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Lights the up on2010 / 2011 ON SALE NOW!

special guest Steve Earle Academy of Music Oct 29

kimmelcenter.org 215.893.1999 Season generously sponsored by:

for the performing arts

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We made this

Season

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cpstaff

Publisher Paul Curci Associate Publisher Nancy Stuski Editor in Chief Brian Howard Senior Editor Patrick Rapa News Editor Jeffrey C. Billman Senior Writer Isaiah Thompson Staff Writer Holly Otterbein Associate Editor and Web Editor Drew Lazor Arts & Movies Editor/Copy Chief Carolyn Huckabay Editorial Assistant Josh Middleton Assistant Copy Editor Carolyn Wyman Contributing Editors Sam Adams, E. James Beale (sports) Contributors A.D. Amorosi, Janet Anderson, Rodney Anonymous, Mary Armstrong, Nancy Armstrong, Julia Askenase, Justin Bauer, Dwayne Booth, Shaun Brady, Peter Burwasser, Charles Cieri, Mark Cofta, Will Dean, Jesse Delaney, Jakob Dorof, Deesha Dyer, Adam Erace, David Faris, M.J. Fine, David Anthony Fox, Lauren F. Friedman, Cindy Fuchs, Ptah Gabrie, Julia Harte, Dan Hirschhorn, K. Ross Hoffman, Deni Kasrel, Gary M. Kramer, Gair Marking, Robert McCormick, Natalie Hope McDonald, Andrew Milner, Michael Pelusi, Nathaniel Popkin, Robin Rice, James Saul, Daniel Schwartz, Yowei Shaw, Jon Solomon, Amy Strauss, Matt Stroud, Andrew Thompson, Tom Tomorrow, Sam Tremble, Char Vandermeer, John Vettese, Bruce Walsh, Julia West, Kelly White Editorial Interns Caitlin Durkin, Stephanie Johnson, Sean Kearney, Joel Maison-Gaines, Juliana Reyes, Eric Schuman, Laura Weber, Daniella Wexler Webmaster Dafan Zhang Associate Web Editor/Staff Photographer Neal Santos Systems Administrator John Tarng Production Director Michael Polimeno Editorial Art Director Reseca Peskin Senior Editorial Designer Allie Rossignol Senior Designer Evan M. Lopez Designer Alyssa Grenning Contributing Photographers Michael M. Koehler, Jessica Kourkounis, Michael T. Regan, Mark Stehle Contributing Illustrators Dwayne Booth, Jeffrey Bouchard, Ryan Casey, Don Haring Jr., Thomas Pitilli, Matthew Smith Human Resources Ron Scully (ext. 210) Accounts Receivable Coordinator Tricia Bradley (ext. 232) Circulation Director Mark Burkert (ext. 239) Senior Account Managers Yasser Hussain (ext. 215), Sharon MacWilliams (ext. 262), Stephan Sitzai (ext. 258) Account Managers Sara Carano (ext. 228), Robert Crain (ext. 250), William Newns (ext. 237), Donald Snyder (ext. 213) Office Coordinator/Adult Advertising Sales Alexis Pierce (ext. 234) Founder & Editor Emeritus Bruce Schimmel citypaper.net 123 Chestnut Street, Third Floor, Phila., PA 19106. 215-735-8444, Tip Line 215-7358444 ext. 241, Listings Fax 215-875-1800, Classified Ads 215-248-CITY, Advertising Fax 215-735-8535, Subscriptions 215-735-8444 ext. 235 Philadelphia City Paper is published and distributed every Thursday in Philadelphia, Montgomery, Chester, Bucks & Delaware Counties, in South Jersey and in Northern Delaware. Philadelphia City Paper is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies may be purchased from our main office at $1 per copy. No person may, without prior written permission from Philadelphia City Paper, take more than one copy of each issue. Pennsylvania law prohibits any person from inserting printed material of any kind into any newspaper without the consent of the owner or publisher. Contents copyright Š 2010, Philadelphia City Paper. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Philadelphia City Paper assumes no obligation (other than cancellation of charges for actual space occupied) for accidental errors in advertising, but will be glad to furnish a signed letter to the buying public. LETTERS & SUBMISSIONS Letters should be brief and are subject to editing. Authors must sign their name for publication and each must contain an address and telephone number for verification, although neither address nor telephone number will be published. Unsolicited submissions are welcome but must be accompanied with a SASE if return is desired.

contents You’re the cream of the crop

Naked City ...................................................................................6 CP Choice/Big Vision Awards .........................................9 Arts & Entertainment.........................................................26 Food & Drink ...........................................................................47 COVER DESIGN BY RESECA PESKIN


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city

THOMAS PITILLI

AMILLIONSTORIES

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We choose you

N

ow it’s time for This Week in Harrisburg, our occasional rundown of the drool-on-your-shirt crazy, perpetually backward and possibly corrupt doings of the country’s most populous full-time legislature! The week’s big news: Nothing! From now until 2011, your state legislators will be campaigning for the November election, dillydallying during a leadership vote right before Thanksgiving, and probably bathing in lakes of special-interest cash. But they almost certainly won’t be passing any more laws. Why? Because it’s mid-October, and the state House and Senate are officially done for the year (unless they have an eventful lame-duck session in November, which is unlikely). Technically, they’re in “recess,” but since they never work anyway, calling it a “recess” isn’t quite accurate, right? Let’s review how much our representatives in Harrisburg are like spoiled, slothful children (hint: a lot): They neglected to impose a tax on the extraction of natural gas from the Marcellus Shale. Senate Republicans are claiming it’s because Democrats in the House lobbied for the highest tax rate in the nation; clearly, then, we shouldn’t levy any tax at all on the ever-booming, environment-destroying industry. Meanwhile, Gov. Ed Rendell remains cluelessly optimistic, assuring the commonwealth that meetings about the proposed tax have yielded a “terrific discussion” and made “significant progress.”

Oh, but there’s more work our state legislature — BTW, one of the best paid in the nation — hasn’t finished: Representatives had vowed to create a $4 million independent office to study Pennsylvania’s fiscal condition by October; they haven’t. The Senate did attach an amendment that would do so to a bill tackling the state’s ballooning pension plan — which will go from costing taxpayers $842 million annually to $4.7 billion by 2012, and thus is in dire need of reform. However, the Senate’s move guarantees that the bill won’t pass, since it likely violates a constitutional provision that keeps two bills from existing in a single piece of legislation. Also, that bill that would plug a huge gap in transportation funding? It didn’t pass, either. Neither did one giving the governor and legislature more control over the Delaware River Port Authority, which is simultaneously rife with corruption and lacking in accountability. Way to go above and beyond, reps. Meanwhile, there are a couple bills that are thankfully dead for now, but could very well sprout into half-alive zombies once the spring session begins. First up, the open-records law we told you about a couple weeks ago [A Million Stories, Oct. 7, 2010], which would have restricted access to government contractors’ documents and impose fees for merely looking at records, among other things; there wasn’t enough House support to pass the bill — which the Senate OK’d unanimously and without debate (fitting) — but who knows what will happen the next go-round. Another bill to keep your eyes on is S.B. 1399, which would ban insurance companies participating in the health care reform act’s state exchange

Way to go above and beyond.

program from covering abortions, except in the case of rape, incest or a medical emergency. (Nearly 80 percent of private insurers now cover abortions.) In fact, under the proposed bill, even rape victims must report the crime within 72 hours in order to be covered — a burden that pro-choice advocates say is both unconstitutional and, quite frankly, pretty damn insulting. With right-winger Tom Corbett leading in the governor’s race, we have a bad feeling about these two bills. But hey, wait a minute! These cads are up for election in a couple weeks! Vote accordingly, people. Please?

 ECONOMIC REALITIES When we visited the Philadelphia Security Officers Union (PSOU) this spring,

its security guards at the Philadelphia Museum of Art were duking it out with

their employer, security service giant AlliedBarton, which had appealed the union’s election to the National Labor Relations Board (NRLB) [A Million Stories, April 15, 2010]. Since then, AlliedBarton — surprise! — appealed >>> continued on adjacent page


the naked city

✚ A Million Stories <<< continued from previous page

again, and lost again. So now that the union’s officially official, we can bring you the next episode in this embittered saga: contract (read: wage) negotiations. AlliedBarton and PSOU managed to play nice over the non-economic issues, but once money came up, things got ugly. For most of the last decade, the guards received a 25-cent raise each year to keep up with inflation — not great, but something. The past two years, however, they’ve received nothing. So what did AlliedBarton offer the newly minted union? Twenty-five cents an hour. PSOU had requested a $3.45 an hour raise, to $13.48 an hour, plus some benefit increases. Considering their 1992 hourly wage was $14.64, it’s not surprising that the union rejected AlliedBarton’s offer. Understandable, perhaps — unless you’re AlliedBarton Vice President and Regional Manager James Gorman, who, in a written statement, blasted the union for demanding “a wage increase that seems out of touch with today’s economic realities.” Yeah, we get it, there’s a recession. Still, in 2005, City Council passed a bill ordering city-supported employers to pay their workers at least 150 percent of the state minimum wage of $7.25 an hour, or $10.88 an hour. AlliedBarton guards at the art museum are currently making $10.03 an hour. (We’ll give you a second to do the math.) And while there may be legal technicalities that get the Art Museum off the hook, the Art Museum has promised Council that it will abide by those rules, says Councilman W. Wilson Goode Jr. Since AlliedBarton is a museum subcontractor, Goode says, that promise applies to them, too. And if the museum doesn’t make good? “I can assure you that their

level of subsidy will be in jeopardy in the next year,” Goode says. (Art Museum officials declined to comment for this story.) That’s nice and all, but PSOU Campaign Director Fabricio Rodriguez says this battle is not just about having friends who can put the screws to your adversaries: “It’s a question of empowerment. These guys want to win justice through a negotiation process.” Meanwhile, PSOU continues to grow. Though it lost its election at the Philadelphia Housing Authority’s Norman Blumberg Apartments [Naked City, “Target: Carl Greene,” Andrew Thompson, Aug. 25, 2010], it won at the Delaware River Waterfront Corp. in early October. And the guards employed by the art museum’s two other security companies, Scotland Yard and Roman Sentry, will also soon vote on joining the union. But, as with AlliedBarton, these companies aren’t going down without a fight. According to Rodriguez, Roman Sentry is sending anti-union literature to its employees. (Roman Sentry declined to comment.) What’s more, shortly after pro-union organizer Juanita Love spoke at a PSOU rally on the Art Museum steps earlier this month, Roman Sentry fired her for “abandoning her post.” Love says her supervisor told her she could leave her station, and anyway, she thinks Roman Sentry is punishing her. Love wasn’t the only union ally who got the ax, Rodriguez says. While Rodriguez believes these terminations violate federal labor law, he can’t go running to lawyers right now — there isn’t enough time or money. The Roman Sentry union election is Oct. 21.

thebellcurve CP’s Quality-o-Life-o-Meter

[ -1 ]

[ + 1 ] Three would-be robbers who followed a New

Jersey man home from SugarHouse are foiled when one trips over his baggy pants. Ultimately, though, it was the jughandles that did them in. “Why go to the right lane if I want to make a left? It’s madness!”

[0]

Longshoremen lobby the Port Authority to force Del Monte to resume deliveries to South Philly. Unfortunately, their statement came out like, “Fuckin’ shit-eating fruit fuckers, what the Christ.”

[ + 1 ] According to the Inky, some women are

watching the Phillies because of their sex appeal. Also in the Inky: “CORRECTION: The Inquirer has learned that girls do, in fact, go number two. How and from where is still being investigated.”

✚ This week’s report by Holly Otterbein and Juliana Reyes. E-mail us at

amillionstories@citypaper.net. Get your daily fix of news, sports and commentary on The Clog, citypaper.net/clog.

The city sues a former newspaper delivery man for $10,000 in unpaid business privilege taxes. City then awards a municipal bureaucrat $750,000 for fake retiring.

[ -3 ]

theotherwhitemeat ³ clowncrack.com

A drunk Chester man brings home injured kittens, intending to eat them, but his roommate calls the police. “If only they’d built the supermarket next to the soccer stadium like they said they would … ” contract to develop the Southport Marine Terminal. “Oh mierda,” sighs DelVal Matadors Ltd. “We were really hoping to store our bullshit there.”

[ + 1] South Philly native and former skinhead Frank Meeink, who “rarely went more than a week without beating on somebody,” now speaks to students about tolerance. “Not a fan,” he says.

[ + 1] Philly boxerTeneal Goyco says he was tricked

into portraying Tiger Woods in a porn video. “It was a clever plot,” says Goyco. “They took me to this hotel, and there was this naked chick there. And I did her. On video. They got me good.”

[ - 2]

In a Daily News jailhouse interview, Ira Einhorn, aka the Unicorn Killer, claims to have slept with 1,500 to 1,800 women. Coming soon: Teneal Goyco as Ima Einhorny in The Unicorn Holer.

This week’s total 2: | Last week’s total: -3

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[ + 4] Delaware River Stevedores Inc. wins the

MR. FISH

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[ never abandons its post ]

7


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Last year, after we ditched the classic City Paper Choice approach in favor of the Big Vision Issue, we wondered whether it would be a one-off thing. An annual ode to the city’s forward thinkers and ambitious dreamers? Wouldn’t we run out, like, right away? Would we go back to naming the “Best Place to Read What Is The What in Public” the very next year? Oh, cynical us.

The happy answer is that the city’s got more than enough worthwhile doers, planners and believers to keep this love train rolling ad infinitum. This year’s Big Visionaries — nominated by CP staff and contributors, and voted on by our editorial board — is a whole new crew. We’ve got a cardboard puppeteer, and a typedefying DA, and a muckraking-documentary filmmaker, and a folksy base-

ball manager, and a group of AsianAmerican student activists, and whole bunch of other Philadelphians who are either already out there changing this city for the better, or are about to. Think of this issue not simply as the best Philadelphia has to offer, but a glimpse of what Philadelphia can be, what it will be in the future. —Brian Howard (bhoward@citypaper.net)

CITY PAPER CHOICE/BIG VISION NOMINATING COMMITTEE A.D. Amorosi, Mary Armstrong, Nancy Armstrong, Justin Bauer, E. James Beale, Jeffrey C. Billman, Shaun Brady, Peter Burwasser, Mark Cofta, Paul Curci, Adam Erace, M.J. Fine, Brian Howard, Carolyn Huckabay, Gary M. Kramer, Drew Lazor, Natalie Hope McDonald, Josh Middleton, Holly Otterbein, Patrick Rapa, Robin Rice, Neal Santos, Isaiah Thompson, Char Vandermeer, John Vettese, Julia West, Carolyn Wyman

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THE VIEW FROM HERE

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T H E B I G V I S I O N AWA R D S

10 | P H I L A D E L P H I A C I T Y PA P E R |

� AT 6 P.M. ON

Thursday, Oct. 7, the night of the Food Trust’s inaugural Night Market, Yael Lehmann called her husband from her home on 10th and Carpenter. “I asked him if people were there yet. He said, ‘I can’t talk about it. Come down here immediately.’” When Lehmann, executive director of the Food Trust since 2006 (she’s been with the nonprofit since 2001), arrived at the Bermuda Triangle of East Passyunk, 11th and Tasker, there were people, all right. Four thousand of them, and easily as many adorable dogs. The Asian market-inspired series, which will resume in the spring in different neighborhoods, is one highly visible reason we love the Food Trust. Another is the city-living-at-itsfinest Headhouse Square farmers market. But their less visible projects are why this 80strong team deserves our Big Vision Award. In 2010, they launched four new farmers markets in low-income areas, with six more rolling out next year. The Food Trust also partnered with the Philadelphia Health Department and began putting $15 million of stimulus money into programs like Philly Food Bucks, which gives food stamp recipients a $2 fresh-fruit-and-vegetable coupon for every $5 spent at a farmers market (resulting in a 70 percent increase in food stamp sales at markets) and leveraged state funds to bump WIC recipients’ farmers market vouchers from $20 to $80. “We’re also creating wellness councils at a hundred local schools,” says Lehmann, “and working to improve food choices at 1,000 corner stores over the next three years.” “I was in Texas recently, where someone said, ‘You shouldn’t have to use a gallon of gas to get a gallon of milk.’ That’s where we’re coming from. We believe that everybody deserves to have access to delicious, fresh, healthy food.” Many Philadelphians still do not. The Food Trust has their backs. � —Adam Erace TRUST EXERCISE: Yael Lehman (front center) with the Food Trust team, photographed Oct. 11 at the 1501 N. Broad St. Fresh Grocer the organization helped open.

THE FOOD TRUST

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THEFRESHMAKERS

PHOTO BY NEAL SANTOS

HONORABLE MENTION

FOOD AND DRINK � HAN CHIANG The Han Dynasty restaurateur, who opened his first city outpost this year, lures the spicerati with his liberal use of chilies and Sichuan peppercorn. � MARCIE TURNEY AND VALERIE SAFRAN The power-couple whose spots include Lolita, Grocery, Verde and now Barbuzzo are leading the 13th Street revival. � JOSE GARCES With Garces Trading Co., the brand-new JG Domestic and even a taco truck (Guapos Tacos) added to his résumé in 2010, the Iron Chef’s shown no shortage of energy or ideas. � ART IN THE AGE The taste-making label’s spirits, ROOT and SNAP, balance a unique aesthetic — throwback Americana and über-trendy.


Quaker Quest What is Quakerism all about? How are Quakers bringing Peace, Simplicity, Justice, and Equality to the world today?

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Oct. 24

Quakers and Spirituality

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the naked city

T H E B I G V I S I O N AWA R D S

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� THAT THE CITY’S rock clubs haven’t already been filled with Girls Rock Philly alumnae says more about the dearth of all-ages venues where tweens and teens can support each other’s bands than about the talent coming out of the weeklong summer sessions. Still, seeds are sprouting: This month’s Swap-O-Rama Rama featured a DJ set from a GRP crew, while former camper Attia Taylor is turning heads with her Short Stories & Small Glories. Up next: a show at Johnny Brenda’s on Nov. 6 to celebrate the camp’s second compilation CD. (Yes, it’s all-ages.) Director Beth Warshaw-Duncan reels off some of this year’s other big accomplishments: “We expanded camp about 50 percent from 2009, from 50 to 75 campers, and held our showcase at the Trocadero for the first time. We also held a Ladies Rock Camp for the first time that ran over Memorial Day Weekend 2010; won a Powerful Voices Award from Women’s Way in May; are fiscally sponsoring and partnering with a new after-school music and tutoring program called Rock to the Future; and have just moved into a new practice space and office in Fishtown.” All of that takes a small army of volunteers, so it’s only natural that GRP emphasizes cooperation over competition, and taking aesthetic risks over mastering the canon. Those lessons are just as crucial as guitar skills and drum techniques, and they resonate in the world beyond the scene. “Young girls don’t always have the encouragement that they do what they want to do and be who they want to be,” says gear coordinator Tara Hoffman. Camper-turned-volunteer Taylor concurs: “What we’ll see is an increasing amount of female musicians in our local scene … and most importantly a new breed of young women with the courage to take on challenges that they once thought weren’t for them.” � —M.J. Fine BANG THE DRUM: Girls Rock Philly director Beth Warshaw-Duncan is photographed Oct. 17 at the organization’s new Frankford Avenue space.

GIRLS ROCK PHILLY

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GIRLSANDNOISE

PHOTO BY NEAL SANTOS

HONORABLE MENTION

MUSIC

� MAKING TIME Our most revered dance/pop/rock night celebrated 10 years with an enormous series of cocainesexjam parties, ending with a 3,500-plus throwdown with LCD Soundsystem at the Navy Yard. Club kids FTW. � THE PHILLY F/M FEST Because why shouldn’t we have our very own SXSW? � PHILLY FOLK PARADE The Spinning Leaves-led folk collective preaches building an unstoppable music community. � MATTHEW FELDMAN Philly’s most die-hard jazz advocate hosts a series at Moonstone, a show on GTown Radio and is pushing to open South Philly club Lucky Old Souls.


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T H E B I G V I S I O N AWA R D S

14 | P H I L A D E L P H I A C I T Y PA P E R |

� IN A CITY that has bombed itself, canonized Frank Rizzo and defended brutal cops who act with impunity, the rote notion of being “tough on crime” should make us all ill. It’s a credo that advocates red-blooded brawn over justice. But instead, because we yearn for a solution — any solution — the philosophy typically delivers votes and respect. This year, it finally didn’t: Seth Williams, who ran on a decidedly neomammalian approach, became Philly’s district attorney. “People think the only response to criminal behavior is to be tougher,” says Williams. “But the reality is, if you’re ‘tough’ on everything, you end up being tough on nothing.” Indeed, Philly has a busted budget, more than 75,000 cases a year, and one of the lowest conviction rates in the country. Which is why Williams made a ballsy move: He eased the penalty for possessing fewer than 30 grams of marijuana, a crime that led to at least 3,000 cases annually; the D.A.’s Office now treats it as a summary offense instead of a misdemeanor, which is punishable by a fine rather than a draconian jail sentence and criminal record. “We were hiring an attorney for defendants, having the police hang out in court for several days, and paying thousands of dollars per case — when somebody possessed about $10 worth of weed,” he says. “It was ludicrous.” Though we don’t bless every step Williams takes — frankly, he could handle police misconduct and house theft much better — we’re hopeful his progressivism won’t end with dank. Next year, Williams says the D.A.’s Office will adopt San Francisco’s “Back on Track” program. In lieu of a jail sentence, it gives nonviolent, first-time drug offenders job training, drug and alcohol treatment and literacy classes. Currently, the recidivism rate for those folks is about 73 percent. In other words, it’s about damn time we quit being tough. � —Holly Otterbein NAME OF THE LAW: Seth Williams peers into the D.A.’s Office window Oct. 14, City Hall reflected in the glass.

SETH WILLIAMS

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THECRIMEBOSS

PHOTO BY JESSICA KOURKOUNIS

HONORABLE MENTION

GOVERNMENT & POLITICS � THE ZONING COMMISSION For the first time in nearly 50 years, they’re rewriting the city’s zoning code. It’s a huge undertaking and they’re doing all the right things, including involving the community throughout the process. � MANAN TRIVEDI A smart, engaging congressional candidate from the ’burbs whose experience as a doctor and Iraq vet, along with an honesty and independent streak unrivaled by most politicians, makes him a standout in a political season of mush. � PHILLY 311 Budget woes be damned, the city’s info hot line rules the Philly arm of the crowdsourced seeclickfix.com.


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UPCOMING PERFORMANCES:


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� IT ALL STARTED inauspiciously enough. A source at the Police Advisory Commission told a police informant to go talk to Wendy Ruderman, a reporter at the Daily News. And he did. But the story Ventura Martinez told through tears took on a life of its own: The cops, especially narcotics officer Jeffrey Cujdik, were fudging search warrants, Martinez said, and lying about evidence. Later, Ruderman and partner Barbara Laker’s investigation went to a whole new level: Numerous immigrant bodega owners told them Cujdik’s elite narcotics squad had raided them, cut surveillance camera wires, and taken cash, cigarettes and other items. The cops, the store owners said, would then report only a small percentage of the confiscated goods, and pocket the rest. The “Tainted Justice” series, 10 articles in all throughout 2009, prompted a still-ongoing joint FBI/internal affairs investigation and a slew of Philadelphia Police Department reforms regarding how cops handle their informants. And then in April, Ruderman and Laker brought home the big cheese of journalism awards: the Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting — a well-deserved honor for a series marked by dogged and uncompromising shoe-leather reporting and document-culling. “We found out [about the Pulitzer] with the rest of the world,” says Laker. An editor, she says, saw their award on a wire story. “It was one of the most emotional moments in my entire life. The whole room became, like, electric.” What’s perhaps most remarkable, and bodes well for watchdog journalism in this city, is that even in bankruptcy, the DN remained committed to this project. Other reporters picked up two or three stories a day to allow them the time to report. “We believed in this story, our editors believed in it,” Laker says. “We knocked on hundreds of doors. That was the beauty of it, in a way — getting back to what journalism is all about.” —Jeffrey C. Billman

BARBARA LAKER & WENDY RUDERMAN

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THENEWSHOUNDS

PAPER CHASE: Wendy Ruderman (left) and Barbara Laker, photographed Oct. 12 in the newsroom at the Philadelphia Daily News, where they penned their Pulitzer-winning investigative series.

PHOTO BY NEAL SANTOS

HONORABLE MENTION

LITERATURE AND JOURNALISM � DENNIS TAFOYA Because Philadelphia deserves a homegrown novelist who’s able to, in the wormseye tradition of David Goodis, show the city at street level, both panoramically and specifically. � TOM FERRICK/METROPOLIS The longtime Inky man’s site promises in-depth news, analysis and commentary, and delivers. And its Vox Pop blog opens the discussion to anyone with something to say. � BROWNSTONER The scrappy blog has become a vital source for real estate and development news. � SOLOMON JONES The Daily News columnist is releasing his seventh book and has an NBC development deal cooking.


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—Isaiah Thompson LEADER OF THE PACK: Helen Gym (center) and members of the AAU are photographed Oct. 15 at 440 N. Broad St., the School District of Philadelphia’s headquarters. PHOTO BY NEAL SANTOS

HONORABLE MENTION

ACTIVISM/WATCHDOGS � RIDERS AGAINST GENDER EXCLUSION For championing the end of SEPTA’s discriminatory use of gender stickers on its TransPasses. � IT’S OUR MONEY More than mere policy wonkery, the Daily News/ WHYY/William Penn Foundation blog gives you the play-by-play on the ridiculous, wasteful and, every blue moon, prudent ways our tax money is spent. � COMMITTEE OF SEVENTY The better-government org’s been calling for the heads of the BRT and the CQS for ages. � GAY HISTORY WIKI Its mission, to preserve vast swaths of Philadelphia’s rapidly vanishing gay history, is as daunting as it is heroic and vital.

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SOUTH PHILADELPHIA HIGH ASAIN STUDENT ADVOCATES

� AS THE NEW freshman class entered South Philadelphia High for the first time last month, students had reason to be wary. Last year, a pattern of violence against Asians at the school culminated in an attack on 20-plus Asian students by a large group of their peers. The incident was ugly; uglier was the School District’s response, downplaying race and brushing aside the school’s Asian students as they went on strike, demanding accountability. Luckily, there’s reason to be hopeful, too: In the wake of the attacks, students, victim advocates and community leaders organized into a movement. When school started this year, South Philadelphia High School Asian Student Advocates (SASA) — a coalition including Asian Americans United (AAU), Victim/Witness Services of South Philadelphia, Boat People SOS, the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund, current and former SPHS students, and community leaders — was ready. In a boggy terrain of politics, finger-pointing and understandably high sensitivity, SASA has stood firmly on the high ground, refusing to be dragged into a racial blame game while directing its efforts squarely at District administration and emphasizing the role the grownups are supposed to play in protecting all students from violence. To this end, SASA is fortunate to have as a member and occasional spokeswoman Helen Gym, a tireless activist for better schools and Philadelphia’s Asian community. Although she’s quick to deflect praise to fellow coalition members, including Chinatown organizer Xu Lin and former SPHS student Wei Chen, Gym’s background in journalism and the politics of school reform (she is a former editor of the Daily Pennsylvanian and writes for the Notebook), and her ability to communicate between different worlds, have been crucial in making sure the students’ voices, and not just the District’s, are heard. With recent episodes of violence against Asian students at yet another high school — and, again, a rapid denial of racial motivations by District officials — it’s as important as ever, for all of Philadelphia’s kids, that SASA’s looking out for them.

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THEGUARDIANS

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� LET’S PARSE Philagrafika 2010, the city’s triennial printmaking festival, by the numbers: It was 10 weeks long, involved 80 local venues and 300 artists, and was the culmination of nearly five years of planning. It attracted 150,000 visitors; if you count outdoor projects, like Paul Morrison’s 40-footlong landscape mural at Moore College of Art & Design, it lured in nearly 8 million. For an inaugural event, that’s ginormous. But stats don’t reveal, for instance, the newlyweds who used Morrison’s piece as a backdrop for their wedding photos. Nor how provocateur Duke Riley trespassed onto a New Jersey island to paint a portrait atop a CITGO oil tank; how The New York Times wrote a glowing, front-page review of the fest; or how Philagrafika made the local arts community believe it could support its very own Whitney Biennial — or perhaps already had. “It wasn’t like any other print festivals,” says Julien Robson, one of Philagrafika’s six curators. “They’re usually based in tradition- and craft-based practices, whereas this one really expanded the idea of what constitutes as print.” Indeed, it’s hard to imagine that just a few years ago, people were battling over whether photography should be deemed “print.” PostPhilagrafika, print is not only that, but it’s also video, breaking the law and Pepón Osorio’s heaping pile of black-and-gold confetti. So what’s in store for the next fest? Though chief curator José Roca won’t disclose much about its tenor, he says, “I have been thinking about the idea of the print as performance — specifically themes that deal with the relationship between the print and the body, or the body and the environment.” That brings us to another statistic: three, the number of years we’ll have to hold out till the next fest — the only thing about Philagrafika we wish were smaller. � —Holly Otterbein FINE PRINT: Philagrafika staff — including curator José Roca, via Skype — are photographed Oct. 14 in their office at 16th and Walnut streets.

PHILAGRAFIKA

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THEFRESHPRINTS

PHOTO BY NEAL SANTOS

HONORABLE MENTION

VISUAL ARTS

� SARAH STOLFA The goal of the photog’s Fishtown nonprofit Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, complete with digital lab, is to keep talented Philly photographers in Philly. � LOVE LETTER The Mural Arts Program/Steve Powers/SEPTA/ Pew joint project is the epitome of innovative — and gorgeous — urban collaboration. � ZOE STRAUSS Her “On the Beach” work after the Deepwater Horizon disaster is as enlightening as it is harrowing. � MIDWIVES COLLECTIVE Their June/July showcase to benefit Midwives of Haiti epitomized art’s universal responsibility.


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It Doesn’t Matter…Who You Are or What You’re Going Through.

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� THANK THE REPUBLICANS,

in a roundabout way, for West Philly native Beth Nixon’s return 10 years ago: She came back from Rhode Island, after puppeteers were arrested before the 2000 Republican National Convention here, to participate in a “Puppet Uprising” fundraiser. She hasn’t left. The self-described builder of “puppets, masks, piñatas, parades, pageants, palindromes, magical lands and other spectaculah” joined creative juggernaut Pig Iron Theatre Co. last winter for a brainstorming workshop that led to the 2010 Philadelphia Live Arts Festival hit Cankerblossom. For the show, Nixon created unique cardboard set pieces, props and costumes for a fantastical flat world — while also playing the mother trying to rescue her two-dimensional foundling. “I was originally hired as a designer,” says the thirtysomething who sparkles with childlike curiosity, “but in February, when we were working out in La Jolla, I was having a great time playing with the cardboard. I told Dan [Rothenberg, Cankerblossom director] I’d be excited to improvise some stuff, too, and he put me in the mix. … The show sort of spooled from there, with me in it.” After juggling design, performing and her own (three-dimensional) child, Nixon says she’s reveling in some time off, but her list of projects belies that: “I’m gnawing on an idea for a new solo puppet/clown show, maybe involving performative piñata action or walruses. I’m trying to find funding for a giant puppet flotilla down the Schuylkill River. I’m creating a new illustrated palindrome calendar for 2012. And I’m currently working with The Rotunda Youth Theater Arts Program, making a show with a group of fourth- through eighth-graders.” Pig Iron, she reports, hopes to secure funding to further develop Cankerblossom, their first all-ages production. —Mark Cofta BEAR ESSENTIALS: Puppeteer Beth Nixon (center), with Cankerblossom cast members David Sweeney (left) and Alex Torra, shows off her creative cardboard costuming Oct. 16 in the backyard of her West Philadelphia home.

BETH NIXON & PIG IRON THEATRE CO.

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’BOARDMEETING

PHOTO BY MARK STEHLE

HONORABLE MENTION

PERFORMING ARTS � BRAT PRODUCTIONS The troupe known for its 24-hour Bald Soprano pushed the envelope with Haunted Poe and a gender-bending Carrie. � PHILLY IMPROV THEATER With a dedicated space and the impressive Düofest in its portfolio, PHIT demands you take improv comedy — seriously. � JENNIFER CHILDS 1812’s pint-size powerhouse looms even larger with her stunning one-woman Why I’m Scared of Dance under her tutu. � LIBERTY CITY DRAG & BURLESQUE While queens get all the ink, LCDB is hard at work putting drag kings on the map.


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� PHILADELPHIANS ARE intimately familiar with the saga of the Barnes Foundation, the peerless collection of Impressionist masterworks whose scheduled 2012 move to the Benjamin Franklin Parkway from its home in Lower Merion continues to be the subject of fierce controversy. But outside the city, the battle over the Barnes — and the collection itself — has been something of an open secret. That secret got a lot more open with the release of The Art of the Steal, the proudly muckraking documentary directed by Don Argott and produced by his 9.14 Pictures partner, Sheena Joyce. Whether they came away thinking Albert Barnes was a visionary whose dying bequest had been violated by moneyed interests or an eccentric nutball with great taste in art, audiences left hungry to view one of the world’s greatest unsung art collections. Steal, as did prior Argott doc Rock School, expands the national image of a city beyond airborne batteries and the Rocky run. Even better, the films do it without a trace of civic boosterism, the kind that makes the city seem even more undervalued than it is. In The Art of the Steal, city officials claim moving the collection will make Philadelphia a world-class city, but that’s not something world-class cities need to prove. True, the film’s portrait of city and state officials involved in a conspiracy to subvert the will of a dead man isn’t entirely flattering, but a world-class city ought to able to stand that, too. “There’s such an inferiority complex here,” Argott said last week. “Look at Client 9, the documentary about Elliott Spitzer. Do you think New Yorkers are worried about how they come across in that? It’s like, how much can the city take a look in the mirror and be OK with it? The film does not make the city look good. But that’s the fault of the reality of what’s happening here.” � —Sam Adams STATE OF THE ARTS: Director Don Argott is photographed in front of the new Barnes site Oct. 13.

DON ARGOTT

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THEBARNESSTORMER

PHOTO BY JESSICA KOURKOUNIS

HONORABLE MENTION

FILM AND SCREEN � SECRET CINEMA The already-respected Secret Cinema upped its relevance by unearthing The Jungle, an all-but-lost snapshot of gang life in 1970s Philadelphia, then gathered some of the film’s subjects for a reunion. � INTERNATIONAL HOUSE For consistently inventive rep cinema programming. � JOSH FOX’S GASLAND Milanville’s Fox isn’t a Philly guy, but his documentary exposé about the ills of natural gas fracking could have ramifications here for years to come. � PHILADELPHIA UNDERGROUND FILM FORUM For giving indie filmmakers a legit shot at the elusive big screen.


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—Brian Howard WASTE NOT, WANT NOT: Rina Cutler, deputy mayor for transportation and utilities, poses next to a BigBelly solar compactor in front of City Hall Oct. 15. PHOTO BY MARK STEHLE

HONORABLE MENTION

SUSTAINABILITY AND DESIGN � HYDROS BOTTLE Penn grads Aakash Mathur and Jay Parekh have big, big plans for their ingenious little on-the-go filter bottle. � PHILLY COMPOST The Mount Airy group goes to great lengths to keep biodegradable stuff out of landfills. � NIC ESPOSITO The new-school community gardening/urban ag advocate’s got his hands all up in UC Green and the PHS’s City Harvest Grower’s Alliance. � COMMONSPACE.US The site, a collaboration between local techies Azavea and the Sustainable

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Business Network, makes navigating the city on foot easier, and more rewarding, than ever.

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RINA CUTLER

� WHEN IT COMES

to environmental stewardship, no one would mistake Philadelphia for Berkeley. But in one short year, the city has taken strides — huge strides — in the way it deals with its waste. We’ve got weekly recycling pickup, we recycle all numbered plastics, and we have a Recycling Rewards program wherein residents rack up and redeem points for local goods and services. Good. But not good enough, says Rina Cutler, deputy mayor for transportation and utilities, under whose purview this all falls. “When I look to the future,” says the Boston native with a Jane Jacobs-like fascination with urbanity, “I see Philadelphia developing a waste management strategy that mirrors those in Denmark and Sweden.” These are lofty goals. After we reduce our waste (check) and increase our recycling (check), “we ought to look to convert [our waste] to energy. That’s what makes it a sustainable plan.” It’s not pie-in-the-sky rhetoric. There’s math. According to Cutler, we spend $37 million to send 565,000 tons of garbage to the landfill per annum. Recycling can offset some of that. She says Philadelphia recycled about 100,000 tons last year, and though the selling price fluctuates, last quarter we got $51 per ton, or $1.2 million. Says Cutler: “This isn’t brain surgery.” While the ultimate goal of zero waste is probably a pipe dream, Cutler says the final piece — reuse — is the trickiest, because it comes with images of dirty incinerators. But Cutler, who’s been in Philly since 1994, has learned a few things about her adopted citizens. In a recent speech, she noted: “Philadelphians embrace change, they just want it to look exactly the same when it’s done.” Recalling the line, she laughs: “Half the city wants to kill me, and half wants to marry me. Some of that is that the city is cautious about change, perhaps deservedly so. I think the more communication there is, the more willingness there is to try stuff. And if it doesn’t work, I won’t do it anymore.” �

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THEBLUEBUCKETEER

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� ON ONE HAND, Charlie Manuel is a 66-year-old West Virginian with a high school degree, a hillbilly vocabulary and a yen for old-school professional wrestling. In a baseball universe rapidly moving from bunting the runner over toward advanced stats like xFIP and SNLVA — two acronyms that, I promise, the Phillies manager does not know the meaning of — guys like Manuel aren’t supposed to have vision. They’re supposed to have visions. On the other, the man we all call Uncle Cholly just led baseball’s oldest team to more victories than anyone else in baseball. Charlie has learned to see what his players need and then provide it. Sometimes this is tough love — how many other guys could bench a former MVP for effort and have it go over calmly? — and sometimes it is simply staying upbeat. “[Confidence] is all he talks about,” Chase Utley explained after a recent win. “It’s helpful, especially in a game where you fail a lot.” Whatever it is, Charlie sees it. Besides, how can we not give our Big Vision Award to a man who sees the future? Last week, just one day before the last of his three aces would finish the Cincinnati Reds, Charlie Manuel was asked what he thought the Reds’ chances were of coming back from their two-wins-to-none deficit. After fumbling over a few initial words, Manuel stumbled onto his talking point: “It can happen,” he started, pausing to smile before finishing the quote. “It ain’t goin’ to happen, but it can happen.” The statement was completely incoherent on its face, unequivocally beloved by local fans and — as the Phils would go on to prove — absolutely spot-on. What can we say? The man has vision. —E. James Beale CHOLLY IN CHARGE: Philadelphia Phillies manager Charlie Manuel watches practice Oct. 5 in Philadelphia. The Phillies face the San Francisco Giants tonight, Oct. 21, at AT&T Park in Game 5 of the National League Championship Series.

CHARLIE MANUEL

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THEORACLE

AP PHOTO/MATT SLOCUM

HONORABLE MENTION

SPORTS AND RECREATION � THE PHILADELPHIA SPORTS FAN From the crimson tide of fan-designed Ts, the sold-out season at Citizens Bank Park and the McNabb ovation, to Taserboy and Pukemon, the Philly sports fan added layers of complexity to its rep. � GEARING UP The cycling program for lady ex-cons reinforces what we’ve said for years: Nothing says freedom like a bike. � THE PHILADELPHIA NAKED BIKE RIDE Year two welcomed controversy and doubled ridership. � THE CITY OF BROTHERLY LOVE SOFTBALL LEAGUE The beloved gay and lesbian league won its bid to host the 2011 Women’s Softball World Series.


 

 

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icepack By A.D. Amorosi

³ I’M NOT A HOLY MAN (see any of Icepack’s

more autobiographical moments), but I have my God and never lost my religion. Holding the spirit close is better than having nothing at all, honest. That’s why I implore all-y’all with cash to save historic Philly churches that may be lost to messy but unnecessary blight, non-occupancy and potential destruction. We’re talking about the Gothic-style church at 37th and Baring in Powelton Village and Church of the Assumption on Spring Garden in NoLibs, but that’s just the start. Philly has more than a few misused holy spaces. Do not lose yourself to eternal damnation. (OK, maybe a few of you can go.) Pay in, moneybags. ³ Speaking of: The cost of this weekend’s Rock ’n’ Roll Fantasy Camp at the Troc with Kip Winger, a Hooter and a Hudson Bros. bro is waaay over a thou. You can watch VH1’s Mark Burnett reality show version. I’m not saying don’t go. God wants you to rock out fantastically and jam with Grand Funk Railroad members. Just find a way to do both. ³ Parting with food-faves is hard to swallow. Lacroix chef Jason Cichonski leaves his Rittenhouse digs this week (boo) with a self-owned space to follow (yay). My beloved, always empty sushi BYOB Ro-Zu on Bainbridge is rumored to be throwing in the towel. I’m wasobbing. ³ 1812’s Pete Pryor won’t be at NYC’s Intercontinental Hotel for the Oct. 25 luncheon celebrating his comedy theater troupe’s National Theatre Co. Grant from the American Theatre Wing (even though only 10 theater companies will receive the prestigious award). He’ll be too busy rehearsing for The Three Musketeers, The Later Years at People’s Light & Theatre (starts Nov. 17). Besides, Pryor is no longer on the administrative side of 1812. “But I’m pleased as punch for Jen [Childs], and the national recognition our company deserves.” And while Childs’ll eat something swank that day, Pryor will have Vietnamese pho for lunch (“I love that stuff”) and await the fate of the due-in-2010 film Mayor Cupcake with Lea Thompson and Judd Nelson.“The shoot was a blast. I met representatives of the Brat Pack and hung out at the beach. It felt like the ’80s again, only more wrinkly.” ³When Philly soul’s best gal, Gretchen Elise, releases a CD, she doesn’t just let it drop. The crooning momto-be will hold a party at World Café Live for Time & Space Oct. 27, with a crack band (Naeemah Maddox, Pete Gaudioso, Anam Owili-Eger), ace choreography (Fatima Adamu), an eco-conscious fashion show with Ivy Glass Ecouture’s collection and FOE Company’s winterwear. And the whole thing benefits Camden nonprofit Unity Community Center. Dag. ³ More Ice, in Cube form, at citypaper.net/criticalmass. (a_amorosi@citypaper.net)

DISCIPLES OF THE WATCH: In an odd juxtaposition, a collection of marble heads rests on furry white pedestals in Virgil Marti’s “Set Pieces” at the ICA. AARON IGLER/ GREENHOUSE MEDIA

[ visual art ]

THE PUZZLER Virgil Marti’s reflective “Set Pieces” is a study in reconfiguration. By Shaun Brady

A

voice appears, as if from out of nowhere, before Virgil Marti emerges, crawling out from underneath a display at the Institute of Contemporary Art. It’s an appropriate entrance for the Philly-based artist, whose work delights in separating function from form and reuniting them in unexpected ways. He’d been busy setting up an array of deceptive shadows cast by a horde of small bronze figurines, an effect inspired by Alain Resnais’ Last Year at Marienbad. Like the ambiguous, evershifting relationships between the characters in that film, the connections between the myriad objects in “Set Pieces,” the new show curated by Marti, may seem enigmatic at first. But a careful viewing teases out thematic echoes — while at the same time opening new mysteries. Marti was given relatively free rein to scour the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s storage to cull items for the show. “I’d never done anything like this before, so looking at the amount of stuff they have and trying to figure out what to do with it or what’s possible was a pretty daunting process,” Marti says. “If it wasn’t for having to put a show together, it would just have been fun. But I didn’t want to seem like a dilettante, another person who thinks they can curate.” His selections include paintings, sculpture, furniture and décor, all sharing space and arranged so each object reflects the other in

oblique ways. A Claes Oldenburg drum kit shares a vitrine with a Duchamp bust of Aesop and a 19th-century forgery of St. John. These forms are twinned by a collection of marble heads resting on furry white pedestals, a louche classicism straight out of ’60s popart cinema — and, in fact, inspired by Antonioni’s L’Avventura, the first of five films scheduled to be screened at International House in conjunction with the exhibition. “I have a certain narrative in my head when I look at these things,” Marti says, “but I like people to come and find their own way through it.” Marti, whose own work tends to explore and subvert the decorative arts, chose objects that fulfill much the same purpose when placed in this alien context and in such odd juxtapositions — a Dorothea Tanning is partially shielded from view by a semicircle of tilt-top tables, all resting underneath a collection of degraded Chippendale mirrors. “When I make a chandelier,” Marti explains, “it’s a sculpture of a chandelier to me, but it also is a chandelier. The museum does kind of the same thing where they’re not using these as tables, they’re setting them aside as a type of form.” Mirrors and mirrored surfaces are a constant theme throughout the show, beginning with the model of the Fairmount Water Works — pre-PMA — that welcomes attendees to the gallery. Nearby hang two still lifes whose off-balance compositions leave significant areas of black, which, set behind glass, absorb the viewer into the image.

“I didn’t want to seem like a dilettante.”

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[ ruling with panache and benevolence ] Fat Wreck Chords all-star team Me First and the Gimme Gimmes is pop punk’s greatest cover act. Which, yes, makes them lords of a small fiefdom. But it’s one they rule with panache and benevolence, meting anthemic, shout-along versions of country (“Goodbye Earl”), show tunes (“Over the Rainbow”) and classics both popular (“I Am a Rock”) and obscure (“One Tin Soldier”) in equal measure. And if you can’t get behind a guy named Spike singing a 100 percent earnest version of “Natural Woman,” you deserve to be expelled from the kingdom. (Hmm. Their Tuesday show at North Star is sold out, so maybe you —Brian Howard knew all this.)

³ comics There are, of course, plenty of recognizable names in The Best American Comics 2010 (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Sept. 28) — Ben Katchor, Chris Ware, Robert Crumb, Chris Ware again — but some equally worthwhile entries are turned in by relative rookies like Theo Ellsworth and Gabrielle Bell. Which, cough, makes me think of City Paper’s annual Comics Issue, which is now accepting entries. (More info at citypaper.net/comicsissue.) —Patrick Rapa

Where other artists might limit themselves to one or two sonic tricks per track, Sufjan Stevens isn’t shy about making room for a little bit of everything. His new album, The Age of Adz (Asthmatic Kitty), concludes with one of his most ambitious pieces. Some 25-plus minutes long, “Impossible Soul” works in a full choir, auto-tune and a dancefloor breakdown. After all that, there’s still 10 more joyous minutes. —Eric Schuman

³ movies/festival

GRINDERLAND! The Epic of Gilgamesh A pretty little black A-line dress I give to you The spinal cord of JFK Wrapped in Marilyn Monroe’s negligee I give to you. —Grinderman, “Palaces of Montezuma” ³ HAD BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN not converted

The Philadelphia Asian American Film Festival (Oct. 21-24, phillyasianfilmfest.org) celebrates its third season with a collection of homegrown movies that highlight the local Asian-American experience. Two biggies in this lineup of shorts, docs and full-lengths are writer/ director Sebastian Ho Conley’s cutesy, partially animated love story Colin Hearts Kay, and The People I’ve Slept With, a spicy feature by Quentin Lee about anonymous sex and unplanned pregnancy. Whoops. —Josh Middleton

[ movie review ]

HEREAFTER

to Islam shortly after rescuing the crew of the Challenger and remained a rock ’n’ roll musician, it’s highly improbable that he would have made another recording that rivaled Darkness on the Edge of Town. Even if Megan’s Law hadn’t prevented The Beatles from reuniting, it’s a safe bet that none of their output would ever compare to the majesty of their greatest work: “Hang on Sloppy.” This is because every great artist has an initial brief period of highly original productivity followed by decades of unlistenable, self-indulgent crap. The exception to this rule — indeed, the exception to every rule — is Nick Cave. Not only has Nick Cave not made a shitty CD in the last 30 years, but he actually manages to top himself with each release, and Cave’s latest, Grinderman 2, is not only his greatest work, it could also, quite possibly, be the greatest rock ’n’ roll record ever made. Smart without being pretentious. Funny without being trite. Sonically dense without devolving into noise-for-the-sake-of-noise-arty-bullshit. This is simply a powerful CD, both lyrically and musically, that you should own. Verdict: Shortly before you die in a mysterious boating accident at the age of 86, you’ll make a list of list of your favorite recordings, and on that list — rubbing elbows with Bowie’s Station to Station — will be Grinderman 2. (r_anonymous@citypaper.net)

✚ Grinderman

Grinderman 2

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(ANTI)

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[ C+ ] CLINT EASTWOOD IS no stranger to death — much of his career has been spent either doling it out or wrestling with its consequences. But Hereafter marks the first time the taciturn icon has peered beyond the inevitable, and the result suggests that the question of What Comes Next is not one the octogenarian filmmaker has spent much time pondering. Written by Peter Morgan with a soggy sobriety in place of the glib acidity that characterized his scripts for The Queen, Frost/Nixon and The Damned United, the film interweaves three stories of lives touched by an intimacy with death: a man (Matt Damon) with apparently legit psychic powers, an ability to communicate with the dead caused by a childhood illness; a young British boy (George and Frankie McLaren) whose twin brother is struck and killed by a car; and a French anchorwoman (Cécile De France) who suffers a near-death experience when a tsunami strikes an unnamed resort town. The three strands inevitably meet up, under circumstances so lazily contrived that the climactic sequence feels like off-brand Iñárritu. Suffice it to say that after all the brushes with death, the trio’s ultimate connection is brought about not by a life-threatening crisis but by a Derek Jacobi reading at a London book fair. Hereafter posits a definite afterlife, but a decidedly agnostic one. Throughout De France’s quest for meaning and McLaren’s attempts to contact his brother, neither look to religion for possible answers. She does eventually turn her journalist’s eye to the topic, railing against a conspiracy to discredit allegedly “irrefutable evidence” of the afterlife, a curious argument amidst all the carefully cultivated ambiguity. The glimpses Eastwood does allow of the other side are brief flashes of figures silhouetted against a white light. It’s a hazy, Oprah-worthy spirituality evidencing the gooey fingerprints of executive producer Steven Spielberg more than its director. Even this decided atheist, convinced that any afterlife is simply wishful thinking, is left asking, “Clint, is that all there is?” —Shaun Brady

Carefully cultivated ambiguity.

WATER, WATER EVERYWHERE: Clint Eastwood’s Hereafter opens at a breakneck pace, with a French TV anchor (Cécile De France, right) trying to outrun a tsunami.

Rodney Anonymous vs. the world

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³ rock/covers

flickpick

aidorinvade

³ song

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[ kaleidoscope ]


FOUNTAINS OF ’WEEN

³ CAPTAIN FISHSTICKER’S SHIP OF HORRORS We’ve all lost our wits in a haunted house or two, but not many of us can say we’ve been aboard a ship occupied by zombies and anxietywreaking mermaids. Based on a tale by Revival Burlesque regular Max Guerin, Big Ship of Horrors revolves around the ghost of Captain Fishsticker — with a little strip-tease action thrown in for good measure. Guests will be ushered around the 177-foot-long horror craft by Lara Croftish: Ghost Hunter, who’ll try to protect you with her fierce burlesque skills as you cross the bow, galley and pilothouse full of all kinds of scary-ass shit. You better hope the ghouls have an affinity for boo-bies. Oct. 27-31, 8-10 p.m., $20, Tall Ship Gazela, Columbus Boulevard and Market Street, 800-838-3006, gazela.org.

³ HAUNTED MUSEUM MASQUERADE Travel back to the 1920s at the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s Jazz Age masquerade party, a festive take on its weekly Art After

5 Series. Performances include vintage jazz and swing by Drew Nugent & the Midnight Society, tap dancing by Gin Minsky and a decadent, days-gone-by dance party with Dances of Vice. When you’re not fox-trotting in Great Stair Hall, peruse some of the museum’s eerier paintings, like Rousseau’s Carnival Evening or Salvador Dali’s Soft Construction with Boiled Beans (Premonition of Civil War). Costumes are half the fun, so make sure to don your best flapper dress or your most ridiculous van Gogh sunflower. Fri., Oct. 29, 5 p.m., free with $16 admission, Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2600 Ben Franklin Parkway, 215-684-7506, philamuseum.org.

³ OLD CITY HALLOWEEN 2010 The first-ever Old City Halloween tour presents an ideal outing for families. Hosted by Trust Gallery, the neighborhood-centric event happens in two parts. First, spend the morning decorating trick-ortreat bags with your kids while they nibble on historic treats from Franklin Fountain. Later, keep your eyes peeled for the orange balloons directing you to candy-toting businesses, like the Betsy Ross

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Cyborg One Comics owner James Frazier is throwing a three-part Halloween soiree to celebrate a new television series based on the popular comic book The Walking Dead. Fittingly, it all begins with a zombie crawl. Participants will meet at the store for touchups (fake blood, creepy makeup) before making trick-or-treat rounds to Baked on Main, Doylestown Bookshop and Siren Records. The “surreal mob of shambling zombies” that Frazier anticipates will end up at the County Theater for a 9:15 p.m. screening of Night of the Living Dead, hosted by horror magazine Fangoria. When the movie wraps up, Doylestown crawlers can calm their nerves with a nightcap at Maxwell’s on Main. Sun., Oct. 31, 7:30 p.m., $5, 44 E. State St. rear, Doylestown, 215-348-1451, cyborg1.com. (daniella.wexler@citypaper.net)

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October 28 - 31

³ DOYLESTOWN ZOMBIE CRAWL

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BY

Haunted Museum Masquerade

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I

n Philadelphia, you could easily celebrate Halloween every weekend in October. And if you wanted, you could bank on staples like Eastern State Penitentiary’s Terror Behind the Walls and the Halloween Festival in Fitler Square to fill up your calendar. But it’s fun to step outside the box, so we’ve gathered a cauldron full of haps that could’ve easily slipped under your spook-dar. Now all you need is a costume.

a&e

House, and the J. Karma and Three Sirens boutiques. Oh, and don’t forget to dress up your dogs and cats: There’re costume competitions for tots and furry friends alike. Sat., Oct. 31, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., $20, Trust Gallery, 249 Arch St., 215-592-8400, oldcityhalloween.com.

Fun-size treats to trick out the most hallowed of holidays. By Daniella Wexler

the naked city | feature

[ arts & entertainment ]

[ spooky, scary ]


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CITY

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THANKS FOR READING

PAPER

30 | P H I L A D E L P H I A C I T Y PA P E R |

THE PENNSYLVANIA NEWSPAPER ASSOCIATION’S 2010 NEWSPAPER OF THE YEAR!

,

Philadelphia City Paper garnered first-place nods for Newswriting Excellence, Layout & Design and Editorial/Opinion Page Excellence. It took second place awards for Advertising Excellence, Best Use of Photography and Special Section.


[ arts & entertainment ]

John Vettese sees what develops

“We weren’t rebuilding anything.” by the better images. The final section of “The Lower Nine” acts as a time capsule of sorts: Rather than studying buildings, it looks at objects left exactly as they were on Aug. 29, 2005. A suitcase sits packed and ready to go; a board game lays underneath it. A shirt still hangs on a hanger, waiting to be pressed. It feels archaeological, but is also evidence of an ongoing crisis that has become a historical footnote rather than a focal point. Molieri says that combing through her contact sheets while preparing for the exhibit brought back both the reality of what happened, and the discomforting sensation she felt upon arriving in New Orleans. “You don’t think about it every day, it’s not as pressing,” she says. “We’ve moved on. But there are still tens of thousands of blighted houses; there are still children who have not returned to school.” (j_vettese@citypaper.net)

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I wanted them to feel the shell shock I felt.” Christina Molieri stands in the warm lobby of the William Way Community Center, surrounded by stark images of destruction in pointed silver gelatin prints. “The Lower Nine: A Post-Katrina Odyssey” (through Oct. 31) documents the Philly photographer’s time volunteering with Common Ground, a relief organization based in the section of New Orleans hit hardest by the hurricane five years ago. One image shows a building reduced to a splintery shack; it sits down the road from the I-10 overpass where helicopters swooped in and recovered trapped residents. Another depicts a rusted lock box; when her work crew popped it open, they found a house deed and an old coin collection. Nearby hangs a photo of recovered baby pictures from a christening. “Water preserves the strangest things,” Molieri recalls, adding that a member of her team uncovered the Aug. 28, 2005, edition of the TimesPicayune. Headline: “Katrina Takes Aim.” The devastation looks intense, but the images were taken nearly a year and a half after Katrina made landfall. Molieri volunteered in March of 2007 while enrolled at Bryn Mawr College. “We were discussing all these issues about social justice, all this theory,” she says. “And I thought, ‘What am I doing? I’m in a classroom.’” Upon arrival, the pace of recovery shocked her. The French Quarter seemed to have bounced back by comparison; the Lower Ninth Ward still “looked like Beirut.” Molieri laughs when I use the term “rebuilding effort.” “We weren’t rebuilding anything,” she says. “At that point, we were still tearing things down.” For the most part, the first suite of images focuses on those structures. An overgrown backyard encroaches on a collapsing shed. Floor joists crackle. Piles of books and belongings slope off a mattress. In a stunning backlit vertical shot, Molieri’s team drags debris from a basement that’s been reduced to barely stable wooden frames. Absent from this section of the exhibit, for the most part, are people. Molieri says that, along with nonprofit groups, Katrina attracted plenty of gawkers — filmmakers and magazine photographers studying the natural disaster with cold detachment.

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³ “I WANTED PEOPLE to be able to smell the mold.

“That’s not why I went down,” she says. “I was working alongside people who were living this nightmare — I didn’t want to be disrespectful.” But total restraint proved difficult. Molieri’s camera began to join her on daily expeditions. At first, as reflected in the bleak images on the west wall of William Way, it was trained solely on her work. Move to the opposite side of the room, and we see a spark of life. After staying in the Lower Ninth for a week, Molieri encountered a traditional second line brass band parading through the neighborhood, and feverishly shot what she saw. The scene started off slow and mournful, she recalls, before turning into a celebration. You can see the photographer’s excitement in the blurry exposure and unsteady framing of some shots; you can see the residents’ determination in the weathered faces captured

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CRISIS CONNECTION

the naked city | feature

fullexposure

31


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Thursday, October 21 Saturday, October 23* Sunday, October 24*

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the naked city | feature

ction. giveaways galore.

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play with your Xclub card to earn free slot play for each point the birds score!

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shorts

“ ����. ‘RED’ HAS THE MOST

– Sally Kline, THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

“THE BEST PART OF ‘RED’

IS THE SPECTACLE OF TERRIFIC ACTORS BEING TERRIFIC IN NOVEL WAYS.”

– Joe Morgenstern, THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

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GLITTERING ENSEMBLE CAST AND MOST DEFIANT ATTITUDE OF ANY MOVIE THIS YEAR.”

a&e

FILMS ARE GRADED BY CITY PAPER CRITICS A-F.

– Roger Moore, ORLANDO SENTINEL

the naked city | feature

movie

“THE BEST CAST FOR AN ACTION COMEDY…EVER.”

“‘RED’ IS ABSOLUTELY, THOROUGHLY ENJOYABLE. IT ROCKS.”

– Robert Wilonsky, LA WEEKLY

“EXPLOSIVE, FUNNY AND LOADED WITH ACTION!!”

Stone

✚ NEW CONVICTION|B

HEREAFTER See Shaun Brady’s review on p. 27. (Ritz Five, UA 69th St., UA Main St.)

PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2 See Drew Lazor’s review at citypaper.net/movies. (Pearl, Rave, UA 69th St., UA Main St., UA Riverview )

STONE|C“She’s a alien,” says Stone (Edward Norton), “a alien from another world.” He hardly seems to be joking as he describes his wife, Lucetta (Milla Jovovich). She’s a “freak” and a “perfect 10,” too, and thinking about her helps Stone get through his days in prison. Or so he tells his caseworker, Jack (Robert De Niro), who is inevitably intrigued, though he insists he’s not. What follows is a set of games and seductions, premised on the men’s fascinations with Lucetta’s affect — a little country, a lot modeled on trashy-pop girls (she has a pink cell phone and has sex with strangers because she can), all of which makes her both “alien” and utterly familiar. Jack’s wife, Madylyn (Frances Conroy), is slightly less predictable, if only because she’s been so abused emotionally that she’s turned to Bible verses and drink to escape her husband daily. The film offers philosophical questions (Stone asks Jack, “Why do you get to walk around free and I don’t?”) as well as moral and spiritual puzzles (Jack listens to right-wing Christian radio in his sanctuary of a car). As the men find their focus through violence, the women remain mysterious. You know: as it ever was. —Cindy Fuchs (Ritz at the Bourse)

VISION|B When blond, sickly 80-year-old Hildegard von Bingen remembers first arriving at the Benedictine monastery where she will live for most of her life during the 12th century, she stumbles onto a penitent’s whipping. With the connection she makes between her own frailty and

“GO SEE THIS MOVIE.

‘RED’ IS JUST FLAT-OUT FUN!” – Kelli Gillespie, XETV CW6

SUMMIT ENTERTAINMENT PRESENTS A di BONAVENTURA PICTURES PRODUCTION A ROBERT SCHWENTKE FILM “RED” KARL URBAN WITH RICHARD DREYFUSS PRODUCED MUSIC BY LORENZO di BONAVENTURA MARK VAHRADIAN BY CHRISTOPHE BECK BASED ON THE SCREENPLAY DIRECTED BY ROBERT SCHWENTKE BY JON HOEBER & ERICH HOEBER GRAPHIC NOVEL BY WARREN ELLIS AND CULLY HAMNER © 2010 SUMMIT ENTERTAINMENT, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

MOBILE USERS: For Showtimes, Text Message RED and Your ZIP CODE to 43KIX (43549)

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Sure, Betty Ann Waters (Hilary Swank), the single mother of two who got her GED and put herself through law school to exonerate her wrongly incarcerated brother Kenny (Sam Rockwell), is yet another plucky heroine for the two-time Academy Award-winner Swank to sink her big teeth into. And it’s easy to dismiss this true story as a maudlin inspirational drama better suited for a Lifetime movie of the week. But under the sure hand of actor-turned-director Tony Goldwyn, Conviction actually overcomes its disadvantages (hey — just like Betty Ann!) and becomes quite an emotionally affecting film. Viewers who give themselves over to the unsurprising story may even feel goose bumps as Betty Ann learns about DNA testing, or tracks down crucial evidence. Goldwyn makes the bond between these siblings palpable — forming the heart and backbone of his absorbing film — and he coaxes stirring performances from both Swank, who alternately cries and shows her moxie, and Rockwell, who shrewdly never tries to make his character too sympathetic. In support, Juliette Lewis chews the scenery with relish in a critical role. Conviction proves itself to be more entertaining than didactic, and this approach serves heartrending (if treacly) material well. Betty Ann’s remarkable story was destined to be a film, and thankfully, Goldwyn provides her tale with a semblance of justice. —Gary M. Kramer (Visit citypaper.net/criticalmass to read an interview with director Tony Goldwyn.) (Ritz East)

–Mosé Persico, CTV MONTREAL


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the purposeful vulnerability of spiritual devotion, Hildegard grows up to be a nun (played by Barbara Sukawa) with her own ideas. She also has visions, which thrill her confidant, Brother Volmar (Heino Ferch), but threaten Abt Kuno (Alexander Held) — though he’s eager to exploit the potential for money and fame if outsiders believe her. As magistra, Hildegard trains the sisters in the “healing powers of nature,” singing and even dramatic theater, all in search of a closer relationship to God without need of the men who usually serve as intermediaries (and also impregnate young nuns, traditionally without consequence). When she moves the nuns to their own cloister (likening herself to Moses), some resist the initial hardship, while others find their own voices in their new space. Though Margarethe von Trott’s movie proceeds episodically,

it does take a few moments to note Hildegard’s loss of bearings in a shifting (alternately maternal, lesbianish, master-servant) relationship with a worshipful novice, Richardis von Stade (Hannah Herzsprung). Their story isn’t developed so much as it serves as yet another sign of Hildegard’s proto-feminist self-awareness, self-loss and messy complexity. —C.F. (Ritz at the Bourse)

Yael Hersonski’s film reassembles that footage of the Warsaw ghetto residents, accompanied by readings from diaries and transcripts, and shots of ghetto survivors watching that footage. Nazi cameraman Willy Wist remembers shooting victims assembled at a graveyard, anticipating their end; imagining what that’s like makes A Film Unfinished so daunting, so astute and so memorable. —C.F. (Ritz at the Bourse)

✚ CONTINUING

IT’S KIND OF A FUNNY STORY|D+

A FILM UNFINISHED|A Preserved in a 62-minute project titled Das Ghetto, the faces of A Film Unfinished are both haunted and haunting, their skin stretched tight and their eyes unavoidable. They are also silent, like all of Das Ghetto, an unfinished Nazi propaganda film discovered in an East German vault during the 1950s.

“THE MOVIE OF THE YEAR. ”P E T E R T R AV E R S

Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck’s feeble attempt at following in the footsteps of Juno and (500) Days of Summer is a catastrophic botch. The tragedy is that there’s a decent movie hidden among the jokey cutaways, one in which a suicidal teen (Keir Gilchrist) checks himself in to the hospital for observation and finds he’s less crazy than he’d like to think. —Sam Adams (Ritz at the Bourse)

[ movie shorts ]

JACKASS 3D Johnny Knoxville and his band of dumb-ass daredevils have cooked up another round of numbskullery that’s at turns inventive (cavorting in the engine exhaust of a parked fighter plane) and disgusting (Sweatsuit Cocktail). But there’s something missing in the post-coital banter — the O-face reaction shots, such a touchstone of the series’ appeal, seem lackluster, and even Knoxville has a touch of weariness in his face. Which isn’t to say that Jackass 3D isn’t worth your time, or that it is. It’s more that it feels like a swan song. —Brian Howard (Pearl, Rave, UA 69th St., UA Riverview)

LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE|CFilled to the brim with more aurally paralyzing fantasy names than a caffeine-addled Dungeons & Dragons

“ABSORBING, GRITTY AND TOTALLY ENGROSSING. DON’T MISS IT!” – Steve O’Brien, WCBS-FM

session, Legend of the Guardians is just too much. This barrage-of-stimuli approach usually works for director Zack Snyder (300, Watchmen), but in the case of this animated adaptation, it’s downright stultifying. —Drew Lazor (UA 69th St., UA Riverview)

LET ME IN|B Matt Reeves’ English-language remake of Let the Right One In is superfluous but basically harmless. Kodi Smit-McPhee and Chloë Moretz fill the roles of a shy boy and his mysterious new neighbor. They’re both lonely, but as it turns out, the sorrow of a child of divorce is not so different from the ageless angst of a preteen vampire. —S.A. (Pearl, UA Riverview) LIFE AS WE KNOW IT|CThe meet-cute: The couple who tried to set up perky control freak Holly (Katherine Heigl) and gruff dude-bro Messer (Josh Duhamel) have tragically died in a car accident, leaving behind their toddler in this case of matchmaking-from-the-grave. Heigl’s petty narcissism hogs a spotlight that would be better pointed toward the well-being of the kid, and even when Holly and Messer engage in the kind of early-parenthood activities one might look back on fondly, there’s little joy to be found. —Carolyn Huckabay (UA 69th St., UA Riverview)

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MY SOUL TO TAKE 3D A haiku: Guess who’s back! Why it’s a psycho killer that you never heard of yet. (Not reviewed) (Pearl, UA 69th St., UA Riverview)

“T

H E B E S T P I C T U R E.

IT SENDS YOU OUT OF THE THEATER BUZZING, BREATHLESS AND EAGER TO TELL ALL OF YOUR FRIENDS, AND ‘FRIENDED’ FRIENDS, THAT YOU’VE JUST

SEEN WHAT MIGHT END UP BEING THE BEST PICTURE OF THE YEAR. B O B M O N D E L LO

“ONCE-IN-A-GENERATION. A S E N S AT I O N A L , H Y P E R K I N E T I C , O N C E - I N - A - G E N E R AT I O N M OV I E . AN UP- TO- THE-MINUTE DARWINIAN FABLE THAT RUSHES HE A D LON G ON A TSUNAMI OF SNAPPING VERBIAGE. THIS IS A TOUR DE FORCE. STEPHEN HOLDEN

“A

“A SUPERBLY CRAFTED, smartly acted, suspense-filled THRILLER.” – Susan Granger, SSG SYNDICATE

“POWERFUL and PROVOCATIVE.” – Stephen Whitty, THE STAR-LEDGER

“DEAD-ON lead PERFORMANCES from Robert De Niro and Edward Norton.” – Peter Debruge, VARIETY

B R I L L I A N T M O V I E.” FRANK RICH

SCREENPLAY BY

AARON SORKIN

DIRECTED BY

CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

Nowhere Boy, the Sam Taylor-Wood-directed biopic about the teenage years of John Lennon, is most insightful in its deft deconstruction of the complicated triangle between John (a pitch-perfect Aaron Johnson); his aunt Mimi (Kristin Scott Thomas), who raised him; and Julia (Anne-Marie Duff), who gave him up as a young mother. Duff’s portrayal of Julia is most enthralling: part manic rock ’n’ roll lover, part depressive recluse whose feelings for her firstborn seem to teeter perilously in their gushing abundance between motherly affection and teenage lust. —B.H. (Ritz at the Bourse)

N-SECURE STRONG SEXUALITY AND VIOLENCE, AND PERVASIVE LANGUAGE

DAVID FINCHER

NOWHERE BOY|A

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENTS

START FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22

CENTER CITY LANDMARK THEATRES

RITZ AT THE BOURSE

Check Directories For Showtimes. No Passes Accepted. Center City 215-925-7900

NEW JERSEY RAVE MOTION PICTURES

RITZ CENTER 16 Voorhees 856-783-2726

A haiku: It’s too bad that the IMDB descriptions don’t make aNy sense. (Not reviewed) (Pearl, UA 69th St., UA Riverview)


CASE 39 UA Riverview

TAKERS Pearl WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS UA Riverview For movie full reviews and showtimes, go to citypaper.net/movies.

RED|AWhen old Joe (Morgan Freeman), an ex-CIA desk-jobber, smiles and says “we’re getting the band back together,” that’s a good time to take stock of your team. Besides himself there’s elegant assassin Victoria (Helen Mirren), LSD-ravaged nutball assassin Marvin (John Malkovich) and relative youngster Frank Moses (Bruce Willis); all are Retired, Extremely Dangerous black ops with no signs of bone loss or back problems; and all are armed to the teeth. RED is as much a comedy as it is a smart shoot-’em-up, with quips sometimes spraying as wildly as the bullets. Give some props to the kids — Mary-Louise Parker and Karl Urban — but this one’s a salute to the old-heads. —Patrick Rapa (Pearl, UA 69th St., UA Riverview)

A haiku: They used to whip me to make me run. So I ran. Now I’m ghost horse glue. (Not reviewed) (UA Riverview)

Davis Guggenheim offers an impassioned argument against the neglect of the U.S. education system in his latest film, and while it inevitably recycles W’s famous “Childrens do learn” gaffe, Waiting for “Superman” is hardly partisan. He not only lodges complaints about the status quo, but actually offers a number of solutions. —S.B. (Ritz East)

Two married couples, destabilized by their inability to live in the present, quickly become four in this Woody

“‘HEREAFTER’ OPENS WITH THE MOST EXCITING FLOOD SCENE IN MOVIE HISTORY. IT LAUNCHES THE MOVIE WITH

A WONDROUS BLEND OF ART, TECHNIQUE AND ENTERTAINMENT.” Richard Corliss,

More on:

YOU WILL MEET A TALL DARK STRANGER|B

THE HALLMARK OF EASTWOOD AS A FILMMAKER.”

Roger Ebert,

citypaper.net ✚ CHECK OUT REPERTORY F I L M L I S T I N G S AT C I T Y PA P E R . N E T / R E P F I L M .

“CLINT EASTWOOD DELIVERS THE UNEXPECTED.” Kenneth Turan,

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EXPERIENCE THE EXTRAORDINARY JOURNEY OF ONE WOMAN’S 18-YEAR STRUGGLE TO SET HER BROTHER FREE

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Claudia Puig,

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“A RIVETING DRAMA

infused with Oscar®-caliber performances.” P H I L A D E L P H I A C I T Y PA P E R | O C T O B E R 2 1 - O C T O B E R 2 8 , 2 0 1 0 | C I T Y PA P E R . N E T |

SECRETARIAT

WAITING FOR “SUPERMAN”|B+

Allen sex farce. Allen’s lost his former snap, but the movie’s uncharacteristically long takes add a degree of intimacy and excitement that he rarely musters nowadays. —S.A. (Ritz at the Bourse)

ENTHRALLING.

“AN INSPIRATIONAL TRUE-LIFE STORY.

The ending will leave you cheering.”

THE SOCIAL NETWORK|AThe Social Network watches the growth of Facebook from the inside, but ends up being less about one specific phenomenon than the minor tremors that ripple outward into world-altering quakes. Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse Eisenberg) envisions Facebook as replicating “the entire social experience of college” online, and The Social Network posits that the Digital Age has become Revenge of the Nerds, writ large. —Shaun Brady (Pearl, UA Riverview)

THE TOWN|B

THEATRES RAVE MOTION PICTURES EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENTS LANDMARK CENTER 16 RITZ EAST START FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22 Center City 215-925-7900 RITZ Voorhees 856-783-2726

STARTS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22 - CHECK DIRECTORIES FOR LISTINGS

37

Ben Affleck hands himself the thankless challenge of finding life in another criminal with a heart of gold, agreeing to one last job before turn-

the agenda | food | classifieds

INCEPTION Roxy

[ movie shorts ]

a&e

DEVIL UA Riverview

ing his life around. Affleck plays a second-generation thief, the sensitive mastermind behind his team’s heists. He keeps the momentum taut, but the story lacks the depth of his directorial debut. —S.B. (Roxy, UA Riverview)

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✚ ALSO PLAYING


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LISTINGS@CITYPAPER.NET | OCT. 21 - OCT. 28

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the agenda

[ A new view of the urban desert ]

GULL ORIENTED: Philly band a stick and a stone play GenderEDGE at LAVA Space on Tuesday. PAUL WALKER

The Agenda is our selective guide to what’s going on in the city this week. For comprehensive event listings, visit citypaper.net/listings.

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IF YOU WANT TO BE LISTED:

Submit information by mail (City Paper Listings, 123 Chestnut St., Third Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19106) or e-mail (listings@ citypaper.net) to Josh Middleton. Details of the event — date, time, address of venue, telephone number and admission price — should be included. Incomplete submissions will not be considered, and listings information will not be accepted over the phone.

THURSDAY

10.21 [ theater ]

✚ NEIGHBORHOOD 3 Azuka Theatre kicks off its new season with a play that may make you rethink those blinkless hours of World of Warcraft. Jennifer Haley’s Neighborhood 3: Requisition of Doom, loosely based on The

Twilight Zone, is a tale of two teens’ addiction to an online video game — one that’s set in a zombie-infested suburb identical to the one they’re living in. This parallelism, coupled with their foam-out-the-mouth obsession, propels the kids to a place where reality becomes obscured and their parents start to freak out. Possible lesson: Everything in moderation. —Josh Middleton Through Oct. 31, $15-$20, Philadelphia Shakespeare Theater, 2111 Sansom St., 215-733-0255, azukatheatre.org.

[ electronic ]

✚ MATTHEW DEAR Detroit’s Matthew Dear emerged in 2003 as the pretty poster boy of microhouse, a short-lived but pivotal strain of glitch-infused digital disco and tech-pop which has since largely folded itself. Dear, meanwhile, has veered into progressively weirder, more idiosyncratic realms, as a would-be “pop” artist. This

year’s uncompromising Black City (Ghostly) twists his ever-immaculate productions into haunting, mechanically seductive body-music, laced with steely, monochrome vocals and greased up with the sort of pornographic sleaze normally reserved for his rougher-edged Audion alias. Filthy.

troupe, but the big news really is Phantasmagoria, the octogenarian’s electrifying new work. Inspired by Renaissance painter Pieter Bruegel’s Wedding Dance in the Open Air, the piece has been described as a stream-of-consciousness theater event. Doesn’t look like Taylor’s retiring anytime soon.

—K. Ross Hoffman

—Janet Anderson

Thu., Oct. 21, 10 p.m., $10, with Jamaica, Voyeur, 1221 St. James St., 215-735-5772, igetrvng.com.

[ dance ]

✚ PAUL TAYLOR Martha Graham, Jose Limon and Merce Cunningham may be gone, but 80-year-old Paul Taylor, the last of a generation of dance pioneers who changed the way we think about and see movement, is still creating choreography for his muchadmired company. Opening the Annenberg Center’s dance season, Taylor revisits classics Arden Court and Cloven Kingdom with his 17-member

Thu., Oct. 21, 7:30 p.m.; Fri., Oct. 22, 8 p.m.; Sat., Oct. 23, 2 and 8 p.m.; $28-$48, Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, 3680 Walnut St., 215898-3900, annenbergcenter.org.

ish composers Dawud Husni, Zaki Murad and such. But certainly there’s precision in these stoic sweet songs. Once upon a time, this music was played in social clubs, on flutes, zithers, fiddles and bits of percussion, but Laster has corralled cellist Alex Waterman (Elliott Sharp), trombonist/guitarist Curtis Hasselbring (Jazz Passengers) and bassist Kermit Driscoll (John Zorn) for a new view of the urban desert. —A.D. Amorosi

[ jazz ]

Thu., Oct. 21, 8 p.m., free, Rotunda, 4014 Walnut St., arsnovaworkshop.org.

✚ SOUNDS OF CAIRO

[ theater ]

Though associated with NYC’s downtown avant-garde, saxophonist Andy Laster is a Loowng Islandahr whose compositional largesse comes from modern chamber/classical music. His sound is free, rhythm-wise, but also deeply scored and succinct. None of this, necessarily, plays into his performing early-20th-century Egyptian secular songs by Jew-

✚ OLEANNA

cast African-American actress Erika Hicks as the student who accuses the white professor (Paul Kuhn) of impropriety. Kuhn also designed Curio’s innovative set, which makes the claustrophobic play’s spinning-out-of-control vibe literal: Oleanna will unfold on a revolving circular platform surrounded by the audience. —Mark Cofta Oct. 21-Nov. 13, $10-$15, Curio Theatre Co., Calvary Center, 4740 Baltimore Ave., 215-525-1350, curiotheatre.org.

FRIDAY

David Mamet enjoys pissing people off, which he did with savage glee in 1992’s Oleanna — a play that blew the lid off the sexual harassment issue in a politically incorrect, emotionally divisive way. Curio Theatre Co.’s revival ups the stakes by adding race to the mix: Director Gay Carducci

10.22 [ dance ]

✚ SHARP DANCE CO. In a city where dance-theater rules, Diane Sharp-Nachsin calls her eponymous company the odd man out. “We don’t tend


Fri.-Sat., Oct. 22-23, 8 p.m.; Sun., Oct. 24, 3 p.m.; $20, Performance Garage, 1515 Brandywine St., 215-880-2306, sharpdance.org.

food | classifieds

—Deni Kasrel

(Ghostly/Vagrant), and there is certainly an airy detachment to its soaring, sheeny sonics, and an uncanny Zen perfection in its confluence of rhythmic muscle, crushingly thick electro-rock, unabashed vocal prettiness (courtesy of the twin Deheza sisters, one of whom sadly left the band last week) and resoundingly pop melodics. But there’s also a powerfully human warmth and immediacy here that belies any sense of chilly disengagement: SVIIB can do Cocteau Twins ethereality and Kate Bush-grade art-pop as readily as recent tourmates M83 and Bats for Lashes (respectively), but they’re not afraid to shoot for the big, passionate anthemism of Peter Gabriel or U2. Leave your workaday shoegaze retreads at the door.

the agenda

Sharp-Nachsin of her upcoming production, Revelation,“and also make you think.” Hence such topics as female empowerment, the ravages of pollution … and roller coasters.

[ the agenda ]

the naked city | feature | a&e

to the performance-art side,” she says — “we’re more technically driven.” Sharp Dance Co.’s gig is to translate human emotion into contemporary movement. Now in its fifth year, the troupe has gradually gained an enthusiastic fan base while also beefing up its roster, now 10 performers strong. “We like to have some nice and happy,” says

—K. Ross Hoffman Fri., Oct. 22, 9 p.m., $13, with Active Child, Johnny Brenda’s, 1201 N. Frankford Ave., 877-435-9849, johnnybrendas.com.

[ rock/pop ]

✚ THE DRUMS

—K. Ross Hoffman Fri., Oct. 22, 9 p.m., $15, Making Time with Surfer Blood, Voyeur, 1221 St. James St., 215-735-5772, igetrvng.com.

[ rock/shoegaze ]

✚ SCHOOL OF SEVEN BELLS

In her book Love Fraud: How Marriage to a Sociopath Fulfilled My Spiritual Plan (Anderly), South Jersey author Donna Andersen writes about her experience being married to a con man. Her now-ex-husband cheated several times, stole a quarter of a million dollars and had a baby with another woman. Now free as a bird, Andersen will be in town this week for a reading followed by a presentation called “10 Signs That You’re Dating a Sociopath.” The gist: If they’re lying, stealing or cheating, get the hell out. —Caitlin Durkin Fri., Oct. 22, 6 p.m., free, Borders, 1 S. Broad St., 215-568-7400, borders.com.

SATURDAY

10.23 [ puppetry ]

✚ PEOPLEHOOD PARADE & PAGEANT For Spiral Q, puppet-making

39

The stunning new album from these NYC-based mysticalists is named Disconnect from Desire

✚ DONNA ANDERSEN

P H I L A D E L P H I A C I T Y PA P E R | O C T O B E R 2 1 - O C T O B E R 2 8 , 2 0 1 0 | C I T Y PA P E R . N E T |

It can be tricky to sort out just which bygone era these bouncy retro-pop Brooklynites are aiming for. Their tinny synths and bare-bones machine beats are straight out of the early ’80s Factory Records catalog, while their earnestly sunny emotionalism and penchant for doo-wop progressions recall the sweetest turn-of-the-’60s pop — and their spindly, cleanly reverbed guitar lines could almost pass for either. Otherwise, they sorta just sound nostalgic for the happy-go-lucky 2000s, those halcyon days rife with Beach Boys and New Order rips and, of course, whistle hooks: The one sparking their Feelies-ish, feelgood breakout “Let’s Go Surfing” resembles Juelz Santana’s as blown by Peter Bjorn & John.

[ reading/signing ]


the naked city | feature | a&e

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the agenda

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foodanddrink

portioncontrol By Adam Erace

food

LEAF PEEPING

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MUSTARD GREENS | 622 S. Second St., 215627-0833, teapotteapot.com/ttmenu.html. Open Sun.-Thu., 5-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat., 5-11 p.m. Soups, appetizers, vegetables, $2.50-$8; meat dishes, $12-$15; seafood dishes, $12-$23; rice and noodle dishes, $7-$15. ³ EVEN IN TODAY’S enlightened culinary age,

THAT’S A WRAP: A Nicaraguan specialty, El Gallo Pinto’s nacatamales are hard to beat. NEAL SANTOS

[ review ]

HERE COME THE ROOSTER A Central American eatery in a Mexican- and Vietnamese-dominated neighborhood is something to crow about. By Drew Lazor EL GALLO PINTO GROCERY & RESTAURANT | 1163 S. Seventh St., 267-886-9803, elgallopintophilly.com. Open daily, 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Meat dishes, $3-$7; tacos, $6; soups, $8; sides/extras, $3; desserts, $2-$5.

I

citypaper.net

>>> continued on page 48

47

n South Philadelphia, our ethnic dining dollars tend to flow out of our pockets and directly into the coffers of two distinctly different groups, both of which hold down more real estate than Prudential Fox & Roach: More on: the Mexicans and the Vietnamese. But while these two gangs, armed with their verdedrenched enchiladas and their spring rolltopped vermicelli bowls, duke it out for sub-$10 dominance, other contenders have been able to break into the fray below Washington, quietly cooking their own native specialties for a core audience sharp enough to know exactly where to go. One of the absolute best entries in this category is El Gallo Pinto, a three-month-old Central American grocery and eatery under a set of sky-blue awnings at Seventh and Federal. Dania M. Hernandez Vallecio, a native of the city of Ocotal in northwestern Nicaragua, has lived and worked in Philly for a dozen years, but branched out on her own in July. The modest cook

would never tell you this, but she is putting out some of the most distinctive home cooking in all of South Philly, where cultures and cuisines can’t help but back into each other, tapping bumpers more often than the vehicles attending the 24-hour double-parking convention up and down Ritner. Named after the comida tipica rice and beans that has a place in pretty much every meal of her native country (Costa Rica and Honduras, too), El Gallo Pinto is a groceria first, and you’ll concede as much the first time you step in. Several narrow aisles feature shelves stocked with canned food, shampoo, diapers and cleaning supplies. Plastic-wrapped pink and purple umbrellas dangle behind the cash register. There’s a sparsely wienered hot dog roller on a small table up front, next to a tiered produce rack filled with potatoes, tomatoes and onions. But this is a restaurant, too, in case you weren’t able MORE FOOD AND to tell by the lone glass-topped four-top DRINK COVERAGE up front. Peek in back, behind a queso AT C I T Y P A P E R . N E T / fresco-filled deli case, and you’ll find the M E A LT I C K E T. one-person kitchen. Though you’ll sometimes see her working the counter, messing around on her BlackBerry or watching baseball on the mounted flat-screen when it’s slow, the kitchen is where you’ll most often find Vallecio, in an apron and silver flats, bouncing from station to station like a pinball in a hair net, shredding cabbage, holding careful court over a deep fryer or jiggling the handles of sauce pans. This isn’t the fastest food in the neighborhood, because there’s only one person making everything. But just kill some time by browsing the store’s soccer jersey selection or peruse the

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going out for Chinese can still mean going out for Americanized Chinese. You know the stuff: gloopy sauces and gummy wontons, leaky cartons and zodiac mats. If this is now, 2010, imagine what it was like in 1992, the year that saw the opening of a real Cantonese McCoy, Mustard Greens, in Queen Village. Nearly 20 years later, Mustard’s original followers are older, grayer and, judging from a survey of the serene room one recent night, still haunting these hallowed grounds of Cantonese cooking. Sweeping renovations completed this past summer have brought a snug but stylish L-shaped bar to the front of the room and cast the walls in a cool Mentos mint-green that pours down to gleaming wood floors. Black-and-white photos snapped in France, Rwanda and Wildwood create an art-gallery air. The new look will hopefully bring in a transfusion of new blood, ensuring Mustard Greens, unlike some of its clientele, will stay off life support for another two decades. Chef/owner Bon Siu’s food is definitely good enough to bolster that cause, about as similar to Americanized Chinese as a svelte coyote is to an overfed pug. My meal was a vocabulary list of lightness. Ephemeral chicken soup for two, simmered with leaves of succulent Chinese spinach and cubes of tofu, ladled tableside into hand-painted bowls. Diaphanous dumplings, the best I’ve had, featuring glistening pork orbs in slips of skin, pan-fried till caramel-brown and slightly smoky. Delicate mustard greens, a restaurant signature, in a thin, clear sauce sparked with fresh ginger that complemented the natural spiciness of the wilted roughage. If Mustard Greens had an official theme song, it would be OutKast’s “So Fresh, So Clean.” That even extends to entrées like tender pork in snappy “firecracker sauce” that would barely hit a 1 on the Han Dynasty spicy scale but was nonetheless lively; and fluffy fried rice mixed with crunchy snow peas and bits of curry-scented chicken. Complimentary smiles of sweet fresh honeydew sent me on way feeling more spry than when I entered. Mustard Greens is fresh to death, and you don’t need a fortune cookie to figure it out. (adam.erace@citypaper.net)


Let the feeding frenzy begin. Food news, recipes, menu exclusives

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[ food & drink ]

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food

By Drew Lazor

5 TO 7 at BARS - MONDAY-FRIDAY PLUS ONLY $3 for WELL & $4 for CALL: Cuervo, Bacardi, Stoli, Jack Daniels, Absolut, Tanqueray, $6 Martinis $3 Domestic Beer $4 Imports & Micros

³ NOW SEATING Café L’Aube | Jean-Luc Fanny, who opened his first

Cafe L’Aube at 1512 South St. two years ago, has added a Fairmount location. Situated on the corner of 17th and Wallace, the pretty café (above) has more seating room than its older brother, but it offers the same menu of sweet and savory crepes and sandwiches; this spot, however, serves Liège waffles, which are denser and chewier than the fluffier Brussels style Fanny does on South. The coffee beans are roasted by Fanny himself. 1631 Wallace St.

50 | P H I L A D E L P H I A C I T Y PA P E R |

O C T O B E R 2 1 - O C T O B E R 2 8 , 2 0 1 0 | C I T Y PA P E R . N E T

Good Karma Café | In other second-spot news, Good

Karma’s David Arrell has expanded with a new location near Ninth and Pine. Joining the original at 331 S. 22nd, this café is more than twice the size of its predecessor and features a quiet area for study or meetings. Same food/ coffee approach, but Arrell plans on expanding his offerings a bit here since he has the added room (they’ll be making their own sandwiches and salads in-house by spring). Same hours as the original: daily, 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. 928 Pine St., 267-519-8860, thegoodkarmacafe.com. B.B. Go Fusion Rice Bar | Open for about a month

at 18th and Ludlow, B.B. Go is a quick-serve restaurant specializing in bibimbap, the Korean rice/veggie dish that can be had with everything from marinated beef to tofu and seasoned seaweed. The eatery also offers dubbap dishes (steamed rice topped with chicken, short rib, pork, etc.) and apps like seafood pancakes and japchae (stir-fried noodles). Hours: Mon.-Fri., 11 a.m.- 9 p.m.; Sat., noon- 8 p.m. 20 S. 18th St., 215-569-3905, bbgorestaurant.com. ³ LITTLE VITTLES Le Pain Quotidien looks to open its first Philly location

at 1423-25 Walnut before the end of the year. ³ Here’s to Philly’s Marc Vetri, who defeated Michael Symon in a veal battle on an episode of Food Network’s Iron Chef America on Sunday. Catch a re-airing tonight at 9 and midnight; and Saturday night at 5 and 11. Got A Tip? Please send restaurant news to drew.lazor@citypaper.net

or call 215-735-8444, ext. 218.


(T.S.) JEWEL

Black/Tridiaian mixed beauty with the body, the face, and a nice surprise below my waist. Very passable, very sexy and extremely please-able! So 4 a mind blowing experience call *82-215-459-5838.(NE AREA) TASTE ME...TEASE ME!!! (T.S. EXPLOSION)

TRANSSEXUAL ALEXIS (SOUTH PHILLY BABY!)

21y/o Erotic light-brown skinned goddess. Cum taste MY milkshake! It’s all you need (very high in protein!) I welcume ALL 1st timers. I offer sensuous body massages, Ready, willing and a bl e t o p l e a s e y o u . I ’ m waiting for your call NOW!! 215-626-7818. (South Philly location) TRANSSEXUAL GEISHA

TRAINED IN THE ART OF E N T E R TA I N I N G M E N ! NORTHEAST LOCATION 5’10-36C WITH A SEXY LONG 9FF! 215-722-3423. VANESSA FOXXX (T.S.)

Sexy, Hot and Hung 34DD24-36, Bi-Racial Beauty. Very dominant! Looking to get that ass pounded? I’m the girl 4 you! By appt. Call 267-9867574. WANNA TEST DRIVE A MERCEDES! (T.S.)

Looking for the BEST in TS ACTION The BEST in GFE. You know you want an Upscale Girl who can provide the best Quality

WE’LL BLOW YOU AWAY!!

T R A N S S E X UA L B L O W FEST!! DOUBLE THE PLEASURE 2 IS ALWAYS BETTER THAN ONE! 2 TOP NOTCH RICAN FREAK ASS TRANSSEXUALS! VANESSA & VICTORIA. 215-288-0103. HAVE US BOTH OR SEPARATE. NORTHEAST LOCATION. 24 HR SERVICE. NON-STOP HARDCORE ACTION!

Men For Men BATTLE OF THE BIRDS (M4M X-RATED)

19Y/O TOP, 5’7, 140LBS. S M O OT H T I G H T B O DY, D I RT Y B L O N D E , B L U E EYES, LET’S GET DOWN DIRTY 8”! YOUNG NUBILE ON THE SCENE.. ALL INCLUDED MASSAGE ESCORT. 24HR. SERVICE. IN/OUTCALL (N.E. PHILA.) $10 OFF REAL BIRDS FANS! “KOLB” 347-313-1293. EXTREME FREAK

Whatz up fellas! You have a FREAKY bi-sexual nasty TOP here that don’t mind doing the dirty work!! I’m Black/Dominican mixed with dark smooth skin, 12 tattoos. I’m 5’10, 165lbs., slightly bow-legged with a BIG THICK 9 inch COCK with BIGG balls hanging that are extremely full of a creamy white surprise!!! Ver y dominant and extremely masculine. Ask for Jacob, I can be reached at *82-215-687-0740. (24/7) Located in Grays Ferry South Philly. “GROUPS & GANG BANGS AVAILABLE AT YOUR REQUEST” Serious Inquires Only!

Fetish and Fantasy 2 DOMINAS ARE BETTER THAN ONE!

Watch as beautiful Mistress “handles” a pretty little sub or you can be sensually “manipulated” by two powerful females, either way it is only the beginning of your journey and the experience is something you will be coming back for more! 215-569-4333 Royalwomenofphiladelphia.com. B 4 U CHEAT CALL ME!

Spouse 2 tired to spank U or put on a sexy outfit 4 U! Don’t go cheatin’ just call me! Ur/ kinky fetish Domme. Pa/NJ 12 noon to 8 p.m. Ms. Sin/D. 609-289-0219. “BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIALS!”

Foot Special: $100 for 15 minutes of foot, OTK Special: $80 for 20 minutes all day long! Call: 215-569-4629 Royalwomenofphiladelphia.com. “I SPANK U YANK”

Need someone to put you over the knee and you in your place? Beautiful erotic Dominas available, all fetishes considered. Miss Sin/D (215) 636-9666 or (609) 289-0219. Royalwomenofphiladelphia. com. LADY PATTON

Mature Voluptous totally in control of you experienced very dominant yet can be soft and sensual 5’8, 145lbs. 40DDD-26-38. Blonde available by advance appointment only at 267-593-4967. Discreet, private Call for details-Convenient to Center City/Society Hill/Airport. LIPSTICK 100% FEMALE MEGAN CROSS DRESSERS WANTED

When experience counts.... A no rush Platinum service, A luscious 5`4 size 8 mature platinum Blonde. Who would like to transform you into a su-

perstar! All fetishes available, and private one on one visit Call for hours 267-248-9489

27 31

ROYALWOMENOFPHILADELPHIA.COM

Independents, Couples, Models, Photographers, Videographers and other i n t e r e s t e d p a r t i e s m ay rent studio space for fetish shoots or personal play. No alcohol, drugs, or prostitution or smoking permitted on premises. Information: 215-569-4333.

jonesin’

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By Matt Jones

35

SOLVE FOR X — MAD SKILLZ WITH MATH SKILLS

Sensual Adult Massage BACKACHES AND FOOT PAIN 100% FEMALE

Enjoy a Fantastic Rub-down by a sexy Dominican/Black/ American Indian Mixed Female $40 for an hour. No Intimacy. Broad St. Allegheny. 215-900-7183.

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TRANSSEXUAL EXPLOSION!!! ALWAYS HOTT. NO LIMITATIONS. 9 1/2 LONG & STRONG. ELIZABETH & BRIDGETTE. COME ONE... COME ALL...COME TWICE.. LIMITED TIME!! FIRST TIMERS & OUTCALL SPECIAL! 786-247-8493 or 215-8834185.

professional Interaction!! Good with first timers. I also offer sensuous body massages. This will help bring your day to a happy smile. South Philly Location Call Mercedes @ *82215-626-7818.

the naked city | feature | a&e | the agenda | food

GOOD ENOUGH TO EAT!!! 10 INCHES OF PLEASURE..484-751-2222.

GUILT FREE RUBDOWN! 100% FEMALE

I a m N u d e. N o F. S. 5 ’ 1 , 160lbs., Dominican Black/ Native American female! $40hr. Broad St. Allegheny. 215-900-7183. STRAWBERRY BLONDE

ALL AMERICAN. Incredible service,unbeatable value. $75.00 1/2 hr., $60.00 15 min.VERY pretty, 36 y/o, long blonde hair, blue eyes.3624-36. AMERICAN ladies welcome to apply. MUST be exp.,21+.African American ladies preferred. 215-4651541 “WHAT IS YOUR PLEASURE SIR?”

Everyone has a secret fantasy or fetish that they would love to explore; stern teacher, naughty student, a submissive little girl waiting to be drawn out, no matter what your dark desire is, the Royal Women of Philadelphia are well feed that need...come and find out: 215-569-4629. Royalwomenofphiladelphia. com.

✚ ACROSS

scoreboard (if X=9)? Course clubs Large collars Baggage-scanning gp. Army nickname Canine, for one Pig’s digs

✚ DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 18 22 25 26 27 28 31 32 33 35 36 38

Connecticut senator Christopher Sneezy, e.g. Kidney-related Time period that shaped the Great Lakes ___ de mer Police radio report, for short Saint ___, U.S. Virgin Islands “___ one, half a dozen...” www.harvard.___ Election contender, for short Completely uninformed Ham preparer, perhaps Remains Model married to David Bowie Get some rest ___ Club Dental hygiene brand Minor quarrel Where “You Are” Dial-up alternative Prefix before scope Addition to some prison sentences ___ kwon do They’re not pro Gun rights org.

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION

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✚ ©2010 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com)

39 Arizona senator Jon 41 ___ Energy Center (home stadium of the NHL’s Minnesota Wild) 42 Purina competitor 43 “Little Miss Sunshine” actor Paul 48 Message frantically tapped out 50 Signature for #43 51 Feature of Mary, but not marry? 52 City where Yo-Yo Ma was born 53 “Star Trek” crew member 54 Joe Namath was one 55 Muse of lyric poetry 56 Habitual ways 57 Clear Channel-sponsored annual rock event 61 Battle 63 Lang. of T.S. Eliot 64 Compass dir. 66 Tic-tac-toe line 67 It goes boom

P H I L A D E L P H I A C I T Y PA P E R | O C T O B E R 2 1 - O C T O B E R 2 8 , 2 0 1 0 | C I T Y PA P E R . N E T |

1 Music game with a floor pad, for short 4 Apples that are colorful 9 Vast tales 14 Come up short 15 Warm-weather style of pants 16 Treat in a grease-stained bag 17 Crate for actor Radcliffe (if X=1)? 19 Part of UHF 20 Golden Globes genre 21 Charged particle 23 “Over here!” 24 Marks certain bovine parents (if X=4)? 29 Warm, so to speak 30 Like a fairy tale piper 31 “Simpsons” word added to the OED 34 ___ Hari 37 Architect Gehry 40 Old record label’s boat to reach isolated areas (if X=10)? 44 Poet Federico Garcia ___ 45 Software test version 46 Penn of “Harold & Kumar” 47 GOP opponents 49 Rademacher of “General Hospital” 52 Lugs two giant neighboring letters without any help (if X=8)? 58 “Now I see!” 59 Turkey neighbor: abbr. 60 “Well, I must ___ now...” 62 Unsophisticated 65 Spatula hung from the Jaguars’

68 69 70 71 72 73


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AUCTION AUCTION

lulueightball

www.geyerauctions.com 647 Congo Road . Gilbertsville, PA 19525

AUCTION AUCTION

TOLL FREE (800) 554-50005 AUCTION FAX (610) 754-9480 . PHONE( 610)754-9450

By Emily Flake

ABSOLUTE AUCTION

(3) BR Townhome w/ 2.5 Baths. 550 N York Rd, 3 Huntersway, Hatboro, PA Living Room w/Fireplace & Eat-In Kitchen. Heat Pump & AC, Rear Patio.Great Location! Perfect Starter Home Or For Downsizing! ASSOCIATION FEE: $ 205/ mo. (water, sewer, trash, pool) AUCTION: Saturday, Oct 23 – 11 AM . Preview: Sun, 10/10 - 1 to 3 PM TERMS: 10% Buyer’s Premium, Settlement in 30 Days


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THE BEST PRICES | THE BEST MORTGAGE RATES | IMMEDIATE DELIVERY HOMES

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*

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P H I L A D E L P H I A C I T Y PA P E R | O C T O B E R 2 1 - O C T O B E R 2 8 , 2 0 1 0 | C I T Y PA P E R . N E T |

     

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SILK CITY

DINER â&#x20AC;˘ LOUNGE THIS WEEKEND 10.22-10.24.10

FRIDAY:

PUNK SLOPE

ARTHUR SMILIOS (GORILLA BISCUITS) JULIAN & JG (PINK SKULL) & NICK CAIN & BRYAN ROSS

SATURDAY:

DJ DEEJAY SUNDAY:

SUNDAE NITE DJs LEE JONES & DIRTY HECTOR ROMERO Open every day 4pm - 2am Sat & Sun Brunch 10am - 4pm 5th & Spring Garden www.silkcityphilly.com

$5 WINE SNOB CELEBRATION

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The 300 Greatest Beers Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve Never Hadâ&#x20AC;?

Nobilo Sauvignon Blanc or Don Miguel Gascon Malbec or Stella, Hoegaarden or Leffe with our cheese or chocolate sample

136 Chestnut St. Philadelphia, PA 215.413.1918

JUST $5 TOTAL. 5 until 7pm Tuesday til Sunday Cash only at bar while supplies last in October 2010

beneluxx

33 S. 3rd Street, Cellar Level. Philadelphia 267-318-7269 www.beneluxx.com Reservations at website

Beneluxx Won!!!

www.eulogybar.com

2740 S Front St . Philadelphia    215-467-1980

Philadelphia City Paper, October 21st, 2010  

Philadelphia's Trusted News and Entertainment Source.

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