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The Collection of

Robert Tibbles Young British Artists & More 20th Century & Contemporary Art Evening & Day Sales London / 13 & 14 February 2020


Contents Te Collection of Robert Tibbles Te Young British Artists 20th Century & Contemporary Art Evening Sale 20th Century & Contemporary Art Day Sale


The Collection of

Robert Tibbles Young British Artists & More

Robert Tibbles is a collector in the truest sense. Having found his niche in the late 1980s, when London was bustling with a novel, brash artistic energy that readily met the increasing momentum of his own industry – fnance – he became one of the frst to promote and purchase the work of a then loud, yet marginal, artistic movement: the Young British Artists (YBAs). Deeply enamoured with art from his frst encounter with it in 1988, he quickly amassed a dozen works, and then more, constituting a collection of topical, charismatic, and intimate pieces spanning painting, sculpture, photography and video. The art collection he built over two decades remained with him to this day, predominantly in the comfort of his London home, and is now being entrusted to Phillips, London, across particularly crafed sales. ‘There are lots of diferent types of collectors’, Robert confessed. ‘I’ve never been one to put works straight into storage’. Instead, he placed a monumental Spot Painting by Damien Hirst above his freplace, a brash dual portrait of Gilbert & George, along with two paintings by Sarah Morris spelling out ‘GIRLS’ and ‘FUCK’ in his dining room, and a poetic Julian Opie composition, portraying a road cut of by a large expanse of azure sky, just above his bed. Each work from Robert Tibbles’ artful aggregation is tied to the other in a shared story of passion, foresightedness and wit. It is important to mention the spiritedness of Robert’s collection as each work carries tremendous individual charisma; a spark that reflects his own. The frst major work he purchased was Damien Hirst’s Bodies, 1989, brought to his attention by the art dealer Karsten Schubert in the year of its creation. Acquiring the work for £600, he was the frst collector, alongside Charles Saatchi, to buy a work by Damien Hirst. Indeed, while Hirst was still a student at the Goldsmiths College of Art, London, Robert was immediately taken by his work; he envisioned a likeness between his gesture and that of Duchamp years before him, similarly elevating an ordinary object to the realm of fne art. Hirst himself has fond memories of the banker. ‘I remember

Robert very well, he was so excited by the art’, he said. ‘It was in the days when I installed my own work in people’s houses, so I went round and met him and he made me tea’. Further highlighting the integrity of Robert’s collection, the artist mused, ‘Robert is a proper collector and I’m really touched he kept and lived with my work for all those years’. Through the initial and seminal purchase of Bodies, Robert continued buying more works by the artist, and became increasingly close to Schubert, who subsequently introduced him to Hirst’s mentor – the Irish-born, U.S.A-educated artist Michael Craig-Martin. Robert’s particular relationship with Michael Craig-Martin, cultivated over the years, ushered new possibilities for his vision as a collector. He formed a friendship with him early on in his collecting years, and valued his advice as a friend and artist throughout his collecting journey. One of his most exciting purchases was the commissioned Narrative Painting from 1993-94; a composition that followed Craig-Martin’s solo show in Paris’ Centre Pompidou in 1993, where he had painted the walls of each room a diferent colour, and placed one image on each wall. For Robert, Craig-Martin produced a canvas with a large expanse of pink to symbolise one wall, and an eighth of yellow to symbolise its tangent. ‘He then included a book because he always said, “If you want to be a really serious Contemporary Art collector, Robert, you cannot have curtains or books”. And then he included the back of a canvas to show I am a collector’. Themes that consume artists at the time of creation – including life, death, freedom, irreverence and identity politics – seem to consume Robert in turn, and run consistently throughout the collection he built. The Robert Tibbles Collection: Young British Artists & More thus forms a coherent, wholly fascinating narrative; one that tells Robert Tibbles’ singular story, and the visionary verve with which he approached art over the course of three decades.


Robert Tibbles in his London home, with Michael Craig-Martin’s Full, 5 December 2019. Š Michael Craig-Martin, 2020. Image: Alex Braun/Phillips.


‘I have to be realistic and say that being a collector is part of who I am. It brings me so much pleasure.’ Robert Tibbles


Young British Artists & More ‘Tere was a chemistry that was very unusual. I knew it was special.’ Michael Craig-Martin

It is a story that has entered art world mythology. In July 1988, a group of sixteen young artists took part in a show held in an abandoned London Port Authority warehouse, organised by a Goldsmiths’ second year student called Damien Hirst. The artists included Gary Hume, Mat Collishaw, Ian Davenport, Michael Landy, Sarah Lucas and of course, Hirst himself. The now infamous exhibition, titled Freeze, epitomised the essence of these new artists’ common creative verve; they wanted to tackle and re-structure the established art world through selfpromotion, shock-tactics and pure entrepreneurial spirit. The Royal Academy of Art’s then Exhibitions Secretary Normal Rosenthal and the Tate’s new Director, Sir Nicholas Serota, attended along with advertising mogul and collector Charles Saatchi, signalling not only a watershed moment in British art but also Hirst’s dogged determination for widespread recognition. Birthing a new generation of artists, this group and others would soon experience a meteoric rise to fame under the collective name: ‘Young British Artists’ or ‘YBAs’. A tale of perseverance, dedication, commitment and creativity, the genesis of the YBAs has come to represent the most treasured characteristics of British morale. Goldsmiths College of Art undoubtedly provided the foundation for Freeze and the subsequent YBA movement, with the majority of the group attending their BA Fine Art course between 1987 and 1990 – in the exception of Julian Opie who graduated years before, in 1982, but was a driving force for the younger generation. From the conservatism of Margaret Thatcher’s government to the rebellion of The Sex Pistols and The Clash, London in the 1980s thrived in diversity. Goldsmiths’ innovative approach to art-making was no diferent, abandoning the traditional segregation of artistic training into painting, drawing and sculpture in favour of an openness to process and materials which resulted in a fresh and confident dominance of mixed-media work.


Damien Hirst with Sarah Lucas, Colony Room, London, 1999. © Johnnie Shand Kydd. All Rights Reserved, DACS/Artimage 2020. Image: Johnnie Shand Kydd.


Lef / Right Angus Fairhurst, Gary Hume, Michael Landy, Mat Collishaw and Gavin Turk, London, 2002. © Johnnie Shand Kydd. All Rights Reserved, DACS/Artimage 2020. Image: Johnnie Shand Kydd. Just prior to Freeze private view. Lef to Right: Ian Davenport, Damien Hirst, Angela Bulloch, Fiona Rae, Stephen Park, Anya Gallaccio, Sarah Lucas and Gary Hume, August 1988. © Abigail Lane. All Rights Reserved, DACS/Artimage 2020. Image: Abigail Lane.

These students were receiving advice and encouragement from their course leader and artist in his own right, Michael Craig-Martin. As a principal fgure of British conceptual art, his personal approach to the play between rhetoric and object infuenced many of his young students to pursue complex themes through diverse media and processes. However, the students were as much influenced and nurtured by their mentor as they were by each other. Gary Hume was painting his seductively shiny hospital doors in household gloss as Hirst was experimenting with the same medium on kitchen pans. Spurning the ofen inevitable competition that comes with beginning an artistic career, the YBAs supported one another in their pursuits. Craig-Martin has noted retrospectively that ‘With the YBAs, I saw a generosity I’d never witnessed before. When a collector came to a studio, the artist would say, “Do you know so-and-so’s work?” And if the collector said no, the artist would take them round to so and so’s studio. It was a magical time.’ (Michael Craig-Martin, quoted in Stuart Jefries, ‘Michael Craig-Martin: Up close and impersonal’, The Guardian, 4 May 2011, online). The YBA magic was infectious and quickly afer their bold arrival onto London’s art scene, their work was snapped up by dealers, gallerists, as well as both established and new collectors. Amongst these collectors stood out Robert Tibbles – a veteran YBA-admirer, whose aggregation of artworks forms a sourcebook of the movement’s best productions. ‘I did want the overarching story of my collection to make

‘I bought and put together all these works, in a very slow but very careful way, and they only got better with time.’ Robert Tibbles


sense’, Robert said. ‘And so, I had to continually ask myself: do these bits of the jigsaw produce something that has a theme or coherence?’ Uniting seminal formulations of Damien Hirst’s best bodies of work, impressive large-scale compositions by Michael Craig-Martin, provocative word-paintings by Sarah Morris and a uniquely touching video piece by Sam Taylor-Johnson, Robert’s collection traces his emotional and psychological journey as a collector, but also the history of Britain’s most revered contemporary movements. With the new decade came an unprecedented recognition and fame for these young artists fresh out of art school. It was also during the 1990s that the YBAs became notorious for their punky ‘work hard, play hard’ ethos, taking over the pubs and clubs of London’s Soho and East End to host parties and private views whilst mixing with friends

from the worlds of fashion, music and flm. The group’s absorption into the establishment was frmly secured when the Royal Academy staged the notorious Sensation exhibition in 1997, travelling to New York and Berlin and introducing these artists to the wider public both in Britain and internationally. Innovative and provocative, these artists indeed caused a powerful sensation in the cultural landscape from which we are still feeling the afer-shocks. Acquired from 1988 until roughly 2000, the works from Robert Tibbles’ collection allow a glimpse into the YBAs’ genesis and progression, conveying a visual time capsule that close to no other collection could boast. ‘I bought and put together all these works, in a very slow but very careful way, and they only got better with time’, the collector said.


20th Century & Contemporary Art Evening Sale

London / 13 February 2020


The Collection of

Robert Tibbles Young British Artists & More

15. Michael Craig-Martin

b. 1941

Full acrylic on canvas 213.8 x 412.7 cm (84 1/8 x 162 1/2 in.) Painted in 2000. Estimate £80,000-120,000 $104,000-156,000 €94,100-141,000 ♠

Provenance Jay Jopling, London Acquired from the above by the present owner circa 2000 Exhibited London, Fragile House, fg-1, 2000 Dublin, Irish Museum of Modern Art, Michael Craig-Martin: Works 1964 - 2006, 4 October 2006 - 14 January 2007, pp. 216-217 (illustrated, pp. 216-217)

plus Buyers Premium and VAT, ARR applies*

‘I thought the objects we value least because they were ubiquitous were actually the most extraordinary.’ Michael Craig-Martin

Michael Craig-Martin in front of the present work, circa. February 2006. Image: Eamonn McCabePopperfoto via Getty Images.

*The amount of Buyer’s Premium, VAT and, if applicable, Artist’s Resale Right payable is dependent on the sale outcome. For full details see Calculating the Purchase Price in the Buyer’s Guide online or in this catalogue. Buyer’s Premium is payable at a maximum of 25%. VAT, where applicable, is payable at 20% on the Buyer’s Premium.


Mixing surprising amalgamations of neon colour and seminal arthistorical references, Full, 2000, is an exceptional example of Michael Craig-Martin’s witty, versatile and iconographically referential painterly practice. Over an expanse of four metres, nine objects are pictured side by side, evenly distributed across the width of the canvas. The restraint of the drawing – typically defned by sleek black lines – stands in high contrast with the ferce, riotous hues that animate the composition; absorbed by the grandeur of this visual blend, the viewer is lef to ponder the nature of each item. Afer careful observation, one is able to discern, one afer the other, the fling cabinet from Edward Hopper’s Ofce at Night, 1940, the brushes from Jasper Johns’ Painted Bronze, 1960, Craig-Martin’s own repeated ladder symbol, as well as his seminal conceptual readymade An Oak Tree, 1973, followed by Marcel Duchamp’s Bottlerack, 1914, Man Ray’s Object to Be Destroyed, 1923, and fnally Craig-Martin’s fre-extinguisher, appearing in his 1996 painting Innocence and Experience (Fire Extinguisher). There is also an undeniable architectural element to the composition, frst, in its ambitious scale – Craig-Martin’s favourite to work on – and second, in its precise outlines and broader construction. ‘I am fascinated by architecture and also by the possibility of making very large images’, the artist said (Michael Craig-Martin, quoted in ‘Michael Craig-Martin’, Aesthetica Magazine, 2013, online). With Full, Craig-Martin presents the viewer with a monument to the ordinary – an homage to symbolism.

Housed in the same collection since its acquisition in 2000, Full revels in its immaculate provenance, presented at auction for the frst time in 2020 since its creation. Echoing the proximity shared by the collector Robert Tibbles and Craig-Martin, the painting was purchased when the artist and the collector were already close. ‘I met him through Karsten Schubert, who sold me the Medicine Cabinet [Damien Hirst’s Bodies] in 1989. He was around in the galleries, and we became friendly’, Tibbles remembers. In 1993, Tibbles commissioned his frst piece from Craig-Martin – Narrative Painting, 1993-94, which pictures a large expanse of pink next to a narrower section of yellow, over which a canvas and a book appear to foat. ‘Michael included a book because he always said “If you want to be a really serious Contemporary Art collector, Robert, you cannot have curtains or books.” And then he included the back of a canvas to show I am a collector’ (Robert Tibbles, in conversation with Cheyenne Westphal, 6 December 2019). With the present work, Craig-Martin seems to have merged notions of solemnity and creativity, the thirst of knowledge and the verve to collect, and materialised them into a suite of objects. Art and its index thus fuse into a single subject matter in the composition: that of symbolism. As a result, Full functions as a sourcebook of art history; a collector’s perfect companion as he moves forward towards an increasingly careful examination of objects.

Following the Line The Art Historical References of Michael Craig-Martin

Edward Hopper, Ofce at Night, 1940, oil on canvas, Collection Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Gif of the T.B. Walker Foundation, Gilbert M. Walker Fund, 1948. © Heirs of Josephine Hopper/ Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS) NY/DACS, London 2020. Image: Walker Art Center, Minneapolis.

Jasper Johns, Painted Bronze, 1960, oil on bronze, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © Jasper Johns/VAGA at ARS, NY and DACS, London 2020. Image: Bridgeman Images.

Marcel Duchamp, Bottlerack, 1961, bottlerack, replica of 1914 original, The Philadelphia Museum of Art. © Association Marcel Duchamp/ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2020. Image: The Philadelphia Museum of Art/Art Resource/ Scala, Florence.

Man Ray, Indestructible Object (or Object to Be Destroyed), 1964, assemblage, replica of 1923 original, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © Man Ray 2015 Trust / ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2020. Image: 2020, The Museum of Modern Art, New York/Scala, Florence.


‘As an artist you are free to use any image, any style, any idea from any culture and any period of history.’ Michael Craig-Martin

Despite originating from diferent historical contexts, the nine symbols in Full are unifed by the special, beautifed status that was endowed to them by the artists who materialised them in painting or sculpture, decades before Craig-Martin. The bottlerack, the glass of water, the paintbrushes et. al., all transcended their functional value and entered the realm of art history when they were elevated by seminal art-historical protagonists who, in their art, sought to reinstate value in the ordinary. ‘What’s more famous than famous?’, Craig-Martin once asked, ‘…more famous than famous is ordinary, because ordinary is everywhere, ubiquitous, instantly familiar and so familiar that it’s invisible’. In this perspective, he continued, ‘a lightbulb is more famous than Marilyn Monroe’ (Michael Craig-Martin, quoted in Matt Alagiah, ‘Michael Craig-Martin on the changing nature of “ordinariness”’, It’s Nice That, 6 February 2019, online). In the present composition, CraigMartin pays tribute to Hopper, Duchamp, Man Ray; distinguished fgures who successfully shed light on the exceptional nature of ordinary objects – and made them visible again. A father of the Young British Artists movement, Craig-Martin fostered a new generation of conceptual creators who looked at the world anew, and materialised it accordingly. Full is a masterpiece from his own visual repertoire; it beautifully encapsulates his desire to merge painting, sculpture, architecture, and the striking relevance of symbolism within a single image. It moreover demonstrates the importance of colour and visual brashness in the work of Young British Artists – a feature that contemporaries such as Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin, Michael Landy and Gary Hume imparted in their own work.

Michael Craig-Martin, An Oak Tree, 1973, glass, water, shelf and printed text, Tate, London. © Michael Craig-Martin. Image courtesy of Gagosian.


The Collection of

Robert Tibbles Young British Artists & More

O♦

16. Damien Hirst

b. 1965

Antipyrylazo III signed ‘D Hirst’ on the reverse household gloss on canvas 205.7 x 251.5 cm (80 7/8 x 99 in.) Executed in 1994. Estimate £900,000-1,200,000 $1,180,000-1,570,000 €1,060,000-1,410,000 ♠

Provenance Jay Jopling, London Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1994 Exhibited London, Gagosian Gallery, Damien Hirst: The Complete Spot Paintings 1986-2011, 12 January - 18 February 2012, p. 828 (illustrated, p. 75)

Literature Robert Violette, ed., Damien Hirst: I want to spend the rest of my life everywhere, with everyone, one to one, always, forever, now, London, 1997-2005, p. 236 (illustrated) Jason Beard and Millicent Wilner, eds., Damien Hirst: The Complete Spot Paintings 1986-2011, London, 2013, p. 828 (illustrated, p. 75)

plus Buyers Premium and VAT, ARR applies*

‘I was always a colourist. I’ve always had a phenomenal love of colour... I mean, I just move colour around on its own. So that’s where the Spot Paintings came from...’ Damien Hirst

*The amount of Buyer’s Premium, VAT and, if applicable, Artist’s Resale Right payable is dependent on the sale outcome. For full details see Calculating the Purchase Price in the Buyer’s Guide online or in this catalogue. Buyer’s Premium is payable at a maximum of 25%. VAT, where applicable, is payable at 20% on the Buyer’s Premium.


Congregated on a vast, white support, ffy colourful spots run across the elongated expanse of Antipyrylazo III, 1994, while forty-one descend down its two metre height, making for a joyous amalgamation of 2,050 bright circular units. An early example of Damien Hirst’s infamous Spot Paintings – which comprise thirteen sub-series, and a total of more than 1,500 canvases – Antipyrylazo III falls within the artist’s sustained investigation of the medical realm, taking afer a similarly named chemical tool indicating the presence of calcium and magnesium in natural materials. With this niche, obscure title, pulled from the revered thematic catalogue Biochemicals for Research and Diagnostic Reagents that the artist frst stumbled across in the early 1990s, Hirst delves into a territory that eludes easy comprehension. He then paradoxically pairs the work’s esoteric designation with an image that is clear and recognisable to all: candy-like spots proliferating with jubilant energy. Regarding the medicinal nature of the title, Hirst elucidated, ‘I started them as an endless series… A scientifc approach to painting in a similar way to the drug companies’ scientifc approach to life. Art doesn’t purport to have all the answers; the drug companies do. Hence the title of the series [...] and the individual titles of the paintings themselves’ (Damien Hirst, quoted in Robert Violette, ed., ‘On Dumb Painting’, Damien Hirst: I want to spend the rest of my life everywhere, with everyone, one to one, always, forever, now, London, 1997-2005, p. 246).

Though upon visualising the series, one may think of Hirst’s more recent Spot Paintings – those that boast unequivocally pristine, thick and glossy surfaces – the story of the artist’s pharmaceutical body of work goes back to his student days at Goldsmiths College of Art, London. Hirst made his frst Spot Painting on canvas in 1988, following some loose hand-painted spots on board from 1986, and two near-identical arrangements applied directly on the wall from 1988. This preliminary work was entitled Untitled (with Black Dot), and was a rare work from the series to contain the colour black. The present painting, executed just six years later, benefts from years of practice and refned instructions, while at the same time retaining the matte quality of Hirst’s early spots. The colour from each dot is not restricted by an overarching sense of fatness – like they ofen are in recent formulations – but instead delves into new layers of depth, perhaps enabled by a minute, lesser use of prime that in turn allows for subtly varying levels of thickness to interact at the surface. Indeed, only the frst few dozen Spot Paintings were made by Hirst alone, as the rest became part of a larger production system soliticiting the help of assistants. Hirst’s mature works thus not only remove drawing traces in their immaculate, spotless rendition, but furthermore negate the artist’s hand, promoting a kind of artistic mechanism that readily espouses his conceptual approach to the painterly medium.

‘I wanted to fnd a way to use colour in paintings that wasn’t expressionism. And then I lost faith in it and wanted to create a system where whatever decisions you make within a painting, the paintings end up happy. And I came up with spot paintings?’ Damien Hirst The artist in his studio, 1993 © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2020. Image: Gemma Levine/Hulton Archive/Getty Images.


Donald Judd, Untitled, 1991, enamelled aluminium, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. © Judd Foundation/ARS, NY and DACS, London 2020. Image: 2020, The Museum of Modern Art, New York/Scala, Florence.

Any physical evidence of human intervention – such as the compass point lef at the centre of each spot – vanishes, until the works appear to have been constructed perfunctorily, or ‘by a person trying to paint like a machine’ (Damien Hirst, in conversation with Sophie Calle, Internal Afairs, exh. cat., Institute of Contemporary Art, London, 1991, reproduced online). For Hirst, this technique marked a departure from years of experimenting with paint and collage, and the frst result of his search for a truly contemporary art form, coming as close as possible to formal perfection. Yet with Antipyrylazo III, extremely faint traces of pencil around certain dots recall the artist’s early craf, when he and the canvas were at one – an exceptional and rare feat in his eponymous body of work. In this perspective, Hirst asserts that his approach to the Spot Paintings had more to do with their embodiment of the painterly medium than with sheer perceptual experimentation with colour or space. ‘[T]hey have nothing to do with Richter or Poons or Bridget Riley or Albers or even Op’, he said. ‘They’re about the urge or the need to be a painter above and beyond the object of painting. I’ve ofen said that they are like sculptures of painting’ (Damien Hirst, quoted in Jason Beard and Millicent Wilner, eds., ‘On Dumb Painting’, Damien Hirst:

The Complete Spot Paintings 1986-2011, London, 2013, p. 246). It is the technique employed in the making of Antipyrylazo III that diferentiates it from other types of experimentation; the resulting aesthetic engenders an immediate response with a sleek, minimalist approach. In its laborious and painstaking reproduction of each circle, Antipyrylazo III exploits the powers of illusion allowed by the painterly medium at its heights. The element of organisation – both with respect to structure and colour – is of quintessential importance in Antipyrylazo III. The spots are structured on a grid; a seminal art historical tool that allows painters and sculptors to bring their visions – real or abstract – to life. The grid, wrote Rosalind Krauss, is what art looks like when it turns its back on nature. Yet in the frenetic repetition of the single pattern, disseminated across three decades of Hirst’s output, the artist has transcended the grid held within his twodimensional support. Showing his Spot Paintings in a group and all over the world has indeed become part of their content and meaning: they are infiltrating everywhere, their field expanding to cover the world itself.


Dan Flavin, Untitled (to a man, George McGovern) 2, 1972, fuorescent light and metal fxtures, Dia:Beacon, New York. © Stephen Flavin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 2020. Image: Bill Jackson Studio, New York, courtesy Dia Art Foundation.

‘ To create that structure, to do those colours, and do nothing. I suddenly got what I wanted. It was just a way of pinning down the joy of colour.’ Damien Hirst

The use of an iconic image as a brand, a point of departure from which to multiply ad infnitum holds visual and conceptual similarities with the gestures of Dan Flavin, Donald Judd and Yayoi Kusama, who also repeatedly deployed the same pattern within their work – a beaming dash, a succession of slabs, or myriad recurring visions of dots, pumpkins and eyes. In the very nature of Hirst’s recurring pattern – the spot – Antipyrylazo III furthermore recalls the traditional technique of Pointillism, which sought to compose a single image with small dots exclusively. In this perspective, the present work could posit as the section of a pointillist canvas under microscope; a snapshot of the image upon total abstraction. It is in the plethora of references it conjures that Antipyrylazo III encapsulates the complexity of life itself. Named afer a biological indicator, it gestures outwards to new horizons, only to fnally return to its initial scientifc realm, summoning multifaceted notions of life and death. In its grand size and sublime rendering, the work exists as an exceptional and seminal example of Hirst’s broader investigation.


The Collection of

Robert Tibbles Young British Artists & More

O♦

17. Damien Hirst

b. 1965

Bodies signed, titled and dated ‘Damien Hirst Bodies 1989’ on the reverse glass, faced particleboard, ramin, plastic, aluminium and pharmaceutical packaging 137.2 x 101.6 x 22.9 cm (54 x 40 x 9 in.) Executed in 1989. Estimate £1,200,000-1,800,000 $1,560,000-2,350,000 €1,410,000-2,120,000 ♠ plus Buyers Premium and VAT, ARR applies*

Provenance Karsten Schubert, London (acquired directly from the artist in 1989) Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1989 Exhibited London, Goldsmiths College, Degree Show, 1989 Naples, Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Damien Hirst. The Agony and the Ecstasy: Selected Works from 1989-2004, 31 October 2004 - 31 January 2005, p. 254 (illustrated, p. 63) New York, L&M Arts, Damien Hirst: The Complete Medicine Cabinets, 28 October - 11 December 2010, pp. 76 and 176 (the present work illustrated, pp. 75, 77, degree show illustrated, p. 199) London, Tate Modern, Damien Hirst, 4 April - 9 September 2012, p. 232 (illustrated, p. 69)

Literature Robert Violette, ed., Damien Hirst: I want to spend the rest of my life everywhere, with everyone, one to one, always, forever, now, London, 1997-2005, p. 332 (illustrated, p. 210) Jeremy Cooper, No Fun Without U: The Art of Factual Nonsense, London, 2000, p. 13 (degree show illustrated, p. 13) Elizabeth Fullerton, ARTRAGE! The Story of the Britart Revolution, London, 2016, pp. 46-47 (degree show illustrated, p. 46)

‘You can only cure people for so long and then they’re going to die anyway. You can’t arrest decay but these medicine cabinets suggest you can.’ Damien Hirst

*The amount of Buyer’s Premium, VAT and, if applicable, Artist’s Resale Right payable is dependent on the sale outcome. For full details see Calculating the Purchase Price in the Buyer’s Guide online or in this catalogue. Buyer’s Premium is payable at a maximum of 25%. VAT, where applicable, is payable at 20% on the Buyer’s Premium.


Created at the genesis of Damien Hirst’s career, Bodies, 1989, marked a watershed in the artist’s practice, as well as a signifcant milestone in the history of contemporary British art. With its distinct pharmacological subject matter, the sculpture presaged an array of works within Hirst’s oeuvre – most notably his two pharmacy-themed installations, his Pill Cabinets and Spot Paintings, as well as his restaurant Pharmacy, 19982003. The artist frst inaugurated his thematic vision with two medicine cabinets entitled Sinner, 1988, and Enemy, 1988-89, which he flled with remnants of his late grandmother’s medication. These preliminary formulations, executed during his second year at Goldsmiths College of Art in London, were followed by a sequence of thirteen cabinets, named afer the twelve songs of the Sex Pistols’ UK debut album Never Mind the Bollocks, Here’s the Sex Pistols, with two units referring to the seminal track God Save the Queen. The frst four from the grouping – Bodies, Liar, Seventeen and Pretty Vacant – were exhibited at the artist’s degree show in a shared space with his peer Angus Fairhurst, forming the bedrock of the series. From the Medicine Cabinets, one resides at the Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen München, and three are housed in the eminent collections of Bruno Bischoferger, Irma and Norman Braman, and Vicki and Kent Logan (promised gif to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art). Bodies, an early formulation from the series and the embodiment of track number 2 from the Sex Pistols’ album, posits as a precocious sign of Hirst’s rebellious spirit and unfinching audacity.

In 1989, Bodies was immediately bought by the German gallerist Karsten Schubert from Hirst's degree show, along with three other cabinets, before being purchased by the British collector Robert Tibbles, with whom the work – along with a multitude of YBA treasures – has remained for almost thirty years. Along these three decades, Bodies was shown only three times following Hirst’s graduation show: once, at the Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Naples; then, alongside eleven counterparts at L&M Arts, New York, exactly ten years ago; and fnally in 2012 at Tate Modern, London, on the occasion of Hirst’s frst substantial survey in a British institution. The spectacular nature of Bodies is thus threefold. Firstly, its importance within Hirst’s oeuvre – as an undisputed masterpiece from his celebrated Medicine series – is veritably unparalleled. Secondly, its provenance – held in the same collection essentially since conception – tells a story of passion, trust and courage, that close to no other collection could boast. And fnally, its meaning today, tying historical and personal signifcance, transcends artistic intention and takes on an added symbolic layer, which encompasses the importance of the owner as patron. It is only upon seeing the work – and taking a step back from its storied parcours – that one can be brought back to its fundamental conceptual genius, and made to understand the gesture from which Hirst departed as a 23 year-old student, studying at Goldsmiths alongside a generation of equally irreverent artists.

‘I can’t understand why most people believe in medicine and don’t believe in art, without questioning either.’ Damien Hirst

Damien Hirst, Untitled (Drawing With Cabinet and Medical Packaging) Corpus Book Image, 1989. © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2020. Image: courtesy of the artist’s studio.


Installation view of the present work in Damien Hirst's Degree Show, Goldsmiths College, London, 1989. Š Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2020. Image: courtesy of the artist’s studio.


‘I like it when there is more than one way of saying something, like songs on an album.’ Damien Hirst

Jef Koons, New Shelton WetDry 5-Gallon, New Hoover Convertible Doubledecker, 1981-1987, vacuum cleaners, acrylic and fuorescent lighting, Private Collection. © Jef Koons. Image: 2020, Christie's Images, London/Scala, Florence

From an innocent and uninformed perspective, a frst encounter with Bodies grants the viewer with a succession of interrogations. Though the object of the cabinet is immediately familiar and recognisable, the arrangement of the medical elements is deeply enigmatic – too perfect, too aesthetic, and therefore designed to spur confusion as to whether its constitution was deliberate or entirely random. The used packages, described by Hirst as ‘empty fucking vessels’, are believed to have been originally arranged as if the cabinet were itself a body, each item placed according to the organs it relates to. ‘I chose the size and shape of the cabinet like a body. I wanted it to be kind of human, like with an abdomen and a chest and guts’, the artist said. ‘Then I played around with the idea of putting the head at the top and those for your feet at the bottom and in doing something like that. I started trying to fnd out what all the drugs were’ (Damien Hirst, quoted in ‘Pharmaceutical Heaven’, Damien Hirst, exh. cat., Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Naples, 2004, pp. 105-106). Yet Hirst quickly outgrew this system, overtaken by his desire to arrange the cabinets arbitrarily, according to colours and patterns. ‘In the end, coming from that background of colour arranging, I can’t resist doing it in terms of colour. Everything is done in terms of colour and what it looks like. The whole cabinet really is just an illusion, just to hide behind the fact of making those old fashioned decisions I think’ (Damien Hirst, quoted in ‘Pharmaceutical Heaven’, Damien Hirst, exh. cat., Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Naples, 2004, pp. 105-106).

The cabinets’ arbitrary arrangements furthermore echoes the multiplicity of meaning that radiates from their enigmatic shells. Bodies, as such, is evocative of a plethora of visual references and historical notions. On the one hand, it provides an art historical nod to Kurt Schwitters’ collages and Joseph Cornell’s ingenious assemblages; on the other, it echoes the formal concerns of such seminal fgures as Sol LeWitt and Donald Judd. In its artistic displacement of a real, recognisable object, the sculpture also calls to mind Andy Warhol’s Brillo boxes – culled from the environment of a supermarket – that indeed resonate with Hirst’s desire to have his cabinets look like those he saw in pharmacies. Being part of an endlessly ambivalent series, Bodies’ meaning seems perpetually in process, awaiting the thoughts and interpretations of its newcoming spectators. In a compelling anecdote, Hirst described the response of a particular viewer who had a distinct understanding of the drugs’ arrangement; having worked in the medical industry, she had in mind a physician’s very real and strategic placement of the medication packages. After staring at the object for some time, the viewer said she could not figure out Hirst’s cabinet; to her, it made no clinical sense, and was in fact a total mess – this, despite the fact it may have appeared exactly the opposite to an unsuspecting eye: neat, clinical and orderly.


The Sex Pistols Medicine Cabinet Series by Damien Hirst

Track 1 Holidays, 1989, Private Collection Photographed by Prudence Cuming Associates. © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2020.

Track 3 No Feelings, 1989, Irma and Norman Braman Collection, Miami Photographed by Prudence Cuming Associates. © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2020.

Track 4 Liar, 1989, Private Collection Photographed by Prudence Cuming Associates. © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2020.

Track 7 Seventeen, 1989, Private Collection Photographed by Prudence Cuming Associates. © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2020.

Track 8 Anarchy, 1989, Private Collection Photographed by Stephen White. © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2020.

Track 9 Submission, 1989, Bruno Bischoferger Collection, Zurich Photographed by Stephen White. © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2020.


Track 5 god, 1989, Private Collection Photographed by Prudence Cuming Associates. © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2020.

Track 5 God, 1989, Private Collection, New York Photographed by Prudence Cuming Associates. © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2020.

Track 6 Problems, 1989-2010, Private Collection Photographed by Prudence Cuming Associates © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2020.

Track 10 Pretty Vacant, 1989, Vicki and Kent Logan Collection, promised gif to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art Photographed by Prudence Cuming Associates. © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2020.

Track 11 New York, 1989, Private Collection Photographed by Prudence Cuming Associates. © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2020.

Track 12 E.M.I., 1989, Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlung München, Udo and Anette Brandhorst Collection Photographed by Haydar Koyupinar. © Bayerische Staatsgemaldesammlungen.


Lef / Right Joseph Cornell, Pharmacy, 1943, mixed media, Private Collection. © The Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation/ VAGA at ARS, NY and DACS, London. Image: 2020, Christie's Images, London/Scala, Florence. Sol LeWitt, Open Modular Cube, 1966, painted aluminium, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto. © ARS, NY and DACS, London 2020. Image: Bridgeman Images.

Of paramount importance in Bodies is also the theme at its core, deeply entrenched in all of Hirst’s subsequent works. Indeed, Bodies refers to Hirst’s preferred – and most employed – subject matter: the dichotomy of life and death, and the uniquely special, iridescent, and fragile line separating the two. ‘I’m going to die and I want to live forever’, the artist confessed to Sophie Calle. She asked in return, ‘You obviously don’t think that drugs can cure this problem, if indeed it is a problem, but do you think that art can?’ ‘No’, he responded, ‘but I’m not going to stop trying. I know it’s impossible to believe it, and impossible for me to not… If I follow my ideas about art through to their final conclusion I realize I shouldn’t make art, but I still do’ (Damien Hirst, in conversation with Sophie Calle, Internal Afairs, exh. cat., Institute of Contemporary Art, London, 1991, reproduced online). If it is not Bodies and its myriad medical contents that will save Hirst from the great leveller of death, it could perhaps be the idea behind it – the conceptual host allowing him to look beyond the mere physicality of the world. This seems to be at the heart of Hirst’s conceptual intention, overarching the entirety of his oeuvre.

Art – not medicine – is the cure. This is something he vividly expressed in the context of explaining his cabinets. ‘I cannot understand why some people believe completely in medicine and not in art’, he said ‘without questioning either. I was with my mum in the chemist’s; she was getting a prescription. And it was, like, complete trust on the sculpture and organizing shapes, one level in something she’s equally in the dark about. In the medicine cabinets there’s no actual medicines in the bottles. It’s just completely packaging and formal sculptures and organized shapes. My mum was looking at the same kind of stuf in the chemist’s and believing in it completely. And then, when looking at it in an art gallery, completely not believing in it. And as far as I could see it was the same thing. And for a long time I’d seen that. I knew that was going on. And I was thinking “If I could only make art like that – that did that”. And then in the end, I just decided to do that directly. I’ve always loved the idea of art maybe, you know, curing people. And I have this kind of obsession with the body’ (Damien Hirst, quoted in Arthur C. Danto, ‘Damien Hirst’s Medicine Cabinets: Art, Death, Sex, Society and Drugs’, The Complete Medicine Cabinets, exh. cat., L&M Fine Arts, New York, 2010, reproduced online).


The present work in Robert Tibbles' London home.


The Collection of

Robert Tibbles Young British Artists & More

18. Gilbert & George b. 1943 and b. 1942 CITY FAIRIES signed and dated ‘1991 Gilbert & George’ lower centre; further titled ‘CITY FAIRIES’ lower right mixed media, in artists’ frames, in 18 parts overall 253.7 x 426.8 cm (99 7/8 x 168 in.) Executed in 1991. Estimate £120,000-180,000 $157,000-235,000 €141,000-212,000 ♠ plus Buyers Premium and VAT, ARR applies*

Provenance Anthony d’Ofay Gallery, London Acquired from the above by the present owner in October 1997 Exhibited Aarhus Kunstmuseum, Gilbert & George: New Democratic Pictures, 6 September 25 October 1992, no. 3, p. 44 (illustrated, p. 45) Galleria d’Arte Moderna di Bologna, Gilbert & George, 18 May - 8 September 1996, p. 223 Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris, Gilbert & George, 4 October 1997 4 January 1998, p. 430 (illustrated, pp. 220-221) London, Tate Modern; Munich, Haus der Kunst; Turin, Castello di Rivoli; San Francisco, de Young Museum; Milwaukee Art Museum; New York, Brooklyn Museum, Gilbert & George: Major Exhibition, 15 February 2007 - 11 January 2009, pl. 143, p. 207 (illustrated, p. 132)

Literature François Jonquet, Gilbert & George: Intimate Conversations with François Jonquet, London, 2004, pp. 213-214 Robin Dutt, Gilbert & George: Obsessions & Compulsions, London, 2004, p. 120 (illustrated) Rudi Fuchs, ed., Gilbert & George: The Complete Pictures 1971-2005, Volume 2: 1988-2005, London, 2007, p. 763 (illustrated, p. 766)

‘In CITY FAIRIES we depicted ourselves as fairies. Fairies are traditionally little creatures that live at the bottom of your garden. Tey have wings like insects and lead an idyllic existence.’ Gilbert & George

*The amount of Buyer’s Premium, VAT and, if applicable, Artist’s Resale Right payable is dependent on the sale outcome. For full details see Calculating the Purchase Price in the Buyer’s Guide online or in this catalogue. Buyer’s Premium is payable at a maximum of 25%. VAT, where applicable, is payable at 20% on the Buyer’s Premium.


At once playful and sardonic, humorous and profane, CITY FAIRIES, 1991, is a paradigmatic example of Gilbert & George’s oeuvre, touching on themes of identity, freedom, and irreverence. Split in 18 colourful units, the work outlines a vast composition that is almost perfectly symmetrical, spanning bright purples, pinks, greens and yellows, and showing the two artists birthing one other through the mouth as winged, suited creatures, supported from beneath by a pair of exposed buttocks. At the core of the photographic construction – between the two artist’s standing bodies – lies an image of London’s Liverpool Street Station, brimming with pacing financiers. This location, somewhat incongruous within the composition, takes on particular meaning in the context of CITY FAIRIES’ provenance. Indeed, acquiring the work in 1997, Robert Tibbles concurrently worked at UBS as a bond salesman – the ofces of which were erected at the heart of the same London railway. A fervent admirer of large, brash contemporary art, the collector found it only ftting that the image would reference a distinct dimension of his own life; ‘It felt like my work’, he said (Robert Tibbles, in conversation with Cheyenne Westphal, 6 December 2019).

Testament to the work’s importance within the artists’ oeuvre, CITY FAIRIES was exhibited on the occasion of multiple ‘one-man shows’ (the duo insists on the term), at the Musée d’Art moderne de la Ville de Paris in 1998, and Tate Modern, London; Haus der Kunst, Munich; Castello di Rivoli, Turin; de Young Museum, San Francisco; Milwaukee Art Museum; and the Brooklyn Museum, New York, from 2007 to 2009. With its bright colours and bold subject matter, CITY FAIRIES sheds light on the visual and conceptual power of iconoclasm – a theme of paramount importance in Gilbert & George’s artistic output. Employing stained-glass windows and an eclectic colour palette, the work borrows from religious iconography, while at the same time challenging its numinous display through a use of highly graphic and disruptive images. Laying bare their bodies and aggrandising them to colossal proportions, the artistic duo pushes their imagery to new levels of rawness, confronting the viewer to anatomical parts traditionally only visible in situations of heightened intimacy. Providing further insight into the work’s meaning, the artists have declared: ‘Fairies are traditionally little creatures that live at the bottom of your garden. They have wings like insects and lead an idyllic existence. In English, “fairy” is also an old-fashioned familiar way of saying homosexual. A derogatory word. In a way, we’re turning the whole thing around by calling ourselves “fairies” and totally standing by it’ (Gilbert & George, quoted in François Jonquet, Gilbert & George. Intimate Conversations with François Jonquet, London, 2004, pp. 213-14). Conducting themselves as living sculptures – ‘Our whole life is one big sculpture’, George once said – Gilbert & George have, throughout their multi-disciplinary practice, surpassed any kind of artistic categorisation or etiquette, instead straddling a variety of media such as performance, sculpture and photography (George, quoted in Carter Ratclif, ‘Gilbert and George: The Fabric of their World’, Gilbert and George: The Complete Pictures 1971-1985, Stuttgart, 1996, p. 9). With its compelling size, history and subject matter, the photographic construction posits as an excellent example of their thematic output – both buoyant and acerbic, amusing and tormenting.

Damien Hirst, Posterity – The Holy Place, 2006, butterfies and household gloss on canvas, Private Collection. © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS/Artimage 2020. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd.


Gilbert Prousch and George Passmore, London, 1990. © Gilbert & George, 2020. Photo: Chris Felver/Getty Images.


The Collection of

Robert Tibbles Young British Artists & More

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19. Damien Hirst

b. 1965

Summer Breeze

Provenance White Cube, London Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2002

signed, titled and dated ‘Damien Hirst Summer Breeze 2002’ on the reverse butterfies and household gloss on canvas, in artist’s frame overall 203 x 233.6 cm (79 7/8 x 91 7/8 in.) Executed in 2002. Estimate £250,000-350,000 $327,000-457,000 €294,000-412,000 ♠ plus Buyers Premium and VAT, ARR applies*

‘Ten you get the beauty of the butterfy... Te death of an insect that still has this really optimistic beauty of a wonderful thing.’ Damien Hirst

*The amount of Buyer’s Premium, VAT and, if applicable, Artist’s Resale Right payable is dependent on the sale outcome. For full details see Calculating the Purchase Price in the Buyer’s Guide online or in this catalogue. Buyer’s Premium is payable at a maximum of 25%. VAT, where applicable, is payable at 20% on the Buyer’s Premium.


On frst encounter, Damien Hirst’s delectably fresh Summer Breeze, 2002, seems to paint the perfect summer day. Sixteen colourful butterflies, small and big, are set against a pristine blue sky, punctuated by sof formations of luminous white clouds. However, on closer inspection, the idyllic composition reveals darker folds. The sixteen butterfies fapping across the work’s surface are not roaming freely as they outwardly seem to be; their wings are trapped in the household gloss that covers the painting’s support; ‘I [wanted] it to look like an artist’s studio where he had wet coloured canvases and the butterfies had landed in them’, (Damien Hirst, quoted in Damien Hirst: The Agony and the Ecstasy, exh. cat., Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Naples, 2004, p. 83). Continuously playing with dichotomic notions of life and death, freedom and captivity, Hirst here creates an inherently ambivalent image that spurs contradicting emotions within the viewer – astonishment, rapture, quickly followed by hard-hitting disillusionment. Yet even in its bleak moments, the art of Hirst continues to spark wonder. His ‘work is essentially life-afrming, even at its most chilling moments’, writes Richard Shone (Richard Shone, ‘Damien Hirst: A Power to Amaze’, Damien Hirst: Pictures from the Saatchi Gallery, London, 2002, p. 85).

Acquired by Robert Tibbles in the early 2000s, the avid Hirst-collector observed that beyond the multiple links existing between the artist’s plethora of series, a particularly potent one stood out between Hirst’s butterfy paintings and his fy works – and more specifcally Summer Breeze, 2002, and AIDS, 2003, which both sat in conversation in Tibbles’ collection for decades. Capturing Hirst’s preoccupation with life and death, Summer Breeze depicts a clear blue sky scattered with butterfy wings glued to the canvas, whereas AIDS engulfs the viewer in darkness, with thousands of fies trapped behind glass. Through almost opposite renditions – one akin to an aesthetic of entrapment and the other deceivingly emulating an image of liberation – these two works convey similar themes, essentially spanning freedom and ensnarement, life and death. About the Butterfy works, Hirst has said: ‘I don’t want it to look like a kind of oil-painted beautiful sky that’s been created. If you use it, thick gloss paint really does, in a very sculptural way, start to form fucking clouds. I want it to look like an accident of gloss paint with butterfies stuck on it’ (Damien Hirst, quoted in Damien Hirst and Gordon Burn, On the Way to Work, London, 2001, p. 133). In this sense, Summer Breeze discreetly addresses the same complex and intense subjects as its visibly darkened counterpart; it is a testimony to the fragility of life, and the ofen misleading impressions of iridescent beauty.

‘I think rather than be personal you have to fnd universal triggers: everyone’s frightened of glass, everyone’s frightened of sharks, everyone loves butterfies.’ Damien Hirst

Installation view of Damien Hirst including In and Out of Love (White Paintings and Live Butterfies), 1991, Tate Modern, London, 2012. © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2020. Image: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd.


Yet in its specifc use of butterfies – insects that have been gifed a very particular experience of life, at once long in its concoction and quick in its expiration – Summer Breeze also tackles an age-old subject that has fascinated painters, poets, writers, and opera composers across time. By virtue of their beauty, unique growing stages and lifespan, butterfies have enjoyed a repeated presence in the canon of art, scattered in Renaissance paintings and cabinets of wonder, while at the same time maintaining heightened importance in contemporary art. Eminent fgures such as Vincent van Gogh, Odilon Redon, Mark Grotjahn, but also Vladimir Nabokov have observed the almostmiraculous status that the winged creatures were bestowed in life. ‘Caressed by the inert and omnivorous body of painting, butterfies, like the animals in formaldehyde, maintain their vital and pulsating aspect’, noted Mario Codognato, ‘even in the stasis of death, prolonging and transferring their fnal movement in the stasis of representation, and celebrating, simultaneously, their grandeur and

their impotence’ (Mario Codognato, ‘Warning Labels’, Damien Hirst: The Agony and the Ecstasy, exh. cat., Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Naples, 2004, p. 41). The universal, timeless and collective fascination surrounding butterflies also lead to more widespread activities, including butterfy-catching and butterfy-collecting. In the common practice of placing butterfies behind glass, man has notably achieved the impression that life can be frozen in the instant of death. A wondrous, exceptional example of Hirst’s butterfly paintings, Summer Breeze is one of the few formulations of the Butterfy series evincing a non-monochromatic background. The sky backdrop in the present work amplifies the discrepancy that exists between the butterfies’ physical entrapment and their falsely unrestrained fight; as a result, the composition takes on an added poetic layer, whereby living creatures are sunk into an intangible vortex of air – impossibly glued to the summer breeze.


The Collection of

Robert Tibbles Young British Artists & More

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20. Damien Hirst

b. 1965

Beautiful tropical, jungle painting (with pink snot)

Provenance Jay Jopling, London Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1999

signed, titled and dated ‘Damien Hirst Beautiful tropical, jungle painting (with pink snot) 1998’ on the reverse household gloss on canvas diameter 215 cm (84 5/8 in.) Executed in 1998. Estimate £270,000-350,000 $353,000-457,000 €318,000-412,000 ♠ plus Buyers Premium and VAT, ARR applies*

‘Te movement sort of implies life.’ Damien Hirst

*The amount of Buyer’s Premium, VAT and, if applicable, Artist’s Resale Right payable is dependent on the sale outcome. For full details see Calculating the Purchase Price in the Buyer’s Guide online or in this catalogue. Buyer’s Premium is payable at a maximum of 25%. VAT, where applicable, is payable at 20% on the Buyer’s Premium.


An enthralling tondo that transports the viewer into a vortex of colour and movement, Beautiful tropical, jungle painting (with pink snot), 1998, forms part of Damien Hirst’s celebrated series of Spin Paintings, which he frst conceptualised in his Brixton studio in 1992, and tentatively introduced to the public as a participative method in 1993. In the summer of that year, Hirst and his peer Angus Fairhurst – both dressed as clowns – set up a ‘Spin Art’ stall at the London street fair A Fête Worse than Death, organised by Joshua Compston and featuring works by Gavin Turk, Tracey Emin and Sarah Lucas. Hirst and Fairhurst’s stall encouraged passersby to create their own spin paintings by pouring variably coloured paint onto rapidly rotating canvases, producing a number of unique kaleidoscopic surfaces that, in their fnished state, were sold for one pound each. It was only a year later that Hirst began creating Spin Paintings with the intent of growing them as a prominent branch of his infamously serial artistic practice. That year, he commissioned a scaled-up version of the machine he had used at the fair, and began to work on tondos – which now occupy the majority of the series. Calling comparisons with Jackson Pollock’s infamous gestural process, Hirst’s application of paint combined with the machine’s energetic spin blurred the boundaries between genres and media.

Created in 1998 as an early formulation of the series, the present work vividly embodies Hirst’s tongue-in-cheek attitude to art historical tradition through a brilliant process-based approach, lingering somewhere between painting and performance. Enforcing his tendency to elaborate discreet rules for all his self-described ‘endless’ series of works, Hirst’s spins are often thematic and specific in designation. Like all other paintings from the series, Beautiful tropical, jungle painting (with pink snot) bears an idiosyncratically elongated title that begins with ‘Beautiful’ and ends with ‘Painting’. Composed of amorphous masses of ochre, green, red and blue that take over the surface of the canvas entirely, the composition transforms into a wondrous and vivacious explosion of colour that departs from Hirst’s usual intentness on order, repetition, and quasi-scientifc formulaism. Unlike his infamous Medicine Cabinets, Spot and Kaleidoscope Paintings, Hirst’s spins are controlled solely by the motion of a machine, which he is only able to manipulate to a limited degree. They are ‘childish… in the positive sense of the word’, the artist has said (Damien Hirst, quoted in Stuart Morgan, ‘An Interview with Damien Hirst’, 1995, reproduced online).

Henri Rousseau, The Dream, 1910, oil on canvas, The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Image: Bridgeman Images.


‘I really like making them [Spin Paintings]. And I really like the machine, and I really like the movement. Everytime they’re fnished, I'm desperate to do another one.’ Damien Hirst

They conjure a gem or candy-like visual universe that seems to spin forevermore – even in their fnal state. The circular shape of the canvas furthermore brings to mind Hirst’s infamous pattern of the spot, which invades a number of his series, namely his eponymously titled body of Spot Paintings. The result of daring spontaneity and dizzying movement, Beautiful tropical, jungle painting (with pink snot) is evocative of the movement found in Abstract Expressionist canvases, while at the same time recalling Robert Delaunay’s masterful circular compositions, which equally appear to swirl and whirl with unbridled energy. A tondo of colourful charisma enmeshing a number of striking hues, the present work boasts a comparable painterly constitution. Yet the wildness of its spin, paired with a revealingly feral title, suggests a tangible atmosphere. In this sense, one is reminded of Henri Rousseau’s The Dream, which features a nude woman reclining in flora and fauna, pried on by two wide-eyed lions. Though Rousseau’s picture entails scenic verisimilitude, and therefore contrasts with the present work’s full abstraction, its colours and suggestive angles convey a similar environment – beautifully tropical.


The Collection of

Robert Tibbles Young British Artists & More

21. Gary Hume

b. 1962

Magnolia Door One

Provenance Richard Salmon Gallery, London Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1988

signed and titled ‘MAGNOLIA DOOR ONE HUME’ on the reverse; further inscribed ‘SOLD TO STOCKBROKER’ on a label afxed to the reverse household gloss on canvas 254 x 162.6 cm (100 x 64 in.) Painted in 1988. Estimate £20,000-30,000 $26,100-39,200 €23,600-35,300 ♠ plus Buyers Premium and VAT, ARR applies*

‘Te doors swing to and fro, all day and all night long...’ Adrian Searle, ‘Gary Hume’, Frieze, 5 June 1993, online

*The amount of Buyer’s Premium, VAT and, if applicable, Artist’s Resale Right payable is dependent on the sale outcome. For full details see Calculating the Purchase Price in the Buyer’s Guide online or in this catalogue. Buyer’s Premium is payable at a maximum of 25%. VAT, where applicable, is payable at 20% on the Buyer’s Premium.


Opening and closing to the thoroughfare of bodies, hasty nurses, convoys of cleaning equipment and new life, hospital doors are silent witnesses to life’s most defning and perfunctory moments, encapsulating the spectrum of complexity that commands each person’s existence. In Gary Hume’s Magnolia Door One, 1988, the faint traces of circular windows in the upper quadrant of the canvas and the neat separation at its centre reenvision a door in its static state. An early example of Hume’s iconic series of Door Paintings, Magnolia Door One is an important formulation in which the artist employed the eponymous colour, immediately following the three seminal Mint Green Doors he presented at Damien Hirst’s Freeze show in 1988. Commenced the same year, the Magnolia doors were conceptualised specifcally in reference to their colour. ‘I went to St Bartholomew’s Hospital with a tape measure and a piece of paper, measured numerous doors and made schematic copies of them’, he said. ‘I used house paint in an institutional colour, magnolia, which is a colour of no choice… it was about democratic use of the symbol of the door’ (Gary Hume, quoted in ‘Brilliant’: New Art from London, exh. cat., Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, 1995, p. 45). Though Hume’s early doors captured the interest of only a select few in 1988, the artist went on to represent Great Britain in the Venice Biennale eleven years later. Today, his works are held in the prominent collections of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Tate, London, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, among others.

A study in liminality, Hume’s Magnolia Door One looks at the dutiful structure of the door that, in the context of hospitals, physically separates life from death. At the same time, the artist uses a neutral, transitional hue that vacillates between many different colours, evoking the chromatically diminished art of Agnes Martin, who equally studied chromatic soothening in her minimalist canvases. Pink, beige, or green according to the viewer’s position and perspective, Magnolia Door One posits as a chameleon of sorts, adapting to all situations like a double-swing door. As a result, the painting is as transitional in subject matter as it is in aesthetic; it presents itself as a great leveller both in meaning and in form. Commenting on the portals’ capacity to carry poetic meaning, Adrian Searle writes, ‘It seems entirely appropriate to our time that the painting-as-window should have become a painting-as-door, and that the door should be closed. It is an image of closure and impenetrability which still manages to allude to the idea of something beyond – withheld, unseen, absent. There’s a dumb poetry in the image of the shut door. The paint is built up, layer on layer, accentuating in relief the parts of the door. It is painted as well or as badly as you or I might decorate a door. Any drips are accidental’ (Adrian Searle, ‘Gary Hume’, Frieze, 5 June 1993, online).

‘Seeing them [Door Paintings] together, there’s a sense of disquiet because they can turn slightly macabre-like a regiment of doors with anthropomorphic qualities.’ Gary Hume

Gary Hume, Incubus, 1991, alkyd paint on Formica, Tate Collection, London. © Gary Hume. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2020. Image: Tate, London.


Gautier Deblonde, Gary Hume, from the Artists Series, 1993-99, black and white photograph. © Gary Hume. Image © Gautier Deblonde. All Rights Reserved, DACSArtimage 2020.

Similarly displacing and physically embodying objects to elevate, honour and commemorate all the things that surround us, Rachel Whiteread’s sculptural output that sheds light on the household items and familiar architectural structures we ofen overlook. Just like Hume’s work, Whiteread’s sculptures are evocative of much more than that which they represent indexically. They bring the viewer back to the notion of inescapability, as outwardly closed and impenetrable structures. Equally, Robert Gober and Felix Gonzalez-Torres’ silent sculptures come to mind – notably in their transformation of movable or live constructions into mute, seemingly sterile forms. In displacing what was once known into the realm of the nebulous, these artists address the poetry that is located in the ordinary – those small alterations that render the invisible visible again. Exploring the diference between the painted and the real, Magnolia Door One moves between strangely representational and iconographically minimal. Like a doorway, it is just the right size to encompass a human body – designed to meet human needs, and therefore, immediately evocative. An exceptional example of one of Hume’s most compelling ideas, the present painting demonstrates the medium’s ability to convey emotion through a simple, quintessential rendering.


Sarah Morris’ Girls and Fuck in the home of Robert Tibbles, to be included in the 20th Century and Contemporary Art Day Sale under Lots 157 and 158 respectively. Behind are Damien Hirst’s Antipyrylazo III and Gary Hume’s Magnolia Door One.


20th Century & Contemporary Art Day Sale

London / 14 February 2020


The Collection of

Robert Tibbles Young British Artists & More

146. Grayson Perry

b. 1960

Pope stamped with the pope’s monogram on the inside of the lid glazed earthenware 27.6 x 17.3 x 18.3 cm (10 7/8 x 6 3/4 x 7 1/4 in.) Estimate £20,000-30,000 $26,000-39,100 €23,500-35,200 ♠ plus Buyers Premium and VAT, ARR applies*

Provenance Birch & Conran, London Acquired from the above by the present owner circa 1993-1994

Alternative view of present lot.

*The amount of Buyer’s Premium, VAT and, if applicable, Artist’s Resale Right payable is dependent on the sale outcome. For full details see Calculating the Purchase Price in the Buyer’s Guide online or in this catalogue. Buyer’s Premium is payable at a maximum of 25%. VAT, where applicable, is payable at 20% on the Buyer’s Premium.


The Collection of

Robert Tibbles Young British Artists & More

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147. Damien Hirst

b. 1965

I’m So Tired signed on the reverse pills and eggshell paint on canvas 122 x 122 cm (48 x 48 in.) Executed in 1990. Estimate £80,000-120,000 $104,000-156,000 €93,900-141,000 ♠ plus Buyers Premium and VAT, ARR applies*

Provenance Gifed by the artist to the present owner

‘Tere’s a balance I was after between a certain amount of this and a certain amount of that, like an alchemist.’ Damien Hirst

I’m So Tired forms part of a seminal four-part series of ‘Pill Paintings’ executed by Damien Hirst in 1990, each comprised of pharmaceutical pills pushed through the reverse of a canvas. The resulting protrusions disrupt the pure cream painted surface. This cycle of works serves as a synthesis of two of the artist’s most important achievements: the ‘Spot Paintings’ and ‘Medicine Cabinets’, uniting the ordered and painterly qualities of the former with the physical media of the latter. The title I’m So Tired – as with all works in the series – was borrowed from a song by the Beatles, where the lyrics allude to the infuence of drugs. This choice further links the work to Bodies (1989) and the ‘Medicine Cabinets’ which were named afer Sex Pistols songs. On the theme of medicine, the Artist wrote “All Pharmaceutical drugs exist in the space between birth and death. The drugs are meant to keep you alive.” (Damien Hirst & Gordon Burn, I want to spend the Rest of My Life Everywhere, with Everyone, One to One, Always, Forever, Now, London 1997, p. 225), the pills incorporated into I’m So Tired appear suspended between the recto and verso of the piece and are exemplary of the Hirst’s opinion of the place Pharmaceuticals occupy in society.

*The amount of Buyer’s Premium, VAT and, if applicable, Artist’s Resale Right payable is dependent on the sale outcome. For full details see Calculating the Purchase Price in the Buyer’s Guide online or in this catalogue. Buyer’s Premium is payable at a maximum of 25%. VAT, where applicable, is payable at 20% on the Buyer’s Premium.


© Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2020.


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Robert Tibbles Young British Artists & More

O♦

148. Damien Hirst

b. 1965

AIDS signed and inscribed ‘Mathew Damien Hirst’ on the reverse; further signed ‘Damien Hirst’ on a poem printed on paper afxed to the reverse fies and resin on canvas, in artist’s frame overall 164.6 x 128.8 cm (64 3/4 x 50 3/4 in.) Executed in 2003. Estimate £80,000-120,000 $104,000-156,000 €93,900-141,000 ♠

Provenance White Cube, London Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited London, White Cube, Damien Hirst: Romance in the Age of Uncertainty, 10 September - 19 October 2003, pp. 26-27, 142 (illustrated, p. 26) Naples, Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Damien Hirst. The Agony and the Ecstasy: Selected Works from 1989-2004, 31 October 2004 - 31 January 2005, pp. 87-89, 254 (illustrated, pp. 87-89)

plus Buyers Premium and VAT, ARR applies*

‘You trick the viewer into thinking that you’re telling them something, but you’re revealing something that they already have. It’s like magic.’ Damien Hirst

AIDS is a powerful continuation and exploration of one of Hirst’s most significant preoccupations, the theme of Death and decay. Consciously rendered in proportions identical to Hirst’s seminal ‘Medicine Cabinets’ selected for the artist’s degree show in 1989, the work is comprised of thousands of black fies afxed to the surface of a canvas in a dense monochromatic blanket. AIDS belongs to a series of thirteen ‘Fly Paintings’ created for Hirst’s 2003 exhibition at White Cube: Romance in the Age of Uncertainty. Each canvas is titled afer deadly diseases such as Smallpox, Leukaemia and Meningitis. The Fly Paintings’ medium directly references Hirst’s 1990 masterpiece A Thousand Years; which displays a cyclical representation of life and death through the glass vitrine containing a rotting cow’s head being slowly devoured a swarm of live fies, which in turn are dying one by one as a result of the Insect-O-Cutor and whose bodies litter the foor. Through the series incorporating AIDS, Hirst challenges the traditional notion of painting by utilising the powerful motif of the Fly and all of the meaning it conjures, as the sole medium for the painting.

*The amount of Buyer’s Premium, VAT and, if applicable, Artist’s Resale Right payable is dependent on the sale outcome. For full details see Calculating the Purchase Price in the Buyer’s Guide online or in this catalogue. Buyer’s Premium is payable at a maximum of 25%. VAT, where applicable, is payable at 20% on the Buyer’s Premium.


© Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2020.


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149. Julian Opie

b. 1958

Imagine you are driving. 4. signed ‘Julian Opie’ on the stretcher vinyl on aluminium stretcher, in artist’s frame 240.4 x 336.8 cm (94 5/8 x 132 5/8 in.) Executed in 1997. Estimate £20,000-30,000 $26,000-39,100 €23,500-35,200 ♠ plus Buyers Premium and VAT, ARR applies*

Provenance Lisson Gallery, London Acquired from the above by the present owner

‘What I would really like to do is make a painting and then walk into it.’ Julian Opie

Belonging to a series of fve paintings, Imagine that you are driving.4.  presents an empty expanse of road disappearing into the distance. Based on photographs taken during an inspiring trip Julian Opie took across Europe in 1993, the work is an exquisite digital alteration of a rural landscape pushing the boundaries of traditional artistic practice. A cartoonish image reminiscing of the symbolic landscape of computer driving games and children books, Opie encourages the viewers to embark on an endless and hypnotic journey into a stylised representation of the world, emptied of human presence. Graduated from Goldsmiths in 1982 and burst onto a pre-Young British Artists art scene in London, the artist was one of the most infuential fgures for the now well-known group of artists. Though only few years ahead of the YBAs, Julian Opie instilled confdence in the youngest artists to become part of the artistic fabric and engage actively with the art community.

*The amount of Buyer’s Premium, VAT and, if applicable, Artist’s Resale Right payable is dependent on the sale outcome. For full details see Calculating the Purchase Price in the Buyer’s Guide online or in this catalogue. Buyer’s Premium is payable at a maximum of 25%. VAT, where applicable, is payable at 20% on the Buyer’s Premium.


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*The amount of Buyer’s Premium, VAT and, if applicable, Artist’s Resale Right payable is dependent on the sale outcome. For full details see Calculating the Purchase Price in the Buyer’s Guide online or in this catalogue. Buyer’s Premium is payable at a maximum of 25%. VAT, where applicable, is payable at 20% on the Buyer’s Premium.


150. Sam Taylor-Johnson

b. 1967

Pietà flm/DVD, duration: 1 minute 57 seconds installation dimensions variable Executed in 2001, this work is number 2 from an edition of 3 and is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity, published by White Cube, London. Estimate £20,000-30,000 $26,000-39,100 €23,500-35,200 ♠ plus Buyers Premium and VAT, ARR applies*

Exhibited New York, Matthew Marks Gallery, Sam Taylor-Wood: The Passion, 21 September - 2 November 2002 (another example exhibited) London, White Cube, Sam Taylor-Johnson: Mute, 23 November 2001 - 12 January 2002 (another example exhibited) Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, Sam Taylor-Wood, 2 August - 5 October 2008 (another example exhibited) Literature Sam Taylor-Wood, exh. cat., Hayward Gallery, London, 2002, n.p. (another example illustrated)

Provenance White Cube, London Acquired from the above by the present owner

With profound humanity and an essential cinematic rendering, Pietà presents the artist Sam Taylor-Johnson cradling the Hollywood actor Robert Downey Jr. in her lap with splayed legs and open arms. Referring to Michelangelo’s Pietà in St Peter’s Basilica – an iconic sculpture portraying the Madonna revealing the body of a supine Christ following Crucifxion – this scene alludes to essential themes of life and death, as well as the relationship between a mother and her son. Notably, it was created at a time when Taylor-Johnson was battling cancer, and Robert Downey Jr. was recovering from addiction issues. The artist’s portrayal of human sufering is thus heightened by the hard-hitting reality of their respective health states; and the physical support Taylor-Johnson provides to Downey takes on an added layer of symbolism, truly embodying the mutual sense of care and benevolence they shared for one another. In the flm, there is no scant movement and no sound, aside from Robert Downey Jr.’s heavy breathing. The viewer is thus left with a quasi-photographic shot, which only so slightly moves upon careful and sustained inspection. Filmed for just under two minutes – the time that Taylor-Johnson could hold Downey’s weight over her legs and open arms – the work exudes a powerful sense of gravitas and spirituality, that brings the viewer back to Michelangelo’s numinous vision.

Sam Taylor-Johnson and Robert Downey Jr. at the private view of Sam Taylor-Johnson’s Yes I No, White Cube, London, 23 October 2008. Image: Dave M. Benett/Getty Images.


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151. Mat Collishaw

b. 1966

Two works: (i) Antonius, a horse belonging to his grace the Duke of Grafon; (ii) The Marquess of Rockingham’s scrub with John Singleton Up each glass, photocopy, light, light ftting and steel each 20.5 x 23 cm (8 1/8 x 9 in.) Executed in 1990.

Estimate £3,000-4,000 $3,900-5,200 €3,500-4,700 ♠ plus Buyers Premium and VAT, ARR applies*

Provenance Karsten Schubert, London Acquired from the above by the present owner circa 1990

‘Art is the modern religion, isn’t it? Tat’s what you get from galleries – I don’t think there’s another place apart from a church where you’re allowed to meditate about your place on earth, and think about questions deep and frivolous.’ Mat Collishaw

*The amount of Buyer’s Premium, VAT and, if applicable, Artist’s Resale Right payable is dependent on the sale outcome. For full details see Calculating the Purchase Price in the Buyer’s Guide online or in this catalogue. Buyer’s Premium is payable at a maximum of 25%. VAT, where applicable, is payable at 20% on the Buyer’s Premium.


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152. Simon Patterson

1967

The Great Bear signed, numbered and dated ‘Simon Patterson 1992 A/P’ lower right lithograph, in artist’s frame 108.8 x 134.2 cm (42 7/8 x 52 7/8 in.) Executed in 1992, this work is artist’s proof 1 from an edition of 50 plus 10 artist’s proofs. Estimate £18,000-22,000 $23,400-28,600 €21,100-25,800 ♠ plus Buyers Premium and VAT, ARR applies*

Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Exhibited London, Tate Gallery, The Turner Prize 1996, 29 October 1996 - 12 January 1997, pp. 10-11, 13 (illustrated, p. 13) London, Royal Academy of Arts, Sensation: Young British Artists from the Saatchi Collection, 18 September - 28 December 1997, pp. 143, 204, 216 (another example exhibited and illustrated, p. 143)

Helsinki City Art Museum; Stockholm, Royal Academy of Free Arts; Kyiv, Soros Foundation; Warsaw, Zacheta Gallery; Chemnitz, Städtische Kunstsammlungen; Prague, Museum of Modern Art; Zagreb Union of Croatian Artists; Darmstadt, Institute Mathildenhoe;Vilnius, Centre of Contemporary Art; Budapest, Museum of Modern Art; Bratislava, Slovak National Gallery; Bucharest, National Theatre Galleries, Dimensions Variable, New Works for the British Council Collection, 4 November 1997 - 10 December 1999 , pp. 48-49 (another example exhibited and illustrated, p. 49) London, Alan Cristea Gallery, Signature Pieces: Contemporary British Prints and Multiples, 5 January - 6 February 1999, pp. 28-29, 46 (another example illustrated, p. 46) Slovakia, Kosice, Kunsthalle, British Express, 14 November 2013 - 26 January 2014 (another example exhibited) New York, Benrimon Contemporary, Simon Patterson: Anthology, 6 November - 18 December 2010 (another example exhibited) Leyton Library, Simon Patterson, 24 April - 31 August 2019 (another example exhibited)

Literature Richard Cork and Dick Price Kent, Young British Art: The Saatchi Decade, London, 1999, p. 123 (another example illustrated) Simmons & Simmons, Made in London, Southampton, 2002, pl. 18, pp. 47, 63 (another example illustrated, p. 47) Patricia Bickers, ed., Simon Patterson, London, 2002, n.p. (another example illustrated) Pamela K. Gilbert, Imagined Londons, New York, 2002, pp. 114-116 (another example exhibited, p. 115) The Saatchi Gallery, 100 The Work That Changed British Art, London, 2003, no. 56, pp. 118 - 119 and 210 (another example illustrated, p. 119) David Carrier, A World Art History And Its Objects, Pennsylvania, 2008, pp. 62-63 (another example illustrated, p. 62) Claire Dobbin, London Underground Maps: Art, Design and Cartography, London, 2012, pp.114, 115 (another example illustrated, p. 114)

*The amount of Buyer’s Premium, VAT and, if applicable, Artist’s Resale Right payable is dependent on the sale outcome. For full details see Calculating the Purchase Price in the Buyer’s Guide online or in this catalogue. Buyer’s Premium is payable at a maximum of 25%. VAT, where applicable, is payable at 20% on the Buyer’s Premium.


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153. Simon Patterson

1967

Rodrigo Borgia, Lucrezia Borgia, Cesare Borgia silkscreen monoprint on acrylic gesso on canvas, in 3 parts each 182.5 x 136.8 cm (71 7/8 x 53 7/8 in.) Executed in 1988. Estimate £3,000-5,000 $3,900-6,500 €3,500-5,900 ♠ plus Buyers Premium and VAT, ARR applies*

‘Making a pair of paintings in 1987 of the names Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor. It hung in the college bar, and felt like my frst proper artwork. Exhibiting with Damien Hirst in the Freeze show in 1988 led to my frst solo show.’ Simon Patterson

Provenance Lisson Gallery, London Acquired from the above by the present owner

*The amount of Buyer’s Premium, VAT and, if applicable, Artist’s Resale Right payable is dependent on the sale outcome. For full details see Calculating the Purchase Price in the Buyer’s Guide online or in this catalogue. Buyer’s Premium is payable at a maximum of 25%. VAT, where applicable, is payable at 20% on the Buyer’s Premium.


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154. Bob Law

1934-2004

Untitled, 7.4. 87 signed and dated ‘BOB LAW 7.4.87’ on the reverse watercolour on paper 57.5 x 76 cm (22 5/8 x 29 7/8 in.) Executed in 1987.

Estimate £6,000-8,000 $7,800-10,400 €7,000-9,400 ♠ plus Buyers Premium and VAT, ARR applies*

Provenance Karsten Schubert, London Acquired from the above by the present owner


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155. Ian Davenport

b. 1966

Untitled

Provenance Waddington Galleries, London Acquired from the above by the present owner

oil on canvas 213.3 x 213.3 cm (83 7/8 x 83 7/8 in.) Painted in 1988.

Exhibited London, Karsten Schubert, Ian Davenport, 15 November - 7 December 1988

Estimate £8,000-12,000 $10,400-15,600 €9,400-14,100 ♠

Literature Damien Hirst, Martin Filler and Michael Bracewell, eds., Ian Davenport, London, 2014, no. 9, pp. 25, 274 (illustrated, p. 25)

plus Buyers Premium and VAT, ARR applies*

*The amount of Buyer’s Premium, VAT and, if applicable, Artist’s Resale Right payable is dependent on the sale outcome. For full details see Calculating the Purchase Price in the Buyer’s Guide online or in this catalogue. Buyer’s Premium is payable at a maximum of 25%. VAT, where applicable, is payable at 20% on the Buyer’s Premium.


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156. Michael Craig-Martin

b. 1941

Narrative Painting signed and dated ‘Michael Craig-Martin 1993-4’ on the overlap acrylic on canvas 183.1 x 366.1 cm (72 1/8 x 144 1/8 in.) Painted in 1993-94.

Estimate £30,000-40,000 $39,100-52,100 €35,200-46,900 ♠ plus Buyers Premium and VAT, ARR applies*

Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner in 1994

‘Michael included a book because he always said, “If you want to be a really serious collector, Robert, you cannot have curtain or books in one room”. And then he included the back of a canvas to show I am a collector.’ Robert Tibbles


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Robert Tibbles Young British Artists & More

157. Sarah Morris

b. 1967

Girls signed, titled, dedicated and dated ‘“GIRLS” FOR PAOLO + ROBERT S Morris ‘96’ on the overlap household paint on canvas 102 x 152.5 cm (40 1/8 x 60 in.) Painted in 1996.

Provenance White Cube, London Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Oxford, Museum of Modern Art; Galerie fur Zeitgenossiische Kunst Leipzig; Dijon, Le Consortium, Sarah Morris, 18 April 1998 27 June 1999, no. 19, n.p. (illustrated)

Estimate £6,000-8,000 $7,800-10,400 €7,000-9,400 ♠ plus Buyers Premium and VAT, ARR applies*

*The amount of Buyer’s Premium, VAT and, if applicable, Artist’s Resale Right payable is dependent on the sale outcome. For full details see Calculating the Purchase Price in the Buyer’s Guide online or in this catalogue. Buyer’s Premium is payable at a maximum of 25%. VAT, where applicable, is payable at 20% on the Buyer’s Premium.


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158. Sarah Morris

b. 1967

Fuck

Estimate £6,000-8,000 $7,800-10,400 €7,000-9,400 ♠ plus Buyers Premium and VAT, ARR applies*

signed, titled, dedicated and dated ‘“FUCK” FOR ROBERT & PAOLO S Morris ‘96’ on the overlap household paint on canvas 102 x 152.6 cm (40 1/8 x 60 1/8 in.) Painted in 1996.

FPO

Provenance White Cube, London Acquired from the above by the present owner


Evening Auction Sale Information

20th Century & Contemporary Art Evening Sale

20th Century & Contemporary Art Department

Auction and Viewing Location 30 Berkeley Square, London W1J 6EX

Head of Evening Sale Rosanna Widén +44 20 7318 4060 rwiden@phillips.com

Auction 13 February, 7pm Viewing 3–13 February Monday – Saturday 10am – 6pm Sunday 12pm – 6pm Sale Designation When sending in written bids or making enquiries please refer to this sale as UK010120 or 20th Century & Contemporary Art Evening Sale. Absentee and Telephone Bids tel +44 20 7318 4045 fax +44 20 7318 4035 bidslondon@philips.com

Associate Specialist Charlotte Gibbs +44 20 7318 4093 cgibbs@phillips.com Senior Administrator Constance Perret +44 20 7318 4073 cperret@phillips.com Writer/Researcher Clara Krzentowski +44 20 7318 4064 ckrzentowski@phillips.com Senior Property Manager Ross Martin +44 20 7318 4057 rmartin@phillips.com Photographers Jean Bourbon Alex Braun Matt Kroenig Kent Pell Charlie Sheldon Auctioneer Henry Highley

Front cover Lot 17, Damien Hirst Bodies, 1989 (detail) © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2020.

Back cover Lot 15, Michael Craig-Martin Full, 2000 (detail) © Michael Craig-Martin.

Client Accounting Richard Addington Head of Client Accounting +44 20 7901 7914 Jason King Client Accounting, Director +44 20 7318 4086 Buyer Accounts Heather Welham +44 20 7901 2982 Seller Accounts Surbjit Kaur +44 20 7318 4072 Client Services 30 Berkeley Square, London W1J 6EX +44 20 7318 4010 Shipping Andrew Kitt +44 20 7318 4047 Annaliese Clark +44 20 7318 4081 Rita Matos +44 20 7901 7906 Lucia Nuñez +44 20 7901 7920 Creative Services Andrea Koronkiewicz, Director of Creative Services Orlann Capazorio, Director of Production Steve Rubbins, Senior Graphic Designer Grace Neighbour, Graphic Designer


Day Auction Sale Information

20th Century & Contemporary Art Day Sale

20th Century & Contemporary Art Department

Auction & Viewing Location 30 Berkeley Square, London, W1J 6EX

Head of Day Sale Tamila Kerimova tkerimova@phillips.com +44 20 7318 4065

Auction 14 February, 2pm Viewing 3–14 February Monday – Saturday 10am–6pm Sunday 12pm–6pm Sale Designation When sending in written bids or making enquiries please refer to this sale as UK010220 or 20th Century & Contemporary Art Day Sale Absentee and Telephone Bids tel +44 20 7318 4045 fax +44 20 7318 4035 bidslondon@philips.com

Cataloguer Louise Simpson lsimpson@phillips.com +44 20 7901 7911 Administrator Elena Setaro esetaro@phillips.com +44 20 7318 4028 Senior Property Manager Ross Martin +44 20 7318 4788 rmartin@phillips.com Photographers Charlie Sheldon Alex Braun Jean Bourbon Matt Kroenig Kent Pell Auctioneers Henry Highley, Principal Auctioneer Susanna Brockman Adam Clay

Client Accounting Richard Addington Head of Client Accounting +44 20 7901 7914 Jason King Client Accounting, Director +44 20 7318 4086 Buyer Accounts Heather Welham +44 20 7901 2982 Seller Accounts Surbjit Kaur +44 20 7318 4072 Client Services 30 Berkeley Square, London W1J 6EX +44 20 7318 4010 Shipping Andrew Kitt +44 20 7318 4047 Annaliese Clark +44 20 7318 4081 Rita Matos +44 20 7901 7906 Lucia Nuñez +44 20 7901 7920 Creative Services Andrea Koronkiewicz, Director of Creative Services Orlann Capazorio, Director of Production Steve Rubbins, Senior Graphic Designer Grace Neighbour, Graphic Designer

The 20th Century & Contemporary Art Evening and Day sale would like to thank: London Operations Team, Anthony Brennan, Nathan Bendavid, Kate Finefrock, Francesca Carnovelli, Raphael Laval, Zoe Tolkowsky, Brooke Reese, Julia Hirschberg, Samara Kaplan, Mathilde Heaton, Caroline Porter, Judith Lamb, Catherine Bird, Rebecca Cockell, Rebecca Dabby, Michael de Habsbourg-Lorraine,Stanislas Reifers, Eliza Davis Beard, Gabriella McIlgorm and Claire Ping.


UK Auction Buyer’s Guide The following pages are designed to offer you information on how to buy at auction at Phillips. Our staff will be happy to assist you. The Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty published on our website at https://phillips.com also govern the auction. Bidders are strongly encouraged to read them as they outline the legal relationship between Phillips, the seller and the buyer and describe the terms upon which items are bought at auction. A) Before The Auction Catalogues & Catalogue Entries Our catalogues provide information on the lots for sale at the auction and are available on our website at www.phillips. com and in hard copy. Lot details can also be viewed on the Phillips App. If you would like to purchase a hard copy catalogue for a Phillips auction, please visit our website or contact us at catalogues@phillips.com. Catalogue entries may include the history of ownership of a work of art, as well as the exhibition history of the property and references to the work in art publications. While we are careful in the cataloguing process, provenance, exhibition and literature references may not be exhaustive. In some cases we may not disclose the identity of previous owners where we are not authorised to do so. Please note that all dimensions of the property set out in the catalogue entry are approximate. Pre-auction viewings are open to the public and free of charge. The dates and times are published on our website at https://phillips.com. Our specialists are available to give advice and condition reports at viewings or by appointment. Estimates Pre-sale estimates are intended as a guide for prospective buyers. Any bid within the high and low estimate range should, in our opinion, offer a chance of success. However, many lots achieve prices below or above the pre-sale estimates. Pre-sale estimates do not include the buyer’s premium or VAT. Where ‘Estimate on Request’ appears, please contact the specialist department for further information. As estimates can be subject to revision we suggest contacting us closer to the time of the auction. Estimates in non-local currencies Although the sale is conducted in pounds sterling, the pre-sale estimates in the auction catalogues may also be printed in other currencies. These estimates are approximate and provided as a courtesy to our clients. The exchange rates used are those applying on the last practical date before printing the catalogue. The rates may have changed between the time of printing the catalogue and the auction. Condition Our catalogues include references to condition only in the descriptions of multiple works (e.g., prints). Such references, though, do not amount to a full description of condition. The absence of reference to the condition of a lot in the catalogue entry does not imply that the lot is free from faults or imperfections.

Solely as a convenience to clients, Phillips may provide condition reports. In preparing such reports, our specialists assess the condition in a manner appropriate to the estimated value of the property and the nature of the auction in which it is included. While condition reports are prepared honestly and carefully, our staff are not professional restorers or trained conservators. We therefore encourage all prospective buyers to inspect the property at the pre-sale exhibitions and recommend, particularly in the case of any lot of significant value, that you retain your own restorer or professional advisor to report to you on the property’s condition prior to bidding.

∑ Endangered Species Lots with this symbol have been identified at the time of cataloguing as containing endangered or other protected species of wildlife which may be subject to restrictions regarding export or import and which may require permits for export as well as import.

Any prospective buyer of photographs or prints should always request a condition report because all such property is sold unframed, unless otherwise indicated in the condition report. If a lot is sold framed, Phillips accepts no liability for the condition of the frame. If we sell any lot unframed, we will be pleased to refer the purchaser to a professional framer.

Calculating the Total Purchase Price If you are the successful bidder on a Lot, the total purchase price you pay is made up of the following elements:

Symbols Used In The Catalogue You may see the following symbols referenced in the catalogue. O Guaranteed Property Lots designated with the symbol O are the subject of a minimum price guarantee. In such cases Phillips has guaranteed to the seller of the lot that regardless of the outcome of the sale the seller shall receive no less than a minimum sum. This guarantee may be provided solely by Phillips or jointly with a third party. ♦ Third Party Guarantee Where Phillips has agreed to a minimum price guarantee it assumes the financial risk of a lot failing to sell or selling for less than the minimum price guarantee. Because the sums involved can be significant Phillips may choose to share the burden of that financial risk with a third party. The third party shares the risk by committing in advance of the sale, usually by way of a written bid, to buy the lot for an agreed amount whether or not there are competing bidders for the lot. If there are competing bidders third party guarantors may also bid above any written bid. In this way the thirdparty guarantor assumes the risk of the bidding not reaching the amount of the minimum price guarantee. In return for underwriting or sharing this risk Phillips will usually compensate the third party. The compensation may be in the form of a fixed fee or an amount calculated by reference to the hammer price of the lot. If the thirdparty guarantor is the successful bidder Phillips will report the purchase price net of any fees paid to the third-party guarantor. ∆ Property in which Phillips has an Ownership Interest Lots with this symbol indicate that Phillips owns the lot in whole or in part or has an economic interest in the lot equivalent to an ownership interest. No Reserve •Unless indicated by a •, all lots in this catalogue are offered subject to a reserve. A reserve is the confidential value established between Phillips and the seller and below which a lot may not be sold. The reserve for each lot is generally set at a percentage of the low estimate and will not exceed the low pre-sale estimate.

Ж Property Subject to US Import Tarifs

Lots with this symbol indicate that the Property may be subject to additional tariffs upon importation into the United States of America. See paragraph 12 of the Conditions of Sale.

Hammer Price

Buyer’s Premium

VAT on Buyer’s Premium and/or Hammer Price (If applicable)

Artist’s Resale Royalty (ARR) (If applicable)

The Hammer Price: This is the final, highest bid which the auctioneer accepts by bringing down the auctioneer’s hammer. Buyer’s Premium: This is the commission Phillips charges the successful highest bidder and buyer of the lot. The Buyer’s premium is calculated on the hammer price of the lot at the following rates on a cumulative basis: • 25% on the portion of the hammer price up to and including £300,000; and • 20% on the portion of the hammer price above £300,000 up to and including £3,000,000 and • 13.5% on the portion of the hammer price above £3,000,000. Where VAT is payable on the Buyer’s premium the VAT inclusive Buyer’s Premium rates are 30%, 24% and 16.2% respectively. VAT Most items we sell are sold under UK Auctioneer’s Margin Scheme rules. This means that VAT is charged at 20% on the buyer’s premium and will not be shown separately on the invoice. UK Auctioneer’s Margin Scheme lots have no VAT symbol. Where the lot has a †, ‡ or Ω symbol against it, VAT may be charged on a different basis. For full details, including how to claim VAT refunds, please see the VAT & Tax Guide in this Auction Buyer’s Guide and on our website ♠ Artist’s Resale Royalty (ARR) The laws in certain countries entitle qualifying artists or their estates to a royalty when the artist’s works are resold for a hammer price of EUR 1,000 or more. Lots subject to ARR are marked with the symbol ♠. The ARR is calculated as a percentage of the hammer price on a cumulative basis as follows and is payable as part of the purchase price: Portion of the Hammer Price (in EUROS) From 0 to 50,000 From 50,000.01 to 200,000

Royalty Rate 4% 3%


From 200,000.01 to 350,000 From 350,000.01 to 500,000 Exceeding 500,000

1% 0.5% 0.25%

The total charge for ARR on any single lot cannot exceed Euros 12,500. To calculate the ARR, we use the pounds sterling/euro reference exchange rate quoted on the date of the auction by the European Central Bank. Example To illustrate how the purchase price is calculated, please see the below example: UK Auctioneer’s Margin Scheme lot Hammer Price: £350,000 Buyer’s Premium including VAT @20% £102,000: 25% of first £300,000 of the hammer price = £75,000 + 20% on the balance of £50,000 = £10,000 Total BP = £85,000 VAT @ 20% on the total BP of £85,000 = £17,000

By bidding on the telephone, you consent to the recording of your conversation. We suggest that you leave a maximum bid, excluding the buyer’s premium and VAT, which we can execute on your behalf in the event we are unable to reach you by telephone. Online Bidding If you cannot attend the auction in person, you may bid online on our online live bidding platform available on our website at https://phillips.com. The digital saleroom is optimized to run on Google Chrome, Firefox, Opera and Internet Explorer browsers. Clients who wish to run the platform on Safari will need to install Adobe FlashPlayer. Follow the links to ‘Auctions’ and ‘Digital Saleroom’ and then pre-register by clicking on ‘Register to Bid Live.’ The first time you register you will be required to create an account; thereafter you will only need to register for each sale. You must pre-register at least 24 hours before the start of the auction in order to be approved by our bid department. Please note that corporate firewalls may cause difficulties for online bidders.

B) At The Auction Bidding Bids may be executed during the auction in person, by paddle or by telephone or prior to the sale in writing by absentee bid. Proof of identity in the form of governmentissued identification will be required, as will an original signature and proof of address. We may also require that you furnish us with a bank reference. For individuals, acceptable forms of government issued photo identification include a passport or photo driving licence. For companies, acceptable forms of government issued identification include a certificate of incorporation or similar as well as proof of owners and directors. Undisclosed agreements between bidders to bid or abstain from bidding on lots are illegal. Please note that Phillips monitors its sales and bidding records to ensure that bidding is transparent and fair and will take appropriate action in the event of any suspected breach of this requirement. In Person To bid in person, you will need to register for and collect a paddle before the auction begins. New clients are encouraged to register at least 48 hours in advance of a sale to allow sufficient time for us to process your information. All lots sold will be invoiced to the name and address to which the paddle has been registered and invoices cannot be transferred to other names and addresses. Please do not misplace your paddle. In the event you lose it, inform a Phillips staff member immediately. At the end of the auction, please return your paddle to the registration desk. By Telephone If you cannot attend the auction, you may bid live on the telephone with one of our multilingual staff members. This service must be arranged at least 24 hours in advance of the sale and is available for lots whose low pre-sale estimate is at least £500. Telephone bids may be recorded.

Absentee Bids If you are unable to attend the auction and cannot participate by telephone, Phillips will be happy to execute written bids on your behalf. A bidding form can be found at the back of this catalogue. This service is free and confidential. Bids must be placed in the currency of the sale. Our staff will attempt to execute an absentee bid at the lowest possible price taking into account the reserve and other bidders. Always indicate a maximum bid, excluding the buyer’s premium and VAT. Unlimited bids will not be accepted. Any absentee bid must be received at least 24 hours in advance of the sale. In the event of identical bids, the earliest bid received will take precedence. Bidding Increments Bidding generally opens below the low estimate and advances in increments of up to 10%, subject to the auctioneer’s discretion. Absentee bids that do not conform to the increments set below may be lowered to the next bidding increment. UK£50 to UK£1,000 UK£1,000 to UK£2,000 UK£2,000 to UK£3,000 UK£3,000 to UK£5,000

by UK£50s by UK£100s by UK£200s by UK£200s, 500, 800 (e.g. UK£4,200, 4,500, 4,800) UK£5,000 to UK£10,000 by UK£500s UK£10,000 to UK£20,000 by UK£1,000s UK£20,000 to UK£30,000 by UK£2,000s UK£30,000 to UK£50,000 by UK£2,000s, 5,000, 8,000 UK£50,000 to UK£100,000 by UK£5,000s UK£100,000 to UK£200,000 by UK£10,000s above UK£200,000 at the auctioneer’s discretion The auctioneer may vary the increments during the course of the auction at his or her own discretion. Conditions Of Sale The auction is governed by the Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty which are available on our website. All prospective bidders should read them carefully. They may be amended by saleroom addendum or auctioneer’s announcement.

Interested Parties Announcement In situations where a person allowed to bid on a lot has a direct or indirect interest in such lot, such as the beneficiary or executor of an estate selling the lot, a joint owner of the lot or a party providing or participating in a guarantee on the lot, Phillips will make an announcement in the saleroom that interested parties may bid on the lot. Consecutive And Responsive Bidding; The auctioneer may open the bidding on any lot by placing a bid on behalf of the seller. The auctioneer may further bid on behalf of the seller up to the amount of the reserve by placing consecutive bids or bids in response to other bidders. No Reserve Lots If a lot is offered without reserve, unless there are already competing absentee bids, the auctioneer will generally open the bidding at 50% of the lot’s low pre-sale estimate. In the absence of a bid at that level, the auctioneer will proceed backwards at his or her discretion until a bid is recognized and will then advance the bidding from that amount. Absentee bids on no reserve lots will, in the absence of a higher bid, be executed at approximately 50% of the low pre-sale estimate or at the amount of the bid if it is less than 50% of the low pre-sale estimate. If there is no bid whatsoever on a no reserve lot, the auctioneer may deem such lot unsold. C) After The Auction Payment Payment is due immediately following the auction, unless other arrangements have been agreed with Phillips in writing in advance of the sale. Interest will be charged on late payment at the rate of 12% per annum. Payments must be made by the invoiced party in pounds sterling and may be sent by wire transfer. Our account details are available on our website. Please reference the relevant invoice number when making payment. Alternatively, payment can be made: • For invoices of £30,000 or less by credit card. We accept American Express, Visa, MasterCard and UnionPay (UnionPay for in person transactions only). • It is our corporate policy not to make or accept single or multiple payments in cash in excess of £5,000 for all purchases in any calendar year. Title to each lot will not pass until the buyer has made full payment of the Purchase Price plus any applicable Artist Resale Royalty and all applicable taxes. Collection Once Phillips has received full and cleared payment of the total purchase price for the lot and any other amounts the buyer owes to Phillips, lots will be released for collection. To collect paid for lots buyers (or their authorised representatives) must provide proof of identity. Authorised Representatives should also bring a copy of a letter signed by the buyer authorising them to collect. Smaller items may be collected from our London gallery on the day of the auction. Please check with our staff when making payment.


Important Notices After the auction, lots will be transferred to offsite fine art storage facilities. The buyer information pack you will receive after the auction will confirm details of the storage facility where your lot is held for collection. Please contact us to make arrangements for collection. Storage Charges Lots will be held for collection from our offsite storage facilities for thirty (30) days after the auction free of charge. Storage charges and property release fees will apply after this 30-day period for any lots which have not been collected. Details of the applicable storage charges will be confirmed to you in the buyer information pack you will receive after the auction. Loss or Damage Buyers are reminded that Phillips accepts liability for loss or damage to lots for a maximum of seven (7) days following the auction. Transport and Shipping We will coordinate with shipping agents instructed by you in order to facilitate the packing, handling and shipping of property purchased at Phillips. Please refer to Paragraph 7 of the Conditions of Sale for more information. As a free service for buyers, Phillips will wrap purchased lots which are for hand carry only. We do not provide packing, handling or shipping services directly. Export and Import Licenses Before bidding for any property, prospective bidders are advised to make independent enquiries as to whether a licence is required to export the property from the United Kingdom or to import it into another country. It is the buyer’s sole responsibility to comply with all import and export laws and to obtain any necessary licences or permits. The denial of any required licence or permit or any delay in obtaining such documentation will not justify the cancellation of the sale or any delay in making full payment for the lot. Endangered Species Items made of or incorporating plant or animal material, such as coral, crocodile, ivory, whalebone, Brazilian rosewood, rhinoceros horn or tortoiseshell, irrespective of age, percentage or value, may require a licence or certificate prior to exportation and additional licences or certificates upon importation to the US or to any country within or outside the European Union (EU). Please note that the ability to obtain an export licence or certificate does not ensure the ability to obtain an import licence or certificate in another country, and vice versa. We suggest that prospective bidders check with their own government regarding wildlife import requirements prior to placing a bid. It is the buyer’s sole responsibility to obtain any necessary export or import licences or certificates as well as any other required documentation. Please note that the US prohibits the importation of any item containing African elephant ivory. Asian elephant ivory may be imported in to the US only if accompanied by independent scientific analysis regarding continent of origin and confirmation the object is more than 100 years old. We have not obtained a scientific analysis on any lot prior to sale and cannot indicate whether elephant ivory in a particular lot is African or Asian elephant. Buyers purchase

these lots at their own risk and will be responsible for the costs of obtaining any scientific analysis or other report required in connection with their proposed import of such property into the US. With regard to any item containing endangered species other than elephant ivory, an importer into the US must provide documented evidence of the species identification and age of an object in order to demonstrate that the object qualifies as an antique. This will require the buyer to obtain an independent appraisal certifying the species of endangered material on the object and certifying that the object is not less than 100 years of age. A prospective buyer planning to import an object into the US may not rely on Phillips cataloguing to establish the species of endangered material on the object or to establish the age of the object and must consult with a qualified independent appraiser prior to placing a bid on the lot. Please note that lots containing potentially regulated plant or animal material are marked as a convenience to our clients, but Phillips does not accept liability for errors or for failing to mark lots containing protected or regulated species. Privacy Our Privacy Policy is available at https://phillips.com or by emailing dataprotection@phillips.com and sets out: (i) the types of personal data we will or may collect and process; (ii) the purposes for which we will or may process your personal data; (iii) the lawful bases we rely on when processing your personal data; (iv) your rights in respect of our processing of your personal data; and (v) various other information as required by applicable laws. Phillips’ premises, sale, and exhibition venues are subject to CCTV video surveillance and recording for security, client service and bid monitoring purposes. Phillips’ auctions will be filmed for simultaneous live broadcast on Phillips’ and third-party websites and applications.

Identification of Business or Trade Buyers As of January 2010, Her Majesty’s Revenue & Customs (“HMRC”) has made it an official requirement for auction houses to hold evidence of a buyer’s business status, due to the revised VAT rules regarding buyer’s premium for lots with symbols for businesses outside the UK. • Where the buyer is a non-EU business, Phillips requires evidence of the business status by means of the company identification, Certificate of Incorporation, Articles of Association or government-issued documents showing that the company exists. • Where the buyer is an EU VAT registered business, Phillips requires the business’s VAT registration number. These details can be scanned and emailed to us, or alternatively they can be faxed or mailed. If these requirements are not met, we will be unable to cancel/ refund any applicable VAT. Electrical and Mechanical Lots All lots with electrical and/or mechanical features are sold on the basis of their decorative value only and should not be assumed to be operative. It is essential that, prior to any intended use, the electrical system is verified and approved by a qualified electrician.


VAT & Tax Guide VAT Depending on the status of the lot, and your status as a buyer, VAT may be charged on the hammer price, the buyer’s premium or both. UK Auctioneer’s Margin Scheme Most items we sell are second-hand goods, so we sell them under UK Auctioneer’s Margin Scheme rules. Lots falling into this category have no VAT symbol and are treated as follows: No symbol

UK Auctioneer’s Margin Scheme sale

20% VAT charged on the buyer’s premium. (The invoiced buyer’s premium will include the VAT).

Special VAT Treatment If the Lot has one of the below symbols, the VAT treatment will be as follows: VAT Symbol

Basis

Treatment

Standard UK VAT rules

20% VAT charged on both the hammer price and buyer’s premium

Imported lot under Temporary Admission (Low rate)

5% import VAT on the hammer price and 20% VAT on the buyer’s premium

Imported lot under Temporary Admission (High rate)

20% import VAT on the hammer price and 20% VAT on the buyer’s premium

Lots sold outside the Auctioneer’s Margin Scheme If the buyer is a relevant business person in the EU (nonUK) or is a relevant business person in a non-EU country then no VAT will be charged on the buyer’s premium. This is subject to Phillips receiving evidence of the buyer’s VAT registration number in the relevant Member State (non-UK) or the buyer’s business status in a non-EU country such as the buyer’s Tax Registration Certificate. Should this evidence not be provided VAT will be charged on the buyer’s premium. Exports from the European Union The following types of VAT may be cancelled or refunded by Phillips on exports made within three months of the sale date if strict conditions are met: • The amount in lieu of VAT charged on the buyer’s premium for property sold under the Auctioneer’s Margin Scheme (i.e., without a VAT symbol). • The VAT on the hammer price for property sold under normal VAT rules (i.e., with a † symbol). The following type of VAT may be cancelled or refunded by Phillips on exports made within 30 days of the payment date if strict conditions are met: • The import VAT charged on the hammer price and an amount in lieu of VAT on the buyer’s premium for property sold under temporary admission (i.e., with a ‡ or a Ω symbol) under the Auctioneer’s Margin Scheme. In each of the above examples, where the appropriate conditions are satisfied, no VAT will be charged if, at or

before the time of invoicing, the buyer instructs Phillips to export the property from the EU. This will require acceptance of an export quotation provided by Phillips. If such instruction is received after payment, a refund of the VAT amount will be made. Where the buyer carries purchases from the EU personally or uses the services of a third party, Phillips will charge the VAT amount due as a deposit and refund it if the lot has been exported within the timelines specified below and either of the following conditions are met: • For lots sold under the Auctioneer’s Margin Scheme or the normal VAT rules, Phillips is provided with appropriate original documentary proof of export from the EU within three months of the date of sale. Buyers carrying their own property must obtain hand-carry papers from the Shipping Department to facilitate this process. • For lots sold under temporary admission, Phillips is provided with the original correct paperwork duly completed and stamped by HMRC which shows the property has been exported from the EU via the UK within 30 days of the payment date. It is essential for shippers acting on behalf of buyers to collect copies of original import papers from our Shipping Department. HMRC insist that the correct customs procedures are followed and Phillips will not be able to issue any refunds where the export documents do not exactly comply with governmental regulations. Property subject to temporary admission must be transferred to another customs procedure immediately if any restoration or repair work is to be carried out. Buyers carrying their own property must obtain hand-carry papers from the Shipping Department, for which a charge of £20 (plus any applicable VAT) will be made. The VAT refund will be processed once the appropriate paperwork has been returned to Phillips. Phillips is not able to cancel or refund any VAT charged on sales made to UK or EU private residents unless the lot is subject to temporary admission and the property is exported from the EU within 30 days of the payment date. We can only process VAT refunds where the VAT to be refunded is £50 or more per shipment. There will be a processing fee of £20 (plus any applicable VAT). Buyers intending to export, repair, restore or alter lots under temporary admission should notify the Shipping Department before collection. Failure to do so may result in the import VAT becoming payable immediately and Phillips being unable to refund the VAT charged on deposit. VAT Refunds from HM Revenue & Customs Where VAT charged cannot be cancelled or refunded by Phillips, it may be possible to seek repayment from HMRC . Repayments in this manner are limited to businesses located outside the UK and may be considered for example for Import VAT charged on the hammer price for lots sold under temporary admission. If you are located in an EU member state other than the UK you will need to apply for a refund of UK VAT directly to your local tax authority. This is done via submission of an electronically based claim form which should be accessed through the website of your local tax authority. As a result,

your form may include VAT incurred in a number of member states. Time limits for claiming VAT refunds • If you are located in an EU member state other than the UK: Any claim must be made on a calendar year basis and submitted no later than 30 September in the following calendar year (e.g., for VAT incurred in the year 1 January to 31 December 2019 you should make a claim to your local tax authority no later than 30 September 2020). Once you have submitted the electronic form to your local tax authority it is their responsibility to ensure that payment is obtained from the relevant member states. This should be completed within four months. If this time limit is not adhered to you may receive interest on the unpaid amounts. • If you are located outside the EU you should apply for a refund of UK VAT directly to HMRC. Claim forms are available from the HMRC website. https://www.gov.uk. You should submit claims for VAT to HMRC no later than six months from the end of the 12-month period ending 30 June (e.g., claims for the period 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020 should be made no later than 31 December 2020). Please note that refunds of VAT will only be made where VAT has been incurred for a business purpose. Any VAT incurred on articles bought for personal use will not be refunded. Sales and Use Taxes Buyers from outside the UK should note that local sales taxes or use taxes may become payable upon import of lots following purchase. Buyers should consult their own tax advisors.


Conditions of Sale The Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty set out below govern the relationship between bidders and buyers, on the one hand, and Phillips and sellers, on the other hand. All prospective buyers should read these Conditions of Sale, the UK Auction Buyer’s Guide, the Important Notices, VAT & Tax Guide and the Authorship Warranty carefully before bidding. 1 Introduction Each lot in this catalogue is offered for sale and sold subject to: (a) the Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty; (b) additional notices and terms printed in other places in this catalogue, including the Guide for Prospective Buyers and (c) supplements to this catalogue or other written material posted by Phillips in the saleroom, in each case as amended by any addendum or announcement by the auctioneer prior to the auction. By bidding at the auction, whether in person, through an agent, by written bid, by telephone bid or other means, bidders and buyers agree to be bound by these Conditions of Sale, as so changed or supplemented, and Authorship Warranty. These Conditions of Sale, as so changed or supplemented, and Authorship Warranty contain all the terms on which Phillips and the seller contract with the buyer. 2 Phillips as Agent Phillips acts as an agent for the seller, unless otherwise indicated in this catalogue or at the time of auction. On occasion, Phillips may own a lot directly, in which case we will act in a principal capacity as a consignor, or a company affiliated with Phillips may own a lot, in which case we will act as agent for that company, or Phillips or an affiliated company may have a legal, beneficial or financial interest in a lot as a secured creditor or otherwise. 3 Catalogue Descriptions and Condition of Property Lots are sold subject to the Authorship Warranty, as described in the catalogue (unless such description is changed or supplemented, as provided in Paragraph 1 above) and in the condition that they are in at the time of the sale on the following basis. (a) The knowledge of Phillips in relation to each lot is partially dependent on information provided to us by the seller and Phillips is not able to and does not carry out exhaustive due diligence on each lot. Prospective buyers acknowledge this fact and accept responsibility for carrying out inspections and investigations to satisfy themselves as to the lots in which they may be interested. Notwithstanding the foregoing, we shall exercise such reasonable care when making express statements in catalogue descriptions or condition reports as is consistent with our role as auctioneer of lots in this sale and in light of (i) the information provided to us by the seller; (ii) scholarship and technical knowledge and (iii) the generally accepted opinions of relevant experts, in each case at the time any such express statement is made. (b) Each lot offered for sale at Phillips is available for inspection by prospective buyers prior to the auction. Phillips accepts bids on lots on the basis that bidders (and independent experts on their behalf, to the extent appropriate given the nature and value of the lot and the bidder’s own expertise) have fully inspected the lot prior to

bidding and have satisfied themselves as to both the condition of the lot and the accuracy of its description. (c) Prospective buyers acknowledge that many lots are of an age and type which means that they are not in perfect condition. As a courtesy to clients, Phillips may prepare and provide condition reports to assist prospective buyers when they are inspecting lots. Catalogue descriptions and condition reports may make reference to particular imperfections of a lot, but bidders should note that lots may have other faults not expressly referred to in the catalogue or condition report. All dimensions are approximate. Illustrations are for identification purposes only and cannot be used as precise indications of size or to convey full information as to the actual condition of lots. (d) Information provided to prospective buyers in respect of any lot, including any pre-sale estimate, whether written or oral, and information in any catalogue, condition or other report, commentary or valuation, is not a representation of fact but rather a statement of opinion held by Phillips. Any pre-sale estimate may not be relied on as a prediction of the selling price or value of the lot and may be revised from time to time by Phillips at our absolute discretion. Neither Phillips nor any of our affiliated companies shall be liable for any difference between the pre-sale estimates for any lot and the actual price achieved at auction or upon resale. 4 Bidding at Auction (a) Phillips has absolute discretion to refuse admission to the auction or participation in the sale. All bidders must register for a paddle prior to bidding, supplying such information and references as required by Phillips. Proof of identity in the form of government issued identification will be required, as will an original signature and proof of address. We may also require that you furnish us with a bank reference. For individuals, acceptable forms of government issued photo identification include a passport or photo driving licence. For companies, acceptable forms of government issued identification include a certificate of incorporation as well as proof of owners and directors.

(b) As a convenience to bidders who cannot attend the auction in person, Phillips may, if so instructed by the bidder, execute written absentee bids on a bidder’s behalf. Absentee bidders are required to submit bids on the Absentee Bid Form, a copy of which is printed in this catalogue or otherwise available from Phillips. Bids must be placed in the currency of the sale. The bidder must clearly indicate the maximum amount he or she intends to bid, excluding the buyer’s premium and value added tax (VAT). The auctioneer will not accept an instruction to execute an absentee bid which does not indicate such maximum bid. Our staff will attempt to execute an absentee bid at the lowest possible price taking into account the reserve and other bidders. Any absentee bid must be received at least 24 hours in advance of the sale. In the event of identical bids, the earliest bid received will take precedence.

(c) Telephone bidders are required to submit bids on the Telephone Bid Form, a copy of which is printed in this catalogue or otherwise available from Phillips. Telephone bidding is available for lots whose low pre-sale estimate is at least £500. Phillips reserves the right to require written confirmation of a successful bid from a telephone bidder by fax or otherwise immediately after such bid is accepted by the auctioneer. Telephone bids may be recorded and, by bidding on the telephone, a bidder consents to the recording of the conversation.

(d) Bidders may participate in an auction by bidding online through Phillips’s online live bidding platform available on our website at www.phillips.com. To bid online, bidders must register online at least 24 hours before the start of the auction. Online bidding is subject to approval by Phillips’s bid department in our sole discretion. As noted in Paragraph 3 above, Phillips encourages online bidders to inspect prior to the auction any lot(s) on which they may bid, and condition reports are available upon request. Bidding in a live auction can progress quickly. To ensure that online bidders are not placed at a disadvantage when bidding against bidders in the room or on the telephone, the procedure for placing bids through Phillips’s online bidding platform is a one-step process. By clicking the bid button on the computer screen, a bidder submits a bid. Online bidders acknowledge and agree that bids so submitted are final and may not under any circumstances be amended or retracted. During a live auction, when bids other than online bids are placed, they will be displayed on the online bidder’s computer screen as ‘floor’ bids. ‘Floor’ bids include bids made by the auctioneer to protect the reserve. In the event that an online bid and a ‘floor’ or ‘phone’ bid are identical, the ‘floor’ bid may take precedence at the auctioneer’s discretion. The next bidding increment is shown for the convenience of online bidders in the bid button. The bidding increment available to online bidders may vary from the next bid actually taken by the auctioneer, as the auctioneer may deviate from Phillips’s standard increments at any time at his or her discretion, but an online bidder may only place a bid in a whole bidding increment. Phillips’s bidding increments are published in the Guide for Prospective Buyers. (e) When making a bid, whether in person, by absentee bid, on the telephone or online, a bidder accepts personal liability to pay the purchase price, as described more fully in Paragraph 6 (a) below, plus all other applicable charges unless it has been explicitly agreed in writing with Phillips before the commencement of the auction that the bidder is acting as agent on behalf of an identified third party acceptable to Phillips and that we will only look to the principal for such payment. (f) By participating in the auction, whether in person, by absentee bid, on the telephone or online, each prospective buyer represents and warrants that any bids placed by such person, or on such person’s behalf, are not the product of any collusive or other anti-competitive agreement. (g) Arranging absentee, telephone and online bids is a free service provided by Phillips to prospective buyers. While we undertake to exercise reasonable care in undertaking such activity, we cannot accept liability for failure to execute such bids except where such failure is caused by our willful misconduct.


5 Conduct of the Auction (a) Unless otherwise indicated by the symbol •, each lot is offered subject to a reserve, which is the confidential minimum selling price agreed by Phillips with the seller. The reserve will not exceed the low pre-sale estimate at the time of the auction. (b) The auctioneer has discretion at any time to refuse any bid, withdraw any lot, re-offer a lot for sale (including after the fall of the hammer) if he or she believes there may be error or dispute and take such other action as he or she deems reasonably appropriate. Phillips shall have no liability whatsoever for any such action taken by the auctioneer. If any dispute arises after the sale, our sale record is conclusive. The auctioneer may accept bids made by a company affiliated with Phillips provided that the bidder does not know the reserve placed on the lot. (c) The auctioneer will commence and advance the bidding at levels and in increments he or she considers appropriate. In order to protect the reserve on any lot, the auctioneer may place one or more bids on behalf of the seller up to the reserve without indicating he or she is doing so, either by placing consecutive bids or bids in response to other bidders. If a lot is offered without reserve, unless there are already competing absentee bids, the auctioneer will generally open the bidding at 50% of the lot’s low pre-sale estimate. In the absence of a bid at that level, the auctioneer will proceed backwards at his or her discretion until a bid is recognized and will then advance the bidding from that amount. Absentee bids on no reserve lots will, in the absence of a higher bid, be executed at approximately 50% of the low pre-sale estimate or at the amount of the bid if it is less than 50% of the low pre-sale estimate. If there is no bid whatsoever on a no reserve lot, the auctioneer may deem such lot unsold. (d) The sale will be conducted in pounds sterling and payment is due in pounds sterling. For the benefit of international clients, pre-sale estimates in the auction catalogue may be shown in US dollars and/or euros and, if so, will reflect approximate exchange rates. Accordingly, estimates in US dollars or euros should be treated only as a guide. If a currency converter is operated during the sale, it is done so as a courtesy to bidders, but Phillips accepts no responsibility for any errors in currency conversion calculation. (e) Subject to the auctioneer’s reasonable discretion, the highest bidder accepted by the auctioneer will be the buyer and the striking of the hammer marks the acceptance of the highest bid and the conclusion of a contract for sale between the seller and the buyer. Risk and responsibility for the lot passes to the buyer as set forth in Paragraph 7 below. (f) If a lot is not sold, the auctioneer will announce that it has been ‘passed’, ‘withdrawn’, ‘returned to owner’ or ‘bought-in’. (g) Any post-auction sale of lots offered at auction shall incorporate these Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty as if sold in the auction. 6 Purchase Price and Payment (a) The buyer agrees to pay us, in addition to the hammer price of the lot, the buyer’s premium, plus any applicable

value added tax (VAT) and any applicable resale royalty (the ‘Purchase Price’). The buyer’s premium is 25% of the hammer price up to and including £300,000, 20% of the portion of the hammer price above £300,000 up to and including £3,000,000 and 13.5% of the portion of the hammer price above £3,000,000. Phillips reserves the right to pay from our compensation an introductory commission to one or more third parties for assisting in the sale of property offered and sold at auction. (b) VAT is payable in accordance with applicable law. All prices, fees, charges and expenses set out in these Conditions of Sale are quoted exclusive of VAT. (c) If the Artist’s Resale Right Regulations 2006 apply to the lot, the buyer agrees to pay to us an amount equal to the resale royalty provided for in those regulations and we undertake to the buyer to pay such amount to the artist’s collection agent. In circumstances where (i) we are on notice that the resale royalty is payable or (ii) we have not been able to ascertain the nationality of the artist, we will identify the lot with the symbol ♠ next to the lot number and will invoice the resale royalty to the buyer. If we subsequently determine that the nationality of the artist does not entitle him/her to the resale royalty on the lot, we will arrange a refund to the buyer of the amount of the royalty paid to us. If, after a sale in which we did not collect the resale royalty on a particular lot, we become aware that information provided to us prior to the auction concerning an artist’s nationality was incorrect and the artist is entitled to the resale royalty on the lot, the buyer shall pay the resale royalty to us upon receipt of an invoice. (d) Unless otherwise agreed, a buyer is required to pay for a purchased lot immediately following the auction regardless of any intention to obtain an export or import license or other permit for such lot. Payments must be made by the invoiced party in pounds sterling as follows: (i) Payments may be made by wire transfer. Our account details are available on our website. Please reference the relevant invoice number when making payment. Alternatively, payment can be made: • For invoices of £30,000 or less by credit card. We accept American Express, Visa, MasterCard and UnionPay (UnionPay for in person transactions only). • It is our corporate policy not to make or accept single or multiple payments in cash in excess of £5,000 for all purchases in any calendar year. (e) Title in a purchased lot will not pass until Phillips has received the Purchase Price for that lot in cleared funds. Phillips is not obliged to release a lot to the buyer until title in the lot has passed and appropriate identification has been provided, and any earlier release does not affect the passing of title or the buyer’s unconditional obligation to pay the Purchase Price. 7 Collection of Property (a) Phillips will not release a lot to the buyer until we have received payment of its Purchase Price in full in cleared funds, the buyer has paid all outstanding amounts due to Phillips or any of our affiliated companies, including any charges payable pursuant to Paragraph 8 (a) below, and the buyer has satisfied such other terms as we in our sole

discretion shall require, including completing any antimoney laundering or anti-terrorism financing checks. As soon as a buyer has satisfied all of the foregoing conditions, he or she should contact us at +44 (0) 207 318 4081 or +44 (0) 207 318 4082 to arrange for collection of purchased property. (b) The buyer must arrange for collection of a purchased lot within seven days of the date of the auction. After the auction, we will transfer all lots to our offsite fine art storage facilities. Details will be included in the buyer information packs sent to buyers after the auction. Purchased lots are at the buyer’s risk, including the responsibility for insurance, from (i) the date of collection or (ii) seven days after the auction, whichever is the earlier. Until risk passes, Phillips will compensate the buyer for any loss or damage to a purchased lot up to a maximum of the Purchase Price paid, subject to our usual exclusions for loss or damage to property.

(c) As a courtesy to clients, Phillips will, without charge, wrap purchased lots for hand carry only. We do not provide packing, handling, insurance or shipping services. We will coordinate with shipping agents instructed by the buyer, whether or not recommended by Phillips, in order to facilitate the packing, handling, insurance and shipping of property bought at Phillips. Any such instruction is entirely at the buyer’s risk and responsibility, and we will not be liable for acts or omissions of third party packers or shippers. (d) Phillips will require presentation of government-issued identification prior to release of a lot to the buyer or the buyer’s authorized representative. 8 Failure to Collect Purchases (a) Lots will be held for collection from our offsite storage facilities for thirty (30) days after the auction free of charge. Storage charges and property release fees will apply after this 30-day period for any lots which have not been collected. Details of the applicable storage charges will be confirmed to buyers in the buyer information pack they will receive after the auction. Purchased lots will not be released to the buyer until the Purchase Price and all charges have been paid in full. (b) If a purchased lot is paid for but not collected within six months of the auction, the buyer authorizes Phillips, upon notice, to arrange a resale of the item by auction or private sale, with estimates and a reserve set at Phillips’s reasonable discretion. The proceeds of such sale will be applied to pay for storage charges and any other outstanding costs and expenses owed by the buyer to Phillips or our affiliated companies and the remainder will be forfeited unless collected by the buyer within two years of the original auction. 9 Remedies for Non-Payment (a) Without prejudice to any rights the seller may have, if the buyer without prior agreement fails to make payment of the Purchase Price for a lot in cleared funds within seven days of the auction, Phillips may in our sole discretion exercise one or more of the following remedies: (i) store the lot at Phillips‘s premises or elsewhere at the buyer’s sole risk and expense; (ii) cancel the sale of the lot, retaining any partial payment of the Purchase Price as liquidated damages; (iii) reject future bids from the buyer


or render such bids subject to payment of a deposit; (iv) charge interest at 12% per annum from the date payment became due until the date the Purchase Price is received in cleared funds; (v) subject to notification of the buyer, exercise a lien over any of the buyer’s property which is in the possession of Phillips and instruct our affiliated companies to exercise a lien over any of the buyer’s property which is in their possession and, in each case, no earlier than 30 days from the date of such notice arrange the sale of such property and apply the proceeds to the amount owed to Phillips or any of our affiliated companies after the deduction from sale proceeds of our standard vendor’s commission, all sale-related expenses and any applicable taxes thereon; (vi) resell the lot by auction or private sale, with estimates and a reserve set at Phillips’s reasonable discretion, it being understood that in the event such resale is for less than the original hammer price and buyer’s premium for that lot, the buyer will remain liable for the shortfall together with all costs incurred in such resale; (vii) commence legal proceedings to recover the hammer price and buyer’s premium for that lot, together with interest and the costs of such proceedings; (viii) set off the outstanding amount remaining unpaid by the buyer against any amounts which we or any of our affiliated companies may owe the buyer in any other transactions; (ix) release the name and address of the buyer to the seller to enable the seller to commence legal proceedings to recover the amounts due and legal costs; or (x) take such other action as we deem necessary or appropriate. (b) The buyer irrevocably authorizes Phillips to exercise a lien over the buyer’s property which is in our possession upon notification by any of our affiliated companies that the buyer is in default of payment. Phillips will notify the buyer of any such lien. The buyer also irrevocably authorizes Phillips, upon notification by any of our affiliated companies that the buyer is in default of payment, to pledge the buyer’s property in our possession by actual or constructive delivery to our affiliated company as security for the payment of any outstanding amount due. Phillips will notify the buyer if the buyer’s property has been delivered to an affiliated company by way of pledge.

(c) If the buyer is in default of payment, the buyer irrevocably authorizes Phillips to instruct any of our affiliated companies in possession of the buyer’s property to deliver the property by way of pledge as the buyer’s agent to a third party instructed by Phillips to hold the property on our behalf as security for the payment of the Purchase Price and any other amount due and, no earlier than 30 days from the date of written notice to the buyer, to sell the property in such manner and for such consideration as can reasonably be obtained on a forced sale basis and to apply the proceeds to any amount owed to Phillips or any of our affiliated companies after the deduction from sale proceeds of our standard vendor’s commission, all salerelated expenses and any applicable taxes thereon. 10 Rescission by Phillips Phillips shall have the right, but not the obligation, to rescind a sale without notice to the buyer if we reasonably believe that there is a material breach of the seller’s representations and warranties or the Authorship Warranty or an adverse claim is made by a third party. Upon notice of Phillips election to rescind the sale, the buyer will promptly return the lot to Phillips, and we will then refund the

Purchase Price paid to us. As described more fully in Paragraph 13 below, the refund shall constitute the sole remedy and recourse of the buyer against Phillips and the seller with respect to such rescinded sale.

Buyers should note that they are responsible for all charges, duties and taxes related to the exportation and importation of lots shipped by them or shipped on their behalf by Phillips.

11 Export, Import and Endangered Species Licences and Permits Before bidding for any property, prospective buyers are advised to make their own enquiries as to whether a licence is required to export a lot from the United Kingdom or to import it into another country. Prospective buyers are advised that some countries prohibit the import of property made of or incorporating plant or animal material, such as coral, crocodile, ivory, whalebone, Brazilian rosewood, rhinoceros horn or tortoiseshell, irrespective of age, percentage or value. Accordingly, prior to bidding, prospective buyers considering export of purchased lots should familiarize themselves with relevant export and import regulations of the countries concerned. Please note that the US prohibits the importation of any item containing African elephant ivory. Asian elephant ivory may be imported in to the US only if accompanied by independent scientifc analysis of continent of origin and confrmation the object is more than 100 years old.

Please contact the department organising the auction for further details.

With regard to any item containing endangered species other than elephant ivory, an importer into the US must provide documented evidence of the species identifcation and age of an object in order to demonstrate that the item qualifes as an antique. This will require the buyer to obtain an independent appraisal certify the species of endangered material on the object and certifying that the object is not less than 100 years of age. A prospective buyer planning to import an object containing endangered species into the US may not rely on Phillips cataloguing to establish the species of endangered material on the object or to establish the age of the object and must consult with a qualifed independent appraiser prior to placing a bid on the lot. It is solely the buyer’s responsibility to comply with these laws and to obtain any necessary export, import and endangered species licences or permits. Failure to obtain a licence or permit or delay in so doing will not justify the cancellation of the sale or any delay in making full payment for the lot. As a courtesy to clients, Phillips has marked in the catalogue lots containing potentially regulated plant or animal material, but we do not accept liability for errors or for failing to mark lots containing protected or regulated species. 12. US Import Tarifs Buyers intending to import property into the United States of America should note that US Customs may charge an additional import duty upon the importation of (i) products manufactured or created in mainland China and (ii) printed materials (including photographs, prints, lithographs, books and designs) printed in the UK or Germany. Phillips will mark with a symbol Ж lots which may be subject to additional US import tarifs, where this is known to us. Please note, however, that any such markings are done by us only as a convenience to bidders. Phillips does not accept liability for errors including failing to mark lots accurately or for the absence of any marking.

13 Privacy (a) You acknowledge and understand that we may process your personal data (including potentially special category data) in accordance with our privacy policy from time to time as published at www.phillips.com or available by emailing dataprotection@phillips.com. (b) Our privacy policy sets out: (i) the types of personal data we will or may collect and process; (ii) the purposes for which we will or may process your personal data (including for example the provision of auction, private sale and related services; the performance and enforcement of these terms and conditions; the carrying out of identity and credit checks; keeping you informed about upcoming auctions, exhibitions and special events; and generally where reasonably necessary in the management and operation of our business); (iii) the lawful bases on which we rely in undertaking our processing of your personal data; (iv) your rights in respect of our processing of your personal data; and (v) various other information as required by applicable laws. (c) Phillips premises and sale and exhibition venues are subject to CCTV video surveillance and recording for security, client service and bid monitoring purposes and will be filmed during the auction for simultaneous live broadcast on our and third party websites and applications. By remaining in these areas, you acknowledge that you may be photographed, filmed and recorded and grant your permission for your likeness and voice to be included in such recordings. If you do not wish to be photographed or filmed or appear in such recordings, please speak to a member of Phillips staff. Your communications with Phillips, including by telephone and online (e.g. telephone and on-line bidding) may also be recorded for security, client service and bid monitoring purposes. Where we record such information we will process it in accordance with our Privacy Policy available at www.phillips.com. 14 Limitation of Liability (a) Subject to sub-paragraph (e) below, the total liability of Phillips, our affiliated companies and the seller to the buyer in connection with the sale of a lot shall be limited to the Purchase Price actually paid by the buyer for the lot.

(b) Except as otherwise provided in this Paragraph 14, none of Phillips, any of our affiliated companies or the seller (i) is liable for any errors or omissions, whether orally or in writing, in information provided to prospective buyers by Phillips or any of our affiliated companies or (ii) accepts responsibility to any bidder in respect of acts or omissions, whether negligent or otherwise, by Phillips or any of our affiliated companies in connection with the conduct of the auction or for any other matter relating to the sale of any lot.


Authorship Warranty (c) All warranties other than the Authorship Warranty, express or implied, including any warranty of satisfactory quality and fitness for purpose, are specifically excluded by Phillips, our affiliated companies and the seller to the fullest extent permitted by law. (d) Subject to sub-paragraph (e) below, none of Phillips, any of our affiliated companies or the seller shall be liable to the buyer for any loss or damage beyond the refund of the Purchase Price referred to in sub-paragraph (a) above, whether such loss or damage is characterised as direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential, or for the payment of interest on the Purchase Price to the fullest extent permitted by law. (e) No provision in these Conditions of Sale shall be deemed to exclude or limit the liability of Phillips or any of our affiliated companies to the buyer in respect of any fraud or fraudulent misrepresentation made by any of us or in respect of death or personal injury caused by our negligent acts or omissions. 15 Copyright The copyright in all images, illustrations and written materials produced by or for Phillips relating to a lot, including the contents of this catalogue, is and shall remain at all times the property of Phillips and, subject to the provisions of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, such images and materials may not be used by the buyer or any other party without our prior written consent. Phillips and the seller make no representations or warranties that the buyer of a lot will acquire any copyright or other reproduction rights in it. 16 General (a) These Conditions of Sale, as changed or supplemented as provided in Paragraph 1 above, and Authorship Warranty set out the entire agreement between the parties with respect to the transactions contemplated herein and supersede all prior and contemporaneous written, oral or implied understandings, representations and agreements.

(b) Notices to Phillips shall be in writing and addressed to the department in charge of the sale, quoting the reference number specified at the beginning of the sale catalogue. Notices to clients shall be addressed to the last address notified by them in writing to Phillips. (c) These Conditions of Sale are not assignable by any buyer without our prior written consent but are binding on the buyer’s successors, assigns and representatives. (d) Should any provision of these Conditions of Sale be held void, invalid or unenforceable for any reason, the remaining provisions shall remain in full force and effect. No failure by any party to exercise, nor any delay in exercising, any right or remedy under these Conditions of Sale shall act as a waiver or release thereof in whole or in part. (e) No term of these Conditions of Sale shall be enforceable under the Contracts (Rights of Third Parties) Act 1999 by anyone other than the buyer. 17 Law and Jurisdiction (a) The rights and obligations of the parties with respect to these Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty, the

conduct of the auction and any matters related to any of the foregoing shall be governed by and interpreted in accordance with English law. (b) For the benefit of Phillips, all bidders and sellers agree that the Courts of England are to have exclusive jurisdiction to settle all disputes arising in connection with all aspects of all matters or transactions to which these Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty relate or apply. All parties agree that Phillips shall retain the right to bring proceedings in any court other than the Courts of England. (c) All bidders and sellers irrevocably consent to service of process or any other documents in connection with proceedings in any court by facsimile transmission, personal service, delivery by mail or in any other manner permitted by English law, the law of the place of service or the law of the jurisdiction where proceedings are instituted at the last address of the bidder or seller known to Phillips.

Phillips warrants the authorship of property in this auction catalogue described in headings in BOLD or CAPITALIZED type for a period of five years from date of sale by Phillips, subject to the exclusions and limitations set forth below. (a) Phillips gives this Authorship Warranty only to the original buyer of record (i.e., the registered successful bidder) of any lot. This Authorship Warranty does not extend to (i) subsequent owners of the property, including purchasers or recipients by way of gift from the original buyer, heirs, successors, beneficiaries and assigns; (ii) property where the description in the catalogue states that there is a conflict of opinion on the authorship of the property; (iii) property where our attribution of authorship was on the date of sale consistent with the generally accepted opinions of specialists, scholars or other experts; (iv) property whose description or dating is proved inaccurate by means of scientific methods or tests not generally accepted for use at the time of the publication of the catalogue or which were at such time deemed unreasonably expensive or impractical to use or likely in our reasonable opinion to have caused damage or loss in value to the lot or (v) property where there has been no material loss in value from the value of the lot had it been as described in the heading of the catalogue entry. (b) In any claim for breach of the Authorship Warranty, Phillips reserves the right, as a condition to rescinding any sale under this warranty, to require the buyer to provide to us at the buyer’s expense the written opinions of two recognized experts approved in advance by Phillips. We shall not be bound by any expert report produced by the buyer and reserve the right to consult our own experts at our expense. If Phillips agrees to rescind a sale under the Authorship Warranty, we shall refund to the buyer the reasonable costs charged by the experts commissioned by the buyer and approved in advance by us. (c) Subject to the exclusions set forth in subparagraph (a) above, the buyer may bring a claim for breach of the Authorship Warranty provided that (i) he or she has notified Phillips in writing within three months of receiving any information which causes the buyer to question the authorship of the lot, specifying the auction in which the property was included, the lot number in the auction catalogue and the reasons why the authorship of the lot is being questioned and (ii) the buyer returns the lot to Phillips to the saleroom in which it was purchased in the same condition as at the time of its auction and is able to transfer good and marketable title in the lot free from any third party claim arising after the date of the auction. Phillips has discretion to waive any of the foregoing requirements set forth in this subparagraph (c) or subparagraph (b) above. (d) The buyer understands and agrees that the exclusive remedy for any breach of the Authorship Warranty shall be rescission of the sale and refund of the original Purchase Price paid. This remedy shall constitute the sole remedy and recourse of the buyer against Phillips, any of our affiliated companies and the seller and is in lieu of any other remedy available as a matter of law or equity. This means that none of Phillips, any of our affiliated companies or the seller shall be liable for loss or damage beyond the remedy expressly provided in this Authorship Warranty, whether such loss or damage is characterized as direct, indirect, special, incidental or consequential, or for the payment of interest on the original Purchase Price.


30 Berkeley Square, London, W1J 6EX phillips.com +44 20 7318 4010 bidslondon@phillips.com Please return this form by email to bidslondon@phillips.com at least 24 hours before the sale. Please read carefully the information in the right column and note that it is important that you indicate whether you are applying to bid as an individual or on behalf of a company. Please select the type of bid you wish to make with this form (please select one):

In-person Absentee Bidding Telephone Bidding

Paddle Number

As a private individual On behalf of a company

• If you cannot attend the sale, we can execute bids confdentially on your behalf.

Sale Title

Sale Number First Name

Sale Date

Surname Account Number

Company (if applicable)

• For absentee bids, indicate your maximum limit for each lot, excluding the buyer’s premium and any applicable VAT. Your bid will be executed at the lowest price taking into account the reserve and other bidders. On no reserve lots, in the absence of other bids, your bid will be executed at approximately 50% of the low pre-sale estimate or at the amount specifed, if less than 50% of the low estimate.

Address

City

State/Country

• Your bid must be submitted in the currency of the sale and may be rounded down to the nearest amount consistent with the auctioneer’s bidding increments.

Post Code Phone

Mobile

Email

Fax

• If we receive identical bids, the frst bid received will take precedence.

• Arranging absentee and telephone bids is a free service provided by us to prospective buyers. While we will exercise reasonable care in undertaking such activity, we cannot accept liability for errors relating to execution of your bids except in cases of wilful misconduct. Agreement to bid by telephone must be confrmed by you promptly in writing or by fax. Telephone bid lines may be recorded.

Phone number to call at the time of sale (for Phone Bidding only) 2.

Please complete the following section for telephone and absentee bids only Lot number

Brief description

In Consecutive Order

• Phillips charges the successful bidder a commission, or buyer’s premium, on the hammer price of each lot sold. The buyer’s premium is payable by the buyer as part of the total purchase price at the following rates: 25% of the hammer price up to and including £300,000, 20% of the portion of the hammer price above £300,000 up to and including £3,000,000 and 13.5% of the portion of the hammer price above £3,000,000. • “Buy” or unlimited bids will not be accepted. Alternative bids can be placed by using the word “OR” between lot numbers.

VAT number (if applicable)

1.

• Company Purchases: If you are buying under a business entity, we require a copy of government-issued identifcation (such as the certifcate of incorporation) as well as proof of owners and directors to verify the status of the company. This should be accompanied by an ofcial document confrming the company’s EU VAT registration number, if applicable, which we are now required by HMRC to hold. • Conditions of Sale: All bids are placed and executed, and all lots are sold and purchased, subject to the Conditions of Sale available online at phillips.com,. Please read them carefully before placing a bid. Your attention is drawn to Paragraph 4 of the Conditions of Sale.

Please indicate in what capacity you will be bidding (please select one):

Title

• Private Purchases: Proof of identity in the form of government-issued identification and proof of address will be required.

Maximum pound sterling price* Absentee Bids Only

• Please submit your bids to the Bid Department by email to bidslondon@phillips.com or by fax at +44 20 7318 4035 at least 24 hours before the sale. You will receive confrmation by email within one business day. To reach the Bid Department by phone please call +44 20 7318 4045. • Absent prior payment arrangements, please provide a bank reference. Payment for lots can be made by cash (up to £5,000 per calendar year), credit card (up to £30,000) using Visa, American Express, Mastercard or Union Pay (for in person transactions only), UK debit cards, wire transfer, banker’s draf or personal cheque with identifcation, drawn on UK banks. • Lots cannot be collected until payment has cleared and all charges have been paid. • You will not have the right to cancel the sale of any lot purchased by you under the Consumer Contracts (Information, Cancellation and Additional Charges) Regulations 2013. • By signing this Bid Form, you acknowledge and understand that we may process your personal data (including potentially special category data) in accordance with Phillips’s Privacy Policy as published at www.phillips.com or available by emailing dataprotection@phillips.com. • Phillip’s premises and sale and exhibition venues may be subject to video surveillance and recording. Telephone calls (e.g. telephone bidding) may also be recorded. We may process that information in accordance with our Privacy Policy.

* Excluding Buyer’s Premium and VAT

Signature

Date

By ticking this box, you confrm your registration/bid(s) as above and accept the Conditions of Sale of Phillips as stated in our catalogues and on our website.

Please tick this box to receive emails about upcoming sales, exhibitions, and special events ofered by members of the Phillips group, as referenced in our Privacy Policy available on our website at www.phillips.com, where you may also update your email preferences or unsubscribe at any time.


Index

Collishaw, M. 151 Craig-Martin, M. 15, 156 Davenport, I. 155 Gilbert & George 18 Hirst, D. 16, 17, 19, 20, 147, 148 Hume, G. 21 Law, R. 154 Morris, L. 157, 158 Opie, J. 149 Patterson, S. 152, 153 Perry, G. 146 Taylor-Johnson, S. 150


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The Collection of Robert Tibbles Young British Artists & More  

Phillips Presents The Collection of Robert Tibbles Young British Artists & More.

The Collection of Robert Tibbles Young British Artists & More  

Phillips Presents The Collection of Robert Tibbles Young British Artists & More.