Page 1


2 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT


LAUGHING FEELS GOOD. Try a comedy class! Spend 3 hours a week, for 8 weeks, trying out stand-up, sketch writing, or improv Learn from experienced teachers in a fun, accessible atmosphere See a ton of comedy shows for free Get half-price or free tuition with an internship at the theater

Classes start:

Oct. 14

Even more classes start: Jan. 6

Have some funny!

arcadecomedytheater.com

THIRD THURSDAY

September 19: Intimate Subjects 8–11 p.m.

Experience sensational performances, interactive technology, and immersive adventures in the galleries. Tickets are $10 in advance, $15 at the door. Sponsored by:

cmoa.org/3t

Use code CITYCURRENT to save $5 on single tickets PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 3


STAFF Publisher/Editor: Charlie Deitch Charlie@pittsburghcurrent.com Associate Publisher: Bethany Ruhe Bethany@pittsburghcurrent.com

CONTENTS

Vol. II Iss. XIX September 17, 2019

EDITORIAL

Fall Guide 2019 begins on page 37

Managing Editor: Meg Fair Meg@pittsburghcurrent.com

NEWS 6 | Checks And Balances 8 | Brewed on Grant 6 | Checks And Balances 8 | Brewed on Grant |

Art Director: Larissa Mallon Larissa@pittsburghcurrent.com Music Editor: Margaret Welsh Margaret@pittsburghcurrent.com Visuals Editor: Jake Mysliwczyk Jake@pittsburghcurrent.com Staff Writer, Arts: Amanda Reed Amanda@pittsburghcurrent.com Columnists: Sue Kerr, Jessica Semler, Mike Wysocki, Gab Bonesso info@pittsburghcurrent.com Craft Beer Writer: Day Bracey info@pittsburghcurrent.com Contributing Writers: Jody DiPerna, Nick Eustis, Ted Hoover, Thomas Leturgey, Matt Petras, Mike Shanley, Steve Sucato, Justin Vellucci, Atiya Irvin-Mitchell, Emerson Andrews, Hugh Twyman, Kierran Young

OPINION 9 | Jesus was an Immigrant 10 | Pilot Error 11 | Venue Accessibility ART 12 | 14 | 18 | 20 |

Close Up Project Amelia Marilou is Everywhere Latest Dance

MUSIC 24 | One Final Wax 25 | Birth of Cool 26 | Lucy Dacus 27 | First/Last FOOD 28 | State of Vermouth 33 | Day Drinking 34 | This Tastes Funny35 Savage Love

|

info@pittsburghcurrent.com Logo Design: Mark Addison

ADVERTISING Vice President of Sales: Paul Klatzkin Paul@pittsburghcurrent.com Senior Account Executive: Andrea James Andrea@pittsburghcurrent.com

ADMINISTRATION Marketing and Administrative Coordinator: Sereny Welsby Sereny@pittsburghcurrent.com 4 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

CREDIT:

COVER PHOTO BY MEG FAIR & JAKE MYSLIWCZYK THE FINE PRINT The contents of the Pittsburgh Current are © 2019 by Pittsburgh Current, LLC. All Rights Reserved. No portion of this publication shall be duplicated or reprinted without the express-written consent of Pittsburgh Current LLC.The Pittsburgh Current is published twice monthly beginning August 2018. The opinions contained in columns and letters to the editors represent the views of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Pittsburgh Current ownership, management and staff. The Pittsburgh Current is an independently owned and operated print and online media company produced in the heart of Pittsburgh’s Beechview neighborhood, 1665 Broadway Ave., Pittsburgh, PA., 15216. 412-204-7248. Email us or don’t: info@pittsburghcurrent.com.


Organic Garden and & Gift Shoppe

Artsburgh is your resource for the city’s arts and culture events. Not just any events calendar, Artsburgh.org lets you filter and personalize your preferences for the exact experience and price you want. Or perhaps you’ll find something surprising!

Specializing in locally grown certified organic seedlings, veggies, herbs, fruits and more

Decorative Plants | Succulents | Cacti Bonsai | Air Plants | Dried Wreaths & Flowers | Garden Equipment | Soils Organic Gifts

City Grows

5208 Butler St., Pittsburgh 15201 412.781.2082 | citygrowspgh.com *use this ad to receive 15% off a single item!

Our Goal Is to Help You Maintain A Safe & Reliable Car at a Reasonable Price ALL GENERAL REPAIRS STATE INSPECTION EMISSION TESTS BOSCH SERVICE CENTER AAA APPROVED ALL FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

412.682.1866 4741 BAUM BLVD - PITTSBURGH BAUMBLVDAUTO.COM

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 5


NEWS

U.S. President Trump receives a Hurricane Dorian update at the White House in Washington

CHECKS AND BALANCES CLIMATE DENIERS ARE THE WORST, PART 2

BY DAVID DEANGELO - PITTSBURGH CURRENT CONTRIBUTING WRITER INFO@PITTSBURGHCURRENT.COM

T

wo weeks ago on this column, I looked at the science of global warming, the mechanics — the “how” if you want to frame it that way. This week we look at the evidence — the “what,” if you will. Initially, I thought researching this column was going to be easier than it turned out to be, as I’d done it more than a few times at the 2 Political Junkies blog. This time it’s proven to be a little more difficult — not because the evidence changed or the science shifted (nope, both as solid as ever), but because the websites where I first found the information that I now need are now gone. In July 2010, I blogged about the then-recently released report from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) titled, “State of the Climate 2009.” From the “report at a glance” summary, we were able to read: A comprehensive review of key climate indicators confirms the world is warming and the past decade was the warmest on record. More than 300 scientists from 48 countries analyzed data on 37 climate indicators, including sea ice, glaciers and air temperatures. A

more detailed review of 10 of these indicators, selected because they are clearly and directly related to surface temperatures, all tell the same story: global warming is undeniable. That last phrase is the most important. The thing is, while the summary is still available the full report it summarizes is not. In 2017, NBC news reported, “reports of climate science being scrubbed from U.S. government websites arrived early in President Donald Trump’s tenure.” Elsewhere in the news, it was reported that teams of scientists at the University of Pennsylvania with an eye to what happened in Canada during Stephen Harper’s conservative government to climate research, were busy scouring government websites a few days before the Trump inauguration in 2017 looking for climate data to saved. What they saved, they sent to the Internet Archive, aka “the wayback machine.” It’s completely possible that I could be wrong about this, that my not finding the climate data is just a coincidence, that absence of this evidence is just evidence of its absence. I could be wrong, but this report from 2009 seems to be one such report scrubbed by the Trump

6 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

administration. On the other hand, all hail the wayback machine. The full 2009 report is still there. The report summary (still easily accessible at a government website) talks of 37 climate indicators, focusing on these 10; Air Temperature Near Surface (Troposphere), Humidity, Temperature Over Oceans, Sea Surface Temperatures, Sea Level, Ocean Heat Content, Temperature Over Land, Sea Ice, Glaciers, and Snow Cover. There’s a chart for each of the ten indicators and each chart graphs each of the multiple data sets for that indicator. All indicators point to the report’s undeniable conclusion – that global warming is happening. Why so much varied data all in one place? The point is that if there’s some sort of issue with a particular data set for a particular indicator (a missed calculation, a misplaced decimal point, and so on), that issue wouldn’t affect any of the other sets either for that indicator or for any of the other data sets for any of the other indicators. There’s just too much independent data for it all to be wrong. Let’s take a look at a few of the indicators. The troposphere is that part of the atmosphere closest to the ground, it’s about 8 miles thick, on average. Satellite data is used to calculate the heat in the troposphere and the data shows the planet’s warming. As we learned in the last column, as the amount of greenhouse gasses increases, the atmosphere is able to hold a little more water vapor, which is another way of saying the humidity rises. And the specific humidity in the atmosphere has been rising for decades. Ship and buoy data show that the air temperature over the oceans has been rising over the last few decades and the temperature of the oceans

themselves have been rising. As the oceans’ temperatures rise, the water expands. And as the glaciers melt the resulting liquid water flows, inevitably, into the oceans. The sea-levels have been rising for decades. NASA is showing that the sea-levels are rising about 3.3 millimeters a year. Currently, NOAA is showing that there’s been an average rise in global land and sea temperatures of about .07 degrees Celsius per decade in the last 130 years or so. And so on. Climate science deniers have two separate but related problems when denying the science; the evidence and the science explaining the evidence. In order to succeed, they’d have to explain how all the known evidence (and the above is only a thumbnail sketch of a thumbnail sketch) is wrong — and wrong in a way that just happens to be the most agreeable to their position. All the seawater measurements? Wrong. All the satellite data? Wrong. Humidity? Weather stations? Glaciers? Wrong. Wrong. And wrong. Just try to imagine the scope of the conspiracy necessary to fake all of that data over all those years. Then there’s the science we looked at in the last column. The data only shows that the temperatures are rising, the oceans are growing and the glaciers and sea ice are shrinking. If the deniers can show that the scientific explanation itself is flawed, then perhaps another, more benign explanation can take its place — one that finds less blame in our human behavior. But, as we saw in the last column, that science has been around for more than a hundred years. If the science was flawed, then perhaps the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Meteorological Society, and the National Academy of Science would’ve said so by now. But they haven’t. Because it isn’t.


america’s tastiest drive TM

Buffalo’s corner taverns have been perfecting the chicken wing since it was invented at the legendary Anchor Bar in 1964. Secret recipes, historic charm and Buffalo-style hospitality make the new BUFFALO WING TRAIL an experience to be savored. Come to Buffalo this summer to taste the delicious dozen.

The wet naps are on us.

buffalowingtrail.com @buffalowingtrail

#WingBUF #NeverRanch

® NYSDED

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 7


NEWS

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO SUPPORTED THE RETURN OF 'BREWED ON GRANT' 8 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT


OPINION

HEY, WASN'T JESUS AN IMMIGRANT? BY JESSICA SEMLER - PITTSBURGH CURRENT COLUMNIST INFO@PITTSBURGHCURRENT.COM

T

here’s a thought that keeps flashing through my mind when I pour through the news about reproductive health access, immigration, and government; do these folks realize that Jesus was an immigrant? A pregnant woman in Texas lost 20 pounds in an immigration detention center, and her experience is not unique. ICE admitted that nearly 30 women have miscarried while in their custody in the past couple years. My knee jerk reaction is to ask what folks who are Christian, or identity as pro-life have to say about this. During my years at Planned Parenthood, I consistently found that the folks who are the most vocal against abortion care use religion as the driving reason for heir fight. Whether it was folks yelling at women outside of clinics with

posters and rosaries, or anti-choice legislators voting for abortion bans, it always came back to their religious beliefs. This feels personal to me. I was raised Catholic, and my dad was the most religious person in my life. In his youth, he even attended the seminary for years and almost became a priest. He was the most compassionate, empathetic man in the world and he was vehemently pro-choice, pro-welfare, pro-gray rights. He held all of these beliefs and they were informed by his faith, not in spite of it. Because of this, it’s always struck me as intellectually lazy when people are anti-choice and say it’s due to their sincere religious beliefs. Denying people access to healthcare; cancer screenings, birth control, prenatal care, general assistance for

people just trying to pay rent and put food on their table. Not exactly the Good Samaritan’s way of doing things, right? I spent eight years in Catholic school, and I guess I just missed the allegories about Jesus helping and healing the poor for a $100 copay. In an effort to remind myself that people who spew right-wing rhetoric don’t own Christianity, I recently read a book by ordained Baptist minister Katey Zeh, Women Rise Up: Sacred Stories of Resistance for Today’s Revolution. In particular, I was struck by Zeh’s chapter about Mary, mother of Jesus. “I see Mary in the women today who cross borders and give birth in a land far from their homes.” For example, an ArmenianAmerican pregnant woman in California began to experience

contractions before her US citizenship ceremony. She refused to go to the hospital until she was sworn in as a citizen, fearful of losing her green card and her baby growing up without protections. Last year, Diana Sanchez gave birth to a baby in jail, alone, despite her cries for help. “That pain was indescribable, and what hurts me more though is the fact that nobody cared.” Sanchez said last year. Days ago, Time reported that a woman who crossed the Mexican border was 8.5 months pregnant and experiencing contractions when she was detained by the US Border Patrol. She was taken to a hospital where doctors gave her medications to STOP her contractions, and she was immediately sent back to Mexico. For my friends who’ve gone to medical school, how do those actions square with a physician’s Hippocratic Oath? Imagine being a pregnant person, and enduring miles and miles of hardship, despite your condition because you want your baby to have a better life. Where is the pro-life outrage for her? Where is the outrage from pro-life folks who love babies so much, but say nothing of the treatment of these pregnant women? I come back to Katey Leh’s words about Jesus’ mother, which are deeply impactful: “When I consider the circumstances of Mary’s pregnancyyoung, unplanned, high-risk; and her birthing conditions- unsanitary, possibly unattended, I strongly believe that the miracle of the nativity is not that Jesus, the Son of God, is born among humans, but also that Mary survives the labor and recovers birthing him into our world. We take this for granted. Even in the best circumstances, pregnancy is risky, and childbirth is dangerous, even life-threatening. Every day hundreds of women lose their health or their lives while bringing new life into existence.”

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 9


OPINION PILOT ERROR BY KIERRAN YOUNG - PITTSBURGH CURRENT POLITICAL COLUMNIST INFO@PITTSBURGHCURRENT.COM

U

PMC, University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Mellon University and Highmark are 4 of the largest nonprofits in Pittsburgh who are tax-exempt. Combined, the “Big 4” own billions of dollars in tax-exempt property and occupy approximately 1,000 acres of land across the city While the City of Pittsburgh is experiencing economic stagnation, you would think asking nonprofits to contribute payments in lieu of taxes (PILOT) to help offset the cost of providing public services to them doesn’t seem at all unreasonable. The City’s financial future is at stake, after all, as these nonprofits continue to expand and scoop up more land that will ultimately be tax-exempt. Property taxes fund law enforcement, fire management, emergency services, garbage collection, paving city roads, infrastructure, water and sewer services, just to name a few. These nonprofits impose a cost by consuming public services. If a fire breaks out, or a burglary occurs or some other crisis arises, the City is responsible for providing emergency services to these entities. In 2014, upon assuming office, Mayor Bill Peduto and his staff met with officials from UPMC to discuss how to get the largest non-governmental employer in Pennsylvania (87,000 employees), and Allegheny County’s largest property owner (656 acres and 1.6 billion in land and buildings) to pay its “fair share” into the city budget. However, in 2013 former Mayor Luke Ravenstahl took UPMC to court to try and take away its taxexempt status and collect payroll taxes. UPMC immediately fired back

with a federal lawsuit alleging it was unfairly singled out in violation of its due-process rights. Against this backdrop, Peduto said it was tough negotiating with “guns pointed at each others’ heads,” and decided to take a “leap of faith” and cease legal action against UPMC. After that, UPMC dropped its federal suit. If UPMC were to pay taxes on the land they presently own, the City would have brought in hundreds of millions of dollars in additional revenue. That would have been a huge boost to the city’s $488 million budget. Prior to Peduto becoming mayor, there was a PILOT program in place that he scrapped as a “show of good faith” to UPMC. In 2014, Peduto said future discussions will focus on “other opportunities to really become a good neighbor” that could include housing developments, job training or youth programs. But that was a tune completely different than the one Peduto was singing in 2007. In December of that year, then-Mayor Luke Ravenstahl reached an agreement with UPMC to pledge $100 million in matching funds over 10 years to fund the Pittsburgh Promise scholarship program. A day after the Promise was announced, Ravenstahl informed Pittsburgh City Council, of which Peduto was then a member, that in order to secure the Promise dollars, the city had to agree not to seek any additional dollars. Pittsburgh Current Editor Charlie Deitch wrote this at the time: “Councilor Bill Peduto [said] UPMC’s gift to the Pittsburgh Promise should have no bearing on payments to the city. “The Pittsburgh Promise is not

10 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

Bill Peduto (Current Photo by Jake Mysliwczyk)

the city of Pittsburgh,” Peduto said. “The Pittsburgh Promise is a charity the same as the Salvation Army or the Jubilee Kitchen. If we approve this, we’re setting a dangerous precedent. It’s the same thing if Giant Eagle goes out and feeds the poor and then says, ‘We don’t have to pay our taxes.’” Even after taking office in January 2014, Peduto wrote to Gov. Tom Wolf, “We must develop a sustainable stream of compensation for the services that our city provides to large nonprofit institutions so that we can achieve the other measures of fiscal health laid out above without raising taxes on our residents,” But by July 2014, he had apparently changed his mind. Instead of holding UPMC accountable, Peduto gave up the fight and sold out thousands of Pittsburgh residents that have been demanding that UPMC pay its fair share in taxes, as well as pay their employees a living wage. In 2016, UPMC pledged to have service employees at “most” facilities paid $15 an hour by 2021. But they lavish millions on their top executives while they fly around in private jets, while rank and file employees are forced to apply for

second jobs, welfare or handouts. UPMC can and should do more but instead, they have spent years and countless dollars trying to keep workers from unionizing. UPMC, University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Mellon and Highmark are a drain on the city’s budget and we really need to devise ways in which these entities will step up and pay their fair share. UPMC is worth $19 billion and the University of Pittsburgh has a $4 billion dollar endowment. Yet, the city is not compensated for any of the services they provide and the taxpayers are left to foot the bill. We need leadership in this city that will take bold action in order to provide more services to residents without raising taxes on personal property or income. We could use the additional funds from a Pilot program to fund affordable housing, to tackle the growing problem with homelessness, provide property tax relief to seniors and fund critical infrastructure projects. If the large nonprofits pay their fair share, we can use the new influx of revenue to make Pittsburgh more competitive nationally and turn Pittsburgh into the most livable city for everbody.


OPINION MUSIC VENUES NEED TRUE ACCESSIBILITY BY SUE KERR - PITTSBURGH CURRENT COLUMNIST INFO@PITTSBURGHCURRENT.COM

I

have a confession. I once fell asleep at a Bruce Springsteen concert. I wasn’t drinking alcohol or particularly tired. But, I nodded off to the utter horror of my partner who is a diehard live music fan. Anxiety is the culprit. Sometimes I have this drowsy sensation in the middle of a Giant Eagle on a Sunday. It isn’t that I’m tired or weary. I’m just sleepy because my senses are overloaded with anxiety stimuli. It is almost like playing possum or hibernating. I must close my eyes. Anxiety is a bitch at a large music venue. There are so many anxiety triggers — parking, lines, bag checks, finding an aisle seat, plus potentially falling asleep for starters — leaving me a literal nervous wreck before I arrive. Throw in inebriated people and it’s a recipe for disaster. Accessibility supports can be a big help. Stage AE has a straightforward process to accommodate. Club Cafe does, too. Other venues tend to focus on physical disabilities and force me into a box that doesn’t fit AND potentially limits access for another customer. I don’t need a folding chair in the designated wheelchair seating. I need an aisle seat somewhere, anywhere in the facility. Access to water is another issue. I’ve learned that under Pennsylvania law, venues must provide access to water but they are not required to provide a cup. They can forbid outside cups, ban outside water, and charge me for a cup, as long as there is running water that can be freely accessed. Staying hydrated is

important when anxious. Any venue could proactively offer reusable branded water bottles to all guests requesting an accommodation. It’s an investment that sets the tone for brand loyalty. It saves us all time and precious energy to not have to go looking for a cup. Not everyone needs a cup alternative, but everyone appreciates a thoughtful gesture that does not stigmatize or label the recipient. Venue websites should have detailed information on how to reach a live person to discuss accommodations. Staff should be aware of and ready to address hidden disability requests. Performers and promoters should also request this information. It truly is exhausting to get myself to the event. Having to argue with staff over issues like elevator access or aisle seats consumes precious energy reserves from my diminishing supply. Now, I’m privileged because I know my rights, and I’m often accompanied by in-house counsel (my partner is a licensed attorney.) But sometimes that’s not enough. Sometimes the anxiety, dread, and apprehension take hold of me and I can’t imagine leaving the house to go to a space I perceive as hostile or exhausting. I beat myself up mercilessly for being a failure and missing out on life experiences that I want to embrace. I miss a lot of things. I missed Heart touring with Joan Jett this August. Reaching a live person with Live Nation was impossible, so my Facebook friends helped me

patch an accessibility plan together. This cobbled together plan wasn’t enough to overcome my symptoms. I’ve missed countless other shows that were important to me. Elton John’s farewell tour? I can’t risk spending the money in a venue that’s unwelcoming to people like me. Often, I just don’t even try. Laura usually covers live shows for our blog. I handle the Q&As with the artists and advance PR. Sometimes I’m the +1, sometimes she takes a friend. Missing Ann Wilson from Heart was crushing. And it could have been avoided if the venue cared about disabled patrons. The Bruce Springsteen story is amusing as far as anecdotes go, but it is heartbreaking for me. I will never go to music festivals. I will never go to standing-roomonly shows. I will judiciously attend live music events that have accommodations, especially when the tradeoff is having to relinquish the cell phone I rely on

to help me manage the experience. I understand the reasons for banning cell phones, I just wish you understood how a cell phone section could make any show more accessible. I also wish you would stop berating people on Facebook because we don’t turn out in droves for live music. We all lose when the arts are inaccessible to members of our community. My world is smaller, for sure, and I lose access to all the ways music heals, soothes, and lifts up wounded spirits. The arts themselves lose because a community not visible will not be part of the artistic narrative, rendering it less true and less authentic.

ROB ROGERS / Andrews McMeel Syndication

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 11


ART

UP CLOSE

DENNIS WATKINS BRINGS "THE MAGIC PARLOUR"FROM THE WINDY CITY TO PITTSBURGH'S LIBERTY MAGIC BY AMANDA REED - PITTSBURGH CURRENT STAFF WRITER AMANDA@PITTSBURGHCURRENT.COM

S

leight-of-hand is the family business for Chicago magician Dennis Watkins. His uncle Jeff is a magician and so is his grandfather, Ed. In fact, Ed ran his own magic shop in Texas for more than 30 years. So, when the younger Watkins expressed interest in learning the craft at seven, he was in good hands. “I’ve wanted to do this job since I was a kid,” he says. Watkins combines this childlike wonder with mentalism and sleight-of=hand magic in “The Magic Parlour,” running from now until Sept. 29 at Liberty Magic, the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust venue dedicated to parlour magic. Unlike other shows at Liberty Magic, which gives the historic form a modern, edgy twist, “The Magic Parlour” gives off a swanky air, with a suit-clad Watkins performing tricks to impressionist piano and jazz. After graduating with a degree in acting, Watkins moved to Chicago to start The House Theater of Chicago, a multidisciplinary theater company that allowed him to combine magic with theater. “I’m one of those lucky people who, when they were in first grade and the teacher said, ‘What do you want to be when you grow up?’ I actually get to be that,” he says. Watkins first performed “The Magic Parlour” eight years ago in Chicago at the Palmer House Hilton hotel. The venue and the concept are similar to Liberty Magic’s; Watkins performs to a small group of 44 people for an intimate, magical night. Audience members can expect the same Chicago set in Pittsburgh, but with a few additions and changes, according to Watkins.

crossed to revel in the awe and mystery. “Theater-goers as grownups living our day-to-day lives, we don’t get to live in that place very often,” he says. “So I hope that that that’s what we can give them when they come to The Magic Parlour. It’s just a chance to experience joy and wonder in a light-hearted way.”

DENNIS WATKINS “The Magic Parlour.” Now until Sept. 29. Times vary. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. www.trustarts.org.

Dennis Watkins

“I had a lot of guests over the last couple weeks say to me, ‘Hey we’re from Pittsburgh and we saw you’re going to be at Liberty Magic and here we are in Chicago, so we thought we’d come to your show here,’” he says. “I can say that those folks are going to see some different stuff if they come back to it.” Watkins also serves as one of three artistic advisors to Liberty Magic, a post he has held since the venue’s opening last year. After helping plan the venue, Watkins says it’s incredible to finally perform in the venue. “It’s just such a joy to be able to be in a space that literally my imagination got to to design a little bit,” he says. “I voiced the kinds of

12 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

things that I would want as someone who does a parlour-style magic show five shows a week to walk in and have all those things there, it’s remarkable.” For audience members used to seeing larger shows, Watkins says “The Magic Parlour” and other Liberty Magic give them a chance to take part in a custom experience. “This is sort of a unique opportunity to see magic in a room that’s built for magic by professional working entertainers who are getting to sit down for a stretch of time and work on a longer-form magic show,” he says. Watkins hopes the show inspires those who come into the theater with their guard up and their arms


October 12 - 20

Mozart’s masterpiece meets film noir

Benedum Center • Tickets $14+ • Kids and teens half-price English supertitles projected above the stage

November 9 - 17

A mystical journey into the jungle... and beyond

H

PITT

RG SBU

!

RE E I EM

PR

FOR TICKETS AND MORE INFORMATION

pittsburghopera.org

412-456-6666

DOWNLOAD OUR FREE MOBILE APP:   FIND US ON SOCIAL MEDIA:      PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 13


ART

Project Amelia

TECHNOLOGICAL IMMERSION

'PROJECT AMELIA' AT BRICOLAGE EXAMINES OUR FUTURE RELATIONSHIP WITH TECH BY NICK EUSTIS - PITTSBURGH CURRENT CONTRIBUTING WRITER INFO@PITTSBURGHCURRENT.COM

T

echnology is a part of everyday life like no other time in history. We can find nearly any piece of information we want, connect with almost everyone we know in an instant, and share content on a massive scale; all from tiny pocketsized supercomputers. With all of the information we put out in the digital sphere, there are a plethora of people and companies who want to collect that information, to learn more about you and those around you. But is volunteering all of this data in our best interest? Who really benefits from the ways we use technology? These questions, among many others, are pondered in

Project Amelia, the latest show from downtown-based theater company Bricolage, who specialize in productions that put audience members at the center of the action. “Project Amelia is an immersive theatrical experience based around the future of technology, our relationship with it, our relationship with permission and privacy, and machine learning technology,” says Tami Dixon, producing artistic director of Bricolage. “It’s a narrative-based experiential storytelling that the audience participates in and contributes to as a kind of character in this story.” Bricolage is no stranger to nontraditional theater experiences, with popular productions such as

14 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

their “Midnight Radio” series, in which stories are acted out in the style of 1920s radio broadcasts, encouraging audiences to create their own visuals. This concept was taken to the next level with their 2015 production, Ojo: The Next Generation of Travel, in which audience members were physically blindfolded and led around an urban environment. “Project Amelia” is the result of Bricolage’s first collaboration with Probable Models, founded by computer engineers Michael Skirpan and Micha Gorelick. Audience members will interact with several different types of technology, developed by Probable Models, and through that technology, interact

with the cast of actors, as well as fellow audience members. “Things from ticketing all the way down to how audience members walk around the space has been worked on, developed, and done closely in partnership with Bricolage,” says Gorelick. “You will perhaps have conversations with people, be asked to do things by people,” Dixon says. “You will also engage with technologies that allow you to share data about yourself. The more data you share, the more deeply you’ll be involved in the story.” Guests will visit the world of “Project Amelia” at an undisclosed location in the Southside, rather than Bricolage’s downtown homebase. “The conceit of the show is that you are arriving at the secret lab of a large technology company called Aura, and you’re here to experience a product launch,” says Dixon. Once there, guests will be able to experience all of the groundbreaking new technologies that Aura has to offer, through a series of demonstrations developed by Probable Models. “Because the show is talking about technology companies in a way that is trying to challenge these ethical assumptions,...we’ve decided the way to talk about this is to build a variety of demonstrations and fake products for people to interact with,” says Michael Skirpan. Audience members will be able to interact with these demonstrations, with results both abstract and highly tangible. “Some of those might do things like use computer vision to learn things about you through your face. We have things that look at the future of music and how music is being made by artificial intelligence,” says Skirpan. “We have social mediastyle experiences where you would have political discussions with other people. We even have things that make you drinks on the spot based


ART on aspects of your data.” For Bricolage, “Project Amelia” is a significant departure in style, as their productions are typically rooted in mainstay stage techniques. “Our technologies are the traditional theater technologies: lights, sound, projection, costumes,” Dixon says. “We were looking to up our game a little in order to bring deeper connectivity to our audience, and create systems of communication that aren’t necessarily person-to-person.” “Project Amelia” is also a dramatically different type of storytelling for Bricolage, who usually prefer storytelling intended for several small groups in rapid succession. “Our other immersive experiences are either made for one, six or ten people at a time,” Dixon says. “This one is very different because we’re taking 60 people at a time, and doing one narrative over the evening for all 60 people.” Project Amelia began as part of Skirpan’s doctoral thesis at the University of Colorado, focused on computer ethics. As part of that program, he had formative experiences where he discovered major corporations, who drive much of the technological progress that impacts our lives, weren’t acting in the best interest of the public. “I realized the technology companies themselves were not interested in people really understanding or having opinions about these things,” Skirpan says. “That really bothered me, so I wanted to find ways to teach people about these things.” As a writer, Skirpan gravitated toward storytelling as a way of educating the public about ethical issues of technology, but found a traditional written story would not be the most effective method. This brought about the concept of using a theatrical experience as the vehicle for Skirpan’s goals.

With the concept in mind, Skirpan and Gorelick teamed up to find a theater company in Pittsburgh that would be willing to tackle such a project. When they found Bricolage, they found very eager partners capable of bringing this highly unorthodox experience to life, and willing to put a considerable amount of time into it. “We’ve been meeting...for over a year and a half, weekly, to really dig into the narrative, figure out deeper levels of engagement for the audience, and build this piece,” says Dixon. The scale of “Project Amelia” has necessitated a crew far larger than Bricolage traditionally uses, nearly 100 strong. “There’s just so many people involved in making something like this happen, a village of people, and we could not do it without them,” Dixon says. The unorthodox nature of this

show also required a cast to be assembled early, nearly six months before opening, to allow adequate preparation. “We got an amazing group of actors that are really game for this challenge,” says Jeff Carpenter, founder of Bricolage. “It’s really about preparing them as much as we can for something that, ultimately, they can’t control.” This intense preparation is all in the service of creating the most immersive experience possible for the audience, allowing them to fully enter and explore this new, and yet all too familiar, world, and hopefully leave with new thoughts for the real world. “A lot of the conversation about technology is very sterile, and I am excited to have an environment for audience members to have a more emotional conversation about the role of technology in their lives, and to do that in a space where they have

agency,” says Gorelick. “What I want people to come away with is this understanding that your data is largely how these companies see you,” says Carpenter. “Are the technologies we’re receiving actually creating the futures we’ve been promised? What should the government’s role be in protecting us? Who should be protecting us? When should I give people my information and when should I not?” says Skirpan. “The show challenges you not only to think about where the currents are taking us now, but also whether you are ready to pivot that direction in your life.”

PROJECT AMELIA will run from September 20 to November 3. For tickets and guest information, visit bricolagepgh.org.

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 17


ART

Sarah Elaine Smith

MARILOU IS EVERYWHERE

SARAH ELAINE SMITH WRITES ABOUT HER APPALACHIA IN DEBUT NOVEL BY JODY DIPERNA - PITTSBURGH CURRENT SENIOR CONTRIBUTING WRITER JODY@PITTSBURGHCURRENT.COM

C

indy Stoat is hit and miss in her ability to read the humans in her world. She grows up connected more to the land around her than to the people. She counts the few cars passing by her rural home, daydreams as she rides in the back of her brother’s truck, reads catalogs (there are no books in the house), and subsists on (sometimes stolen) junk food and

sugary drinks. She’s kind of feral. But with Cheetos. Marilou Is Everywhere (Riverhead Books, 2019), the magnificent first novel from local author Sarah Elaine Smith, centers around Cindy. “I’ve been really tired of how other people write about Appalachia,” Smith said when she sat down with the Current. The novel

18 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

is set in Greene County, one of the poorest and least populous counties in Pennsylvania, with about 36,500 total residents. It’s where Smith herself grew up. After high school, Smith went to Carnegie Mellon, then on to earn two MFAs, from the Michener Center for Writers at the University of Texas, Austin, and the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, respectively.

“I really wanted to write something that included the livedin experience of growing up there. I read stuff that doesn’t feel lived in to me, or it feels pre-received, or there’s some kind of idea that’s being transmuted about the place. I wanted to write really rooted in the experience. I wrote a lot based on sense memory growing up where I did,” she said.


ART I’m from, say things like, ‘I would write about race, but there weren’t any people of color in my high school, or statistically it was almost entirely white.’ Which is really telling -- it points to this assumption that race belongs not to white people, like, I don’t have any obligation to think about that. That is fascinating. Racism can be talked about, I think, within whiteness,” Smith said. Because the novel is set in rural northern Appalachia, she is able to roll around in the insularity, the poverty, and the mistrust of anybody seen as an outsider. There are upsides to growing up in isolated areas, one of which is a much richer and deeper connection to the natural rather than man-made world. And we see some of that through Cindy’s eyes, too, as she befriends the trees and the crickets and the changing shadows as the morning slides to the afternoon. But Cindy is not living an ideal country life, communing with nature like Walt Whitman or Henry David Thoreau. Essential human needs for warmth, deep connection and simple nourishing meals are missed. And though she can’t give voice to what’s missing, Cindy feels it acutely. Smith takes the reader to truly astonishing and unexpected places, especially as Cindy develops a relationship with the missing girl’s mother. It leads her protagonist to do some patently crazy things, to “evacuate her own life,” as Smith put it. She gets away with it for a really long time because nobody notices: nobody really cares what happens to her because nobody has really seen Cindy Stoat. Or Jude. “All of the women in the book -- are there ways that they have been missing for a long time before they go missing?” Smith wonders. “So, that’s maybe the first place that starts to show up -- maybe Jude’s community is not doing a good job of seeing her before she goes missing. That failure to see her might be perpetuating what’s happening to her.” You crack open a book which seems to be about a missing girl and end up on a journey about what it means to be an outsider, to live with the trauma of neglect. It explores questions about how a young person might find her way through life with no adults lighting the way with care. Those sense memories bubble forth in descriptions of place that are downright Faulknerian. Isolation, neglect, unnamable economic anxiety and the threat of physical danger are their own kinds of trauma. And Smith puts us deep inside Cindy’s traumatized head. The reader inhales the smell of grass cuttings mixed with exhaust in the back of the truck; we move about in their dimly lit house, where her mother is absent more often than not; and we feel Cindy’s unease and uncertainty. The action tips off with the disappearance of an 18-year-old woman. The missing Jude is a young woman of color and, as such, someone viewed as not fully of this mostly white place, even though she is actually from this place. “I was thinking a lot about how often I hear white writers who are from rural places, like where

SARAH ELAINE SMITH

will read at Penguin Books in Sewickley on Sept 26th.

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 19


ART

THE LATEST DANCE

MOMIX'S VIVA MOMIX AND EXHALATIONS DANCE THEATRE'S TIME: UNBOUND

I

the troupe’s 10 dancers on Saturday will be an excerpt from Lunar Sea that uses black light to reveal only the dancers arms to create the look of a flock of snow geese; a giant manfan from Botanica that Pendleton calls an extension of late 19th and early 20th century choreographer Loie fuller’s dances. The company will also perform short works created for Viva MOMIX including “Daddy Long Legs,” a humorous piece featuring a trio of cowboys with the gimmick being each sports a leg much longer than their other, “Paper Trails,” a work all done with paper and projections that Pendleton calls an “installation fantastique,” and “Light Reigns,” which got its inspiration from a skiing trip Pendleton took in Colorado and where he saw strings of cascading Christmas tree lights that looked like it was raining light.

“There is a musical curve to the evening as well and each piece has its own beginning, middle, and end,” says Pendleton. “If you don’t like what you are seeing with one, you don’t have to wait too long before it changes to something else.” MOMIX performs Viva MOMIX, 8 p.m., Saturday, September 21; Byham Theater, 101 6th St., Downtown, Tickets are $10-65, (412) 456-6666 or trustarts.org. Dancing Through Time Entering its 9th season, Exhalations Dance Theatre will present the mixed repertory program TIME: UNBOUND, September 2122 at the University of Pittsburgh’s Charity Randall Theatre. The program features 7 mostly company-dancer works on a theme of time. It will begin with EDT Founding Executive Director Katherine Mann’s “Moving Still” to

BY STEVE SUCATO - PITTSBURGH CURRENT DANCE WRITER INFO@PITTTSBURGHCURRENT.COM

t’s harvest time and dancemaker/multimedia artist Moses Pendleton is in perhaps his favorite place on earth; roaming the sunflower fields of his rural Connecticut home picking heads to photograph and film them. Pendleton, on the phone with the Current from those very fields, says he’s had 50-years-worth of traveling with his former company, Pilobolus, that he co-founded and danced with, and MOMIX, the dance-theater company he started 39-years ago. “Now, I do a lot of traveling in my own backyard,” he says. And while the 70-year-old doesn’t leave home much, that hasn’t stopped the fruits of his fertile imagination from spreading far and wide in the form of MOMIX’s panoply of visually striking shows that tour the globe annually. Last in Pittsburgh in 2011, Pendleton’s MOMIX returns to the Byham Theater on Saturday, September 21 in Viva MOMIX (a.k.a.

W MOMIX Forever), a mix-andmatch collection of some of the company’s best moments from their evening-length works Botanica, Alchemia, Remix, Opus Cactus and Lunar Sea. The 2-hour, 2-act performance created for the company’s 35th Anniversary Celebration in Milan, Italy says Pendleton, has no storyline or full-evening theme other than that of MOMIX, “which is kind of the theme of surreal, vaudeville, visual and physical theater coming at you at a rapid rate. The show has a lot of variety, humor and poetry.” While the work may not have an over-arching theme per se, Pendleton says, “When you are taking selections from full-evening productions, the main criteria is that the pieces need to fit together to create a seamless show — Viva MOMIX is a nice cross-section of our aesthetic.” Some of what will be seen from

20 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

PROJECT AMELIA A mind-bending immersive theater adventure that helps you take control

BRICOLAGEPGH.org

SEPT 20 - NOV 3


EVENTS THE CAN’T MISS FROM PITTSBURGH CURRENT STAFF REPORTS INFO@PITTSBURGHCURRENT.COM FEATURED EVENTS IN AND AROUND THE PITTSBURGH REGION

September 18

music by French-Finnish musician Örsten and others. Says Mann of the 12-minute work for 5 dancers in 3 movements, it is about life’s inherent perpetual motion and the need to create our own paths forward. Next, Ebony Cunningham’s “Born, Never Asked” is a reworking of her 2017 piece for the company, “Rise and Fall”. Danced to music by Laurie Anderson, Philip Glass and Robert Wilson, the 11-minute contemporary dance work is for a quartet of dancers and explores women’s roles in society. A nod to the changing season upon us, Heidi Murr’s 6 ½-minute “When the Leaves Fall” to music by Max Richter, “Is about the moment when the air begins to crisp, the leaves begin to transform…and there is the possibility of new beginnings,” says Murr. Guest choreographer, Texture Contemporary Ballet’s Kelsey Bartman’s new work created for Exhalations entitled “Humble Chessboard Queen,” touches on the role reversal the aging process brings with it. When we are young our parents care for us and when they get older we are called upon to care for them. The 10 ½-minute work for 5 dancers in performed to music by English alternative rock band Dry

the River. Next, choreographer Alyssa Bradley’s “Culaccino,” an 11-minute piece for 7 dancers to the music of English singer/songwriter Sohn (a.k.a. Christopher Michael Taylor) then ponders how relationships can change over time and the lessons that can be learned from them. Rounding out the program will be Stephanie Frey Anderson’s new 9-minute trio “Press Pause” about the fleeting aspect of time, and EDT Artistic Director Lea Kasic Fosbenner’s “Trench” to music by Twenty One Pilots. Costumed in all white, 10 dancers relay the effect time has on relationships either in a positive or negative way in the 13-minute piece. Exhalations Dance Theatre presents

TIME: UNBOUND

,

8 p.m., Saturday, September 21 & 5 p.m., Sunday, September 22; University of Pittsburgh’s Charity Randall Theatre, 4301 Forbes Ave, Oakland. Tickets are $10-18. exhalations.org/time.

Tim O’Brien comes to the Heinz History Center for a special program featuring his best-known work The Things They Carried, a fictional portrayal of the Vietnam War based on his own experiences in the service. O’Brien will sign copies of all his books after the program. 7 p.m. 1212 Smallman St. $10 for veterans, active duty service members, students, and History Center members, $20 general admission. kmroberts@heinzhistorycenter.org or heinzhistorycenter.org/events (Emerson Andrews)

September 19

The Steel City Improv Festival begins Sept 19 and continues through Sept 22. The nonprofit arts organization promises four nights of improv shows from the best talent the Pittsburgh area has to offer, as well as troupes from all over the United States and Canada. Ticket prices and venue vary depending on the night. 7 p.m. 5950 Ellsworth Ave. $10 Thursday and Sunday, $15 Friday and Saturday. 412-4042695 or pr@steelcityimprov.com (Emerson Andrews)

Oliver Lake

September 20

From Sept 20 to Sept 26, it’s the Fashion Film Fest presented by Style 412 at Row House Cinema. All week long enjoy films about fictional models such as Zoolander or learn more about the industry and its environmental and human impact with documentaries like The True Cost. Special events will be held at certain screenings, and ticket prices vary. 7 p.m. 4115 Butler St. $10 general admission. Rowhousecinema. com (Emerson Andrews) -----------Saxophonist Oliver Lake has been coming to City of Asylum each September since 2006, performing in tandem with poets from around the world. In the time since his first performance, the event has grown from a one-night event into a month-long Jazz Poetry Festival with numerous acts performing as well. Lake has appeared with different bands, including the World Saxophone Quartet (in their final Pittsburgh performance) and the funky Jump Up. This week, he brings the OGJB Quartet, a cooperative group that includes trumpeter Graham Haynes, bassist Joe Fonda and drummer Barry Altschul. They’ll perform at Alphabet City on Thursday, Sept. 19 with poet Alicia Ostriker and Friday, Sept. 20 with poet Justin Phillip Reed. Both 7 p.m. performances are free, but reservations are recommended by going to cityofasylum.org. (Mike Shanley) ---------When booking Descendants of Crom, festival founder Shy Kennedy has a rule. “No band gets to play two

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 21


EVENTS Players must be 18 or older. 7:30 p.m. 600 Penn Ave. $44.75-$74.75. Pittsburghsymphony.org (Emerson Andrews) -----------Trax Farms begins their Hops and Hayrides event, every Wednesday from Sept 25 to Oct 30. Kids and their parents can find their way through the corn maze and pick out a pumpkin from the pumpkin patch, then settle in for a bonfire as weather permits. The last hayride of the night begins at 6:30 p.m. Six-packs will be available for adults to purchase, and no off-site alcohol is allowed. 4:30 p.m. 528 Trax Rd. Finleyville. $8 for kids, $10 for adults. 412-835-3246 or traxfarms.com (Emerson Andrews)

years in a row – there’s enough to go around,” she told The Current’s Justin Vellucci. And that’s certainly true: now in its third year, the event, which highlights heavy underground music of all stripes, features 38 bands over three days (Friday, Sept. 20 at Howler’s in Bloomfield, and Saturday and Sunday, the 21st and 22nd at Cattivo, in Lawrenceville). It’s a diverse lineup including headliners Icarus Witch, ASG, and Brown Angel, plus Submachine, Black Pyramid, Brimstone Coven, Frayle, and many more. Read more of our coverages of Descendants of Crom III at www. pittsburghcurrent.com. $12-68. www. descendantsofcrom.com. (Justin Vellucci) Aldous Harding

September 21

Take a trip to the silent film era with the Pittsburgh Area Theatre Organ Society for a screening of 1927’s “It” starring the It Girl herself, Clara Bow. Tom Roberts will accompany the film on piano and Dale Abraham on the theatre organ, with a special performance before the screening by pianist Rowan Belt. 7:30 p.m. 1000 Kelton Ave. Free for students, $15 in advance, $20 at the door. 412-3224078 or info@pittsburghtheatreorgan. com (Emerson Andrews) ----------The Pine Bank Covered Bridge takes center stage at Meadowcroft Rockshelter and Historic Village during Washington and Greene Counties’ 48th Annual Covered Bridge Festival from Sept 21 to Sept 22. The bridge was first built in 1871 and was restored in 2017 to preserve Western Pennslyvanian history. Tours of the Meadowcroft Rockshelter will be held during the festival for a $5 fee. 12 p.m. 401 Meadowcroft Rd. Avella. Free. kmroberts@heinzhistorycenter.org or heinzhistorycenter.org/events (Emerson Andrews)

September 23

Sigrid Nunez, winner of the 2018 National Book Award, comes to Carnegie Music Hall for the Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures series. The Friend is Nunez’s seventh novel spanning a career of over two decades. She will be signing and personalizing copies of her book after the lecture. 7:30 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave. $15-$35. 412-6228866 or info@pittsburghlectures.org (Emerson Andrews)

September 24

Bill Suys leads a four day masterclass at Sweetwater Center for the Arts on bringing animals to life in painting. For those 18 and older, this workshop will focus on form, structure and surface and is open to those of any skill level. The workshop runs from Sept 24 though Sept 27. 9 a.m. 200 Broad St. Sewickley. $525. 412-741-4405 or aspiegel@sweetwaterartcenter.org (Emerson Andrews) -----------In 2009, Tyler, the Creator (aka Tyler Okonma) planted his flag on planet hip hop with his mixtape Bastard; his debut solo record Goblin

22 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

made him a star, and solidified his persona as an innovator and an unapologetic provocateur (or a talented teenage brat, depending on which critic you ask). Regardless, Okonma – also the figure-head of alternative hip-hop collective Odd Future – continues to grow as an artist, and IGOR, which he released in May, has been hailed as Okonma’s masterpiece. Inspired by ’80s pop music (a genre he used to hate), the record is beautify constructed and heavily layered, sometimes veering into jazz fusion, then sunny AM pop, and then back to Tyler’s trademark lead-like flow. He comes to Stage AE Tuesday, Sept. 24, along with Jaden Smith and GoldLink. 6 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $59.50-100. www.stageae.com (Margaret Welsh)

September 25

The Price is Right Live comes to Heinz Hall for the Performing Arts. Come be part of the audience of the long-running game show or register up to three hours before the show for a chance to play the classic games up on stage and win prizes.

September 26

Citizens Bank and Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy team up to close out the summer at Mellon Square with a Summer at the Square: Last Call Happy Hour event. Enjoy live music while trying out foods from Atria’s, Totopo Food Truck and Mac & Gold Truck, with delicious treats from Graeter’s Ice Cream and the Milk Shake Factory. Mindful Brewing Company and Atria’s will be supplying the drinks. Attendees must be 21 and older. 4:30 p.m. Sixth Ave. Free. 412-682-7275 (Emerson Andrews) -----------To describe Aldous Harding as a folk singer may be correct in the broadest of senses, but it doesn’t do much to capture the way the New Zealand folk singer actually sounds. It would take a long list of qualifiers to get even close: pop-folk? Gothfolk? Art-folk? None of these really touch the oddness at the center of her work. Over the course of three records, Harding’s songwriting has become increasingly idiosyncratic, moving from the quasi-traditional folk of her debut, to the colorful and borderline bizarre Designer, which came out earlier this year. Harding’s


EVENTS songs are lovely and fully of strange turns, and as a live performer, she’s a compelling presence. But her voice alone is worth the price of admission: she croons from her chest like a heartbroken lounge singer one moment, the next her trill – sometimes nearly a shriek – hits the rafters. Don’t miss her when she comes to Club Café Thursday, Sept 26. Tiny Ruins opens. 8 p.m. 56 S. 12th, South Side. $15-17. www.clubcafelive.com (Margaret Welsh) -----------Learn to make your own homemade mozzarella cheese at Threadbare Cider and Mead. Threadbare Pastry Chef Elise Miranda leads the class, which includes a mini-tour of the Cider House. Ticket price also covers a glass of cider, a cheese, meat and pickle board to snack on throughout the glass, and the hand-pulled mozzarella to take home with you. 6 p.m. 1291 Spring Garden Ave. $40. threadbarecider. com/event or info@threadbarecider. com (Emerson Andrews)

THE FUTURE IN FIVE MINUTES. Where last year’s show invited people to let go of the past, this event features a variety of presenters speculating on the future: “The future they THINK will happen -- OR the future they WANT to happen -- OR the future they DON’T want to happen,” explains Press via email. “Every vision will be delivered in five minutes, in any nutty way they want.” The lineup includes Unfinished Symphonies, The Tortured Genius, Steve Pellegrino, Maurice Rickard, Matt Alemore, Shawn Maddey, and more. Check it out on Saturday, Sept. 28, at the Glitterbox Theater. 5 p.m. 460 Melwood Ave., Oakland. $5. (Margaret Welsh)

September 29

September 27

The Mattress Factory opens their “Factory Installed 2019” exhibit featuring eight exhibitions by nine artists from around the world. Members can enjoy an exclusive preview at 5 p.m. This reception is free and open to the public. 6 p.m. 500 Sampsonia Way. Free. 412-231-3169 or info@mattress.org (Emerson Andrews) -----------The Governor’s Awards for the Arts & Block Party is being hosted at the August Wilson Cultural Center to honor five Pennsylvania artists. Dj Nate tha Barber will be performing at the block party, and attendees can enjoy a gallery crawl through the cultural district and an after party with a cash bar. Admission is free. 4 p.m. 980 Liberty Ave. Free.

Tyler the Creator (Photo: Wikimedia Commons

412-391-2060 or pittsburghartscouncil. org (Emerson Andrews)

September 28

The Thomas Merton Center, Pittsburgh UNITED, IfNotNow Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Student Power Network and Casa San José are partnering to put on a training event for white allies in Allegheny County. White Accomplice Training: Unsexy Work for Sexy People will cover topics such as how to protest without centering whiteness, digital organizing, how to talk to family or co-workers to dismantle biases or prejudice and many other ways that white people can use their

privilege to stand in solidarity with their black and brown friends and neighbors. Tickets are on a sliding scale donation. 10 a.m. 116 South Highland Ave. $5-$50. 412-3613022 or 412-343-3111 (Emerson Andrews) -----------We’re all interested in the future, whether it’s planning for dinner, or wondering when ecological catastrophe will finally take us all out. In that spirit of curiosity, the folks who brought us last year’s EXORSCISM (including Rob Press a.k.a. the Dirty Poet, a.k.a. Unfinished Symphonies) will host

The Steel Valley School District partners with the Waterfront Shopping Center to hold the 2nd Funder Under the Bridge event. Over ten student clubs will be providing fun activities for the whole family while the Steel Valley chorus, marching band and cheerleaders perform. Suggested ticket price is $5, and all proceeds will be divided equally between the participating extracurricular school clubs to help their fundraising efforts. 12 p.m. 149 West Bridge St. Homestead. $5. steelvalleysd.org or waterfrontpgh. com (Emerson Andrews)

September 30

For poetry lovers, the Center for African American Poetry and Poetics presents a reading and conversation with Tyrone Williams and Julie Patton at the Frick Fine Arts Auditorium. Williams is a scholar and author of six poetry collections, while Patton is a composer, poet, performer and author of many books. Admission is free. 7 p.m. 650 Schenley Dr. Free. caapp.pitt.edu/ events (Emerson Andrews)

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 23


MUSIC

Brazillian Wax (Photo: Amber Weaver)

ONE FINAL WAX

BRAZILIAN WAX BIDS FAREWELL AT LADYFEST BY MEG FAIR - PITTSBURGH CURRENT MANAGING EDITOR MEG@PITTBURGHCURRENT.COM

G

rrrls to the front!” repeatedly commands Athena Kazuhiro at the beginning of a Brazilian Wax song of the same name, from the 2016 record Feel the Burn. The song is a perfect snapshot of Brazilian Wax: assertive, catchy, fiery. It has bite, but it’s also endlessly fun to thrash around to in a joyous explosion of movement. Brazilian Wax will make its ‘grrls to the front’ declaration one more time at this year’s Ladyfest, an all-ages, three-day festival that highlights women and gendernonconforming performers and benefits the Women’s Shelter of Pittsburgh. The band is performing

its final show after seven years of making delightfully bratty feminist grunge punk. Bassist and singer Kazuhiro and guitarist Jen Sabol founded Brazilian Wax after the two met doing roller derby together. “We’d be in line for drills and I’d be like, ‘Athena! Athena! Let’s start a band!’ and she’d be like ‘Yeah, whatever!’ So I kept asking her about it,” says Sabol. But Kazuhiro did eventually agree to start the band. She was already a drummer and had performed with the band Bunny Five Coat, but with Brazilian Wax she decided to pick up the bass for the first time. It was also Sabol’s first time playing guitar in a

24 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

band. A three-piece seemed like the simplest way to go, so they asked a friend to play drums. Five drummers later, Ian White has been backing Brazilian Wax for several years now. “We didn’t know how to play our instruments when we started the band,” laughs Sabol. “I always wanted to play guitar and after I was 15 and didn’t learn, I always thought that I wasn’t able to learn. I knew if I started playing I’d need something to keep me going, and a band is a perfect thing for that.” “I’d play guitar a little bit, but I’d never played bass before,” says Kazuhiro. “But since I played instruments since I was little, there’s a certain technique and musical muscle that I have because I’ve done it for so long.” Kazuhiro’s confidence is a refreshing flip of a common narrative. A lot of women and nonmen feel like there isn’t space for them in music, or that they won’t be able to learn, or it’s too late to learn. And those that aren’t kept out by this societally imposed perception are oftentimes kept down by imposter syndrome. But not Kazuhiro or Sabol. “I have the confidence that I can do this, and no one’s gonna tell me I can’t do it,” says Kazuhiro. Sabol was 32 and Kazuhiro was 37 when they formed the band. “I think that’s important to talk about,” says Sabol. “The obsession with youth has thwarted a lot of people’s hopes and dreams because they buy into it,” says Kazuhiro. “I want to say that it’s super important for anyone to start a band or artistic endeavor whenever, because everyone has some type of creative thing that they need to give to the world,” adds Sabol. Since its inception, Brazilian Wax has toured, played festivals and released several records. They’ve played with bands they admired and gained a fervent group of followers

locally and otherwise. “We have accomplished so much,” says Kazuhiro. “I am sad and in a way I’m mourning it, but I know you go through stages in life and it’s time for [Brazilian Wax] to be done.” “It’s fun to look at it as a celebration,” says Sabol. It was a happy accident that the band’s final show aligned with Ladyfest, as Kazuhiro used to run Ladyfest and its prior iteration, Vulvapalooza. Current Ladyfest organizer Steph Flati worked with Kazuhiro’s until Kazuhiro moved back to Kentucky and Flati continued the festival. “Our music is all online. Our music isn’t going to go away,” says Kazuhiro, “Who knows what could happen! Look at Bikini Kill--they weren’t that popular in their time and now they are playing Riot Fest. I’m not saying we’ll play again--but you just never know what’s going to happen.” While the band members don’t plan to stop their own creative endeavors, Brazilian Wax’s time felt like it was naturally coming to an end. While Kazuhiro would make the trek often, living six hours away has made it harder to practice, write and play as frequently. The final set at Ladyfest will feature “all the hits” and some personal favorites. It’s also an opportunity to thank those who have been a part of the band’s journey. “There’s so many people I met and so many new friendships I created from playing music that I never thought I’d make,” says Sabol. “I had no expectations of what this band was going to be, and to make lots of great friendships has been really cool.”

BRAZILIAN WAX’S FINAL SHOW. Saturday, September 21. The Shop. 3520 Charlotte St.,Lawrenceville. $10. All ages.


MUSIC RETURN ENGAGEMENT PITTSBURGH'S HEPCAT DILEMMA RELEASES ITS FIRST NEW RECORD SINCE 2002 BY MIKE SHANLEY - PITTSBURGH CURRENT MUSIC WRITER INFO@PITTSBURGHCURRENT.COM

A

rt Imitates Life, the new album by Pittsburgh’s Hepcat Dilemma, includes a track titled “The Hepcat Motto.” Its sole lyric warns, “If you’re not careful/ in five years/ you will only/ listen to music like this.” The stop-start groove of the song turns at one point into a quasiclassic rock guitar solo, but just as quickly shifts back to an odd time signature riff. If the band is referring to their sound as “music like this,” maybe it’s not a bad thing. Hepcat Dilemma hasn’t released an album since 2002 and the band’s origins date back nearly a decade earlier. It’s hard to talk about the group without referencing the band Special Ed. During the second half of the ’80s, that McKeesport-based trio boldly merged the members’ progressive rock upbringing with the brevity of punk rock, frequently delivering it with a surreal lyrical outlook. After a few records and cassettes, bassist Bob Loiselle switched to guitar and started Hepcat Dilemma with bassist Chuck McPherson, a longtime friend and former bandmate who had run lights for Special Ed. Loiselle says his approach with the new band was similar to Special Ed. “The only difference was now I was writing the lyrics,” he says. “Other than that, it wasn’t any conscious way to change anything or reinvent the wheel. It was just an effort to continue what we were doing – just in a new way.” They pumped up the volume a bit when they decided to use two drummers. But like many groups, things slowed down after a while. Then McPherson passed away and Loiselle

went into musical retirement for a few years, later playing in the more straightforward group Junk Fingers. But he got a call from E Hood, the former drummer #2, expressing a desire to play some old songs one more time. Loiselle agreed, and they recruited Junk Fingers bassist Chris Colpo and sealed their fate. Colpo, who also sings in the REM tribute group the Reckoning, has the perfect set of pipes to belt out – and harmonize – Loiselle’s lyrics. “It was one of those magical things that all musicians have one time in their lives. The first time E, Chris and I played together it was so strong and so perfect that [we knew] this has got to be more than one show,” Loiselle says. “Now seven years later we’re finally putting out a record.” With Colpo now living outside Washington, D.C., they don’t get many chances to perform, but they’re already looking forward. “Our priorities are to play when we can and write the songs for the next album,” Loiselle says. “We’ve got about eight songs written for the next one.” Considering that Art Imitates Life has nine songs, they’re ahead of the game.

HEPCAT DILEMMA RECORD RELEASE with ATS. 8:30 p.m.,

Saturday, Sept. 21 Funhouse at Mr. Small’s, 400 Lincoln Avenue, Millvale. $8. 412-821-4447

'BIRTH OF COOL'

MILES DAVIS DOCUMENTARY COMES TO THE HARRIS THEATER BY MIKE SHANLEY - PITTSBURGH CURRENT CONTRIBUTING WRITER INFO@PITTSBURGHCURRENT.COM

S

tanley Dance became obsessed with Miles Davis while the future filmmaker was in college. He took his dad’s copy of Davis’ Kind of Blue album to school and spent many hours in his dorm listening to the rhapsodic “Flamenco Sketches” and getting lost in the sound of it. Miles Davis has many stories attached to his legend, including a lyrical soloist, a musical visionary, sharp dresser and a person who didn’t suffer fools, to put it gently. The trumpeter furthered his legend with his 1989 autobiography, filling it with braggadocio that might not have let the truth get in the way of a good story. “At times his persona eclipsed his music,” Dance says in his director’s statement. As a filmmaker, Dance always dreamed of being able to tell the whole story of Davis, clearing away the mythology to reveal a deep thinker who listened to all kinds of music. His Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool was the result of that dream. It reveals someone who was constantly exploring. While his peers thought learning theory could take something away from their

performance, Davis “wanted to see what was going on in all of music.” To make the documentary, Dance was granted full access to the Miles Davis estate, which allowed him to use footage that has never been presented to the public and studio outtakes from his recordings. He also interviewed musicians who played with him, including Ron Carter, Herbie Hancock, Lee Konitz and Wayne Shorter. Birth of the Cool, named for a seminal recording session that ushered in a more subdued brand of jazz, also includes Davis’ trademark raspy voice, offering firsthand insight into his work. While the film might further the Davis legend, it also goes a long way to show the facets of his work that earned him that distinction in the first place.

MILES DAVIS:

Birth of the Cool screens at the Harris Theater, from Friday, September 27 through October 10. Mike Shanley will introduce the screening on Saturday, September 28.

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 25


MUSIC In reading your op-ed, I was struck by your summation of the lasting impact of Woodstock -and of the romanticizing of it -- as coming from desire to find solace and feel free. Does that resonate with you as a performer? Yeah, I think that in a lot of ways playing shows has taken the place of church for me, like a place for community and for unspoken understanding, and being able to bring whatever to a place and look in the same direction, and witness something with a lot of other people. I think there is a lot of solace, even in the physical space of a show. I’ve felt it myself, I’ve felt freed or opened up by different musicians, which is probably why I started writing music. I think a lot of people are drawn in by that particular sorcery, making something out of nothing. I’ve benefited from it so I’m happy to be on the other side of it. Lucy Dacus (Photo courtesy of Matador Records)

FREE SPACE

"I HAD TO SEE THE WOMEN OF RICHMOND GET ON STAGE AND PLAY SONGS BEFORE I THOUGHT I WAS ALLOWED TO."

I

BY MARGARET WELSH - PITTSBURGH CURRENT MUSIC EDITOR MARGARET@PITTSBURGHCURRENT.COM

t’s easy to feel connected to Lucy Dacus. Her lyrics are wise, candid and quotable; her calm alto hovers in a sing-alongable octave; her melodies are full of unexpected hooks and big riffs. At 24, the Richmond, VA-based singer/ songwriter is an old, exceptionally articulate soul. But that ability to connect can sometimes be a burden, and Dacus has become an important voice in an ongoing conversation about the comfort and safety of touring musicians, especially women. When the Current caught up with Dacus, she was on her way to play some shows in New York while recovering from a late-night

performance at the Hopscotch Music Festival in Raleigh, North Carolina. “I’m trying to be extra careful,” she said, of her sleeping habits. “I’m kind of worn down from all the touring and we don’t really have a break until 2020.” Even so, there’s a measured excitement in her voice when she talks about everything she’s doing, from her solo work to boygenius (her band with Julien Baker and Phoebe Bridges), to the op-ed on Woodstock 50 she recently wrote for the New York Times. There’s plenty ahead – she brings her solo tour to Mr. Smalls Theatre on Friday, Sept. 20 -- but in the meantime, she’s doing her best to take care the best she can.

26 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

When do you remember first feeling that as an audience member? The first time I went to a local show in Richmond, which was my freshman year of high school … I realized that music was something that wasn’t manufactured exclusively by pop stars for the radio … I’ve always said you have to see it, to be it – I’m not the first to say that, I don’t know who said it first. But I had to see the women of Richmond get on stage and play songs before I thought I was allowed to. Your songwriting is incredibly vulnerable, and I’m curious about your ability to maintain vulnerability as an artist as you’re more in the public eye. In a way [I’m] getting more vulnerable, because the quantity of people that are listening to my message is growing. So quantitatively I’m more vulnerable than ever, while qualitatively I do feel myself closed off more and more. People abuse the

projection of empathy or abuse the vulnerability. Even last night at Hopscotch some lady kept breaking into the green room and trying to pretend that she knew one of us in the band, like two or three times … she needed something from me, I don’t know what it was. She could have been really nice, but it was threatening. In May you tweeted asking people to respect boundaries by not coming into the stage door during load-in, not coming into the green room, not following you, etc. It was so basic, but it speaks to a serious issue of boundaries between performers and fans. Have you had any encouraging feedback since then? I think that a lot of people have been like, ‘Oh, wow, I never thought about it this way. Thank you for letting me know.’ Usually I’m fine with people coming up briefly … if we run into each other naturally it’s ok to say something. I am usually very happy to meet people because a lot of my fans are really kind. But it’s when people encroach on my personal space, my safety, day of show: it’s just really unsettling. What do you think can happen on a larger scale to help protect artists? I would just hope that people would spread the word, and that this behavior catches on, and that being a zealous fan should stay in the crowed. … I think that the more it’s spoken about, the more likely that people will adapt and learn how to treat each other better.

LUCY DACUS with QUINN CHRISTOPHERSON, TAYLOR JANZEN. 8 p.m.

Friday, Sept. 20. Mr. Smalls Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $18. www. mrsmalls.com


MUSIC FIRST/LAST BY HUGH TWYMAN - PITTSBURGH CURRENT FEATURED WRITER INFO@PITTSBURHCURRENT.COM

f

uck yeah, dinosaurs! is a Pittsburgh-based pop-punk band that writes and performs songs about dinosaurs. Yes, you read that right. A quick look at some of their song titles proves that point. With soon to be classics like “Stegosaurus Shuffle,” “T-Rex Arms,” and the fan-favorite, “Raptors on Acid,” the band encourages the listener to consume large amounts of beer to get the most out of their music. Catch them live on Friday, September 27 at 222 Ormsby. As the band finalizes their soon-to-bereleased album. I want to thank Jon Stefaniak (Guitar, Co-Lead- Vocals w/ @WeekendZach) for taking the time to participate in this edition of First/Last. The first album you ever bought? I came across Hanson’s Middle of Nowhere in 3rd grade, which was influenced by peer pressure and my older cousin, before I really developed any taste. Hey, at least they write/play their own music. Your last album bought? Pin by our buds in Signals Midwest. Favorite album of all time? … And Out Come the Wolves by Rancid. That album was one of biggest influences on my taste in punk rock as I grew up and shifted from the TRL=phase of nu-metal to Metallica to punk. Least favorite/most disappointing album? A close tie between Decemberunderground by AFI and Get Hurt by The Gaslight Anthem. Both are bands that I followed and

listened to heavily for years, and they went on paths that caused me to lose interest. First concert attended? First concert goes back to Hanson, 3rd grade at the Civic Arena. I threw up in the back of a minivan on the way home in a used car lot in Monroeville. Last concert? Signals Midwest album release for Pin (see above), and before that, I finally got to see the Mighty Mighty Bosstones for the first time. Shout out to the local buds in iNCO FidO who opened and got to play with the Bosstones! Favorite concert ever? Laura Jane Grace (of Against Me!) played a sold-out solo show at Garfield Artwork 10-ish years ago, but when Limp Bizkit played on the roof of GetGo in Lawrenceville last year, that was something else. Least favorite concert? For some reason, my girlfriend Sam and I decided it was a good idea to get tickets to Hobo Johnson on Nov. 5th, 2018. We liked the Tiny Desk Concert audition that he put up on Youtube and thought he’d be interesting. I can’t think of anything that I have ever regretted paying money to see except for that show. Favorite thoughts, experiences about Pittsburgh? The Pittsburgh punk community is a very tight-knit, self-sufficient ecosystem that doesn’t really need the help from “the industry” or “advisors” from Austin, TX. From what I’ve continually read with these committees, there’s never

really much mention of our genre. As artists, we have to remember that there is STILL a lot of the general population who aren’t immersed in this world on a daily basis as we are. We constantly have to keep things interesting and get them to come out and show them a good time. Punk and live music in general is VERY MUCH alive and well in the city. People just have to seek it out! Thanks, Jon. I think you hit on something very profound, in that many people outside the music community have no idea of what is going on within the scene. What bands are making music and where they are performing? The question is, how do we let them know all the great stuff that is happening? I have made that my mission to expose the general public to all the amazing

music and shows that are occurring. Are they getting the message? I am not concerned with that. I am concerned with putting it out. Check out more from fuck yeah, dinosaurs at www.facebook.com/ fyeahdinosaurs Hugh Twyman (AKA HughShows) has been documenting the Pittsburgh music scene since 2004. His website (www.hughshows.com) features a comprehensive Pittsburgh Concert Calendar, episodes of HughShowsTV, a newly launched public Pittsburgh music database, exclusive audio steams from local bands, thousands of his concert photos and his trademark First/Last interview series.

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 27


FOOD STATE OF VERMOUTH IS THIS FORTIFIED WINE THE NEXT SPIRIT TO GET ITS TIME IN THE SPOTLIGHT BY BETHANY RUHE - PITTSBURGH CURRENT ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER BETHANY@PITTSBURGHCURRENT.COM

S

pirits tend to fall in and out of favor. For a while, martini bars were all the rage; then, anything infused with something else was hot. After that, bourbon experienced a huge surge in popularity. Could the next big spirit to capture hearts and palettes be… Vermouth? If Don Mahaney, proprietor of Scratch Food and Beverage has his way, yes, Vermouth is going to be your next favorite drink. Vermouth is a fortified wine, meaning another distilled spirit has been added to it. It’s also aromatized, so it’s flavored with herbs, flowers, or other natural ingredients. If you ask most Americans if they’ve heard of Vermouth, it’s usually as either an ingredient in a martini or Negroni, or as something to cook with. But as is the case with so many other things in America, that’s not how it works in Europe. Spain, Italy and France have all been producing high-quality, coveted Vermouths for years. And now, it’s spilling its way across the ‘pond’, and Mahaney is here to help you properly understand and appreciate this quirky beverage. In a lot of ways, Mahaney’s experience with Vermouth was probably pretty close to yours. “I was tasting sherry one day,” he said, “and the vendor who brought it, on a whim, introduced me to a Vermouth by the same company (Lustau, from Spain). It was like Santa handed me a present, himself. I was blown away. But I had no idea what it was I was drinking. My experiences with Vermouth had not seeded ANY fond memories.” Same. And this is why I

approached a Vermouth tasting he hosted at Scratch on September 10 with a healthy amount of trepidation and antacids. Turns out, I could have left both at home. What I found was an array of colors, tastes, and flavor profiles that were more complex and satisfying than I could have ever anticipated. We started in Spain with a Lustau Vermouth Rojo, a sweet, warm red Vermouth that’s a favorite of Mahaney: “It’s fantastic on it’s own (Lustau Rojo over ice with anchovies in olive oil is to die for), and it’s a perfect complement to base spirits in a bevy of classics.” (I skipped the anchovies because there is only so much experimenting I can handle at one sitting). We tried an Italian Baglio Baita Alagna Vermouth Bianca, as well as a more tongue-coating Baglia Rosso. Mahaney explained that Italian Vermouths were best for ‘situational sipping’, and truly shined when incorporated into a cocktail. There was also a very wine-like French La Quintinye Vermouth Royal, and even an American version, Lofi, which had very strong notes of anise and fennel, with a sweet, cherry bark finish. Lead bartender Josh Bordini also whipped up some cocktail samples, and this is where the Vermouth shined the most. We sampled El Pechecote, Manhattan Port Calling, and their newest brunch drink, an Apple Cider Mimosa. While all of the Vermouths stood on their own, much better than I would have ever thought, they truly make a cocktail magical. And don’t expect that to come

28 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

Owner Don Mahaney behind the bar at Scratch Food and Beverage. (Current Photo by Bethany Ruhe)

to an end anytime soon. According to Mahaney, the mad Vermouth experiments are nonstop. “We are toying with what Vermouth to pair with Vodka, Gin, Bourbon, Mezcal— we’ve got a doozy we are working on with Wahaka Mezcal—that is a real treat. We will be rolling out new drinks

that will feature Vermouth in one way or another over the next few weeks, and they will make up our fall menu.” The warmth that you get from sipping Vermouth lends itself perfectly to Fall. The anchovies? Well. That’s up to you.


NOV 6-9

TRINITY CATHEDRAL

ODC/ DANCE

WITH THE MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH

Immersive dance piece journeys through Trinity Cathedral

Trinity Cathedral

SUBSCRIBE

TRUSTARTS.ORG/DANCE

Fall 2019 Friday, September 27 5:30 – 10 pm

Featured: Boat Trip, Wood Street Galleries

FREE ADMISSION TO CRAWL EVENTS crawl after dark COVER CHARGES MAY APPLY

#CrawlPGH

Photo: Andrew Weeks

TRUSTARTS.ORG/CRAWL PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 29


2019 AUT GALLERY

CRAWL

DENNIS WATKINS: IN THE MAGIC PARLOUR SEPTEMBER 11 – 29 LIBERTY MAGIC

UN POYO ROJO SEPTEMBER 14 AUGUST WILSON AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER

LEE TERBOSIC: IN PLAIN SLEIGHT SEPTEMBER 28 BYHAM THEATER

OCTOBER 2 – NOVEMBER 24 LIBERTY MAGIC

MOMIX SEPTEMBER 21 BYHAM THEATER

MASTERCHEF JUNIOR LIVE!

BLACK VIOLIN SEPTEMBER 26 BYHAM THEATER

JESSE COOK

SEPTEMBER 27 CULTURAL DISTRICT

CATAPULT

LEE TERBOSIC p r e s e n t s

OCTOBER 6 BENEDUM CENTER

OCTOBER 9 BYHAM THEATER

THE LIFE AND DEATH OCTOBER 10 IN BYHAM THEATER

of

THAT GOLDEN GIRLS SHOW – A PARODY OCTOBER 11 & 12 BYHAM THEATER

DEBORAH COX OCTOBER 14 GREER CABARET THEATER

MARY CHAPIN CARPENTER AND SHAWN COLVIN OCTOBER 17 BYHAM THEATER

THE OFFICE – A MUSICAL PARODY OCTOBER 18 & 19 BYHAM THEATER

HARRY

HOUDINI LEE TERBOSIC: LIFE & DEATH

OCTOBER 23 – NOVEMBER 3 LIBERTY MAGIC

OctOBER 23 - NovEMBER 3, 2019 BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE

412-456-6666 GROUPS 10+

A BYOB SPEAKEASY

MEAN GIRLS OCTOBER 29 – NOVEMBER 3 BENEDUM CENTER

A TUBA TO CUBA PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND WITH YUSA AND SPECIAL GUESTS OCTOBER 30 BYHAM THEATER

CHELSEA HANDLER “LIFE WILL BE THE DEATH OF ME” NOVEMBER 1 BYHAM THEATER

811 Liberty ave

ERIC ANDRE NOVEMBER 2 BYHAM THEATER

NOVEMBER 4 BYHAM THEATER

FOR INFORMATION, TICKETS AND UPDATED EVENTS VISIT 30 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

412-471-6930

TR


C O H E N

RO S A N N E CASH &

G R I G S B Y

T R U S T

P R E S E N T S

S E R I E S

TUMN EVENTS

BYHAM THEATER NOVEMBER 13, 2019

TAJ EXPRESS

ODC/DANCE WITH THE MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH

NOVEMBER 6 BYHAM THEATER

NOVEMBER 6 – 9 TRINITY CATHEDRAL

WALK TWO MOONS

ROSANNE CASH

NOVEMBER 8 & 9 BYHAM THEATER

NOVEMBER 13 BYHAM THEATER

EDDIE B.: “I’M ALREADY PROFESSIONALLY DEVELOPED” TOUR NOVEMBER 16 BENEDUM CENTER

T R U S T A R T S .B OOX RG • F I CT EH A TE AT THE S Q URAER E O FBFOIXC O E FAT EART SE R Q UA 4 1 2 - 4 5 6 - 6461626- 4•5 6G- R 0+ U T IP CS K E1T0S+ 44 11 2 6 6O6U6P •S G1 RO 2 -- 44 77 11 -- 66 993300

TRUSTARTS.ORG TRUSTARTS.ORG TRUSTARTS.ORG

JUDY MOODY AND STINK

THE TELLY LEUNG QUARTET

NOVEMBER 17 – 24 BYHAM THEATER & REGIONAL

PIT TSB URG H

NOVEMBER 18 GREER CABARET THEATER

URG H ST AN D PIT TSB CULTUR AL TRU

PIT TSB URG H

H OM E HISOTMLASIDAY2018S

ST AND CULTUR AL TRU

WIN PIT TSB URG H

NOVEMBER 19 – 24 BENEDUM CENTER

LES MISERABLES NOVEMBER 26 – DECEMBER 1 BENEDUM CENTER

ROBERT RAMIREZ NOVEMBER 27 - JANUARY 5 LIBERTY MAGIC

SEN T WIN ERY PRE

PITTSBURGH TM A SORCHESTRA HR IS C JAZZ M U D E N E AB NOVEMBER 30 FT O BYHAM THEATER ERY PRE SEN

A BRONX TALE

NOVEMBER 30

H E CABARET THEATER R TGREER

PURE YANNI DECEMBER 9 BENEDUM CENTER

MANNHEIM STEAMROLLER CHRISTMAS DECEMBER 10 BENEDUM CENTER

SING! AN IRISH CHRISTMAS DECEMBER 12 BENEDUM CENTER

C HR A B E N E D UM

NIBALE BROOKTEHAEN GHA M RRGOT BIN OA FM EY SC OT T B L A S D E A S Y BILL STRAIGHT NO AY E Y FRID S18 KEL20 CHASER LEY IKE NIBAJO 17NNIE IRIS DECEMBER 18 BROOKE ANDECEMBER O HADM G IN B BENEDUM CENTER BENEDUM CENTER T O G R d by MA cke N Ba O S K MBO JAC JI EY TRIO +, SCOT T BL A S DH RDINE BUFFALO ALNT E AOSNYY JA BIL ROSE, Y PRICE STEELTOWN A ID R LY F IL Y B E S L E K HORNS E Y SMITH JOY IK LYENDSIR IS

H OM E HOLIDAY S

A CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS DECEMBER 26-29 HEINZ HALL

DECEMBER 28 BYHAM THEATER

JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR DECEMBER 31-JANUARY 5 BENEDUM CENTER

RUS TARTS.ORG DONNIE ON Backed by JIMBO JACK S IO +, 19 E ATR D DEC EMBER JAERDNIN FFALO Y, E SDBU A NTHON Y W SEN, ED U M CE N TE R RO BE • E BILLY PRIC7: 30 PM STEELTOWN HORNS H IT M S Y E S LY ND ER SQUARE ICE AT TH EAT 6 • BOX OFF - 471 - 693 0 412 - 456 - 666 TIC KET S 412 GR OU PS 10+

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 31


PURE YANNI C O H E N

&

G R I G S B Y

T R U S T

P R E S E N T S

S E R I E S

Piano and Intimate Conversation

MONDAY, DECEMBER 9 B E N E DU M C E N T E R BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE 412-456-6666 • GROUPS 10+ TICKETS 412-471-6930 TRUSTARTS.ORG 32 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

C O H E N

&

G R I G S B Y

T R U S T

P R E S E N T S

S E R I E S

THE AMAZING MAGIC OF E C N A D D SHADOW AN

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2019

7:30 PM • BYHAM THEATER BOX OFFICE AT THEATER SQUARE 412-456-6666 • GROUPS 10 + TICKETS 412-471-6930

TRUSTARTS.ORG


FOOD DAY DRINKING

KEEPING TABS ON PITTSBURGH'S CRAFT BEER SCENE BY DAY BRACEY - PITTSBURGH CURRENT CRAFT BEER WRITER INFO@PITTSBURHCURRENT.COM Sept. 5, 9:30 p.m.: Brandalynn Armstrong (Zeroday) and Meg Seastedt (North Country) have invited me to State College for the Brewers of PA Symposium to speak about diversity and inclusion. It’s a three-day event for brewers and brewer-adjacent personnel to talk about brew stuff. I didn’t read the list of topics, but I

imagine they were very intriguing to the beer nerds like, Kettle Sour vs Kettle Corn, Hops: Who Needs ‘Em, and PA Reps and Brewers: What Do They Know? Do They Know Things? Let’s Find Out! Unfortunately, I arrive just in time to miss all of the great brew knowledge passed around during the first day of symposing. But, I managed to make it through several Pennsyltucky counties without getting pulled over, so there is much cause for celebration. I come equipped with a mix six of collabs that include Radical Triviale (Radical Trivia x Shubrew), Fresh Fest (Drinking Partners x Apis x Troegs), and Swig For The Fences (Tim Ross x Union Brothers). We gather in the lobby and trade beers, stories, and cards. The staff eventually asks us to keep it down. We try our best, but ultimately realize it’s futile. Someone suggests a whiskey bar. We’re not hard to convince. Sept. 6, Midnight: We move to a whiskey bar called Local Whiskey. It’s short for “We don’t serve any local whiskey.” Much like Mad Mex is short for “You’ll be Mad if you’re expecting

Mex.” I have only recently entered a tax bracket that can afford whiskey at home. I have yet to reach the $19/ shot of bar whiskey bourgeoisie. I find the cheapest glass of distilled mash I can find and throw a couple back, because regret is best served with Gatorade in the morning. Sept 6, 2 a.m.: Street meat sounds like a good idea. Sept. 6, 4 a.m.: I’m in a fourway argument outside of the hotel with three Euros about privilege in America. An after-after party of sorts. “I Don’t See Color,” is the preferred playlist, spun by DJ Whiz-Ki. I’m the old man across the street screaming, “Turn that shit down!” Sept. 6, 9 a.m.: Nope. Snooze. Sept. 6, 10:55 a.m.: Checkout is at 11, so I manage to brush my teeth and crawl to the lobby before they force me out. I’m way too old for this shit. I was supposed to attend a few of the discussions. Instead, I sit in the lobby and drink Gatorade while checking my bank account. Who thought whiskey was a good idea?! Sept. 6, 2:15 p.m.: I’m at a table in a very sterile conference room full of Euros with pens and pads. It feels like an auction. I’m joined at the table with Tim Harris (Harris Family Brew), John Stemler (Free Will Brew), & Brian Patchkoski (Penn State), with Jennifer McClendon and Meg Seastedt moderating. Tim is asked a loaded question and goes off on a tangent about dogs and babies, the most heated debate in all of craft beer. I’m lost at first, but then realize the extent at which

breweries and other establishments will go to show they’re welcoming to dogs and babies, but how uncomfortable Black people still feel there. “They keep dog treats at the desk of this hotel… and I recently saw a confederate flag at a brewery.” Brian is Director of the Center for Sexual and Gender Diversity. He expounds upon Tim’s thought as it applies to the LGBTQIA community and bathrooms, and touches on unconscious biases. John is the only straight white male at the table and is doing his best to rep the brand well. He speaks on his efforts to make his place more inclusive, the importance to emphasize that message to his team, how it trickles down to the patrons and affects the overall vibe of the brewery. If you’ve read this column long enough, you can guess what I nonsensically rambled about until I felt my time was up, rambled a bit more for good measure, and dropped a few F-bombs to make sure the people in the back heard me. Well worth the trip. Sept. 7, 7 p.m.: City Theatre is hosting their annual fundraiser, The Bash. They have a block blocked off, valet drivers, and some of the best-dressed people in the city attending. They’ve got food, booze, parades, plays, chocolate, comedy, art, and a parking lot DJ dance-off. I’ve never seen anything quite like it. Two things I learned that night: 1. You really need to go check out City Theatre this year. 2. No matter how fly you think you are, you will never outfly theatre gays. Snap snap, good sir. Snap snap, indeed.

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 33


FOOD

Matt Stanton (Photo: Gab Bonesso)

THIS TASTES FUNNY

PIZZA AT AIELLO'S AND MINEO'S WITH MATT STANTON BY GAB BONNESO - PITTSBURGH CURRENT COLUMNIST INFO@PITTSBURGHCURRENT.COM

M

att Stanton is sort of an enigma in the Pittsburgh Comedy scene. He has one of the coolest resumes, including working with Lewis Black, but you rarely see his name on any local lineups. Stanton has built a career living in different parts of the country and building connections with comedy clubs. He jokes, “I’m not a major city headliner, but if your city has an AA baseball team I’m your guy!” Stanton is currently based out of Squirell Hill, so when we discussed meeting up for a bite, I had an idea. Squirrel Hill houses two of the best pizza spots in Pittsburgh: Mineo’s and Ailello’s. They are certainly the two iconic spots that most Pittsburghers would argue are the best. They are both located on the same block and each pizzeria’s fans

are fiercely loyal. I asked Stanton if he had any interest in getting a slice at each spot and doing a fair comparison taste test. He agreed but also texted, “Mineo’s for life”. I have always identified as an Aiello’s girl. Years ago, I was introduced to Mineo’s and thought it was amazing. One day, I stepped into Aiello’s and tried their Ricotta and Meatball slice and my life was changed. I was hoping by the end of the interview Stanton would be an Aiello’s fan. We met at Mineo’s because I wanted Stanton to be in his element. He ordered two pepperoni slices and I went for one slice of pepperoni & mushroom. We picked a booth and started chatting. Stanton and his girlfriend recently moved back to Pittsburgh because she got a new job in the city.

34 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

They were living in San Diego, and Stanton was running an outdoor room that consistently brought 200300 audience members a month. I asked Stanton if his parents are supportive of his comedy and he told me that his mom is very supportive. His father, who suddenly passed away of a heart attack the day Stanton flew to San Diego, was proud, but not necessarily supportive. He told me a story. He was going to work with Lewis Black and his father was a huge fan of the Daily Show. Stanton was sure his Dad would be excited by this news, but he wasn’t. However, Stanton said that his stepmom recently told him that his father said that he was proud that Stanton still did what he wanted and that he wasn’t able to dash his hopes. “He told other people he was proud of me, just not me,” Stanton said. “I think he was concerned that I wouldn’t have a savings.” Our pizza shows up--three, piping-hot slices sat in front of us with molten-like cheese bubbling. We both grabbed a slice without thinking and started shoving the pizza into our faces. The cheese was burning the roof of my mouth, but it tasted so damn good I didn’t care. “See this is what people either love or hate about Mineos, but I love. It’s so greasy and it has extra cheese,” said Stanton. “I love that I can have grease on every part of the crust. It’s so good.” I had to agree. I haven’t eaten Mineo’s in over a decade and it was the best slice of pizza I’ve had in years. There was something so comforting about the hot grease that was pouring down my hand and the thick cheese that would eventually trigger my lactose intolerance. I completely regretted only ordering one slice, but I was counting on Aiello’s to knock it out of the park for me. I should note that because we ate our Mineo’s like honey-badgers,

I didn’t get a photo of it. However when I explained my dilemma to the staff of Mineos they made another piece of pizza for us to photograph, and then they gave it to us for free. Needless to say, the staff at Mineo’s goes above and beyond for their customers. We headed over to Aiello’s and Stanton was telling me more about his career and how he’s his own manager. We both shared horror stories about our experiences with agents/managers who demanded money from shows that they didn’t even book for us. Unlike a lot of comedians, Stanton doesn’t have a jealous or mean streak about him. I was telling him that I’ve only once ever sent a submission tape to a club and it worked out, I got to headline. I said, “I’m just not sure if that’s how you get gigs.” He replied, “Yes, That’s exactly how you do it.” He then proceeded to write down every club/ club manager that he personally knows and told me to reach out to those venues because he’d put a good word in for me. I’ve been doing this for 15 years and he’s the first person to ever share a club connection with me. Let alone, multiple clubs in multiple cities. He’s truly a nice guy, so when I asked where the people of Pittsburgh could see him LIVE, he explained that all of his upcoming shows are on the road. He doesn’t have a home club or home base in Pittsburgh at the moment. But he does run his own TRIVIA NIGHT company that he brings to a plethora of bars all over the city, and that cuts into him hitting up the open mic/showcase scene. In order to see Stanton perform in Pittsburgh, you’ll probably have to attend a fundraiser or private event that he’s headlining. I’d tell you to follow him on Twitter, but Stanton isn’t on there. He steers clear, but he is on


Facebook and Instagram and online at www.Stantonstantoncomedy.com. At Aiello’s, the staff delivers our pizza to the table, a perk that Mineo’s did not offer to us. However it did have double the customers that Aiello’s had. Stanton once again ordered a slice of pepperoni (this time just one slice) and I ordered another pepperoni/mushroom combo. Right away Stanton said, “See this what I don’t like. This extra part of

definitely sweeter. At this point, with disappointment in my tone, I had to concede defeat, “Yeah and it feels like there’s not nearly the amount of cheese and grease on this pizza. Like the sauce isn’t even all the way up the crust.” “That’s what I mean about the wasted crust at the top,” Stanton said. I confessed to Stanton that all morning prior to our meetup, I was imagining him turning to me and saying, “Thank you, Gab for

Matt Stanton (Photo: Gab Bonesso)

the crust it’s just not necessary and hard.” This time I remember to photograph the pizza before eating it. It wasn’t piping hot the way the slices at Mineo’s were so I was slightly disappointed at the start of the experience. I went to fold my slice of pizza (as one is want to do) and it cracked. The crust was so thin, almost flatbread-like, that it snapped. Stanton jumped at the opportunity to take a shot at my beloved Aiello’s, “The crust at Mineo’s is definitely softer and more delicious to me.” But I had to agree. Then Stanton said, “Do you notice that the sauce is sweeter at Aiello’s?” I had to once again agree with him, it was

introducing me to Aiello’s. It’s my new favorite pizza.” Unfortunately my daydream turned into an unforeseen nightmare when I said, “Thank you, Matt Mineos is the best pizza I’ve ever had. I’m a fan.” I guess after visiting two different pizza shops with Matt Stanton and conceding that he has a superior palate for pizza, I find him less of an enigma. I finally get it: he’s lived in more than six different metropolitan regions since he started doing stand up in the early 2000s, so it’s hard to identify him as a “Pittsburgh Comic”. Stanton is a successful, working comedian who currently happens to be based in Pittsburgh. He also knows a thing or two about pizza. PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 35


CBD IS ALL THE RAGE

ORGANICALLY DERIVED HEMP PRODUCTS FROM YOUR CBD STORE AND CBD SPECIALISTS Considering trying this plant-based trend for your health & overall well-being?? Thinking of managing stress and anxiety with a natural alternative like CBD? Why go to someone who doesn't specialize in CBD products? Look for this organically sourced Hemp product in Your CBD Store. Your CBD Store carries oil tinctures, water-soluble drops, edibles, topical pain creams, beauty products, vape selections and an organic pet line. Upscale Boutiques throughout the Pittsburgh area including Bridgeville, Bellevue, Bethel Park, and more. No Rx needed, all Credit Cards accepted.

Bridgeville. 510 Station St. Bellevue. 512 Lincoln Ave. Bethel Park. 4522 Library Road

Open 7 days a week

call

412-528-1733 for more info

PRESENT THIS A D IN STORES FOR 15% OFF! Coupon expires Sept. 30, 2019. Cannot be combined with another offer

*Only good at Bridgeville, Bellevue or Bethel Park locations

36 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT


FALL GUIDE

Fall Guide

INSIDE: ALL YOUR EVENTS

FOR THE FALL SEASON

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 37


FALL GUIDE

Amani Lewis Subjective Nature exhibit apart of The August Wilson African American Cultural Center (Current photo by Jake Mysliwczyk

EVENT OF THE SEASON

AUGUST WILSON AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTERTAKES CENTER STAGE WITH TWO VISUAL ARTS EXHIBITS BY NICK EUSTIS - PITTSBURGH CURRENT CONTRIBUTING WRITER INFO@PITTSBURGHCURRENT.COM

A

s artists, Ben Jones and Amani Lewis are at different stages in their

careers. At 78, Jones has been an artistic tour de force over his five-decade career. The recipient of two National Endowment for the Arts grants, among many other accolades, he is internationally lauded for his contributions to the arts. Jones has also made more than 90 trips to Cuba over his life, becoming a key connection between the American and Cuban art worlds. He is currently a Professor of Art at New Jersey City University. In contrast to the longevity of Jones’ career, Amani Lewis is, at 24, about to make their solo debut. Lewis is based in Baltimore,

Maryland, and graduated in 2016 from the Maryland Institute College of Art. But for three months this fall, the pair will have their work on display in two separate, highly anticipated exhibits at the August Wilson African American Cultural Center September 13, saw the opening of Resurgence - Rise Again: The Art of Ben Jones and Amani Lewis: Subjective Nature. Resurgence is a collection of eight large-scale works from the last decade of Jones’ career. The exhibition is his call to action for young people to rise up in opposition to authoritarian leaders and corrupt business practices. “The title of the show is ‘Resurgence’ because we need to

38 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

make sure the young people are paying attention and that the young people are organizing themselves to vote in this next election,” Jones says. The first works shown in the exhibition come from Jones’ “Wallpaper” series. As the name suggests, these works are created to resemble wallpaper, large in size and scale, and covered in repeating patterns. They demonstrate Jones’ prowess in multiple artistic media, combining painting, printing, and digital art techniques to create rich textures. “I started this wallpaper series because wallpaper is usually in the interior of homes,” Jones said. “Everyday, you have to go into your home, so you’re confronted by the things in your house.”

Jones’ wallpaper series takes the idea of being confronted by the things in your home to the political level. The image of the President appears in several of the works, as do logos of companies like BP, Shell, Taco Bell, and McDonald’s. These more literal images are juxtaposed against a variety of symbols, from Biblical imagery like the fish, representing life, as well as references to various African cultures, recalling humankind’s African origins. Printed poems are often also incorporated in these wallpaper works, creating multifaceted works that demand the attention of the viewer. “You find with classical music, with jazz, with classical theater, the different layers,” said Jones. “Layering is another way of getting deeper, not just passing by and glancing. You want to have a relationship with it.” Each work espouses a progressive message, and sometimes several messages simultaneously. Jones’ early wallpaper works promote protecting the Earth, incorporating poetry with environmental messages, as well as references to the Deepwater Horizon disaster, the

DEZ by Murjoni Merriweather (Current photo by Jake Mysliwczyk)


FALL GUIDE the humanity of their subjects, something the artist believes is often overlooked or erased by American society at large. “Subjective Nature” also shines a light on the work Lewis does with other artists. Lewis, alongside good friend and fellow artist Murjoni Merriweather, founded CLR’D, a collective of artists that focus on the experiences of people of color. A portion of “Subjective Nature” is dedicated to the work of artists in CLR’D. Featured prominently in this section is a series of six sculptures by Merriweather. Each sculpture is in the image of a black person from the neck up, most crafted from

ceramics. The standout of the series, “Braided Shawty,” is an image of a black woman constructed entirely of braided synthetic hair. “It’s a reflection about her upbringing, her mother braiding her hair,” Luckett said. Whether reflecting on childhood, friendship, hatred, or the Earth itself, the works of both Lewis and Jones are both specific and universal, straightforward but deeply complex, driven by a philosophy best summed up by Ben Jones and one of his favorite quotes. “Jayne Cortez wrote in a poem: ‘Find your own voice and use it, use your own voice and find it.”

Ben Jones explaining his artwork entitled The Big Picture (Current photo by Jake Mysliwczyk)

largest oil spill in American waters. Other works champion racial justice and heavily critique institutional brutality against people of color. His 2016 installation, titled “Trayvon Martin,” features dozens of photos of Martin, overlaid with painted symbols and pleas for justice in several languages. In front of the installation is a floor mat, with flowers on one side, guns on the other. This represents the artist’s question of whether America will choose peace over gun culture. The largest work of the exhibition is also Jones’ newest, making its first public appearance in Resurgence Rise Again. Titled “The Big Picture,” the work represents the myriad ways American culture and politics influence our day-to-day lives, but also implores the viewer to reflect and work toward solutions, particularly on humanity’s effect on the climate. “We’re bombarded by so many things, so you have to meditate, you have to reflect,” Jones said. Opening alongside Jones’ work is Amani Lewis: Subjective Nature, a mini-retrospective of Lewis’ work. There are echoes of Jones’

artistic style in Lewis’ work, particularly in their use of layering and combination of digital and traditional art skills. While Jones’ work places more emphasis on the traditional, Lewis showcases digital art through collage and photo manipulation techniques. “What is so unique about Amani’s work is their use of photography and digitizing and then printing it on canvas, but then also working that canvas,” said Kilolo Luckett, curator of visual arts at August Wilson Center. This combination of techniques is seen most prominently in Lewis’ newest series, eleven portraits of friends and family members, titled “Negroes in the Trees.” Each portrait is based on a photograph of the subject, manipulated in the digital realm, then printed on canvas and manipulated further, incorporating paint, glitter, even clothing. Lewis’ use of layering in “Negroes in the Trees” forces the viewer to linger on each painting, similar to Jones’ work, but towards different ends. While Jones uses layering to reveal connections between ideas, Lewis’ layering is meant to reveal

Guns vs flowers signifying peace apart of Trayvon Martin (Installation) (Current photo by Jake Mysliwczyk)

RESURGENCE - RISE AGAIN:

THE ART OF BEN JONES AND AMANI LEWIS: SUBJECTIVE NATUR” will run from September 13 to December 15. For more information, aacc-awc.org.

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 39


FALL GUIDE Gargaro Theater, East End. www. pittsburghmusicals.com Mystery Science Theater 3000. Sept. 28. Byham Theater, Downtown. www.trustarts.org

OCTOBER Tiger at the Gates Oct 3-12., Carnegie Mellon University. Purnell Center for the Arts, Oakland. www.drama. cmu.edu Not Medea. Oct 4-18. Off The Wall Productions, Carnegie.www.insideoffthewall.com/ Master Chef Junior Live! Oct. 6. Benedum Center, Downtown. www. trustarts.org Bianca Del Rio: It’s Jester Joke. Oct. 8. Byham Theater, Downtown. www. trustarts.org Bazaar: A Micr-immersive Carnival. Oct. 12. Bricolage, Downtown. www.bricolagepgh.com Cowboy. Oct 18-20. New Horizon Theater. Kelly Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. www.newhorizontheater.org/

Fall Guide

Stage and Performance

STAGE ONGOING

A Few Good Men. Through Oct. 13. Pittsburgh Public Theater. O’Reillly Theater, Downtown. www.ppt.org Enter the Imaginarium. Weekly, Wednesday-Sunday. Bricolage, Downtown. www.bricolagepgh.com. Gem of the Ocean. Through Sept. 22. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theater Company, 1839 Wylie Ave., Hill District. www.playwrights.org One-Man Star Wars Trilogy.

Through Sept. 29. Greer Cabaret Theater, Downtown. www.trustarts. com Pittsburgh New Works Festival. Program C, Sept. 19-28. Program D, Sept. 2-29. www.pittsbughnewworks. com

SEPTEMBER Cambodian Rock Band. Sept. 20-Oct. 6. City Theatre, South Side. citytheatrecompany.org Project Amelia. Sept. 20-Aug. 3. Bricolage, Downtown. www.bricolagepgh.org. (See story page ??)

The Lion King. Through Sept. 29. PNC Broadway in Pittsburgh Series, Benedum Center, Downtown. www. trustarts.org

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra Opening Weekend. Sept. 20-22. Heinz Hall, Downtown. www.pittsburghsymphony.org

True West. Through Sept. 29. barebones productions, Braddock. www. barebonesproductions.com

Evil Dead: The Musical. Pittsburgh Musical Theater. Sept 27-Oct 19.

40 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

RuPaul’s Drag Race: Werq the World. Oct. 12. Heinz Hall, Downtown. www.trustarts.org. Don Giovani. Oct. 12-20. Pittsburgh Opera. Benedum Center, Downtown. www.pittsburghopera.com Good Grief. Oct 18-27. Point Park University Conservatory. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Downtown. www.pittsburghplayhouse.com The Office: A Musical Parody. Oct. 18-19. Byham Theater, Downtown. www.trustarts.org. A Life Behind Bars. Oct 24-26. Off The Wall Productions, Carnegie. www.insideoffthewall.com/ Mean Girls. Oct 29-Nov. 3. PNC Broadway in Pittsburgh. Benedum Center, Downtown. www.trustarts.org Joseph & the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat Pittsburgh Musical


FALL GUIDE Theater. Oct 24-27. Byham Theater, Downtown. www.pittsburghmusicals.com

Or,. Nov. 14-23. Carnegie Mellon University. Purnell Center for the Arts, Oakland. www.drama.cmu.edu

Dec, 28. Byham Theater, Downtown. www.trustarts.org.

Sasha Velour's Smoke and Mirrors. Oct. 29. Byham Theater. www. druskyentertainment.com

Judy Moody and Stink. Nov. 1724. Children’s Theater Series. TBD. www.trustarts.org

Every Brilliant Thing. Dec. 5-21. Kinetic Theatre, immersive experience. Location TBD. www.kinetictheatre. org.

Forever Plaid. Oct. 31-Dec. 29. Pittsburgh CLO, Freer Cabaret Theater, Downtown. www.trustarts.org

Bronx Tale. Nov. 19-24. PNC Broadway in Pittsburgh. Benedum Center, Downtown. www.trustarts.org

NOVEMBER Baby Shark Live! Nov. 4. Byham Theater, Downtown. www.trustarts. org.

Up and Away. Nov. 23. Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.Heinz Hall, Downtown. www.pittsburghsymphony.org

The Woman in Black. Nov. 7-23. PICT Classic Theatre. WQED’s Fred Rogers Studio, Oakland. www.picttheatre.org

Les Miserables. Nov. 26-Dec. 1. PNC Broadway in Pittsburgh. Benedum Center, Downtown. www.trustarts. org

School Girls, or The African Mean Girls Play. Nov. 7-Dec. 8. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. www.ppt.org

The Santaland Diaries. Nov. 29-Dec. 22. City Theatre, South Side. www. citytheatrecompany.org

Disney Junior Holiday Party. Nov. 7, Heinz Hal, Downtown. www. trustarts.org Walk Two Moons. Nov. 8-9. EQT Bridge Theater Series. Byham Theater, Downtown. www.trustarts.org Darci Lynne & Friends: Fresh Out of the Box. Heinz Hall, Downtown. www.trustarts.org. The Mon Valley Medium. Nov. 8-9. Off The Wall Productions, Carnegie. www.insideoffthewall.com/

DECEMBER A Musical Christmas Carol. December 6-22. Pittsburgh CLO, Byham Theater, Downtown. www.trustarts. org

COMEDY/ VARIETY ONGOING

The Price is Right Live. Sept. 25. Heinz Hall, Downtown. www.trustarts.org Girls Gotta Eat. Sept. 25, Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall, Munhall. www.druskentertainment.com My Brother, My Brother and Me: Become the Monster Tour. Sept. 27. www.druskyentertainment.com

OCT

7

Adding Machine: A Musical. Dec 6-16. Point Park University Conservatory. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Downtown. www.pittsburghplayhouse.com PSO360: Holiday Brass Spectacular. Dec. 9. Pittsburgh Symphony. Heinz Hall, Downtown. www.pittsburghsymphony.com.

Much Ado About Nothing. Nov. 8-17. Point Park University Conservatory. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Downtown. www.pittsburghplayhouse.com

Sensory Friendly Concert: Holiday Pops. Dec. 21. Heinz Hall, Downtown. www.trustarts.org

One Night in Miami: Nov. 9-Dec. 1. City Theatre, South Side. www. citytheatrecompan.org.

Jesus Christ Superstar: Dec. 31-Jan. 5. PNC Broadway in Pittsburgh. Benedum Center, Downtown. www. trustarts.org

SEPTEMBER Orny Adams. Sept.20-22. Pittsburgh Improv, Waterfront. www.improv. com/pittsburgh

The Carols. Nov. 29-Dec 14. Off The Wall Productions, Carnegie.www. insideoffthewall.com

Shakespeare’s Will. Nov. 8-Dec. 1. Quantum Theatre, Location TBD. www.quantumtheatre.com

Florencia en el Amazonas. Nov. 9-17. Pittsburgh Opera. Benedum Center, Downtown. www.pittsburghopera.com

The Illusionists: Magic of the Holidays. Dec. 26-29. PNC Broadway in Pittsburgh. Benedum Center, Downtown. www.trustarts.org

Dennis Watkins in The Magic Parlour. Through Sept. 29. Liberty Magic, Downtown. www.trustarts.org Pittsburgh Improv Jam. Thursdays through Dec. 19. Greer Cabaret Theater, Downtown. www.trustarts.org

The Illusionists: Magic of the Holidays. Dec. 26-29. PNC Broadway in Pittsburgh. Benedum Center, Downtown. www.trustarts.org Highmark Holiday Pops. Dec. 13-22. Pittsburgh Symphony. Heinz Hall, Downtown. www.trustarts.org. A Charlie Brown Christmas Live.

Film director and author of The Perks of Being a Wallflower

Stephen Chbosky

7:00 pm, Carnegie Lecture Hall, Oakland Tickets $10 pittsburghlectures.org/tickets PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 41


FALL GUIDE T-Robe. Sept. 27-29. Pittsburgh Improv, Waterfront. www.improv.com/ pittsburgh Brett Hiker. Sept. 28. Burning Bridges Comedy Club, Lawrenceville. www.burningbridgescomedyclub. com Nate Bargatze: Good Problem to Have Tour. Sept. 28. Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall. Munhall. www.librarymusichall.com

OCTOBER The Pump and Dump Show: Parentally Incorrect. Oct. 1. Pittsburgh Improv, Waterfront. www.improv. com/pittsburgh Brendan Schaub. Oct. 3-5. Pittsburgh Improv, Waterfront. www. improv.com/pittsburgh Charlie Vergos. Oct. 5. Burning Bridges Comedy Club, Lawrenceville. www.burningbridgescomedyclub.com Mini Ladd Presents: Demonetized Tour with BigJiggly Panda. Oct. 6. Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall. Munhall. www.librarymusichall.com T.K. Kirkland. Oct. 11-13. Pittsburgh Improv, Waterfront. www.improv. com/pittsburgh That Golden Girls Show! A Puppet Parody. Oct. 11-12. Byham Theater, Downton. www.trustarts.org

NOVEMBER Eric Andre: Legalize Everything Tour. Nov. 2. Byham Theater, Downtown. www.trustart.org Tom Green. Nov. 8-10. Pittsburgh Improv, Waterfront. www.improv. com/pittsburgh Deon Cole. Nov. 15-17. Pittsburgh Improv, Waterfront. www.improv. com/pittsburgh Eddie B.: I’m Already Professionally Developed Tour. Nov. 16. Benedum Center, Downtown. www. tustarts.org. Robert Ramirez is The Musical Theater Magician. Nov. 27-Jan. 5, 2020. Liberty Magic, Downtown. www. trustarts.org Felipe Esparza. Nov. 30-Dec. 1. Pittsburgh Improv, Waterfront. www. improv.com/pittsburgh

DECEMBER D.L. Hughley. Dec. 6-8. Pittsburgh Improv, Waterfront. www.improv. com/pittsburgh Preacher Lawson. Dec. 13-15. Pittsburgh Improv, Waterfront. www. improv.com/pittsburgh Steve Byrne. Dec. 27-29. Pittsburgh Improv, Waterfront. www.improv. com/pittsburgh

DANCE

Kreeps With Kids Comedy Tour with Rich Vos and Jim Florentine. Oct.19. Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall. Munhall. www.librarymusichall.com

Dance in the District Gala w/MOMIX. Sept. 21-22. Byham Theater, 101 6th St., Downtown. trustarts.org

Lee Terbosic in The Life and Death of Harry Houdini. Oct. 23-Nov. 3. Liberty Magic, Downtown. www. trustarts.com

Time: Unbound. Exhalations Dance Theatre. Sept. 21-22. Charity Randall Theatre, 4301 Forbes Ave., North Oakland. exhalations.org/time

Marlon Wayans. Oct. 25-26. Pittsburgh Improv, Waterfront. www. improv.com/pittsburgh

Michiyaya Dance. Sept. 27. The Andy Warhol Museum, 117 Sandusky St., North Side.

Godfrey. Oct. 31-3. Pittsburgh Improv, Waterfront. www.improv.com/ pittsburgh

Olivier Tarpaga. Sept. 27-28. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. www.Kelly-strayhorn.org

SEPTEMBER

42 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

Beatles and Bach. Texture Contemporary Ballet. Sept. 27. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. newhazletttheater.org

Jameelah Platt & Lost Culture Dance Crew. Nov. 1. KST’s Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Ave., East Liberty. www.kelly-strayhorn.org

Bodiography Contemporary Ballet. Sept. 28. Butler County Community College, Succop Theater, 107 College Dr., Butler, PA. bc3.edu/campus/ butler/succop-theater

WIP Choreography Project. Nov. 2. Texture Contemporary Ballet. Carnegie Stage, 25 W. Main St., Carnegie, PA. textureballet.org

Texture Contemporary Ballet. Sept. 28-29. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. newhazletttheater.org

OCTOBER Cleo Parker Robinson Dance Ensemble. Oct. 4-5. August Wilson African American Cultural Center, 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. trustarts.org Nick Daniels/D.A.N.A. Movement Ensemble. Oct. 4-5. City Theatre Company, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. citytheatre.culturaldistrict.org Catapult: The Amazing Magic of Shadow and Dance. Oct. 10. Byham Theater, 101 6th St., Downtown. trustarts.org Contemporary Choreographers. Point Park University’s Conservatory Dance Company. Oct. 10-13. George Rowland White Performance Studio, 201 Wood St., Downtown. pittsburghplayhouse.com Tamburitzans. Oct. 12. East Allegheny Logan Middle School, 1154 Jacks Run Rd., North Versailles, PA. talentshadows.events The World as Know it. CorningWorks. Oct. 23-27. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. newhazletttheater.org. Giselle. Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. Oct. 26-27 Benedum Center for the Performing Arts, 237 7th St., Downtown. pbt.org

NOVEMBER The Get Down. Attack Theatre. Nov. 1. Spirit Hall, 242 51st St., Upper Lawrenceville. www.attacktheatre. com

ODC/Dance with the Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh. Nov. 6-9. Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, 328 Sixth Ave., Downtown. www.trustarts.org. Taj Express: The Bollywood Musical Revue. Nov. 6. Byham Theater, 101 6th St., Downtown. www.trustarts.org The Kitchen Sink. Nov. 15-17. Attack Theatre. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. www.newhazletttheater.org Multiplicity. Nov. 15-16 Bodiography Contemporary Ballet. Byham Theater, 101 6th St., Downtown. www.company.bodiography.com. Fall Student Choreography. Nov. 15-17. Point Park University’s Conservatory Dance Company. George Rowland White Performance Studio, 201 Wood St., Downtown. www. pittsburghplayhouse.com Performance on Screen: Ralph Lemon. Nov. 20. KST’s Alloy Studios, 5530 Penn Ave., East Liberty.www. kelly-strayhorn.org

LIT AND LECTURES Sept. 18 Made Local Reading: Angie Cruz, Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures, South Wing Reading Room Carnegie Library Main, Oakland. https://pittsburghlectures.org/ An Evening with Tim O'Brien, Heinz History Center, Strip District. https://www.heinzhistorycenter.org/ Sept. 19 CMU Speaker Series: Shannon


SATURDAY, AUGUST 15 PNC PARK GET TICKETS FRI. SEPTEMBER 20 AT 10AM | LIVENATION.COM | TICKETMASTER.COM

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 43


FALL GUIDE Gibney, Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. https://www.cmu.edu/uls/ An Evening with Pulitzer Prize Winner Peter Balakian, Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. https://www. penguinbookshop.com/ Sept. 20 Reading and Q&A: Tom Bennitt ('Burning Under') and Stewart O'Nan, White Whale Books, Bloomfield. www.whitewhalebookstore. com/ Reading: Karen Abbott, Riverstone Books, North Hills. /www.riverstonebookstore.com

tures, Carnegie Library Lecture Hall, Oakland. www.pittsburghlectures. org/

Reading: Joe Pan and James Sidel, White Whale Books, Bloomfield. www.whitewhalebookstore.com

Matesa and Sheryl St. Germain, Ace Hotel, East Liberty. www.facebook. com/events/745113055868141/

Reading and Signing: Michael Carroll, author of 'Stella Maris: And Other Key West Stories,' White Whale Books, Bloomfield. www. whitewhalebookstore.com/

Oct. 9 An Evening with Kathleen George, Mt. Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. https://www.mtlebanonlibrary. org/136/Programs-Events

Oct. 24 CMU Speaker Series: Sarah Valentine, Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. www.cmu.edu/uls/

United Black Book Clubs presents Bonita Lee Penn 'Every Morning a Foot Is Looking for My Neck' Book Launch, Carnegie Library, Homewood Branch. www.carnegielibrary. org/clp_location/homewood/

Sept. 21 Poetry Reading: Laser Cat Presents Lamb, Lin, Mercer & Pagano, White Whale Books, Bloomfield. www.whitewhalebookstore.com/

Oct. 1 Book Signing, Phil Bourque and Josh Yohe: 'If These Walls Could Talk: Stories from the Pittsburgh Penguins Ice, Locker Room, and Press Box,' Mystery Lovers Book, Oakmont. www.mysterylovers.com/

Sept. 22 Poetry Reading: Noah Blaustein, Steffan Triplett, Josh Corson, and Deena Nov.ember, White Whale Books, Bloomfield. www.whitewhalebookstore.com/

Oct. 2 Book Launch and Poetry Reading: Jason Baldinger, April Flynn, miss macross, and Daniel W. Wright, White Whale Books, Bloomfield. www.whitewhalebookstore.com/

Sept. 23 Ten Evenings Series: An Evening with Sigrid Nunez, Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures, Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. www.pittsburghlectures.org/

Nasty Slam, Poetry Slam, Spirit, Lawrenceville. /www.facebook.com/ events/2544090482474021/

Sept. 24 Story Time with Beth Ferry ('Stick and Stone'), White Whale Books, Bloomfield. www.whitewhalebookstore.com/ Sept. 26 Reading and Signing: Sarah Elaine Smith, Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. www.penguinbookshop.com/ CMU Lecture Series: Michelle Alexander, McConomy Auditorium, Cohon University Center, Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. www. cmu.edu/uls/ Sept. 27 Reading and Signing: Jonathan Van Ness, Pittsburgh Arts & Lec-

Oct. 4 Chapbook Release: Erinn Batykefer with Emily Mohn-Slate, White Whale Books, Bloomfield.www. whitewhalebookstore.com/ Oct. 6 Reading and Signing: Jewell Parker Rhodes, Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures, Carnegie Library Lecture Hall, Oakland.www.pittsburghlectures.org/ Oct. 7 Reading and Signing: Stephen Chbosky, Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures, Carnegie Library Lecture Hall, Oakland. www.pittsburghlectures.org/ Reading: Kate Wisel (Drue Heinz Winner), City of Asylum, Northside. www.cityofasylum.org/

44 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

Oct. 11 Book Launch: Stephanie Hohl, Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. www. penguinbookshop.com/ Oct. 14 Ten Evenings Series: An Evening with Ibram X. Kendi, Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures, Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. www.pittsburghlectures.org Oct. 15 Book Launch, Poetry: Laura Schulkind, Classic Lines, Squirrel Hill. /www.facebook.com/Classic-Lines-685643054851974/ Oct. 17 Reading and Signing: Julie Lythcott-Haims, Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures, Carnegie Lecture Hall, Oakland. https://pittsburghlectures. org/

Oct. 25 An Evening with Autumn House Press, Barrelhouse and The Rumpus, featuring Cameron Barnett, Lisa Factora-Borchers, Ben Gwin, Geeta Kothari, Monica Prince, Molly Spencer, and Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, White Whale Books, Bloomfield. www.whitewhalebookstore.com/ Oct. 26 Poetry Reading: Gretchen Primack and Jill Khoury, White Whale Books, Bloomfield. www.whitewhalebookstore.com/

We’re your sexual partner.

Reading: TRUTHSayers: April Ryan. Oct. 17. August Wilson Cultural Center, Downtown. www.aaccawc.org/ Reading, Signing and Discussion: 'If I Don't Make It, I Love You,' a Look Back at School Shootings, Riverstone Books, North Hills. www. riverstonebookstore.com/ Library Book Sale, Carnegie Library, West End. www.carnegielibrary.org/clp_location/west-end/ Oct. 22 Keystone Series: An Evening with Brian Lockman, Whitehall Public Library, Whitehall. www.whitehallpubliclibrary.org/ Oct. 23 Bridge Series: Ben Gwin, Jennifer

-Birth Control -STD & HIV Testing -Gynecological Care -Pregnancy Testing -Emergency Contraception -PrEP & HIV Prevention -Abortion Services & Counseling

Planned Parenthood of Western Pennsylvania

933 Liberty Ave. 1.800.230.PLAN www.ppwp.org @PPWPA


FALL GUIDE Oct. 27 Pittsburgh Zine Fair, Ace Hotel, East Liberty. www.facebook.com/ events/650268678825850/ Oct. 28 Ten Evenings Series: An Evening with Doris Kearns Goodwin, Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures, Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. www.pittsburghlectures.org/ Reading: Outside the Academy, Transatlantic Histories with Molly Warsh and Phillip Stelzel, City of Asylum, Northside. www.cityofasylum.org/ Oct. 29 Book Launch: 'The Face Tells the Secret' by Jane Bernstein, White Whale Books, Bloomfield. www. whitewhalebookstore.com/ Latinx & Proud! Series, featuring Denice Frohman, City of Asylum, Northside. www.cityofasylum.org/ An Evening with Sophie Perinot, Mt. Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. www.mtlebanonlibrary.org/136/ Programs-Events Nov. 1 Write Brave, Learning to Write with Courage, feat. Lainy Carslaw, Brittany Hailer & Anjali Sachdeva, Riverstone Books, North Hills. www. riverstonebookstore.com/ Nov. 3 Reading and signing: Grace Lin, Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures, Carnegie Library Lecture Hall, Oakland. www. pittsburghlectures.org/ Nov. 6 An Evening with Stewart O'Nan, Mt. Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. www.mtlebanonlibrary.org/136/ Programs-Events Made Local Reading: Frank Santoro, Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures, South Wing Reading Room Carnegie Library Main, Oakland. https://pittsburghlectures.org/ Poetry Reading: Keith Taylor, Jim

Marlon Wayans. Oct. 25-26 at the Pittsburgh Improv.

Daniels, Charlie Brice, & Judy Brice, White Whale Books, Bloomfield. http://whitewhalebookstore.com/ Nov. 7 A Nov.el Nov.ember with Anna Quindlen, Peters Township Public Library, McMurray. https://ptlibrary. org/ Nov. 9 Poetry Reading: Shawn Pavey, Karla Lamb, Kara Knickerbocker, Jason Baldinger, and Scott Silsbe, White Whale Books, Bloomfield. http://whitewhalebookstore.com/ Toi Derricotte: Writing the Difficult Poem Writing Workshop, KST's Alloy Studio, Friendship. https:// www.facebook.com/KSTs-Alloy-Studios-269132166603535/

Nov. 11 Ten Evenings Series: An Evening with Madeline Miller, Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures, Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. www.pittsburghlectures.org/ Nov. 14 Book Launch Party: Lori Jakiela (Belief Is Its Own Kind of Truth, Maybe) and Dave Newman (East Pittsburgh Down Low), brillobox, Lawrenceville. www.brilloboxpgh. com/ Nov. 15-16 Wordplay. Bricolage, Downtown. www.bricolagepgh.com Nov. 18 Reading: Maaza Mengiste, City of Asylum, Northside. www.cityofasylum.org/

Nov. 21 Meet the Authors and Tasting: The New Pie Cookbook, Riverstone Books, North Hills. https://www. riverstonebookstore.com/ Nov. 25 Ten Evenings Series: An Evening with Reza Aslan, Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures, Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. www.pittsburghlectures.org/ Dec 8 Annual Holiday Booksale featuring Independent Book Sellers and Dealers, Spirit, Lawrenceville. Dec 9 Ten Evenings Series: An Evening with Richard Powers, Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures, Carnegie Music Hall, Oakland. www.pittsburghlectures.org/

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 47


FALL GUIDE Earthgang

Dr. John Tribute. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www. roxianlive.com Calexico and Iron & Wine. Roxian Live, McKees Rocks. www.roxianlive. com Strange Ranger. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com Venom Prison, Homewrecker. Smiling Moose, South Side. www. druskyentertainment.com Kristin Hersh Electric Trio. Crafthouse Stage & Grill, Baldwin. www. druskyentertainment.com David Leonard. Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square. www.druskyentertainment.com Sept. 20 Lucy Dacus. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com The Beagle Brothers, Chris Rattie & The New Rebels. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www. roxianlive.com

Fall Guide Sept. 17 Charly Bliss. Spirit, Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com Sheena, Anika & Augusta. The Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. www. therobotoproject.com Billy Cobham's Crosswinds Project ft. Randy Brecker. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www. roxianlive.com Cross / Current Featuring: Max Leake, John Hall, Mark Lucas, & Timothy Woodruff. Agnes Katz Plaza, Downtown. www.trustarts.org

Music

Built To Spill, Prism Bitch, And And And. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com Sept. 18 Itsy bitsy, petit poucet. Dreamers. Rock Room, Polish Hill. Illenium. Stage AE, North Side. www. promowestlive.com STRFKR. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com The Gipsy Kings featuring Nicolas Reyes and Tonino Baliardo. Carnegie

48 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

Ryan Hoffman and the Pioneers. The Warhol Museum, North Side. www. warhol.org/series/soundseries/ Gov’t Mule. Roxian Live, McKees Rocks. www.roxianlive.com Warrant. Jergel’s, Wexford. www. druskyentertainment.com Sept. 20-21

of Homestead Music Hall, Homestead. www.druskyentertainment. com Low Cut Connie. The Rex Theater, South Side. www.druskyentertainment.com Sept. 19 Clowns, Latecomer, Fuck Yeah Dino-saurs, Sarlacc. Gooski’s, Polish Hill. Five Foot Arm. Spirit Lodge, Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com Slaughter Beach, Dog. Spirit Hall, Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com

Pitt Gets Alternative. Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. www.therobotoproject.com Sept. 20-22 Ladyfest Pittsburgh. The Shop, Lawrenceville. Sept. 21 Descendants of Crom III. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. www.cattivopgh.com Stone Temple Pilots, Rival Son. Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive. com


FALL GUIDE IRREAL, Living World, Speed Plans. Rock Room, Polish Hill. Slippery When Wet - The Ultimate Bon Jovi Tribute. Roxian Live, McKees Rocks. www.roxianlive.com Steel City Ska Fest. Spirit, Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com Holly Bowling. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www. roxianlive.com Rascal Flatts. KeyBank Pavilion, Bur-gettstown. www.livenation.com Nick Lowe’s Quality Rock & Roll Revue featuring Los Straitjackets. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www. mrsmalls.com Hepcat Dillema. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls, Millvale. www.mrsmalls. com High N Dry - A Tribute to Def Leppard. Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square. www.druskyentertainment. com

com

Crafthouse Stage & Grill, Baldwin. www.druskyentertainment.com

Sept. 26

Sept. 28

Matthew Mayfield. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com

Aldous Harding. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com

Kyle Daniel. Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square. www.druskyentertainment. com

Frankie Cosmos. Spirit Hall, Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com

Slingshot Dakota, Divided Heaven. The Government Center, North Side. www.facebook.com/dltsgdom/

Liliac. Crafthouse Stage & Grill, Baldwin. www.druskyentertainment. com

An Evening with Matthew and Gunnar Nelson. Jergels, Wexford. www. druskyentertainment.com Sept. 24 Proper., Mint Green, Baseball Dad. Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. www.therobotoproject.com Steady Sun, Bouquets, Maplewave. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www.roxianlive.com

Broadside. Crafthouse Stage & Grill, Baldwin. www.druskyentertainment. com

Tyler, The Creator, Jaden Smith, GoldLink. Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive.com

Northern Gloom. Black Forge Coffee II, McKees Rocks. www.blackforgecoffee.com Telehope. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com

Blanck Mass, Helm. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com

Craig Finn & The Uptown Controllers. Club Cafe, South Side. www. clubcafelive.com

Roger Humphries, RH Factor. Agnes Katz Plaza, Downtown. www.trus-tarts.org

CeCe Winans. Part of the Highmark Blues and Heritage Festival. Sept. 20. August Wilson African American Cultural Center. www.aacc-awc.org

Mike Adams At His Honest Weight. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www. mrsmalls.com

Oso Oso, The Sidekicks, Future Teens, Brightside. Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. www.therobotoproject.com Brantley Gilbert. KeyBank Pavilion, Burgettstown. www.livenation.com Bastille, Joywave. Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive.com Rose of the West. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls, Millvale. www.mrsmalls. com

Black Violin. Byham Theater, Downtown. www.trustarts.org Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad with Brahctopus. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www. roxianlive.com

Becca Mancari. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com

Sept. 22 Charles Musselwhite. Part of the Highmark Blues and Heritage Festival. Sept. 20. August Wilson African American Cultural Center. www. aacc-awc.org

Wingtips., Bring Her, Ky Voss. Spirit Lodge, Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com

Agnostic Front. Crafthouse Stage & Grill, Baldwin. www.druskyentertainment.com

Whitney. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com Cruces, Rave Ami, Side Sleeper. Bab-yland, Oakland. Peace Talks, Killer of Sheep, Living World. Rock Room, Polish Hill. Sept. 27

Kitchen Dwellers, Tenth Mountain Division. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www. roxianlive.com Streetlight Manifesto. Roxian Live, McKees Rocks. www.roxianlive.com Graveyard, Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com Sept. 29 Sebastian Bach. Jergels, Wexford. www.druskyentertainment.com Year of October, Ugly Blondes, Daisy Chain. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www.roxianlive. com Girih Heron, Fuzznaut, Trvss. Black Forge Coffee II, McKees Rocks. www. blackforgecoffee.com Thom Yorke. Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive.com DeVotchKa, The Joy Formidable. Mr. Smalls, Millvale. www.promowestlive.com Adam Ezra. Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square. www.druskyentertainment. com

Sept. 25

Southern Culture on the Skids. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www.roxianlive.com

Western Centuries. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www.roxianlive.com

flor, joan, lostboycrow. Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive. com

Cerebral Rot, Fetid, Cell. Black Forge Coffee II, McKees Rocks. www.black-forgecoffee.com

Shawn James. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com

Toby Keith. Highmark Stadium, Station Square. www.druskyentertainment.com

Oct. 1

The Blasters. Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square. www.druskyentertainment. com Michale. Crafthouse Stage & Grill. www.druskyentertainment.com Justin Townes Earle. Jergels, Wexford. www.druskyentertainment.

The Impurity. Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. www.therobotoproject. com Suck City, Choral Reef. Rock Room, Polish Hill. The Complete Sabbath Experience.

Sept. 30

The Midnight Hour. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com Sum 41. Roxian Live, McKees Rocks. www.roxianlive.com Jevon Rushton. Backstage Bar at Theater Square, Downtown. www. trustarts.org

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 49


FALL GUIDE Josh A, Jake Hill. Smiling Moose, South Side. www.druskyentertainment.com

Witt Lowry. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www.promowestlive.com

Oct. 8

Blue Clutch. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com

Byrne Bridges, Swampwalk, Big Baby. Government Center, North Side.

Oct. 2

MercyMe. PPG Paints Arena, Uptown. www.ppgpaintsarena.com

Avril Lavigne. Roxian Live, McKees Rocks. www.roxianlive.com

Phil Collins. PPG Paints Arena, Uptown. www.ppgpaintsarena.com

Minimum Wage Assassins. Rock Room, Polish Hill.

Remo Drive. Spirit, Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com

Oct. 5

Night Riots. Smiling Moose, South Side. www.druskyentertainment. com

Steve Hackett. Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall, Homestead. www. druskyentertainment.com

Elizabeth Moen. Smiling Moose, South Side. www.druskyentertainment.com Senses Fail. The Rex Theater, South Side. www.druskyentertainment. com

John-Allison “A.W.” Weiss. Mr. Robo-to Project, Bloomfield. www.thero-botoproject.com

Charlie Parr. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com

The Melvins. The Rex Theater, South Side. www.druskyentertainment. com

Dan Baird and Homemade Sin. Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square. www. druskyentertainment.com

All-Scene Entertainment Festival. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www. mrsmalls.com

Chariot Fade. Spirit, Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com

Theo Von: Dark Arts Tour. Roxian Live, McKees Rocks. www.roxianlive. com

Oct. 3 Roanoke. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com Defeater, Field Mouse, SOM, Shin Guard. Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. www.therobotoproject.com Ghost Hounds with Desmond Jones. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www.roxianlive.com Brent Cobb and Them. Mr. Smalls, Millvale. www.promowestlive.com Church of Cash. Crafthouse Stage & Grill, Baldwin. www.druskyentertainment.com Tyler Rich. Jergels, Wexford. www. druskyentertainment.com

An Evening with theCAUSE. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www.roxianlive.com Oct. 6 Smooth Hound. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com Four Chord Music Festival 6. Highmark Stadium, South Side. www. druskyentertainment.com Oct. 7 The Huntress. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com half•alive. Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive.com

Strung Out, The Casualities. Crafthouse Stage & Grill, Baldwin. www. druskyentertainment.com Noël Quintana & The Latin Crew. Backstage Bar at Theater Square, Downtown. www.trustarts.org The Distillers, Death Valley Girls. Mr. Smalls, Millvale. www.promowestlive.com Oct. 9 Ever Ending Kicks, Rue, Tyler Heav-en. The Government Center, North Side. Tiger Army, SADGIRL, Kate Clover. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www. mrsmalls.com Operators. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com Slaughter to Prevail. Crafthouse Stage & Grill. www.druskyentertainment.com Roosevelt Collier Band, Electric Kif. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www.roxianlive.com Jesse Cook. Byham Theater, Downtown. www.trustarts.org

Oct. 4

Warbringer, Enforcer. Cattivo, South Side. www.druskyentertainment. com

Red Elvises. Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square. www.druskyentertainment. com

Nana Grizol, Lee Bains III. Mr. Robo-to Project, Bloomfield. www.thero-botoproject.com

Zedd, Jax Jones, NOTD. Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive. com

The Ghost of Paul Revere, Ferdinand The Bull. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www. roxianlive.com

Mike Watt. Spirit, Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com

Moonchild. Spirit, Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com

50 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

Hugh Jackman. PPG Paints Arena, Uptown. www.promowestlive.com

Oct. 10

Mother Feather. Spirit, Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com Bonerama. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www. roxianlive.com George Thorogood & The Destroyers. The Palace, Greensburg. www. druskyentertainment.com Chase Rice. Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive.com Less Than Jake, Bowling For Soup. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www. mrsmalls.com The Burning Hell, The Wreckids. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com Bumblefoot. Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square. www.druskyentertainment. com Oct. 11 The Zells. Howler’s, Bloomfield. www.howlerspittsburgh.com Arielle. Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square. www.druskyentertainment. com Meeting of Important People, Jenn Wertz Band. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www. roxianlive.com Bass Nation Presents: Bear Grillz. Roxian Live, McKees Rocks. www. roxianlive.com Swiss Army, Jack Swing, Hearken. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com The Chainsmokers. PPG Paints Are-na, Uptown. www.ppgpaintsarena. com Oct. 12 HarptoberFest. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com Sinkane, Con Brio. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www. roxianlive.com Helado Negro. The Museum, North www.warhol.org/series/

Warhol Side.


FALL GUIDE sound-series/ Oliver Tree. Roxian Live, McKees Rocks. www.roxianlive.com Dark Star Orchestra. Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive.com Carrie Underwood. PPG Paints Arena, Uptown. www.ppgpaintsarena. com Country For a Cure featuring Dawn Savage. Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square. www.druskyentertainment. com Frank Foster. Jergels, Wexford. www. druskyentertainment.com

Ballyhoo! Crafthouse Stage & Grill, Baldwin. www.druskyentertainment. com Oct. 17 Mudhoney, Monkey Birds, The gotobeds. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com The Minks, Murder For Girls. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls. www.mrsmalls.com Late Night Radio. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www. roxianlive.com

Oct. 13

Bob Seger and the Silver Bullet Band. PPG Paints Arena, Uptown. www. ppgpaintsarena.com

Jinjer. Crafthouse Stage & Grill, Baldwin. www.druskyentertainment.com

Rich Aucoin. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com

Oct. 14

Hoodie Allen. Foxtail, South Side. www.druskyentertainment.com

Karmic Juggernaut. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www.roxianlive.com

Tom Keifer. Jergel’s, Wexford. www. druskyentertainment.com

Oct. 15

Oct. 17-18

The Hussy, Silver Car Crash. Rock Room, Polish Hill.

Brittney Chantele. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. www.newhazletttheater.org/

Sunseeker. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com

Oct. 18

Mr. Twin Sister. Spirit, Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com

Joey Harkum Band, Keystone Vibe. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www.roxianlive.com

Claudio Simonetti’s Goblin. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com

Matt and Kim, Beach Goons. Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive. com

Chris Bullock Boomtown. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www.roxianlive.com

The Wonder Years. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com

Jeff Bush Quartet. Backstage Bar at Theater Square, Downtwon. www. trustarts.org Oct. 16 The Bros. Landreth. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www.roxianlive.com Ingested. Smiling Moose, South Side. www.druskyentertainment.com

Stiff Little Fingers. Jergels, Wexford. www.druskyentertainment.com Oct. 19 Immortal Technique. Foxtail, South Side. www.druskyentertainment. com

Silence Follows. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls. www.mrsmalls.com Donnie Iris & The Cruisers. Jergels, Wexford. www.druskyentertainment. com Oct. 20 San Fermin. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www. roxianlive.com Natasha Bedingfield. Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall, Homestead. www.druskyentertainment.com Candlebox. Roxian Live, McKees Rocks. www.roxianlive.com 3 Years Hollow, Madame Mayhem. Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square. www.druskyentertainment.com Trash Boat. Crafthouse Stage & Grill, Baldwin. www.druskyentertainment.

com Daughtry. The Palace Theatre, Greensburg. www.druskyentertainment.com Kelsey Waldon. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. www.druskyentertainment.com Swervedriver. Spirit, Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com Slaughter. Jergels, Wexford. www. druskyentertainment.com Oct. 21 FatLip, SlimKid3. Foxtail, South Side. www.druskyentertainment.com Oct. 22 Earthgang. Spirit, Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com Funky Fly Project. Backstage Bar at Theater Square, Downtown. www. trustarts.org

SEPT. 19TH

MEET ADULT FILM STAR & SEX PODCAST HOST MICHELE JAMES: 7:00-9:00 PM

SEPT. 28TH

SEPT. 26TH

PITTSBURGH ZINE FIAR 2019 WARM-UP PARTY WITH JELLYFISH: 10:00 PM

Mr./Ms. Pittsburgh Leather Pride Contest: www.PGHLPW.com. 9:00 PM

Check out our NEW website for all upcoming events and daily specials: www.PTownBarPGH.com.

!!!. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www.roxianlive.com Kevin Gates. Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive.com

4740 BAUM BLVD, PITTSBURGH PA 15213

PTownBarPGH.com.

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 51


FALL GUIDE Yung Bae. Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive.com

Andy Grammar. Roxian Live, McKees Rocks. www.roxianlive.com

Peaer. Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. www.therobotoproject.com

Cheerly Men, Smokey Bellows The Nerd Herders. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com

Oct. 23 Elephant Wrecking Ball. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com

Oct. 26

Missio, The Score. Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive.com

Hellbender Ball. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www. roxianlive.com

Rosie Tucker. Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. www.therobotoproject. com

Sleater-Kinney, Shamir. Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive. com

Taylor Hicks. Jergels, Wexford. www. druskyentertainment.com

BJ The Chicago Kid. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com

Stewart Copeland. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com

Mystery Skulls. Smiling Moose, South Side. www.druskyentertainment.com

Interval Jazz. Spirit, Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com Oct. 24 Pleasurekraft. Spirit, Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com The Rainbow Ends. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www.roxianlive.com Kip Moore. The Palace Theatre, Greensburg. www.druskyentertainment.com Oct. 25 Coco Montoya. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www. roxianlive.com

Dance is not a spectator sport.

Oct. 27 Bob Lanzetti. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www. roxianlive.com Twiztid. Crafthouse Stage & Grill, Baldwin. www.druskyentertainment. com Oct. 28 Wolf Eyes. Black Forge Coffee II, McKees Rocks. www.blackforgecoffee.com Futuristic. Smiling Moose, South Side. www.druskyentertainment. com

Starcrawler. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com Atreyu, Whitechapel, He Is Legend. Mr. Smalls, Millvale. www.promowestlive.com Oct. 29 UFO. Jergels, Wexford. www.druskyentertainment.com Cliff Barnes. Backstage Bar at Theater Square, Downtown. www. trustarts.org Oct. 30 Mt. Joy. Roxian Live, McKees Rocks. www.roxianlive.com A Tuba to Cuba: The Preservation Hall Jazz Band with Yusa and Special Guests. Byham Theater, Downtown. www.trustarts.org Knocked Loose, Stick To Your Guns, Seeyouspacecowboy. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www.mrsmalls. com Oct. 31 Infected Mushroom. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www.roxianlive.com Vixen. Jergels, Wexford. www. druskyentertainment.com Misaligned Mind’s Monster Mash. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com Nov. 1

THE GET

52 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

GRYFFIN. Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive.com Icon For Hire. Smiling Moose, South Side. www.druskyentertainment. com Nov. 2 Wreck Loose. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www. roxianlive.com Badflower. The Rex Theater, South Side. www.druskyentertainment. com Blue Oyster Cult. Jergels, Wexford. www.druskyentertainment.com The Japanese House. Spirit, Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com Nov. 3 The Obsessives, Jelani Sei. Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. www.therobotoproject.com Nov. 4 Little Steven and the Disciples of Soul. Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall. www.druskyentertainment. com Nov. 5 Marcia Ball. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com

THE KITCHEN

SINK

DOWN

NOV 1 | SPIRIT HALL

Joshua Radin & The Weepies. Roxian Live, McKees Rocks. www.roxianlive. com

attacktheatre.com

Wash your hands of the same old song and dance.

NOV 15-17 | NEW HAZLETT THEATER


FALL GUIDE Justine Stone. Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive.com Ryan Bingham. Roxian Live, McKees Rocks. www.roxianlive.com DTC Organ Trio Featuring: David Throckmorton, Cliff Barnes and Dan Wilson. Backstage Bar at Theater Square, Downtown. www.trustarts. org Nov. 5-6 Anna Azizzy - The Secret Life of Gym Girls. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. newhazletttheater.org/ Nov. 6 Wilco. Heinz Hall for the Performing Arts, Downtown. www.promowestlive.com Marco Benevento. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com Aaron Lewis. The Palace Theatre, Greensburg. www.druskyentertainment.com Kung Fu. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www. roxianlive.com Taj Express: The Bollywood Musical Revue. Byham Theater, Downtown. www.trustarts.org Nov. 7 A$AP Ferg, Murda Beatz, MadeinTYO. Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive.com The Black Keys. PPG Paints Arena, Uptown. www.ppgpaintsarena.com L.A. Guns. Jergel’s, Wexford. www. druskyentertainment.com Dax. Foxtail, South Side. www. druskyentertainment.com Nov. 8 David Allan Coe. Jergels, Wexford. www.druskyentertainment.com The Neighbourhood, Slow Hollows. Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive.com The Devil Wears Prada, Norma Jean,

nana grizol, Oct. 22, Roboto

Gideon. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com Jakob’s Ferry Stragglers. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls, Millvale. www. mrsmalls.com Puddles Pity Party. Carnegi of Homestead Music Hall, Homestead. www.druskyentertainment.com TOOL. PPG Paints Arena, Uptown. www.ppgpaintsarena.com

JJ Wilde. The Smiling Moose, South Side. www.livenation.com Nov. 10

Palehound. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com

Bob Dylan and His Band. UPMC Events Center, Moon. www.promowestlive.com

Elton John. PPG Paints Arena, Uptown. www.ppgpaintsarena.com

Nov. 11

Gus Dapperton. Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive.com

Anna Tivel, Maya Devitry. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com

Joanne Shaw Taylor. Jergels, Wexford. www.druskyentertainment. com

Nov. 9 AHI. Cattivo, Lawrenceville. www. druskyentertainment.com The Commonheart. Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive.com Jenna Nicholls. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com

Nov. 13

Nov. 12 Fruit Bats. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com Yoko Suzuki Trio. Backstage Bar at Theater Square, Downtown. www. trustarts.org

Nov. 14 Bit Brigade. Spirit, Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com Kate Davis. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 53


FALL GUIDE Nov. 15

Bloomfield. www.therobotoproject. com

Dec. 7

Nov. 20

The Marcus King Band. Mr. Smalls, Millvale. www.promowestlive.com

Jeffrey Gaines. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com

Gramatik. Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive.com

Dec. 8

North Mississippi Allstars. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www.mrsmalls. com

Cory Branan. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com

Dreamers. Spirit, Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com

Kore Rozzik, Chip & the Charge Ups. The Funhouse at Mr. Smalls. www. mrsmalls.com Nov. 16 Arlo Guthrie. Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall, Homestead. www. druskyentertainment.com The Small Glories. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com Rising Appalachia, Raye Zaragoza. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www. mrsmalls.com Lisa Prank. Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. www.therobotoproject. com

Nobunny. Rock Room, Polish Hill.

Common Holly. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com

Palehound

Dec. 9

Nov. 22

Turnover, Men I Trust, Renata Zeiguer. Mr. Smalls, Millvale. www. promowestlive.com

Nobunny. Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. www.therobotoproject. com Nov. 23 Moon Hooch. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com Axioma, Varaha, Mevrimna. Black Forge Coffee II, McKees Rocks. www. blackforgecoffee.com Luke Combs. PPG Paints Arena, Uptown. www.promowestlive.com

Dec. 10 The Menzingers. The Roxian Theatre, McKees Rox. www.roxianlive.com Summer Walker. Stage AE, North Side. www.promowestlive.com Dec. 3 Our Last Night. The Rex Theater, South Side. www.livenation.com

Nov. 17

Nov. 24

This Will Destroy You. Spirit, Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com

Livingston Taylor. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com

Kenia. Backstage Bar at Theater Square, Downtown. www.trustarts. org

Doobie. Stage AE, North Side. www. promowestlive.com

Nov. 25

Dec. 4

Nick Fradiani. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com

Barnes Gordy Walsh Trio. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com

Nov. 26

Dec. 5

Tiny Moving Parts. The Rex Theater, South Side. www.livenation.com

Pile, Calyx. Mr. Roboto Project, Bloomfield. www.therobotoproject. com

Dwayne Dolphin. Backstage Bar at Theater Square, Downtown. www. trustarts.org

Bailen, Hailey Knox. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com

Nov. 18 The Hu. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com Miss Tess & The Talkbacks, The Armadillos. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com Nov. 19 La Dispute, Touche Amore, Empath. The Rex Theater, South Side. www. druskyentertainment.com Tony DePaolis. Backstage Bar at Theater Square, Downtown. www. trustarts.org

Nov. 27 As I Lay Dying, After the Burial, Emmure. Roxian Theatre, McKees Rocks. www.roxianlive.com Nov. 29

Jimbo Mathus. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com

Sun King Warriors. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com

Bethlehem Steel. Mr. Roboto Project,

Nov. 30

54 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

The Stolen. Smiling Moose, South Side. www.druskyentertainment. com

Aaron Carter. Hard Rock Cafe, Station Square. www.druskyentertainment.com Dec. 6

Anton DeFade. Backstage Bar at Theater Square, Downtown. www. trustarts.org Reverend Horton Heat. Jergels, Wexford. www.druskyentertainment. com Dec. 11 J. Robbins. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com Dec. 12 The Get Up Kids. The Rex Theater, South Side. www.druskyentertainment.com The Other Favorites. Black Forge Coffee II, McKees Rocks. www.blackforgecoffee.com Dec. 13 Herbivore. Club Cafe, South Side. www.clubcafelive.com Dec. 14 Kix. Jergels, Wexford. www.druskyentertainment.com Dec. 17.

The Batushka. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com

New Politics, Plain White T’s, The Mowgli’s. Mr. Smalls Theatre, Millvale. www.mrsmalls.com

Cashmere Cat. The Rex Theater, South Side. www.druskyentertainment.com

Tim Reynolds. Thunderbird Cafe and Music Hall, Lawrenceville. www. roxianlive.com


FALL GUIDE lery.net

Phantom Fright Nights at Kennywood

Forum 82: The works of Margaret Honda. Sept. 20-Jan. 26, 2020 Carnegie Museum of Art.. www.cmoa.org. Boat Trip. Sept. 27-Dec. 31. Wood Street Galleries. www.woodstreetgalleries.org.

October As The World Falls Down. Fantasy art inspired by the film, The Labyrinth. Oct. 4-26. Panza Gallery, Millvale. www.panzagaller.com The Salvation of Art: Pittsburgh By Pittsburgh Artists. Celebrating the Irma Freeman Center for Imagination’s 10th Anniversary. Oct 4-Nov.10. www.irmafreeman.org. Mummies of the World. Oct. 5-April 19, 2020 Andy Warhol: Revelation. Oct. 20-February 16,2020.

Out and About A Taste in Dormont. Sept. 21. 1801 Dormont Ave., Dormont. www.boro. dormont.pa.us/event/a-taste-indormont/

Fall Guide

Bedner's Fall Fest. Sept. 21. - Oct 27. 315 Coleman Rd., McDonald. www.facebook.com/ events/969405400074454/

Etc

Visual Arts and Exhibitions Ongoing A Pittsburgh Anthology. Celebrating Stories of Creative Life in Pittsburgh, Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland.. www.cmoa.org Iconic: The Photographs of Charles “Teenie” Harris. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. www.cmoa.org Influencers: The Pritzker Architecture Prize. Through Oct. 20. Carnegie Museum of Art. www.cm, Oaklandoa.org Salvador Di Quinzio: Saltimban-

ques et comedien. Through Oct. 4. Boxheart The Warhol’s Collection Crossroads: Carnegie Museum of Art’s Collection, 1945 to Now. Through Nov. 21, 2021.Carnegie Museum of Art. www.cmoa.org

Hartwood Acres Hay Day. Sept. 21. 4000 Middle Road, Allison Park. www.facebook.com/ events/626653497827035/ The Chelsea Girls Exploded. Through Jan. 12, 2020. Andy Warhol Museum. www.warhol.org

Hike in Fall Run Park. 187 Falls Run Trail, Glenshaw. www.alltrails.com/ trail/us/pennsylvania/fall-run-trail

Unblurred Art Exhibition. First Fridays of every month. Boom Concepts. www.boomuniverse.co

Hike in Frick Park. 1981 Beechwood Boulevard, Regent Square. www.alltrails.com/parks/us/pennsylvania/ frick-park

Fine Print: An Exhibit by PULLPROOF Studio. Through Sept. 29. 707 Gallery, Downtown. www.trustarts. org.

Selena Hurst: Welcome Home. Through Oct. 26. Silver Eye, Garfield. www.silvereye.org

Created, Collected Conserved: The Life Stories of Paintings. Carnegie Museum of Art. www.cmoa.org

Pretty Ugly. Sept. 20-Nov. 2. James Gallery, West End. www.jamesgal-

September

Hike in Riverview Park. 159 Riverview Ave., Pittsburgh. www.pittsburghparks.org/riverview-park Historic Deutschtown House Tour. Sept. 29. 415 East Ohio Street, Pittsburgh. www.facebook.com/

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 55


events/325595741717981/ Iron Mills Farmstead. Sept. 14 - Nov. 3. 252 Greenfield Rd., New Wilmington. www.ironsmillfarmstead.com Pennies From Heaven Oktoberfest. Sept. 28. 465 Knob Road, Wexford. penniesfromheavenpittsburgh.org/ events/ Pittsburgh Hard Cider and Doughnut Fest. Oct. 5. 1831 East Carson Street, Southside. www.facebook. com/events/888135468229560/ Pittsburgh Monster Pumpkin Festival. Oct. 19-20. The Great Lawn at the North Shore, Pittsburgh. www.facebook.com/ events/2401992133382462/ Soergel Orchards Fall Festival. Weekends Sept. 21 - Oct. 27. 2573 Brandt School Road, Wexford. www.facebook.com/ events/509657959782999/ Steel City Big Pour. Sept. 28. 214 North Lexington Street, Pittsburgh. www.cjreuse.org/bigpour/

Castle Blood: Halloween Adventure Tour. Weekends in Oct. 100 Schoonmaker Ave. Monessen. www. castleblood.com Cheeseman Fright Farm. Weekends Sept 20-Oct 27. 147 Kennedy Road, Portersville. www.Cheesemanfrightfarm.com Demon House. Weekends Sept. - Nov. 3. 417 Coyle Curtain Road, Monongahela. www.demonhouse. com Haunted Double Decker Bus Tours. Weekends in Oct. 445 27th Street, SouthSide. www.pghtours.com/ haunted-tours Haunted Hills Hayride and The Valley Of Darkness. Weekends Sept. 20 - Nov. 2. 500 Mosside Blvd., North Versailles. www.hauntedhillshayride.com/ Haunted Mini Golf. Sept. 7-Nov 2. 2142 Brodhead Road, Aliquippa. www.hopewellwindmill.com/haunted-mini-golf/

Stroll the Strip. Oct. 5. 2350 Railroad St., Strip District. www.facebook. com/events/395129271100855/

Hundred Acres Manor. Weekends in Sept. Most days Oct. - Nov. 9. 1 Hundred Acre Drive, Bethel Park. www. hundredacresmanor.com

Trax Farms Friday Evening Hayrides. Sept. 21 - Oct. 25. 528 Trax Road, Finleyville. www.facebook.com/ events/526786678092665/

Lonesome Valley Farms: Valley of Terror. Weekends Sept 27 - Oct 27. Blue Ribbon Lane, Greensburg. www.lonesomevalleyfarms.com

Triple B Farms Fall Festival. Weekends Sept. 21. - Oct. 27. 823 Berry Ln. Monongahela. www.facebook.com/ events/387221948627833/

Phantom Fright Nights. Weekends Sept. 27 - Oct. 27. 4800 Kennywood Blvd., West Mifflin. www.kennywood.com/

ZooBoo at the Pittsburgh Zoo. Oct. 19 - 20, 26 - 27. 7370 Baker Street, Pittsburgh. www.pittsburghzoo.org/ event-zooboo/

Scarehouse: Scream District. Oct. 3-Nov. 3. 2420 Penn Ave., Strip District. www.scarehouse.com

Halloween Allen's Haunted Hayride and Tavern of Terror. Weekends in Oct. 2430 Pittsburgh Road, Smock. www.allenshayrides.com Bump in the Night - Frick Park. Oct. 18-19, 25-26. 2005 Beechwood Blvd., Regent Square. www.pittsburghparks.org/bump

The Trail of Terror. Oct. 11-12, 1819, 25-16. Carnegie Park, Carnegie. www.facebook.com/PghTrailOfTerror Zombies of the Corn. Weekends Sept. 27- Nov. 2. 282 Rochester Road, Freedom. www.zombiesofthecorn. com

56 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT


Current Comics Rob Jones

SYNONYM RAISIN

18 | OCT. 23, 2018 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

by Andrew Schubert


ANDREA SHOCKLING

Phineus: Teen Wizard

By Barry Linck

© Barry Linck phinmagic.net

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | OCT. 23, 2018 | 19


Heroineburgh By H-Burgh and Zeus

Sucks to Be an Animal

By Sienna Cittadino

CARTOONISTS CARTOONISTS WANTED WANTED pittsburgh current is looking for local artists who would like to have their comics featured on our twice-monthly funny pages.

20 | OCT. 23, 2018 | PITTSBURGH CURRENTemail: charlie@pittsburghcurrent.com


Best in Show

By Phil Juliano

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | OCT. 23, 2018 | 21


PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 57


EXTRA Savage Love BY DAN SAVAGE MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET

My son has always liked handcuffs and tying people up as a form of play. He is 12 now, and the delight he finds in cuffing has not faded along with his love of Legos. He lobbied hard to be allowed to buy a hefty pair of handcuffs. We cautioned him strongly about consent—he has a younger brother—and he has been good about it. In the last year, though, I found out that he is cuffing himself while alone in the house—and when discovered, he becomes embarrassed and insists it’s a joke. I found him asleep one night with his wrists cuffed. I removed the cuffs and spoke to him the next morning about safety. Then recently, when returning home late, I saw him (through his window, from the back of the house) naked and cuffed with a leather belt around his waist, which seemed attached to the cuffs. This escalation was scarier. I haven’t spoken to him about it. My concern about the bondage stuff is that there are some risks (like escaping a fire), particularly if he gets more adventurous (restricting breathing, etc.). This is something he is doing secretly and alone. He is a smart kid, an athlete, and a fairly conscientious scholar. He has friends but sometimes feels lonely. He is going through puberty with its attendant madness— defiance, surliness, etc.—but he is also very loving and kind. He is also quite boastful, which I interpret as insecurity. I can’t help feeling that this bondage stuff is related to these issues, and I worry about self-esteem and self-loathing. We are considering getting him some help. Any advice for us? Completely Understandable Fears For Son

When a concerned parent reaches out to an advice columnist with a question like yours, CUFFS, the columnist is supposed to call in the child psychologists. But I thought it might be more interesting—I actually thought it might be more helpful—if I shared your letter with a different class of experts: adult men who were tying themselves up when they were 12 years old. “This boy sounds a lot like how I was at his age,” said James “Jimmy” Woelfel, a bondage porn star with a huge online following. “I want to reassure CUFFS that the discovery of things like this, even at a young age, is extremely common. We may not know why we like this stuff at the time, we just know we do.” Jimmy is correct: Many adults who are into bondage, heavy or otherwise, became aware of their bondage kinks at a very early age. “The vast majority of BDSM practitioners report that their sexual interests developed relatively early in life, specifically before the age of 25,” Dr. Justin Lehmiller wrote in a recent post on his invaluable Sex and Psychology blog. “Further, a minority of these folks (7–12% across studies) report that their interests actually developed around the time of puberty (ages 10–12), which is when other traditional aspects of sexual orientation develop (e.g., attraction based on sex/gender).” While an obsession with handcuffs at age 6 isn’t proof a kid is going to grow up with an erotic interest in bondage—lots of kids like to play cops and robbers—a boy who’s cuffing himself in the throes of puberty and doing so in the nude and in secret… yeah, that boy is

58 | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | PITTSBURGH CURRENT

almost certainly going to be into bondage when he grows up. And that boy is also going to be embarrassed when his parents discover him in handcuffs for the exact same reason a boy is going to be embarrassed when his parents walk in on him masturbating—because he’s having a private sexual experience that he really doesn’t want to discuss with his parents. As for your son’s insecurities and loneliness, CUFFS, they may not be related to his interest in bondage at all. They’re more likely a reaction to the shame he feels about his kinks than to the kinks themselves. (And aren’t most 12-year-olds, handcuff obsession or no, insecure?) “People do bondage for various reasons,” said Trikoot, a selfdescribed “bondage fanatic” and occasional kink educator from Helsinki, Finland. “It’s not always sexual, and it’s almost never a symptom of self-loathing—and a counselor will not ‘erase’ a taste for bondage. Too many kinksters had young lives full of shame and hiding, only to accept themselves years later and then discover what they’ve missed out on.” In other words, CUFFS, parents and counselors can’t talk a child out of his kinks any more than they can talk a child out of his sexual orientation. This stuff is hardwired. And once someone accepts his kinks, whatever anxiety he feels about them eventually evaporates. All that said, however awkward it was for you and mortifying for him when you found him asleep in his handcuffs, Jimmy thinks there may be an upside. “I was extremely embarrassed when my mom caught me,” said Jimmy. “She didn’t know how to respond and neither did I at the time. We merely went on as if it never happened. But it was somewhat comforting to know there wasn’t going to be a major backlash. It was better than living in fear.”

Now that you know what you know about your son, CUFFS, what do you do? Well, with the burden of knowing comes the responsibility— not just to educate and warn, but to offer your son a little hope for his future. “Consent and safety are two of the most important universal issues in bondage, and CUFFS has wisely addressed both of them,” said Trikoot. And you should stress both in a follow-up conversation. “There are boundaries that should never be crossed, such as solo breath play, which regularly kills even experienced adults. But dabbling with wrist and ankle restraints while being within shouting distance of the rest of the family is not a serious safety issue.” (Sleeping in handcuffs, however, is a serious safety issue— they can twist, compress nerves, and damage the delicate bones of the wrist. He should not be sleeping in them.) Now for the tricky and super awkward and what will definitely feel somewhat age-inappropriate part: At some point—maybe in a year or two—you need to let your son know that he has a community out there. “When done safely, bondage/ kink can be an extremely rewarding experience as he grows into adulthood,” said Jimmy. “Some of the most important people in my life are those whom I’ve shared this love with. It is nothing to be ashamed of—though at his age, it is unfortunately inevitable. How you react can help mitigate such a reaction.” Oh, and stop peeping in your son’s bedroom window at night. That’s creepy. Follow Jimmy Woelfel on Twitter @for_heavy and on Instagram @ heavybondageforlife. Follow Trikoot on Twitter @trikoot. On the Lovecast, are men and women equally kinky? Listen at savagelovecast.com.


PITTSBURGH CURRENT

CLASSIFIEDS For more information on how to place your classified ad, please call 412-945-0817

YOUR AD HERE

READINGS

REHERSAL SPACE ABC REHEARSAL ROOMS HOURLY ROOMS WITH STAGE, LIGHTS, P.A/BACKLINE Call to reserve your room today!

724-591-1149 CERTIFICATION COMPASSIONATE CERTIFICATION CENTERS

Certifying for medical marijuana cards! Register online OR call 888-316-9085 + NOW HIRING! Email resume to megan@compassionatecertificationcenters.com

NOW HIRING!

Specializing in Auto, Home, Life, & Business Insurance John Kwateng Insurance Agency is seeking a part time/full producer. Ideal candidate must either hold a Property & Casualty License or Life and Health license. Please send resumes to jkwateng@farmersagent.com

For more information or for insurance inquiries call 412-532-9196

■ ■ ■

Automobile insurance Business or Commercial Home insurance “LET'S TALK INSURANCE, I'M JUST AROUND THE CORNER.”

JOHN F KWATENG JR Your Local Agent 2121 MURRAY AVE FL 2 PITTSBURGH, PA 15217 JKWATENG@FARMERSAGENT.COM https://agents.farmers.com/jkwateng

PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 17, 2019 | 59


NOW ON STAGE! NOW THRU SEPT 29 BENEDUM CENTER

©Disney

TrustArts.org I 412-456-4800 PITTSBURGH CURRENT | SEPTEMBER 3, 2019 | 60 TLK_Pittsburgh_FallArtsPreview_9.5x9.875_Runs9.17.19.indd 1

9/13/19 3:37 PM

Profile for pittsburghcurrent

Pittsburgh Current, Volume 2, Issue 19  

Pittsburgh Fall Guide

Pittsburgh Current, Volume 2, Issue 19  

Pittsburgh Fall Guide