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The Little Book of Plan: 75 years with and for children


Juan Grenados, sponsored by actress Tallulah Bankhead, at a home for Spanish refugee children organised by the ‘Foster Parents Plan’, Biarritz, France, May 1939.

Robert Capa © International Center of Photography/Magnum Photos, Victor Brott/Fotojournalisten

Robert Capa © International Center of Photography/Magnum Photos

In 1938 renowned war photographer Robert Capa was commissioned to capture images of children being looked after by Plan.


The past 75 years have been defined by changes of such scale and scope that our distant forebears would have been staggered by humanity’s progress, yet doubtless dismayed at how little has changed for so many.

In those years since Plan’s founding on the battlefields of the Spanish Civil War in 1937, progress, where made, has been hard won.

This approach is vital if we are to make real progress in ensuring that girls and boys can realise their rights and influence the development of their countries.

Throughout my career and most recently as the Head of the UN Peacekeeping Mission in Liberia, I have come to understand that it is through the determination and co-operation of people and institutions that communities and entire societies can come to enjoy greater freedoms, security and prosperity.

The challenges facing humanity loom large but time and again we are reminded of what is possible when we work together.

Central to this common endeavour is the work of civil society organisations.That is why I sought to join Plan as its global chair. Plan’s work in over 50 countries is long term with partners at all levels; from children and local communities to national and international decision-makers.

We may be able to only guess at what the next 75 years will bring. But we can be reassured that the coming generation have in Plan a partner who will support them to move from a life of poverty to a future with opportunity. I hope that on the occasion of Plan’s 75th anniversary you can renew your commitment, with us, to build a better future in which all children realise their full potential.

UNMIL Photo/Christopher Herwig

the Plan

Ellen Margrethe Løj, Chair of Plan International and former Special Representative of the United Nations Secretary General for Liberia


Plan today

1,518,561

sponsored children

Plan is a global children’s charity. We work with children in the world’s poorest countries to help them build a better future: a future you would want for all children, your family and friends. For 75 years we’ve been taking action and standing up for every child’s right to fulfil their potential by: giving children a healthy start in life, including access to safe drinking water l securing the education of girls and boys l working with communities to prepare for and survive disasters l inspiring children to take a lead in decisions that affect their lives l enabling families to earn a living and plan for their children’s future. l

We do what’s needed, where it’s needed most. We do what you would do. Join us on Facebook www.facebook.com/planuk To find out more go to http://www.plan-uk.org/75

Engage with us on Twitter www.twitter.com/planuk #Plan75


Working in Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, China, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Laos, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Tanzania, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Uganda, Vietnam, Zambia, Zimbabwe Fund-raising Australia, Belgium, Canada, Colombia, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Ireland, Japan, Korea, Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, UK, USA.

Last year…

Water and sanitation

…We worked with 58,053 communities reaching 56.5 million children in 50 developing countries. Our impact included...

11,733 latrines built l 9,307 families benefited from new or upgraded community water systems l

Education

75,698 girls and 33,922 boys received school scholarships l 369,746 school books and supplies were provided l

Health l l

Economic security

63,857 farmers received training on agricultural techniques l 20,381 sets of seeds distributed to farmers l

58,259 community health workers trained 31,086 children under 5 received supplementary feeding

…Our total income was €591.4m


Marie Staunton is Chief Executive of Plan UK. From a legal career that included defending victims of human rights abuse to leading international campaigning groups, Marie’s professional life has also been shaped by her family life and her roles as a grand-daughter, daughter and mother. What is the key to Plan’s longevity?

Our essential philosophy hasn’t changed since our founders took action to help children caught up in the Spanish Civil War. Everyone at Plan is passionate about improving the lives of children – about giving them the chance to fulfil their potential. Our work requires a deep understanding of the communities we work with, so 95 per cent of our staff in the field are from the countries we work in and we have 70,000 community volunteers. We work with local organisations. We give people a hand in finding their own solutions, and make children and young people’s ideas central to decisions that affect their lives.

Plan/Zack Seckler

75 years of commitment We’ve responded to global changes and learned from experience - sharing that knowledge across communities and countries. Recognising the expertise and strengths that other organisations can bring, we’re always ready to join forces in the interests of children.

What makes Plan different?

When children and adults work together, change is more likely to be successful and sustainable. Ensuring young people’s participation in decision making is vital – our ‘child-centred community development’ approach. We want girls and boys to have equal opportunities to raise their differing concerns, be heard and influence decisions.


to children

To help us champion children’s rights and participation, Plan UK has a Youth Advisory Panel and two young people on the Board.

We have set ourselves a significant challenge – to remove the barriers to education for the 75 million girls worldwide who are out of school, and to provide 250,000 girls directly with the education and skills they need for life. Empowering girls is key for them, their families and communities, including boys, to move from poverty to opportunity. Plan was supported in the beginning by people who cared deeply about children they had never met, in countries they had never visited. That inspiration, the common humanity and belief in the primacy of the needs and rights of children, still binds all of us at Plan today – my experience tells me it will continue to do so.

Paolo Black for the Young Health Programme

What does the future hold for Plan?

Marie Staunton on a visit to Zambia to see first-hand the work taking place to improve the health of young people.


passionate Our energy is devoted to making a difference with and for girls and boys, supporting them

and their communities to work together to seek solutions. We always listen to – and act on – what they have to say. “In my life what I’d really, really, really like is an education. This is the issue most in my heart and most on my mind. I want my own children to be educated, so they get good jobs. In the future I hope to not be poor or rich, but to be able to earn a living, and to provide for my mother,” explains Bintou in Mali. We listen to them when they tell us how we make a difference.

“Now, I am able to read and write. I owe what I am today to my sponsor and I am so grateful. I will tell my sponsor that I have passed my exams, because I studied well, and that I will continue on this path so that I can realise my dreams,” says Pauline in Haiti.

We make sure they are listened to by the people who have the power to change things for them – in the Philippines schoolchildren successfully ran a campaign for their school to be re-sited – away from the path of potential landslides.

“With the new school, I no longer worry when there is a heavy downpour and I can now concentrate on my lessons. The challenges we encountered in the transfer of our school changed our lives as children. It made us more aware of our rights, our voice and our power,” observes Rhee. We help girls and boys get involved in changing their own day-to-day lives, and to contribute to local, national and international campaigns, resulting in laws and policies in everyone's best interests – like our ‘Learn Without Fear’ campaign which has helped create safer schools.

Plan/Mico Solon

We listen to them when they tell us what they need.


intuitive The sponsorship idea originated from the insight that a personal connection is a powerful tool for change. While contributions benefit whole communities through long-term development work, the one-to-one nature of that connection through communication provides support and encouragement on an individual level. Plan fosters those relationships – bringing individuals into contact across the globe, forming a worldwide community aware of, involved in and united around the needs and rights of girls and boys.

Martha Adams 10 x10

Sponsorship provides flexible, long-term funding for community development work, meaning that local communities can plan ahead. It keeps us in touch with individual children and their families and increases community understanding of issues affecting children. And we understand that children need to be involved in their community’s development so we champion and reinforce this role through sponsorship.

The young people in communities where Plan works produce materials sent to sponsors, so they get to express their views and reflect on issues that affect them. The detailed updates Plan distributes show sponsors how their support makes a lasting difference, and make global development issues real by relating them to individual people and local situations. We blend funding from sponsorship with grant funding from government bodies, corporate partners and others to support as many of the priorities of communities as we can.


accountable We know that poverty is perpetuated when people are left out of decisions that affect them – at home, in their communities or countries. We’d be letting them and our supporters down if we didn’t do something about it. Language, ethnicity, disability and gender are often bases for marginalisation.

Over 75 million girls are not in education, which is bad news for everybody. Education helps us to know our rights, to exercise them and achieve our potential. Educating girls is central to unlocking the cycle of poverty. Educated girls are less likely to marry and to have children very young, more likely to be literate, survive into adulthood, along with their children, and more likely to reinvest income back into their family, community and country.

Plan UK is focusing on the effect of early and forced marriage. On top of the often dire impact on a girl’s health and well-being, it usually means the end of education. Every year ten million girls in the world’s poorest countries are coaxed, coerced or forced to marry before their 18th birthday and 1 in every 7 is married before they’re 15. Many people still believe girls are safer and more financially secure with a husband, but we’re fighting for their right to choose if, when and whom they marry. Our 'Take the Vow' campaign, which is supported by UK Home Office minister Lynne Featherstone, is already having an impact on world leaders. And our work, for example in Bangladesh, is making a difference to people's attitudes.

Martha Adams 10 x10

A strong element of our drive to tackle exclusion is our ‘Because I am a Girl’ campaign. Girls are less likely to have choices, be enrolled in school, have access to medical care or have enough to eat.


self-assured When disaster strikes you need someone around who keeps their cool and knows what to do. Plan may have been born out of an urgent impulse to help in an emergency – supporting children and families caught up in the Spanish Civil War - but we’ve been doing it ever since, learning and adapting all the time as climates and technology change.

Plan/David Mutua

This experience means we’re well-qualified to help when communities are hit by natural disasters or caught up in conflict. Internationally we are members of the Humanitarian Accountability Partnership and in the UK we are part of the Disasters Emergency Committee. We respond initially by providing children and families with what’s needed for survival, making sure we co-ordinate with other relief efforts. We focus on ensuring children are safe and their emotional needs are met. We make getting back to school or some form of education a priority. And we’re in it for the long term – supporting recovery and involving children in the process.

Over 175 million children are affected by disasters every year, and this is expected to triple in the next decade because of climate change, environmental degradation, poverty and population growth. So communities at risk need to be prepared. We know that some disasters are inevitable – loss of life and livelihood is not. Children often spot risks and dangers and suggest solutions. Plan invests in young people’s knowledge and skills to better prepare for and prevent future disasters, minimising loss and damage – and saving lives.


Plan yesterday

Two British journalists were so affected by the plight of thousands of Spanish children left orphaned, lost, homeless and hungry by the civil war in the late 1930s, that they devised a plan to help as many children as they could – to provide a home for them and connect each child with a ‘foster parent’ overseas. John Langdon-Davies and Eric Muggeridge were joined in the scheme by Australian nurse Esme Odgers and American ambulance driver Nick Barton. The first ‘sponsors’ were from England and America, writing letters and sending presents and photographs to the children living together in ‘colonies’. Our approach even then meant that the children played an active role in organising activities and in the running of the hostels. Esme Odgers established the process for sustaining the relationships, ensuring letters and parcels were delivered and acknowledged. She explained in 1939, ‘The terrific ‘personalness’ of the Plan is very exacting. But what else is there in life? – to help our comrades in distress with warmth and understanding, not with cold charity’.


1930s

The ‘Foster Parents Scheme for Children in Spain’ was created in April 1937. J B Priestley and Benjamin Britten were early supporters.

University of Rh

ode Island

PLAN Archives, University of Rhode Island

Plan founder John Langdon-Davies drove the international recruitment of sponsors. He died in 1971 and his daughter Deborah is a sponsor and volunteer at our London office.

1940s

, PLAN Archives

Spain were The early years in cult and dangerous and diffi were ren eventually the child . evacuated to France 1930s

>

1950s

1960s


1940s

Sponsored children

1,200

Children from countries involved in the Second World War were looked after in the UK by the renamed ‘Foster Parents Plan for War Children’. Working in Belgium, China, Czechoslovakia, England, France, Greece, Italy, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Spain Fund-raising in Australia, Canada, England, USA

In 1947 we began working in China. (Sponsors’ concerns about its regime meant we had to leave in 1950. We returned in 1996.) Today our work includes running community centres for families in poor rural areas. Children play and learn while their parents receive support and training in health, nutrition and parenting. Last year we provided 7,000 households with safe drinking water and sanitation facilities.

1930s

1940s

1950s

1960s


King George V1 and Qu for refugee children een Elizabeth visited a Plan camp in England during World War II. 1970s

1980s

1990s

PLAN Archives ,

University of Rh

ode Island

PLAN Archives, University of Rhode Island

> Child psychologist Anna Freud, daughter of Sigmund, ran nurseries for Plan in North London. Her work is still relevant today, when we provide 'emotional first aid' for children affected by disasters.

2000s

2010s


PLAN Archives, University of Rhode Island

Hollywood stars and other famous faces became sponsors – including Tallulah Bankhead, Harry Belafonte, Bob Hope and Peter Ustinov.

Hungarian families affected by political unrest in 19 were kept safe in a 56 camp in Austria. Photographer

1930s

unknown

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1950s

1960s


1950s

Sponsored children

5,607

>

In this post-war era, major charities focused on mass relief – but Plan’s sponsorship programme reflected a long-term commitment. We extended our work to help ‘any needy or suffering child’ – not just those caught up in war – so became ‘Foster Parents Plan’. Working in Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, China, Czechoslovakia, England, France, Greece, Hong Kong, Italy, Korea, Netherlands, Vietnam Fund-raising in Canada, USA

In 1957 we began working in Vietnam. (The impact of war there meant an absence of around 20 years from 1975.) Today our work includes training local government, communities, teachers and children in disaster response – floods and typhoons are a feature of the country’s climate. Last year we trained 21,321 community volunteers.

1970s

1980s

1990s

2000s

2010s


1960s

Sponsored children

18,725

As post-war reconstruction and restoration in Europe was completed, we started working in Asia, where industrialisation and conflict were displacing families, and in South America, where social and economic instability were holding back development. Working in Belgium, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, England, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, India, Italy, Korea, Peru, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam Fund-raising in Canada, USA

In 1962 Plan began working in Colombia. Today our work includes running training courses for unemployed young people which help them to get jobs or start businesses – and avoid being drawn into gangs, prostitution or drug-dealing. And last year we provided life skills training for 13,317 young people and families.

1930s

1940s

1950s

1960s


1970s

1980s

PLAN Archives

We marked our 25th year with a publication describing our work and with the stories of former sponsored children. US First Lady Jackie Kennedy became Honorary Chairman for the year.

, University of

Rhode Island

>> s - Plan's work m le b ro p h lt ea h g n ns bri Poor living conditio revention rather than cure. p in Bolivia focused on 1990s

2000s

2010s


Plan

In the Philippines Plan helped families evicted from the slums of Manila when new laws came in – assisting with building homes and starting handicraft enterprises.

Plan started work in Haiti where, as wit h ot countries in the Am her eric malnutrition in ch as, ildre was a major concern n . e Island

rsity of Rhod

s, Unive PLAN Archive

1930s

1940s

1950s

1960s


1970s

>

Sponsored children

51,611

Our name became 'Plan International' and we started working in Africa, where children were among the world’s poorest. Our focus on community-led development grew, bringing gradual but meaningful change. We also started to attract new funding – from grants and through joint projects. Working in Bolivia, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Colombia, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Greece, Guatemala, Haiti, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Korea, Mali, Nepal, Peru, Philippines, Sudan, Vietnam Fund-raising Australia, Canada, Netherlands, USA

In 1976 we began working in Mali. Today our work there includes eliminating the dangerous practice of female genital mutilation (FGM) by helping young people spread messages about the risks and how to get help, through local radio and newspapers. Last year we helped bring rates of FGM in Plan communities to 49.5 per cent (national rate 74 per cent). 1970s

1980s

1990s

2000s

2010s


1980s

Sponsored children

158,774

The number of ‘foster’ parents grew rapidly over the 1980s as people became more aware of the gulf between developed and developing countries – and as more effective methods of combating poverty and child mortality were established. Our work with institutional donors became more established. Working in Bolivia, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Colombia, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Liberia, Kenya, Korea, Mali, Nepal, Nicaragua, Peru, Philippines, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Sri Lanka Fund-raising in Australia, Belgium, Canada, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, UK, USA

In 1982 we began working in Senegal. Today our work includes improving the take-up of pre-natal appointments and childhood vaccinations among rural illiterate families, by using mobile phones to spread health messages and remind mothers to keep clinic appointments. Last year we provided in-school health checks for 8,000 children. 1930s

1940s

1950s

1960s


Carolyn Watso

n

In 1980 Plan UK opened in London. We launched ‘World Family’, our supporter magazine, in 1988. Michael Aspel OBE is still a patron.

>

Early in the decad em drought. In Burkin illions of people in Africa were left st arv aF small-scale vegetab aso, Plan villages had set up cereal b ing by a le gardens which le ssened the impact. nks and 1970s

1980s

1990s

2000s

2010s


Plan/Ilene Perlman

Throughout the decade we began to work harder to ensure children's perspectives and priorities were heard - from speaking at public meetings to producing special radio shows and newspapers.

es: our 60th year n to es il m o tw ed rk In 1997 Plan ma d - nine-year il ch d re so on sp th and our one million . Now 25, she lives in Bamako, ali old Sounkoura in M usband and children. �I have h the capital, with her n. When I have been enrolled Pla a good memory of , I was very proud. I was more ild as Plan sponsored ch that I was the one millionth rd delighted when I hea sponsored child.�

Sounkoura in 2012

1930s

1940s

Plan

1950s

1960s


1990s

Sponsored children

567,954

HIV and AIDS threatened whole communities and addressing the impact was a priority in our work. We expanded our efforts to ensure children have a real say in decisions that affect them – through media projects and participation in government processes.

>

Working in Albania, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, China, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Malawi, Mali, Nepal, Nicaragua, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Uganda, Vietnam, Zambia, Zimbabwe Fund-raising in Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Korea, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Thailand, UK, USA

In 1993 we began working in Bangladesh. Today our work includes stopping early and forced marriage - many young girls have to give up their education to marry and raise families when they reach puberty. Youth media groups raise awareness and we run community workshops. Some villages are now child-marriage free. Last year we trained 24,362 health workers.

1970s

1980s

1990s

2000s

2010s


2000s

Sponsored children

1,172,569

In 2004 many areas Plan works in were hit by the December 26 tsunami – we provided emergency support and are still working with communities to rebuild lives and livelihoods. Our first major corporate partnerships were established in the UK. Working in Albania, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, China, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Laos, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Tanzania, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Uganda, Vietnam, Zambia, Zimbabwe Fund-raising in Australia, Belgium, Canada, Colombia, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Korea, Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, Thailand, UK (In 2009 Plan UK joined forces with international sexual and reproductive health and rights charity Interact Worldwide), USA

In 2007 we began working in Rwanda. Today our work there includes refurbishing schools and supplying books and materials, and providing education for vulnerable children, especially girls and orphans. Last year we provided secondary school scholarships for 388 girls and constructed dormitories for 160 girls whose homes are too far from school to travel every day. 1930s

1940s

1950s

1960s


Plan

> Plan has been leading a global campaign for universal birth registration since 2005 and has so far facilitated registration of more than 40 million people _ mostly children, in 32 countries. Our advocacy work has led to improved laws in 10 countries making 153 million children eligible for free birth certificates.

nnual reports Plan is producing a e world’s girls. th assessing the state of 2007, gave an in The first, published on of girls. We ati overview of the situ nflict, economic co have also researched e role of boys th welfare, safety and equality. ng and men in achievi 1970s

1980s

1990s

2000s

2010s


In the lead up to the 2015 deadline for the Millennium Development Goals, Plan is working with girls and boys and all its partners to ensure the best settlement for the world’s children in what comes next.

11 October 2012 is th e fir It shows that the in st UN Day of the Girl – we campaig ned for it to be esta ternational commu b nity acknowledges and that girls’ voic girls rights as a pri lished. es are of importan ority issue, ce and relevance in global affairs. 1970s

1980s

1990s

2000s

Plan/Sander Sto epker

Plan/Ollivier Girard

2010s

The early part of this decade has been marked by largescale disasters: the earthquake in Haiti, floods in Pakistan, the tsunami in Japan and drought in East Africa. Plan has been part of the relief efforts and ongoing recovery.

2010s


Plan tomorrow

Hundreds of millions of girls and boys are living in poverty, denied their rights and unable to fulfil their potential, marginalised by disability, gender or race. We want to make a lasting difference to their lives. To do that, we are determined to continue to improve our effectiveness – both in our own work and in collaborating with other organisations. This means responding to a changing world, keeping children at the heart of what we do by supporting more and more boys and girls to be involved in their communities’ development. It means ensuring our work is of the highest quality and based on solid evidence – and adapting and replicating successful projects. We are committed to sustaining our relationships with sponsors and donors and to welcome new supporters. So the plan is to enhance and expand our work – supported by energetic fund-raising and stand-out communications, influencing and campaigning activity – to help achieve our aim for a world in which all children realise their rights. Together we will help children living in the poorest countries move themselves from a life of poverty to a future with opportunity.

Please join the Plan.


Thank you to all our supporters We are very grateful to everyone who has helped us through the years: to staff, sponsors, donors, volunteers, partner organisations in the UK and in the countries where we work, and to high profile supporters like these who help us raise our voice and tell our story… Broadcaster Dr Miriam Stoppard has been sponsoring children through Plan for over 20 years. In 2012 she is visiting two of the children she sponsors in South America.

TV presenter Ben Shephard visited Haiti after the earthquake in 2010 to lend his support to Plan’s activities there – rebuilding a school and providing emotional help for children living in camps.

Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Minister of Finance of Nigeria and former Managing Director of the World Bank, contributed the foreword for our 2009 report: ‘Because I Am A Girl: Girls in the Global Economy’.

Author Monica Ali supports our 'Because I am a Girl' campaign and joined the growing list of people adding their voices to our ‘Take the Vow’ campaign, aiming to stop early and forced marriage and help keep girls at school.

Mary Robinson, President of the Mary Robinson Foundation _ Climate Justice, wrote the foreword for ‘Weathering the Storm’ _ our research into the impact of climate change on girls living in poverty.* Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Nobel Peace Prize winner and Chair of The Elders group of independent global leaders working for peace and human rights, supports our campaigns on birth registration and child marriage.

* Mary Robinson is also a former United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, was the first woman President of Ireland and is a member of The Elders. Miriam Stoppard: Picture by Carolyn Djanogly, Photo of Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala: @World Bank, Photo of Desmond Tutu: Plan/Lori Grinker, Photo of Mary Robinson: Mary Robinson Foundation, Photo of Ben Shephard: Plan/Ben Depp


Maria Teresa Muguruza, one of five children sponsored by the Broadway cast of The American Way, at a home for Spanish refugee children organised by the ‘Foster Parents Plan’, Biarritz, France, May 1939.

Robert Capa © International Center of Photography/Magnum Photos, Edward Kojonen/Plan

Robert Capa © International Center of Photography/Magnum Photos

Editor: Jo Holmes Research: Tulin Arslan, Simone Schneider Thanks to: Alex Betti, Keira Dempsey, Deborah Falero-Essex, Ben Mills, Diane Richmond, Adam Short Designed by: picnicdesign.co.uk Printed by: Calverts using vegetable oil based inks.


the Plan: to work with the world’s poorest children so they can move themselves from a life of poverty to a future with opportunity

Plan UK Finsgate, 5-7 Cranwood Street, London EC1V 9LH www.plan-uk.org Tel: 0300 777 9777 Published March 2012 Registered Charity Number 276035

The Little Book of Plan: 75 years with and for children  

Explore the 75-year history of Plan, one of the world's biggest international children's charities.

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