and an intuitive approach to algebra and geometry. Intended primarily for elementary school teachers. Not acceptable for a major. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 321

Geometry

1 1 : 1 0 a.m. to 1 2 :40 p.m., A-2 1 0.

3

Mr. Peterson

Second Session

A survey of the foundations of geometry and of basic theory in the areas of Euclidean, projective, and non-Euclidean geometry. Prerequisite: Mathe­ matics 2 3 1 or consent of instructor. 1 2 :50 to 2 :2 0 p.m., A-2 1 7. Mr. Herzog 433

Modem

Algebra

3

Second Session

Topics include groups, rings, modules, fields, field extensions. Prerequi­ M r. Herzog site: Mathematics 2 3 1 . 9 : 1 0 to 1 0 :40 a.m., A-2 1 7 .

MUSIC 101

Fundamentals

3

First Session

A study of the rudiments of music, including rhythms, sight reading, ele­ mentary keyboard experience, and creative music. 1 1 : 1 0 a.m. to 1 2 :40 p.m., EC-228. 120

Music Survey

Mr. Gilbertson 3

Second Session

An introduction to the music li terature of Western civilization through the study of the form and meaning of musical masterpieces. A course de­ signed to enhance the enjoyment of music. Not open to music majors. M r . Skones 1 1 : 1 0 a.m. to 1 2 :40 p.m., EC-2 2 7 . 1 50

Piano

Ten Week..

M inimum of 16 lessons.·

Mr. Knapp

·Students registering for these lessons must contact the Music Department prior to the first day of classes. Students may register for fewer lessons at $3.00 per lesson if no credit is desired.


32 1 52 Organ

1

Ten Weeks

Minimum of 16 lessons.*

Mr. Knapp

1 54 Voice

Ten Weeks

Minimum of 16 lessons . * 3 3 3 Basic Conducting

Mr. Urness

2

Second Session

A basic course in the techniques of reading and conducting scores; prac­ tice in conducting, both instrumental and vocal . 9 : 1 0 to 1 0 : 1 0 a . m . , EC-227.

Mr. Skon�s

340 Music in the Ele mentary School

2

June 1 7 to July 12

Techniques and procedures for the music program of the first six grades. The rote song, child voice, rhythm activities, Kodaly m ethod and the like. Prerequisite: Music 1 0 1 or equivalent background music. a.m., E C - 2 2 B . 350 Piano

9 : 1 0 to 1 0 : 2 5 Mr. G i lbertson

1

Ten Weeks

Mi nimum of 1 6 lessons.· 352 Organ

Mr. Knapp Ten Weeks

Minimum of 1 6 lessons.* 354 Voice

Mr. Knapp Ten Weeks

Minimum of 1 6 lessons.* 425 Major Conference

1-3

Either Session

To be arranged. 426 Worship and Liturgy

Mr. Urness

Staff 3

First Session

The nature and scope of Christian worship. The history of the main litur­ gies beginning with temple and s ynagogue, Eastern Orthodox, Roman Catholic, Lutheran, Calvinist and Anglican Orthodox. Special reference to the Lutheran Liturgy. 7 : 30 to 9 : 00 a.m., E C - 2 2 7 . M r . Urness S429 Sacred Music Institute

June 24 to June 28

A comprehensive workshop which will include the study of organ li tera­ ture, technique of organ playing, style in organ playing, problems involved in service playing, basic principles of organ design. One day of the insti­ tute will be held off campus to enable students to hear and play outstand­ ing organs in the Puget Sound area. One hour graduate or undergraduate cred i t . Private lessons to be arranged. Conducted by Fenner Douglass, Guest Professor and head of the Organ Department, Oberlin Conservatory of Music.

1 2 :50 to 4:00 p.m., E C - 2 2 7 .

442 Methods of Teaching Piano

Mr. Douglass June 10 to June 1 4

Lectures, discussions, prescribed reading i n methods o f teaching piano. Practical approach to teaching beginners and i n termediate piano students. Emphasis on techniques and materials. Open to piano teachers and those *Students registering for these lessons must contact the Music Department prior to the first day of classes. Students may register for fewer lessons at $ 3 . 0 0 per lesson if no credit is desired.


33 in terested In teaching music In the schools. 9:30 to 1 2 : 00 noon, EC-2 27. Mr. Knapp S443 Choral Literature and Style

July 1 5 to July 19

An institute designed primarily for the study of style and interpretation of choral literature from all periods, with emphasis on correct performance practices. Individual work in the area of conducting will be included, as will the reading of new li terature for choir with emphasis on con tempor­ ary choral music. One hour graduate or undergraduate credit. The insti­ tute will be conducted by Jean Berger, Guest Professor from the University Mr. Berger of Colora d o . 1 2 :50 to 4:00 p.m., EC-2 2 7 . 436 P iano Literature of Debussy

June 10 to June 1 4

A brief study o f the life a n d works o f Claude Achille Debussy. His contri­ butions and techniques will be studied. Open to music teachers and to those interested in furthering their appreciation of music. No prerequisite. M r . Knapp 1 :00 to 3 : 30 p.m., A-2 2 7 . 437 Kodaly Method Music Workshop

July 1 5 to July 19

This workshop includes materials and techniques of presentation of the Kodaly Method of teaching music. 9 : 1 0 a.m. to 1 2 :40 p.m., EC-2 2 7 . M r. Weeks

NURSING

436 Pul;llic Health Nursing

9

Ten Weeks

A course designed to help the student learn new concepts and review ma­ terials previously presented which are applicable to the experience in the field of public health nursing. Provides the opportun i ty for the student to apply nursing skills in a setting outside the hospital. It shows the family and community as important units of health promotion and points out their influence on individual health. A study of the adm inistration, organi­ zation and services of both voluntary and official agencies on national, state and local levels is included. The student must provide her own auto trans­ portation to and from the clinical laboratory experiences. To be arranged. Mrs. Ruth 475 Senior Nu rsing

10

Ten Weeks

A course designed to provide learning experience in: ( 1 ) The study of selected problems of medical or surgical patients including planning, pro­ viding and evalua ting nu rsing care for a group of patients; ( 2 ) Team nursing with emphasis on identifying leadership principles of nursing, utili­ zation of other nursing personnel and the interdisciplinary health team, and the basic principles and concepts of nursing management; ( 3 ) The role of the professional nurse in emergency and disas ter situations and the effects of these situations on the community. Prerequisites: Senior standing Miss Tollefson

and Nursing 335, 337. To be arranged.


34 POLITICAL SCIENCE

301 Pr inci ples of Political Science

3

Second Session

An introductory course i n political science designed to meet the needs of juniors a nd seniors. Not open to freshmen, sophomores or to anyone who has received credit for Politi cal Science 1 0 1 . 9 : 1 0 to 1 0 :40 a.m., X- 1 07. Mr. C ulver 3 1 6 Recent Political Thought

3

First Session

A critical examination of the major political philosophies of the modern world: Democracy, conservatism, capitalism, socialism, ana rcho-syndical足 ism, communism, racial and political elitism, nationalism, liberalism, and Christianity. Contemporary problems. 7:30 to 9 :00 a.m., X- I 07 . Mr. Farmer 3 3 1 International Relations

3

Second Session

This introductory course deals with the scope and methods, concepts, and the vocabulary oJ international relations. Survey of the foreign policy of the major world powers and contemporary international problems. 1 2 :50 Mr. Culver to 2:20 p.m., X- I 0 7 . 361 A meri can PoTitical Pa rties

3

First Session

Party history and organizations; nominations and elections; campaigns and conventions; electoral 'problems and administration; bossism in local poli足 tics; pressure groups; platforms. 1 1 : 1 0 a.m. to 1 2 :40 p.m., X- I 0 7 . M r . Farmer

PSYCHOLOGY

1 0 1 General Psychology

First SesMon

3

A general course in psychology emphasizing the principle and basic facts which are essential to an u nderstanding of human behavior. The main problems discussed are the physical basis for behavior, motivation, learn足 ing, remembering, thinking, emotion, intelligence, personality. 9 : 1 0 to 1 0 :40 a.m., A-2 1 3 . Staff

405 Adolescent Psychology

2

Second Session

An advanced course dealing with physical development, mental traits, so足 cial characteristics and interests of adolescents. Adjustments in home, school and community. Prerequisites: Psychology 3 0 1 or consent of the Mr. Severtson department. 7:30 to 8 : 3 0 a.m., A-2 1 3 .

42 1 Be havior Disorders

3

Second Session

A study of the etiology and treatment of behavior disorders. Prerequisite: Mr. Severtl!0n Psychology 420. 1 1 : 1 0 a.m. to 1 2 :40 p.m., A-2 1 3 .

430 Group Processes and Group Lea dershi p

2

First Session

A human interaction ( sensitivity) laboratory designed to explore interper-


3S sonal operations in groups and to facilitate the development of seU insight. Emphasis is given to the development of skill in di agnosing individual, group, and organizational behavior patterns and influences.

441 Statistical Methom

1 2 :50 to 4:00 Mr. Holmberg

p.m., A-22 1 . 3

Either �ion

( S ee Economics 441 ) . 450 Psychological Testing

3

First Session

A survey of the field of standardized tests. Tests i n the areas of intelligence, aptitude, i n terest, and personality are considered. The proper use, the limi­ tations, and the in terpretation of these tests are emphasized. Prerequisite: either Psychology 240 or 441 and at least six additional hours credit in Psychology beyond the 200 level.

9 : 1 0 to 1 0 :40 a.m., A-223. Mr. Holmberg

490 H istor y and Systems of Psychology

3

First Session

The philosophi cal and experimental background of scientific psychology from its pre-Arisotelian Greek origins through recent schools. One purpose of this course will be to integrate the previous studies of the psychology major. It is, therefore, open only to majors in their final year, or to other students by consent of the department. 520 In di vi dual Psychological Testing

1 2 : 50 to 2 : 2 0 p.m., L- I 0 fi.

3

Staff

Second Session

An intensive study of the Stanford-Binet and the Wechsler intelligence scales. Prerequisite Psychology 450, or consent of the department.

9: 10 to

M r . Holmberg

1 0 : 40 a.m., A-2 1 3 . 530 Group Processes and the Individual

2

Second Session

A human interaction laboratory to facilitate the exploration of the self concept through the mechanisms of interpersonal interactions and feed­ back. Emphasis will be placed on the acquisition of skill in self-explora­ tion, role identification, and climate making. Prerequisite: Psychology <4-30. Mr. Holmberg

1 2 :50 to 4:00 p.m., A-2 2 1 . 540 Counseling Theory and Practice

3

Second Session

A course designed to acquaint the student with the various theories and techniques of counseling. There will be opportunity for simulated inter­ views and some role playing in connection with the development of the theories and the techniques. Prerequisite: Psychology 450.

1 1 : 1 0 a.m. to

1 2 :40 p.m., A-2 2 3 . 570 Pra cti cum in Conuseling and Testing

Mr. Adachi

6

Either Session

Supervised practice using the tech niques of counseling and

evaluation.

Practicum students are trained in the flexible use of information and psy­ chological test data to evaluate learning problems. This is integrated with the process of helping students individually or in small groups. Familiari­ zation with procedures, resources, tests and occu pational i nformation be­ come part of the experience. Prerequisite: Psychology 450 and 5<4-0. To be arranged.

Stafr


36 RELIGION

1 03 In t r oduc t i o n to the Christian Faith

3

Second Session

study of the Biblical foundations of the Christian faith, its theology, and its his tory with the objective of relating the Christian faith in a meaning­ ful way to the basic problems which confront the student in the modern world. This course or its equivalent is required preparation for all other courses in religion. 7 : 3 0 to 9 :0 0 a.m., A-2 1 4 . M r . Anderson A

203 The Bible

3

First Session

A study of the literature, history and theology of the Old and New Testa­ M r. Govig ments. 7 : 3 0 to 9 ; 00 a.m., A-2 1 4 . 305 Religious Education

3

First Session

Theological, psychological and philosophical foundations for the educa­ tional ministry of the Church, to meet the needs of students who wis h to relate the study of religion to the disciplines of psychology and education. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 0 1 . I I :00 a.m. to 1 2 :40 p.m., A-2 1 4 . Mr. Govig 342 Contemporary Christianity

3

Second Session

challenges and trends i n the Christian Church with par ticu ­ lar attention to contemporary theology and the ecumenical movem ent. M r . Anderson 1 1 : 1 0 a.m. to 1 2 :40 p.m., A-2 1 4 .

Mid-century

426 Worship and Li tu rgy

3

First Session

( See Music 4 26 ) .

SOC IOLOGY

308 Juvenile De l i nq ue ncy

3

First Session

Family and community back grounds; treatment through institutions, the juvenile court and probation; programs of p r eve n ti o n . 9 : I 0 to 1 0 :40 a.m ., Mr. Jobst A-208. 332 Contemporary Marriage Problems

3

First Session

practical inquiry into the forces influencing modern courtship and mar­ riage, with emphasis on human experience rather than statistical presen­ Mr. Jobst tations. 1 2 :5 0 to 2 : 2 0 p.m., A-206.

A

344 Cultural Anthropology

3

Second Session

study of the uniformities and variations in man's cultural development, with special emphasis upon the value of this study for contemporary so­ ciety. 9 : 1 0 to 1 0 :40 a.m., A-2 2 3 . M r . Jobst A

44 1 Statistical Methods ( See

3

Economics 44 1 ) .

Either S�ion


37 496 Senllnar in Sociology

3

Second Session

Intended for perwns who need a refresher course in sociology. A series of contemporary research studies will be used to acquaint the student with the theories, concepts, approaches and knowledge of sociology. Special emphasis will be given to the interest needs of teachers. No prerequisite. Mr. Jobst 1 2 : 5 0 to 2 : 20 p . m . , A-223.

SP EECH 1 0 1 Fundamentals of Oral Communication

3

First Session

Foundation course dealing with basic elements of the speech situation, in足 cluding the visible and audible approaches. Some concentration on con足 tent. Extensive platform work. 2 1 0 Interpr e ta tive Reading

7 : 3 0 to 9 :00 a.m., E C - 1 2 3 .

3

Mr. Bassett

First Session

An introduction to the art of interpre tative reading. Emphasis given to developing logical and emotional responsiveness to literature. 1 1 : 10 a.m. Mr. Bassett to 12 :40 p.m., EC- 1 2 3 .

447 Speech for the Classroom Teacher

2

First Session

A survey of speech problems and opportunities which confront the teacher Mr. Utzinger in the classroom. 9 : 1 0 to 1 0 :40 a.m., E C- 1 2 2 .

462 Su mmer Drama Workshop

5

Second Session

The summer drama workshop will consist of five weeks of intensive work in drama. Acting, stage management, lighting instruction, and all other phases of production. E C Stage.

9 : 1 0 a.m. to 1 2 : 1 0 p.m. and 1 2 :5 0 to 2 : 2 0 p.m., Mr. Karl

463 Sununer Television Workshop

4

First Session

A practical and intensive study of the creative and production techniques of television programming. This course is designed for the mature student interested in the commercial, educational, or religious use of television. I t w i l l feature extensive use o f studio facilities and equipment. 7 :30 t o 1 0 :40 Mr. Doughty a.m., A-203.

464 Television and the Classroom Teacher

2

First Session

A course designed to acquaint the classroom teacher with in-school tele足 vision; examining television as a medium; the classroom teacher's use of television as an instructional device; the television teacher's problems in planning production and presentation of in-school lessons. 1 1 : 10 a.m. to 1 2 : 1 0 p.m., A-2 1 1 . Mr. Doughty

465 Clinical Practices in Speech Correction and Audiology

2

First Session

Clinical school procedures in speech correction and audiology. Emphasis on diagnostic and therapeutic techniques of common' disorders. 1 1 : 1 0 a.m. M r . U tzinger to 1 2 : 1 0 p.m., E C - 1 2 2 .


39 MAIL REGISTRAliON Payment Information 1 . Payment must be by check or money order, payable to Pacific Lutheran University. Do not enclose cash .

2. In order to complete registration for one or both sessions, you must pay at least one half of the total charges.

3 . The balance must be paid by July 1 0 for first session enrollment and no later than August 1 0 for those attending both sessions. 4. I f you cannot meet the above requirement, i t will be essen tial to enclose a note explaining how you intend to complete your payment.

5 . Any class changes a fter you have returned your registration must be accomplished in person under the established University procedure.

COMPUllE YOUR CHARGES FROM THE TABLE BELOW :

Total Hours 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Tuition Charge $ 35 70 1 05 1 40 1 75 210 245 280 315 350 385 420

OTHER CHARGE S : If you are attending PLU for the first t i m e, a d d $ 5 . 0 0 matricula足 tion fee. For details concerning board and room

and other m i s c e l l a n e o u s

charges, refer to page eight.


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FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE you may complete your registration by mail. Simply complete the tear out registration card on this page and on page 4 1 and mail along w ith a check or money order to :

Registrar, Pacific Lutheran University Tacoma, Washington 9 8 44 7

WHEN YOU A RRIVE on campus, you may report directl y to your classes.

Birthdate

INDICATE: R

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FIRST SESSION

Credits

SECOND SESSION

I I

Instructor

AL TERNA TE COURSES : Please list, on the last two lines of the registration card, other courses you are willing to substitute should lack of demand require a course cancell atio n or should the course you re­ quest be filled. PAYMENT DETAILS are shown on page 3 9 .

I

Zip

I I

PLEASE NOTE : M a il registrations must reach the University n o later than June 7 , 1 9 6 8 .

Name

Local School Address

Telephone

Permanent Home Address

of Parent, Guardian or Spouse

Name of Parent, Guardian or Spowe

Address

Zip )

AL TERNA TE COURSES


Simply complete the rear

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PLEASE NOTE : Mail registrations m ust reach t be U n iversi ty n o l a ter rban J u ne 7 , 1 9 6 8 .

Tacoma . W as hi ng to n 9 8 4 4 7

Pacific L u theran Un iversity

Registrar

40 a n d mail along w ith a check or money order to :

PAYMENT DETAILS a re shown o n page 3 9

out registration card on this page a n d on page

FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE you may complete your registration by mail.

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PACI FIC LUTHERAN UNIVE RSITY Tacoma, Washington 98447 Second Clas Posta

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Paid

al Tacoma, W' h ingtoll

1968 Summer  
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