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C oacll H ovalcr Omicron

J. B. Copela11d Beta

Engers

While all the boys were away for the holidays •tball B_rother Hoggard persuaded one of Durham's prettiest ;ame, g~rls (Miss Ruth May before her marriage) to marry k on htm. We wonder how he did it, but we consider him nany due congratulations. year and Xi Men Dominate Roanoke College rned

Football Team uted

: the

By THOS. F.

WEST, JR.

Xi

Thompson Alpha Pi

Hughes Omicron

that even though he was only a sophomore his play was equal to that displayed by many if not all the veteran tackles of the Virginia teams. "Big Gene," as he was called, also possessed one of those educated toes about which we hear so much. He has the honor of being the only man on the team who played all of every game. Charlie Engers, one of the smallest men on the squad, held down an end in a way that would have brought joy to any coach's heart. He had the misfortune to injure his ankle during an afternoon scrimmage rather early in the season, but despite this mishap he played in practically every game. W. E. Boone was a mainstay in the line and his play at guard position would have satisfied any coach. .After the sixth game of the season, during one of the practice games, he had the misfortune of fracturing one of the veterbrae in his neck. He was unable to participate in any of the remaining games on the schedule. Nevertheless, Boone is not going to give up the game and he will be back as strong as ever for the nineteen thirty-two season. T. F. West, Jr., played an end with Charley Engers. West was one of the large men of the team and the largest of the ends. He saw regular service and started all but two of the games. He played either end, but he saw more action on the right side of the line than on the left. The last four men named, namely, Barnett, Engers, Boone, and West all are sophomores and will be back to carry on next year.

Hill. During the past football season at Roanoke Coltrack 1ege, members of Xi Chapter dominated the Roanoke College football team. Led by the impetuous Pleas :lave Ramsey as captain, six other brothers played regularly of a ~~d earned their varsity monograms. Of the seven 1 Kappas who made their "R," four were sophon of : out ~ores, one a junior, and two were seniors. From this ings, tact one is able to conclude very readily that Xi will \1u's contribute much to the football teams of Roanoke ·ead· College for several years to come. our Brother Ramsey was captain of the team as has already been mentioned. During the first half of the season he was quarterback, and although he had not h~d very much experience at this post, he carried on \Vtth the coolness and the surety of a veteran of three ?r. four seasons. After the fifth game, in which he was ~0 JUred, he was shifted to fullback and continued to e a worthy foeman of the colleges of the Virginia conference. When he graduates in June, he will leave ~gap which the coaches will find extremely difficult to II. All this is augmented by the fact that he was chosen as all-state fullback in Virginia by all the Phi Beta Kappas, Tau Beta Pi, coaches in the state. at Omicron Brother Howard Altizer, the other senior of the ~quad, was a reserve tackle. Besides being a player By HENRY H. MIZE e Was of invaluable service as a scout. I' Brother S. W. Lavinder was a veritable rock in the Pledges: James King, Wilmington, N.C. tne. "Pete" weighed two hundred and thirty pounds, lntitiates: E. Davis Haigler, Tarrant City; Frank Wil~nd rival centers and tackles found him extremely liamson, Anniston. 0 fficers: Harry Carroll, archon; Theodore Jackson, ~ard to manage. His favorite position was at center, Ut at times he was shifted to tackle in order to treasurer; Mel Jackson, secretary; Henry H. Mize, stop some concentrated attack. historian; Warren Hemphill, chaplain; Wood Rowe Gene Barnett held down a tackle position so well Purcell, warden.

0

Op PI KAPPA PHI

25

1932_1_Feb  

But what torments oF pain you endured "Some of your ills you have cured, from evils that never arrived." ..

1932_1_Feb  

But what torments oF pain you endured "Some of your ills you have cured, from evils that never arrived." ..