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music 21 november 2009 london 000

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lot 31. Damien hirst (Detail)

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lot 28. peteR doheRty (detail)

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lot 48. Andy WArhol (detAil)

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lot 81. SHi xinning

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lot 189. david lachapelle

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contentS

Simon de pury

Thank you for the music! A letter from the chairman ...page 14

jÓnSi & alex

Picturing the icelandic ambient duo ...page 16

daniel birnbaum A curatorial tutorial in Frankfurt ...page 24

art School confidential Learning music at the school of art ...page 32

martin creed

stepping out with the former Turner Prize winner ...page 36

mtv to moma

Taking music videos seriously – for a change ...page 44

chriStian marclay The artist's quiet side revealed ...page 48

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Contents

matthew herbert Spinning discs and shooting pies ...page 54

rankin and damien hirst Destroying the photograph ...page 60

objeCt lesson Self-portrait, Lot 31 ...page 66

news

What’s happening in the international art world ...page 68

5pm: musiC Lots 1 – 231 ...page 70

buyers guide

How to buy and whom to contact at Phillips de Pury ...page 180

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music music music music music music 14

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MUSIC, along with smell, has the magic capacity of instantly transporting us back to the very moment we heard it first. Ever since I was a teenager a few light years ago, music, art and football have been the dominant passions (at least the ones I can admit to) in my life. I’m therefore particularly happy to launch the first of what will be an annual MUSIC theme sale. We gave it four components: art works by contemporary artists that have a reference to music; art works by contemporary musicians; portraits of contemporary musicians by top photographers; and musical memorabilia. Only the last category had hitherto been focused on by the art market. Whether it is Peter Blake creating the ultimate album cover for Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band by the Beatles in the 1960s, or more recently Damien Hirst doing all the fabulous artwork for the last two releases of The Hours, there has always been an inextricably close link between art and music. Some years ago, at the instigation of the great collector Monique Barbier-Mueller, I conducted a charity auction at the Dallas Museum of Art in tandem with a Texan cattle auctioneer. Listening to my colleague that night I was struck by the musicality of his performance. Attending some Hip Hop concerts by artists such as 50 Cent or Eminem, their rhythmic rapping also reminded me of the pace of certain auctions. This led to the idea of asking a musician to create a sound carpet that will accompany the live part of our MUSIC auction. I’m thrilled that the supremely gifted Matthew Herbert found inspiration in this novel challenge and will make this the first auction ever to have a soundtrack. Thanks to H.I.H. Francesca von Habsburg I made earlier this year my first trip to Iceland. I fell in love with this country and its inhabitants, the majority of whom are artists, poets, writers or musicians. It was my privilege there to meet Jónsi, whose dreamy music with Sigur Rós transports you to another level and whose art epitomizes what this sale is all about. Finally as Abba would sing: Thank you for the MUSIC.

SIMON de PURY ChaIRMaN, PhIllIPS de PURY & COMPaNY 15

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jÓnsi & alex a conversation

interview karen wright | portraits dietmar busse | reportage john best 16

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J贸nsi and Alex, photographed in New York, September 21, 2009

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Jón Thór (Jónsi) Birgisson first achieved international recognition as the lead singer and front man for sigur rós, a band which in their words ‘really found their feet’ with their second album, the masterpiece that is Ágætis byrjun (A good beginning). The album was originally released only in iceland, but was discovered by Brighton’s Fatcat records, who snapped up the band and released the album in the UK in August 2000. The band toured north America for the first time in April and May 2001, and the vast majority of the dates sold out straight away. Perhaps due to the hype in the American media, the shows were attended by many big-name celebrities, somewhat to the band’s bemusement. since then the band has gone from strength to strength, their recognizable music conjuring up both the strangeness and beauty of their native iceland. To date sigur rós have released four albums and one remix album Von brigði (recycle bin). Praise has continued to be heaped upon the band. Brad Pitt recently said in an interview that the group was his ‘favourite band of all times.’ in 2006 Jónsi and his romantic partner Alex somers released a picture book, Riceboy Sleeps. Earlier this year the duo's track ‘happiness’ provided one of the standout moments on AiDsawareness compilation Dark Was The Night, and the same track

Karen Wright Did you always make art? JÓnsi I was always drawing. When I was a student, art was the only class I got good grades in.

opens Riceboy Sleeps, the duo’s debut album. Alex was a founding member of the band Parachutes, an

KW Not music? J No! I didn’t get good grades in music! [Laughs]

experimental band who record in Alex’s home using household objects as instruments. Alex has previously collaborated with Jónsi producing visual art and music under the name Jónsi & Alex, and has

KW When did you start making art together? alex When we moved in together in 2005. Our trajectory is similar. I used to collect old photographs when I was a student in Boston. I used to go to flea markets and little antique shops and find beautiful photographs – and then I found that Jónsi collected old photographs too. At first it was just the content that attracted me but I was also drawn to the colours, the beautiful sepias and also the sense of movement.

also designed a number of sigur rós album covers including the cover of Takk, which won the Best Album Design at the 2006 icelandic Music Awards. Jónsi & Alex, as they are self-styled, released their first album Riceboy Sleeps in 2009 and are working together now on their next album. i caught up with Jónsi and Alex in new York where they

KW Were the photographs that you found in Iceland the same that Alex found in Boston? J Yes and no, they were at first mainly old-fashioned photographs of people sitting, very still, old classic photographs but now we are into movement – I like it that some moment is captured.

were recording new tracks for the follow up to Riceboy Sleeps. i spoke to them individually about their art but it soon became apparent that like all great collaborations, their artwork was a conversation between them.

KW Was using found images important? J Finding things is still important. There are lots of accidents and that’s important. It’s like finding a prize, it’s like something in the music, something that grabs you in music, a photograph, in food and all kinds of stuff. It is an inspiration. a In the beginning we used the image but now we draw from the picture, movement in the photograph or something that sparks other ideas; zoom in on a detail in a corner, a tree in the background, for example.

«I used to collect old photographs when I was a student In Boston. I used to go to flea markets and lIttle antIque shops and fInd BeautIful photographs – and then I found that JÓnsI collected old photographs too» 18

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www.dietmarbusse.com

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«Arvo Pärt wAs definitely An insPirAtion. i hAve AdmirAtion for doing something thAt wAs so simPle And beAutiful. i think the music critics would ProbAbly reAlly hAte it»

KW Tell me about the frames that you used in your recent show, are they found as well? A We were forever drawing and one day we were in the countryside and we were walking – it is very desolate in Iceland and empty – and we came upon a huge pile of abandoned windows, probably an old summer house or something. So we filled up a car, went home and returned and filled up another car and decided that it was the right way to make frames for our paintings. In 2006 we made an exhibition using these old windows as frames. Since then we have kept an eye out for old windows and collect them when we see them. But we don’t want to get stuck in one idea so we may not use windows forever. KW I think the art reflects something in the music. It is wistful and nostalgic. Is that fair? J Yes, I suppose our art is like that. Nostalgic, ghostly, dreamy. It reminds you of your past. KW Who inspires you? J There are many artists that inspire me but I can’t name any. KW Is there an artist? A Yes! Henry Darger, I only discovered him recently, I like Sally Mann as well. I am influenced by her photographs. KW Do you draw to your music? A We don’t draw to our music. Jónsi has got me into old music, crackling records. J Yes, I work at home and I always have music on. I like old music, old jazz, Django Reinhardt or Billie Holiday. KW Is the nostalgia in the music important in your artwork? J I like music for its atmosphere. I keep it on in the background. I like its scratchiness, it’s like a crackling fire in the background, it’s cosy – like creating a cocoon that is nice to be in. 21

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Jónsi Birgisson and Alex Somers celebrated the release of their album Riceboy Sleeps with a display of their art work earlier this year at the French patisserie gallery Maison Bertaux, Greek Street, London. We photographed the work there and I asked Jónsi and Alex to write their thoughts about this work, which they did in their very personal and colourful fashion.

KW Are Nordic composers like Arvo Pärt an inspiration to your work? J Arvo Pärt was definitely an inspiration. Some works like Galine: innocent and honest and pretty and really beautiful, simple and touching. I have admiration for doing something that was so simple and beautiful. It was a brave thing for him to do. I think the music critics would probably really hate it. KW Can you see changes in your art? A I notice there is more colour in the work recently. We started with pencils and charcoals. We wanted to stay safe and in our comfort zone, but recently started using more colour, different layers of colour. That was why we chose watercolour, as you can make it opaque, and barely there. We used tea shades to start with but we are experimenting with more and more colour. We crept more into colour, pale tones, and we grew into it. We are using more colour and we are really into it. J I like working in what inspires me at the moment, photography, video or painting. Whatever inspires me. KW What are you working on together at the moment? A We are doing lots of creative projects together. We edit together and mix and make drawings and paintings together. KW And the future? J I would really like to focus on video. It is our strong side, that and installation. Alex and I really compliment each other so well. I would like to do more but it is about finding the time. I am still working with Sigur Rós and on my own stuff as well. KW What is it like to collaborate with another person – be honest! J Collaborating with Alex has been good. I work fast, he’s slow. He’s thorough, I’m spontaneous. I kick his ass and he focuses me. n Riceboy Sleeps lot 104, estimate £1, 5 0 0 -2, 0 0 0 ; lot 105, estimate £1, 5 0 0 -2, 0 0 0 22

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Daniel birnbaum curatorial tutorial interview karen wright | PhotograPhy Dominik butzmann

Dr Daniel BirnBaum is rector of Frankfurt’s Staatliche Hochschule für Bildende Künste, more commonly known as the Städelschule. He is also, he is quick to tell me, a failed drummer and philosopher. Daniel was born in Sweden in 1963. He had a peripatetic childhood, living in Geneva, Vienna, Cambridge, massachusetts and Stockholm. He is impressively well educated: his studies at Stockholm university, where he received his PhD in philosophy, included comparative literature, art history, philosophy and the history of religion. He also broadened his horizons by studying art history at both Columbia and the Freie universität, Berlin. Shortly after leaving university, Daniel became the art critic for Stockholm’s newspaper Dagens Nyheter. From there, he says, it seemed a natural progression to become a curator. He wanted to ‘go backstage instead of being in the audience, and observe the performance from another point of view.’ in 2001 he accepted his current position as rector of the Städelschule, at the same time becoming director of Portikus, a nearby art space affiliated to the school. His curatorial stints have culminated in directing this year’s fifty-third Venice Biennale: Making Worlds. This is not his first time in Venice. in 2003, he co-curated (with Francesco Bonami) the international Section of the Biennale: Dreams and Conflicts – The Dictatorship of the Viewer. in 2005, Daniel was co-curator of the first moscow Biennale: Dialectics of Hope, and, in 2006–7, he was co-curator (with Hans ulrich Obrist) of Uncertain States of America, a touring show. last year, he co-curated 50 Moons of Saturn, the Yokohama Triennial, as well as serving as curator of the second Turin Triennial: T2 Torino Triennale. as Director of Portikus, he has curated exhibitions with both young artists such as Paul Chan and the late Jason rhoades, and more established figures like John Baldessari. reading through his achievements, as well as his list of publications and first-rank trusteeships, it is easy to be impressed. in person the man himself is equally impressive. He is generous with his time, although he is clearly tired when we meet, having just flown back from a long weekend in Belo Horizonte at the opening of another section of Bernardo Paz’s extraordinary contemporary project: Nine New Destinations. He flourishes a book in front of me, a catalogue from 1969 from the Stockholm museum museet. ‘This is where the Venice Biennale comes from,’ he says. His voice and his face are alive with intelligent enthusiasm. Failed philosopher, drummer manqué or not, this is a man capable of inspiring and uplifting – someone with whom i for one would love to study.

We are sitting at a long table in Daniel Birnbaum’s large, airy office in the Städelschule. He produces a newspaper with a prominent headline, ‘Mickey Mouse,’ and says, ‘perhaps this is a good place to start: Leopold Stokowski and Walt Disney.’

had with Mallarmé. Music finds its absolute purity in John Cage’s silence, which can also suggest something else, something very expansive – an art without borders, where the sounds from the nervous system, or the traffic outside, or the heartbeat, are part of his conception of art and music.

Karen Wright I have tried in the past to get people to write about animation as an artform but it is hard. Daniel BirnBaum Stokowski and Disney – their collaboration on Mickey Mouse and Fantasia – are part of a desire to be on the other side: rock musicians want to be artists, artists want to start bands, architects want to be artists. The idea of an artistic crossover isn’t new, for example, the ballet in Paris.

KW Do you think that artists having multidisciplinary careers is a trait of the early twenty-first century? DB For decades we had Hermann Nitsch here. He was a professor of something that at the time seemed very radical: interdisciplinary art. Hermann, who was highly subversive, was also Austrian and formalistic. He always called me the ‘diréctor’ and saw the school as hierarchical, although this was partly a joke. When he retired in 2004, he said that the radical thing now would be to insist on a single focus for each student, say, there’s someone who can really do a piece of sculpture, or maybe a painting – it was no longer necessary to insist on interdisciplinary art.

KW Do you mean Sergei Diaghilev? DB Yes, or the Swedish Ballet in Paris with Picasso and Picabia. On the one hand is this idea of a crossover, on the other is the modernist idea of purification – the formalists, Michael Fried or Clement Greenberg, that idea of each artform finding its specificity and purity: painting in the end becomes just a flat surface and writing is pure writing, which we already

KW So have you continued Hermann’s thinking? DB We have Wolfgang Tillmans here as a teacher. When he founded his class, he insisted that he was not a photographer. He wanted students who 24

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Daniel Birnbaum shot at the St채delschule, Frankfurt, October 6, 2009

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do film or even painting. It is interesting to think that, twenty-five years ago, this was a radical gesture by Hermann, this insistence on an interdisciplinary course. KW You are in Germany, where you still must have the ongoing Joseph Beuys effect, namely that anything can be art if it is done artfully. A lecture could be a sculpture, for instance. Is this where this is coming from? DB Beuys is re-appearing, perhaps. But more important for us here, we had Peter Kubelka, a filmmaker, one of the founders of the film anthology archive. He insisted that he’s not a professor of film, but a professor of film and cooking. Kubelka’s work here is not really about eating and cooking as a social exchange. It is more about the specificity of the cooked object as the oldest art form – its physics and chemistry. The chef who works with the elements is a God-like creature, and who doesn’t want to be a god? Kubelka asked. For the identity of this school, Kubelka is very important because there is a food tradition here; a lot of such initiatives have come out of the Städelschule. It’s another crossover.

will always say it’s the art market speaking: paintings are flat objects that are very, very valuable and easy to display and to look at and sell and ship and transport and insure and put in storage – it’s all much easier, for example, than Kubelka’s kitchen operations. KW This leads me into the new paintings by Damien Hirst. Do you think this is about the return to specificity? DB I don’t think one can say it has anything to do with the discipline of painting. The art market is operating here, and Damien is very clever at operating the market and its changing expectations.

KW Do you see a Kubelka influence in the work of people like Rirkrit Tiravanija or Carsten Höller? DB I don’t think that Rirkrit or Carsten came out of Kubelka. Isn’t that more from Fluxus and Situationists and that kind of thing? KW Moving back into music again, why do you think art schools spawn so many bands? DB Art school, or design school, is a place where people experiment: they don’t know if they want to become painters or musicians. Every school, including our little school here, produces lots of bad rock bands. You know the story about Kraftwerk? They were in Düsseldorf, in the music school, and they re-branded themselves after Gilbert and George. But it wasn’t only Gilbert and George: their album cover for Man-Machine was inspired by the work of Lisitsky. But it was supposedly after Konrad Fischer brought Gilbert and George to Germany; suddenly, it’s cooler – better, to look like a banker. To be motionless, machine-like, to be like a singing or living sculpture. Konrad was great at bringing in America artists.

KW I thought he was painting himself into a corner but now it seems he’s attempting to get out of it in a different way. DB Do you think he’s painting those himself? That will be the new thing! KW Do you see a return to the hand here in the school? DB If you look at an art school, you can see that things aren’t changing so quickly: many different things are happening simultaneously. An interesting place to look at what people are doing is in the workshop. The print shop here has instruments that are hundreds of years old. That is where the memory of image production remains in a little school like this, a place in which students can see how to print with wood, with metal, all these different machineries. We had William Kentridge here as a guest professor. The more obsolete the object, the more interesting it is to him. He typified a certain tendency within this school and perhaps within artists generally, a strange attraction triggered by these old machines. Confronted by them, artists find some sort of friction, a protest against the smooth convergence towards digital hegemony. A traditional discipline like painting of course can fall within this mindset. On the other hand, within this school everybody works with the same computer programmes, so there’s a convergence towards the cannibal artist.

KW Things were so different then, weren’t they? DB Today, no one is impressed or surprised that a young, hip, or cuttingedge American artist is showing in Berlin – it is almost taken for granted. But wouldn’t you say that the music-art thing is characteristic of something that seemed to happen in the 90s, an idea of artists cannibalising other forms of artistic expression, other forms of creativity? This was an ongoing proximity that we could give so many examples of – Jorge Pardo or Andrea Zittel, Tobias Rehberger with some sort of closeness to design, sometimes just appropriating design objects. Most visible of all is the dialogue with film. Douglas Gordon, for example, was very knowledgeable and almost obsessed with cinema. Other people ‘used’ cinema, somehow finding one little jump cut, or one scene, and then turning that into an installation. Then suddenly artists from Cindy Sherman to many others wanted to do film. There seems to be a desire to get into Hollywood. Another crossover. We have film, food (perhaps this is a phenomenon unique to Frankfurt), the kitchen, and music.

KW What about sound in the school? DB One professor here is Willem de Rooij, a filmmaker and artist from Holland. With him we made a sound studio. Twenty years ago it would have cost hundreds of thousands, but through the technological revolutions that allow even one computer to do what the sound studio did fifty years ago, we built an advanced sound studio with just 30,000 euros. And that has been used by lots of people. We now have a drum-kit in the school so when everyone has gone home I play the drums. [laughs]

KW So no one wanted to be a painter or photographer, but an ‘artist’? DB Or maybe a kind of artist at large? Is this more an effect of conceptual art? What does that will to cross the barrier mean? It’s an interesting question. And then the resistance to that with an insistence on specific genres. I mean there are painters who insist that they are painters. Now, sometimes it is said that there is a return to painting. In this case, people

KW Tell me about your curating. What was the first show you ever curated? DB It was at the university of Stockholm. We did shows there, which were more like parties, but with some quite good artists. The relationship between artist and curator was more like that between friends. We once did a show in a cinema.

«Dieter roth’s magnum opus was the complete works of hegel turneD into 20 sausages» KW It’s exactly how Hans Ulrich started in a way… DB But he was young, he was 11 or something! [laughs] KW And tell me about the Portikus. DB The Portikus is just a Kunsthalle but the city already has a museum of modern art and the Kunstverein. So we have a great freedom to do things. It doesn’t matter if the artist is Gilbert and George or even Gerhard Richter, or if it’s someone very young – we had the first Paul Chan show in Europe, a show by Paola Pivi and Wade Guyton. We’ve done a lot of things at the school that are collective works, we had a Jason Rhoades show that was basically a factory of salad dressing. The whole school was Jason’s 26

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ÂŤwe had a moment when there had to be a golden frame

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show. His whole class of students, they were all in love with him and doing fun things all night. He was a tyrant, he was ruthless and bribed his students to do these things, you would get a TV if you installed his work – it was a tense situation sometimes. KW Did you use the Portikus as a model for the Biennale? DB The Portikus has been a place where the artist has redefined the institution of an art school completely. It can be a bazaar, a factory, a cinema, a classical exhibition space or anything. I always thought that if we could bring a little bit of the atmosphere of the Portikus and the school to a big blockbuster thing like the Biennale, it would be nice. You’ll see the photos of the parade we did here, not even the Guggenheim could do it. It takes 200 enthusiastic students to do a thing like that. It’s not about money; it’s about people doing things.

DB When you talk about art without borders, there is this willingness to break out of the institution. To break out of the gallery, the museum, the white cube – it’s a paradoxical thing because often these kinds of artworks and projects are only visible if you have the kind of framework that the institution brings. And I guess we had a moment when there had to be a golden frame around the picture to understand where the art stopped. Then the gallery took over that role: whatever you put in there is art. And then in Venice, the whole city is the framework. Although the frame has become more and more invisible, you cannot really point at it and say, it is this golden line here, or this wall of the white cube gallery. Now it is the whole city. In Cage’s work, it is a temporal frame, a temporal invisible line.

KW As there are smaller sums of money involved, is there more freedom? DB It’s a wonderful space in the sense that we’re always bankrupt, and we have no board of trustees or anything. I decide everything together with a curator. I don’t run a museum, thank God. We don’t produce things that are that expensive. Our shows cost about 30,000 or 40,000 euros not millions of euros. The incredible strength of the commercial part of the art world pushed other things aside, making them marginal, as though nothing else important could happen outside the market. The first function to go was criticism, followed by good curatorial skills since powerful gallerists were able to decide everything without any reality check from critics or writers or curators.

KW Is there a strong theme about the amnesia of rediscovery? DB There’s nothing profound in saying that art is not reinvented every second year like pop music or fashion. This means that things have a certain relevance after ten, twenty or even forty years. One could go further back, but we didn’t want to make a show about carpets from the sixteenth century! I mean recent artists who are obviously influencing what’s happening today. Take someone like Gordon Matta-Clark, for example, who had never been in the Venice art Biennale before. We showed this film called the Tree Dance that is not very famous. Without people such as Gordon Matta-Clark and Robert Smithson, it is impossible to imagine the young Brazilian artist Renata Lucas or Simon Starling or Rirkrit – people working with certain architectural sensibilities, and urbanistic

KW Tell me about your Biennale – if it’s not too much of a leap. Did you survive the experience? DB Biennales aren’t there to be loved, but they’re there to be discussed. It is the most vulnerable and exposed thing to be in charge of that whole thing. I have to say I don’t know if it was the show or the moment, but it has been more generously received than usually happens. KW Your choice of title, Making Worlds, was a strong one and seems to sum up much of the exhibition.

around the picture to understand where the art stopped»

Arto Lindsay (second from right) at his parade:

ideas of small shifts and interventions in the urban space. These are the people who keep our conversation about Gordon Matta-Clark alive. And some people say it is stupid of me to suggest that they are influential on Gordon Matta-Clark, but it is artists who keep artists alive. And as soon as Renata Lucas and Simon Starling stop being interested in Gordon Matta Clark, then he’s ready for storage. We also had this new garden where people could do things. It’s interesting to think about the first open-air exhibitions, like the Japanese group Gutai. They did shows for children – they did something on an aeroplane, they did it on a rooftop, they did it in a garden, and that’s interesting, it’s sculptural work and painterly work. Gutai’s work showed how institutions like the Biennale help us to understand who we are today. Gutai, for example, was important for Allan Kaprow and Yves Klein. Including them is not all about political fairness. To understand western modernisation, even to understand who we are in the west, one needs some of these people because they were influential already then. It’s a case of filling in the gaps, although it was not done systematically.

Photos: Martin Weis

I Am A Man, Frankfurt, April 2008

KW Is Öyvind Fahlström interesting as well? DB Fahlström was famous for his poetry, and is interesting because he is a well-known visual artist but also quite influential in the poetry world. He wrote a manifesto for concrete poetry – I think the first one in the world – 29

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in 1953. That was not so far away from Dieter Roth, people working with books and working with text, with some sort of poetry, although Dieter Roth was not famous in the poetry world, I think. He has been totally unsuccessful. KW Dieter needs to be resurrected. DB His anger: you know the work Literature Sausage? He took works by particularly irritating, very successful people, like Günter Grass, and put them in a machine, and ground them, and took herbs that you make a sausage with, and made sausages. It started with Günter Grass and other people he hated for their success. His magnum opus was the complete works of Hegel, which he turned into 20 big sausages. should translate a song you don’t understand and then try to sing it. And his is a total mistranslation, almost a little bit rude, to the extent that people wonder what the Chinese think about it. But it’s meant as a joke and I liked it.

KW You had a strong Latin American group as well. DB We had Renata Lucas, Cildo Meireles, Lygia Pape and Sara Ramo. There were other South American artists. It’s about taste. And I like it a lot, that whole Concrete Neo-concrete movement. The best big show I’ve seen in my life was co-curated by Paulo Herkenhoff and Adriano Pedrosa for the São Paulo Biennale in 1998. It was about this Brazilian idea of Brazilian art eating and metabolizing Europe. And if you eat something, you create something of your own because it’s nourishment. So that was a show with a local concept. I just like Brazilian art, but the larger picture is concerned with this idea of western modernism not being complete without other modernisms.

KW A lot of what we have talked about is participatory art. It is really formless in a way, isn’t it? Is this where we should bring back John Cage and his insistence on chance? DB Aspects of Cage’s influence seem to be everywhere – in Rirkrit’s work and Philippe Parreno’s work, he’s a major inspiration. Cage’s major influence on the Venice Biennale is Parreno’s piece. It is about the dialogue between Rauschenberg and Cage at the Black Mountain College, where Rauschenberg talks about his white monochromes as screens for projections for personal fantasies, or visions. Rauschenberg was very important for Venice, and Venice for Rauschenberg. We put these white fake monochromes in Philippe’s piece. And instead of imaginary film, there is real film, something projected on to the screen. And the white blank space is 4 minutes and thirty-three seconds; it’s a Cage piece, the whole thing. If there’s ever been an affective relational/ participatory art, I think Cage is quite a fantastic example. It’s not about 4’33 silence, it’s about the sounds that are there anyhow. He talks about what I mentioned; the heartbeat; the nervous system producing its own sounds. 4’33 is just a random score; it could have been anything. It was just the throw of the dice. David Tudor threw the dice, it was in three parts, and together the scores turned out to be four minutes and thirty three seconds. It was marked with him closing the piano top. With chance, there’s an attraction to something that is beyond intentionality, and beyond control, and beyond the subject, and one way to get at that is to allow for automatic or chancelike processes. And in Cage’s case, it really is chance. But for chance to become interesting, to become visceral in any way, or meaningful, to become readable, the set-up in which chance appears has to be very intelligent. Chance is a challenging thing. If it’s just sloppy and anything goes, then I think we can do that ourselves, we don’t need artists to help us. The exact signature of chance is a very difficult thing. It’s like Francis Bacon didn’t think his paintings were done until there was a chance like process in them, which he explained to David Sylvester. It’s a big tradition to try to bring in chance in some kind of interesting way. But that doesn’t mean that it’s all chance. It’s about a very exact set-up in which chance becomes interesting.

KW So, tell me about sound in the Venice Biennale. DB There was the parade, which is perhaps the strongest example, with Arto Lindsay and his unbelievable guitar, and the rhythms and the streettheatre sensibility to it. Arto is a musician and producer and lately he’s done a few parades, including one here in Frankfurt. For Venice, he made an amazing parade. The Via Garibaldi was turned into this incredibly loud thing with Tony Conrad marching next to William Forsythe – it was beautiful. Paul Chan was in the parade, so he brought some of his artists into the parade. KW I am so sorry I missed it. Is it documented? DB Arto was thinking about what it means to do these parades, which are explosive moments. But how can they be displayed after? At least they will be documented properly. It’s embedded documentation; the cameramen are part of it. It’s on YouTube. KW Isn’t it strange how everything is on YouTube. DB YouTube is a radically democratic thing, which allows for radically democratic stupidity: people can put out things that should not be put out. For instance, an interesting thing: Peter Kubelka, our filmmaker, insisted on the ontological, philosophical specificity of film. He would not allow video cameras in his class, for example. Now all his films are cult objects for obsessed film fanatics, they’re on YouTube. I have no idea what Peter and his loyal friends think about that. But other people think it’s cool to be visible. It’s fine for the parades because they are meant to be inclusive and participatory art. And elsewhere, I had never worked with Roberto Cuoghi before. He has done a number of things in the US, and is one of the more visible Italian artists. He had a large piece on the Scarpa terrace about a Chinese song from a well-known Chinese film. Roberto performed it with instruments that he built himself – he created a sound that is supposed to be this song. But he doesn’t speak a word of Chinese. He sings it himself in a strange voice that he supposedly learnt from an American transsexual. In the end he got a fever! It’s a strange comment on the nature of translation that you

KW Can you summarise how you made your final choice for Venice? DB It is not possible to know everything! So an exhibition with ninety or a hundred artists is a totally subjective thing. No one should think anything else. You try to be informed but in the end you chose things that you find interesting. If you don’t find them interesting, then who else will? An exhibition is an artistic medium in itself. And just as to perform a symphony takes many people – an exhibition is perhaps comparable.

«it’s a wonderful space – we're always bankrupt and we have no board of trustees!» KW What’s in the future? DB I am working on a show with Olafur Eliasson next year in Berlin. KW He’s into acoustics, he’s doing music stuff? DB He has a close friend, an intellectual Icelandic violin-maker. Their work together is not music in the sense that we would usually think of but is certainly acoustic. KW I hear that Olafur is trying to make sculptures out of sound. DB It’s more of an acoustic phenomenon. He has a relationship with music; he was the Icelandic champion of break-dancing. n 30

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art school confidential

David Bowie, Brian Eno, David Byrne all share more than music as an occupation. They all are serious visual artists as well. Why are art colleges such fertile breeding grounds for both musicians and visual artists? Rock journalist ChRis PaRkin examines why there is such a cross-pollination and interviews three art making musicians: Graham Coxon, Goldie and Jeffrey Lewis.

When Joe Boyd booked a then little-known beat combo called Pink Floyd as house band at his UFo club in 1966, it wasn’t as a big-ticket attraction. Led by Camberwell College of Art student Syd Barrett, the band were there, in a basement hall under Tottenham Court Road, to accompany the visuals and art being made and performed on those barely remembered, lysergic acid-splashed evenings. Just like a flower-powered reimagining of Andy Warhol’s Factory, the UFo nights were a hive of cross-pollination as artists and musicians, the majority having been through art school, came to play. This incitement to cross boundaries carries on today. emerging from the visual art side of the curtain with their strange leftfield pop are artist david Cunningham (with his band The Flying Lizards) and Turner Prize winner Martin Creed, whose stock-in-trade is roiling, sweary punk rock that can turn the air bluer than an yves Klein. entering from the other side – and creating much more fuss among the cynics – are popular musicians who are committed to the visual medium, many of whom have owned paintbrushes far longer than they have guitars and drumsticks. Thanks to the work of music’s art school alumni such as david Bowie and Brian eno, plus those punk rockers loaded on dadaism, the image of the pensionable rocker stood in front of his easel on Sunday afternoons has taken a buffeting. In recent years there have been celebrated exhibitions from folk-mystic devendra Banhart, whose naïve art has won him genuine acclaim; John Squire, once of The Stone Roses and now making fresh and original abstracts; and david Byrne, who continues to push further than any of them and holds little truck with the restrictive definition of a musician. Blur guitarist Graham Coxon is another who easily straddles these worlds. As well as a 2004 retrospective of his paintings at the ICA, Coxon’s work – ghostly, peaceful figures and colourful, violent scenes – can be seen illuminating his solo albums, like his recent, folkleaning release The Spinning Top, and Blur’s 1999 album 13. Suitably skilled, Coxon was invited by the Tate Modern to soundtrack Franz Kline’s Meryon for their Tate Tracks project in 2007. ‘I missed it all,’ he says, ‘but in the 1960s, when it seemed like they were freer, there were a lot of things being mixed up and I really like that idea. I’ve made soundscapes for some other exhibitions, like Julie Verhoeven, who I did a really long piece for. I like music and art being unstructured. I’m a figurative painter, I suppose, and that goes with structured pop songs, but I do like the looser stuff.’ It’s clear from speaking to Coxon that painting isn’t something he simply dabbles in – he’s candid and open about his art in a way musicians rarely are about their sonic creations. he ponders his reluctance to use computers (‘but I don’t get dirty or smell of turps’) and explains how, despite playing to tens of thousands of rabid Blur fans over the years, he worries himself silly before exhibiting to a few hundred. (‘There were two women whispering, then a little giggle and I thought: oh my God, what are they saying? It was awful. In music you get cheered or booed. In art, people have different sets of symbols and their own visual references, so they see all sorts of different things.’) had Coxon stayed at Goldsmiths, where he studied for a time

alongside yBAs damien hirst, Abigail Lane and Sam Taylor-Wood, things might have been different, but he was invited to take a break when Blur-time took over and that was that. he’s well-placed, then, to explain why musicians and the creatively undecided find their way into art school. ‘Growing up, creative people naturally pick up a guitar or a pencil, so the two things develop side by side and art school is the only place you can go – it’s like a boundaryless place for experimentation. There’s performance art, painting, dance, just about everything. It doesn’t necessarily train you to be a great frontman, though. Learning the guitar and drawing doesn’t sharpen your social skills,’ chuckles the famously shy guitarist. It’s a different story in America. Brooklyn comic book artist and antifolk troubadour Jeffrey Lewis, whose punk streams of consciousness teeter compellingly between the hilarious, the surreal and the disturbing, had no inclination to attend art school. For anyone without the means, it just isn’t the place to find your chosen art-form, says Lewis. ‘People at art school in the States might be involved in music as well, but going to college is so expensive that anybody who’s going to art school who isn’t paying vast amounts of money has to be a pretty dedicated artist to get a scholarship.’ Certain that he’d make his living as an artist, Lewis never for a moment thought he’d become a musician. had he been making his living from art, Lewis says he might not have bothered with the music, which is an alarming thought for his fans. Instead, he combines the two like he was born to do so, illustrating his songs with comic book expositions of the Mayflower story and tales of a Private dick. In drum ‘n’ bass pioneer Goldie (Clifford Joseph Price on his passport), Lewis has an unlikely kindred spirit. After he ‘ran away from art-college, literally climbed the fence and never went back,’ the West Midlands jack-of-allarts, who spent years in care homes as a child, let things evolve organically, just like Lewis. And wielding the wise words of david Bowie, who once told him ‘reinvention is the greatest gift we’ve ever been given,’ Goldie’s art, whichever form he might be working on at the time, is coloured by a journey that saw him begin as a world-famous graffiti artist, which he revisited in his latest exhibition The Kids Are All Riot, and end (for now, anyway) composing a piece of music for the recent Proms. Goldie’s art school is life – not a bad alternative if the tuition fees go up. ‘There has to be a tension in art,’ says Goldie in his usual 150bpm. ‘People saying what is and isn’t, but it’s up to the individual artist, how much he’s learnt along the way, to make it as solid as it can be and draw from what he’s picked up along the journey. My life chose me, I didn’t really choose it. I’ve tried to run away from art, from painting, from music, but I can’t get away. If you take away the name Goldie, I’m just this kid who’s had an amazing journey, seen some amazing things and all of that amalgamates into what art is.’ n

«art school is a boundary-less place for experimentation» graham coxon, blur

Chris Parkin has been a music journalist for the past seven years, writing about the highs and lows of music for Time Out, NME, Arise, bbc.co.uk, High Life and Hotline. 32

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Graham coxon

was born in 1969 in Rinteln, West Germany and grew up in Colchester, where he met Blur co-founder Damon Albarn. After leaving the band in 2002 he rejoined in summer 2009 when they reconvened for several triumphant live shows. Having studied Fine Art at Goldsmiths, Coxon was awarded an honorary fellowship by the college in 2006. He’s currently promoting his latest solo album, The Spinning Top, and painting in his new studio. Does your art come from the same place as your music? Some of the visuals that come with the new album are quite violent, but that’s always been the two extremes. I’ve always liked musical violence – I was very influenced by The Who and people like that – but then I like the absolute other extreme, too, people like Chopin and glassy, calm, beautiful music. With visual art I’m the same. I like the symbolists but then I also like Willem de Kooning and Door to a River, work in which there’s more violence. I was always into the black and white Klines.

Graham Coxon © Essy Syed

Why did you dislike art school so much? I was possibly too immature to get down to it, really. I was 19, I’d moved away from home and at my previous art school I was one of the most serious people there. Then I went to London and there were so many things to learn about, your first time away from home. If you’d have got beyond the sort of serious I was in my previous art school you’d get into the realms of pretentious pain in the arse and when I got to Goldsmiths a lot of people irritated me; they took themselves far too seriously. I was always serious about art but as a person I’m generally quite light-hearted and it got on my wick.

Clockwise from top left: Girl With Brown Hair, 2003. Happiness in Magazines, 2004. Nude # 4, 2004

Would you give it another go? I’ll probably never be as good an artist as I am a guitar player, but it doesn’t mean I can’t hang up the guitar for a couple of years and see if I can’t find my way with drawing and painting. That’s something I’ve been toying with lately, whether I should just see if there’s anything there. www.grahamcoxonart.com 33

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jeffrey lewis

33-year-old punk storyteller has released his last three albums on Rough Trade (’Em Are I, his latest). He studied Literature at the State University of New York at Purchase and his senior thesis explored the graphic novel The Watchmen, which he describes as ‘the Ulysses of comic books.’ His own comic series Fuff can be found at his shows or, like the rest of his art, at olivejuicemusic.com.

You’re fond of narratives in your work. I do enjoy having a narrative, although a bunch of the songs aren’t necessarily so. They have verses and choruses, but I suppose it’s more unusual for people to use narrative in song. The fact I do any puts me in the narrative guy pile. With my art, because most of what I’m interested in is comic books, it’s 100 per cent narrative. I’ve never been into oil painting or anything purely image-making or making a statement with the art itself. The statement that the art makes is the story I’m telling.

Top: Lewis’s series of comic books FUFF, the first of which came with a CD of Lewis performing a rhyming lecture, ‘The History of Punk on the Lower East Side, 1950–1975.’ Above: the album cover for Jeffrey Lewis and the Junkyard’s album ’Em Are I (May 2009).

You’re nearly always on tour; how do you work? Very haphazard and cats as cats can. It’s hard to find time to get any work done because every day you’re in a car travelling to a venue, then you’re sound-checking, playing your show, selling comics and CDs, working out where you’re going to spend the night. It’s hard to find the hours of solitary focus time and a place that has decent lighting and a surface to work on. www.thejeffreylewissite.com

Jeffrey Lewis portrait Alison Wonderland

Does one art form come more naturally? The art takes a lot of time and work but it’s pretty much guaranteed I’ll have something good at the end of it if I put eight, ten, twenty hours into a project. I feel like I’m much more adept at the craft of making art, whereas the music relies on inspiration. When that happens, it’s incredibly easy because I can sit down and an idea for a song pops into my head, something that people will tell me they like and that I can put on an album and make money with, much more so than art which doesn’t have the same sort of outreach as a song. Yet it might be a song that took me three minutes to write.

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goldie

Clifford Joseph Price has lived a life of ‘many s.’ Born in 1965 he moved between care homes until the age of 17 when he broke free. He’s since moved stealthily and often brilliantly through the graffiti art world, b-boy culture, selling grills (gold teeth), dance music and, recently, classical composition. His most recent exhibition was The Kids Are All Riot. What’s the secret? The practice of alchemy is really it. I’m getting to 44-years-old and I realise that for the last ten years I’ve been scratching my head trying to work out, as an artist, what sort am I? I’ve worked with jewellery, gold, canvas, paint, decks, it doesn’t matter. I found that fascinating in terms of the learning process of art and what comes from that.

Clockwise from top: I Predict a Riot, 2008. This Joke Isn’t Funny Anymore, 2008. Sonic Terrorist Eco-Friendly, 2009.

How important is graffiti? Look at anybody from Banksy to me to Bio, all these great writers, and the way of applying an aerosol can to a wall and the application of that medium has stayed pretty much the same over the space of 25 years. What’s amazing is that the manipulation of that has led to lots of things. I mean, try and think of a world without graffiti, it’s like remembering going to a disco when there was one deck. A critic once said the barbarian from within will eventually take over the art world as we know it. Lo and behold, that’s what’s happening.

www.eddielock.co.uk

Whether it’s classical music or graffiti, you like to submerge yourself in those worlds. The social aspect of going to New York and hanging out with those writers and feeling what it’s like to be them. Those guys were on crack, their fathers were dealers and they were dealers. It was such a wake-up call: realising the implication of it all, that these people would die for it, this is what they do. Where next? I’ll probably be chipping away with stone and a mallet. Sculpture’s where I began. When I was a kid I made a pram and it had a hood and it was articulated. The teacher asked me to show everyone and as soon as I did I crushed it. I had to think, why did I do that? If I look at it, this kid just wanted to be mothered. I find that’s what I get when I look at fine art – all the stories, the feeling. n 35

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Martin creed i’ve got rhythM interview alex coles | PhotograPhy gautier deblonde

Running feet, ticking metronomes and flickering lights – all are descriptions of Turner Prize-winner Martin Creed’s most familiar works. Movement and rhythm are at the core of these pieces. Alex Coles met with Creed in the countdown to the world premier of his ballet, Work No. 1020, at sadler’s Wells, where for the first time, Creed will take his love of movement and music onto the stage.

Alex Coles Let’s go back to the beginning. The band OWADA came together in 1994 a few years after you graduated from the Slade. Had you been writing songs before that? MARTiN CReed Aye I had, but eventually that was all channelled through OWADA. That was all the same stuff. First I was working on those early songs, then I tried them out with friends and then it became the band. At the time it felt like a natural progression. But I no longer do things under the name of the band. After a while the band thing felt wrong: I just wanted to do my work – be it music or sculpture. The band felt like a separate thing – something that I was trapped into – and I didn’t like that. It felt fake my being one thing in one context and something completely different in another. AC That makes sense – this way you dissolve the line between the music and the art so that it is just one continuous form of practice. With the way people differentiate between the two leading to confusion, this can only help... MC Aye, and anyway, in my mind I have written sound pieces before, like the voices in the lift at Hauser and Wirth, London in 2004, [Work No. 371: Elevator ooh/aah up/down] which is a sound sculpture rather than a piece to be performed. Then I repeated the idea – the journey of the elevator being the same as the journey of the scale of music from bottom to top – at the Ikon Gallery last year but using a choir instead [Work No. 409]. So the two aspects of what I do have never really been separate. AC There are also the pieces with the metronomes from the 1990s. In a way they were early sound sculptures. MC Exactly.

AC I want to concentrate on the songs for a moment. I’m interested in the precise character of the sound you make. It’s a very minimal, trebly, thin kind of sound. New Wave you could say. Fear of Music (1979), Talking Heads’ third album, is an interesting reference point here not only because of the sound but also because of the titles of the songs: ‘Mind’, ‘Paper’, ‘Air’, ‘Electric Guitar.’ There is that same sense of pared-back simplicity in both sound and song concept. David Byrne said that in the mid-70s, with all the progressive rock around, there was a tendency for the guitar to sound really beefy and macho and that by contrast he wanted his guitar to sound weedy and thin. Your sound has something of that same quality especially on your first CD Nothing (1997). MC I remember when he said that too, so I know what you mean.Talking Heads’ early albums have been very important to me. It’s funny though because when I play live now the guitar sound is more beefy and distorted [both laugh]. In those early recordings I always wanted the guitar to sound as clean as possible. I didn’t want to use any effects like reverb or distortion. When you take this approach the sound is thin. But actually it is just the natural sound of the guitar. So it was not so much that I was trying for a weedy sound, but more a straight sound. It was important to me to use the materials as they were without supplementing them in any way. AC There is a parallel here with some of the sculpture works. Many of them were fabricated out of the materials already present in a gallery: air, with the various balloon pieces; light, with the Turner Prize piece from 2001 [Work No. 227: The lights going on and off]; walls, with the various wall protrusions; doors, opening and closing; and 36

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Martin Creed shot in rehearsals at Sadler’s Wells Theatre, London, October 1, 2009

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ambient sound, with the work from Javier Lopez Gallery in 1995 that recorded the private sounds of the gallery, including the toilet and the director’s telephone, and transported them to the public part of the gallery through an amplifier. MC Yeah. In both cases – with the guitar or the gallery – it is a matter of trying to just let things be. One of my favourite quotes that relates to this is from Michelangelo who said he thought that a sculpture was already in the marble it was just a matter of trying to find it. AC I’ve heard that too. I wonder if he really said it – or whether it was someone in the sculpture department at the Slade in the 1950s and just got passed along. MC If it was Michelangelo, he must have intended it as a kind of fake modesty. But I don’t mind why he said it, I just like it and I think it relates to what I do. AC Right. One of your early songs, ‘Circle,’ establishes a literal relationship between your music and your art because its hilarious lyrics are actually about the artworld. The lyrics go: ‘Stephen Willats thought that Art & Language were ripping him off Art & Language thought that Joseph Kosuth was ripping them off Joseth Kosuth thought that Lawrence Wiener was ripping him off on a recent trip to London Lawrence Wiener saw a show by Stephen Willats he said, “Fuck me this guy’s ripping me off.”’ MC Aye, that was me trying to do a collaboration with Patrick Brill from Bob and Roberta Smith. Patrick wrote those words and I liked them so I wrote music to accompany them. We performed it a couple of times together with him singing but after that I always sang it. AC It’s an interesting one because the song structure and even the precise sound of the rhythm driving the song is cyclical. It repeats itself over and over again – making the lyrics increasingly hilarious as they are repeated. MC I always enjoyed playing that piece. Even though they are not my words, I was one hundred per cent behind it. AC Now that you have dissolved the band name, and with it the concept of a band, it places more emphasis on you as a figure. Where many musicians and artists hide behind the screen of what they do, you stand in front of it. I would have thought that this would help – in the most obvious sense – critics see the two activities as part of one continuous form of practice, but it doesn’t seem to have. Some people still don’t seem to get it. MC Doing gigs under my own name now I think makes it easier because there is no confusion about what I’m doing. But I still get asked whether the music is different to the sculptural work. In response I always say no – no, it isn’t! Doing a gig 39

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is just a different way of being in the world. I need to make art and do shows and performances to find out about my work. It’s crucial. I can’t do something on my own in a separate room and then go out and put it in the world. It has to emerge from my time in the world. Sometimes I feel like a goldfish – I have no memory. So I have to go out again and again and find out what it is I like doing and from that understand what it’s about. Going on stage is a crucial part of that. When you are on stage you have a kind of heightened awareness of people and your relation to others. AC Today you have a broad variety of songs to choose from when you play live. In the early 1990s there were fewer. At the time, I thought that your songs were intended as a set of instructions with chords and lyrics, reminiscent of certain types of conceptual art. Do you see the songs like an early Sol LeWitt instruction piece? Or do you see it more like Bruce Springsteen performing ‘Hungry Heart’ for the umpteenth time? I suppose what I’m asking is whether the songs are delivered in a very cool conceptual way or whether you inhabit them by breathing new emotion into them each time they are performed. You need to explain to me what’s happening there... MC ...I’m not quite sure what’s happening there [laughs]. But for sure they are songs other people could do – they are instructions in that way. But at the same time they are close to my heart. I feel I don’t do them in a cool way, and in a way that is a problem. Sometimes I feel more freedom when I work with other musicians – especially orchestras – because then I can get some distance from the piece and see what it’s like. Performing the songs myself is definitely a ‘hot’ activity – it’s not a cool thing. AC By the late 1990s I felt that you were developing two different types of songs: one was more structural and the other much more lyrical. It’s apparent in the difference between say ‘1-100’ from Nothing and ‘You’re the One for Me’ from I Can’t Move (1999). Is this a fair perception and has it changed since? MC Yeah, I think you’re right. The warmer ones were a departure for me and they related to other works I was doing at the time like the ‘Everything is Going to be Alright’ neon pieces. This series doesn’t fit in with the earlier counting pieces or the lights going on and off installation. I find it difficult to say why the more emotive pieces were made whereas with the other pieces it is much easier – it is almost a more scientific approach to making a work. One is more to do with thinking and the other feeling. AC While the emotive songs are structured in a more traditional way, I still couldn’t imagine a Sinatra-style saloon singer covering one, although that would be interesting... MC Aye, I agree about that [both laugh]. But even the more dry scientific pieces are still expressionistic – otherwise I wouldn’t be able to live

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ÂŤFor me the ballet is a way oF trying to move better. you can think oF dance Forms as [a way oF] trying to live betterÂť

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AC The next development was the Variety Performances.They are part of this explosion that went off a few years ago in your work when you totally opened out to new mediums and languages with the result that your oeuvre is now much broader and more complex than before. As a consequence, there is now an even more complex relationship between the sound pieces and sculpture realised through the medium of performance. What’s happening here? MC You know, again I don’t know precisely what’s going on! But I do know that it started from doing slide talks about my work. I began more and more to think that talking about work was a whole work in itself. It didn’t just come after the work – it could be a work. I started thinking that it would be better to get rid of the slides altogether – slides seem to be like a third person in the room: there is you, the audience, and then the slides. The slides act like an escape hatch out of the lecture room. So I started doing talks without slides – but I always had one as a backup [laughs]. Instead of showing slides from another time and place I would try and improvise by thinking out loud and making something up using words. To me, this seemed a more true way of talking about making work. Then I started presenting more things during the performances – leading to works that were actually designed purely for theatrical presentation. So where in the early days I talked about the work depicted in the slides, now I try and make a song and dance about the work without it actually being there.That’s what is going on there [both laugh]. AC When you were one of the judges for the Beck’s Prize in 2006, and you did a little jive, a sort of stand-up routine, during the presentation ceremony what exactly was that? I don’t mean it in a facetious way! I mean it genuinely: what was the status of that jive? Was it a performance as a work or just you making a performance of presenting a prize for someone else’s work? MC They just asked me to present the prize. But to me the speech making the presentation in front of the audience was a work too – in fact, just as much so as a sculpture or a song. AC That’s interesting. It’s like the sense you had earlier on that everything you did was somehow a part of the work has now been fully realised. Could you say something about the next stage in the development of the Variety Performances – with the one you did for Calvin Klein in 2008? MC It’s funny you mention that and the Beck’s Prize speech because both of those things were really important to me. They were important even though they were everyday things. Calvin Klein

basically asked me to design a party for them. It was a commercial job, but I was really up for it. Doing things in different venues and contexts is important – whether it’s the theatre, dance, or the fashion world. I already had this piece consisting of an orchestra sitting in a straight line twenty metres or so long which had been performed at Hauser and Wirth at Coppermill in 2007 [Work No. 673]. Part of the idea behind the piece is that the orchestra sit in a straight line so that you can see the music going along the line and then back again. I had designed a huge stage for Calvin Klein so that the musicians could be perched on it and the models could move around them. The stage was like a catwalk where the models could walk around the musicians rather than just in a straight line. Doing works in a situation like that is a way for me to test the work out. If you always do things in art galleries then you only know how things operate in one very specific space. I think it’s important to remember that galleries are just theatres for looking at things and that there are other spaces available. AC I like the idea of the orchestra in a line. Whenever I listen to classical music I never know who is doing what. MC Aye, that’s exactly why I wrote that piece, because I always thought an orchestra was just like a blob. Sounds just seem to emerge from it and you can’t make out who is doing what! AC Could you say something about the ballet at Sadler’sWells and the music it will be performed to? MC Basically the ballet comes from the running piece I did for the Duveen Galleries at Tate Britain in 2008. Doing that piece got me thinking about people moving. Really I thought about the people running as a kind of dance. Both the dancing and running come from thinking about what I do. The one thing I am interested in is the way I move my body. The more I thought about that the more I got to thinking about what I have to do to make something. I was thinking that moving your body is the first thing you have to do in the world. That got me thinking that moving the body is something to concentrate on. If you think of the runners as an extreme example of movement, then working with the dancers is about trying to break movement down into constituent parts.The music I wrote accompanies it. For me the ballet is a way of trying to understand movement... No, not trying to understand movement so much as move better – that’s what it is about. Or to put it another way: you can think of dance forms as trying to live better. You know you were talking about those old songs being more expressionistic or more scientific. In the end, both have the same aim – I did them because I wanted to feel better about being in the world. That’s what it is all about. n Alex Coles is an art critic and an editor. He is the author of DesignArt (Tate Publishing, 2005) and the editor of Design and Art (MIT Press, 2007).

© The artist. Photo:  Hugo Glendinning

with them. In the end, all works have to be expressionistic in some way otherwise they don’t feel right. They can’t just be cold experiments - I just wouldn’t be excited about them. In the end they have to be the same in a way. But I totally agree that there is a difference there.

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«I was thInkIng that movIng your body Is the fIrst thIng you have to do In the world»

Martin Creed, Work No. 850, 2008

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Bjork, All is Full of Love, dir. Chris Cunningham, 1999.

Grace Jones, Libertango (I’ve Seen That Face Before), dir. Jean-Paul Goude, 1978.

Influential music video director brings romance to robots

Graphic designer, illustrator and photographer

mtv to moma text LouisA wright

MTV hit the screens for the first time in 1981. But long before, musicians and film directors had been experimenting with music videos, not only as promotional material but as art. Collected here is a series of videos all of which have innovated the form, pushing it from the realm of MTV to the modern art museum.

Arcade Fire, be oNline B, dir. Vincent Morisset, 2007. Interactive video

The Eurythmics, Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This), dir. Dave Stewart and Jon Roseman, 1983. Iconic video from early MTV era

Six Orders of Admittance, Shelter from the Ash, dir. Cam Archer, 2007. Up-and-coming

Bob Dylan, Subterranean Homesick Blues, dir. DA Pennebaker, 1966.

music video director and photographer producing high-quality art-house videos

Dylan famously illustrates lyrics with cue-cards

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Massive Attack, Teardrop, dir. Walter Stern, 1998. Fractured images from the

The Knife, Marble House, dir. Chris Hopewell, 2007. Stop motion animation

Hubble space telescope

of a day in the life of a family of mice

Smashing Pumpkins, Thirty-Three, dir. Billy Corgan and Yelena Yemchuk, 1996.

Feist, 1234, dir. Patrick Daughters, 2007. Grammy nominated video, shot in a single take

Stop motion video shot with a stills camera

Madonna, Justify My Love, dir. Jean Baptiste Mondino, 1990.

Coldplay, Strawberry Swing, dir. Shynola, 2009. A world drawn in chalk

The fashion world meets the music industry

Fatboy Slim, Weapon of Choice, dir. Spike Jonze, 2001. Hugely inuential music

Emily Haines + Soft Skeleton, Our Hell, dir. Jaron Albertin, 2007.

video director; Christoper Walken tapdances

Shot using a thermal camera 45

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Dan Deacon, Paddling Ghost, dir. Natalie Van Den Dungen, 2009

Spiritualized, You Lie You Cheat, dir. Jake Chapman, 2008. Filmed using a handheld camera by the director better known for his visual art

Laurie Anderson, O Superman, 1983. Anderson's ďŹ rst music video,

New Order, Blue Monday, dir. William Wegman and Robert Breer, 1988.

included in a MoMA exhibition, 1985

Modern art meets music video

Radiohead, House of Cards, dir. James Frost, 2008. Made using new 3D plotting techniques

Paul McCartney, Dance Tonight, dir. Michel Gondry, 2007. Great director whose

with no lights or cameras

ďŹ lms include The Science of Sleep and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

Nick Knight, Massive Attack, 2003. The fashion photographer takes on the music video

Avalanches, Frontier Psychiatrist, dir. Tom Kuntz and Mike Maguire, 2001. Runner up at the Soho Short Film Festival in 2001

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The Beatles, Penny Lane, dir. Peter Goldman, 1967.

Norman McLaren, Pas de Deux, 1968. Used innovative visual effects and won a BAFTA

One of MoMA’s collected videos

for best animated video in 1968

PUMPED into EvEry hotel room across Europe but little discussed in academic or journalistic writing, the music video is a strange amalgam straddling different art forms. the vocabulary of the music video is developing, and there is evidence that it is growing as a platform for directors to explore innovative and artistic filmic techniques. And everyone is trying their hand at it, from fashion photographers to top film directors and artists. in the music video, narrative, music, and, increasingly, visual art, are combined, making this a form like no other. MoMA, new york, led the way. the museum began to accumulate music videos over twenty-five years ago, and continues to incorporate the collection into contemporary exhibitions. When i asked Barbara London, curator of the music video collection at MoMA and of the 1985 show Music Video: The Industry and Its Fringes, about why it is relevant to have music videos in an arts institution, she replied, ‘the music video began as an interdisciplinary hybrid, on the border between performance, music, and visual art during the 1970s. Back then this short, experimental form found its way onto cable television, and into a handful of museums and alternative art spaces a good fifteen years before the arrival of Mtv.’ She continues, ‘the Museum has had a long connection with such visual artists/musicians as Laurie Anderson, an unassuming and charismatic powerhouse who has developed an inventively personal form of storytelling with a disarmingly straightforward style. With her feet firmly planted in the worlds of both art and experimental music, for decades she has adroitly used language to engage and activate her audiences. the Museum exhibited her Handphone Table in its Projects series in 1978. So it was logical that Anderson’s first music video, O Superman (1981), entered the collection as part of the 1985 exhibition i organized. the forty-part survey was really a means of preserving the hybrid form by acquiring as gifts archival copies of key works. After all, the music industry – the record labels, producers, directors and creators of most videos – work under such time pressures, they tend not take care of their own projects.’ i asked Barbara about more recent additions to the collection, and what MoMA looks for when choosing a music video. She responded, ‘to date the Museum has acquired approximately 85 music videos. the works use a range of styles, including animation, live action filming, documentaries, and non-narrative approaches. Some blend different styles, incorporating animation and live action. All are inventive fusions of image and sound. recently, the Museum received forty-one works of David Bowie’s music videos, as a gift from the David Bowie Archive. these videos are directed by such innovators as Mick rock, David Mallet, and Jean-BaptisteMondino, among others.’ this summer, Montreal’s contemporary art museum, MACM, showed its fourth exhibition of music videos. the museum maintains a commitment to showcasing the music video as a growing and ever-changing art-form. one such video from the exhibition is vincent Morisset’s interactive work be oNline B for Neon Bible by Arcade Fire. online, the viewer is able to manipulate the actions of Win Butler, Arcade Fire’s frontman. Move Butler’s arms; make rain fall from his hands. Here is a prime example of how directors are seeking to incorporate new technologies such as the internet into the transforming function of the music video. that MoMA and MACM both consider it appropriate to cover the music video in their collections shows how a once promotional tool of the Mtv generation has and continues to transform into an art form in its own right, fully deserving its place in both hotel room and gallery space. n

David Bowie, Space Oddity, dir. Mick Rock, 1972. One of forty-one Bowie videos in the MoMA collection

Sarabeth Tucek, Something for you (version 1), dir. Cam Archer, 2007

A Ha, Take On Me, dir. Steve Barron, 1984. Made with a combination of pencil animation and live action animation in a technique called rotoscoping 47

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christian marclay music of silence text joshua mack

At first blush it seems paradoxical that Christian Marclay would create some of his most mature, conceptually sophisticated work around the idea of silence. After all, ever since his student days in the late 70s, the quality and aesthetics of sound, the ways it is packaged for consumption, and its translation into visual language have remained the overarching themes of his protean work. he has, for example, recorded and re-recorded incidental noise for use as raw material in his live performances. in Video Quartet (2002) and Telephones (1995), he collaged stock images like doors slamming and telephones ringing taken from classic movies into operatic ďŹ lms that reveal the clichĂŠ rituals and visual idioms associated with sound. Much of his sculpture and work on paper (most by necessity mute) implies the presence of music. understanding his splicing of various record albums into often lewd, 48

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© Christian Marclay. Courtesy of the artist and Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

Installation view: The Electric Chair, 2006. Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

spheres and cubes of melted vinyl albums, riffs on Minimalist forms and the compressed trash created by French Nouveau-Realists Cesar and Arman, that Marclay made in the late 1980s. Unavailable to be played, that is, unable to produce sound, these records are useless. What remains is a corpse, so to speak, a mass of plastic squashed like old cars ready for the dump. What is lost is not the physical body of the LP, which has simply been reshaped, but the content it is meant to preserve. The soul of the recording, what differentiates it from other discs of black plastic and determines its purpose, is the content encoded in its grooves. Once this is silenced, the album is dead. The irony here is that while recording is meant to preserve the immediacy and quality of live sound, making the past available for the future, the process is more akin to mummification. Records, as Marclay’s melted

absurd images of, say, Michael Jackson in bitingly appropriate travesty, as caustic comments on how celebrity image-making and marketing sell music depends on the connection between image and the audible material it advertises. There is, however, an aspect of his work that deals with silence, as Miwon Kwon and Russell Ferguson have noted in the catalog for Marclay’s 2003 mid-career survey at UCLA’s Hammer Museum. In their texts both consider this theme through the lens of sound: Kwon taking the absence of noise as a tabula rasa which invites, even requires, viewers to project their own imagined music on to the work; Ferguson pointing to several pieces which reference death without, however, pursuing the implications of the link between the absence of sound and the absence of life. This connection has a long trajectory in Marclay’s work. Start with the 49

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Christian Marclay installing a vinyl piece

the work begins, an electric guitar is tied to the rear bumper of a pickup. Then the truck drives away and accelerates to speed. The guitar skids and bumps across gravel and pavement emitting a hellish symphony of electric wails and rough cracks. Marclay based the work on the murder of James Byrd, Jr, an African American man from Jasper, Texas, who was dragged behind a pickup truck in a racially motivated slaying. There is something horrible and thrilling about the image of the guitar sailing behind the truck, a rush similar to that derived from violent films, loud motors, and blaring Electronica among other aspects of popular American culture – similar, I assume, to the reaction Mr Byrd’s killers had to dragging him behind their vehicle. This relationship poses ethical questions, as Marclay acknowledges, about the slippery boundaries between pleasure, aggression, power, and lust. What cements these issues is that Guitar Drag presents an act of silencing; at the end the guitar, like James Byrd, Jr, is incapable of produc-

masses indicate, are fragile items. Their surfaces are easily scratched, compromising the integrity of their contents, a circumstance Marclay has exploited by using the blips and blurs created by such scrapes and skips as raw material in his performances. On one level, doing so underscores the artificiality and impermanence of recorded sound, skewering the common propensity to accept the replayed as the ‘real.’ On another, it hints at a process of decay whereby original material, already mediated, is distorted, obscured until a record becomes unplayable and, other than the incidental noise produced by the rubbing of its surface against a needle, silent. This dynamic is similar to mortality; the schism between the physicality of a recording and the evanescence of its content, to the difference between the body, a person’s material presence, and the immaterial quality of the personality it houses. One of the clearest explorations of this dynamic comes in Guitar Drag (2000), a video realized during a residency at Art Pace in San Antonio. As 50

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Guitar Drag, 2000. DVD projection, view #1 running time 14 minutes. Edition of 6

Marclay based the work [guitar drag] on the Murder of JaMes byrd, Jr, an african aMerican Man froM Jasper, texas, who was dragged behind a pickup truck in a racially Motivated slaying. there is soMething horrible and thrilling about the iMage of the guitar sailing behind the truck, a rush siMilar to that derived froM violent filMs, loud Motors, and blaring electronica aMong other aspects of popular aMerican culture – siMilar, i assuMe, to the reaction Mr byrd’s killers had to dragging hiM behind their vehicle

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Opposite, top: Vertebrate, 2000. Altered acoustic guitar Bottom: Breathless II, 2000. Altered plastic recorder ute This page: Lip Lock, 2000. Altered tuba and pocket trumpet

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«what remains is a corpse, a mass of plastic squashed like old cars ready for the dump»

But they also raise far more nuanced questions about the moral contradictions and compromises inherent in any individual’s participation in society. To what extent, for example, are individual voice and need stilled in order to fulfill obligations to the body politic? To what extent do we remain silent in the face of policies we find ethically repugnant? Such questions are deeply complex and the answers can become, ironically, quite noisy. But ignoring them, which so many do, is to remain truly silent and, at least intellectually, dead. n

ing a sound other than that of its body thudding against the ground. These moral and social issues are expanded in The Electric Chair (2006) a series of paintings and works on paper based on the detail of a sign reading SILENCE appropriated from Andy Warhol’s 1963 eponymous series. By reducing Warhol’s image to this single word and by keeping his title, Marclay establishes an equation between the command to keep quiet and the chair, suggesting not only that silence is the outcome of execution but that it is a killing mechanism itself. It is, however, the living, those who participate in or witness an execution, who are ordered to remain silent. The philosophical implications of this dynamic are enormous. They seem to begin with a comment on the brutality of capital punishment and an indictment of the individuals and the state that look to the death of one person as recompense for the loss of another.

Joshua Mack is a writer living and working in New York. Christian Marclay: 2822 Records (PS1), 1987-2009. P. S. 1. MoMA, New York, until April 5, 2010. Christian Marclay lot 91, estimate £ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 53

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Matthew Herbert shot at his studio in Whitstable, Kent, September 28, 2009

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matthew herbert whips it up text karen wright PhotograPhy grant scott

Matthew herbert is in London planning his unique installation for the MUsiC auction at Phillips de Pury when i first meet him. the sound decks will be at the front of the saleroom next to the auctioneer’s podium, adding to the drama of the sale. he will be composing a ‘sound carpet’ for the auction. today, Matthew is also teaching simon de Pury to DJ, in preparation for the opening night of his photography exhibition in berlin. i sit observing them; simon, in his trademark apparel – a sharp navy suit and crisp white shirt – today wearing large incongruous ear phones, working next to a man who could only be an artist or musician, dressed grungily in a dark jumper. after the session i ask Matthew how hard it is to be a DJ? ‘it is about controlling technology and the hardware but it is also about being able to put this together with an artistic sensibility.’ when i ask simon de Pury whether he was nervous about his impending gig his response was that he was ‘looking forward to whipping it up.’ his main stress was that all his ian Dury has disappeared from his itunes. he tells Matthew that he wants ‘to be able to access his herb alpert and his bert bacharach.’ when simon had put on a russ Conway track with voice-over, Matthew had put his hands over his ears, although his response is a genial, ‘be careful of the talking stuff.’ his advice, which can be applied to all aspiring DJs, is ‘to start quietly and when more champagne is drunk you can work it up. have a clear idea of where you want to go and make sure that you have chains of music, two or three pieces that go together so you can fall back on them. DJing is all about managing people’s expectations.’ Good advice from a successful festival DJ. Later i agree to meet Matthew in his studio in whitstable, Kent, where he decamped from London five years ago in order to focus fully on his music. he and his wife, Jay, and young son, hunter, have a house by the sea. it is a beautiful late autumn afternoon and we spend our meeting perched on a picnic bench outside the whitstable Oyster Company, sadly closed to business at the moment. Our conversation is accompanied by sounds – seagulls and children playing, laughing

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«i wanted it to be violent, to reflect bush’s violence in iraq, so i decided to shoot the apple pie»

and whining – something which Matthew points out that in the past he would have been hastening to record and import into his mixer. I ask him about the auction project and he tells me that Simon initially contacted him after he had brought Matthew’s record, Plat du Jour (2004). This was a record made of the sounds of food, and, he tells me, a response to the historic dinner between George Bush and Tony Blair cooked by Nigella Lawson: ‘a reprisal of the current state of the British food industry, it was composed literally of the sounds of poo flowing down Fleet Street, a KFC chicken farm and a tank running over an apple pie.’ He continues, ‘it was a matter of principle. Food is in the front line of culture; peoples’ behavior evolves over food. At this historic dinner there was great French wine, although Bush does not actually drink wine. It was strange but the wives were not invited to the dinner. I found the menu from that evening and employed a man from the Foreign Office to prepare and cook it. I wanted it to be violent, to reflect Bush’s violence in Iraq, so I decided to shoot the apple pie.’ He laughs and recounts, ‘it was difficult, I could not get a gun here, so in the end I went to America where it is easy to get a gun. I got a friend’s father who had been a spy in Vietnam to shoot the gun.’ The review in The Guardian of the consequent live shows, complete with a chef making live smells was ‘a wild stimulation of senses, feat and intellect.’ Herbert is clear throughout our conversation that narrative plays a central role in his work, although he admits that this narrative is so obscure that it is often difficult, if not impossible, to decipher it from the score. His robust defense to my implied question is that ‘these narratives are implicit, embedded in the sounds. It is the maker who makes them more powerful. There is all this locked-in potential in sound. That is about what my work is about – it is the artist’s responsibility to make connections, no matter how absurd they are and where they lead us to.’ He tells me that place also affects sound. ‘We went and recorded singers on landfill sites to hear if they sounded different. The vocals we recorded there did have a more melancholy qual-

ity.’ It is a fundamental part of Matthew’s music – finding the music in unusual events and situations and taking the art into unexpected places (like Phillips). He concedes that this is both a challenge and difficult, ‘but that is what music is about. It is what traditional music by composers like Beethoven and Mahler has. It is about tension and release.That is what it is about – tension and release.’ MATTHEW GREW uP in the midst of an artistic family. ‘My grandfather was a watercolor artist in Wales. My mother and father were both painters and I grew up without telly.’ His father was also a BBC sound technician who encouraged his son to invest in his home studio. ‘We would dress up and do theatrical performances and make art and music.’ He read theatre at Exeter university and although he graduated, he never went into the theatre. Instead, he says, his choice of theatre allowed him to go at his own pace with music and technology. He credits as inspirational a teacher at his school who considered Reich, Xenakis and Jazz standards to be the equal of Beethoven. Matthew himself was classically trained, playing both the violin and piano from the age of four, playing first in an orchestra then his first band, a big band – ‘there were twenty-five of us.’ He recalls the problems of an accumulation of musicmakers, not everyone on time, not everyone in a good mood, not everyone liking each other. He admits, ‘it was a relief when along came the 1980s and with it the democraticasation of technology, which quickly turned the band into the solitary geek.’ You get the feeling that Herbert is relieved that he ‘no longer has to be a fascist to the drummer to keep the beat or to the bass to keep in tune. It eliminated the friction, and stopped the failure which, ironically, I now love and adore.’ His first concert in 1995 showcased Matthew alone with a mixer and a bag of crisps. This seems the right moment to ask if John Cage and his embracing of the random accident was an influence on his music development. ‘He is very important to me. After I discovered Cage for myself, he was the father I never had. I didn’t

have the childhood, I had the reunion. I love the combination of the serious and silly. I loved his lecture from Silence of thirty-two questions. “Which is better music, a truck passing by a music school or a concrete factory?” When he got to the end of thirty-two questions he started again. Cage seduces you into taking up the challenge.’ It was not Cage, however, that Matthew credits but ‘the invention of the mixer that in a moment changed music forever.’ He explains: ‘up to the era of the sampler, music about the sea was always impressionistic, poetic; with a sampler you didn’t need to do that. You could do anything.’ It was the trajectory of composition, however, that developed in a disappointing way that Matthew defines simply as ‘once you sampled James Brown you became a consumer.’ This under-fulfillment of potential, he points out, may well be a result of the genesis of the technology. When Matthew got his first sampler, it was empty. ‘You went out and filled it with the sounds that you wanted – the waves, the train, whatever – it was like buying a tube of paint. Now it comes with four gigabytes of samples already analysed, arranged and labeled – hip hop, Berlin Electro, Italian house, Ambient, etc. It’s a bit like painting by numbers.’This, he says, has led to the fundamental collapse of music education, where it is now led by technology rather than by ideas. This is particularly true in dance music today. Electronic music should be about controlling technology, but so often isn’t. The technology is accepted unquestioningly and the results are too uniform. He himself admits he is naturally drawn to the ‘accident’ of the sampler turning the instruction book on its head. Not surprisingly for someone whose record label is called Accidental Records, ‘I like it to be imprecise. It is funny! With samplers we spend our time accumulating sounds, dogs barking, seagulls calling, while in the studio we try and keep all the ambient sounds out.’ With all this incident you would expect the results to be tough listening, but Matthew says clearly, ‘I don’t actually think that music has to be unpleasant or unlistenable to be challenging.’ Who inspires him? Matthew has an instant

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«who inspires me? Geri halliwell, because she is so mediocre!»

response. ‘Geri Halliwell, because she is so mediocre! Her music is done for all the wrong reasons – money and vanity. While there’s work like that, there is still the reason to get off your bum. Silent Way by John Coltrane doesn’t make me work.’ He increasingly sees an artist's responsibility as having both a social conscience and an aesthetic purpose. He chose to work in sound ‘because sound is the richest medium and it is so untapped, while there has been recorded image since cave painting.’ It is clear that he thinks that the mixer has been taken into areas of facileness and fights back saying, ‘the more difficult, the more crucial it becomes. There is an incredulity which pulls one back from instant gratification.’ He fixes me with a look and asks, ‘do you know

that McDonald’s spends millions on “mouth feel” but nothing on body consequences? They are not dealing with repercussions. It is part of my responsibility as an artist to glue the consequences on to the action.’ It is in this spirit that he attacks his subject, admitting that often his preconceptions are shot out of the water. He recalls his trip to hear 25,000 chickens simultaneously hatching out of their eggs. In his mind it would be a Jurassic Park moment, the sound of the chicks pecking away, the cracking of the eggs and the emergence of the birds. When he arrived at the factory it was a different story, the only sound the fans that keep the temperature at a constant 99° for hatching, the eggs kept in plastic drawers, the chicks not visible at all. He sighs, ‘They enter into the world, and see nothing, not the sky or a plant or anything. I was thoroughly disappointed until I realized later that there was nothing romantic, charming or endearing or earthy.’ It is moments like this that Matthew credits with making him reassess his musical stance. ‘Artistically this caused me to reassess everything in sound and to re-engage with narrative to listen to the story. The story is all about accident: you are on the planet, which is an accident, you are born, you are not killed. All of these things are accidents. It became a fixation with the unknown.’ As a respected musician Matthew concedes ‘I am lucky I am overpaid as a species. But along with this privilege comes responsibility. I need to question the responsibility. I do feel a groundswell of fellow grumps, encouraging me to be surprising and keep trying things. I accept that life is a flawed and unpredictable process. I have a responsibility as an artist to continue my resistance to the corporate media and to base my decisions on resources. My work is about Sustainabalism – if there is such a word’ (He says on his web site that is trying to find a better word for sustainabilism). ‘It’s the new capitalism/communism: a society structured around the principle of what is best for the resources upon which it builds itself.’ As his work has become more concerned with politics and the environment, he has chosen to amend his own life style. He no longer

eats food with high air miles and restricts his flying to one transatlantic crossing per year to visit his family in America. It’s a vast change from a man who regularly flew once a week to his gigs and meetings and a serious commitment for a travelling DJ. IT IS In this exploratory mood that he is embarking on his next record, ‘One Pig.’ It is 'made out of, er..., a pig. It will take about a year to make. In the meantime I am still waiting for the pig to be born.’ He elaborates: ‘I will be present at the birth, the life and eventually the death. Afterwards the pig will be cooked – the head by Heston Blumenthal, who will have a banquet. The bones will be turned into a flute on which to play…’ I question, in light of all this anti-corporate conversation, why he decided to work with Phillips de Pury? ‘I don’t know if the composition for the sale will be an important piece of music but it is a significant challenge, to harness the technology and all of the musical presumptions, and that is why I did it. I am working on a new piece, two tracks per minute for around twenty lots. I am coming up with an atmosphere for each piece and that is not easy. The gavel itself is a noise, it is also the punctuation. It is why I sometimes do pop music for shows like the X Factor. It is my chance to be aTrojan horse within the industry.’ We end our conversation as the light starts to fade and it suddenly becomes too chilly to remain on the beach. My mind is, care of Matthew, full of the music of the day – the sea gulls and the children and the sound of footsteps on the shingle. n

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rankin & damien hirst destroy Rankin co-founded Dazed & Confused magazine in 1992 and is the brains behind the Destroy project, in which he invited seventy musicians to transform their portraits by him into new artworks. His invitation to Damien Hirst to rework Rankin’s portrait of the Clash’s Joe strummer elicited the following conversation. it was held shortly before the week-long celebration of the project, culminating in an auction of selected works. the proceeds of the auction will be given in aid of the charity Youth music, which provides support for young peoples’ music projects and activities.

on a white canvas, because it terrified him… that’s the thing. It’s the fear of a white canvas. So, once it’s not moving you in any sense – like you’ve been doing it for a long time and it’s very limiting, photographing, the same way painting is, you’ve just got to get it moving. To give it to somebody else activates it in some way.

Rankin We first met when I came to the Serpentine to take your photo, and you used it for your private view card. That was a long time ago. And then we did a Dazed cover with you – I took some photos and got somebody to do line drawings of them, then we made ‘dot-to-dots’, so you could ‘create your own Damien.’ After that, we’ve just known each other socially. Damien HiRst I get the feeling that I always arrived at parties when you were too far gone, and you always arrived when I was too far gone. You cleaned up your act way before me. I was still running up to the 14th floor and setting fire to myself, and jumping into the pool, over and over. I met Joe Strummer through Antony Genn (The Hours). Ant said to me, ‘Oh, I’ve got this mate and I thought you could maybe do a few snaps of him?’ It’s totally casual, and he walked in and I’m like, ‘That’s Joe Strummer!’ Ant’s like that – he knows absolutely everyone, and he was in Joe’s band at the time. Joe threw him out, though. In fact, I told Joe to sling him out, because of the heroin.

R Do you feel with your paintings that when you produce them, they have a life of their own? DH I started when generations before me were of that idea – if you paint, and you put your paintings in a corner and wait to be discovered, then it doesn’t matter if you’re not discovered because someone will look after your paintings if you’re lucky, and then you’ll get discovered after you’re dead. When I got on the scene, I was just like, ‘F**k that.’ I just thought, ‘My work doesn’t work without an audience, I’ve got to get an audience.’ And you look at a gallery… all it is, it’s a building with white paint and they’re taking 50 per cent. The thing is, I want kids to think I’m cool. And that’s why you’ve got to step over the boundaries. You’re in a position where it’s a relay race and at some point you have to hand it over. I’ve met artists and I don’t think they’re cool. Joe Strummer was a great guy who I met, who was much more of a hero in real life. You don’t meet many people like that.

R Joe was very far gone at that time, but always lovely. You then did the stuff with Ant and his band The Hours, didn’t you? DH Oh, well I did that with him and Martin after Joe died. I think I felt guilty because I’d told Joe to throw him out the band. R Have you done well out of The Hours? DH No, I’ve lost money on that. But I’ve enjoyed it. I’ve always had an interest in the music biz. I got all my interest in art from album covers when I was a kid. All the Pink Floyd ones... I was painting album covers on mates’ jackets when we were at school. I loved The Beatles – Peter Blake and Sgt Pepper, and all that, Andy Warhol and the Velvet Underground. I was really depressed when it all went down in size from 12-inches…

R What did you think when you started work on the portrait of Joe for this project, what went though your mind? DH I did a couple, the first one I did was horrible, and scary. Just death and horror… I had to chuck it away. But I was doing some painting at the time, so I thought I’d just paint on it. I didn’t know what I was going to do when I said yes to Rankin. Then I thought, well it’s going to be his picture of Joe, and it will be my painting… which is really difficult to put together without it looking like collage. But I tried to keep it about him as a person. I kept looking at the thing on the hand, where it said ‘Joe.’ Because I did that in the corner. That was his signature. I’ve got reams of paper by him, just him writing poetry. I found a thing the other day I had to chuck out, both of us were out of our minds. But we did a lot of paintings and drawings, and I’ve got artworks by him. Collages and stuff. He made one, I think, during his last Christmas, he did this boat floating round all these islands with campfires on them…

R When you’re asked to do collaborations, what’s your approach? Like with me asking you to do this Joe Strummer thing? DH I like collaborations. I like blurring the boundaries. Crossing over boundaries, falling over them. You have to invent the future. R You can’t follow the rules, you can’t do it the way everyone does it. I get criticised by Bailey – he says, ‘Everyone always says that Rankin started a magazine,’ and Bailey started a magazine as well, but everyone’s forgotten. So, he’s pissed off about it. But let’s get back to this thing about the musicians – what for me is interesting was I got to a point where I was taking photos, and I was thinking, ‘Shit, these photos are good, but I feel like I need to see what someone else can do with them.’ That’s why I thought I’d do ‘Destroy,’ to give people photographs and let them say something with them, and give them back their power. DH With all art, you have to get something moving between you and it. Max Beckmann used to paint his canvas black because he couldn’t paint

R What kind of stuff did you get up to when you were together? DH When he came to my house, the tunes would change, he’d bang the Colombian music on, then blow up little kids’ balloons and sellotape them on to all the lights. Then he’d put blankets up and make a den for the kids… I had two dogs I kept outside, and he’d always get them back in the house. I’d always then go for a walk with him, and he’d take my white cat, a pony and the dogs, like it was the f**king Incredible Adventure or something. 60

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Joe Strummer by Damien Hirst, 2009

«Money’s very coMplicated; it Might be More iMportant than love» 61

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‘I started drawing various symbols for god, love, hate, infinity... then I took the picture to

‘It’s always fun to make a collage. I wanted to exaggerate my curly hair, make it wilder.

Simon, who started cutting away bits of his face. But Matt Maitland, who was designing

The completed picture is more flamboyant and eccentric than the original photograph,

our album artwork, told us we were being too reverential, and started adding new ‘Jaxx

which is the more demure me.’ Alison Goldfrapp

characters’, incorporating human and animal parts. What he did represents the Jaxx

Goldfrapp, 2009

aesthetic, as our faces are all but removed, which is true when we create music – it doesn't focus on our personal images, and pulls in different characters, shapes, forms, dimensions, and isn't just human.’ Felix Buxton, Basement Jaxx Basement Jaxx & Big Active, 2009

‘I thought it would be interesting to bring that portrait down to its essence, which would

‘Despite the minimal photographic content of my contribution, there was a Rankin work

be the negation of any detail whatsoever… well, we see enough of me.’

at the start of the process, a deeply flattering portrait that I will be showing off to all my

Michael Stipe, REM

mates long into old age.’ Fred Deakin

Michael Stipe, 2009

Fred Deakin, 2009

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‘When I was growing up, I would look at myself in the mirror and realise I don’t really

‘I wanted to make a work incorporating artists who were not yet at the height of their

look like a pop star, so I suppose that’s what amused me in a way. To try and take that not

powers. I'd seen Kitty, Daisy and Lewis a few times, and liked their rawness and obvious

very appropriate raw material, and make it work in some way. You do some of the moves

passion for the music they played. When talking with them one night, Lewis expressed an

and do the things that pop stars are supposed to do, but because it’s you doing it, it

utter contempt for digital media. I also knew that they preferred to use older equipment

looks kind of strange. The geography teacher thing… I thought it’s a look that suits me. I

and dressed in a 50s style. I decided to push them back further into the past by making

thought it would be quite good to make that work on stage.’ Jarvis Cocker

a daguerreotype of them. This is a highly complex process that was briefly popular for

Jarvis Cocker, 2009

making images in the mid-19th century. It was intended to have the effect of making them appear to be from an era long past, but where their youthful appearance was preserved. The daguerreotype is also quite mirror-like, which lends them a chimerical and ephemeral quality. This is what I experienced when I saw the band, a contrast of a familiar 50s retro style with very youthful looks and musical vigour. A vibrant and boisterous enigma.’ Mat Collishaw Kitty, Daisy & Lewis by Mat Collishaw, 2009

‘Nathan did this artwork, it’s really incredible. He’s really good at defacing things – it’s like a talent that most people grow out of! And it’s something you think will never come in handy, but then was good for this. He really took his time, because he takes his painting very seriously. I think people often think of me and that it’s all about the music, I think that’s bullshit – all the artists I’ve ever appreciated thought it so much more… politics, sexuality, expression, clothing.’ Beth Ditto, The Gossip The Gossip, 2009

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‘My desire to reconfigure the shot is just, you know, how I feel about my own image sometimes as being “extra-personal.”’ Debbie Harry, 2009

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«I suppose the whole thIng Is about beIng Immortal, really, Isn’t It? I mean, we’re goIng to lIve forever, aren’t we, rankIn?»

R I was thinking about Joe as an artist earlier, it’s interesting because he was very aware of his image, of how he was visually perceived on stage and in the media, but was also always talked of in terms of being very real, and never ‘selling out.’ DH I think Joe taught me the most fundamental things, like who you are and what you represent are equally important. So, I’m aware that I represent something to people and it’s very fragile – as an individual, you can do what you f**king want, but selling out is something that affects what you represent, so you’ve got to be really careful that you don’t. But you know, everybody sells out…

want people to look at the photographs, because that gives them a life of their own. That’s why I do so much to promote it. And what comes with that, whether I like it or not, is an invasion of who you are. Everybody wants to know where you come from, and all that sort of stuff. DH You’ve got to be really careful. I mean, artists have this thing where money’s ‘bad,’ but you’re in a brilliant position. I think it’s an amazing achievement, there’s not a photographer in the world who could do this. There’s nobody who could fill a space like this. Apart from when you’re 90 years old, and it’s a retrospective with lots of white space around it. But I still don’t know what this is, or where it leads to…

R Do you really think so? DH I don’t know, money’s very complicated and I’ve said this before, but it might be more important than love... and I think it’s dangerous. You know, I’ve given art to people, and 90 per cent of the people I give it to then sell it.

R But I don’t know, either! Do you know where things are going to lead every time? DH I’m talking to the Tate about doing shows and they’re hindering me and pulling me back, then at the end of it, they ask for £20,000 to help install this piece or other! It’s like you’ve always got to give, give, give – and then their bookshops are full of people and the viewing figures go through the roof. You just think, Victorians probably invented museums, and the idea’s not really been revamped. Then you think – why don’t I just get my own? I remember when I did Freeze when I was a student, it took me ages – I got a space, painted it white, put all the work up, invited people, bought the wine, did the card, made a little catalogue, sent it all out… I did the whole thing and then I thought afterwards, ‘Oh well, that means now, because it worked and everyone came, if I wanted to do a proper exhibition, I could do it.’ It took me about a year to figure out that I’d already done it. I think you’re definitely in that position, where you can create something more permanent... I once did a spot painting with a million spots on it, I worked it out as half a millimetre spots – you print it up in grey first on white, then you just dip in this single hair and cover the dots… they’re a bit smaller in the grey, so you didn’t have to do any measuring. When I worked out that it was like 40 feet by 20 feet, and that it would take 20 years to make it, I just went, f**k!

R I get calls about the painting you gave me every year, telling me what it’s worth and asking do I want to sell it? DH People follow me around, getting to the people I’ve given stuff to. I had an accountant once who I gave a painting to, he phoned me up and said, ‘I’ve sold the painting, and I want to take you out for dinner.’ F**king unbelievable, he sold it for like a hundred grand. I gave him a grand in cash, and said he’d been so great in sorting me out that I gave him a little spot painting as well. He sold it for a hundred grand, then wanted to buy me dinner. Unbelievable. It’s mad. Frank, my business manager, says, ‘You might not have noticed this Damien, but when people say to you, just give me a painting, it’s got to be worth ten times the money. Give them a painting worth less than the money, and they’ll be very disappointed.’ But that is money, isn’t it? Whereas in life generosity’s something very good, when it comes to money it’s something that’s not always very good. R Do you think that you’ve changed now, you’re generous as a person, but you’re not going to be generous with the work? DH I think you just try and learn, that’s the most important thing. Recently, I’ve changed. I always thought museums were for dead artists, but you’re at the age now when you need a museum… and this is temporary, but it’s still a museum. Galleries are old-fashioned, aren’t they? I love books because I love the way that books, even today, even with the computer, they still stand up. It’s very personal, it’s very intimate… you really get inside someone’s head. That won’t die, but gallery systems… I always used to feel that in the record business, the people who have the most control are those who are the furthest away from creativity. That always f**ks it up. But in the art world, it’s great! Jay will come to my studio and go, ‘What are you working on?’ and I’ll say, ‘I’m doing this piece with a dog shit stuck to a telephone,’ and he’ll go, ‘Really?!’ And he’s not sure! [Laughs] But in the music business, they’ll just tell you, ‘No you’re not, mate.’

R Don’t you still want to do it? DH I printed it up, I started it… I got like four spots done! And that was when I finished doing the spot paintings. I thought, I’m not f**king doing it, and I just went mental. Because there is always a billion spots, or a trillion. You see, it starts to eat into your lifetime, that’s the thing. You realise you’re mortal. I suppose the whole thing is about being immortal, really, isn’t it? I mean, we’re going to live forever, aren’t we, Rankin? n This interview is abridged from the Destroy / Rankin book, available at Phillips de Pury, November 9 – 21 or at youthmusic.org.uk/rankin. Destroy / Rankin supports Youth Music’s tenth Birthday, helping children to transform their lives, whatever their circumstances, with the power of music.

R I get really criticised for all the PR I do. My response is always that I 65

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object lesson: lot 31 text silke taprogge

Martin Kippenberger’s Untitled (self portrait, Chelsea Hotel), 1990, is a fine example of one of his hotel drawings, of which he made hundreds during his short career. it is often said that he fitted several lifetimes of artistic endeavour into one short life. the hotel works are more personal in some ways than his paintings and sculptures – reflecting the itinerant quality of his life. the subject matter in this one is especially so: a self-portrait alongside a series of the hotel drawings together, one is aware of the wide variety of styles employed, from the collage aesthetic of Dadaism to the caricatures of Daumier. this drawing also has elements of pop art, with the repetition of the guitars recalling the repetition in works by andy Warhol, in particular his cow wallpaper. During the 1980s, although constantly returning to germany, Kippenberger travelled widely in europe – France, spain, greece – as well as north and south america. in 1987 he immersed himself in Kreuzberg, West berlin, where he, along with gisela Capitain, opened the now legendary büro Kippenberger, modelled on andy Warhol’s Factory. He also managed and programmed the legendary avant-garde punk club sO36, where he frequently performed as a member of the band Luxus. the Hotel Chelsea referred to on the letterhead was owned by the philosopher and politician Dr Werner peters, who had a keen interest in art, that led to him to encourage Kippenberger to redesign parts of the hotel. perhaps it was for this reason that he stayed in the Chelsea longer than almost anywhere else, making this an especially poignant piece. n

Picasso was central to Kippenberger’s way of thinking. an artist who could turn his hand to painting, sculpture, graphics and ceramics and loved guitars too. Bottle of Vieux Marc, Glass, Guitar and Newspaper (1913).

Andy Warhol loved repetition, often making series of portraits in various colour combinations. His iconic cow wallpaper illustrates Warhol’s love of now fashionable clashing colours too.

Richard Prince’s idea of integrating his personal cancelled cheques in a series of paintings, took the idea of using stationery to its conceptual limit. Untitled (check painting) #5 (2004).

Kippenberger’s lithograph This Band is Playing on Luxus (1979) portrays Kippenberger’s group posing, looking über cool as if about to take to the stage at sO36.

pablo picasso, Bottle of Vieux Marc, Glass, Guitar and Newspaper © succession picasso/DaCs 2009. andy Warhol, cow wallpaper © the andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual arts/artists rightssociety (ars), new York / DaCs, London 2009. richard prince, Untitled (check painting) #5, 2004 © richard prince. Courtesy gagosian gallery. photography by robert McKeever. Martin Kippenberger, This Band is Playing on Luxus, © estate Martin Kippenberger, galerie gisela Capitain, Cologne, 1979

of electric guitars, reflecting his interest in music. seeing a group

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BARCELONA

It is clear from the contents of this MUSIC issue that John Cage continues to influence both musicians and artists. If Duchamp has been considered the key figure for the beginning to middle of the twentieth century, it is becoming more apparent that Cage has become the paradigm for the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Through his dialogues with artists such as Robert Rauschenberg and Andy Warhol, younger artists have become aware of him. It is hard to imagine a Martin Creed or Matthew Herbert without his reference. This exhibition at MACBA, The Anarchy of Silence: John Cage and Experimental Art (October 23, 2009 – January 10, 2010), covers Cage’s entire career and includes sound recordings, music and documentary materials, to give an idea of the extraordinary scope and influence of his work.

John Cage on the primed piano. Performance at Friedric-Wilhelm Gymnasium, 5 October 1960. Photo: Peter Fischer. Courtesy Galerie Schüppenhauer

news

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news

Tim Burton, Untitled (Creature Series), 1992. Private collection. © 2009 Tim Burton. Guillermo Kuitca, Mozart-Da Ponte I, 1995. Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. Courtesy Sperone Westwater, New York. Damien Hirst, Floating Skull, 2006 © the Artist. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd. Courtesy White Cube. Richard Woods, Port Sunlight, 2009. Lever House, New York, NY. Image courtesy of the artist and Perry Rubenstein Gallery, New York. © Richard Woods

MIAMI

Art Basel Miami Beach (December 3 – 6 2009) warms up the winter months. Over 250 galleries from around the world gather at this year’s show, where thousands of artworks from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries sit alongside performance art, film, parties and concerts. While you’re there, make sure you see Guillermo Kuitca: Everything, Paintings and Works on Paper, 1980-2008, the retrospective of this versatile artist at the Miami Art Museum, which promises to be an exciting show. It follows the development of the Argentinian artist’s work, from the early paintings to abstract maps and architectural plans, such as the pictured opera house, abstracted into bold red. (Continues until January 17, 2010).

NEW YORK

Tim Burton, the mastermind behind iconic films such as Edward Scissorhands (1990) and The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993), has a major retrospective this autumn at MoMA (November 22, 2009 – April 26, 2010). The show includes work from throughout his life, with childhood drawings and never before seen puppets, storyboards and paintings, such as the strange creature pictured. In conjunction with the exhibition, MoMA is screening each of Burton’s films, so you can see in motion his gangly-limbed characters from across the years.

LONDON

NEW YORK

Be prepared for darkness, with Damien Hirst: Nothing Matters at White Cube (November 25, 2009 – January 30, 2010). This exhibition of Hirst’s paintings, such as the pictured Floating Skull, shows the influence of Francis Bacon, whose work is in the Hirst collection. Catch the show in Hoxton Square and Mason’s Yard, or pop over to the Wallace Collection to see Hirst’s ‘blue paintings.’ (Continues until January 24, 2010).

Colourful patterns brighten up the winter months in Richard Woods: Port Sunlight at New York’s Lever House for Perry Rubenstein Gallery (December 3, 2009 – February 15, 2010). Woods has clad the lobby of the iconic Modernist building in bold print in this site-specific installation (pictured). Household materials such as wood and wallpaint are transformed into vibrant panels and benches. 69

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music

5 pm Saturday 21 november 2009 london

Lots 1 - 231 ALDRIDGE, M. 96 ALEXANDER GLOBAL PRODUCTIONS 54 ANSETT, R. 231 ARMAN 224 - 226 BENAIN, P. 120 - 122 BERTOIA, H. 106 BLAKE, P. 62, 63 BLANKENSTEIN, H. 92 BLING, D. 204 BLUMENFELD, E. 169 BOOT, A. 133 , 134 BOWIE , D. 182 BREITZ, C. 2 BRODSKY, J. 138 BROOKS, C. 113 CAMDEN, W. 39, 40 CHAPMAN, C. 186 CLAXTON, W. 178, 179 COBAIN, K. 93 COHEN, J. 165, 166 CORBIJN, A. 10, 42 DAL LAGO A. 109 DIAZ de VIVAR, J. 17 DOHERTY, P. 28 DONWOOD, S. 37 DYLAN, B. 168 ERWITT, E. 219, 220, 221 FAIREY, S. 85, 86, 87 FERNANDEZ GUITAR COMPANY 55 FRIEDLANDER, L. 177 FURMANOVSKY, J. 38, 150 FURNAS, B. 90

GASSIAN, C. 23, 24, 170 GIBSON GUITAR 53 GLASER, M. 101 GLINN, B. 222 GODLIS 167 GOTTLEIB, W. 181, 223 GREEN, D. 57 GRIFFIN, R. 100, 110, 111, 112 GRUEN, B. 84, 136

MACMILLAN, I. 65 MANSON, M. 98 MARCLAY, C. 91 MARSHUTZ, R. 212 MARY, S. 159, 160 MATOS, Y. 1 MATSENKO, M. 157 MCCARTNEY, B. 29 MCCARTNEY, L. 145, 180 MCCARTNEY, P. 70, 71, 75, 77 MCLAREN, M. 129 MEKAS, J. 214 MELAMID, A. 199 MOBY 187 MODEL, L. 175, 176 MORRIS, D. 123, 135 MORRISON, J. 144 MULLER, D. 147

HAMILTON, R. 227 HANSEN, M. W. 188 HAPSASH AND THE COLOURED COAT 99 HARING, K. 59 HARRISON, G. 78 HIRSCHHORN, T. 130 HIRST, D. 31 - 35 HOLMES, B. 137 HOWES, J. P. 193 HUGHES, G. 7 HURN, D. 66 ILLSLEY, J. 156 INVADER 36

NEMAN, A. 228 NEWSON, M. 46 NEWTON, H. 3, 4, 5, 11 OERKE, T. 107 OLEDENBURG, C. 58

JACKSON, M. 51, 52 JONES, C. 148, 149 JUE, K. 57

SABRI 210 SANFORD, T. 95 SAVILLE, P. 64 SCHARF, K. 61 SCHATZBERG, J. 163, 164 SCHUTZ, D. 89 SHAHAL, H. 152, 213 SHI X. 81 SIMONON, P. 125 SLIMANE, H. 27 STAVERS, G. 139 STEELE-PERKINS, C. 218 STEWART, C. 172 STOCK, D. 183, 184 STRONGWATER, P. 14, 15, 41, 118 SZABO, J. 21, 22 TAYLOR-WOOD, S. 229, 230 TESKE, E. 140, 141, 142 TESTINO, M. 25 THOMAS, M. 194 TOWNSEND, P. 12, 13, 79, 80 TURK, G. 124, 209 TUTEN, R. 143 VITAL TOYS 196, 197

PANTON, V. 108 PARENT, R. 171 PFEIFFER, W. 94

KARR, D. 97 KIPPENBERGER, M. 30 KIRK, N. 8

RAY, B. 68, 211 RHODES, N. 131, 132 RICEBOY SLEEPS 104, 105 ROCK, M. 114, 115, 116, 117, 119, 151, 153, 154, 155 RUSSELL, E. 82

LACHAPELLE, D. 6, 189 LAMBIE, J. 88 LE MERDE, M. 56 LE QUERREC, G. 185 LENNON, J. 72 LINDBERGH, P. 26 LIU Y. 60 LUXEMBURG, R.B. 198

WARHOL, A. 48, 49, 50 WATSON, A. 9 WATSON, L. 190 - 192 WERTHEIMER, A. 215, 216, 217 WHITAKER, R. 69 - 83 WOHNSEIFER, J. 195 WOOD, R. 18 YANG M. 47 YOUNG, R. 16, 158, 161

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1 Yochai Matos b. 1977 I’m Not Gonna Live Forever, 2009 Forty 40 Watt fluorescent light bulbs and d-c-fix® adhesive sticker attached to metal panel. 300 x 120 cm. (118 1/8 x 47 1/4 in). This work is from an edition of one plus one artist’s proof and is accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 3 , 0 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0 $ 4 , 8 0 0 - 6 , 4 0 0 € 3 , 3 0 0 - 4 , 4 0 0 Ω 71

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2 CANDICE BREITZ b. 1972 Yes/No (Babel Series Diptych), 1999. DVD installation: two DVD loops are exhibited on monitors positioned to face one another so that there is a dialogue between the two. This work is from an edition of two and is accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity signed by the artist and of the Babel Series Diptychs. provenance Galleria Francesca Kaufmann, Milan; Private collection, Italy exhibited New York, The New Museum of Contemporary Art, 16 November - 10 December, 2000 (installation of seven projections exhibited); 6th International Biennale of Istanbul, 1999 (installation consisting of seven videos exhibited); Milan, Galleria Francesca Kaufmann, Candice Breitz: Babel Series, 2000; Geneva, Centre d’Art Contemporain, Candice Breitz: Babel Series, 1999, 16 June - 21 September, 2000

(installation consisting of seven videos exhibited); Linz, OK Centre for Contemporary Art, Cuttings, 10 May - 15 July, 2001 (installation consisting of seven videos exhibited); Göteburg, 2nd International Biennale for Contemporary Art, 24 May - 24 August, 2003 (installation consisting of seven videos exhibited); Stockholm, Galeri Roger Björkholmen, Candice Breitz: Diptychs, 2 October - 30 October, 2004 (another example exhibited); Kingston (Jamaica), Bob Marley Museum, Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary (TBA 21) presents Candice Breitz: LEGEND (A Portrait of Bob Marley) and Other Works, 4 December, 2005 - 3 January, 2006 (installation consisting of seven videos exhibited). D Hunt, Fighting Words, Flash Art International, Anno 33, no. 211, March - April, 2000 Estimate £ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 $ 9 , 6 0 0 -1 2 , 8 0 0 € 6 , 5 0 0 - 8 ,7 0 0 Ω 72

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The present lot is a diptych from The Babel Series. These works are less widely exhibited by the artist and focus on the relationship between two of the figures exhibited in the larger installation of seven looping DVDs originally exhibited in 1999 at the 6th Istanbul Biennale. ‘For me the most provocative tale dealing with the original of multiple languages is the biblical story of the Tower of Babel, in which God punishes man for his vanity and grandiosity by violently denying him the ability to understand the languages of others. When I made the “Babel Series” installation in 1999, this violent failure, the failure of language to function as the glue coalescing different cultures (which is still the case now as much as it was then) became a compelling point of reference for me. Many key members of the twentieth-century avant-garde were preoccupied with the possibility

of a universal language that might communicate above and beyond the specificity of linguistic and natural references...With the “Babel Series” I wanted to make a work that would pay homage to such endeavors while at the same time recognizing the extent to which any notion of pure language has become increasingly hard to maintain. In this work [short loops] appropriated and isolated from popular music videos are played back simultaneously [No, No, No and Yeh, Yeh, Yeh in the present lot]. The most primal units of language are regurgitated by the ambassadors of MTV, this being a medium which has succeeded - beyond the wildest dreams of the twentieth-century avant-garde - in forging a language that is accessible to people from vastly different contexts.’ (Candice Breitz taken from an interview with Rosanne Alstatt, Kunst-Bulletin, June 2001) 73

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3 HELMUT NEWTON 1920 - 2004 Grace Jones and Dolph Lundgren Los Angeles, 1985. Gelatin silver print. 60.7 x 50 cm. (23 3/4 x 19 5/8 in). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 3/10 in pencil on the verso. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0 $ 8 , 0 0 0 -11, 0 0 0 € 5 , 5 0 0 -7, 6 0 0 ‡ 74

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4 HELMUT NEWTON 1920-2004 Madonna Covering Man’s Face, Hollywood, 1990. Gelatin silver print. 48.9 x 47.3 cm. (19 1/4 x 18 5/8 in). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 1/ 10 in pencil on the verso. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £1 2 , 0 0 0 -1 8 , 0 0 0 $ 1 9 , 3 0 0 - 2 8 , 9 0 0 € 1 3 ,1 0 0 -1 9 , 6 0 0 ‡

5 HELMUT NEWTON 1920-2004 Madonna at Small’s Bar, Hollywood, 1990. Gelatin silver print. 48.6 x 48.3 cm. (19 1/8 x 19 in). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 2/10 in pencil on the verso. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £1 2 , 0 0 0 -1 8 , 0 0 0 $ 1 9 , 3 0 0 - 2 8 , 9 0 0 € 1 3 ,1 0 0 -1 9 , 6 0 0 ‡ 75

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6 DaviD LaChapeLLe b.1963 Madonna: Mythical Swans, 1998. Digital colour coupler print, flush-mounted. 109.9 x 151.4 cm. (43 1/4 x 59 5/8 in). Signed in ink, printed title, date and number on an artist’s label affixed to the reverse of the frame. One from an edition of 1 plus 3 artist’s proofs. provenance Tony Shafrazi Gallery, New York Estimate £ 2 0 , 0 0 0 - 3 0 , 0 0 0 $ 3 2 ,1 0 0 - 4 8 , 2 0 0 € 2 1, 8 0 0 - 3 2 ,7 0 0 ‡ 76

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© Bryan Ferry The location for the Siren shoot was near Anglesey on the coast of Wales. Although the original intention was to have a stormy sea in the  background, the day of shooting ended up being the hottest day in living memory, and therefore the sea was extremely calm. This gave the resulting picture a mythological aspect, reminiscent of Ancient Greece. Antony Price designed the Siren costume, the model was Jerry Hall and  the photographer was Graham Hughes. The Art Director was Bryan Ferry.

7 ART DIRECTOR: BRYAN FERRY, PHOTOGRAPHER: GRAHAM HUGHES b. 1945 Siren (Alternative shot for Siren album cover), 1975. Digital colour coupler print, printed 2009. 40 x 40 cm. (15 3/4 x 15 3/4 in). Signed by Bryan Ferry in ink on the reverse of the flush-mount. Accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity affixed to the reverse of the frame. provenance Bryan Ferry Archive Estimate £1 0 , 0 0 0 -1 5 , 0 0 0 $ 1 6 ,1 0 0 - 2 4 ,1 0 0 € 1 0 , 9 0 0 -1 6 , 4 0 0 † 78

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© Bryan Ferry Following in the Roxy tradition of using iconic female images on their album covers, it was decided this time to depict a Celtic warrior queen, gazing towards Avalon. She is wearing medieval armour and holding a Merlin (a small bird of prey commonly used by lady falconers). The photograph was taken at dawn on the west coast of Ireland in 1982. The costume and styling was supervised by Antony Price, the photographer was Neil Kirk, and the Art Director was Bryan Ferry.

8 ART DIRECTOR: BRYAN FERRY, PHOTOGRAPHER: NEIL KIRK b. 1945 Avalon (Alternative shot for Avalon album cover), 1982. Digital colour coupler print, printed 2009. 40 x 40 cm. (15 3/4 x 15 3/4 in). Signed by Bryan Ferry in ink on the reverse of the flush-mount. Accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity affixed to the reverse of the frame. provenance Bryan Ferry Archive Estimate £1 0 , 0 0 0 -1 5 , 0 0 0 $ 1 6 ,1 0 0 - 2 4 ,1 0 0 € 1 0 , 9 0 0 -1 6 , 4 0 0 † 79

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9 ALBERT WATSON b. 1942 Mick Jagger, Los Angeles, 1992. Archival pigment print. 61 x 47.9 cm. (24 x 18 7/8 in). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 20/25 in ink on the reverse of the flush-mount. provenance Private collection, New York Estimate £ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 $ 4 , 8 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 € 3 , 3 0 0 - 5 , 5 0 0 ‡ ♠

10 ANTON CORBIJN b. 1955 Mick, 1995. Lith print, mounted. 45.1 x 45.1 cm. (17 3/4 x 17 3/4 in.) Signed, titled, dated and numbered in ink on the mount and the reverse of the mount. One from an edition of 20. Estimate £ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 $ 3 , 2 0 0 - 4 , 8 0 0 € 2 , 2 0 0 - 3 , 3 0 0 ♠ 80

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11 HELMUT NEWTON 1920-2004 Mick Jagger and Jerry Hall, Cap d’Antibes, 1991. Gelatin silver print. 48.9 x 47.5 cm. (19 1/4 x 18 11/16 in). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 1/10 in pencil on the verso. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0 $ 8 , 0 0 0 -11, 2 0 0 € 5 , 5 0 0 -7, 6 0 0 ‡ 81

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12 PHILLIP TOWNSEND b. 1940 Mick and Keith in Studio, 1960s. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 48.1 x 33 cm. (18 15/16 x 13 in). Signed, numbered 27/50 in ink in the margin, blind stamp credit on the recto. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 6 0 0 - 8 0 0 $ 9 5 0 -1, 3 0 0 € 6 5 0 - 8 7 0 ♠

14 PETER STRONGWATER Mick Jagger, August, 1981. Gelatin silver print, printed 2004. 50.8 x 61 cm. (20 x 24 in). Signed, dated and annotated ‘AP’ in ink on the recto. One from an edition of 7 plus 3 artist’s proofs. provenance Acquired directly from the artist literature Interview magazine, August 1981 Estimate £ 6 0 0 - 8 0 0 $ 9 5 0 -1, 3 0 0 € 6 5 0 - 8 7 0 †

13 PHILLIP TOWNSEND b. 1940 Rolling Stones, Chelsea, 1960s. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 37.9 x 37.9 cm. (14 15/16 x 14 15/16 in). Signed, numbered 15/50 in ink and blindstamp credit in the margin. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 6 0 0 - 8 0 0 $ 9 5 0 -1, 3 0 0 € 6 5 0 - 8 7 0 ♠

15 PETER STRONGWATER Mick Jagger, August, 1981. Gelatin silver contact sheet. 27.9 x 21.6 cm. (11 x 8 1/2 in). Signed, dated and annotated ‘unique’ in ink on the recto. provenance Acquired directly from the artist literature Interview magazine, August 1981 Estimate £ 5 0 0 -7 0 0 $ 8 0 0 -1,1 0 0 € 5 5 0 -7 6 0 † 82

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16 RUSSELL YOUNG b. 1960 The Rolling Stones, 2007. Colour screenprint on canvas. 121 x 152.5 cm. (47 3/4 x 60 in). Signed and dated ‘Russell Young 2007’ on the reverse. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 $ 9 , 6 0 0 -1 2 , 8 0 0 € 6 , 5 0 0 - 9 ,7 0 0

19 THE ROLLING STONES Love You Live, 1977. A set of eight black and white promotional stickers depicting the Rolling Sones, the images based on polaroid photographs of the band for the album cover designed by Andy Warhol. These stickers were printed for the release party for the album at Trax in New York, 1977. Overall: 22.5 x 35cm (8 7/8 x 13 3/4in). With letter of provenance. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 $ 1, 3 0 0 -1, 9 0 0 € 8 7 0 -1, 3 0 0

17 JESUS DIAZ DE VIVAR b. 1976 The Ageless Rolling Stones, 2008. Silkscreen print. This work is unique. 123 x 123 cm. (48 1/2 x 48 1/2 in). provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0 $ 6 , 4 0 0 - 9 , 6 0 0 € 4 , 4 0 0 - 6 , 5 0 0 ♠

20 THE ROLLING STONES The Rolling Stones, Decca Records, 1964. LP signed on the back cover circa 1964 by Brian Jones, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts and Bill Wyman. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 $ 3 , 2 0 0 - 4 , 8 0 0 € 2 , 2 0 0 - 3 , 3 0 0

18 RONNIE WOOD b. 1947 Sophisticado, 2007. Coloured charcoal on paper. 42 x 29.2 cm. (16 1/2 x 11 1/2 in). Signed and titled ‘Sophisticado Ronnie’ lower right. With a letter of provenance. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0 $ 8 , 0 0 0 -11, 2 0 0 € 5 , 5 0 0 -7, 6 0 0 ♠

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21 JOSEPH SZABO b. 1944 Rolling Stones Fans # 22, 1978. Gelatin silver print, printed early 1980s. 22.9 x 31.4 cm. (9 x 12 3/8 in). Signed, titled, dated and copyright in ink in the margin; signed, titled, dated, copyright in pencil and credit stamp on the verso. One from an edition of 20. provenance Acquired directly from the artist literature PAM Book, Joseph Szabo: Rolling Stones Fans, 2007, n.p. Estimate £1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0 $ 1, 9 0 0 - 2 , 9 0 0 € 1, 3 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 ‡

23 CLAUDE GASSIAN b. 1949 Mick Jagger, Paris, 1976. Gelatin silver print, printed 2005. 78 x 120 cm. (30 7/10 x 47 1/5 in). Signed, titled and numbered 3/5 in ink on the reverse of the flush-mount. provenance Private collection, Europe eXHiBiteD Double Vie, acte2galerie, Paris, 20 May - 14 September 2002; Intersections, Musée d’Art Contemporain de Lyon, 5 June - 3 August 2003 (each another example exhibited) literature Éditions de la Martinière, Claude Gassian Photographies 1970-2001, 2001, p. 9; Éditions Musée d’Art Contemporain de Lyon, Intersections, exh. cat. 2003, pp. 216-217 Estimate £ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0 $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 6 0 0 € 2 ,7 0 0 - 3 , 8 0 0 †

22 JOSEPH SZABO b. 1944 Rolling Stones Fans # 13, 1978. Gelatin silver print. 22.5 x 29.4 cm. (8 7/8 x 11 9/16 in). Signed, titled, dated and copyright in ink in the margin; signed, titled, dated, copyright in pencil and credit stamp on the verso. One from an edition of 20. provenance Acquired directly from the artist literature PAM Book, Joseph Szabo: Rolling Stones Fans, 2007, n.p. Estimate £1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0 $ 1, 9 0 0 - 2 , 9 0 0 € 1, 3 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 ‡

24 CLAUDE GASSIAN b. 1949 Keith Richards, New York, 1992. Gelatin silver print, printed 2005. 120 x 78.5 cm. (47 1/4 x 30 7/8 in). Signed, titled and numbered 3/5 in ink on the reverse of the flush-mount. provenance Private collection, Europe. eXHiBiteD Double Vie, acte2galerie, Paris, 20 May - 14 September 2002; Intersections, Musée d’Art Contemporain de Lyon, 5 June - 3 August 2003; Anonymous Claude Gassian, Govinda Gallery, Washington, 13 April - 12 May 2007 (each another example exhibited) literature Éditions de la Martinière, Claude Gassian Photographies 1970-2001, 2001, p. 307; Éditions Musée d’Art Contemporain de Lyon, Intersections, exh. cat. 2003, p. 177; Govinda Gallery, Anonymous Claude Gassian, exh. cat., 2007, p. 17 Estimate £ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0 $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 6 0 0 € 2 ,7 0 0 - 3 , 8 0 0 † 84

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25 MARIO TESTINO b. 1954 Keith Richards and Mick Jagger, Los Angeles, 2003. Lightjet print, printed 2009 and flushmounted. 139.8 x 180 cm. (54 3/4 x 70 7/8 in). Signed, dated and numbered on a label affixed to the reverse of the frame. One from an edition of 3 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Accompanied by a signed Certificate of Authenticity. provenance Private collection, Europe Estimate £ 2 5 , 0 0 0 - 3 5 , 0 0 0 $ 4 0 , 2 0 0 - 5 6 , 2 0 0 € 2 7, 3 0 0 - 3 8 , 2 0 0 ♠ 85

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26 PETER LINDBERGH b. 1944 Keith Richards, New York, 1999. Gelatin silver triptych, printed 2003. Each 180 x 120 cm. (70 7/8 x 47 1/4 in); 180 x 360 cm. (70 7/8 x 141 3/4 in) overall. Signed, dated and numbered 3/3 in pencil on a label affixed to the reverse of the flush-mount. One from an edition of 3 plus 1 artist’s proof. provenance Acquired directly from the artist eXHiBiteD Rolling Stones, Camera Work, Berlin, 31 May - 25 June 2003; Rolling Stones, Camera Work, Hamburg, 7 July - 30 July 2003; Peter Lindbergh Like a Rolling Stone, acte2gallery, Paris, 20 April - 23 June 2006 (each another example exhibited) literature British GQ, October, 1999; Italian GQ, October, 1999; L’Uomo Vogue, October, 2006 Estimate £ 7 0 , 0 0 0 -1 0 0 , 0 0 0 $ 11 2 , 0 0 0 -1 6 1, 0 0 0 € 7 6 , 3 0 0 -1 0 9 , 0 0 0 87

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27 HEDI SLIMANE b. 1968 Pete, 2007. Digital print, Diasec mounted. 124.8 x 177.2 cm. (49 1/8 x 69 3/4 in). Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 1/3 on a Certificate of Authenticity affixed to the reverse of the flush-mount. provenance Almine Rech Gallery, Paris. literature MUSAC (Museo de Arte Contemporanea de Castilla y Leon), Rock Diary: Hedi Slimane, 2008, n.p. Estimate £ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0 $ 8 , 0 0 0 -11, 2 0 0 € 5 , 5 0 0 -7, 6 0 0 ♠

29 BILLY MCCARTNEY b. 1981. On the sofa, 2/08/2007 - 4/08/2007 from The Scolt Head. Four gelatin silver prints, printed 2009. Each 61 x 50.8 cm. (24 x 20 in). Each signed and annotated ‘unique’ in ink on the verso. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 $ 3 , 2 0 0 - 4 , 8 0 0 € 2 , 2 0 0 - 3 , 3 0 0 ♠ †

28 PETER DOHERTY b. 1979 Self Portrait, 2007. Ink and artist’s blood on card. 43 x 34 cm. (16 7/8 x 13 3/8 in). Signed, titled and dated ‘Peter Doherty Self Portrait 2007’ lower right. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 3 , 0 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0 $ 4 , 8 0 0 - 6 , 4 0 0 € 3 , 3 0 0 - 4 , 4 0 0 ♠ 88

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30 MARTIN KIPPENBERGER 1953-1997 Untitled (Self Portrait, Chelsea Hotel), 1990. Graphite and coloured crayons on printed paper. Signed and dated ‘M.K. 90’ lower left. 29.5 x 21 cm. (11 5/8 x 8 1/4 in). provenance Thomas Ammann Fine Art, Zurich Estimate £ 2 0 , 0 0 0 - 3 0 , 0 0 0 $ 3 2 ,1 0 0 - 4 8 , 2 0 0 € 2 1, 8 0 0 - 3 2 ,7 0 0 ‡ 89

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31 DAMIEN HIRST b.1965 Spin Skull with Clocks in Eyes, 2008. Household gloss on canvas. 122 x 122 cm. (48 x 48 in). Signed and dated ‘Damien Hirst 2008’ on the reverse and further signed ‘Damien Hirst’ on the stretcher. provenance Private collection, London Estimate £1 0 0 , 0 0 0 -1 5 0 , 0 0 0 $ 1 6 1, 0 0 0 - 2 41, 0 0 0 € 1 0 9 , 0 0 0 -1 6 4 , 0 0 0 ♠ 90

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32 DAMIEN HIRST b. 1965 Beautiful Psychedelic Rays of Dancing Love Hours Spin Painting, 2008. Household gloss on canvas. 203.2 x 177.8 cm. (80 x 70 in). Signed, dated and inscribed with ‘Beautiful Hours Spin Painting IV 2008 Damien Hirst’ on the reverse and further signed ‘Damien Hirst’ on the stretcher. provenance Private collection, London Estimate £ 2 0 0 , 0 0 0 - 3 0 0 , 0 0 0 $ 3 2 0 , 0 0 0 - 4 8 0 , 0 0 0 € 2 2 0 , 0 0 0 - 3 3 0 , 0 0 0 ♠ The Hours was formed in 2002 by Antony Genn and Martin Slattery. Between them, they have worked with three of the greatest British poets and front men of all time: Joe Strummer, Shaun Ryder and Jarvis Cocker. They have individually toured with Elastica and Black Grape, separately produced sessions for UNKLE and Grace Jones and worked alongside the likes of Brian Eno. Although the friendship between Antony Genn and Damien Hirst began over ten years ago, the music business collaboration of Hirst with the two men who would become The Hours, happened indirectly as a result of a great loss to popular music culture: the untimely death of Joe Strummer in 2002. Ant Genn and Martin Slattery had both collaborated with Strummer in the Mescaleros and on his solo albums. Hirst was a long time friend of Strummer during the glory years of the early 90s. Two years after Joe Strummer died of a heart attack in 2002, Genn and Slattery formed a band, calling themselves The Hours. Hirst put the band in the studio, paid for their debut album recording and got them ready for their first record deal. He also created all the artwork for the album and collateral materials. 91

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33 Damien Hirst b. 1965 The Hours Spin Skull & All Hours Merchandise, 2009. Household gloss paint on resin skull, five T-shirts, six cards/flyers, seven CDs, five EPs, one USB and two LPs. Skull: 20 x 14 x 16.5 cm. ( 7 7/8 x 5 1/2 x 6 1/2 in). Outer box: 24 x 17 x 20 cm. (9 1/2 x 6 3/4 x 7 7/8 in). Inner box: 22.5 x 15 x 17.5 cm. (8 7/8 x 6 x 6 7/8 in). All merchandise signed ‘Damien Hirst’ on the reverse and The Hours Spin Skull signed ‘Damien Hirst’ on the underside. The Hours Spin Skull is from an edition of 210. provenance Private collection, London Estimate £ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0 $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 6 0 0 € 2 ,7 0 0 - 3 , 8 0 0 ♠ 34 Damien Hirst b. 1965 The Hours Promotional Poster – The Spin Poster, 2005. Colour lithographic print on 320gsm silk board. 218.2 x 103.2 cm. (85 7/8 x 40 1/4 cm). Signed ‘Damien Hirst’ lower right; signed  ‘EL SLATTO X’ lower left; signed ‘Ant Genn’ lower centre. provenance Private collection, London Estimate £1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0 $ 2 , 4 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0 € 1, 6 0 0 - 2 ,7 0 0 ♠ 35 Damien Hirst b. 1965 The Hours Promotional Poster – The Mirror Poster, 2005. Colour lithographic print with white silkscreen underpin on 400 micron mirri board. 218.2 x 103.2 cm. (85 7/8 x 40 5/8 in). Signed ‘Damien Hirst’ lower right; signed ‘EL SLATTO X’ lower left; signed ‘Ant Genn’ lower centre. provenance Private collection, London Estimate £1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0 $ 2 , 4 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0 € 1, 6 0 0 - 2 ,7 0 0 ♠

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36 inVaDer Rubik (This is Hardcore), 2009. 225 Rubik cubes on Plexiglas. 84.5 x 84.5 cm. (33 1/4 x 33 1/4 in). Signed, titled and dated ‘RUBIK THIS IS HARDCORE Invader 09’ on the reverse. provenance Laz Inc., London literature Invader Low Fidelity, 2009, p. 26 - 27 Estimate £ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0 $ 6 , 4 0 0 - 9 , 6 0 0 € 4 , 4 0 0 - 6 , 5 0 0 ♠ †

37 stanLeY DOnWOOD b. 1968 Kabul, 2003. Oil on canvas. 150 x 150 cm. (59 x 59 in). Signed and dated ‘Stanley Donwood 2003’ on the reverse. Estimate £1 0 , 0 0 0 -1 5 , 0 0 0 $ 1 6 ,1 0 0 - 2 4 ,1 0 0 € 1 0 , 9 0 0 -1 6 , 4 0 0 ♠ This work by Donwood is from the Hail to the Thief series, a set of nine canvases painted in Radiohead’s Oxford studio during the final recordings of the Hail to the Thief album. The present lot was inspired by the album tracks and the city of Kabul. The album, which debuted at number one in the United Kingdom, was released 9 June 2003, and featured a similar work from the series on the cover.

This piece was inspired by the Pulp This is Hardcore cover art and transforms the image of a leaning nude model into a near abstraction with Invader’s signature, tiled motif.

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38 JILL FURMANOVSKY b. 1953 Oasis, Abbey Road, 2007. Archival pigment print. 56.5 x 99.1 cm. (22 1/4 x 39 in). Signed, titled, dated, numbered in pencil, copyright credit blindstamp; signed and inscribed ‘God Bless’ by Oasis in ink in the margin. One from an edition of 20. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 $ 9 , 6 0 0 -1 2 , 8 0 0 € 6 , 5 0 0 - 8 ,7 0 0 ♠ †

40 WILLY CAMDEN b. 1962 Oasis in Japan, September, 1994. Seventeen gelatin silver prints and one gelatin silver contact sheet, each printed 2009. Each 30.5 x 40.6 cm. (12 x 16 in) or the reverse, contact sheet 30 x 24 cm. (12 x 9 1/2 in). Each signed and annotated ‘unique’ in ink on the verso. Prints contained in a clamshell case. provenance Acquired directly from the artist literature GQ (UK), December 1994 Estimate £ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0 $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 6 0 0 € 2 ,7 0 0 - 3 , 8 0 0 ♠ †

39 WILLY CAMDEN b. 1962 Crowd Pleaser, September, 1994. Gelatin silver print, printed 2009. 61 x 50.8 cm. (24 x 20 in). Signed and numbered 1/7 in ink on the verso. provenance Acquired directly from the artist literature GQ (UK), December 1994 Estimate £ 6 0 0 - 8 0 0 $ 9 5 0 -1, 3 0 0 € 6 5 0 - 8 7 0 ♠ † 94

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41 Peter strOnGWater Sting, January, 1983. Gelatin silver print, printed 2004. 50.8 x 61 cm. (20 x 24 in). Signed and numbered 2/7 in ink on the recto. One from an edition of 7 plus 3 artist’s proofs. provenance Acquired directly from the artist literature Interview magazine, August 1981 Estimate £ 6 0 0 - 8 0 0 $ 9 5 0 -1, 3 0 0 € 6 5 0 - 8 7 0 †

42 antOn COrBiJn b. 1955 Bono (Bath), 1992. Lith print, printed later. 45.7 x 45.1 cm. (18 x 17 3/4 in). Signed, titled and numbered 8/20 in pencil on the overmat; signed, titled and numbered 8/20 in pencil on the reverse of the mount. Estimate £ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0 $ 8 , 0 0 0 -11, 2 0 0 € 5 , 5 0 0 -7, 6 0 0 ♠ 95

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46 marC neWsOn b. 1963 Set of eight ‘Komed’ chairs, c. 1996. Brushed tubular steel, leather. Each 86.5cm. (34 in.) high. Manufactured by Colber, Italy. Four chairs with paper label to underside ‘colber/ITALY’ (8). literature Alice Rawsthorn, Marc Newson, London, 1999, pp. 136-144. provenance Osman restaurant, KOMED Media Park, Cologne Estimate £ 2 5 , 0 0 0 - 3 5 , 0 0 0 $ 4 8 , 2 0 0 - 8 0 , 3 0 0 € 3 2 ,7 0 0 - 5 4 , 5 0 0 96

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47 YanG mian b. 1970 Dangerous, 2007. Painted fibreglas. 198 cm. (78 in) high. Signed, dated and numbered of 4 on the base. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £1 8 , 0 0 0 - 2 2 , 0 0 0 $ 2 8 , 9 0 0 - 3 5 , 3 0 0 € 1 9 , 6 0 0 - 2 4 , 0 0 0 ‡ 98

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48 ANDY WARHOL 1928-1987 Michael Jackson, 1984. Silkscreen inks on paper. 126 x 94.9 cm. (49 5/8 x 37 3/8 in). Stamped lower right ‘© ANDY WARHOL’; stamped by the Art Authentication Board, Inc. and numbered ‘A205.046’ on the reverse. provenance Max Lang Gallery, New York Estimate £1 5 0 , 0 0 0 - 2 5 0 , 0 0 0 $ 2 41, 0 0 0 - 4 0 2 , 0 0 0 € 1 6 4 , 0 0 0 - 2 7 3 , 0 0 0 ‡ 99

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49

50

49 anDY WarHOL 1928 - 1987 Untitled (Grace Jones), c. 1975. Polaroid print. 11.1 x 8.6 cm. (4 3/8 x 3 3/8 in). ‘Andy Warhol Art Authentification Board, Inc. Authentic’ stamp on the verso. provenance Acquired directly from the artist; Private collection Estimate £ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 $ 9 , 6 0 0 -1 2 , 8 0 0 € 6 , 5 0 0 - 8 ,7 0 0 ‡

50 anDY WarHOL 1928 - 1987 Untitled (Mick Jagger), 1975. Polaroid print. 11.1 x 8.6 cm. (4 3/8 x 3 3/8 in). ‘Andy Warhol Art Authentification Board, Inc. Authentic’ stamp on the verso. provenance Acquired directly from the artist; Private collection Estimate £ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0 $ 1 2 , 8 0 0 -1 9 , 3 0 0 € 8 ,7 0 0 -1 3 ,1 0 0 ‡ 100

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52 51 miCHaeL JaCKsOn 1958-2009 T.S., c.1995. A single page of lyrics entitled ‘T.S’, the 15 lines written in blue ballpoint pen beginning: ‘They wanna get my ass dead or alive’, and ending: ‘I heard his brother to the KKK’. 28 x 21.5 cm. (11 x 8 1/2 in). This song was released as ‘D.S’ on the 1995 HIStory: Past, Present and Future, Book 1 double album. It is thought the song referred to Santa Barbara County District Attorney Tom Sneddon, who led the child abuse case against Michael Jackson. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0 $ 1 2 , 8 0 0 -1 9 , 3 0 0 € 8 ,7 0 0 -1 3 ,1 0 0

52 miCHaeL JaCKsOn 1958-2009 The Innocent Man, 2005. A single page of lyrics entitled ‘The Innocent Man’, the 13 lines for the chorus written in pencil beginning: ‘If I sail to Acapulco’, and ending: ‘And only God knew I was innocent now’. 28 x 21.5 cm. (11 x 8 1/2 in). These lyrics were apparently written during Michael Jackson’s child abuse trial in 2005. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0 $ 1 2 , 8 0 0 -1 9 , 3 0 0 € 8 ,7 0 0 -1 3 ,1 0 0

101

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ALL PROCEEDS TO BENEFIT TRIBUTE TO BAMBI 53 miCHaeL JaCKsOn 1958-2009 A limited edition Gibson Flying V electric guitar with hardshell case. In black finish with rosewood fingerboard. Signed on the body in silver felt pen by Michael Jackson. This guitar was used in the video for the track, ‘Scream’, a duet performed with Janet Jackson and released on the 1995 album HIStory: Past, Present and Future, Book I. The video shows Jackson dancing against a background of Flying V guitars but this particular guitar was apparently used for publicity photographs of Michael Jackson and was signed by him for his Manager Dieter Wiesner. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 2 0 , 0 0 0 - 3 0 , 0 0 0 $ 3 2 ,1 0 0 - 4 8 , 2 0 0 € 2 1, 8 0 0 - 3 2 ,7 0 0 102

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54

55

56

57

54 alexander global productions The Rolling Stones LICKS World Tour Bobble Heads, 2002-2003. Resin. Each 17.8 cm. (7 in) high. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 6 0 -7 0 $ 1 0 0 -11 0 € 6 5 -7 5 Ω

56 MiKe le Merde b. 1973 Vanfar, USA, 2008. Resin and paint. 15.2 cm. (6 in.) high. Signed and dated.  This work is a unique paint version from a varied edition of 10 and includes a custom cloth sack. Estimate £ 2 0 0 - 3 0 0 $ 3 2 0 - 4 8 0 € 2 2 0 - 3 3 0

55 FernandeZ guitar coMpanY Ultraman Electric Guitar, 1980s. 86.1 cm. (33.9 in) high. This work is from an edition of three. Estimate £ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 $ 4 , 8 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 € 3 , 3 0 0 - 5 , 5 0 0

57 KirKland Jue (toYbot studio) & doZe green Space Traveller DJ with turntables and aliens, 2007. Vinyl and PVC. Largest: 20.3 cm. (8 in) high. This work is a unique paint version from a limited edition. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 2 5 0 - 3 5 0 $ 4 0 0 - 5 6 0 € 2 7 0 - 3 8 0 Ω 103

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59

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61

58 Claes Oldenburg b. 1929 Soft Drum Set On Chalk Board, 1972. Colour screenprint on paper. 87 x 110 cm. (34 x 43 1/2 in). Signed ‘Oldenburg’ and numbered along the lower edge, published by Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles. This work is from an edition of 34. literature Richard Axsom and David Platzker 98 Printed Stuff: Catalogue Raisonné 1958 - 1996, Hudson Hills Press, New York Estimate £ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 $ 1, 3 0 0 -1, 9 0 0 € 8 7 0 -1, 3 0 0 ‡

60 lIu Ye bO b.1964 Choir of Angels, 2001. Screenprint in colours, on canvas. 23 1/2 x 27 3/8 in. (59.7 x 69.5 cm). Signed, dated and numbered of 100 in black ink, published by George Mulder Fine Art, New York. provenance Private collection, Amsterdam Estimate £1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 $ 2 , 4 0 0 - 3 , 2 0 0 € 1, 6 0 0 - 2 , 2 0 0 ‡ 61 KennY sCHarF b. 1958 Grammy, 1997. Lithograph in colours, on wove paper. 36 1/4 x 28 5/8 in. (92.1 x 72.7 cm). Signed, dated and numbered in pencil, for the 39th Annual Grammy Awards to benefit N.A.R.A.S. Foundation, New York. This work is from an edition of 250. provenance Private collection, Los Angeles Estimate £ 4 0 0 - 6 0 0 $ 5 5 0 - 9 6 0 € 4 4 0 - 6 5 0 ‡

59 KeITH HarIng 1958-1990 Knokke, 1987. Lithograph with watercolour. 34.5 x 51 cm. (13 1/2 x 20 1/8 in). Signed, titled and dated ‘JUNE 19 1987 K.Haring KNOKKE’ on the reverse. This work is from an edition of 200. provenance Anon. sale, Ketterer Kunst, Hamburg, October 2007, lot 627; Private collection, Switzerland Estimate £ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 $ 4 , 8 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 € 3 , 3 0 0 - 5 , 5 0 0 ‡ 104

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63

64

62 Peter BLaKe b. 1932 Love Portfolio, 2004. The complete set of ten screenprints in colours with diamond dust. Each 75 x 57.8 cm. (29 1/2 x 22 3/4 in). Each signed, titled and numbered lower edge, published by Paul Stolper. This work is from an edition of 75 plus 5 artist’s proofs. eXhibited Salamanca, DA2. Domus Artium 2002, ROCK MY RELIGION: The Crossroads between the Visual Arts and Rock. 1956 – 2006, 10 October 2008 – 7 January 2009; Kristiansand, Norway, Galleri BI-Z, Peter Blake and Gavin Turk, September 2007; Asker, Norway, Galeri Trafo, Peter Blake and Gavin Turk, June 2007 Estimate £ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 $ 9 , 6 0 0 -1 2 , 8 0 0 € 6 , 5 0 0 - 8 ,7 0 0 ♠

63 Peter BLaKe b. 1932 Love Me Do, 2004. Screenprint in colours with diamond dust. 75 x 57.8 cm (29 1/2 x 22 3/4 in). Signed, titled and numbered lower edge, published by Paul Stolper. This work is from an edition of 75. eXhibited Salamanca, DA2. Domus Artium 2002, ROCK MY RELIGION: The Crossroads between the Visual Arts and Rock. 1956 - 2006, 10 October 2008 – 7 January 2009; Kristiansand, Norway, Galleri BI-Z, Peter Blake and Gavin Turk, September 2007; Asker, Norway, Galeri Trafo, Peter Blake and Gavin Turk, June 2007 Estimate £1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0 $ 1, 6 0 0 - 2 , 4 0 0 € 1,1 0 0 -1, 6 0 0 ♠ 64 Peter saViLLe b. 1955 FAC1, 2003. Screenprint in colours. 101.5 x 76.2 cm (40 x 30 in). Signed and numbered in ink in the margin, published by Paul Stolper. This work is from an edition of 25 Estimate £ 2 0 0 - 3 0 0 $ 3 2 0 - 4 8 0 € 2 2 0 - 3 3 0 ♠ 105

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66

65 iain maCmiLLan 1938 - 2006 The Beatles, Abbey Road, 1969. Colour coupler print, printed later. 43 x 42.7 cm. (16 15/16 x 16 13/16 in). Signed and numbered 15/25 in ink in the margin. provenance Private collection, London Estimate £ 3 , 0 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0 $ 4 , 8 0 0 - 6 , 4 0 0 € 3 , 3 0 0 - 4 , 4 0 0

66 DaViD HUrn b. 1934 The Beatles, Abbey Road Studios, examining the script of the film ‘A Hard Day’s Night’, 1964. Gelatin silver print, printed 2008 and flush-mounted. 23.5 x 34.9 cm. (9 1/4 x 13 3/4 in). Signed in pencil in the margin. provenance Magnum Photos, London literature Abrahams, Pop Sixties, 2008, p. 117 Estimate £ 6 0 0 - 8 0 0 $ 9 5 0 -1, 3 0 0 € 6 5 0 - 8 7 0 ♠ 106

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67 tHe BeatLes Four black and white publicity photographs of the Beatles, 1961-1963. Two by Dick Matthews taken at the Palais De Dance, Aldershot, 9 December, 1961; one by Peter Kaye, Liverpool, 1962; and another by an unknown photographer, 1963, with corresponding negative. Each: 25.4 x 20.3 cm. (10 x 8 in). The Dick Matthews photographs in this lot were taken at a 1961 concert in Aldershot, now infamous in Beatles lore as apparently only 18 people attended. The concert was the band’s first appearance in the South of England before Beatlemania took its hold.   Please note that the negative included in this lot is offered for sale without copyright or other reproduction rights. provenance Celebrity Vault Gallery, Beverly Hills Estimate £ 6 0 0 - 8 0 0 $ 9 5 0 -1, 3 0 0 € 6 5 0 - 8 7 0 Ω

68 BiLL raY b. 1961 The Beatles at JFK, 1964. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 46.4 x 31.4 cm. (18 1/4 x 12 3/8 in). Signed and dated in ink in the margin. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0 $ 1, 9 0 0 - 2 , 9 0 0 € 1, 3 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 Ω 69 rOBert WHitaKer b. 1939 ‘Way Out’ George and Fans, Chiswick Park, London, May, 1966. Lightjet print, printed later. 44.1 x 35.6 cm. (17 3/8 x 14 in). Signed in pencil on the verso. provenance Peter Fetterman Gallery, Santa Monica Estimate £1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0 $ 1, 6 0 0 - 2 , 4 0 0 € 1,1 0 0 -1, 6 0 0 ♠ 107

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70 sir PaUL mCCartneY b. 1942 Untitled, 1999. Ink on paper. 30 x 22 cm. (12 x 8 1/4 in). Signed and dated ‘Paul McCartney 99’ along the right side edge. Estimate £ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0 $ 6 , 4 0 0 - 9 , 6 0 0 € 4 , 4 0 0 - 6 , 5 0 0 ♠

73 sir PaUL mCCartneY b. 1942 Teddy Boy in Brothel Creepers, late 1950s. Pencil on paper. 32.4 x 20.3 cm. (12 3/4 x 8 in). A reluctant artist, McCartney is quoted as saying that he thought ‘only people that had been to art school were allowed to paint’ but he took up painting in 1983 after witnessing Willem De Kooning paint in Long Island. Since then, he has exhibited his work at numerous shows worldwide. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 $ 9 , 6 0 0 -1 2 , 8 0 0 € 6 , 5 0 0 - 8 ,7 0 0 ♠

71 sir PaUL mCCartneY b. 1942 Nurse Young, late 1950s. Red pencil on paper. Accompanied by a document concerning the authenticity. This early drawing by Paul McCartney was executed during his time at the Liverpool Institute which he left in July, 1960 to play with the Beatles in Hamburg. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0 $ 1 2 , 8 0 0 -1 9 , 3 0 0 € 8 ,7 0 0 -1 3 ,1 0 0 ♠

74 tHe BeatLes Beatle Photo Stamps, 1964. A set of five sheets of unused black and white stamps featuring portraits of the Beatles, in original presentation box. Overall: 20.3 x 24.1 cm. (8 x 9 1/2 in). provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 3 0 0 - 5 0 0 $ 5 0 0 - 8 0 0 € 3 3 0 - 5 5 0

72 JOHn LennOn 1940-1980 Self-portrait caricature, c. 1969. Ink on paper, the reverse with typescript questions, probably prepared for an interview with Lennon. Signed and inscribed by Lennon ‘To Guy de St. George, love + Peace from John Lennon’. With a letter authenticity. 28 x 21.5 cm. (11 x 8 1/2 in). This caricature was apparently executed for a journalist during the Montreal Bed-In for Peace. John Lennon and Yoko Ono often drew these self-portrait caricatures, the most famous of which adorns John Lennon’s Gibson acoustic guitar used at the famous Bed-In For Peace in Amsterdam and Montreal in 1969. An accomplished artist, Lennon attended Art School in Liverpool following failed GCE exams at high school. He published two volumes of illustrated nonsense verse in 1964 and 1965, In His Own Write and A Spaniard In The Works, and a portfolio of erotic lithographs depicting himself and Yoko Ono in 1970. Since Lennon’s death, Yoko Ono has published three volumes of his drawings: Skywriting by Word of Mouth (1986); Ai: Japan Through John Lennon’s Eyes: A Personal Sketchbook (1992); and Real Love: The Drawings for Sean (1999). provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £1 0 , 0 0 0 -1 5 , 0 0 0 $ 1 6 ,1 0 0 - 2 4 ,1 0 0 € 1 0 , 9 0 0 -1 6 , 4 0 0

75 tHe BeatLes A collection of 10 uncut unprocessed sheets of lenticular designs for the Beatles ‘flasher’ rings. 20.3 x 20.3 cm. (8 x 8 in). Manufactured by Vari-View, Mt. Vernon, New York. These flasher rings were manufactured as novelty merchandise in 1964 to capitalize on the burgeoning popularity of the Beatles. They were made as imitation silver or gold rings with lenticular or hologram images of each Beatle. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 9 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 $ 1, 4 0 0 -1, 9 0 0 € 9 8 0 -1, 3 0 0 76 tHe BeatLes The Beatles, U.K. Tour, September - October, 1964. A concert tour programme. Signed and inscribed by each Beatle to Don Andrew, of the Remo Four, ‘To Don, from John Lennon, To Don, lots of love, from George Harrison, To Don, from another FAT SCHOOL BOY, Paul McCartney’ and ‘To Don, Best Wishes, Ringo Starr’, additionally signed inside by other musicians and Beatles Road Manager, Neil Aspinall, ‘Paul McCartney alias Neil Aspinall, it will never be as bad as the Cavern’. With letter of provenance. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0 $ 1 2 , 8 0 0 -1 9 , 3 0 0 € 8 ,7 0 0 -1 3 ,1 0 0 108

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77 sir PaUL mCCartneY b. 1942 Surfers Against Sewage, 2008. A surfboard painted with a seaside and floral theme. 182 x 49 cm. (71 5/8 x 19 1/4 in). Signed and dated ‘Paul McCartney 08’ lower edge. With letter of provenance. This surfboard was painted by Paul McCartney and donated to an auction in 2008 to raise money for Surfers Against Sewage, a charity campaigning for clean, safe, recreational water. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 6 0 , 0 0 0 - 8 0 , 0 0 0 $ 9 6 , 4 0 0 -1 2 8 , 0 0 0 € 6 5 , 4 0 0 - 8 7, 2 0 0 ♠ 109

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78 GeOrGe HarrisOn 1943-2001 A Yamaha model FG-340 acoustic guitar. Serial number 80607130, in a natural finish with spruce top, mahogany body and bound rosewood fingerboard with dot inlays. Played by George Harrison during a jam session with local musicians whilst on holiday in Goa, 1994.  Signed twice by Harrison on the body and additionally inscribed ‘To Orlando’ and annotated with the Om symbol. Accompanied by a cassette recording of the jam session, a photograph of Harrison signing the guitar and two letters of provenance. Please note that the cassette tape is offered for sale without copyright, broadcast rights or other reproduction rights. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 4 0 , 0 0 0 - 6 0 , 0 0 0 $ 6 4 , 2 0 0 - 9 6 , 4 0 0 € 4 3 , 6 0 0 - 6 5 , 4 0 0

This guitar belonged to a resident musician, Orlando, at the Taj Holiday Village, Goa. During George Harrison’s stay at the hotel with his wife, Olivia, he became friendly with the musicians and one night, an informal jam session took place with Harrison playing this guitar and singing various renditions of Beatles songs as well as a newly-composed Harrison song. During the session, Harrison signed this guitar for Orlando.

110

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79 PHiLLiP tOWnsenD b. 1940 George and John, 1968. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 42.5 x 35.6 cm. (16 3/4 x 14 in). Signed, numbered 13/50 in ink and blindstamp credit in the margin. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 6 0 0 - 8 0 0 $ 9 5 0 -1, 3 0 0 € 6 5 0 - 8 7 0 ♠

80 PHiLLiP tOWnsenD b. 1940 The Beatles with Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, 1968. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 31.8 x 45.7 cm. (12 1/2 x 18 in). Signed, numbered 12/50 in ink and blindstamp credit in the margin. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 6 0 0 - 8 0 0 $ 9 5 0 -1, 3 0 0 € 6 5 0 - 8 7 0 ♠ 112

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81 sHi xinninG b. 1969 The Beatles, 2005. Oil on canvas. 120 x 200 cm. (47 1/2 x 78 1/2 in). Signed [in Chinese] and dated ‘Shi Xinning 2005’ on the reverse. provenance The Red Mansion Foundation, London Estimate £ 2 0 , 0 0 0 - 3 0 , 0 0 0 $ 3 2 ,1 0 0 - 4 8 , 2 0 0 € 2 1, 8 0 0 - 3 2 ,7 0 0 113

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82 ETHAN RUSSELL John Lennon Listening to the ‘White Album’, London, 1968. Platinum palladium print, printed later. 52.9 x 35.6 cm. (20 13/16 x 14 in). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 28/35 in ink in the margin. provenance Peter Fetterman Gallery, Santa Monica Estimate £ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 $ 4 , 8 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 €3,300-5,500

84 BOB GRUEN b.1945 John Lennon, NYC, 1974. Gelatin silver print, printed 2008. 40.6 x 29.5 cm. (16 x 11 5/8 in). Signed, titled and dated in ink in the margin. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 4 0 0 - 6 0 0 $ 5 5 0 - 9 6 0 € 4 4 0 - 6 5 0 Ω

83 ROBERT WHITAKER b. 1939 John with Flower, Weybridge, May, 1965. Lightjet print, printed later. 34.1 x 43.2 cm. (13 7/16 x 17 in). Signed in pencil on the verso. provenance Peter Fetterman Gallery, Santa Monica Estimate £1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0 $ 1, 6 0 0 - 2 , 4 0 0 € 1,1 0 0 -1, 6 0 0 ♠ 114

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85 SHEPARD FAIREY b. 1970 John, 1996. Colour lithograph. 66 x 48 cm. (26 x 19 in). Signed and dated ‘Shepard Fairey 96’ and numbered of 56 along the lower edge. This work is from an edition of 56. provenance Horse Hospital, London Estimate £ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 $ 1, 3 0 0 -1, 9 0 0 € 8 7 0 -1, 3 0 0

87 SHEPARD FAIREY b.1970 Eardrum HPM, 2008. Silkscreen and mixed media on reclaimed album cover. 30.5 x 30.5 cm. (12 x 12 in). Signed and dated ‘Shepard Fairey 08’ and numbered of eight lower right. This work is from an edition of eight. provenance Private collection, Los Angeles Estimate £ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 $ 3 , 2 0 0 - 4 , 8 0 0 € 2 , 2 0 0 - 3 , 3 0 0 ‡

86 SHEPARD FAIREY b.1970 Two Tone Album Cover HPM, 2008. Silkscreen and mixed media on reclaimed album cover. 30.5 x 30.5 cm. (12 x 12 in). Signed and dated ‘Shepard Fairey 08’ and numbered of eight lower right. This work is from an edition of eight. provenance Private collection, Los Angeles Estimate £ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 $ 3 , 2 0 0 - 4 , 8 0 0 € 2 , 2 0 0 - 3 , 3 0 0 ‡ 115

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88

90

90 BARNABY FURNAS b. 1973 Untitled, 2005. Dyed wool tapestry. 230.9 x 305.1 cm. (90 3/4 x 120 1/4 in). This work is from an edition of 100. provenance Private collection, London Estimate £ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 $ 3 , 2 0 0 - 4 , 8 0 0 € 2 , 2 0 0 - 3 , 3 0 0

88 JIM LAMBIE b. 1964 Non-Stop Rock ’n’ Soul, 2007. 30 cm. (11 7/8 in) diameter. Wool, vinyl record and paper. Signed, titled and dated ‘Jim Lambie 2007 NON-STOP ROCK ’N’ SOUL’ on the record label on the reverse. provenance The Modern Institute, Glasgow Estimate £ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0 $ 8 , 0 0 0 -11, 2 0 0 € 5 , 5 0 0 -7, 6 0 0 ♠ 89 DANA SCHUTZ b. 1976 Untitled, 2005. Dyed wool tapestry. 244.3 x 211 cm. (96 1/8 x 83 3/8 in). This work is from an edition of 100. provenance Private collection, London Estimate £ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 $ 3 , 2 0 0 - 4 , 8 0 0 € 2 , 2 0 0 - 3 , 3 0 0 116

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92 91 CHRISTIAN MARCLAY b. 1955 Untitled, 1988. Record cover collage. 31.2 x 31.2 cm. (12 1/4 x 12 1/4 in). Signed and dated ‘Christian Marclay 1988’ on the reverse. provenance Tom Cugliani Gallery, New York Estimate £ 6 , 0 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 $ 9 , 6 0 0 -1 2 , 8 0 0 € 6 , 5 0 0 - 8 ,7 0 0 ‡

92 HEIKO BLANKENSTEIN b.1970 Stagefright, 2007. Ballpoint pen on tracing paper. 42 x 29.5 cm. (16 1/2 x 11 5/8). This work is unique. provenance Galerie Alexandra Saheb, Berlin Estimate £ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 $ 1, 3 0 0 -1, 9 0 0 € 8 7 0 -1, 3 0 0 ‡ ♠ 117

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94

95

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95 TOM SANFORD b. 1975 The Assassination of ‘Dime Bag’ Darrell Abbott, 2005. Oil, acrylic and fake silver leaf on wood in artist’s frame. 207 x 182 cm. (81 x 71 5/8 in). Signed, titled and dated ‘Tom Sanford the Assassination of "Dime Bag" Darrell Abbott 2005’ on the reverse. provenance Leo Koenig Inc, New York exhibited New York, Leo Koenig Inc, Tom Sanford, 10 March - 6 April 2006 Estimate £ 5 0 0 -7 0 0 $ 8 0 0 -1,1 0 0 € 5 5 0 -7 6 0 'Dimebag Darrell' was born in 1966 to Country music producer Jerry Bob Abbott and his wife, Carolyn. Deviating from his father’s preferred genre, Dimebag co-founded the seminal heavy metal band Pantera in 1981, and later, Damageplan. It was during a December 2004 performance with this latter group that Dimebag was murdered on-stage by a paranoid fan. Three of those who came to the musician’s aide were also shot and killed. This work is one of several paintings Sanford has created depicting violence in the lives of musicians; other subjects have included the infamous 2004 Vibe Awards stabbing incident and a knife altercation involving 50 Cent while at the studio.

97

93 KURT COBAIN 1967-1994 Untitled Landscape, c. 1982. Ink on paper. Signed ‘Cobain’ lower right. 30.2x 48 cm. (11 7/8 x 18 3/4 in). With letter of provenance. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £1 0 , 0 0 0 -1 5 , 0 0 0 $ 1 6 ,1 0 0 - 2 4 ,1 0 0 € 1 0 , 9 0 0 -1 6 , 4 0 0

96 MILES ALDRIDGE b. 1964 Beyond the Pale #3, 2006. Colour coupler print. 101.6 x 77.3 cm (40 x 30 1/2 in). Signed in ink, printed credit, title, date and number 1/10 on a label affixed to the reverse of the flush-mount. One from an edition of 10 plus 2 artist’s proofs. provenance Hamiltons Gallery, London exhibited Miles Aldridge, The Cabinet, Reflex Gallery, Amsterdam, 18 November 2006 – 9 June 2007;  Miles Aldridge, Print for Photographs, Steven Kasher Gallery, New York, 28 May – 20 June 2009 (each another example exhibited) Estimate £ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0 $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 6 0 0 € 2 ,7 0 0 - 3 , 8 0 0 ♠ †

This painting was executed by Kurt Cobain whilst at Aberdeen High School, Washington. Cobain took a deep interest in art during school and often drew bizarre human forms. Later on, his work was often influenced by his interest in medicine, his dreams, and his bizarre, often macabre sense of humour. Unable to afford art materials, Cobain would improvise with materials, painting on board games and album sleeves, and painting with an array of substances, including his own bodily fluids. His paintings appeared on the LP covers for the Nirvana albums In Utero and Incesticide and he also conceived the idea for the infamous image of a baby swimming after a dollar bill used on the Nevermind album.

97 DEAN KARR b. 1965 Marilyn Manson 'Antichrist Superstar', 1996. Archival pigment print, printed 2009. 83.8 x 101.6 cm. (33 x 40 in). Signed and numbered 13/25 in pencil on the recto. One from an edition of 25 plus 5 artist’s proofs. provenance Acquired directly from the artist exhibited Merry Karnowksy Gallery, L.A., 1998 literature Imagozine #4, Toronto, 2009 pp. 69-69; Playboy, Issue 1, Ukraine, 2007, p. 96 Estimate £ 6 0 0 - 8 0 0 $ 9 5 0 -1, 3 0 0 € 6 5 0 - 8 7 0 †

94 WALTER PFEIFFER b. 1946 Untitled, 2007. Lambda print, mounted. 79.4 x 120 cm. (31 1/4 x 47 1/4 in). Number 2 from an edition of 5. This image portrays Seraina Schoenenberger, girlfriend of Mötley Crue guitarist, Mick Mars. provenance de Pury & Luxembourg, Zurich Estimate £ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 $ 4 , 8 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 € 3 , 3 0 0 - 5 , 5 0 0 ‡ 118

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98

98 MARILYN MANSON b. 1969 Elisabeth Short as Snow White (A Smile II), 2002. Watercolour on paper. 76 x 56 cm. (30 x 22 in). provenance Galerie Brigitte Schenk, Cologne; Acquired directly from the artist Estimate ÂŁ 2 5 , 0 0 0 - 3 5 , 0 0 0 $ 4 0 , 2 0 0 - 5 6 , 2 0 0 â‚Ź 2 7, 3 0 0 - 3 8 , 2 0 0 Marilyn Manson created a cycle of pictures around the spectacular murder case of Elisabeth Short committed in 1947, which received high media interest due to the exceptional brutality displayed. The case is now well known as 'Black Daliah' in criminal and film history. The subsequent trial was ruled by the media, a phenonemon not unlike the Michael Jackson trial decades later. Manson has a deep, personal understanding of such procedures being a person of common interest himself; the topic will always find its place in his performance as well as fine art. 119

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99

101

100

99 HAPSHASH AND THE COLOURED COAT (MiCHAEL ENgLiSH & NigEL WEyMOUTH) A collection of four offset lithograph posters for the Saville Theatre, 1967. Comprising: Jimi Hendrix Experience And Others, 27 August, 1967, OAS 1; Traffic And Others, 17 September, 1967, OAS 2; Jimi Hendrix Experience, Pink Floyd And Others, 1 October, 1967, OAS 3; and The Who And Others, 15 October, 1967, OAS 4. Each approximately 75 x 48.3 cm. (29 1/2 x 19 in). provenance Private collection, Europe Estimate £ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 $ 3 , 2 0 0 - 4 , 8 0 0 € 2 , 2 0 0 - 3 , 3 0 0

100 RiCK gRiFFiN 1944-1991 Duran Duran, Fillmore Auditorium, San Francisco, 19 October, 1988. Concert poster designed by Rick Griffin. 89 x 62.2 cm. (35 x 24 1/2 in). Signed and numbered lower edge. This work is from an edition of 100. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 3 0 0 - 5 0 0 $ 5 0 0 - 8 0 0 € 3 3 0 - 5 5 0 † 101 BOB DyLAN Dylan, 1966. Souvenir poster. Art by Milton Glaser. 84 x 56 cm. (33 x 22 in). provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 3 0 0 - 5 0 0 $ 5 0 0 - 8 0 0 € 3 3 0 - 5 5 0 Ω 120

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102

103

Image © Freudenthal / Verhagen

ALL PROCEEDS TO BEnEFIT UnICEF 102 BJÖRK An elaborate multi-coloured couture dress with short ruched rainbow-striped cotton skirt, loose aztec-patterned silk bodice and voluminous sleeves trimmed with deep cuffs. Labelled inside 'handmade' with Bernhard Willhelm button. Designed by Bernhard Willhelm. Worn by Björk on stage during her Volta Tour, 2009 and featured on the front cover of Dazed And Confused magazine, October, 2007. provenance Private collection, London Estimate £ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 $ 1, 3 0 0 -1, 9 0 0 € 8 7 0 -1, 3 0 0

103 BOB DyLAN A black leather jacket with white stitched detail and fringing to the chest and pockets. Worn by Bob Dylan circa mid-1980s and featured on the front cover of The Telegraph magazine, Winter 1987. With letter of provenance. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 2 0 , 0 0 0 - 3 0 , 0 0 0 $ 3 2 ,1 0 0 - 4 8 , 2 0 0 € 2 1, 8 0 0 - 3 2 ,7 0 0

121

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104

105

104 RiCEBOy SLEEPS Indian summer, 2007. Digital print in the artist’s found wooden frame. 71 x 76.5 cm. (28 x 30 1/8 in). Stamped with signature, date and title ‘Riceboy Sleeps Indian Summer 2007’ on the reverse. This work is unique. provenance Private collection, Reykjavik Estimate £1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 $ 2 , 4 0 0 - 3 , 2 0 0 € 1, 6 0 0 - 2 , 2 0 0 ♠

105 RiCEBOy SLEEPS Maybe they will sing for us tomorrow, 2007. Digital print in the artist’s found wooden frame. 38 x 102 cm. (15 x 40 in). Stamped with signature, title and date ‘Riceboy Sleeps Maybe they will sing for us tomorrow 2007’ on the reverse. This work is unique. provenance Private collection, Reykjavik Estimate £1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 $ 2 , 4 0 0 - 3 , 2 0 0 € 1, 6 0 0 - 2 , 2 0 0 ♠ 122

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106

106 HARRy BERTOiA 1915-1978 ‘Sonambient’ sculpture, c. 1968. Beryllium copper, bronze 62 x 20.5 x 20.5 cm. (24 1/2 x 8 x 8 in) provenance Acquired directly from the artist; Private collection; Wright, Important Design, 11 December 2008, lot 600 Estimate £ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0 $ 9 , 6 0 0 -1 2 , 8 0 0 € 6 , 5 0 0 - 8 ,7 0 0 ‡ 123

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108

107

109

109 ALBERTO DAL LAGO b. 1937 ‘Batman’ stereophonic Hi-Fi system and bar, c. 1970. Brushed metal, acrylic, painted wood, rubber. 83 x 150 x 51 cm. (32 3/4 x 59 x 20 in). Manufactured by Giuseppe Rossi di Albizzate, Italy. Comprising: record player, eight track player, cassette player, radio, two speakers, bottle compartment, refrigerator, record cabinet, on free running castors. Together with two original brochures and two associated ice buckets. Estimate £ 3 , 0 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0 $ 4 , 8 0 0 - 6 , 4 0 0 € 3 , 3 0 0 - 4 , 4 0 0

107 THILO OERKE b. 1940 ‘Vision 2000’ stereophonic Hi-Fi system, early 1970s. Acrylic, chrome-plated acrylic, brushed steel. 94 cm. (37 in) high, 64.5 cm. (25 3/8 in) diameter. Manufactured by Rosita Tonmöbel, Germany. Comprising: radio, cassette player, the swivel base on castors. literature David Attwood, Sound Design, Classic Audio Hi Fi Design, London, 2002, p. 67 for an illustration Estimate £1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0 $ 1, 9 0 0 - 2 , 9 0 0 € 1, 3 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 108 VERNER PANTON 1926-1988 ‘Wega 3300 Hifi’ stereophonic system, designed 1963. Painted wood, painted metal, chrome-plated metal, brushed aluminium, rubber, plastic. 60.5 x 42.5 x 42.5 cm. (23 3/4 x 16 3/4 x 16 3/4 in) closed. Manufactured by Wega-Radio GmbH, Germany. Together with a pair of associated HMV speakers. literature Alexander von Vegesack, Mathias Rummele, Verner Panton, The Collected Works, Balingen, 2002, p. 302; N.N. Verner Panton, Basel, 1998, n.p. for an illustration of a variant of this model Estimate £ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 $ 1, 3 0 0 -1, 9 0 0 € 8 7 0 -1, 3 0 0 124

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110

111

112

110 RiCK gRiFFiN 1944-1991 Monument Valley Flying Eyeball: A Tribute to John Cipollina, c. 1990. Ink airbrush on paper. 34 x 56.2 cm. (13 3/8 x 22 1/8 in). The imagery in this painting is typical of Rick Griffin’s artwork from 1988 to 1991, the flying eyeball being one of Griffin’s continuous motifs from his work in the 1960s and the Monument Valley images informed by a trip he had made to Monument Valley navajo Tribal Park. Griffin had recently designed a tribute poster for the wake of his good friend, John Cipollina, guitarist with Quicksilver Messenger Service, who died in May 1989. provenance Acquired directly from the Rick Griffin estate Estimate £ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 $ 3 , 2 0 0 - 4 , 8 0 0 € 2 , 2 0 0 - 3 , 3 0 0

111 RiCK gRiFFiN 1944-1991 Grateful Dead Double Logo, 1987. Graphite on tracing paper. 47 x 29 cm. (18 1/2 x 11 3/8 in). This design was a detailed study for the artwork used on the VHS release of the 1987 film Grateful Dead So Far, directed by Jerry Garcia. provenance Acquired directly from the Rick Griffin estate Estimate £1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0 $ 2 , 4 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0 € 1, 6 0 0 - 2 ,7 0 0 112 RiCK gRiFFiN 1944-1991 Grateful Dead: 25th Anniversary, 1989. Gouache on celluloid. 41.9 x 54.6 cm. (16.5 x 21.5 in). This image was used on T-shirts, postcards and other promotional material to commemorate the band’s anniversary in conjunction with the release of their thirteenth and final studio album, Built To Last, released in October, 1989. provenance Acquired directly from the Rick Griffin estate Estimate £ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0 $ 1 2 , 8 0 0 -1 9 , 3 0 0 € 8 ,7 0 0 -1 3 ,1 0 0 125

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113

113 CHRiSTOPHER BROOKS David Bowie, 2002. Enamel, spray paint and paper collage on masonite. 121.8 x 152 cm. (48 x 59 7/8 in). provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 3 , 0 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0 $ 4 , 8 0 0 - 6 , 4 0 0 € 3 , 3 0 0 - 4 , 4 0 0 ‡ 126

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114

115 114 MiCK ROCK b. 1948 David Bowie and Mick Ronson, ‘Lunch on British Rail to Aberdeen’, May, 1973. 50.8 x 61 cm. (20 x 24 in). Gelatin silver print, printed 2009. Signed and numbered 27/50 in pencil in the margin. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £1, 0 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 $ 1, 6 0 0 - 3 , 2 0 0 € 1,1 0 0 - 2 , 2 0 0 Ω

115 MiCK ROCK b. 1948 David Bowie, Iggy Pop and Lou Reed, ‘The Terrible Trio: Teatime At The Dorchester’, London, June, 1972. 50.8 x 61 cm. (20 x 24 in). Gelatin silver print, printed 2007. Signed and numbered 30/50 in pencil in the margin. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £1, 0 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 $ 1, 6 0 0 - 3 , 2 0 0 € 1,1 0 0 - 2 , 2 0 0 Ω 127

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116

117

118

119

116 MICK ROCK b. 1948 Iggy Pop, ‘Backbend’, London, July, 1972. 61 x 50.8 cm. (24 x 20 in). Gelatin silver print, printed 2007. Signed and numbered 22/50 in pencil in the margin. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £1, 0 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 $ 1, 6 0 0 - 3 , 2 0 0 € 1,1 0 0 - 2 , 2 0 0 Ω

118 PETER STRONGWATER David Bowie, September, 1981. Gelatin silver print, printed 2009. 76.2 x 101.6 cm. (30 x 40 in). Signed and numbered 1/2 in ink on the recto. One from an edition of 2 plus 1 artist’s proof. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 $ 1, 3 0 0 -1, 9 0 0 € 8 7 0 -1, 3 0 0 †

117 MICK ROCK b. 1948 Lou Reed, ‘Transformer’, cover, London, July, 1972. 61 x 50.8 cm. (24 x 20 in). Gelatin silver print, printed 2005. Signed by the artist and Lou Reed, numbered 37/50 in pencil in the margin. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0 $ 2 , 4 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0 € 1, 6 0 0 - 2 ,7 0 0 Ω

119 MICK ROCK b. 1948 Lou Reed and Andy Warhol, ‘Release Party for RocknRoll Heart’, New York, September, 1976. 50.8 x 61 cm. (20 x 24 in). Gelatin silver print, printed 2009. Signed and numbered 11/50 in pencil in the margin. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £1, 0 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 $ 1, 6 0 0 - 3 , 2 0 0 € 1,1 0 0 - 2 , 2 0 0 Ω 128

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120

121

122

123

120 PIERRE BENAIN b. 1956 Johnny Rotten Inside Gunter Grove, London, 1978. Previously unseen limited-edition photograph. 50.2 x 70.5cm. (19 x 27 in). Signed on the reverse and numbered 1/25. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 3 0 0 - 5 0 0 $ 5 0 0 - 8 0 0 € 3 3 0 - 5 5 0

122 PIERRE BENAIN b. 1956 Johnny Rotten on the Roof at Gunter Grove, London, 1978. Previously unseen limited-edition photograph. 50.2 x 70.5 cm. (19 x 27 in). Signed on the reverse and numbered 1/25. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 3 0 0 - 5 0 0 $ 5 0 0 - 8 0 0 € 3 3 0 - 5 5 0

121 PIERRE BENAIN b. 1956 Johnny Rotten on the Roof at Gunter Grove, London, 1978. Previously unseen limited-edition photograph. 50.2 x 70.5cm. (19 x 27 in). Signed on the reverse and numbered 1/25. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 3 0 0 - 5 0 0 $ 5 0 0 - 8 0 0 € 3 3 0 - 5 5 0

123 DENNIS MORRIS b. 1959 Pretty Vacant, 1977. Silver-bromide triptych, printed 2005. Each 100 x 150 cm. (39 3/8 x 59 in). Each signed and dated in ink on the reverse of the flush-mount. Number 1 from an edition of 5 plus 1 artist’s proof. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 7, 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0 $ 11, 2 0 0 -14 , 5 0 0 € 7, 6 0 0 - 9 , 8 0 0 ♠ 129

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125

124

127

128

129

124 GAVIN TURK b. 1967 Pop Up, 2000 and numbered of ten. C-print, flush-mounted to aluminium. 182.9 x 76.2 cm. (72 x 30 in). Signed and dated ‘Gavin Turk 2000’ and numbered of ten on the reverse. This work is from an edition of ten. provenance Private collection, London Estimate £1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0 $ 1, 6 0 0 - 2 , 4 0 0 € 1,1 0 0 -1, 6 0 0 ♠

128 THE CLASH The Clash, Acklam Hall, 50p, London, 25 December, 1979. Concert poster. 60.4 x 43.3 cm. (23 3/4 x 17 in). This poster was for one of two secret gigs on Christmas Day and Boxing Day, 1979. The concerts were put on as a Thank You to their fans and as a warm up for the Kampuchea benefit performance on 27 December at the Hammersmith Odeon. The first date was poorly attended but by Boxing Day, the secret was out and Acklam Hall was full to capacity. This poster appears to be a preliminary version as there is another version in existence advertising both dates with the artwork depicting recent photographs of the band by Pennie Smith. provenance Private collection, London Estimate £ 7 0 0 - 9 0 0 $ 1,1 0 0 -1, 4 0 0 € 7 6 0 - 9 8 0

125 PAUL SIMONON b. 1955 Untitled, 1989. Oil on canvas. 35.5 x 25.5 cm. (14 x 10 in). Signed and dated 'Simonon 89' lower right. provenance Private collection, London Estimate £1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0 $ 1, 6 0 0 - 2 , 4 0 0 € 1,1 0 0 -1, 6 0 0 ♠ 126

NO LOT

129 THE SEx PISTOLS b. 1946 The Sex Pistols: London’s Most Notorious Band, Club Chalet Du Lac, Paris, 3 September, 1976. A rare French concert poster. 79 x 53 cm. (31 x 21 in). The design for this poster, by Malcolm McLaren, was originally intended for a t-shirt, and was used despite objections from Glen Matlock and Bernie Rhodes (manager of The Clash, and at this time working with The Sex Pistols). In fact, when adding the concert details to this poster, Rhodes tried to cover up the boys’ genitals with lettering and reportedly said: ‘Malcolm likes to titillate, but I like to get down to substance’. provenance Acquired directly from the concert promoter Estimate £ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0 $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 6 0 0 € 2 ,7 0 0 - 3 , 8 0 0

127 THE CLASH The Clash + Full Supporting Show, Apollo Theatre, Manchester, 5-6 October, 1981. Concert poster. 102 x 75.9 cm. (40 1/8 x 29 7/8 in). This concert was part of the 1981 Radio Clash UK Tour. provenance Private collection, London Estimate £ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 $ 1, 3 0 0 -1, 9 0 0 € 8 7 0 -1, 3 0 0

130

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130 THOMAS HIRSCHHORN b. 1957 Sex Pistols, 2004. Nails, screws, electrical wiring, tape and printed paper collage on painted wood assemblage. 250 x 125 x 9.5 cm. ( 98 3/8 x 49 1/4 x 3 3/4 in). Signed, titled and dated ‘THOMAS HIRSCHHORN <<Nail & Wire>> Sex Pistols 2004’ on the reverse. provenance Arndt & Partner, Berlin Estimate £1 8 , 0 0 0 - 2 2 , 0 0 0 $ 2 8 , 9 0 0 - 3 5 , 3 0 0 € 1 9 , 6 0 0 - 2 4 , 0 0 0 131

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131

131 NICK RHODES b. 1962 Selected Images from the Flag Series, c. 1984. Four colour coupler prints. Each 18.4 x 17.9 cm. (7 1/4 x 7 1/16 in). Each signed in pencil on the verso. provenance Acquired directly from the artist exhibited Hamiltons Gallery, London, 1984 Estimate £ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 $ 3 , 2 0 0 - 4 , 8 0 0 € 2 , 2 0 0 - 3 , 3 0 0 † 132

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132

132 NICK RHODES b. 1962 Selected Images from American TV, circa 1984. Nine colour Polaroid prints. Each: 10.8 x 8.7 cm. (4 1/4 x 3 7/16 in). Each signed in ink, numbered sequentially in pencil on the verso. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0 $ 8 , 0 0 0 -11, 2 0 0 € 5 , 5 0 0 -7, 6 0 0 † 133

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133

134

133 ADRIAN BOOT Bob Geldof and Paula Yates, 1978. Archival inkjet print, printed later. Overall 25.7 x 71 cm. (10 1/8 x 27 15/16 in). Signed and numbered 1/25 in pencil in the margin. Accompanied by a signed Certificate of Authenticity. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 $ 1, 3 0 0 -1, 9 0 0 € 8 7 0 -1, 3 0 0 † 134 ADRIAN BOOT Marvin Gaye, February, 1984. Archival inkjet print, printed later. Overall 36.2 x 74 cm. (14 1/4 x 29 1/8 in). Signed and numbered 6/125 in pencil in the margin. Accompanied by a signed Certificate of Authenticity. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 $ 1, 3 0 0 -1, 9 0 0 € 8 7 0 -1, 3 0 0 † 135 DENNIS MORRIS b. 1959 Bob Marley. Colour coupler print with collage. 67.9 x 50.2 cm. (26 3/4 x 19 3/4 in.) Accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0 $ 6 , 4 0 0 - 9 , 6 0 0 €4,40 0 - 6,50 0 ♠

135 134

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136

137

136 BoB Gruen b. 1945 Sonny and Cher, NYC, 1973. Gelatin silver print, printed 1999. 30.5 x 18.7 cm. (12 x 7 3/8 in). Signed, titled and dated in ink in the margin; annotated ‘R-337 5/5/73’ in pencil on the verso. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 3 0 0 - 5 0 0 $ 5 0 0 - 8 0 0 € 3 3 0 - 5 5 0 Ω

137 BArrY HoLMeS Lenny Kravitz & Steven Tyler, Holborn Studios, London, September, 2009. 63.5 x 50.8 cm. (25 x 20 in). Digital colour coupler print. Signed and numbered in pencil on the recto. One from an edition of 5. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 6 0 0 - 8 0 0 $ 9 5 0 -1, 3 0 0 € 6 5 0 - 8 7 0 ♠ † 135

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138

138 JOEL BRODSKY 1939-2007 Jim Morrison, The Doors, American Poet, New York City, 1967. Archival pigment print, printed later by David Adamson, Adamson Editions. 63.8 x 63.5 cm. (25 1/8 x 25 in). Blindstamp and number 3/25 in pencil in an unidentified hand in the margin. Accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity. Estimate £ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0 $ 8 , 0 0 0 -11, 2 0 0 € 5 , 5 0 0 -7, 6 0 0 139 GLORIA STAVERS 1926-1983 Jim Morrison, 1967. Four black and white publicity photographs, two head and shoulders portraits, two of Morrison performing on stage at SUNY, Stony Brook, New York, 23 September, 1967. Each 25.4 x 20.3cm. (8 x 10 in) or the reverse. provenance Celebrity Vault Gallery, Beverly Hills Estimate £ 7 0 0 - 9 0 0 $ 1,1 0 0 -1, 4 0 0 € 7 6 0 - 9 8 0 Ω These photographs were taken by Gloria Stavers during her time as Editor of 16 Magazine. She is credited with being the first female rock and roll journalist and it is rumoured that she often became romantically involved with her interviewees. She had an ongoing relationship with Jim Morrison and the two posed shots of him in this lot were taken at Stavers’ apartment in New York.

139

136

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140

141

142

143

144

140 EDMUND TESKE 1911-1996 Jim Morrison and Pamela Courson, Bronson Caves, Hollywood, California, 1969. Limited-edition archival inkjet print, printed later. 45.5 x 30.5 cm. (18 x 12 in). Edmund Teske Archive ink-stamp credit to the reverse of the mount. provenance Acquired directly from the Edmund Teske Archive Estimate £ 5 0 0 -7 0 0 $ 8 0 0 -1,1 0 0 € 5 5 0 -7 6 0 Ω

143 RANDY TUTEN b. 1946 The Doors, Madison Square Garden, 24 January, 1969. Handtinted artwork for the 30th Anniversary commemorative poster. 54 x 35.5 cm. (21 1/4 x 14 in). Signed lower edge. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 $ 3 , 2 0 0 - 4 , 8 0 0 € 2 , 2 0 0 - 3 , 3 0 0 144 JIM MORRISON 1943-1971 Cartoon Babies, c. 1965. Pen and cartoon collage on paper. 11.5 x 30.5 cm. (4 1/2 x 12 in). Signed ‘By Jim’ lower right. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0 $ 8 , 0 0 0 -11, 2 0 0 € 5 , 5 0 0 -7, 6 0 0 Jim Morrison is remembered as controversial lead singer with the Doors but, during his lifetime, he was also an artist, filmmaker and published poet. He self-published two volumes of his poetry in 1969, The Lords / Notes on Vision and The New Creatures. These rare volumes are highly sought after by collectors as are his drawings, which, like the cartoon offered here, are often crude and sexually explicit by nature.

141 EDMUND TESKE 1911-1996 Jim Morrison in His Studio, Hollywood, California, 1970. Limited-edition archival inkjet print, printed later. 45.7 x 30.5 cm. (18 x 12 in). Edmund Teske Archive ink-stamp credit to the reverse of the mount. provenance Acquired directly from the Edmund Teske Archive Estimate £ 5 0 0 -7 0 0 $ 8 0 0 -1,1 0 0 € 5 5 0 -7 6 0 Ω 142 EDMUND TESKE 1911-1996 The Doors, Hollywood, California, 1969. Limited-edition archival inkjet print, printed later. 45.5 x 30.5 cm. (18 x 12 in). Edmund Teske Archive inkstamp credit to the reverse of the mount. provenance Acquired directly from the Edmund Teske Archive Estimate £ 5 0 0 -7 0 0 $ 8 0 0 -1,1 0 0 € 5 5 0 -7 6 0 Ω 137

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145

146

145 LINDA MCCARTNEY 1941 - 1998 Janis Joplin at the Fillmore East, 1969. Gelatin silver print, printed 1995. 40.3 x 27.6 cm. (15 7/8 x 10 7/8 in). Signed and dated in pencil and credit stamp on the verso. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 5 0 0 -7 0 0 $ 8 0 0 -1,1 0 0 € 5 5 0 -7 6 0 Ω

146 LED ZEPPELIN Three black and white publicity photographs of Led Zeppelin performing on stage, c. 1971. Includes one by Neal Preston of Robert Plant, one by Chris Walter of Robert Plant and one by Neal Preston of Jimmy Page. Each 25.4 x 20.3 cm. (8 x 10 in). provenance Celebrity Vault Gallery, Beverly Hills Estimate £ 6 0 0 - 8 0 0 $ 9 5 0 -1, 3 0 0 € 6 5 0 - 8 7 0 Ω

138

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147

148

149

147 DAVE MULLER b. 1964 John Entwistle Meet Sol Lewitt, 2004. Watercolour and coloured pen on paper. 101.7 x 81.5 cm. (40 x 32 1/8 in). Signed, titled and dated ‘John Entwistle Meet Sol Lewitt 04 Dave Muller’ on the reverse. provenance Creative Growth Auction, California Estimate £ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0 $ 6 , 4 0 0 - 9 , 6 0 0 € 4 , 4 0 0 - 6 , 5 0 0 ‡

149 COLIN JONES b. 1936 The Who, Manchester, England, 1966. Inkjet print, printed later. 50.8 x 34 cm. (20 x 13 3/8 in). Signed, titled, dated, annotated ‘AP’ in pencil and blindstamp credit in the margin. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0 $ 1, 6 0 0 - 2 , 4 0 0 € 1,1 0 0 -1, 6 0 0

148 COLIN JONES b. 1936 Pete Townsend – The Who, 1966. Gelatin silver print. 37.1 x 24.8 cm. (14 5/8 x 9 3/4 in). Blindstamp copyright credit on the recto; signed, titled, dated in pencil and copyright credit stamp on the verso. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £1, 0 0 0 -1, 5 0 0 $ 1, 6 0 0 - 2 , 4 0 0 € 1,1 0 0 -1, 6 0 0 139

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150

151

152

150 JILL FURMANOVSKY b. 1953 Cream Rehearsal, Bray Studio, 14th April, 2005. Gelatin silver print. 27.6 x 40.6 cm. (10 7/8 x 16 in). Signed, titled, dated and annotated ‘AP’ in ink in the margin. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 $ 1, 3 0 0 -1, 9 0 0 € 8 7 0 -1, 3 0 0 ♠ †

152 HAGIT SHAHAL b. 1950 Freddie Mercury, 2008. Oil on canvas. 114 x 93 cm. (45 x 36 1/2 in). Signed and dated ‘H. Shahal 2008’ lower left. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 $ 4 , 8 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 € 3 , 3 0 0 - 5 , 5 0 0

151 MICK ROCK b. 1948 ‘Queen In Mirror: Queen 2 cover session', London, February, 1976. 61 x 50.8 cm. (24 x 20 in). Lambda print, printed 2009. Signed and numbered 12/50 in ink in the margin. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £1, 0 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 $ 1, 6 0 0 - 3 , 2 0 0 € 1,1 0 0 - 2 , 2 0 0 Ω 140

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153

154

155

153 MICK ROCK b. 1948 Syd Barrett, 1969. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 41 x 58.4 cm. (16 1/8 x 23 in). Signed and numbered 11/50 in ink in the margin. provenance Syd Barrett Trust Estimate £1, 0 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 $ 1, 6 0 0 - 3 , 2 0 0 € 1,1 0 0 - 2 , 2 0 0 ♠

155 MICK ROCK b. 1948 Syd Barrett with Record Player, 1969. Digital colour coupler print, printed later. 66 x 97.5 cm. (26 x 38 3/8 in). Signed and numbered 1/25 in the margin. provenance Syd Barrett Trust Estimate £1, 5 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0 $ 2 , 4 0 0 - 3 , 2 0 0 € 1, 6 0 0 - 2 , 2 0 0 ♠

154 MICK ROCK b. 1948 Syd Barrett on Car, 1969. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 40.3 x 58.4 cm. (15 7/8 x 23 in). Signed and numbered 18/50 in ink in the margin. provenance Syd Barrett Trust Estimate £1, 0 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 $ 1, 6 0 0 - 3 , 2 0 0 € 1,1 0 0 - 2 , 2 0 0 ♠ 141

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156

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158

ALL PROCEEDS TO BENEFIT THE CORAM LIFE EDUCATION 156 JOHN ILLSLEY b. 1949 Blue Stratocaster, 2008. Oil on canvas. 61 x 46 cm. (24 x 181/8 in). Signed, titled and dated ‘Blue Stratocaster May 08 John Illsley’ on the reverse. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 2 , 0 0 0 - 2 , 5 0 0 $ 3 , 2 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0 € 2 , 2 0 0 - 2 ,7 0 0 ♠

158 RUSSELL YOUNG b. 1960 Dylan and Cash, 2004. Screenprint on canvas. 157 x 122 cm. (62 x 48 in). Signed ‘Russell Young’ on the reverse. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0 $ 8 , 0 0 0 -11, 0 0 0 € 5 , 5 0 0 -7, 6 0 0

157 MYKOLA MATSENKO b. 1960 Musical Culture, 2008. Oil and acrylic on canvas. 180 x 60 cm. (70 7/8 x 23 5/8 in). Initialed [in Cyrillic] ‘M.Matsenko’ lower left, ‘2008’ lower right; signed, titled [in Cyrillic] and dated ‘M.Matsenko. 2008 y. “Music Culture”' on the top reverse. exhibited Kiev, Ukraine, Pavel Gudimov Art Centre Ya Gallery, Culture, 26 November - 15 December 2008; Kharkov, Ukraine, Kharkov Municipal Gallery, Culture, 28 September - 12 October 2009. provenance Art-Agent Ukr Gallery Estimate £ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 $ 4 , 8 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 € 3 , 3 0 0 - 5 , 5 0 0 ‡ 142

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159 SERVANE MARY b. 1972 Untitled #1, 2008. Ink on paper. 186 x 125 cm. (73 1/4 x 49 1/4 in). provenance Martos Gallery, New York. exhibited New York, Martos Gallery, Servane Mary: WORKS ON PAPER, 9 May - 21 June 2008 Estimate £ 3 , 0 0 0 - 4 , 0 0 0 $ 4 , 8 0 0 - 6 , 4 0 0 € 3 , 3 0 0 - 4 , 4 0 0 ♠

162 JIMI HENDRIx 1942-1970 Axis: Bold As Love, 1967. Lenticular LP cover. 57.2 x 57.2 cm. (22 1/2 x 22 1/2 in). These lenticular album covers were manufactured by VariVue, Mt. Vernon, New York. The company made many items of merchandise using lenticular images depicting the Beatles, the Rolling Stones and others. When the Rolling Stones’ album Their Satanic Majesties Request was released with a 3D hologram cover in 1967, Vari-Vue manufactured other 3D covers depicting the most popular albums at the time. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 $ 4 , 8 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 € 3 , 3 0 0 - 5 , 5 0 0

160 SERVANE MARY b. 1972 Untitled (Jimmy), 2007. Ink on paper. 110 x 80 cm. (43 x 31 in). provenance Martos Gallery, New York; Maisonneuve, Paris Estimate £1, 8 0 0 - 2 , 8 0 0 $ 2 , 9 0 0 - 4 , 5 0 0 € 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 ,1 0 0 ♠ 161 RUSSELL YOUNG b. 1960 Jimi Hendrix, Hollywood Bowl 1967, 2006. Screenprint on canvas. 152 x 114 cm. (60 x 45 in). Signed ‘Russell Young’ on the reverse. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 5 , 0 0 0 -7, 0 0 0 $ 8 , 0 0 0 -11, 0 0 0 € 5 , 5 0 0 -7, 6 0 0 143

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163

163 JERRY SCHATZBERG b. 1927 Bob Dylan, ‘The Soul Of’, 1965. Gelatin silver contact sheet, printed 2005. 60.6 x 44.5 cm. (23 7/8 x 17 1/2 in). Signed, titled and numbered 16/30 in ink in the margin. provenance Peter Fetterman Gallery, Santa Monica Estimate £ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 $ 3 , 2 0 0 - 4 , 8 0 0 € 2 , 2 0 0 - 3 , 3 0 0 164 JERRY SCHATZBERG b. 1927 Bob Dylan, ‘Musician/ Poet’, 1965. Platinum palladium print, printed 2005. 46.7 x 46.6 cm. (18 3/8 x 18 1/3 in). Signed, titled, dated, numbered 5/12 in pencil in the margin. provenance Peter Fetterman Gallery, Santa Monica Estimate £ 4 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 $ 6 , 4 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 €4,40 0 -5,50 0

164

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165 JOHN COHEN b. 1932 Bob Dylan, 1962. Gelatin silver print, printed 2005. 22.7 x 15.2 cm. (8 15/16 x 6 in). Signed in pencil on the verso. provenance Deborah Bell Photographs, New York literature Powerhouse Cultural Entertainment Books, J. Cohen, Young Bob: John Cohen’s Early Photographs of Bob Dylan, 2003, p. 31 Estimate £ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 $ 1, 3 0 0 -1, 9 0 0 € 8 7 0 -1, 3 0 0 Ω

167 GODLIS b. 1951 Patti Smith, Bowery, 1976. Archival gelatin silver print, printed later. 43.8 x 27.6 cm. (17 1/4 x 10 7/8 in). Signed, titled and dated in ink in the margin. provenance Free Arts, NYC Estimate £ 7 0 0 - 9 0 0 $ 1,1 0 0 -1, 4 0 0 € 7 6 0 - 9 8 0 Ω

168 BOB DYLAN Bob Dylan’s Greatest Hits, 1967. An LP signed and inscribed on the front cover by Dylan with a line from the song Rainy Day Women # 12 & 35. ‘No one would feel so all alone if everybody just got stoned! Bob Dylan, 6/23/68’. With two letters of provenance. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0 $ 1 2 , 8 0 0 -1 9 , 3 0 0 € 8 ,7 0 0 -1 3 ,1 0 0

166 JOHN COHEN b. 1932 Bob Dylan, 1962. Gelatin silver print, printed 2006. 22.5 x 14.9 cm. (8 7/8 x 5 7/8 in). Signed in pencil on the verso. provenance Deborah Bell Photographs, New York literature Powerhouse Cultural Entertainment Books, J. Cohen, Young Bob: John Cohen’s Early Photographs of Bob Dylan, 2003, p. 35 Estimate £ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 $ 1, 3 0 0 -1, 9 0 0 € 8 7 0 -1, 3 0 0 Ω 145

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169

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169 ERWIN BLUMENFELD 1897-1969 Hot Jazz de France, Django Reinhardt and Stephane Grapelli, 1935. Gelatin silver print. 34.3 x 26.7 cm. (13 1/2 x 10 1/2 in). Estate and copyright credit stamps on the verso. provenance From the Collection of the Blumenfeld Family; Collection of Corbeau et Renard, Phillips de Pury & Company, 9 April 2008, lot 204 literature Corbeau & Renard, La trajectoire du regard, p. 113 Estimate £ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 $ 4 , 8 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 € 3 , 3 0 0 - 5 , 5 0 0 Ω

171 ROBERT PARENT 1923-1987 Miles Davis, circa 1950s. Gelatin silver print. 20.3 x 25.1 cm. (8 x 9 7/8 in). Credit stamp and various annotations in pencil in an unidentified hand on the verso. provenance Peter Fetterman Gallery, Santa Monica Estimate £ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 $ 1, 3 0 0 -1, 9 0 0 € 8 7 0 -1, 3 0 0 172 CHUCK STEWART John and Alice Coltrane, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, April, 1966. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 44.5 x 37.8 cm. (17 1/2 x 14 7/8 in). Signed, titled, numbered 39/100 and copyright in pencil on the verso. provenance Peter Fetterman Gallery, Santa Monica Estimate £ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 $ 1, 3 0 0 -1, 9 0 0 € 870-1,300

170 CLAUDE GASSIAN b. 1949 Miles Davis, Paris, 1986. Gelatin silver print, printed 2005. 78.5 x 120 cm. ( 30 3/4 x 47 ¼ in). Signed, titled and numbered 2/5 in ink of the reverse of the flush-mount. provenance Private collection, Europe exhibited Double Vie, acte2galerie, Paris, 20 May – 14 September 2002; Intersections, Musée d’Art Contemporain de Lyon, 5 June – 3 August 2003; Anonymous Claude Gassian, Govinda Gallery, Washington, 13 April – 12 May 2007; We want Miles, Cité de la Musique, Paris, 16 October 2009 - 17 January 2010 (each another example exhibited) literature Éditions de la Martinière, Claude Gassian Photographies 1970 – 2001, 2001, p. 254-255; Éditions Musée d’Art Contemporain de Lyon, Intersections, exh. cat. 2003, p. 174-175; Govinda Gallery, Anonymous Claude Gassian, exh. cat., 2007, p. 34 Estimate £ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0 $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 6 0 0 € 2 ,7 0 0 - 3 , 8 0 0 †

173

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174

NO LOT

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175 LISETTE MODEL 1903 - 1983 Louis Armstrong, 1954-1956. Gelatin silver print. 27.5 x 34.9 cm. (10 13/16 x 13 3/4 in). provenance Private collection, London literature Editions Leo Scheer, Lisette Model, 2002, p. 114 Estimate £4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0 $ 6 , 4 0 0 - 9 , 6 0 0 € 4 , 4 0 0 - 6 , 5 0 0 Ω

177 LEE FRIEDLANDER b. 1934 Jazz and Blues Portfolio. New York: produced for Q.E.D. Editions, 1983. Seven dye transfer prints. Varying sizes from 27.9 x 27.6 cm. (11 x 10 7/8 in) to 36.2 x 23.8 cm. (14 1/4 x 9 3/8 in). Each signed and one dated by the artist, each titled, numbered AP1 in pencil in an unidentified hand and six with copyright credit date stamps on the verso. Numbered AP1 in ink on the colophon. One from a limited edition of 50 plus 7 artist’s proofs. 25 sets are represented as the portfolio Jazz and Blues. Contained in a linen folio case. Sitters are Aretha Franklin, Ray Charles, Robert/Pete Williams, Joe Turner, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, and Milt Jackson. provenance Private collection, London literature Galassi, Friedlander, pp. 21-24 Estimate £1 2 , 0 0 0 -1 8 , 0 0 0 $ 1 9 , 3 0 0 - 2 8 , 9 0 0 € 1 3 ,1 0 0 -1 9 , 6 0 0 ‡

176 LISETTE MODEL 1903 - 1983 Dizzy Gillespie, 1956. Gelatin silver print. 27.3 x 22.1 cm. (10 3/4 x 8 11/16 in). Signed, titled ‘Music Men’ and annotated in ink on the verso. provenance Private collection, London literature Editions Leo Scheer, Lisette Model, 2002, p. 110 Estimate £ 4 , 0 0 0 - 6 , 0 0 0 $ 6 , 4 0 0 - 9 , 6 0 0 € 4 , 4 0 0 - 6 , 5 0 0 Ω 147

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178 WILLIAM CLAXTON 1927-2008 Chet Baker and Lily, Hollywood, August, 1955. Gelatin silver print, printed 1991. 34.4 x 26.7 cm. (13 9/16 x 10 1/2 in). Signed, titled, dated, and numbered 8/25 in pencil and copyright credit reproduction limitation stamp on the verso. provenance Peter Fetterman Gallery, Santa Monica Estimate £1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0 $ 1, 9 0 0 - 2 , 9 0 0 € 1, 3 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

180 LINDA MCCARTNEY 1941-1998 B.B. King, c. 1968. Gelatin silver print, printed 1990s. 41 x 28.3 cm. (16 1/8 x 11 1/8 in). Signed in pencil and credit stamp on the verso. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 5 0 0 -7 0 0 $ 8 0 0 -1,1 0 0 € 5 5 0 -7 6 0 Ω 181 WILLIAM GOTTLIEB 1917-2006 Billie Holiday, 1948. Gelatin silver print, printed 1990s. 32.9 x 26.5 cm. (12 15/16 x 10 7/16 in). Signed, titled and copyright in ink in the margin; signed, titled, copyright in ink and copyright credit reproduction limitation stamp on the verso. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 7 0 0 - 9 0 0 $ 1,1 0 0 -1, 4 0 0 € 7 6 0 - 9 8 0 Ω

179 WILLIAM CLAXTON 1927-2008 Teddy Charles, "Jazz scene Chet Baker", Pasadena, 1953. Gelatin silver print, printed 2000. 26 x 26.5 cm. (10 1/4 x 10 7/16 in). Signed, titled, dated, and numbered 5/25 in pencil and copyright credit limitation stamp on the verso. provenance Peter Fetterman Gallery, Santa Monica Estimate £ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 $ 1, 3 0 0 -1, 9 0 0 € 8 7 0 -1, 3 0 0

182 DAVID BOWIE b. 1947 Montreux Jazz Festival, 1995. Festival poster with artwork by David Bowie. 100 x 70 cm. (39 3/8 x 27 1/2 in). Signed, dated and numbered lower edge. This work is from an edition of 250. provenance Private collection, Switzerland Estimate £ 2 0 0 - 3 0 0 $ 3 2 0 - 4 8 0 € 2 2 0 - 3 3 0 Ω 148

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183 DENNIS STOCK b. 1928 Ella Fitzgerald, Las Vegas, 1958. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 47.9 x 31.8 cm. (18 7/8 x 12 1/2 in). Signed in ink in the margin. provenance Peter Fetterman Gallery, Santa Monica Estimate £1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0 $ 1, 9 0 0 - 2 , 9 0 0 € 1, 3 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

185 GUY LE QUERREC b. 1941 At the film Studios, in a film set created by Alexandre Trauner, reproducing New York jazz club the ‘Birdland’, from the set of ‘Around Midnight’ by Bertrand Tavernier, France, 20th August, 1985. Gelatin silver print, printed circa 1989. 37 x 56 cm. (14 ½ x 22 in). Signed in pencil on the verso. provenance Magnum Photos, London literature W. W. Norton & Co., In Our Time: The World Seen by Magnum Photographers, 1989, p. 386; Phaidon, Magnum Cinema, 1995, p. 250 Estimate £ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 $ 3 , 2 0 0 - 4 , 8 0 0 € 2 , 2 0 0 - 3 , 3 0 0 ♠

184 DENNIS STOCK b. 1928 Charlie Parker, Mercury Recording Session, 1949. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 47.9 x 34.9 cm. (18 7/8 x 13 3/4 in). Signed in ink in the margin. provenance Peter Fetterman Gallery, Santa Monica Estimate £1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0 $ 1, 9 0 0 - 2 , 9 0 0 € 1, 3 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0

186 HAROLD CHAPMAN b. 1927 Selected Images of the Mandrake Club, Soho, 1950s. Five gelatin silver prints, one mounted, four flush-mounted. Varying in size from 32.7 x 47 cm. (12 7/8 x 18 1/2 in) to 35.6 x 49.5 cm. (14 x 19 1/2 in) or the reverse. One signed in ink on the mount; all variously signed, titled, dated in ink or pencil with credit stamp on the verso of mount or flush-mount. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 2 , 5 0 0 - 3 , 5 0 0 $ 4 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 6 0 0 € 2 ,7 0 0 - 3 , 8 0 0 ♠ 149

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187 all procEEdS to bEnEFit thE huManE SociEty 187 MOBY b. 1965 Three works: Untitled. Felt-tip pen on paper. Each 59 x 45 cm. (23 1/4 x 17 3/4 in). Signed ‘Moby’ lower right of each. Estimate £1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0 $ 1, 6 5 0 - 2 , 8 8 0 € 1, 3 2 0 -1, 9 5 0 ‘My mother was a figurative painter, my uncle is a sculptor, and my other uncle is a photographer. So as to not compete, I became a musician... Then around 25 years ago I started drawing these very rudimentary, very naive little characters. The main character, little idiot, is a self-portrait of sorts (with antennae). They’re designed to be the least intimidating drawings on the planet...’ Moby 150

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188

188 MARIUS W HANSEN b. 1979 Sébastien Tellier, 2009. Gelatin silver print, printed 2009. 92.1 x 68.3 cm. (36 1/4 x 26 7/8 in). Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 1/3 on a label accompanying the work. provenance acquired directly from the artist Estimate £1, 0 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 $ 1, 6 0 0 - 3 , 2 0 0 € 1,1 0 0 - 2 , 2 0 0 † 151

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189 DaviD LaChapeLLe b. 1963 Sean ‘Puffy’ Combs: Mississippi Goddam, 1999. Digital colour coupler print, flushmounted. 111.1 x 151.1 cm. (43 3/4 x 59 1/2 in). Signed in ink, printed title, date and number on an artist’s label affixed to the reverse of the frame. One from an edition of 3. provenance Tony Shafrazi Gallery, New York Estimate £ 2 0 , 0 0 0 - 3 0 , 0 0 0 $ 3 2 ,1 0 0 - 4 8 , 2 0 0 € 2 1, 8 0 0 - 3 2 ,7 0 0 ‡

152

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190 LaWReNCe WaTSON b. 1963 Run DMC, Philadelphia, 1986. Gelatin silver print, printed 2009. 78.1 x 57.2 cm. (30 3/4 x 22 1/2 in). Signed, titled, dated and numbered 3/6 in ink on the reverse of the frame. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0 $ 1, 9 0 0 - 2 , 9 0 0 € 1, 3 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 ♠

192 LaWReNCe WaTSON b. 1963 Public Enemy, New York, 1985. Gelatin silver print, printed 2009. 80.6 x 56.8 cm. (31 3/4 x 22 3/8 in). Signed, titled, dated, numbered 2/6 in ink on the reverse of the frame and a printed label affixed to the reverse of the frame. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0 $ 1, 9 0 0 - 2 , 9 0 0 € 1, 3 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 ♠

191 LaWReNCe WaTSON b. 1963 LL Cool J, Philadelphia, 1985. Gelatin silver print printed 2009. 69.9 x 46.7 cm. (27 1/2 x 18 3/8 in). Signed, titled, dated and annotated ‘AP’ in ink on the reverse of the frame. One from an edition of 6 plus 1 artist’s proof. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0 $ 1, 9 0 0 - 2 , 9 0 0 € 1, 3 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 ♠

193 JaMeS peaRSON hOWeS b. 1982 Jay-Z, 2006. Gelatin silver print, printed 2009. 50.8 x 61 cm. (20 x 24 in). Signed, dated and numbered 5/5 in ink on the verso. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 6 0 0 - 8 0 0 $ 9 5 0 -1, 3 0 0 € 6 5 0 - 8 7 0 ♠ † 153

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194 MICKALENE THOMAS b. 1971 Donna Summer, 2002. Rhinestones, acrylic paint and oil enamel on wood panel. 100 x 71.7 cm. (39 1/8 x 28 1/4 in). Signed, titled and dated ‘Mickey Donna Summer 2002’ on the reverse. Estimate £1 0 , 0 0 0 -1 5 , 0 0 0 $ 1 6 ,1 0 0 - 2 4 ,1 0 0 € 1 0 , 9 0 0 -1 6 , 4 0 0 ‡ 154

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195 JOHANNES WOHNSEIFER b. 1967 Beyoncé Painting (RAL 8003 - Lehmbraun), 2007. Powder-coated print on PVC and perforated aluminium frame. 200 x 140 x 4 cm. (78 3/4 x 55 1/8 x 1 1/2 in). Signed, titled, initialed and dated ‘J Wohnseifer 2007 BEYONCÉ-PAINTING (RAL 8003 - LEHMBRAUN) JW 650’ on the reverse. provenance Johann König Gallery, Berlin Estimate £ 7, 0 0 0 - 9 , 0 0 0 $ 11, 2 0 0 -14 , 5 0 0 € 7, 6 0 0 - 9 , 8 0 0 ‡ ♠ 155

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196

197

The Streets, Original Pirate Material, 2002, album cover. Album artwork courtesy of 679 Recordings © 2002 679 Recordings Limited

198

196 VITAL TOYS Snoop Dogg, ‘Snoopafly’, 2002. PVC, cloth and metal chain. 30.5 cm. (12 in) high. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 3 0 - 4 0 $ 5 0 - 6 0 € 3 0 - 4 0 Ω

198 RUT BLEES LUXEMBURG b. 1967 Towering Inferno of a Modern Project, 1996. Colour coupler print, flush-mounted. 60.6 x 75.9 cm. (23 7/8 x 29 7/8 in). Signed, titled, dated and numbered AP 1/2 in ink on the reverse of the frame. One from an edition of 5 plus 2 artist’s proofs. This work appeared as the cover of the Streets’ first album, Original Pirate Material. provenance Private collection, London literature BlackDog Publishing, Commonsensual: The Works of Rut Blees Luxemburg, 2009, p. 21 Estimate £ 3 , 5 0 0 - 4 , 5 0 0 $ 5 , 6 0 0 -7, 2 0 0 € 3 , 8 0 0 - 4 , 9 0 0 ♠

197 VITAL TOYS Snoop Dogg, ‘Little Junior’, 2002. PVC, cloth and metal chain. 30.5 cm. (12 in) high. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 3 0 - 4 0 $ 5 0 - 6 0 € 3 0 - 4 0 Ω 156

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199 ALEXANDER MELAMID b. 1945 DJ Whoo Kid, 2008. Oil on canvas. 152 x 104.5 cm. (59 7/8 x 41 1/8 in). Signed ‘Melamid’ lower right. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 3 0 , 0 0 0 - 5 0 , 0 0 0 $ 4 8 , 2 0 0 - 8 0 , 3 0 0 € 3 2 ,7 0 0 - 5 4 , 5 0 0 ‡

157

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200

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200 A Diamond and Yellow Gold ‘Roc-A-Fella’ Records Pendant. Designed as the ‘Roc-AFella’ Records logo, the pavé-set diamond record-shaped plaque, enhanced by a scripted ‘R’, from a polished gold bail, mounted in 18K yellow gold, length 6 cm. Co-founded in 1996 by Hip Hop moguls Kareem Burke, Damon Dash and Jay-Z, Roc-A-Fella Records is a Hip Hop record label.  Each new artist signed to Roc-A-Fella Records was given a Roc medallion with diamonds, which over time came to symbolize much more than a business alliance.  Hip Hop artists who have worn Roc-A-Fella pendants include Beanie Sigel, Jay-Z, and Just Blaze.  These Roc-A-Fella Records pendants were previously owned by Damon Dash. PROVENANCE Made for, as well as worn by, Damon Dash Estimate £ 3 , 2 0 0 - 4 , 5 0 0 $ 5 ,1 0 0 -7, 2 0 0 € 3 , 5 0 0 - 4 , 9 0 0 Ω 204 DAVID BLING An ‘80s Baby’ Four-Finger Ring. Designed as a four-finger ring scripted ‘80s Baby’, mounted in gilt metal, length 10 cm. When Remy Ma was confirmed as a performer for the MC Lyte tribute at the 2006 VH1 Hip Hop Honors, she committed herself to a complete 1980s look. She wanted a four finger ring to express the appropriate era of Hip Hop and the decade in which she was born.  Remy commissioned her jeweller, David Bling, to make the ring, and ultimately chose for it to read ‘80s Baby’. PROVENANCE Made for, as well as worn by, Remy Ma Estimate £ 3 5 0 - 5 0 0 $ 5 5 0 - 8 0 0 € 3 8 0 - 5 5 0 Ω

201 A Diamond and Yellow Gold ‘Roc-A-Fella’ Records Pendant. Designed as the ‘Roc-AFella’ Records logo, the pavé-set diamond record-shaped plaque, enhanced by a scripted ‘R’, from a polished gold bail, mounted in 18K yellow gold, length 6 cm. PROVENANCE Made for, as well as worn by, Damon Dash Estimate £ 3 , 2 0 0 - 4 , 5 0 0 $ 5 ,1 0 0 -7, 2 0 0 €3,500-4,900 Ω 202 A Yellow Diamond and Yellow Gold ‘Roc-A-Fella’ Records Pendant. Designed as the ‘Roc-A-Fella’ Records logo, the pavé-set yellow diamond record-shaped plaque, enhanced by a scripted ‘R’, from a polished gold bail, mounted in 18K white gold, length 6 cm. PROVENANCE Made for, as well as worn by, Damon Dash Estimate £ 3 , 2 0 0 - 4 , 5 0 0 $ 5 ,1 0 0 -7, 2 0 0 € 3 , 5 0 0 - 4 , 9 0 0 Ω 203 A Yellow Diamond and White Gold ‘Roc-A-Fella’ Records Pendant. Designed as the ‘Roc-A-Fella’ Records logo, the pavé-set yellow diamond record-shaped plaque, enhanced by a scripted ‘R’, from a polished gold bail, mounted in 18K yellow gold, length 6 cm. PROVENANCE Made for, as well as worn by, Damon Dash Estimate £ 3 , 2 0 0 - 4 , 5 0 0 $ 5 ,1 0 0 -7, 2 0 0 € 3 , 5 0 0 - 4 , 9 0 0 Ω 158

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205

206

205 A Black Diamond and Diamond ‘DD’ Pendant. A pavé-set black diamond and diamond geometric plaque, depicting the initials ‘DD’  for Damon Dash, from a similarly designed bail, mounted in 18K white gold, length 9 cm. PROVENANCE Made for, as well as worn by, Damon Dash Estimate £ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 0 , 0 0 0 $ 1 2 , 8 0 0 -1 6 ,1 0 0 € 8 ,7 0 0 -1 0 , 9 0 0 Ω

206 A Black Diamond and Diamond ‘Roc-A-Fella’ Records Pendant. Designed as the ‘Roc-A-Fella’ Records logo, centering upon a spinning pavé-set black and colorless diamond record, enhanced by a scripted pavé-set diamond and black diamond ‘R’, from a pavé-set diamond bail, mounted in 18K white gold, length 9 cm. PROVENANCE Made for, as well as worn by, Damon Dash Estimate £ 9 , 5 0 0 -11, 0 0 0 $ 1 5 , 3 0 0 -17,7 0 0 € 1 0 , 4 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0 Ω

Photo of Damon Dash courtesy of Tiret New York

159

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207 A Diamond Cross Pendant-Ring. Designed as an asscher-cut diamond cross, trimmed by pavé-set yellow diamonds, from a similarly designed bail (detaches, and can be worn as a ring), mounted in platinum, length 10 cm PROVENANCE Made for, as well as worn by, Damon Dash Estimate £ 9 5 , 0 0 0 -1 2 5 , 0 0 0 $ 1 5 3 , 0 0 0 - 2 0 1, 0 0 0 € 1 0 4 , 0 0 0 -1 3 6 , 0 0 0 Ω 160

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208 A Multicolored Diamond Eye Patch. Of camouflage design, set with pavé-set colorless, pink, yellow, blue and black diamonds, to the similarly set flat curb-link chain, ending with triple black elastic band, length adjustable. In 1986, Slick Rick defined the ‘Bling Bling’ look with his fingers adorned with rings, a diamond and gold-capped tooth and a diamond eye patch. The diamond eye patch is still the favored signature of the artist.  This Multicolor Diamond Eye Patch was individually designed for Slick Rick by his wife Mandy for the artist’s 40th birthday in 2005. PROVENANCE Made for, as well as worn by, Slick Rick Estimate £1 8 , 0 0 0 - 2 5 , 0 0 0 $ 2 8 , 9 0 0 - 4 0 , 2 0 0 € 1 9 , 6 0 0 - 2 7, 3 0 0 Photo of Slick Rick courtesy of his wife, Mandy Walters 161

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210 209 GAVIN TURK b. 1967 Jackie Blue Elvis, from Faces portfolio, 2004. Screenprint in colors with diamond dust, on Somerset Satin paper. 100 x 70 cm. (39 3/8 x 27 1/2 in). Signed, titled and numbered on the reverse, published by Paul Stolper, London. This work is from an edition of 40. provenance British Council, Hiscox collection eXHIBITeD Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton Art Gallery, Pop Art: Now and Then, 16 February – 9 August 2008; Kristiansand, Norway, Galleri BI-Z, Peter Blake and Gavin Turk, September 2007; Asker, Norway, Galeri Trafo, Peter Blake and Gavin Turk, June 2007   Estimate £1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0 $ 1, 9 0 0 - 2 , 9 0 0 € 1, 3 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 ♠

210 SABRI The Legend (Elvis with his Guitar), 2007. Oil on canvas. 140 x 140 cm. (55 1/4 x 55 1/4 in). Signed and dated ‘SABRi 2007’ lower right. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 $ 4 , 8 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 € 3 , 3 0 0 - 5 , 5 0 0 ‡

162

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213

212

211 BIll RAy Elvis in Uniform, 1958. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 31.4 x 21.6 cm. (12 3/8 x 8 1/2 in). Signed and dated in ink in the margin. provenanc d directly from the artist Estimate £ 4 0 0 - 6 0 0 $ 5 5 0 - 9 6 0 € 4 4 0 - 6 5 0 Ω

213 HAGIT SHAHAl b. 1950 Elvis, 2007. Oil on canvas. 89 x 103 cm. (35 x 40 1/2 in). Signed and dated ‘H. Shahal 2007’ lower left. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 3 , 0 0 0 - 5 , 0 0 0 $ 4 , 8 0 0 - 8 , 0 0 0 €3,300-5,500

212 ROGER MARSHUTZ Elvis Presley, Mississippi-Alabama fair and dairy show, Tupelo, Mississippi, 26 September, 1956. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 32.1 x 47.3 cm. (12 5/8 x 18 5/8 in). Signed in pencil on the verso. provenance Celebrity Vault Gallery, Beverly Hills Estimate £ 8 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 $ 1, 3 0 0 -1, 9 0 0 € 8 7 0 -1, 3 0 0 Ω 163

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214

214 JONAS MEKAS b. 1922 Collection of 40 Film Stills: Elvis, 2008. Forty dye-destruction prints. Each 40.5 x 51.1 cm. (15 15/16 x 20 1/8 in). Each signed in ink on the verso. Number 2 from an edition 3 plus 1 artist’s proof. provenance Private collection of Giuseppe Cipriani Estimate £ 8 0 , 0 0 0 -1 2 0 , 0 0 0 $ 1 2 8 , 0 0 0 -1 9 3 , 0 0 0 € 8 7, 2 0 0 -1 3 1, 0 0 0 ‡

164

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Jonas Mekas carefully composes his work at a three-way intersection, in which music, film and photography meet. As a result, the work deftly references all three disciplines without compromising the integrity and idiosyncrasy of each one, allowing for a simultaneous occupation that is harmonious and cohesive. By taking advantage of the rapidly evolving technological devices within each field, Mekas addresses the likewise-evolving cultural permutations on both sides of the Atlantic. His work is consistently characterized by a balance of documentarian precision and personal narrative, whether covering construction workers peddling remnants of the Berlin Wall, or such cultural titans as John Lennon, Andy Warhol and Elvis. The latter example, presented in this lot, is comprised of 40 film stills that capture the energy, charisma, and swagger of the famed Pop icon as much as the sensitivity and avant-garde style of the renowned artist.

Mekas has represented his home country of Lithuania in the Venice Biennale, and his work has been exhibited at P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center, New York; Hirshorn Museum, Washington D.C.; Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne, Australia; and the American Museum of Moving Image. Since 2006, he has been honoured by the Los Angeles Film Critics Association, the Library of Congress National Film Registry, the Austrian Decoration of Honor for Science and Art, and the Baltic Cultural Achievement Award.

165

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215

217

216

217 verso

215 ALFRED WERTHEIMER b. 1930 A-Frame, March 17, 1956. Gelatin silver print, printed 1977. 29.8 x 21.1 cm. (11 3/4 x 8 5/16 in). Signed, titled, dated, annotated ‘Elvis, during the afternoon rehearsal of the Dorsey Brother’s “Stageshow”, awaits the director’s cue to sing “Heartbreak Hotel”. Scotty Moore, Elvis’s guitarist is to the right. CBS, Studio 50, NYC’ in pencil, copyright credit and reproduction limitation stamps on the verso. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 $ 3 , 2 0 0 - 4 , 8 0 0 € 2 , 2 0 0 - 3 , 3 0 0 216 ALFRED WERTHEIMER b. 1930 Kneeling at the Mosque, June 30, 1956. Gelatin silver print, printed 1972. 35.2 x 20.5 cm. (13 7/8 x 8 1/16 in). Signed in ink on the recto; signed, titled, dated, annotated ‘Elvis Presley in performance at the Mosque Theatre, Richmond, Virginia’ in pencil; copyright credit and reproduction limitation stamps on the verso. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 $ 3 , 2 0 0 - 4 , 8 0 0 € 2 , 2 0 0 - 3 , 3 0 0 217 ALFRED WERTHEIMER b. 1930 RCA Victor Studio One, July 2, 1956. Gelatin silver print, printed 1972. 35.2 x 23.2 cm. (13 7/8 x 9 1/8 in). Signed, titled, dated, annotated ‘Elvis belts out, “You ain’t nothin’ but a Hound Dog”, New York City -recording session’ in pencil, copyright credit and reproduction limitation stamps on the verso. provenance Private collection, United States Estimate £ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 $ 3 , 2 0 0 - 4 , 8 0 0 € 2 , 2 0 0 - 3 , 3 0 0 218 CHRIS STEELE-PERKINS b. 1947 Barry Ransome in The Castle, Old Kent Road, London from The Teds, 1976. Gelatin silver print, printed circa 1989. 56 x 37 cm. (22 x 14 1/2 in). Signed in pencil on the verso. provenance Magnum Photos, London literature W. W. Norton & Co., In Our Time: The World Seen by Magnum Photographers, 1989, p. 211; Traveling Light/ Exit, The Teds, 1979, n.p Estimate £ 2 , 0 0 0 - 3 , 0 0 0 $ 3 , 2 0 0 - 4 , 8 0 0 € 2 , 2 0 0 - 3 , 3 0 0 ♠

218 166

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22/10/09 14:23


219

220

221

222

223

219 ELLIoTT ERWITT b. 1928 Pablo Casals at home in San Juan, Puerto Rico, 1957. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 45.4 x 29.8 cm. (17 7/8 x 11 3/4 in). Signed in ink in the margin; signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. provenance Private collection, New York Estimate £ 9 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 $ 1, 4 0 0 -1, 9 0 0 € 9 8 0 -1, 3 0 0 Ω

222 buRT GLINN 1925-2008 Sammy Davis Jr., 1959. Gelatin silver print, printed 1990s. 55.2 x 37.5 cm. (21 3/4 x 14 3/4 in). provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0 $ 1, 9 0 0 - 2 , 9 0 0 € 1, 3 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 Ω 223 WILLIAM GoTTLIEb 1917-2006 Frank Sinatra, 1947. Gelatin silver print, printed 1990s. 33.2 x 26.5 cm. (13 1/16 x 10 7/16 in). Signed, titled and copyright in ink in the margin; signed, titled, copyright in ink and copyright credit reproduction limitation stamp on the verso. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 7 0 0 - 9 0 0 $ 1,1 0 0 -1, 4 0 0 € 7 6 0 - 9 8 0 Ω

220 ELLIoTT ERWITT b. 1928 Newport, Rhode Island, 1954 Gelatin silver print, printed later. 44.5 x 29.8 cm. (17 1/2 x 11 3/4 in). Signed in ink in the margin; signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. provenance Private collection, New York Estimate £ 9 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 $ 1, 4 0 0 -1, 9 0 0 € 9 8 0 -1, 3 0 0 Ω 221 ELLIoTT ERWITT b. 1928 Frank Sinatra and Mia Farrow, Truman Capote Black and White Ball, New York City, 1986. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 45.7 x 29.8 cm. (18 x 11 3/4 in). Signed in ink in the margin; signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. provenance Private collection, New York Estimate £ 9 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 $ 1, 4 0 0 -1, 9 0 0 € 9 8 0 -1, 3 0 0 Ω 167

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22/10/09 14:24


224

225

224 ARMAN 1928-2005 Viva Stradivarius; and Sans Titre, 1977. Two screenprints in colour, on Arches Grey paper. Each 75.6 x 55.2 cm. (29 3/4 x 21 3/4 in). Each signed and annotated ‘HC’ and ‘OK’ respectively in pencil (a hors commerce and right-to-print proof, the edition was 150 and 30 artist’s proofs), published by Jackie Fine Arts, New York. provenance Private collection, New York Estimate £ 7 0 0 - 9 0 0 $ 1,1 0 0 -1, 4 0 0 € 7 6 0 - 9 8 0 ‡

225 ARMAN 1928-2005 Squeezed Blue Fiddle; Orange and Grey Concerto; and Serenade, 1979. Three screenprints in colour, on Arches paper. Each 76.8 x 56.5 cm. (30 1/4 x 22 1/4 in). Each signed and titled in pencil, one annotated ‘Bon-a-tirer’ (the editions were 150 and 30 artist’s proofs), published by Jackie Fine Arts, New York. provenance Private collection, New York Estimate £ 9 0 0 -1, 2 0 0 $ 1, 4 0 0 -1, 9 0 0 € 9 8 0 -1, 3 0 0 ‡ 168

MUS_LOTSpart4V7-p144-172.indd 168

22/10/09 14:24


226

227

228

226 ARMAN 1928-2005 Repeating Violins, 1971. Silkscreen on canvas. 129 x 95.5 cm. (50 3/4 x 37 5/8 in). Signed ‘Arman’ lower right. provenance Private collection, Italy Estimate £ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0 $ 1 2 , 8 0 0 -1 9 , 3 0 0 € 8 ,7 0 0 -1 3 ,1 0 0

228 ARNoLD NEWMAN 1918-2006 Igor Stravinsky, New York City, 1946. Gelatin silver print, printed later. 28 x 35.6 cm. (11 x 14 in). Signed in pencil in the margin. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 3 , 5 0 0 - 4 , 5 0 0 $ 5 , 6 0 0 -7, 2 0 0 € 3 , 8 0 0 - 4 , 9 0 0 Ω

227 RICHARD HAMILToN b. 1922 La Scala Milano, 1968. Photo-etching and screen print with eight stencils on mould-made etching paper.  49.8 x 58.8 cm. (19 1/2 x 23 in). Signed ‘R. Hamilton’ lower left and numbered of 65. This work is from an edition of 65. provenance Petersbury Press, London Estimate £ 8 , 0 0 0 -1 2 , 0 0 0 $ 1 2 , 8 0 0 -1 9 , 3 0 0 € 8 ,7 0 0 -1 3 ,1 0 0 ♠ 169

MUS_LOTSpart4V7-p144-172.indd 169

22/10/09 14:25


229

229 SAM TAYLoR-WooD b. 1967 The Guitar Player, 2001. C-print in artist’s frame. 184 x 114 cm. (72 1/4 x 45 in). Numbered one from an edition of six and two artist’s proofs and accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £1 5 , 0 0 0 - 2 0 , 0 0 0 $ 2 4 ,1 0 0 - 3 2 ,1 0 0 € 1 6 , 4 0 0 - 2 1, 8 0 0 ♠

170

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22/10/09 14:25


230

230 SAM TAYLoR-WooD b. 1967 Mute, 2001. DVD projection. Duration: 6 minutes 42 seconds. Numbered one from an edition of three and accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity. This work depicts Edgaras Montvidas, a Lithuanian tenor then performing in the Vilar Young Artists program at the Royal Opera House. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £ 3 0 , 0 0 0 - 4 0 , 0 0 0 $ 4 8 , 2 0 0 - 6 4 , 2 0 0 € 3 2 ,7 0 0 - 4 3 , 6 0 0 ♠ © 2001 Sam Taylor-Wood. Sam Taylor-Wood retains the copyright and asserts her moral rights in relation to the lot. Please note that White Cube Gallery, as agent for Sam Taylor-Wood, strongly advises the successful bidder to enter into an agreement with White Cube concerning copyright on purchase of this lot. 171

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231

231 RICHARD ANSETT b. 1966 Boy Scouts, Lake Königsee, Bavaria, 2005. Archival pigment print. 50.8 x 41.3 cm. (20 x 16 1/4 in). Numbered 2/5 in pencil in the margin. Accompanied by a signed Certificate of Authenticity. provenance Acquired directly from the artist Estimate £1, 2 0 0 -1, 8 0 0 $ 1, 9 0 0 - 2 , 9 0 0 € 1, 3 0 0 - 2 , 0 0 0 † 172

MUS_LOTSpart4V7-p144-172.indd 172

22/10/09 14:25


music Lots 1 - 36

1 YoCHai matoS eSt £3,000 - £ 4,000

2 CandiCe breitz eSt £6,000 - 8,000

3 Helmut newton eSt £5,000 - 7,000

4 Helmut newton eSt £12,000 - 18,000

5 Helmut newton eSt £12,000 - 18,000

6 david laCHapelle eSt £20,000 - 30,000

7 GraHam HuGHeS eSt £10,000 - 15,000

8 neil KirK eSt £10,000 - 15,000

9 albert watSon eSt £3,000 - 5,000

10 anton CorbJin eSt £2,000 - 3,000

11 Helmut newton eSt £5,000 - 7,000

12 pHillip townSend eSt £600 - 800

13 pHillip townSend eSt £600 - 800

14 peter StronGwater eSt £600 - 800

15 peter StronGwater eSt £500 - 700

16 ruSSell YounG eSt £6,000 - 8,000

17 JeSuS diaz de vivar eSt £ 4,000 - 6,000

18 ronnie wood eSt £5,000 - 7,000

19 eSt £800 - 1,200

20 eSt £2,000 - 3,000

21 Joe Szabo eSt £1,200 - 1,800

22 Joe Szabo eSt £1,200 - 1,800

23 Claude GaSSian eSt £2,500 - 3,500

24 Claude GaSSian eSt £2,500 - 3,500

25 mario teStino eSt £25,000 - 35,000

26 peter lindberGH eSt £70,000 - 100,000

27 Hedi Slimane eSt £5,000 - 7,000

28 peter doHertY eSt £3,000 - 4,000

29 billY mCCartneY eSt £2,000 - 3,000

30 martin KippenberGer eSt £20,000 - 30,000

31 damien HirSt eSt £100,000 - 150,000

32 damien HirSt eSt £200,000 - 300,000

33 damien HirSt eSt £2,500 - 3,500

34 damien HirSt eSt £1,500 - 2,500

35 damien HirSt eSt £1,500 - 2,500

36 invader eSt £ 4,000 - 6,000

173

MUS_Index_p173-175.indd 173

22/10/09 14:22


music Lots 37 - 72

37 STANLEY DONWOOD EST £10,000 - 15,000

38 JILL FURMANOVSKY EST £6,000 - 8,000

39 WILLIE CAMDEN EST £600 - 800

40 WILLIE CAMDEN EST £2,500 - 3,500

41 PETER STRONGWATER EST £600 - 800

42 ANTON CORBJIN EST £5,000 - 7,000

43 NO LOT

4 4 NO LOT

45 NO LOT

46 MARC NEWSON EST £25,000 - 35,000

47 YANG MIAN EST £18,000 - 22,000

48 ANDY WARHOL EST £150,000 - 250,000

49 ANDY WARHOL EST £6,000 - 8,000

50 ANDY WARHOL EST £8,000 - 12,000

51 MICHAEL JACKSON EST £8,000 - 12,000

52 MICHAEL JACKSON EST £8,000 - 12,000

53 GIBSON GUITAR EST £20,000 - 30,000

54 ALE XANDER GLOBAL PRODUCTIONS EST £60 - 70

55 FERNANDEZ GUITAR COMPANY EST £3,000 - 4,000

56 MIKE LE MERDE EST £200 - 300

57 KIRKLAND JUE & DOZE GREEN EST £250 - 350

58 CLAES OLDENBERG EST £800 - 1,200

59 KEITH HARING EST £3,000 - 5,000

60 LIU YE EST £1,500 - 2,000

61 KENNY SCHARF EST £ 400 - 600

62 PETER BLAKE EST £6,000 - 8,000

63 PETER BLAKE EST £1,000 - 1,500

64 PETER SAVILLE EST £200 - 300

65 IAIN MACMILLAN EST £3,000 - 4,000

66 DAVID HURN EST £600 - 800

67 EST £600 - 800

68 BILL RAY EST £1,200 - 1,800

69 ROBERT WHITAKER EST £1,000 - 1,500

70 SIR PAUL MCCARTNEY EST £ 4,000 - 6,000

71 SIR PAUL MCCARTNEY EST £8,000 - 12,000

72 JOHN LENNON EST £10,000 - 15,000

174

MUS_Index_p173-175.indd 174

22/10/09 14:32


music Lots 73 - 108

73 est £6,000 - 8,000

74 est £300 - 500

75 sir Paul mccartney est £900 - 1,200

76 est £8,000 - 12,000

77 sir Paul mccartney est £60,000 - 80,000

78 est £ 40,000 - 60,000

79 PhilliP townsend est £600 - 800

80 PhilliP townsend est £600 - 800

81 shi xinning est £20,000 - 30,000

82 ethan russell est £3,000 - 5,000

83 robert whitaker est £1,000 - 1,500

84 bob gruen est £ 400 - 600

85 shePard fairey est £800 - 1,200

86 shePard fairey est £2,000 - 3,000

87 shePard fairey est £2,000 - 3,000

88 jim lambie est £5,000 - 7,000

89 dana schulz est £2,000 - 3,000

90 barnaby furnas est £2,000 - 3,000

91 christian marclay est £6,000 - 8,000

92 heiko blankenstein est £800 - 1,200

93 kurt cobain est £10,000 - 15,000

94 walter Pfeiffer est £3,000 - 5,000

95 tom sanford est £500 - 700

96 miles aldrige est £2,500 - 3,500

97 dean karr est £600 - 800

98 marilyn manson est £25,000 - 35,000

99 haPsash and the colured coat est £2,000 - 3,000

100 rick griffin est £300 - 500

101 milton glaser est £300 - 500

102 est £800 - 1,200

103 est £20,000 - 30,000

104 riceboy sleePs est £1,500 - 2,000

105 riceboy sleePs est £1,500 - 2,000

106 henry bertoia est £8,000 - 12,000

107 thilo oerke est £1,200 - 1,800

108 verner Panton est £800 - 1,200

175

MUS_Index_p173-175.indd 175

22/10/09 14:43


music Lots 109 - 145

109 ALBERTO DAL LAGO EsT £3,000 - 4,000

110 Rick GRiffin EsT £2,000 - 3,000

111 Rick GRiffin EsT £1,500 - 2,500

112 Rick GRiffin EsT £8,000 - 12,000

113 DAviD BOwiE EsT £3,000 - 4,000

114 Mick ROck EsT £1,000 - 2,000

115 Mick ROck EsT £1,000 - 2,000

116 Mick ROck EsT £1,000 - 2,000

117 Mick ROck EsT £1,500 - 2,500

118 PETER sTROnGwATER EsT £800 - 1,200

119 Mick ROck EsT £1,000 - 2,000

120 PiERRE BEnAin EsT £300 - 500

121 PiERRE BEnAin EsT £300 - 500

122 PiERRE BEnAin EsT £300 - 500

123 DEnnis MORRis EsT £7,000 - 9,000

124 GAvin TURk EsT £1,000 - 1,500

125 PAUL siMOnOn EsT £1,000 - 1,500 126 nO LOT

127 EsT £800 - 1,200

128 EsT £700 - 900

129 MALcOLM McLAREn EsT £2,500 - 3,500

130 THOMAs HiRscHHORn EsT £18,000 - 22,000

131 nick RHODEs EsT £2,000 - 3,000

132 nick RHODEs EsT £5,000 - 7,000

133 ADRiAn BOOT EsT £800 - 1,200

134 ADRiAn BOOT EsT £800 - 1,200

135 DEnnis MORRis EsT £ 4,000 - 6,000

136 BOB GRUEn EsT £300 - 500

137 BARRY HOLMEs EsT £600 - 800

138 JOEL BRODskY EsT £5,000 - 7,000

139 GLORiA sTAvERs EsT £700 - 900

140 EDMUnD TEskE EsT £500 - 700

141 EDMUnD TEskE EsT £500 - 700

142 EDMUnD TEskE EsT £500 - 700

143 RAnDY TUTEn EsT £2,000 - 3,000

14 4 JiM MORRisOn EsT £5,000 - 7,000

145 LinDA MccARTnEY EsT £500 - 700

176

MUS_Index_p176-177a.indd 176

22/10/09 16:05


music Lots 146 - 181

146 est £600 - 800

147 DAVe MULLeR est £ 4,000 - 6,000

148 COLIN JONes est £1,000 - 1,500

149 COLIN JONes est £1,000 - 1,500

150 JILL FURMANOVsKY est £800 - 1,200

151 MICK ROCK est £1,000 - 2,000

152 HAGIt sHAHAL est £3,000 - 5,000

153 MICK ROCK est £1,000 - 2,000

154 MICK ROCK est £1,000 - 2,000

155 MICK ROCK est £1,000 - 2,000

156 JOHN ILLsLeY est £2,000 - 2,500

157 MYKOLA MAtseNKO est £3,000 - 5,000

158 RUsseLL YOUNG est £5,000 - 7,000

159 seRVANe MARY est £3,000 - 4,000

160 seRVANe MARY est £1,800 - 2,800

161 RUsseLL YOUNG est £5,000 - 7,000

162 est £3,000 - 5,000

163 JeRRY sCHAtZBeRG est £2,000 - 3,000

164 JeRRY sCHAtZBeRG est £ 4,000 - 5,000

165 JOHN COHeN est £800 - 1,200

166 JOHN COHeN est £800 - 1,200

167 GODLIs est £700 - 900

168 est £8,000 - 12,000

169 eRWIN BLUMeNFeLD est £3,000 - 5,000

170 CLAUDe GAssIAN est £2,500 - 3,500

171 ROBeRt PAReNt est £800 - 1,200

172 CHUCK steWARt est £800 - 1,200

173 NO LOt

174 NO LOt

175 LIsette MODeL est £ 4,000 - 6,000

176 LIsette MODeL est £ 4,000 - 6,000

177 Lee FRIeDLANDeR est £12,000 - 18,000

178 WILLIAM CLAXtON est £1,200 - 1,800

179 WILLIAM CLAXtON est £800 - 1,200

180 LINDA MCCARtNeY est £500 - 700

181 WILLIAM GOttLeIB est £700 - 900

177

MUS_Index_p176-177a.indd 177

22/10/09 16:14


music Lots 182 - 217

182 DAVID BOWIE EST £200 - 300

183 DENNIS STOCK EST £1,200 - 1,800

184 DENNIS STOCK EST £1,200 - 1,800

185 GUY LE QUERREC EST £2,000 - 3,000

186 HAROLD CHAPMAN EST £2,500 - 3,500

187 MOBY EST £1,200 - 1,800

188 MARIUS W. HANSEN EST £1,000 - £2,000

189 DAVID LACHAPELLE EST £20,000 - 30,000

190 LAWRENCE WATSON EST £1,200 - 1,800

191 LAWRENCE WATSON EST £1,200 - 1,800

192 LAWRENCE WATSON EST £1,200 - 1,800

193 JAMES PEARSON HOWES EST £600 - 800

194 MICKALENE THOMAS EST £10,000 - 15,000

195 JOHANNES WOHNSEIFER EST £7,000 - 9,000

196 VITAL TOYS EST £30 - 40

197 VITAL TOYS EST £30 - 40

198 RUT BLEES LUXEMBURG EST £3,500 - 4,500

199 ALEXANDER MELAMID EST £30,000 - 50,000

200 EST £3,200 - 4,500

201 EST £3,200 - 4,500

202 EST £3,200 - 4,500

203 EST £3,200 - 4,500

204 DAVID BLING EST £350 - 500

205 EST £8,000 - 10,000

206 EST £9,500 - 11,000

207 EST £95,000 - 125,000

208 EST £18,000 - 25,000

209 GAVIN TURK EST £1,200 - 1,800

210 SABRI EST £3,000 - £5,000

211 BILL RAY EST £400 - 600

212 ROGER MARSHUTZ EST £800 - 1,200

213 HAGIT SHAHAL EST £3,000 - 5,000

214 JONAS MEKAS EST £80,000 - 120,000

215 ALFRED WERTHEIMER EST £2,000 - 3,000

216 ALFRED WERTHEIMER EST £2,000 - 3,000

217 ALFRED WERTHEIMER EST £2,000 - 3,000

178

MUS_Index_p178-179.indd 178

22/10/09 16:25


music Lots 218 - 231

218 CHRIS STEELE-PERKINS EST £2,000 - 3,000

219 ELLIOTT ERWITT EST £900 - 1,200

220 ELLIOTT ERWITT EST £900 - 1,200

221 ELLIOTT ERWITT EST £900 - 1,200

222 BURT GLINN EST £1,200 - £1,800

223 WILLIAM GOTTLEIB EST £700 - £900

224 ARMAN EST £700 - 900

225 ARMAN EST £900 - 1,200

226 ARMAN EST £8,000 - 12,000

227 RICHARD HAMILTON EST £8,000 - 12,000

228 ARNOLD NEWMAN EST £3,500 - £4,500

229 SAM TAYLOR - WOOD EST £15,000 - £20,000

230 SAM TAYLOR - WOOD EST £30,000 - 40,000

231 RICHARD ANSETT EST £1,200 - 1,800

179

MUS_Index_p178-179.indd 179

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GUIDE FOR PROSPECTIVE BUYERS BUYInG aT aUCTIOn The following pages are designed to offer you information on how to buy at auction at Phillips de Pury & Company. Our staff will be happy to assist you. COnDITIOnS OF SalE The Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty which appear later in this catalogue govern the auction. Bidders are strongly encouraged to read them as they outline the legal relationship among Phillips, the seller and the buyer and describe the terms upon which property is bought at auction. Please be advised that Phillips de Pury & Company generally acts as agent for the seller. BUYER’S PREmIUm Phillips de Pury & Company charges the successful bidder a commission, or buyer’s premium, on the hammer price of each lot sold. The buyer’s premium is payable by the buyer as part of the total purchase price at the following rates: 25% of the hammer price up to and including £25,000, 20% of the portion of the hammer price above £25,000 up to and including £500,000 and 12% of the portion of the hammer price above £500,000. VaT Value added tax (VAT) may be payable on the hammer price and/or the buyer’s premium. The buyer’s premium may attract a charge in lieu of VAT. Please read carefully the “VAT AND OTHER TAX INFORMATION FOR BUYERS” in this catalogue.

1 PRIOR TO aUCTIOn Catalogue Subscriptions If you would like to purchase a catalogue for this auction or any other Phillips de Pury & Company sale, please contact us at +44 20 7318 4010 or +1 212 940 1240. Pre-Sale Estimates Pre-Sale estimates are intended as a guide for prospective buyers. Any bid within the high and low estimate range should, in our opinion, offer a chance of success. However, many lots achieve prices below or above the pre-sale estimates. Where “Estimate on Request” appears, please contact the specialist department for further information. It is advisable to contact us closer to the time of the auction as estimates can be subject to revision. Pre-sale estimates do not include the buyer’s premium or VAT. Pre-Sale Estimates in US Dollars and Euros Although the sale is conducted in pounds sterling, the presale estimates in the auction catalogues may also be printed in US dollars and/or euros. Since the exchange rate is that at the time of catalogue production and not at the date of auction, you should treat estimates in US dollars or euros as a guide only. Catalogue Entries Phillips may print in the catalogue entry the history of ownership of a work of art, as well as the exhibition history of the property and references to the work in art publications. While we are careful in the cataloguing process, provenance, exhibition and literature references may not be exhaustive and in some cases we may intentionally refrain from disclosing the identity of previous owners. Please note that all dimensions of the property set forth in the catalogue entry are approximate. Condition of lots Our catalogues include references to condition only in the descriptions of multiple works (e.g., prints). Such references, though, do not amount to a full description of condition. The absence of reference to the condition of a lot in the catalogue entry does not imply that the lot is free from faults or imperfections. Solely as a convenience to clients, Phillips de Pury & Company may provide condition reports. In preparing such reports, our specialists assess the condition in a manner appropriate to the estimated value of the property and the nature of the auction in which it is included. While condition reports are prepared honestly and carefully, our staff are not professional restorers or trained conservators. We therefore encourage all prospective buyers to inspect the property at the pre-sale exhibitions and recommend, particularly in the case of any lot of significant value, that you retain your own restorer or professional advisor to report to you on the property’s condition prior to bidding. Any prospective buyer of photographs or prints should always request a condition report because all such property is sold unframed, unless otherwise indicated in the condition report. If a lot is sold framed, Phillips de Pury & Company accepts no liability for the condition of the frame. If we sell any lot unframed, we will be pleased to refer the purchaser to a professional framer.

Pre-auction Viewing Pre-auction viewings are open to the public and free of charge. Our specialists are available to give advice and condition reports at viewings or by appointment. Electrical and mechanical lots All lots with electrical and/or mechanical features are sold on the basis of their decorative value only and should not be assumed to be operative. It is essential that, prior to any intended use, the electrical system is verified and approved by a qualified electrician. Symbol Key The following key explains the symbols you may see inside this catalogue. O Guaranteed Property The seller of lots with this symbol has been guaranteed a minimum price. The guarantee may be provided by Phillips de Pury & Company, by a third party or jointly by us and a third party. Phillips de Pury & Company and third parties providing or participating in a guarantee may benefit financially if a guaranteed lot is sold successfully and may incur a loss if the sale is not successful.

∆ Property in Which Phillips de Pury & Company Has an Ownership Interest Lots with this symbol indicate that Phillips de Pury & Company owns the lot in whole or in part or has an economic interest in the lot equivalent to an ownership interest.

no Reserve Unless indicated by a , all lots in this catalogue are offered subject to a reserve. A reserve is the confidential value established between Phillips de Pury & Company and the seller and below which a lot may not be sold. The reserve for each lot is generally set at a percentage of the low estimate and will not exceed the low pre-sale estimate.

♠ Property Subject to the artist’s Resale Right Lots marked with ♠ are subject to the Artist’s Resale Right calculated as a percentage of the hammer price and payable as part of the purchase price as follows: Portion of the Hammer Price (in EUR) From 1,000 to 50,000 From 50,001 to 200,000 From 200,001 to 350,000 From 350,001 to 500,000 Exceeding 500,000

Royalty Rate 4% 3% 1% 0.5% 0.25%

The Artist’s Resale Right applies where the hammer price is EUR 1,000 or more, subject to a maximum royalty per lot of EUR 12,500. Calculation of the Artist’s Resale Right will be based on the pounds sterling/euro reference exchange rate quoted on the date of the sale by the European Central Bank.

†, § , ‡ , or Ω Property Subject to VaT Please refer to the section entitled “VAT AND OTHER TAX INFORMATION FOR BUYERS” in this catalogue for additional information. 2 BIDDInG In THE SalE Bidding at auction Bids may be executed during the auction in person by paddle or by telephone or prior to the sale in writing by absentee bid. Proof of identity in the form of government issued identification will be required, as will an original signature. We may also require that you furnish us with a bank reference. Bidding in Person To bid in person, you will need to register for and collect a paddle before the auction begins. New clients are encouraged to register at least 48 hours in advance of a sale to allow sufficient time for us to process your information. All lots sold will be invoiced to the name and address to which the paddle has been registered and invoices cannot be transferred to other names and addresses. Please do not misplace your paddle. In the event you lose it, inform a Phillips de Pury & Company staff member immediately. At the end of the auction, please return your paddle to the registration desk. Bidding by Telephone If you cannot attend the auction, you may bid live on the telephone with one of our multi-lingual staff members. This service must be arranged at least 24 hours in advance of the sale and is available for lots whose low pre-sale estimate is at least £500. Telephone bids may be recorded. By bidding on the telephone, you consent to the recording of your conversation. We suggest that you leave a maximum bid, excluding the buyer’s premium and VAT, which we can execute on your behalf in the event we are unable to reach you by telephone.

by telephone, Phillips de Pury & Company will be happy to execute written bids on your behalf. A bidding form can be found at the back of this catalogue. This service is free and confidential. Bids must be placed in the currency of the sale. Our staff will attempt to execute an absentee bid at the lowest possible price taking into account the reserve and other bidders. Always indicate a maximum bid, excluding the buyer’s premium and VAT. Unlimited bids will not be accepted. Any absentee bid must be received at least 24 hours in advance of the sale. In the event of identical bids, the earliest bid received will take precedence. Employee Bidding Employees of Phillips de Pury & Company and our affiliated companies, including the auctioneer, may bid at the auction by placing absentee bids so long as they do not know the reserve when submitting their absentee bids and otherwise comply with our employee bidding procedures. Bidding Increments Bidding generally opens below the low estimate and advances in increments of up to 10%, subject to the auctioneer’s discretion. Absentee bids that do not conform to the increments set below may be lowered to the next bidding increment. UK£50 to UK£1,000 UK£1,000 to UK£2,000 UK£2,000 to UK£3,000 UK£3,000 to UK£5,000 UK£5,000 to UK£10,000 UK£10,000 to UK£20,000 UK£20,000 to UK£30,000 UK£30,000 to UK£50,000 UK£50,000 to UK£100,000 UK£100,000 to UK£200,000 above UK£200,000

by UK£50s by UK£100s by UK£200s by UK£200s, 500, 800 (i.e. UK£4,200, 4,500, 4,800) by UK£500s by UK£1,000s by UK£2,000s by UK£2,000s, 5,000, 8,000 by UK£5,000s by UK£10,000s auctioneer’s discretion

The auctioneer may vary the increments during the course of the auction at his or her own discretion. 3 THE aUCTIOn Conditions of Sale As noted above, the auction is governed by the Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty. All prospective bidders should read them carefully. They may be amended by saleroom addendum or auctioneer’s announcement. Interested Parties announcement In situations where a person allowed to bid on a lot has a direct or indirect interest in such lot, such as the beneficiary or executor of an estate selling the lot, a joint owner of the lot or a party providing or participating in a guarantee on the lot, Phillips de Pury & Company will make an announcement in the saleroom that interested parties may bid on the lot. Consecutive and Responsive Bidding The auctioneer may open the bidding on any lot by placing a bid on behalf of the seller. The auctioneer may further bid on behalf of the seller up to the amount of the reserve by placing consecutive bids or bids in response to other bidders. 4 aFTER THE aUCTIOn Payment Buyers are required to pay for purchases immediately following the auction unless other arrangements are agreed with Phillips de Pury & Company in writing in advance of the sale. Payments must be made in pounds sterling either by cash, cheque drawn on a UK bank or wire transfer, as noted in Paragraph 6 of the Conditions of Sale. It is our corporate policy not to make or accept single or multiple payments in cash or cash equivalents in excess of the local currency equivalent of US$10,000.

Credit Cards As a courtesy to clients, Phillips de Pury & Company will accept Visa, Mastercard and UK-issued debit cards to pay for invoices of £50,000 or less. A processing fee will apply. Collection It is our policy to request proof of identity on collection of a lot. A lot will be released to the buyer or the buyer’s authorized representative when Phillips de Pury & Company has received full and cleared payment and we are not owed any other amount by the buyer. Promptly after the auction, we will transfer all lots to a third party storage facility and will so advise all buyers. If you are in doubt about the location of your purchase, please contact the Shipping Department prior to arranging collection. We will levy removal, interest, storage and handling charges on uncollected lots.

absentee Bids If you are unable to attend the auction and cannot participate

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ARNE QUINZE

Africa Electronica

EXHIBITIOn 26 NOVEMBER - 20 DECEMBER 2009 lOnDOn

Phillips de Pury & Company Howick Place London SW1P 1BB Enquiries +44 20 7318 4010 Catalogues +44 20 7318 4039 www.phillipsdepury.com

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loss or Damage Buyers are reminded that Phillips de Pury & Company accepts liability for loss or damage to lots for a maximum of five days following the auction. Transport and Shipping As a free service for buyers, Phillips de Pury & Company will wrap purchased lots for hand carry only. We do not provide packing, handling or shipping services directly. However, we will coordinate with shipping agents instructed by you in order to facilitate the packing, handling and shipping of property purchased at Phillips de Pury & Company. Please refer to Paragraph 7 of the Conditions of Sale for more information.

Department on the day of the sale, and the property will be re-invoiced showing no VAT on the hammer price. 4 PROPERTY SOlD WITH a ‡ OR Ω SYmBOl These lots have been imported from outside the EU to be sold at auction under temporary importation. Property subject to temporary importation will be offered under the Auctioneer’s Margin Scheme and will be subject to import VAT of either 5% or 15% on the hammer price and an amount in lieu of VAT at 15% on the buyer’s premium. Anyone who wishes to buy outside the Auctioneer’s Margin Scheme should notify the Client Accounting Department before the sale.

Export and Import licenses Before bidding for any property, prospective bidders are advised to make independent enquiries as to whether a license is required to export the property from the United Kingdom or to import it into another country. It is the buyer’s sole responsibility to comply with all import and export laws and to obtain any necessary licenses or permits. The denial of any required license or permit or any delay in obtaining such documentation will not justify the cancellation of the sale or any delay in making full payment for the lot.

5 EXPORTS FROm THE EUROPEan UnIOn The following types of VAT may be cancelled or refunded by Phillips de Pury & Company on exports made within three months of the sale date if strict conditions are met:

Endangered Species Items made of or incorporating plant or animal material, such as coral, crocodile, ivory, whalebone, rhinoceros horn or tortoiseshell, irrespective of age, percentage or value, may require a license or certificate prior to exportation and additional licenses or certificates upon importation to any country outside the European Union (EU). Please note that the ability to obtain an export license or certificate does not ensure the ability to obtain an import license or certificate in another country, and vice versa. We suggest that prospective bidders check with their own government regarding wildlife import requirements prior to placing a bid. It is the buyer’s sole responsibility to obtain any necessary export or import licenses or certificates as well as any other required documentation. The denial of any required license or certificate or any delay in obtaining such documentation will not justify the cancellation of the sale or any delay in making full payment for the lot.

VaT anD OTHER TaX InFORmaTIOn FOR BUYERS The following paragraphs provide general information to buyers on the VAT and certain other potential tax implications of purchasing property at Phillips de Pury & Company. This information is not intended to be complete. In all cases, the relevant tax legislation takes precedence, and the VAT rates in effect on the day of the auction will be the rates charged. It should be noted that, for VAT purposes only, Phillips de Pury & Company is not usually treated as agent and most property is sold as if it is the property of Phillips de Pury & Company. In the following paragraphs, reference to VAT symbols shall mean those symbols located beside the lot number or the pre-sale estimates in the catalogue (or amending saleroom addendum). 1 PROPERTY WITH nO VaT SYmBOl Where there is no VAT symbol, Phillips de Pury & Company is able to use the Auctioneer’s Margin Scheme, and VAT will not normally be charged on the hammer price. Phillips de Pury & Company must bear VAT on the buyer’s premium. Therefore, we will charge an amount in lieu of VAT at 15% on the buyer’s premium. This amount will form part of the buyer’s premium on our invoice and will not be separately identified. 2 PROPERTY WITH a † SYmBOl These lots will be sold under the normal UK VAT rules, and VAT will be charged at 15% on both the hammer price and buyer’s premium. 3 PROPERTY WITH a § SYmBOl Lots sold to buyers whose registered address is in the EU will be assumed to be remaining in the EU. The property will be invoiced as if it had no VAT symbol. However, if an EU buyer advises us that the property is to be exported from the EU, Phillips de Pury & Company will re-invoice the property under the normal VAT rules. Lots sold to buyers whose address is outside the EU will be assumed to be exported from the EU. The property will be invoiced under the normal VAT rules. Although the hammer price will be subject to VAT, the VAT will be canceled or refunded upon export. The buyer’s premium will always bear VAT. However, buyers who are not intending to export their property from the EU should notify our Client Accounting

‡ = 5%

Ω = 15%

• The amount in lieu of VAT charged on the buyer’s premium for property sold under the Auctioneer’s Margin Scheme (i.e., without a VAT symbol). • The VAT on the hammer price for property sold under the normal VAT rules (i.e., with a † or a § symbol). • The import VAT charged on the hammer price and buyer’s premium for property sold under temporary importation (i.e., with a ‡ or a Ω symbol). In each of the above examples, where the appropriate conditions are satisfied, no VAT will be charged if, at or before the time of invoicing, the buyer instructs Phillips de Pury & Company to export the property from the EU. If such instruction is received after payment, a refund of the VAT amount will be made.

Where the buyer carries purchases from the EU personally or uses the services of a third party, Phillips de Pury & Company will charge the VAT amount due as a deposit and refund it if the lot has been exported within three months of the date of sale and the following conditions are met: • For lots sold under the Auctioneer’s Margin Scheme or the normal VAT rules, Phillips de Pury & Company is provided with appropriate documentary proof of export from the EU. Buyers carrying their own property should obtain handcarry papers from the Shipping Department to facilitate this process; or • For lots sold under temporary importation, Phillips de Pury & Company is provided with a copy of the correct paperwork duly completed and stamped by HM Revenue and Customs which shows the property has been exported from the EU via the UK. It is essential for shippers acting on behalf of buyers to collect copies of original import papers from our Shipping Department. HM Revenue and Customs insist that the correct customs procedures are followed and Phillips de Pury & Company will not be able to issue any refunds where the export documents do not exactly comply with governmental regulations. Property subject to temporary importation must be transferred to another customs procedure immediately if any restoration or repair work is to be carried out. Buyers carrying their own property must obtain hand-carry papers from the Shipping Department, for which a charge of £20 will be made. The VAT refund will be processed once the appropriate paperwork has been returned to Phillips de Pury & Company. Phillips de Pury & Company is not able to cancel or refund any VAT charged on sales made to UK or EU private residents unless the lot is subject to temporary importation and the property is exported from the EU within three months of the sale date. Any refund of VAT is subject to a minimum of £50 per shipment and a processing charge of £20. Buyers intending to export, repair, restore or alter lots under temporary importation should notify the Shipping Department before collection. Failure to do so may result in the import VAT becoming payable immediately and Phillips de Pury & Company being unable to refund the VAT charged on deposit. 6 VaT REFUnDS FROm Hm REVEnUE anD CUSTOmS Where VAT charged cannot be cancelled or refunded by Phillips de Pury & Company, it may be possible to seek repayment from HM Revenue and Customs. Repayments in this manner are limited to businesses located outside the

UK and may be considered for: • VAT charged on the buyer’s premium on property sold under the normal VAT rules. • Import VAT charged on the hammer price and buyer’s premium for lots sold under temporary importation. Claim forms are available from: HM Revenue and Customs VAT Overseas Repayment Section P.O. Box 34, Foyle House, Duncreggan Road, Londonderry Northern Ireland BT48 7AE Tel +44 28 7130 5100 Fax +44 28 7130 5101 7 SalES anD USE TaXES Buyers from outside the UK should note that local sales taxes or use taxes may become payable upon import of lots following purchase. Buyers should consult their own tax advisors.

COnDITIOnS OF SalE The Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty set forth below govern the relationship between bidders and buyers, on the one hand, and Phillips de Pury & Company and sellers, on the other hand. All prospective buyers should read these Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty carefully before bidding. 1 InTRODUCTIOn Each lot in this catalogue is offered for sale and sold subject to: (a) the Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty; (b) additional notices and terms printed in other places in this catalogue, including the Guide for Prospective Buyers, and (c) supplements to this catalogue or other written material posted by Phillips de Pury & Company in the saleroom, in each case as amended by any addendum or announcement by the auctioneer prior to the auction. By bidding at the auction, whether in person, through an agent, by written bid, by telephone bid or other means, bidders and buyers agree to be bound by these Conditions of Sale, as so changed or supplemented, and Authorship Warranty. These Conditions of Sale, as so changed or supplemented, and Authorship Warranty contain all the terms on which Phillips de Pury & Company and the seller contract with the buyer. 2 PHIllIPS de PURY & COmPanY aS aGEnT Phillips de Pury & Company acts as an agent for the seller, unless otherwise indicated in this catalogue or at the time of auction. On occasion, Phillips de Pury & Company may own a lot, in which case we will act in a principal capacity as a consignor, or may have a legal, beneficial or financial interest in a lot as a secured creditor or otherwise. 3 CaTalOGUE DESCRIPTIOnS anD COnDITIOn OF PROPERTY Lots are sold subject to the Authorship Warranty, as described in the catalogue (unless such description is changed or supplemented, as provided in Paragraph 1 above) and in the condition that they are in at the time of the sale on the following basis. (a) The knowledge of Phillips de Pury & Company in relation to each lot is partially dependent on information provided to us by the seller, and Phillips de Pury & Company is not able to and does not carry out exhaustive due diligence on each lot. Prospective buyers acknowledge this fact and accept responsibility for carrying out inspections and investigations to satisfy themselves as to the lots in which they may be interested. Notwithstanding the foregoing, we shall exercise such reasonable care when making express statements in catalogue descriptions or condition reports as is consistent with our role as auctioneer of lots in this sale and in light of (i) the information provided to us by the seller, (ii) scholarship and technical knowledge and (iii) the generally accepted opinions of relevant experts, in each case at the time any such express statement is made. (b) Each lot offered for sale at Phillips de Pury & Company is available for inspection by prospective buyers prior to the auction. Phillips de Pury & Company accepts bids on lots on the basis that bidders (and independent experts on their behalf, to the extent appropriate given the nature and value of the lot and the bidder’s own expertise) have fully inspected the lot prior to bidding and have satisfied themselves as to both the condition of the lot and the accuracy of its description.

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(c) Prospective buyers acknowledge that many lots are of an age and type which means that they are not in perfect condition. As a courtesy to clients, Phillips de Pury & Company may prepare and provide condition reports to assist prospective buyers when they are inspecting lots. Catalogue descriptions and condition reports may make reference to particular imperfections of a lot, but bidders should note that lots may have other faults not expressly referred to in the catalogue or condition report. All dimensions are approximate. Illustrations are for identification purposes only and cannot be used as precise indications of size or to convey full information as to the actual condition of lots.

(b)The auctioneer has discretion at any time to refuse any bid, withdraw any lot, re-offer a lot for sale (including after the fall of the hammer) if he or she believes there may be error or dispute and take such other action as he or she deems reasonably appropriate.

(d) Information provided to prospective buyers in respect of any lot, including any pre-sale estimate, whether written or oral, and information in any catalogue, condition or other report, commentary or valuation, is not a representation of fact but rather a statement of opinion held by Phillips de Pury & Company. Any pre-sale estimate may not be relied on as a prediction of the selling price or value of the lot and may be revised from time to time by Phillips de Pury & Company in our absolute discretion. Neither Phillips de Pury & Company nor any of our affiliated companies shall be liable for any difference between the pre-sale estimates for any lot and the actual price achieved at auction or upon resale.

(d) The sale will be conducted in pounds sterling and payment is due in pounds sterling. For the benefit of international clients, pre-sale estimates in the auction catalogue may be shown in US dollars and/or euros and, if so, will reflect approximate exchange rates. Accordingly, estimates in US dollars or euros should be treated only as a guide.

4 BIDDInG aT aUCTIOn (a) Phillips de Pury & Company has absolute discretion to refuse admission to the auction or participation in the sale. All bidders must register for a paddle prior to bidding, supplying such information and references as required by Phillips de Pury & Company. (b) As a convenience to bidders who cannot attend the auction in person, Phillips de Pury & Company may, if so instructed by the bidder, execute written absentee bids on a bidder’s behalf. Absentee bidders are required to submit bids on the “Absentee Bid Form,” a copy of which is printed in this catalogue or otherwise available from Phillips de Pury & Company. Bids must be placed in the currency of the sale. The bidder must clearly indicate the maximum amount he or she intends to bid, excluding the buyer’s premium and value added tax (VAT). The auctioneer will not accept an instruction to execute an absentee bid which does not indicate such maximum bid. Our staff will attempt to execute an absentee bid at the lowest possible price taking into account the reserve and other bidders. Any absentee bid must be received at least 24 hours in advance of the sale. In the event of identical bids, the earliest bid received will take precedence. (c) Telephone bidders are required to submit bids on the “Telephone Bid Form,” a copy of which is printed in this catalogue or otherwise available from Phillips de Pury & Company. Telephone bidding is available for lots whose low pre-sale estimate is at least £500. Phillips de Pury & Company reserves the right to require written confirmation of a successful bid from a telephone bidder by fax or otherwise immediately after such bid is accepted by the auctioneer. Telephone bids may be recorded and, by bidding on the telephone, a bidder consents to the recording of the conversation. (d) When making a bid, whether in person, by absentee bid or on the telephone, a bidder accepts personal liability to pay the purchase price, as described more fully in Paragraph 6 (a) below, plus all other applicable charges unless it has been explicitly agreed in writing with Phillips de Pury & Company before the commencement of the auction that the bidder is acting as agent on behalf of an identified third party acceptable to Phillips de Pury & Company and that we will only look to the principal for such payment. (e) Arranging absentee and telephone bids is a free service provided by Phillips de Pury & Company to prospective buyers. While we undertake to exercise reasonable care in undertaking such activity, we cannot accept liability for failure to execute such bids except where such failure is caused by our willful misconduct. (f) Employees of Phillips de Pury & Company and our affiliated companies, including the auctioneer, may bid at the auction by placing absentee bids so long as they do not know the reserve when submitting their absentee bids and otherwise comply with our employee bidding procedures. 5 Conduct of the auction (a) Unless otherwise indicated by the symbol • each lot is offered subject to a reserve, which is the confidential minimum selling price agreed by Phillips de Pury & Company with the seller. The reserve will not exceed the low pre-sale estimate at the time of the auction.

(c) The auctioneer will commence and advance the bidding at levels and in increments he or she considers appropriate. In order to protect the reserve on any lot, the auctioneer may place one or more bids on behalf of the seller up to the reserve without indicating he or she is doing so, either by placing consecutive bids or bids in response to other bidders.

(e) Subject to the auctioneer’s reasonable discretion, the highest bidder accepted by the auctioneer will be the buyer and the striking of the hammer marks the acceptance of the highest bid and the conclusion of a contract for sale between the seller and the buyer. Risk and responsibility for the lot passes to the buyer as set forth in Paragraph 7 below. (f) If a lot is not sold, the auctioneer will announce that it has been “passed,” “withdrawn,” “returned to owner” or “boughtin.” (g) Any post-auction sale of lots offered at auction shall incorporate these Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty as if sold in the auction. 6 PURCHaSE PRICE anD PaYmEnT (a) The buyer agrees to pay us, in addition to the hammer price of the lot, the buyer’s premium, plus any applicable value added tax (VAT) and any applicable resale royalty (the “Purchase Price”). The buyer’s premium is 25% of the hammer price up to and including £25,000, 20% of the portion of the hammer price above £25,000 up to and including £500,000 and 12% of the portion of the hammer price above £500,000. (b) VAT is payable in accordance with applicable law. All prices, fees, charges and expenses set out in these Conditions of Sale are quoted exclusive of VAT. (c) If the Artist’s Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to the lot, the buyer agrees to pay to us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those regulations and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist’s collection agent. Lots subject to the Artist’s Resale Right are identified with the symbol ♠ next to the lot number. (d) Unless otherwise agreed, a buyer is required to pay for a purchased lot immediately following the auction regardless of any intention to obtain an export or import license or other permit for such lot. Payments must be made by the invoiced party in pounds sterling either by cash, cheque drawn on a UK bank or wire transfer, as follows: (i) Phillips de Pury & Company will accept payment in cash provided that the total amount paid in cash or cash equivalents does not exceed the local currency equivalent of US$10,000. (ii) Personal cheques and banker’s drafts are accepted if drawn on a UK bank and the buyer provides to us acceptable government issued identification. Cheques and banker’s drafts should be made payable to “PDEPL LTD.” If payment is sent by post, please send the cheque or banker’s draft to the attention of the Client Accounting Department at Howick Place, London SW1P 1BB and ensure that the sale number is written on the cheque. Cheques or banker’s drafts drawn by third parties will not be accepted. (iii) Payment by wire transfer may be sent directly to Phillips de Pury & Company. Bank transfer details: Bank of Scotland Gordon Street, Glasgow G1 3RS. SWIFT BIC: BOFSGB21138 Sort code: 80-54-01 IBAN: GB36BOFS 8054 0100 4407 80 For the account of PDEPL LTD Account no.: 00440780 (e) As a courtesy to clients, Phillips de Pury & Company will accept Visa, Mastercard and UK-issued debit cards to pay for invoices of £50,000 or less. A processing fee will apply.

(f) Title in a purchased lot will not pass until Phillips de Pury & Company has received the Purchase Price for that lot in cleared funds. Phillips de Pury & Company is not obliged to release a lot to the buyer until title in the lot has passed and appropriate identification has been provided, and any earlier release does not affect the passing of title or the buyer’s unconditional obligation to pay the Purchase Price. 7 COllECTIOn OF PROPERTY (a) Phillips de Pury & Company will not release a lot to the buyer until we have received payment of its Purchase Price in full in cleared funds, the buyer has paid all outstanding amounts due to Phillips de Pury & Company or any of our affiliated companies, including any charges payable pursuant to Paragraph 8 (a) below, and the buyer has satisfied such other terms as we in our sole discretion shall require, including completing any anti-money laundering or antiterrorism financing checks. As soon as a buyer has satisfied all of the foregoing conditions, he or she should contact us at +44 (0) 207 318 4081 or +44 (0) 207 318 4082 to arrange for collection of purchased property. (b) The buyer must arrange for collection of a purchased lot within five days of the date of the auction. Promptly after the auction, we will transfer the purchased lot to a third party storage facility and will so advise the buyer. Purchased lots are at the buyer’s risk, including the responsibility for insurance, from the earlier to occur of (i) the date of collection or (ii) five days after the auction. Until risk passes, Phillips de Pury & Company will compensate the buyer for any loss or damage to a purchased lot up to a maximum of the Purchase Price paid, subject to our usual exclusions for loss or damage to property. (c) As a courtesy to clients, Phillips de Pury & Company will, without charge, wrap purchased lots for hand carry only. We do not provide packing, handling, insurance or shipping services. We will coordinate with shipping agents instructed by the buyer, whether or not recommended by Phillips de Pury & Company, in order to facilitate the packing, handling, insurance and shipping of property bought at Phillips de Pury & Company. Any such instruction is entirely at the buyer’s risk and responsibility, and we will not be liable for acts or omissions of third party packers or shippers. (d) Phillips de Pury & Company will require presentation of government issued identification prior to release of a lot to the buyer or the buyer’s authorized representative. 8 FaIlURE TO COllECT PURCHaSES (a) If the buyer pays the Purchase Price but fails to collect a purchased lot within 30 days of the auction, the buyer will incur a late collection fee of £25, storage charges of £3 per day and pro rated insurance charges of .1% of the Purchase Price per month on each uncollected lot. (b) If a purchased lot is paid for but not collected within six months of the auction, the buyer authorizes Phillips de Pury & Company, upon notice, to arrange a resale of the item by auction or private sale, with estimates and a reserve set at Phillips de Pury & Company’s reasonable discretion. The proceeds of such sale will be applied to pay for storage charges and any other outstanding costs and expenses owed by the buyer to Phillips de Pury & Company or our affiliated companies and the remainder will be forfeited unless collected by the buyer within two years of the original auction. 9 REmEDIES FOR nOn-PaYmEnT (a) Without prejudice to any rights the seller may have, if the buyer without prior agreement fails to make payment of the Purchase Price for a lot in cleared funds within five days of the auction, Phillips de Pury & Company may in our sole discretion exercise one or more of the following remedies: (i) store the lot at Phillips de Pury & Company’s premises or elsewhere at the buyer’s sole risk and expense; (ii) cancel the sale of the lot, retaining any partial payment of the Purchase Price as liquidated damages; (iii) reject future bids from the buyer or render such bids subject to payment of a deposit; (iv) charge interest at 12% per annum from the date payment became due until the date the Purchase Price is received in cleared funds; (v) subject to notification of the buyer, exercise a lien over any of the buyer’s property which is in the possession of Phillips de Pury & Company and instruct our affiliated companies to exercise a lien over any of the buyer’s property which is in their possession and, in each case, no earlier than 30 days from the date of such notice arrange the sale of such property and apply the proceeds to the amount owed to Phillips de Pury & Company or any of our affiliated companies after the deduction from sale proceeds of our standard vendor’s commission, all sale-related expenses and any applicable taxes thereon; (vi) resell the lot by auction or private sale, with estimates and a reserve set at Phillips de Pury & Company’s reasonable discretion, it being understood that in the event such resale is for less than the original hammer price and buyer’s premium for that lot, the buyer will

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IN ThE FACE OF CANCER, we oFFer sUPPort It is because Myriam Ullens has been a victim of this illness that she can speak about it with such accuracy. It is because she has fought so fiercely against it that she fully understands what sufferers need. It is because she was surrounded by friends, family and support, and was able to allow herself time to rest during her treatment, that she knows how important this is to help beat cancer. Once cured, Myriam, who likes to be called Mimi, decided to create this foundation. Cancer can be attacked from all fronts: taking care of yourself ensures that you keep your self-esteem, courage and strength to fight this illness. The Mimi Foundation is an addition to the work of the medical teams. These ‘well-being’ units are being installed at the heart of cancer wards: they are completely redesigned to create a calming and warm atmosphere and encourage you to forget your distressing situation. Three services are available to patients: - Psychological support for the patient and their family - A hairdressing workshop (a choice of wigs and scarves, and help with financing these accessories) - Aesthetic care developed specifically for cancer patients All services are financed by the Mimi Foundation and so free of charge for the patient. The ambition of the Mimi Foundation is to answer all the demands of the hospitals and clinics who wish to benefit from a ‘wellbeing’ unit. The Mimi Foundation is there to provide help and support to any patients who ask. Each year, new units are opening and the number of patients is increasing.

we need your donations in order to make sure no one is left to fight this terrible illness alone. Help us to offer comfort to as many people as possible. We are grateful for your commitment. we thank you.

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Photography: Jean-Daniel Lorieux Conceived by iTEM Studio

Please donate to the Mimi Foundation. ING BANK Account: 310-1658221-92 BIC: BBRUBEBB IBAN: BE 12 3101 6582 2192 www.mimi-foundation.org

Myriam Ullens

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remain liable for the shortfall together with all costs incurred in such resale; (vii) commence legal proceedings to recover the hammer price and buyer’s premium for that lot, together with interest and the costs of such proceedings; or (viii) release the name and address of the buyer to the seller to enable the seller to commence legal proceedings to recover the amounts due and legal costs. (b) The buyer irrevocably authorizes Phillips de Pury & Company to exercise a lien over the buyer’s property which is in our possession upon notification by any of our affiliated companies that the buyer is in default of payment. Phillips de Pury & Company will notify the buyer of any such lien. The buyer also irrevocably authorizes Phillips de Pury & Company, upon notification by any of our affiliated companies that the buyer is in default of payment, to pledge the buyer’s property in our possession by actual or constructive delivery to our affiliated company as security for the payment of any outstanding amount due. Phillips de Pury & Company will notify the buyer if the buyer’s property has been delivered to an affiliated company by way of pledge. (c) If the buyer is in default of payment, the buyer irrevocably authorizes Phillips de Pury & Company to instruct any of our affiliated companies in possession of the buyer’s property to deliver the property by way of pledge as the buyer’s agent to a third party instructed by Phillips de Pury & Company to hold the property on our behalf as security for the payment of the Purchase Price and any other amount due and, no earlier than 30 days from the date of written notice to the buyer, to sell the property in such manner and for such consideration as can reasonably be obtained on a forced sale basis and to apply the proceeds to any amount owed to Phillips de Pury & Company or any of our affiliated companies after the deduction from sale proceeds of our standard vendor’s commission, all salerelated expenses and any applicable taxes thereon. 10 RESCISSIOn BY PHIllIPS de PURY & COmPanY Phillips de Pury & Company shall have the right, but not the obligation, to rescind a sale without notice to the buyer if we reasonably believe that there is a material breach of the seller’s representations and warranties or the Authorship Warranty or an adverse claim is made by a third party. Upon notice of Phillips de Pury & Company’s election to rescind the sale, the buyer will promptly return the lot to Phillips de Pury & Company, and we will then refund the Purchase Price paid to us. As described more fully in Paragraph 13 below, the refund shall constitute the sole remedy and recourse of the buyer against Phillips de Pury & Company and the seller with respect to such rescinded sale. 11 EXPORT, ImPORT anD EnDanGERED SPECIES lICEnSES anD PERmITS Before bidding for any property, prospective buyers are advised to make their own enquiries as to whether a license is required to export a lot from the United Kingdom or to import it into another country. Prospective buyers are advised that some countries prohibit the import of property made of or incorporating plant or animal material, such as coral, crocodile, ivory, whalebone, rhinoceros horn or tortoiseshell, irrespective of age, percentage or value. Accordingly, prior to bidding, prospective buyers considering export of purchased lots should familiarize themselves with relevant export and import regulations of the countries concerned. It is solely the buyer’s responsibility to comply with these laws and to obtain any necessary export, import and endangered species licenses or permits. Failure to obtain a license or permit or delay in so doing will not justify the cancellation of the sale or any delay in making full payment for the lot. 12 DaTa PROTECTIOn (a) In connection with the management and operation of our business and the marketing and supply of auction related services, or as required by law, we may ask clients to provide personal information about themselves or obtain information about clients from third parties (e.g., credit information). If clients provide us with information that is defined by law as “sensitive,” they agree that Phillips de Pury & Company and our affiliated companies may use it for the above purposes. Phillips de Pury & Company and our affiliated companies will not use or process sensitive information for any other purpose without the client’s express consent. If you would like further information on our policies on personal data or wish to make corrections to your information, please contact us at +44 (0)20 7318 4010. If you would prefer not to receive details of future events please call the above number. (b) In order to fulfill the services clients have requested, Phillips de Pury & Company may disclose information to third parties such as shippers. Some countries do not offer equivalent legal protection of personal information to that offered within the European Union (EU). It is Phillips de Pury & Company’s policy to require that any such third parties respect the privacy and confidentiality of our clients’

information and provide the same level of protection for client information as provided within the EU, whether or not they are located in a country that offers equivalent legal protection of personal information. By agreeing to these Conditions of Sale, clients agree to such disclosure. 13 lImITaTIOn OF lIaBIlITY (a) Subject to subparagraph (e) below, the total liability of Phillips de Pury & Company, our affiliated companies and the seller to the buyer in connection with the sale of a lot shall be limited to the Purchase Price actually paid by the buyer for the lot. (b) Except as otherwise provided in this Paragraph 13, none of Phillips de Pury & Company, any of our affiliated companies or the seller (i) is liable for any errors or omissions, whether orally or in writing, in information provided to prospective buyers by Phillips de Pury & Company or any of our affiliated companies or (ii) accepts responsibility to any bidder in respect of acts or omissions, whether negligent or otherwise, by Phillips de Pury & Company or any of our affiliated companies in connection with the conduct of the auction or for any other matter relating to the sale of any lot.

with English law. (b) For the benefit of Phillips de Pury & Company, all bidders and sellers agree that the Courts of England are to have exclusive jurisdiction to settle all disputes arising in connection with all aspects of all matters or transactions to which these Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty relate or apply. All parties agree that Phillips de Pury & Company shall retain the right to bring proceedings in any court other than the Courts of England. (c) All bidders and sellers irrevocably consent to service of process or any other documents in connection with proceedings in any court by facsimile transmission, personal service, delivery by mail or in any other manner permitted by English law, the law of the place of service or the law of the jurisdiction where proceedings are instituted at the last address of the bidder or seller known to Phillips de Pury & Company.

aUTHORSHIP WaRRanTY (c) All warranties other than the Authorship Warranty, express or implied, including any warranty of satisfactory quality and fitness for purpose, are specifically excluded by Phillips de Pury & Company, our affiliated companies and the seller to the fullest extent permitted by law. (d) Subject to subparagraph (e) below, none of Phillips de Pury & Company, any of our affiliated companies or the seller shall be liable to the buyer for any loss or damage beyond the refund of the Purchase Price referred to in subparagraph (a) above, whether such loss or damage is characterized as direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential, or for the payment of interest on the Purchase Price to the fullest extent permitted by law. (e) No provision in these Conditions of Sale shall be deemed to exclude or limit the liability of Phillips de Pury & Company or any of our affiliated companies to the buyer in respect of any fraud or fraudulent misrepresentation made by any of us or in respect of death or personal injury caused by our negligent acts or omissions. 14 COPYRIGHT The copyright in all images, illustrations and written materials produced by or for Phillips de Pury & Company relating to a lot, including the contents of this catalogue, is and shall remain at all times the property of Phillips de Pury & Company and, subject to the provisions of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, such images and materials may not be used by the buyer or any other party without our prior written consent. Phillips de Pury & Company and the seller make no representations or warranties that the buyer of a lot will acquire any copyright or other reproduction rights in it. 15 GEnERal (a) These Conditions of Sale, as changed or supplemented as provided in Paragraph 1 above, and Authorship Warranty set out the entire agreement between the parties with respect to the transactions contemplated herein and supersede all prior and contemporaneous written, oral or implied understandings, representations and agreements. (b) Notices to Phillips de Pury & Company shall be in writing and addressed to the department in charge of the sale, quoting the reference number specified at the beginning of the sale catalogue. Notices to clients shall be addressed to the last address notified by them in writing to Phillips de Pury & Company. (c) These Conditions of Sale are not assignable by any buyer without our prior written consent but are binding on the buyer’s successors, assigns and representatives. (d) Should any provision of these Conditions of Sale be held void, invalid or unenforceable for any reason, the remaining provisions shall remain in full force and effect. No failure by any party to exercise, nor any delay in exercising, any right or remedy under these Conditions of Sale shall act as a waiver or release thereof in whole or in part. (e) No term of these Conditions of Sale shall be enforceable under the Contracts (Rights of Third Parties) Act 1999 by anyone other than the buyer. 16 laW anD JURISDICTIOn (a) The rights and obligations of the parties with respect to these Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty, the conduct of the auction and any matters related to any of the foregoing shall be governed by and interpreted in accordance

Phillips de Pury & Company warrants the authorship of property in this auction catalogue for a period of five years from date of sale by Phillips de Pury & Company, subject to the exclusions and limitations set forth below. (a) Phillips de Pury & Company gives this Authorship Warranty only to the original buyer of record (i.e., the registered successful bidder) of any lot. This Authorship Warranty does not extend to (i) subsequent owners of the property, including purchasers or recipients by way of gift from the original buyer, heirs, successors, beneficiaries and assigns; (ii) property created prior to 1870, unless the property is determined to be counterfeit (defined as a forgery made less than 50 years ago with an intent to deceive) and has a value at the date of the claim under this warranty which is materially less than the Purchase Price paid; (iii) property where the description in the catalogue states that there is a conflict of opinion on the authorship of the property; (iv) property where our attribution of authorship was on the date of sale consistent with the generally accepted opinions of specialists, scholars or other experts; or (v) property whose description or dating is proved inaccurate by means of scientific methods or tests not generally accepted for use at the time of the publication of the catalogue or which were at such time deemed unreasonably expensive or impractical to use. (b) In any claim for breach of the Authorship Warranty, Phillips de Pury & Company reserves the right, as a condition to rescinding any sale under this warranty, to require the buyer to provide to us at the buyer’s expense the written opinions of two recognized experts approved in advance by Phillips de Pury & Company. We shall not be bound by any expert report produced by the buyer and reserve the right to consult our own experts at our expense. If Phillips de Pury & Company agrees to rescind a sale under the Authorship Warranty, we shall refund to the buyer the reasonable costs charged by the experts commissioned by the buyer and approved in advance by us. (c) Subject to the exclusions set forth in subparagraph (a) above, the buyer may bring a claim for breach of the Authorship Warranty provided that (i) he or she has notified Phillips de Pury & Company in writing within three months of receiving any information which causes the buyer to question the authorship of the lot, specifying the auction in which the property was included, the lot number in the auction catalogue and the reasons why the authorship of the lot is being questioned and (ii) the buyer returns the lot to Phillips de Pury & Company in the same condition as at the time of its auction and is able to transfer good and marketable title in the lot free from any third party claim arising after the date of the auction. (d) The buyer understands and agrees that the exclusive remedy for any breach of the Authorship Warranty shall be rescission of the sale and refund of the original Purchase Price paid. This remedy shall constitute the sole remedy and recourse of the buyer against Phillips de Pury & Company, any of our affiliated companies and the seller and is in lieu of any other remedy available as a matter of law. This means that none of Phillips de Pury & Company, any of our affiliated companies or the seller shall be liable for loss or damage beyond the remedy expressly provided in this Authorship Warranty, whether such loss or damage is characterized as direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential, or for the payment of interest on the original Purchase Price.

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PHIllIPS de PURY & COmPanY

advisory Board Maria Bell Janna Bullock Lisa Eisner Lapo Elkann Ben Elliot Lady Elena Foster H.I.H. Francesca von Habsburg Marc Jacobs Malcolm McLaren Ernest Mourmans Aby Rosen Christiane zu Salm Princess Gloria vonThurn undTaxis Jean Michel Wilmotte Anita Zabludowicz

Senior Partners Michael McGinnis Dr. Michaela Neumeister

Chairman Simon de Pury Chief Executive Officer Bernd Runge

Partners Aileen Agopian Sean Cleary Alexander Payne Rodman Primack Olivier Vrankenne Tiffany Wood

WORlDWIDE OFFICES NEW YORK 450 West 15 Street NewYork NY 10011 USA +1 212 940 1200 +1 212 924 5403 fax LONDON Howick Place London SW1P 1BB United Kingdom +44 20 7318 4010 +44 20 7318 4011 fax

PARIS 28, rue Michel Le Comte 75003 Paris France +33 1 42 78 67 77 +33 1 42 78 23 07 fax

BERLIN Auguststrasse 19 10117 Berlin Germany +49 30 880 018 42 +49 30 880 018 43 fax

MUNICH Maximiliansplatz 12a 80333 Munich Germany +49 89 238 88 48 0 +49 89 238 88 48 15 fax

GENEVA 23, quai des Bergues 1201 Geneva Switzerland +41 22 906 80 00 +41 22 906 80 01 fax

SPECIalIST anD SERVICE DEPaRTmEnTS

mODERn anD COnTEmPORaRY EDITIOnS NEW YORK Kelly Troester, Worldwide Co-Director +1 212 940 1221 Cary Leibowitz, Worldwide Co-Director +1 212 940 1222 Jannah Greenblatt +1 212 940 1332 Joy Deibert +1 212 940 1333

COnTEmPORaRY aRT LONDON Anthony McNerney, Head of Evening Sale, London +44 20 7318 4067 Peter Sumner, Head of Day Sale, London +44 20 7318 4063 Laetitia Catoir +44 20 7318 4064 Silke Taprogge +44 20 7318 4012 Ivgenia Naiman +44 20 7318 4071 Fiona Biberstein +44 20 7318 4013 Siobhan O’Connor +44 20 7318 4093 Catherine Higgs +44 20 7318 4089 Raphael Lepine +44 20 7318 4078 Tanya Tikhnenko +44 20 7318 4065 Sarah Buchwald +44 20 7318 4085 Phillippa Willison +44 20 7318 4070 Henry Highley +44 20 7318 4065 NEW YORK Michael McGinnis, Worldwide Director +1 212 940 1254 Aileen Agopian, New York Director +1 212 940 1255 Jean-Michel Placent +1 212 940 1263 Timothy Malyk +1 212 940 1258 Chin-Chin Yap +1 212 940 1250 Sarah Mudge, Head of Part II, New York +1 212 940 1259 Roxana Bruno +1 212 940 1229 Sara Davidson +1 212 940 1262 Maria Bueno +1 212 940 1261 Peter Flores +1 212 940 1223 (Uli) Zhiheng Huang +1 212 940 1288 Eugenia Ballvé +1 212 940 1303

JEWElRY NEW YORK Nazgol Jahan, Worldwide Director +1 212 940 1283 Carmela Manoli +1 212 940 1302 Heather Zises +1 212 940 1290 GENEVA Carolin Bulgari +41 22 906 80 00 Veronica Lota +41 22 906 80 05 LONDON Lane McLean +44 20 7318 4032 THEmE SalES Tiffany Wood, Worldwide Director +49 30 880 018 42 LONDON Tobias Sirtl, London Manager +44 20 7318 4095 Arianna Jacobs +44 20 7318 4054 George O’Dell +44 20 7318 4040 NEW YORK Corey Barr, New York Manager +1 212 940 1234 Anne Huntington +1 212 940 1210 Stephanie Max +1 212 940 1301 Steve Agin, Consultant +1 908 475 1796

DESIGn LONDON Alexander Payne, Worldwide Director +44 20 7318 4052 Ben Williams +44 20 7318 4027 Domenico Raimondo +44 20 7318 4016 Ellen Stelter +44 20 7318 4021 Marcus McDonald +44 20 7318 4014 NEW YORK Marcus Tremonto, International Consultant +1 212 940 1268 Alex Heminway, New York Director +1 212 940 1269 Tara DeWitt +1 212 940 1265 Meaghan Roddy +1 212 940 1266 Stephanie Abraitis +1 212 940 1268

CHaIRman lOnDOn Rodman Primack +44 20 7318 4017 manaGInG DIRECTORS Finn Dombernowsky, London +44 20 7318 4034 Charlie Horne, New York +1 212 940 1292 PRIVaTE SalES Christina Scheublein +1 212 940 1248

InTERnaTIOnal SPECIalISTS anD REPRESEnTaTIVES Berlin & munich Dr. Michaela Neumeister Brussels & Paris Olivier Vrankenne Paris Leonie Moschner Paris & london Tamara Corm london Ivgenia Naiman Brooke de Ocampo los angeles Mimi Won Techentin Maya McLaughlin milan Laura Garbarino Eugenia Bertelè moscow Svetlana Marich Shanghai/Beijing Jeremy Wingfield

PHOTOGRaPHS LONDON Louise Proud +44 20 7318 4018 Sebastien Montabonel +44 20 7318 4025 Alexandra Bibby +44 20 7318 4087 Helen Hayman +44 20 7318 4092 NEW YORK Vanessa Kramer, New York Director +1 212 940 1243 Shlomi Rabi +1 212 940 1246 Caroline Shea +1 212 940 1247 Sarah Krueger +1 212 940 1245

+49 89 238 88 48 10 +32 486 43 43 44 +33 6 85 53 92 03 +33 6 75 07 04 71 +44 20 7318 4071 +44 777 551 7060 +1 310 600 9192 +1 323 791 1771 +39 339 478 9671 +39 02 3669 5895 +7 495 225 88 22 +86 135 0118 2804

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SalE InFORmaTIOn aUCTIOn Saturday 21 November 2009 at 5pm VIEWInG Monday 9 November - Saturday 14 November, 10am - 6pm daily Sunday 15 November, 12pm - 6pm Monday 16 November - Friday 20 November, 10am - 6pm daily Saturday 21 November, opens 10am VIEWInG & aUCTIOn lOCaTIOn Howick Place London SW1P 1BB SalE DESIGnaTIOn In sending written bids or making inquiries please refer to this sale as UK000309 or MUSIC. THEmE SalES Tiffany Wood, Worldwide Director +49 30 880 018 42 london Tobias Sirtl, Manager +44 20 7318 4095 Arianna Jacobs, Cataloguer +44 20 7318 4054 George O’Dell, Administrator +44 20 7318 4040 new York Corey Barr, Manager +1 212 940 1234 Anne Huntington, Cataloguer +1 212 940 1210 Stephanie Max, Administrator +1 212 940 1301 Consultants Steve Agin, Toy Art +1 908 475 1796 Alban de Pury, Music +44 7789 1180 62 alban@yodelmusic.com Helen Hall, Music Memorabilia helen@helen-hall.com CaTalOGUES Allyson Melchor +44 20 7318 4039 +1 212 940 1240 catalogues@phillipsdepury.com aBSEnTEE anD TElEPHOnE BIDS Anna Ho +44 20 7318 4045 +44 20 7318 4035 fax bids@phillipsdepury.com BUYERS aCCOUnTS Carolyn Whitehead +44 20 7318 4020 SEllER aCCOUnTS Elliot Depree +44 20 7318 4072 ClIEnT SERVICES Brette Kameny +44 20 7318 4010 SHIPPInG Kate Spalding +44 20 7318 4081 Andrew Ballaro +44 20 7318 4082 Clare Simpson +44 20 7318 4026 PROPERTY manaGER Chris Stacey +44 20 7318 4010 PRInCIPal aUCTIOnEER Simon de Pury 0874341 aUCTIOnEERS AileenAgopian 1199037 Sarah Mudge 1301805 Alexander Gilkes 1308958 Ellen Stelter UK Rodman Primack UK EDITOR Karen Wright Louisa Wright, Editorial assistant PHOTOGRaPHY Byron Slater E-maIl aDDRESSES All Phillips de Pury & Company e-mails are first initial and last name @phillipsdepury.com (e.g. twood@phillipsdepury.com) www.phillipsdepury.com Please note that all lots are offered and sold subject to (i) the StandardTerms and Conditions, and (ii) Special Terms and Conditions applicable to this sale as described within this sale catalogue. The Standard Terms and Conditions and Special Terms and Conditions should be fully read and understood prior to bidding at the auction. All lots are sold “AS-IS.” All lots are offered subject to a reserve unless otherwise indicated. Back Cover: Damien Hirst, Beautiful Psychedelic Rays of Dancing Love Hours Spin Painting (detail), 2008. Lot 32

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Music