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Design

New York, 17 December 2019


177. Gilbert Poillerat


72. Hiroshi Suzuki


66. Jeroen Verhoeven


24. Paolo Venini


Design New York, 17 December 2019

Auction & Viewing Location

Design Department

450 Park Avenue New York 10022

Senior International Specialist Meaghan Roddy mroddy@phillips.com

Auction 17 December, 2pm

Viewing 13 – 16 December Sunday 12pm – 6pm Monday – Thursday 10am – 6pm

Sale Designation

Head of Department, New York Cordelia Lembo clembo@phillips.com Specialist Kimberly Sørensen ksorensen@phillips.com

When sending in written bids or making enquiries please refer to this sale as NY050219 or Design.

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International Business Manager Adam Clay aclay@phillips.com


108. American


Our Team. Design Los Angeles.

New York. Cordelia Lembo

Kimberly Sørensen

Ben Green

Meaghan Roddy

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London. Domenico Raimondo

Antonia King

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Madalena Horta e Costa

Sofa Sayn-Wittgenstein

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Š Brigitte Lacombe

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Deputy Chairmen & Chairwomen. Svetlana Marich

Jean-Paul Engelen

Robert Manley

Jonathan Crockett

Peter Sumner

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Deputy Chairman, Worldwide Co-Head of 20th Century & Contemporary Art

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Miety Heiden

Vanessa Hallett

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181. Giovanni Gariboldi


Business Development. Americas. Vivian Pfeifer Deputy Chairman, Americas, Head of Business Development, Americas +1 212 940 1392 vpfeifer@phillips.com

Client Advisory. Americas. Philae Knight

Liz Grimm

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Europe. Yassaman Ali Client Advisory Director +44 20 7318 4056 yali@phillips.com

Giulia Campaner Mendes

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Trusts, Estates & Valuations. Americas. Jennifer Jones

Laura Wenger

William Leach

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International Specialists & Regional Directors. Americas. Cândida SodrÊ

Carol Ehlers

Lauren Peterson

Melyora de Koning

Blake Koh

Valentina Garcia

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Laurence Calmels

Clara Rivollet

Laurence Barret-Cavy

Regional Director, France

International Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, France

Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, France

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Kalista Fenina

Kirsten MacDonald

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Dr. Alice Trier

Carolina Lanfranchi

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Asia. Kyoko Hattori

Jane Yoon

Sujeong Shin

Wenjia Zhang

Alicia Zhang

Cindy Yen

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International Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Regional Director, Korea

Associate Regional Representative, Korea

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Meiling Lee

Christine Fernando

Sandy Ma

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International Specialist, Taiwan

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Our team is comprised of experts from auction houses, museums, galleries and other leading arts institutions. In addition to auctions in our New York, London, Hong Kong and Geneva salerooms, Phillips holds private sales and curated selling exhibitions across all of our categories around the world. Our range of services includes appraisals for private clients, advisors, attorneys and other key fduciaries, and our dedicated Trusts, Estates and Valuations team provides complimentary reviews of collections.

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1. Jean Royère

1902-1981

Pair of “Mirabeau” stools circa 1957 Painted steel, brass, fabric upholstery. Each: 17 3/4 x 27 x 15 in. (45.1 x 68.6 x 38.1 cm) Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Nadim Majdalani, Beirut Laurice Daou, Beirut, 1957 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Jean Royère, décorateur à Paris, exh. cat., Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, 1999, p. 20 Pierre-Emmanuel Martin-Vivier, Jean Royère, Paris, 2002, p. 130 Galerie Jacques Lacoste and Galerie Patrick Seguin, Jean Royère, Volume 2, Paris, 2012, p. 56 Pierre-Emmanuel Martin-Vivier, Jean Royère, Paris, 2017, p. 146


2. Claude Lalanne

1925-2019

“Collier l’Amour en cage” 2018 Brass. 8 3/8 x 6 1/4 in. (21.3 x 15.9 cm), 14 1/4 in. (36.2 cm) circumference Number 1 from the edition of 8. Reverse impressed with the artist’s monogram CL and LALANNE/1 / 8. Estimate $4,000-6,000


3. Myrbor “Le Drapeau” carpet circa 1932 Hand-dyed and hand-knotted wool. 74 x 56 in. (188 x 142.2 cm) Afer a design by Joan Miró. Woven by Maison Myrbor, Sétif, Algeria. Reverse embroidered MYR/BOR. Estimate $4,000-6,000

Provenance Fashion Institute of Technology, New York, 1988 Charles A. Whitaker Auction Co., Philadelphia, “Fall Couture and Textiles,” October 28-29, 2016, lot 519 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature an exhibition of contemporary french tapestries, exh. cat., Charles E. Slatkin Galleries, New York, 1965, p. 35 Jacques Dupin and Ariane Lelong-Mainaud, Joan Miró, Catalogue raisonné. Paintings, Volume I: 1908–1930, Paris, 1999, no. 314 for the oil on canvas


Property from an Important Private Collection

4. Jean Royère

1902-1981

Rare “Œuf” chest of drawers circa 1956 Ash, ash-veneered wood, fabric, brass. 37 7/8 x 59 3/4 x 20 in. (96.2 x 151.8 x 50.8 cm) Estimate $100,000-150,000 Provenance Madame Lebon Galerie Jacques Lacoste and Galerie Patrick Seguin, Paris Private collection, New York Phillips de Pury & Company, New York, “Design Masters,” December 13, 2011, lot 24 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Mobilier et Décoration, no. 4, May 1961, p. 27 for a drawing Pierre-Emmanuel Martin-Vivier, Jean Royère, Paris, 2002, illustrated p. 258 Galerie Jacques Lacoste and Galerie Patrick Seguin, Jean Royère, Volume 1, Paris, 2012, illustrated p. 119 Galerie Jacques Lacoste and Galerie Patrick Seguin, Jean Royère, Volume 2, Paris, 2012, illustrated p. 74

Taking the Œuf chair as a point of departure, Jean Royère created a range of related Œuf furniture that included the present lot as well as a sofa, a tabouret, a bed, bedside tables, and a coifeuse. In each example a sof upholstered shell envelops the inner structure, in this case, a chest of six drawers. Royère designed the Œuf chair in 1954 and it became a regular fxture in his interiors. The other Œuf furniture, however, is much less ubiquitous, documented in only a few places. The November 1958 issue of Mobilier et Décoration illustrated the bedroom suite, noting the “voluptuous rotundity” of the armchairs and bed and the “energetic contrast” of the two-toned upholstery.


5. Attributed to Jean Royère

1902-1981

Pair of side tables circa 1957 Oak, oak-veneered wood. Each: 15 3/4 x 19 3/4 x 11 3/4 in. (40 x 50.2 x 29.8 cm) Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Nadim Majdalani, Beirut Laurice Daou, Beirut, 1957 Acquired from the above by the present owner


6. Jean Royère

1902-1981

7. Jean Royère

1902-1981

Side chair circa 1956 Oak, vinyl upholstery. 38 3/4 x 17 1/2 x 20 in. (98.4 x 44.5 x 50.8 cm)

Desk circa 1957 Oak, oak-veneered wood, glass. 29 3/4 x 51 x 20 1/4 in. (75.6 x 129.5 x 51.4 cm)

Estimate $7,000-9,000

Estimate $18,000-24,000

Provenance Nadim Majdalani, Beirut Laurice Daou, Beirut, 1957 Acquired from the above by the present owner

Provenance Nadim Majdalani, Beirut George Fayad, Beruit, 1957 Acquired from the above by the present owner

Literature René Chavance, “Les aménagements nouveaux de Jean Royère et les réfexions qu’ils inspirent,” Mobilier et Décoration, no. 8, November 1956, p. 15 for a similar example Catherine and Stéphane de Beyrie and Jacques Ouaiss, Jean Royere, New York, 2000, pp. 113, 158 for a similar example Pierre-Emmanuel Martin-Vivier, Jean Royère, Paris, 2002, p. 180 for a similar example


8. Jean Royère

1902-1981

“Boule” armchair circa 1957 Fabric upholstery, oak. 27 1/2 x 38 1/2 x 37 1/2 in. (69.9 x 97.8 x 95.3 cm) Estimate $120,000-180,000 Provenance Nadim Majdalani, Beirut Laurice Daou, Beirut, 1957 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Jean Royère, décorateur à Paris, exh. cat., Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, 1999, pp. 28, 120 Pierre-Emmanuel Martin-Vivier, Jean Royère, Paris, 2002, pp. 231, 284 Galerie Jacques Lacoste and Galerie Patrick Seguin, Jean Royère, Volume 1, Paris, 2012, p. 75 Galerie Jacques Lacoste and Galerie Patrick Seguin, Jean Royère, Volume 2, Paris, 2012, pp. 46, 274 Pierre-Emmanuel Martin-Vivier, Jean Royère, Paris, 2017, pp. 238, 299

The present Boule armchair was acquired in 1957 from the architect Nadim Majdalani in Beirut. Majdalani had met Jean Royère in Paris and subsequently, in the late 1940s, the two opened an ofce of decoration and architecture together under both their names on avenue des Français in Beirut. The collaboration would continue into the 1960s. Majdalani also owned a furniture workshop and began to execute Royère’s designs according to the detailed plans he had sent over from Paris. Nadine Begdache, the daughter of Majdalani, recounted that Royère’s furniture was “distinguished by their originality and their audacity…Everything he imagined was of great freshness and above all great comfort (Fif Abou Dib, “En tandem avec Nadim Majdalani,” L’Orient-Le Jour, May 5, 2000).”

Royère and Majdalani would go on to collaborate on a large number of both residential and commercial interiors throughout Lebanon, which at the time was experiencing a great deal of growth and new construction. These interiors appeared in French publications throughout the period, with Nadim Majdalani noted as a collaborator in the captions. For his part, Royère loved to travel and throughout his career sought out new markets across the world. As he recounted in 1963, “What you have to remember is that in these new and developing countries, cooperation between architect and decorator is facilitated by the fact that, unlike in France, people don’t spend their time patching up and modernizing old buildings (Revue de l’Ameublement, December 1963).” The form of the present armchair, a variation of the lower-back version now commonly referred to as the Ours Polaire armchair, had been exhibited by Royère as early as 1942 in the Salon des artistes décorateurs.


9. Jean Royère

1902-1981

“Persane” foor lamp circa 1954 Gilt steel, fabric shades. 72 3/8 in. (183.8 cm) high Estimate $60,000-80,000 Provenance Galerie Neo Senso, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner, circa 1990 Literature “Pour grouper la famille: Le Foyer d’aujourd’hui,” Le Décor d’aujourd’hui, no. 86, June 1954, p. 187 René Chavance, “Le Salon des Arts Ménagers,” Mobilier et Décoration, April 1954, p. 102 Christine Grange-Bary, “Un Dialogue Inspiré,” Maison & Jardin, no. 406, September 1994, pp. 52, 54 Jean Royère, décorateur à Paris, exh. cat., Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, 1999, pp. 70, 164 Galerie Jacques Lacoste and Galerie Patrick Seguin, Jean Royère, Volume 1 and 2, Paris, 2012, throughout Pierre-Emmanuel Martin-Vivier, Jean Royère, Paris, 2017, p. 202

Jean Royère featured his Persane foor lamp in the 1954 Salon des arts ménagers as part of a bedroom setting alongside an Œuf chair in fuzzy gray and red upholstery and a Flaque cofee table in black straw marquetry with a constellation of golden straw stars. Against a large light green curtain in the background, the long graceful arms of the Persane stood “gushing like meteors to carry of the light,” in the words of René Chavance, who reviewed the Salon for the April 1954 issue of Mobilier et Décoration. In the same article Chavance praised Royère for having a refned taste that “blends…with a spiritually fanciful invention.” One of the key characteristics of this fanciful inventiveness was Royère’s use of shaped metal rods, which he explored throughout his lighting repertoire. Sometimes they appear, like in the Persane, as a tidy bundle of branches, while in other instances they undulate across the wall, or, in the case of the Liane, sprawl like an unkempt vine or a hand-drawn line.


Property from a Private Miami Beach Collection

10. Jean Royère

1902-1981

“Ours Polaire” sofa 1950s Original fabric upholstery, cherry wood feet, ash internal frame. 30 x 94 x 46 1/2 in. (76.2 x 238.8 x 118.1 cm) Estimate $300,000-500,000 Provenance Galerie Patrick Seguin, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature “La Résidence Française,” Art et Industrie, no. 8, June 1947, p. 20 René Chavance, “Les aménagements nouveaux de Jean Royère et les réfexions qu’ils inspirent,” Mobilier et Décoration, no. 8, November 1956, p. 21 Jean Royère, décorateur à Paris, exh. cat., Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, 1999, throughout Galerie Jacques Lacoste and Galerie Patrick Seguin, Jean Royère, Volumes 1 and 2, Paris, 2012, throughout Pierre-Emmanuel Martin-Vivier, Jean Royère, Paris, 2017, throughout

Jean Royère frst designed the Ours Polaire sofa for the rooms he occupied in his mother’s apartment at 234 rue du Faubourg-Saint-Honoré on the occasion of re-decorating her residence in 1947. This example now resides in the collection of the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris. Later that year he presented the sofa at La Résidence française, an exhibition organized by the publication Art et Industrie. The sofa became ubiquitous in Royère’s interiors of the late 1950s and early 1960s. Today it is recognized as one of his most iconic and sought-afer designs. The sof round form of the Ours, which practically eliminates the typical parts and structure of most seating in favor of one continuous curve, is in keeping with Royère’s whimsical aesthetic as well as the biomorphic style already in full force in the 1950s. Yet while other designers worked with new materials and techniques to achieve their organic forms—Eero Saarinen’s fberglass Womb chair and the Eameses’ use of molded plywood come to mind—the Ours relied on traditional cabinetmaking methods to achieve its novel shape. Photographs of an Ours frame, likely taken in the courtyard of an artisan in the Faubourg SaintAntoine, show the complex wooden understructure that served as the initial armature. To this carcass a metal frame padded with horsehair further defned the form, which was fnally covered by the fabric upholstery, typically a plush velvet sourced from Italy. The present lot retains the original thick red upholstery, a color which Royère particularly favored for this design. He used it for the Ours sofas he created for the French legation in Helsinki, depicted in a beautifully rendered gouache in the collection of the Musée des Arts Décoratifs (1950), as well as for the salon at the Maison de France in Rio de Janeiro (1955-1960).


Jean Royère, Projet pour le grand salon de la Légation de France à Helsinki en Finlande, 1950. Paris, musée des Arts décoratifs. Image © MAD, Paris. Artwork © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ ADAGP, Paris.


Property from a Private Collection, New York

11. Guy de Rougemont

b. 1935

Three totems 1976 Painted PVC, painted metal. Each: 76 in. (193 cm) high Interior of each tube with label signed in marker Rougemont, impressed colonne P.S., printed société branger lajoix/23130 peyrat la nonière/france/ rougemont 1976 and further impressed n° 14/23, n° A 15/23, and n° B 15/23, respectively. Estimate $8,000-12,000

Provenance Artcurial, Paris, circa 1985 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Renée Beslon, Marie-Odile Briot, and Françoise Thieck, Rougemont 1955/1972, Paris, 1973, pp. 46, 49-52, 56-57, 59-60 for similar examples Bernard Chapuis, Rougemont: Espaces publics et arts décoratifs, 1965-1990, exh. cat., Musée des Art Décoratifs, Paris, 1990, pp. 48-51, 56-58, 68, 73 for similar examples


Property from an Important Collection

12. Pierre Paulin

b. 1927

Pair of low chairs, model no. CM 190 circa 1954 Painted steel, fabric upholstery, rubber. Each: 29 x 22 5/8 x 24 1/4 in. (73.7 x 57.5 x 61.6 cm) Estimate $6,000-8,000

Provenance Galerie kreo, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2012 Literature Élizabeth Védrenne, Pierre Paulin, New York, 2004, pp. 52, 75, 78 Catherine Geel, Pierre Paulin, Designer, Paris, 2008, pp. 160-61, 164-65 Nadine Descendre, Pierre Paulin: Life and Work, Paris, 2014, pp. 39, 62


13. Georges Jouve

1910-1964

Table lamp circa 1959 Glazed stoneware, brass, fabric shade. 31 in. (78.7 cm) high Underside signed with artist’s cipher and FRANCE. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Private collection, Massachusetts Literature Philippe Jousse and Galerie Jousse Entreprise, Georges Jouve, Paris, 2005, pp. 201, 289


Property of a Private Collector, New York

14. Georges Jouve

1910-1964

“Oiseau 4 pattes” circa 1951 Glazed stoneware, painted metal. 14 1/2 x 7 1/2 x 9 in. (36.8 x 19.1 x 22.9 cm) Estimate $8,000-12,000 Literature Michel Faré, Georges Jouve, Paris, 1965, pp. 19, 69 Philippe Jousse and Galerie Jousse Entreprise, Georges Jouve, Paris, 2005, pp. 285, 308


Property of a Private Collector, New York

15. Charlotte Perriand

1903-1999

Daybed, designed for a “chambre d’étudiant,” Maison du Brésil, Cité Internationale Universitaire de Paris circa 1959 Oak, fabric upholstery. 23 1/2 x 74 5/8 x 31 1/4 in. (59.7 x 189.5 x 79.4 cm) Issued by Galerie Steph Simon, Paris, France. Estimate $7,000-9,000 Provenance Magen H Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner, circa 2010 Literature Marie Laure Jousset, Charlotte Perriand, exh. cat., Centre Pompidou, Paris, 2005, p. 153 Jacques Barsac, Charlotte Perriand Un art d’habiter 1903-1959, Paris, 2005, p. 470 Jacques Barsac, Charlotte Perriand: Complete Works Volume 3, 1956-1968, Paris, 2017, pp. 369, 373


Property from an Important New York Collection

16. Serge Mouille

1922-1988

Two-arm angled wall light with one “Lampadaire” and one “Casquette” shade circa 1954 Painted aluminum, painted steel, brass. As shown: 26 3/4 x 58 x 62 in. (67.9 x 147.3 x 157.5 cm) Manufactured by Atelier Serge Mouille, Paris, France. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Galerie de Beyrie, New York Private Collection, New York, 1995 Sotheby’s, New York, “20th Century Design,” June 9, 2015, lot 62 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Boris J. Lacroix, “Ensemble de Décorateurs au Salon des Arts Ménagers,” Art & Décoration, no. 39, 1954, p. 2 Alan and Christine Counord, Serge Mouille: Luminaires, 1953-1962, Paris, 1983, p. 28 Pierre Émile Pralus, Serge Mouille: A French Classic, Saint Cyr au Mont d’Or, 2006, pp. 66, 122, 166-67, 171, 176


Property of a Private Collector, New York

17. Pierre Chapo

1927-1986

Table, model no. T21, and pair of benches, model no. S38 1970s Elm. Table: 28 1/4 in. (71.8 cm) high, 55 in. (139.7 cm) diameter Each bench: 17 1/4 x 56 3/4 x 20 1/2 in. (43.8 x 144.1 x 52.1 cm) Estimate $10,000-15,000


Property from an Important Collection

18. Pierre Jeanneret

1896-1967

Pair of chairs circa 1956 Oak, cane. Each: 35 3/4 x 26 1/2 x 27 1/2 in. (90.8 x 67.3 x 69.9 cm)

Provenance Sotheby’s, Paris, “Arts Décoratifs du XXe Siècle,” May 26, 2005, lot 142 Acquired from the above by the present owner

Estimate $10,000-15,000

Literature Michel Weill, “L’appartement subtil,” Maison Française, no. 103, December 1956-January 1957, pp. 44-45


19. Serge Mouille

1922-1988

“Agrafée” desk lamp circa 1957 Painted aluminum, painted steel, brass. 33 3/4 x 11 5/8 x 18 3/4 in. (85.7 x 29.5 x 47.6 cm) Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Private collection, Austria Literature Alan and Christine Counord, Serge Mouille: Luminaires, 1953-1962, Paris, 1983, p. 28 Pierre Émile Pralus, Serge Mouille: A French Classic, Saint Cyr au Mont d’Or, 2006, pp. 66, 76, 207


Property from an Important Collection

20. Pierre Jeanneret

1896-1967

Pair of “Advocate and Press” armchairs, model no. LC/ PJ-SI-41-A, designed for the High Court, Chandigarh circa 1955 Teak, hide upholstery. Each: 35 3/4 x 26 1/2 x 27 1/2 in. (90.8 x 67.3 x 69.9 cm) Estimate $30,000-50,000

Provenance High Court, Chandigarh Galerie Downtown, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2011 Literature Eric Touchaleaume and Gerald Moreau, Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret, The Indian Adventure: Design-ArtArchitecture, Paris, 2010, pp. 168-69, 567 Galerie Patrick Seguin, Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret: Chandigarh, India, Paris, 2014, pp. 136-39, 282, 323


Property of a Private Collector, New York

21. Serge Mouille

1922-1988

Pair of “Cachan” wall lights circa 1957 Painted aluminum, painted steel. Each: 10 3/4 x 11 3/8 x 11 3/8 in. (27.3 x 28.9 x 28.9 cm) Manufactured by Atelier Serge Mouille, Paris, France. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Literature Pierre Émile Pralus, Serge Mouille: A French Classic, Saint Cyr au Mont d’Or, 2006, p. 181

Serge Mouille designed the present model wall lights for the bedrooms of a housing unit intended for young workers in Cachan, France. Mouille produced these lights for only a brief period and never marketed them, making them a rare model.


Property from an Important Collection

22. Jacques Ruelland and Dani Ruelland 1926-2008 and 1933-2010 Four bottles 1960s Glazed earthenware. Tallest: 15 1/8 in. (38.4 cm) high Underside of each incised Ruelland. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Thomas Fritsch, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2005 Literature Pierre Staudenmeyer, La Céramique Française des Années 50, Paris, 2001, pp. 45, 89, 100-1, 282-85 for similar examples


23. Paolo Bufa

1903-1970

Low table circa 1940 Chestnut. 21 in. (53.3 cm) high, 27 5/8 in. (70.2 cm) diameter Executed by Mario Quarti, Milan, Italy. Together with a certifcate of expertise from the Paolo Bufa Archive. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Private collection, Biella Literature Guglielmo Ulrich, Arredamento: Mobili e oggetti d’arte decorativa, Milan, 1950s, fg. 48


24. Paolo Venini

1895-1959

Rare table lamp circa 1950 Zanfrico glass, brass, paper shade. 19 7/8 in. (50.5 cm) high Produced by Venini & C., Murano, Italy. Underside acid-etched venini/murano/ ITALIA and with paper label printed VENINI S.A. MURANO. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Literature Franco Deboni, Venini Glass: Catalogue 1921-2007, Volume II, Turin, 2007, fg. 150


25. Stilnovo Ceiling light, model no. 1126 circa 1959 Painted steel, brass, glass. 68 1/2 in. (174 cm) drop, 37 1/4 in. (94.6 cm) diameter Manufactured by Stilnovo, Milan, Italy. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature Stilnovo: apparecchi per l’illuminazione, sales catalogue, Milan, 1963, p. 21 Stilnovo, exh. cat., Luminaires-Moderniste, Berlin, 2016, p. 128


26. Gio Ponti

1891-1979

Pair of sofas circa 1938 Walnut, fabric upholstery. Each: 33 1/4 x 63 x 27 1/2 in. (84.5 x 160 x 69.9 cm) Together with a certifcate of expertise from the Gio Ponti Archives. Estimate $18,000-24,000 Provenance Private collection, Genoa Literature “Tre divani per voi,” Domus, no. 125, May 1938, p. 40 for a drawing


27. Max Ingrand

1908-1969

Ceiling light, model no. 2258 circa 1960 Glass, nickel-plated brass. 39 1/2 in. (100.3 cm) drop, 22 1/4 x 10 3/4 in. (56.5 x 27.3 cm) Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Milan, Italy. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature Quaderni Fontana Arte 5, sales catalogue, Milan, 1963, p. 51 Franco Deboni, Fontana Arte: Gio Ponti, Pietro Chiesa, Max Ingrand, Turin, 2012, fg. 314


28. Max Ingrand

1908-1969

Pair of table lamps, model no. 2228 circa 1963 Crystal-cut glass, colored glass, nickel-plated brass. Each: 7 3/4 in. (19.7 cm) high Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Milan, Italy. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan

Literature Quaderni Fontana Arte 5, sales catalogue, Milan, 1963, p. 69 Domus, no. 424, March 1965, Milan, n.p. for an advertisement Laura Falconi, Fontana Arte: Una Storia Trasparente, Milan, 1998, p. 216 Franco Deboni, Fontana Arte: Gio Ponti, Pietro Chiesa, Max Ingrand, Turin, 2012, fg. 373


29. Gino Sarfatti

1912-1985

Rare ceiling light, model no. 2041 circa 1946 Painted aluminum, brass, painted brass, painted steel. 49 in. (124.5 cm) drop, 43 1/4 in. (109.9 cm) diameter Manufactured by Arteluce, Milan, Italy. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Private collection, Turin Literature “Consigli per la casa,” Domus, no. 213, September 1946, p. 38 Marco Romanelli and Sandra Severi, Gino Sarfatti: Selected Works 1938-1973, Milan, 2012, pp. 148, 465


30. Max Ingrand

1908-1969

31. Fontana Arte

Set of fve “Micro” wall lights, model no. 2093 circa 1962 Glass, nickel-plated brass. Each: 8 1/4 x 4 3/8 x 5 3/8 in. (21 x 11.1 x 13.7 cm) Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Milan, Italy.

Low table, model no. 2013 circa 1961 Glass, mirrored glass, painted metal, brass. 15 1/2 x 42 x 22 in. (39.4 x 106.7 x 55.9 cm) Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Milan, Italy.

Estimate $10,000-15,000

Estimate $5,000-7,000

Provenance Private collection, Voghera

Provenance Private collection, Rome

Literature Quaderni Fontana Arte 1, sales catalogue, Milan, 1960s, p. 62 Edoardo Paoli, “Specchi nell’arredamento,” Vitrum, no. 151, September-October 1965, pp. 45-46 Pierre-Emmanuel Martin-Vivier, Max Ingrand, du verre à la lumière, Paris, 2009, p. 203

Literature Quaderni Fontana Arte 2, sales catalogue, Milan, 1960s, p. 15


32. Angelo Lelii

1911-1979

Pair of ceiling lights, model no. 12697 circa 1958 Glass, Moplen, brass, brass-plated metal. Each: 24 1/2 in. (62.2 cm) drop, 23 5/8 in. (60 cm) diameter Manufactured by Arredoluce, Monza, Italy. Estimate $18,000-24,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature Anty Pansera et. al., Arredoluce: Catalogo Ragionato 1943-1987, Milan, 2018, pp. 200, 317

The present lot has been registered in the Arredoluce Archives, Italy, as numbers 7538913 and 8460014.


33. Paolo de Poli

1905-1996

Set of fourteen door handles circa 1956 Enameled copper, brass. Each: 4 7/8 in. (12.4 cm) diameter Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Private collection, Como Literature L’Arte dello Smalto Paolo De Poli, exh. cat., Palazzo Della Ragione, Padua, 1984, p. 92 Alberto Bassi and Serena Mafoletti, ed., Paolo De Poli: artigiano, imprenditore, designer, Padua, 2017, pp. 167, 210, 216-218, 237, 422


34. Toni Zuccheri

1937-2008

Pair of “Tacchino” fgures, model no. 412.0 designed circa 1964 Murrina lattimo glass, bronze. Each: 18 1/2 x 17 x 7 3/4 in. (47 x 43.2 x 19.7 cm) Produced by Venini & C., Murano, Italy. Underside of one impressed VENINI. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Literature la Biennale di Venezia: catalogo della XXXII esposizione biennale internazionale d’arte, Venice, 1964, n.p. for an advertisement Arno Hammacher, “Gli uccelli in vetro e bronzo di Venini,” Domus, no. 423, February 1965, p. 54 Marina Barovier, Rosa Barovier Mentasti and Attilia Dorigato, Il Vetro Di Murano Alle Biennali 1895-1972, Milan, 1995, p. 203 Anna Venini Diaz de Santillana, Venini Catalogue Raisonné 1921-1986, Milan, 2000, pp. 181, 228 Franco Deboni, Venini Glass: Its History, Artists and Techniques, Catalogue 1921-2007, Volume 1, Turin, 2007, p. 231, The Green Catalogue (appendix), pl. 6

The present model was included in the XXXII Esposizione Biennale Internazionale d’Arte, Venice, 1964.


35. Guglielmo Pecorini Lounge chair circa 1937 Painted wood, painted metal, cotton webbing, rubber. 29 1/2 x 28 x 66 in. (74.9 x 71.1 x 167.6 cm) Together with a fabric cushion, not illustrated. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Private collection, Forlì Literature “Treccia di paglia,” Domus, no. 115, July 1937, p. 29 “Per il giardino e la campagna,” Domus, no. 188, August 1943, p. 384 for a similar example


36. Gio Ponti and Paolo de Poli 1891-1979 and 1905-1996 “Maschera” statuette circa 1956 Enameled copper. 3 3/4 x 6 x 4 in. (9.5 x 15.2 x 10.2 cm) Reverse signed De Poli and with paper label printed SMALTI/DE POLI/35139 PADOVA/VIA S.PIETRO, 43/ITALIA and MASCHERA in pen. Estimate $2,000-3,000

Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature “Nella mostra ‘Formes Idées d’Italie,’” Domus, no. 329, April 1957, p. 25 for similar examples Alberto Bassi and Serena Mafoletti, ed., Paolo De Poli: artigiano, imprenditore, designer, Padua, 2017, p. 228


37. Gio Ponti and Paolo de Poli 1891-1979 and 1905-1996 Pair of “Gatto” statuettes, model no. 1012 circa 1956 Enameled copper. Each: 2 3/4 x 13 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. (7 x 34.3 x 8.9 cm) Underside of each signed De Poli and with paper label printed SMALTI/DE POLI/35139 PADOVA and “GATTO” dis. Gio Ponti/smalto-su-rame in pen. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Exhibited “Tutto Ponti, Gio Ponti Archi-Designer,” Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, October 18, 2018-May 5, 2019

Literature “Nella mostra ‘Formes Idées d’Italie,’” Domus, no. 329, April 1957, p. 25 Gio Ponti, De Poli: Smalti, Enamels, Émaux, Emaile, Esmaltes, Milan, 1958, fg. 36 Roberto Aloi, L’Arredamento moderno, settima serie, Milan, 1964, p. 53 Andrea Branzi and Michele De Lucchi, eds., Il Design Italiano Degli Anni ’50, Milan, 1985, p. 192 Ugo La Pietra, ed., Gio Ponti, New York, 2009, pp. 312, 315 Alberto Bassi and Serena Mafoletti, ed., Paolo De Poli: artigiano, imprenditore, designer, Padua, 2017, throughout

Gio Ponti designed a series of animal fgurines and masks with Paolo de Poli. Ponti designed the forms while de Poli perfected the enamel glaze on the copper fgures. The present lot is wonderful example of this collaboration and is particularly noteworthy as it was recently chosen for the Gio Ponti exhibition at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris.


38. Fontana Arte Two lidded boxes circa 1939, circa 1960 Glass, walnut, enamel, brass. Larger: 3 1/2 in. (8.9 cm) high, 7 3/4 in. (19.7 cm) diameter Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Milan, Italy. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Private collection, Pavia Literature “Documenti delle Produzioni Italiane,” Domus, no. 136, April 1939, p. 75 for a similar example of the larger box Cristalli d’Arte, Quaderni Fontana Arte 3, sales catalogue, Milan, 1960s, p. 39 for the smaller box


39. Melchiorre Bega

1898-1976

Low table circa 1952 Limed oak, glass, brass. 14 3/4 in. (37.5 cm) high, 24 5/8 in. (62.5 cm) diameter Estimate $4,000-6,000 Literature Roberto Aloi, L’Arredamento moderno, quinta serie, Milan, 1952, fg. 464


40. Stilnovo Rare nine-arm ceiling light 1950s Brass, painted aluminum. 25 1/2 in. (64.8 cm) drop, 38 3/4 in. (98.4 cm) diameter Manufactured by Stilnovo, Milan, Italy. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Private collection, Rome Literature Gerhard Krohn and Fritz Hierl, Formschöne Lampen und Beleuchtungsanlagen, Munich, 1952, p. 89 for a similar example Stilnovo, exh. cat., Luminaires-Moderniste, Berlin, 2016, p. 32 for a similar example


41. Stilnovo Set of four wall lights, model no. 2128 circa 1959 Glass, brass. Each: 23 5/8 x 11 1/2 x 8 in. (60 x 29.2 x 20.3 cm) Manufactured by Stilnovo, Milan, Italy. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature Stilnovo: apparecchi per l’illuminazione, sales catalogue, Milan, 1963, p. 43 Stilnovo, exh. cat., Luminaires-Moderniste, Berlin, 2016, p. 129


42. Gio Ponti

1891-1979

Low table circa 1955 Ash, glass, brass. 20 1/8 in. (51.1 cm) high, 31 7/8 in. (81 cm) diameter Manufactured by Industria Salotti e Arredamenti, Bergamo, Italy. Together with a certifcate of expertise from the Gio Ponti Archives. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Fondazione Livio e Maria Garzanti, Forlì Literature Franco Bertoni, Gio Ponti: “Idee” d’arte e di architettura a Imola e in Romagna, exh. cat., Centro Polivalente Gianni Isola, Imola, 2012, p. 197


Illustration of a bedroom with Carlo Ratti daybed, circa 1955.

43. Carlo Ratti

1890-1960

Daybed circa 1955 Birch plywood, fabric upholstery, brass. 19 1/8 x 82 1/4 x 32 1/2 in. (48.6 x 208.9 x 82.6 cm) Manufactured by Industria Legni Curvati, Lissone, Italy. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Private collection, Monza Literature Domus, no. 317, April 1956, n.p. for an advertisement Irene de Guttry and Maria Paola Maino, Il Mobile Italiano Degli Anni ‘40 e ‘50, Bari, 1992, p. 248 for a drawing


44. Franco Albini

1905-1977

Early “Fiorenza” armchair circa 1954 Walnut, fabric upholstery. 41 1/2 x 27 3/8 x 35 3/4 in. (105.4 x 69.5 x 90.8 cm) Manufactured by Arfex, Milan, Italy. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Private collection, Rimini Literature “Per un collezionista,” Domus, no. 338, January 1958, p. 31 for a similar example Franco Albini & Franca Helg Design, Milan, 2009, n.p.


45. Stilnovo Floor lamp 1950s Acrylic, painted aluminum, nickel-plated brass, painted brass, painted steel, marble. 25 1/2 in. (64.8 cm) high Manufactured by Stilnovo, Milan, Italy. Interior of each shade with manufacturer’s label printed MILANO/STILNOVO/ITALY. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan


46. Stilnovo Pair of ceiling lights, model no. 1158 circa 1955 Painted aluminum, brass, painted metal, glass. Each: 56 in. (142.2 cm) drop, 23 5/8 in. (60 cm) diameter Manufactured by Stilnovo, Milan, Italy. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature Domus, no. 374, January 1961, n.p. for an advertisement Stilnovo: apparecchi per l’illuminazione, sales catalogue, Milan, 1963, p. 12 Clémence and Didier Krzentowski, eds., The Complete Designers’ Lights II: 35 Years of Collecting, Paris, 2014, p. 70 Stilnovo, exh. cat., Luminaires-Moderniste, Berlin, 2016, pp. 124, 153


47. Gio Ponti

1891-1979

Wall-mounted magazine rack circa 1938 Walnut, walnut-veneered wood, brass. 55 1/2 x 74 x 6 1/4 in. (141 x 188 x 15.9 cm) Together with a certifcate of expertise from the Gio Ponti Archives. Likely executed by Sala di Milano, Italy. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Private collection, Forlì Literature “Un Appartamento Risistemato a Milano,” Domus, no. 131, November 1938, p. 18 for a similar example Vito Latis, I Libri Nella Casa, Milan, 1945, p. 19 for a similar example

Interior of an apartment, Milan, circa 1938. Image © Editoriale Domus S.p.A.


48. Ignazio Gardella

1905-1999

Pair of adjustable games tables circa 1949 Painted iron, brass, baize-covered wood, ash-veneered plywood. Each: 30 1/4 in. (76.8 cm) high, fully extended Tray: 3 1/8 x 31 5/8 x 31 5/8 in. (7.9 x 80.3 x 80.3 cm) Together with one ftted and removeable tray tabletop. Manufactured by Azucena, Milan, Italy. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature Roberto Aloi, Esempi di arredamento moderno di tutto il mondo: Tavoli, tavolini, carrelli, Milano, 1950, fgs. 36, 57 “Spedizione per Stoccolma N.4,” Domus, no. 282, May 1953, p. 34 Giulio Carlo Argan, Ignazio Gardella, Milan, 1959, p. 198 Irene de Guttry and Maria Paola Maino, Il Mobile Italiano Degli Anni ‘40 e ‘50, Bari, 1992, p. 33


49. Stilnovo Floor lamp, model no. 4076 circa 1963 Glass, brass, painted steel. 67 3/4 in. (172.1 cm) high Manufactured by Stilnovo, Milan, Italy. Interior of shade with manufacturer’s label printed MILANO/STILNOVO/ITALY. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature Stilnovo: apparecchi per l’illuminazione, sales catalogue, Milan, 1963, p. 66


50. Stilnovo Ceiling light circa 1960 Brass, painted steel, painted metal, glass. 32 3/4 in. (83.2 cm) drop, 30 1/2 x 22 1/8 in. (77.5 x 56.2 cm) Manufactured by Stilnovo, Milan, Italy. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan


51. Angelo Lelii

1911-1979

Adjustable foor lamp circa 1952 Painted aluminum, brass, brass-plated iron, painted brass. 63 in. (160 cm) high Manufactured by Arredoluce, Monza, Italy. Underside of lamp marked ARREDOLUCEMONZA/ITALY 13000 in raised lettering. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature Alexander Koch, Modern Lighting of the ‘50s, Stuttgart, 2012, p. 47 Anty Pansera et. al., Arredoluce: Catalogo Ragionato 1943-1987, Milan, 2018, pp. 144, 289

The present lot has been registered in the Arredoluce Archives, Italy, as number 5319342.


52. Gio Ponti

1891-1979

Desk and side table circa 1950 Beech-veneered wood, beech, brass. Desk: 30 3/4 x 62 7/8 x 31 3/8 in. (78.1 x 159.7 x 79.7 cm) Side table: 19 3/4 x 19 1/2 x 13 1/2 in. (50.2 x 49.5 x 34.3 cm) Possibly produced by Schirolli, Mantua, Italy. Together with a certifcate of expertise from the Gio Ponti Archives. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Banca Nazionale del Lavoro, Italy


54. Elio Monesi

53. Vittorio Gregotti

b. 1927

Bookcase circa 1953 Oak, maple-veneered wood, walnut, painted steel. 110 x 98 1/2 x 23 in. (279.4 x 250.2 x 58.4 cm) Estimate $10,000-15,000

1927-1994

Ceiling light, model no. 12859 circa 1961 Glass, brass, painted brass. 26 in. (66 cm) drop, 553/ 4 x 113/ 4 in. (141.6 x 29.8 cm) Manufactured by Arredoluce, Monza, Italy. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Private collection, Bari

Provenance Bossi textile company, Cameri, Italy

Literature Anty Pansera et. al., Arredoluce: Catalogo Ragionato 1943-1987, Milan, 2018, p. 339

The present lot is documented in the Archivio Gregotti under photo negative number 1/10/4.

The present lot has been registered in the Arredoluce Archives, Italy, as number 8929165.


55. Angelo Ostuni and Roberto Forti Unknown and 1923-2015 Adjustable foor lamp, model no. 399 circa 1960 Brass, painted metal, Perspex. 55 1/8 in. (140 cm) high Manufactured by O-Luce, Milan, Italy. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Private collection, Varese Literature Thomas Bräuniger, Giuseppe Ostuni: O-Luce, apparecchi per illuminazione, Berlin, 2015, p. 116


56. Max Ingrand

1908-1969

Low table, model no. 2012 circa 1960 Glass, brass. 14 x 29 1/2 x 29 1/2 in. (35.6 x 74.9 x 74.9 cm) Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Milan, Italy. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Private collection, Voghera

Literature Quaderni Fontana Arte 2, sales catalogue, Milan, 1960s, p. 18 Domus, no. 388, March 1962, n.p. for an advertisement Edoardo Paoli, Specchiere e specchi: appesi, nel mobile e tecnici, Milan, 1966, p. 157 Laura Falconi, Fontana Arte: Una Storia Trasparente, Milan, 1998, p. 120 Pierre-Emmanuel Martin-Vivier, Max Ingrand, du verre à la lumière, Paris, 2009, p. 147


57. Ico Parisi

1916-1996

Chest of drawers circa 1962 Wenge-veneered wood, plastic laminatecovered wood. 29 5/8 x 58 3/4 x 19 3/4 in. (75.2 x 149.2 x 50.2 cm) Manufactured by Brugnoli Mobili, Cantù, Italy. Estimate $18,000-24,000 Provenance Phillips, New York, “Design,” June 12, 2008, lot 203 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Esperienze di design in Cantù, exh. cat., Centrostampa Banco Lariano, Cantù, 1986, n.p.

Phillips would like to thank Roberta Lietti of the Archivio del Design di Ico Parisi for her assistance cataloguing the present lot.


58. Giulio Ponti

b. 1937

Rare sofa circa 1966 Painted wood, fabric upholstery. 32 7/8 x 77 1/4 x 32 5/8 in. (83.5 x 196.2 x 82.9 cm) Manufactured by Italbed, Pistoia, Italy. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Private collection, Rome Exhibited “Eurodomus,” Genoa, April 30-May 15, 1966 Literature “Italbed,” Domus, no. 440, July 1966, p. 42 “A Parigi ‘Domus Formes Italiennes,’” Domus, no. 450, May 1967, p. 25 Laura Falconi, ed., Gio Ponti: Interiors, Objects, Drawings, 1920-1976, Milan, 2010, p. 254

Giulio Ponti, the son of Gio Ponti, designed the present lot in 1966 for the Italian furniture manufacturer Italbed. This early design demonstrates Giulio Ponti’s afnity for bold colors and forms as well as for modular furniture. The present lot can function as a sofa with either a high or low seat based on its orientation and as a bunk bed when stacked. This design, as with many of the works by Giulio and Gio Ponti for Italbed, allowed the user to adapt the furniture to diferent spatial arrangements. Giulio showed this piece alongside his father’s work at the inaugural Eurodomus, an international exhibition of domestic furniture organized by Gio Ponti himself. Just as Gio Ponti promoted modern design through his magazine Domus, he hoped that this fair would persuade consumers to fll their homes with good design. All of the works were already in production or in prototype phases in an efort to show consumers the options that existed in the marketplace. As Giulio Ponti was not as prolifc as his father, this is a very rare example of his work.


59. Luigi Caccia Dominioni

1913-2016

“Mikado” table lamp circa 1962 Glass, painted brass, brass, painted metal, marble. 43 in. (109.2 cm) high, 23 1/8 in. (58.7 cm) diameter Manufactured by Azucena, Milan, Italy. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Private collection, Bologna Literature Giuliana Gramigna, Repertorio 1950/1980, Milan, 1985, p. 189


60. Alessandro Mendini and Giorgio Gregori 1931-2019 and 1957-1995 Unique cabinet 1985 Macassar ebony, walnut burl, and sycamore-veneered wood, plastic laminate inlay, chromium-plated metal. 33 3/4 x 68 x 23 3/4 in. (85.7 x 172.7 x 60.3 cm) Produced by Mariani Armadi, Lissone, Italy for Studio Alchimia, Milan, Italy. Underside incised Alessandro Mendini/GIORGIO GREGORI/1985. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Adriana Guerriero and Studio Alchimia, Milan Private collection, Virginia, acquired from the above, 1985 Exhibited “Le Afnità Elettive,” XVII Triennale, Milan, 1985 Literature Carlo Guenzi, Le Afnità Elettive, Milan, 1985, illustrated pp. 105, 109 Pierre Restany, “Il Parnaso del design,” Domus, no. 660, April 1985, illustrated p. 82 Annetta Hanna, “Psychodrama in Milan,” ID, May/June 1985, illustrated p. 17 Kazuko Sato, Alchimia: Never-Ending Italian Design, Tokyo, 1985, illustrated pp. 42, 44-45


The XVII Milan Triennale included a special exhibition titled “Le Afnità Elettive” (“The Elective Afnities”) which presented twenty-one displays by Italian and foreign designers such as Ettore Sottsass, Robert Venturi, and Michael Graves. The aim of the exhibition was twofold: to support the region’s furniture industry, historically known for its high level of crafsmanship, and to allow the “twenty-one designers [to] research their afnities,” as the exhibition catalogue explained. This open-ended prompt resulted in experimental tableaux that explored themes of psychoanalysis and proposed new, radical ways of living. The Italian postmodernist designer Alessandro Mendini presented a range of household furniture, including the present cabinet that he designed with Studio Alchimia cofounder Giorgio Gregori. Mendini called his exhibition “Black-Out” and divided his display into two levels. The top of the display, called “Black,” contained various pieces of furniture—a table, bar cart, chairs, lamps, and a rug—that Mendini designed with other Studio Alchimia associates. Central to the display was a hyper-realistic wax sculpture of Mendini (what he called a “counter-monument”) that

“Black-Out” display at the XVII Triennale di Milano, including the present lot and a hyper-realistic sculpture of the designer in wax, 1985. Image courtesy of Alessandro Mendini Archive.

sat in one of his chairs and acted as a tongue-in-cheek criticism of the “deifcation of design…and designers” (Annetta Hanna, “Psychodrama in Milan,” ID, p. 76). The lower component, called “Out,” featured a small opening in the platform through which visitors viewed a mirror-lined room created by Anna Gili that included a fashion design for a human from the future. According to Mendini, the entire display was meant to question “the paradox of mass avant-garde.” Though the present cabinet is a unique piece rather than an object of mass production, it still addresses this “paradox.” The pixelated motif made in inlaid woods on the top and sides appears throughout Mendini’s work, including the rug in his display. These patterns come from what the designer called his “Mendinigraph.” As an ironic gesture, it was meant to be used as a stencil that designers could use and re-use to construct avant-garde forms, further poking fun at what Mendini perceived to be an emptiness in the avant-garde of the mid-1980s. Despite this pessimism, this one-of-a-kind piece of furniture is truly a pinnacle expression of Italian design from the second half of the twentieth century.


61. Ettore Sottsass, Jr.

1917-2007

“Alessandria d’Egitto” bookcase from the “Bau.Haus II” collection circa 1980 Plastic laminate-covered wood, chiseled aluminum. 67 1/4 x 84 5/8 x 19 3/4 in. (170.8 x 214.9 x 50.2 cm) Produced by Studio Alchimia, Milan, Italy. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Art et Industrie, New York Rick Kaufmann, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2002 Literature Kazuko Sato, Alchimia: Never-Ending Italian Design, Tokyo, 1985, p. 17 for a drawing Hans Höger, Ettore Sottsass, jun.: Designer, Artist, Architect, Berlin, 1993, p. 94 Ronald T. Labaco, Ettore Sottsass: Architect and Designer, exh. cat., Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, 2006, p. 123 Peter Weiß, Ettore Sottsass: Bau.Haus I, II, Bönen, 2009, pp. 12, 58 for drawings and p. 59

In 1980, the Italian radical design collective Studio Alchimia released their “Bau.Haus II” furniture collection, which included the present model. Art et Industrie, a former gallery in New York, introduced Studio Alchimia’s furniture to U.S. audiences and included the present lot in their frst American exhibition of the group’s work. The furniture line’s name ironically references the modernist Bauhaus school of design that promoted minimalist forms and functionalism. Sottsass, who worked both independently as well as in collaboration with Studio Alchimia, vehemently rejected this philosophy in favor of design that exhibited elements of pastiche, humor, and play. The title of the present lot, “Alessandria d’Egitto,” (Alexandria, Egypt) is an example of this whimsical approach to design, recalling the city’s famous ancient library—an apt reference for a bookshelf. This allusion, paired with Sottsass’s irreverent use of everyday materials and bright colors, makes the present lot a now-classic example of postmodern Italian design.


62. Yoichi Ohira

Yoichi Ohira Glass art – hard, fragile, cold, and ofen heavy – is not usually designed to be handled. Yoichi Ohira’s luminous blown glass vessels, however, ofer an exception. They are small and light enough to be turned in one’s hands like a Wunderkammer specimen, inviting the viewer to admire his abstracted design vocabulary of gemstones, polished ivory, veined rocks, shimmering water, agate, moss, and lichens. Yoichi Ohira graduated from the Kuwasawa Design School, Tokyo, in 1969. Shortly thereafer he took up a glassblowing apprenticeship at the Kagami Crystal Company, Ltd. In 1973 Ohira moved to Venice to study at the Accademia di Belle Arti; he graduated in 1978, earning the highest possible grade for his thesis, “The Aesthetics of Glass.” In the late 1980s Ohira began collaborating with Murano glassmakers, earning the “Premio Selezione” of the Premio Murano in 1987. Collaboration has always been central to Ohira’s practice; he has written, “If I might compare myself to a composer...I could then compare Murano glassmakers to singers or instrumentalists. Who in the music world would erase the performers’ names? Thus, my pieces in all fairness bear, in addition to my signature, the names of those who carried out my instructions: the glassblower and glasscarver, with the date and the place the piece was made.”

b. 1946

Unique “Composizione a Canne e Polvere” vase 2004 Hand-blown glass canes with murrine and powder inserts, polished and ground. 12 5/8 in. (32.1 cm) high Executed by Livio Serena, master glassblower, and Giacomo Barbini, master cutter and grinder, Murano, Italy. Underside incised with artist’s cipher and Yoichi Ohira m° L. Serena m° G. Barbini 1 / 1 unico Friday 13 -2-2004 murano. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

63. Yoichi Ohira

b. 1946

Unique “Finestre” vase 1997 Hand-blown glass canes with murrine and powder inserts, ground surface. 6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm) high Executed by Livio Serena, master glassblower, Murano, Italy. Underside incised with artist’s cipher and Yoichi Ohira m° L. Serena 1 / 1 unico 5-11-1997 murano. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner

64. Yoichi Ohira

b. 1946

Unique “Mosaico a Polvere” vase 2003 Hand-blown glass canes with murrine and powder inserts. 11 1/2 in. (29.2 cm) high Executed by Livio Serena, master glassblower, and Giacomo Barbini, master cutter and grinder, Murano, Italy. Underside incised with artist’s cipher and Yoichi Ohira/m° L. Serena/m° G. Barbini/1 / 1 unico/Friday 04-7-2003/murano. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Private collection, United States Acquired from the above by the present owner


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Property from the Collection of Trudie Styler & Sting

65. Eva Hild

b. 1966

“Single-Track” 2008 Stoneware, white pigmented paint. 30 x 31 1/2 x 19 1/2 in. (76.2 x 80 x 49.5 cm) Base signed and dated EVA HILD 2008. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist Sotheby’s, New York, “Fusion: Contemporary Art and Design,” December 14, 2010, lot 108 Acquired from the above by the present owners Literature Love Jönsson and Petter Eklund, Eva Hild, Stockholm, 2009, illustrated p. 2


Single-Track: An Interview with Eva Hild Why is clay one of your preferred mediums and how does it enhance your overall design concept? Clay is sticky, heavy, plastic, and multifaceted— a wonderful material in every aspect. Clay has been my main material since I started my artistic education and career. It has been the prerequisite for my exploration of themes ending up in sculptural shapes. I like how the material can be used in diferent ways and transformed into something totally new and unexpected. I like the bodily connection—working with my body, working with abstract bodies—and the long-term relation during the process, from the frst clay-lump to the ready-made sculpture. My shapes have strong spatial and architectural qualities; from smaller clay models I develop my large scale outdoor sculptures in metal materials. You have described your sculptures as expressive of both “strength and fragility” as well as “presence and absence.” How does Single-Track represent these seemingly contradictory ideas? I am fascinated by the relation between inner and outer reality and the dualism between inside and outside. The actual sculpture is the membrane, the in-between. I use my own life, experiences, and emotions and describe this relation. On one hand, it is the mass in thin layers, running in a meandering movement. On the other hand it is the empty space, air and light forming the volumes. The construction is really made of the absent. The clay material also contributes to this duality. The actual wall of the sculpture is strong and fragile like an eggshell.

Many collectors may be familiar with your organic forms in which thin layers of clay delicately envelope and fold onto each other. How has this practice evolved over the last two decades? And where does Single-Track fall within this trajectory? My work is very much connected to my life—the everyday practice and overall happenings. It is a constant and slow change and an ongoing development. I am continuously exploring my themes in diferent materials. My starting points could vary, but I do have a red thread in my storytelling. I work with the material in a close, intimate, planned, and still intuitive way. It is an interaction between brain, body and material. Single-Track is a sculpture from an early stage of the “Loop” series of work, where one line is moving around in the piece. The structure is open and airy with a strong and clear movement. How did you decide on the title Single-Track? I strive for titles that are easy to perceive and that describe something in the actual sculpture, both visually and in content. Preferably I fnd diferent meanings in one word. Single-Track has a strong, circular movement kept together without deviations.


A Symphony of Curves by Glenn Adamson

Property of an American Collector

66. Jeroen Verhoeven

b. 1976

“Lectori Salutem” 2010 Polished stainless steel. 30 x 94 x 43 in. (76.2 x 238.8 x 109.2 cm) Produced by DEMAKERSVAN, the Netherlands. Number 12 from the edition of 20 plus 1 artist’s proof. Underside of desk’s interior with metal label signed Jeroen Verhoeven and printed DEMAKERSVAN/Jeroen Verhoeven/Lectori Salutem Desk/No. 12 of 20. Estimate $120,000-180,000 Provenance Blain Southern, London Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2011 Literature Jessica Watts and Louis Shadwick, eds., Jeroen Verhoeven, Lectori Salutem, London, 2013, pp. 22-38 for sketches, models, and process images and pp. 41-56

“It’s hard to amaze people.” I had to laugh when Jeroen Verhoeven said that to me, back in 2013, because amazement is his stock in trade. I was interviewing the designer and his twin brother Joep about Lectori Salutem, then on its way to a triumphant unveiling at Blain/Southern Gallery.1 The point that Verhoeven was making to me—and it’s a good one—is that technology is now whipping along so fast that we are becoming inured to it. It’s a textbook case of diminishing returns: the latest digital wonder comes along, and is met by a collective shrug. Achieving escape velocity from this dynamic, as Verhoeven so clearly has done over the course of his career, requires more than just technical genius. It demands true creativity. Lectori Salutem exemplifes this future-facing instinct, but to understand the work, it’s necessary to take a step back. Jeroen Verhoeven made his name several years earlier with the Cinderella Table, frst realized in 2005-2006. Though a bellwether in the then-nascent feld of digital design, it began its life in an old-fashioned library, at the Stedelijk Museum. While researching there, Verhoeven became interested in the silhouettes of antique furniture. From this starting point, he created an object of disarming conceptual simplicity. Working in virtual space, he simply placed two diferent profles—those of a commode and a dressing table—at a 90-degree angle. Then he charted point-to-point paths between them. This produced a set of gorgeous, rippling curves, far more complex than anything he could have drawn. Once the shape was fully rendered, it was executed in plywood with a CNC-controlled robotic carving arm, and then hand-fnished. As its title implied, a workaday robot had been liberated into an aesthetic tool, like a humble servant brought to the ball.


Lectori Salutem is the successor to the Cinderella Table, and like many Hollywood sequels, involves higher production values brought to the same basic premise. Working with Joep’s collaborative support (the twins have since become a formal design partnership), Jeroen conceived a desk which would again be based on an historic silhouette, in this case taken from a drawing by the fn-de-siècle ébeniste François Linke. The shape sweeps outward from a single contour line at one end, curving in a wide arc to full three-dimensionality at the other. This makes for an even more voluptuous volume than that of the Cinderella Table, but the more important diference is in the process and materials. Instead of being carved subtractively out of a solid material, the piece was built of many individually formed parts, in recalcitrant stainless steel. This ambitious plan required tooling far beyond that available to an independent designer. What Verhoeven needed was a cutting-edge factory, with the capability to achieve extremely precise results in several diferent processes (laser-cutting, stamping, and welding). Taking advantage of the economic downturn—which made companies much more open to extracurricular activities—he persuaded an automotive factory to take it on. As he told me in our 2013 interview, “a process normally used to make ten thousand of the same thing [was] now used to make only one. We wanted to compress all this attention and put it into one thing.” When fnally completed, Lectori Salutem included no less than 150 separate panels of steel, assembled using 2,300 bolts. Like the Cinderella Table, it also required extensive hand fnishing, in this case to polish the surface to a state of high refectivity. It has an extraordinary intensity, which is partly (as Verhoeven suggests) the result of a whole factory’s worth of capacity being concentrated into a domesticallyscaled object. The incredible intricacy of the object is emphasized by the open back, exposing a complex interior scafolding that contrasts with the seamless fuidity of the outer surface.

1. Jessica Watts and Louis Shadwick, eds., Jeroen Verhoeven: Lectori Salutem (London: Blain/Southern, 2013). 2. Interview with Jeroen Verhoeven, Design: Living in a Material World (London: Sotheby’s, 2017). 3. Gareth Williams, Telling Tales: Narrative in Design Art (London: V&A Publishing, 2009).

It would be wrong, however, to see Lectori Salutem only as a feat of production. The title provides a clue to the work’s deeper meaning. Latin for “greetings, reader,” the phrase (ofen abbreviated to L.S.) was once commonly used to begin correspondence. It is now archaic, and Verhoeven’s use of it here is consistent with his interest in historicism. He is, afer all, making furniture; so his practice has as much to do with that of Linke, or the great Art Nouveau maker Hector Guimard, as it does with an aircraf or racecar, which it superfcially resembles. In this

respect, the design is a thoughtful response to Marc Newson’s Lockheed Lounge, which was so important in establishing an ambitious, atelier-led model for design practice. Both objects partake equally of the antique and the futuristic. Another level of meaning in the desk is more personal. When Jeroen and Joep graduated from the Design Academy Eindhoven in 2004, they set up a design studio called Demakersvan together with a third student, Judith de Grauuw. As a tribute to his two creative partners, Jeroen confgured Lectori Salutem to incorporate the contours of their faces, in the two moldings that bookend the desk’s top. “It is almost like freezing a moment where everything was perfect and polished,” he has said. “For me it symbolizes a moment in life where the perfect balance between myself, Joep and Judith existed.”2 This touching feature is further extended by an inscription, visible in the desk’s interior, giving credit to all the other people who helped realize the project—a gesture that calls to mind the way that builders will sign their names on the inside of a wall before sealing it up. Such personalization is extremely uncommon in design. One of the few things that still distinguishes the feld from contemporary fne art is the studious separation that designers tend to maintain between their private lives and their public projects. This perhaps refects an inheritance from the profession’s formative years. Back then, it was expected that industrial designers would subsume their own identities under that of their corporate clients. Then too, there is the modernist argument that good design should not even be noticed, but should instead provide silent service, giving rational shape to experience without bringing undue attention to its own narratives. These notions have of course been thoroughly demolished in recent years. Curator Gareth Williams’ exhibition Telling Tales at the Victoria and Albert Museum, which included Verhoeven’s work, focused particularly on story-telling in contemporary design.3 Even so, it’s rare that a designer brings much of their own life into a project, perhaps for fear of interfering with the associations of a future prospective owner. Verhoeven realized, though, that there was another way of thinking. Right from the start, Lectori Salutem was conceived a conversation. It began with Linke’s drawing, and continued throughout the design and production process. By the time it was fnished, the object already contained many stories; its ideal use would be to write letters to families and friends, and so generate many more. Scriptori salutem.


67. nendo

est. 2002

“5000mm-table,” from the “thin black lines” series 2010 Painted steel, glass. 8 7/8 x 20 x 20 in. (22.5 x 50.8 x 50.8 cm) Estimate $1,500-2,500 Provenance Tomio Koyama Gallery, Tokyo Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Floyd E. Schulze and Robert Klanten, ed., nendo 10/10, Berlin, 2013, n.p.


68. Max Lamb

b. 1980

“Bronze Poly Chair” designed 2006 Silicon bronze. 28 1/2 x 12 x 15 in. (72.4 x 30.5 x 38.1 cm) Produced for Johnson Trading Gallery, New York. From the edition of 10 unique examples. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Johnson Trading Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2007 Literature Zoë Ryan, Max Lamb, and Ryan Gander, Max Lamb: Exercises in Seating, exh. cat., Art Institute of Chicago, 2018, pp. 82, 84, 86-87, 117

In his seating designs—of which there are over 400—Max Lamb ofen experiments with new forms, materials, and techniques. Lamb made the present lot, for example, using the lostfoam casting process, a highly unconventional production method for furniture making. In this process, a polystyrene foam model of the chair is submerged into sand and then poured over with molten bronze, melting the foam and giving the chair its unique, beady surface. Lamb’s novel use of materials results in a surprising experience with the work: the lightness of foam, from which the chair takes its form, contradicts the heaviness of the bronze and provides the user with an unexpectedly engaging experience. Lamb described his process saying, “The high fuid rate of molten bronze allows a perfectly exact replica of the polystyrene ‘master’ to be cast. Because the master is sacrifced during the casting process, each subsequent bronze stool or chair…is unique.” In this regard, the chair is both original and part of a larger editioned series. An example from the edition belongs to the permanent collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.


69. Ron Arad

b. 1951

“Afer Spring” designed 1992, executed 1996 Mirror-polished stainless steel. 41 1/2 x 15 x 79 1/4 in. (105.4 x 38.1 x 201.3 cm) Number 4 from the edition of 5 plus 3 artist’s proofs. Base incised Ron Arad 4 / 5. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Private collection, New Jersey Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2015 Literature Deyan Sudjic, Ron Arad, London, 1999, p. 60 Matthew Collings, Ron Arad Talks to Matthew Collings, London, 2004, pp. 222-23 Ron Arad: A Retrospective Exhibition, 1981-2001, exh. cat., Barry Friedman Ltd., New York, 2005, pp. 54, 101 Paola Antonelli, Jonathan Safran Foer, Marie-Laure Jousset, Ingeborg de Roode, Ron Arad: No Discipline, exh. cat., The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2009, pp. 54-55 Christian Galli, Ron Arad, Milan, 2011, pp. 43-44, 54-55

Phillips would like to thank Caroline Thorman from Ron Arad Associates for her assistance cataloguing the present lot.


70. Tetsuya Yamada

b. 1968

Unique cofee table 2017 Patinated steel, tempered glass. 17 1/2 x 62 x 20 in. (44.5 x 157.5 x 50.8 cm) Estimate $6,000-8,000

Phillips would like to thank the artist for his assistance cataloguing the present lot.


71. Hiroshi Suzuki

b. 1961

“Miyabi-Fire V” 2006 Hammer-raised and chased fne silver. 10 3/4 in. (27.3 cm) high Underside impressed with artist’s monogram HS, purity mark 999, London town mark, and London date mark g. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Adrian Sassoon, London Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2006 Literature Timothy Schroder, Hiroshi Suzuki, London, 2005, pp. 60-61


72. Hiroshi Suzuki

b. 1961

“Aqua-Poesy VII” 2004 Hammer-raised and chased fne silver. 11 7/8 in. (30.2 cm) high Underside impressed with artist’s monogram HS, purity mark 999, London town mark, and London date mark e. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Contemporary Applied Arts, London Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2004 Literature Timothy Schroder, Hiroshi Suzuki, London, 2005, p. 25


73. Alexander Calder

1898-1976

Cape clasp circa 1936 Hammered silver. 3 1/2 x 11 x 3/4 in. (8.9 x 27.9 x 1.9 cm) Estimate $30,000-50,000 Provenance Perls Galleries, New York Nelson A. Rockefeller, New York, 1968 Mary Rockefeller Morgan, New York, 1970s

Exhibited “Alexander Calder,” Akademie der Kunst, Berlin, May 21-July 16, 1967 Literature Herta Elisabeth Killy, Alexander Calder, exh. cat., Akademie der Künst, Berlin, 1967, illustrated p. 98

The present lot is registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under application number A16326.


Precious Metalwork: Alexander Calder’s Jewelry Created at the height of Alexander Calder’s recognition, when his designs adorned the fashionable intelligentsia of Europe and the United States, Calder’s delicate Cape Clasp and Six Circles brooch are paradigmatic of the artist’s ability to yield a universal, abstract lexicon within intimate objects of wearable art. Delicately hand crafed, each unique piece adds another dimension to the cerebral experience of Calder’s work, allowing for a tangible, portable, and highly personal level of engagement. It is in these exquisite works, where the artist delicately hammered radiant planes of silver and brass into elegantly undulating forms, that we see Calder forming a direct relationship with his patrons, both past and present.

Born in 1898 to the painter Nanette Lederer Calder and the sculptor Alexander Stirling Calder, the young Calder used beads and lef over copper wire to create jewelry for his sister’s dolls. As he grew, Calder nurtured his interests in physics and construction, graduating from Stevens Institute of Technology with a degree in mechanical engineering in 1919. He combined these skills with his creative impulses upon moving to New York, frst enrolling in drawing classes at New York Public School 1922 and then at the Art Students League. Throughout his career, making jewelry provided Calder the perfect confuence of mechanics and artistic experimentation. His tactile appreciation of metal work progressed into a refned understanding of compositional balance and geometric harmony. Afer frst leaving to study in Paris in 1926, Calder’s continued contact with the French capital, and the relationships he built with seminal Surrealists and Abstractionists such as Joan Miró made him a crucial bridge between Abstract Expressionism in New York and European Modernism.


Calder’s sustained practice of delicately manipulating metals into evocative forms marks him as a pioneer of studio jewelry. Inspired by his milieu, his pieces were ofen personal gifs to friends, family, and patrons. In 1931, he made a triple banded ring with a spiral plaque as an engagement ring for his wife Louisa. The spiral motif would remain an enduring formal trope that he would reimagine in copper, brass, silver, and gold. Created circa 1940, Six Circles is emblematic of the artist’s technical capability. Elegance and order is maintained while the minute indentations of Calder’s hammer caress the surface, enabling it to shimmer with the record of his hand. The piece once belonged to artist Aviva BaalTeshuva and her husband Jacob—a renowned critic of modern and contemporary art who later authored a publication on Calder. Tracing a single line of thinly hammered brass that aligns and overlaps to compose an eloquently gathered pyramid of loops, the piece speaks to the artist’s overriding concerns regarding movement and geometry, as expressed in the interlocking patterns of his lithographs and the motion of his mobiles. As a statement of allegiance to avant-garde artistic practice, Calder’s jewelry was collected avidly by infuential contemporaries such as Peggy Guggenheim, Millicent Rogers, and Mary Rockefeller, each beguiled by its enigmatic efect. Created in 1936 and boasting outstanding provenance, Cape Clasp once formed part of Mary Rockefeller Morgan’s collection, having been originally acquired by Nelson A. Rockefeller—

the renowned collector, philanthropist, and 41st Vice President of the United States who also served a as Trustee, Treasurer, and President of the Museum of Modern Art, New York at a time when the museum began to draw an equivalence between jewelry and contemporary art. An early work crafed in silver— which became scarcer in Calder’s œuvre as the war progressed—the elegant clasp plays with sculptural possibilities within the realm of functional attire. A seemingly infnite loop of glistening silver speaks to the conceptual rigor of geometry while the asymmetrical futed ends and hand-formed rivets recall the endearing whimsy of Calder’s early representational wire sculptures. Here, Calder manipulates an ancient, precious metal, inviting the collector to revel in the free abandon of consciously naive forms and “join with him in eschewing the facile and pretentious.” As noted by Calder’s grandson Alexander S. C. Rower, “In my grandfather’s day and today, when his jewelry owners wear his pieces, it sets them apart and they make unspoken recognition as members of the Calder clan.”


74. Alexander Calder

1898-1976

“Six Circles” brooch circa 1940 Hammered brass, steel wire. 5 3/4 x 6 3/8 in. (14.6 x 16.2 cm) Estimate $45,000-65,000 Provenance Perls Galleries, New York Sculpture to Wear, New York, 1973 William Ehrlich Gallery, New York, 1978 Aviva and Jacob Baal-Teshuva, New York Sotheby’s, New York, “An Artistic Home: The Collection of Aviva & Jacob Baal-Teshuva,” December 13, 2016, lot 1 Acquired from the above by the present owner

The present lot is registered in the archives of the Calder Foundation, New York, under application number A16926.


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

75. Edmund de Waal

b. 1964

Teapot circa 1995 Porcelain, celadon glaze, galvanized metal. 8 1/4 in. (21 cm) high, including handle Side impressed with inventory mark under the glaze. Estimate $3,000-4,000 Provenance Contemporary Applied Arts, London Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1995

Exhibited “Contemporary British Studio Ceramics: The Grainer Collection,” The Mint Museum of Craf + Design, Charlotte, North Carolina, October 1, 2010-March 13, 2011 Literature Annie Carlano, ed., Contemporary British Studio Ceramics, exh. cat., Mint Museum of Craf + Design, New Haven, 2010, illustrated p. 165


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

76. Edmund de Waal

b. 1964

Lidded jar and two vessels 1996 Porcelain, celadon glaze. Tallest: 8 in. (20.3 cm) high Underside of each vessel impressed with inventory mark under the glaze. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Lidded jar: New Ashgate Gallery, Farnham Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1998

Two vessels: Egg, London Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1996 Exhibited “Contemporary British Studio Ceramics: The Grainer Collection,” The Mint Museum of Craf + Design, Charlotte, North Carolina, October 1, 2010-March 13, 2011 for the two vessels Literature Annie Carlano, ed., Contemporary British Studio Ceramics, exh. cat., Mint Museum of Craf + Design, New Haven, 2010, illustrated p. 165 for the two vessels


77. Taro Tabuchi

b. 1977

“Untitled� 2015 Wood-fred porcelain. 12 1/2 in. (31.8 cm) high Estimate $2,000-3,000 Provenance Tomio Koyama Gallery, Tokyo Acquired from the above by the present owner


Whereas many contemporary ceramists rely on gas or electric-powered kilns, Japanese artist Taro Tabuchi builds his own furnaces and uses local woods to fre his pottery over a three-day period. Though this traditional fring method dates back to the 5th century, the results are far from traditional. Historically, many Japanese ceramists have created wares that feature planes of solid color. In Tabuchi’s work, though, he prefers to rely on chance to create beautiful abstract patterns. The ashes and the fre from the kiln create varied arrangements of pastel hues on the pottery’s surface. His forms range from traditional, as seen in the “Untitled” vase, to more sculptural, inventive forms, such as the conical “Barbaric White.” Tabuchi has received critical acclaim throughout his native Japan and has been featured in both solo and group exhibitions across Asia, though this is the frst ofering of his work on the secondary market.

78. Taro Tabuchi

b. 1977

“Barbaric White” 2015 Wood-fred porcelain. 10 5/8 in. (27 cm) high Estimate $2,000-3,000 Provenance Tomio Koyama Gallery, Tokyo Acquired from the above by the present owner


79. Wendell Castle

1932-2018

Pair of “three-legged” chairs 1981 Stack-laminated cherry wood, leather upholstery. Each: 30 x 24 1/4 x 26 1/2 in. (76.2 x 61.6 x 67.3 cm) Leg of each incised W. Castle 81. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Private Collection, Rochester, New York Moderne Gallery, Philadelphia Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Emily Evans Eerdmans, Wendell Castle: A Catalogue Raisonné, 1958-2012, New York, 2014, pp. 178-79 for similar examples


Property from a Private Collection, Texas

80. June Schwarcz

1918-2015

Small vessel circa 1977 Hammered, enameled, and patinated copper with electroplated texture. 4 7/8 in. (12.4 cm) high, 8 in. (20.3 cm) diameter Side of vessel incised Schwarcz/735 and the underside with 735/Schwarcz in pen on paper label. Estimate $2,000-3,000 Provenance Private collection, Miami, acquired directly from the artist, 1980s Thence by descent to the present owner, 2018 Literature Bernard N. Jazzar and Harold B. Nelson, June Schwarcz: Invention & Variation, Washington, D.C., 2017, p. 60 for a similar example

Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

81. Jim Partridge

b. 1953

“Black Bowl” circa 1985 Scorched and painted oak burl. 6 3/4 in. (17.1 cm) high Underside impressed J.B. PARTRIDGE. Estimate $1,500-2,500 Provenance Contemporary Applied Arts, London Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1991 Literature Alison Britton and Katherine Swif, Jim Partridge, Manchester, 2003, pp. 20, 68, 80 for similar examples


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

82. Colin Pearson

1923-2007

“Winged Form” 1994 Glazed stoneware. 12 1/4 in. (31.1 cm) high Side impressed with artist’s seal.

Exhibited “Contemporary British Studio Ceramics: The Grainer Collection,” The Mint Museum of Craf + Design, Charlotte, North Carolina, October 1, 2010-March 13, 2011

Estimate $2,000-3,000

Literature Ceramic Pieces by Colin Pearson, exh. cat., Fine Arts Gallery, University Centre, Sandy Bay, 1981, n.p. for a similar example “British Ceramics in Boston,” Ceramics Monthly, December 1984, p. 29 for a similar example Oliver Watson, Studio Pottery: Twentieth Century British Ceramics in the Victoria and Albert Museum Collection, London, 1993, pp. 11, 225 for a similar example

Provenance Galerie Besson, London Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1995


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

83. Nicholas Homoky

b. 1950

“Essential Vase” and “Six-way teapot” 1992, 1997 Porcelain, inlaid decoration. Taller: 7 in. (17.8 cm) Underside of vase incised with artist’s cipher and 1992, underside of teapot impressed with artist’s seal. Estimate $1,500-2,000

Provenance “Essential Vase”: Crafs Council Shop at the V&A Museum, London Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1993 “Six-way teapot”: Anthony Hepworth, London Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1997 Literature Nicholas Homoky, Nicholas Homoky, Somerset, 1997, teapot illustrated p. 37 Emmanuel Cooper, “Nicholas Homoky,” Ceramic Review, no. 170, April 1998, teapot illustrated p. 45


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

84. Gordon Baldwin

b. 1932

“Untitled Vessel (Black with White Signs)” 1999 Earthenware, painted slip. 15 in. (38.1 cm) high Underside incised GB/98, dated in glaze 99, and inscribed in pencil 5-99. Estimate $3,000-4,000 Provenance Barrett Marsden Gallery, London Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1999 Literature Twenty-fve Years: Crafs Council Shop at the Victoria & Albert Museum, exh. cat., Victoria & Albert Museum, London, 1999, illustrated p. 12 Gordon Baldwin, exh. pamphlet, Barrett Marsden Gallery, London, 1999, illustrated n.p.

Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

85. Gordon Baldwin

b. 1932

“Cloudscape” 1998 Earthenware, painted slip. 13 3/8 in. (34 cm) high Underside signed in glaze GB/98. Estimate $3,000-4,000 Provenance Barrett Marsden Gallery, London Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1998 Exhibited “Contemporary British Studio Ceramics: The Grainer Collection,” The Mint Museum of Craf + Design, Charlotte, North Carolina, October 1, 2010-March 13, 2011 Literature Peter Saunders, “Gordon Baldwin’s Silent Clay,” Ceramics: Art & Perception, no. 39, 2000, illustrated p. 40 Michael Hardy, Handbuilding, London, 2000, illustrated p. 53


Σ

86. Joaquim Tenreiro

1906-1992

Settee circa 1958 Brazilian rosewood, cane. 26 1/4 x 70 x 23 1/2 in. (66.7 x 177.8 x 59.7 cm) Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Private collection, Rio de Janeiro Literature Ronaldo do Rego Macedo, Joaquim Tenreiro: Madeira/Arte e Design, Rio de Janeiro, 1985, p. 40 Soraia Cals, Tenreiro, Rio de Janeiro, 1998, p. 114 Aric Chen, Brazil Modern: The Rediscovery of Twentieth-Century Brazilian Furniture, New York, 2016, p. 63 Maria Cecília Loschiavo dos Santos and Tatiana Sakurai, Móvel Moderno Brasileiro, São Paulo, 2017, pp. 70-71


87. Joaquim Tenreiro A trained painter and son of a cabinetmaker, Joaquim Tenreiro began designing furniture in the 1940s. By 1943 he had started his own furniture design company, opening ofces in Rio de Janeiro and Copacabana, and, due to the increasing success of his designs, he opened another shop in 1953 in São Paolo. By the end of the 1950s, Tenreiro was employing approximately 100 crafsmen to construct his designs. The success of the business was evident among Brazilians, but the recognition and growing size of the company led to turmoil, resulting in its closing in the 1960s. Among the greatest of the Brazilian modernist designers, his work was defned by the structural simplicity and brilliant engineering evidenced in the present daybed. Though characteristic of his work, the present lot is a rare form for Tenriero with only a few other known examples, including one from a private estate from a family in Rio de Janiero.

1906-1992

Rare daybed 1960s Cumaru-veneered plywood, cumaru, fabric upholstery. 18 1/8 x 80 3/4 x 35 3/8 in. (46 x 205.1 x 89.9 cm) Underside with two paper labels printed Tenreiro Móveis e Decorações/Rue 7 de Março, 30 / 80 - A/Fab. N.°/Enc. N.°/Pianta N.°/Valor:/INDUSTRIA BRASILEIRA, each with penciled numbers. One label is partially obscured. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Private collection, Rio de Janeiro


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

88. John Ward

b. 1938

Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

89. John Ward

b. 1938

Vase 1990s Hand-built glazed stoneware. 10 1/4 in. (26 cm) high Underside impressed with artist’s seal.

“Black and White Vessel” 1990s Hand-built glazed stoneware. 8 in. (20.3 cm) high Underside impressed with artist’s seal.

Estimate $4,000-6,000

Estimate $4,000-6,000

Provenance New Crafsman Gallery, St. Ives Acquired from the above by the present owners, circa 1996

Provenance New Crafsman Gallery, St. Ives Acquired from the above by the present owners, circa 1996

Exhibited “Contemporary British Studio Ceramics: The Grainer Collection,” The Mint Museum of Craf + Design, Charlotte, North Carolina, October 1, 2010-March 13, 2011

Exhibited “Contemporary British Studio Ceramics: The Grainer Collection,” The Mint Museum of Craf + Design, Charlotte, North Carolina, October 1, 2010-March 13, 2011

Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

90. John Ward

b. 1938

“Large Brown Jug” 1980s Hand-built glazed stoneware. 14 3/4 in. (37.5 cm) high Underside impressed with artist’s seal. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance New Crafsman Gallery, St. Ives Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1988 Exhibited “Contemporary British Studio Ceramics: The Grainer Collection,” The Mint Museum of Craf + Design, Charlotte, North Carolina, October 1, 2010-March 13, 2011


90.

88.

89.


Property from a Private Collection, New Jersey Σ

91. George Nakashima

1905-1990

“Minguren I” table 1985 American black walnut, East Indian rosewood. 29 1/2 x 72 1/2 x 43 in. (74.9 x 184.2 x 109.2 cm) Underside signed in marker George Nakashima June 6 1985 and Fenimore. Together with a drawing of the table by George Nakashima, a copy of the original order card, and a certifcate of authenticity from Mira Nakashima. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Dr. James A. Fenimore, Houston Private collection Wright, Chicago, “Important Design,” June 6, 2013, lot 113 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature George Nakashima, The Soul of a Tree, A Woodworker’s Refections, Tokyo, 1981, pp. 156, 173, 182 for similar examples Mira Nakashima, Nature, Form & Spirit: The Life and Legacy of George Nakashima, New York, 2003, pp. 200, 202 for similar examples


92. Isamu Noguchi

1904-1988

Pair of “Three-Legged Cylinder” table lamps, model no. 9 designed 1944, manufactured 1947-1954 Cherry wood, fberglass-reinforced polyvinyl chloride, steel. Each: 15 3/4 in. (40 cm) high, 7 1/4 in. (18.4 cm) diameter Manufactured by Knoll Associates, New York, New York. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Private collection, Maryland Acquired from the above by the present owner

Literature “Lamps and Lighting,” Everyday Art Quarterly, no. 12, Autumn 1949, p. 6 Isamu Noguchi, Isamu Noguchi: A Sculptor’s World, New York, 1968, p. 190 Nancy Grove and Diane Botnick, The Sculpture of Isamu Noguchi, 1924-1979: A Catalogue, New York, 1980, fg. 805 Kathryn B. Hiesinger and George H. Marcus, eds., Design Since 1945, exh. cat., Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, 1983, p. 148 Alexander von Vegesack, et al., eds., Isamu Noguchi, Sculptural Design, exh. cat., Vitra Design Museum, Weil am Rhein, 2001, pp. 130, 274, 276


Property from an Important Collection

93. Frank Lloyd Wright

1867-1959

Side chair, designed for Taliesin West circa 1937 Birch plywood, fabric upholstery. 28 x 14 1/2 x 21 1/4 in. (71.1 x 36.8 x 54 cm) Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Piasa, Paris, “American Design,” May 30, 2018, lot 57 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Frank Lloyd Wright, The Natural House, New York, 1954, p. 173


Property from an Important Collection

94. José Zanine Caldas

1919-2001

Console table 1970s Cerejeira. 31 x 78 1/4 x 21 in. (78.7 x 198.8 x 53.3 cm) Produced by the Zanine workshop, Nova Viçosa, Bahia, Brazil. Tabletop with brass plate marked Zanine. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Galerie Patrick Fourtin, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2006 Literature Amanda Beatriz Palma de Carvalho, José Zanine Caldas, São Paulo, 2019, p. 274


95. Donald Colfesh

b. 1932

Decanter and six cordials, from the “Circa ‘70” line 1960 Sterling silver, Bakelite. Decanter: 15 3/8 in. (39.1 cm) high Each cordial: 4 5/8 in. (11.7 cm) high Produced by Gorham Manufacturing Company, Providence, RI. Underside of decanter impressed Gorham/STERLING/1466 and with hallmarks. Underside of each cordial glass impressed Gorham STERLING 1467. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Literature Jewel Stern, Modernism in American Silver: 20th Century Design, exh. cat., Dallas Museum of Art, Da, 2005, pp. 257-63 for a discussion on the “Circa ‘70” line

Though the present lot belongs to a line of silver hollowware called “Circa ’70,” Donald Colfesh designed the pieces for Gorham Manufacturing Company more than a decade earlier. This title alludes to the futurism of his forms. The sleek lines of the slender decanter and the attenuated conical cordials almost look like spaceships, surely an inspiration for the young designer during the “Space Race.” Though the aesthetics of the present lot refect a particular zeitgeist, the forms have remained strikingly modern. Just as a

1961 advertisement in The New Yorker predicted: “An inspiring design, this modern sterling has a timeless quality that makes it a joy to own today, tomorrow, forever.” The “Circa ‘70” line also included a tea and cofee set, but the decanter and cordial glass are rarer examples of the “Circa ‘70” line. An example of the present model decanter and cordial belong to the permanent collections of the Brooklyn Museum of Art and the Dallas Museum of Art.


96. Gio Ponti

1891-1979

“Diamond� fatware service for 24 circa 1958 Sterling silver, stainless steel. Largest utensil: 11 in. (27.9 cm) Manufactured by Reed & Barton, Taunton, MA. Each fork, spoon, and twelve serving utensils impressed Reed & Barton/STERLING, each hollow handle piece impressed REED & BARTON/MIRRORSTELE/STERLING HANDLE. Comprising 24 dinner forks, 24 salad forks, 24 dinner knives, 24 butter knives, 24 soup spoons, 24 dessert spoons, 24 demitasse spoons, 2 cold meat forks, 1 cheese knife, 1 cake knife, 1 master butter knife, 2 pierced serving spoons, 2 serving spoons, 2 jelly servers, 1 cream ladle, 1 master sugar spoon, 1 gravy ladle, and 1 cocktail fork (183). Estimate $12,000-18,000


Property from a Private Collection, United States

97. Charles Eames and Ray Eames 1907-1978 and 1912-1988 Pair of “DAR” armchairs circa 1953 Molded fberglass, painted steel, rubber. Each: 31 5/8 x 24 3/4 x 23 1/4 in. (80.3 x 62.9 x 59.1 cm) Manufactured by Herman Miller Furniture Company, Zeeland, Michigan. Underside of each armchair with manufacturer’s paper label printed herman miller/furniture company/zeeland/ michigan and DESIGNED BY/CHARLES EAMES. Estimate $1,000-1,500 Literature John Neuhart, Marilyn Neuhart and Ray Eames, Eames Design: The Work of the Ofce of Charles and Ray Eames, New York, 1989, p. 140

Property from a Private Collection, United States

99. Charles Eames and Ray Eames 1907-1978 and 1912-1988 ESU, model no. 270-C circa 1953 Birch plywood, painted Masonite, chromium-plated steel, painted brass, rubber. 32 x 24 x 16 in. (81.3 x 61 x 40.6 cm) Manufactured by Herman Miller Furniture Company, Zeeland, Michigan. Inside of drawer with manufacturer’s paper label printed herman miller/furniture company/zeeland/michigan and DESIGNED BY/CHARLES EAMES. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Literature John Neuhart, Marilyn Neuhart and Ray Eames, Eames Design: The Work of the Ofce of Charles and Ray Eames, New York, 1989, p. 129

Property from a Private Collection, United States

98. Isamu Noguchi

1904-1988

“Cyclone” dining table, model no. 311 circa 1957 Plastic laminate, birch plywood, chrome-plated steel, enameled steel. 28 3/8 in. (72.1 cm) high, 35 3/4 in. (90.8 cm) diameter Manufactured by Knoll Associates, New York, New York. Estimate $800-1,200 Literature Nancy Grove and Diane Botnick, The Sculpture of Isamu Noguchi, 1924-1979: A Catalogue, New York, 1980, fg. 815A for a similar example Alexander von Vegesack, et al., eds., Isamu Noguchi, Sculptural Design, exh. cat., Vitra Design Museum, Weil am Rhein, 2001, p. 129 for a similar example


Herbert Bayer Tapestries by Lissa Ballinger, Curator at the Aspen Institute

Herbert Bayer’s tapestries are arguably the least researched body of his work, and much of his exploration of this medium and its production remains unknown. In the 1960s, as Bayer continued his geometric and chromatic studies, he began to design and fabricate tapestries. To assist in realizing his vision, Bayer visited factories in diferent locations of the world including Puerto Rico, Morocco, and China. Several of his tapestries are large-scale versions of works that he had executed in diferent media. There is no known accurate record of Bayer-approved fabrication locations, and there is little record of editions. This is particularly curious because of how fastidiously Bayer annotated and recorded his work. It is known that many of the tapestries, including the present lot, were made to fll corporate boardrooms for the Atlantic Richfeld Company (ARCO). The genius of utilizing tapestries in these large spaces is that they had the added beneft of helping to absorb sound. The size and the bold, orderly designs of the tapestries dominate every space they inhabit. The subjects for the tapestries are familiar to Bayer; he explores concepts of geometry, symmetry and asymmetry, and also integrates mathematical theories (such as the Fibonnaci sequence) especially into his later work. He uses a simple and recognizable vocabulary of geometric forms—circles, triangles, and rectangles. Also relevant to all of these tapestries is Bayer’s masterful use of color and the interaction and interplay of the color on the wool canvas. The tapestries are yet another example of Bayer’s fearlessness and experimentation in a new medium, enforcing his Bauhaus ethos of equality and lack of hierarchy in the arts. Working with textiles was practical and efcient and allowed him yet another way to advance his understanding of color and form.

100. Herbert Bayer

1900-1985

“Chromatic Circles” tapestry, commissioned for the ARCO ofces, Los Angeles circa 1967 Wool pile. 107 x 101 3/4 in. (271.8 x 258.4 cm) Manufactured by V’Soske, New York, New York. Reverse with manufacturer’s fabric label. Estimate $7,000-9,000 Provenance ARCO, Los Angeles, acquired directly from the artist, circa 1967 Los Angeles Modern Auctions, “20th Century Design and Fine Art Auction,” May 6, 2001, lot 465 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature “Masters of Arts,” Interior Design, August 1978, pp. 140, 144 for similar examples


Florence Knoll and her dog, Cartree, at the 575 Madison Avenue Knoll Associates Showroom, 1956. Image courtesy of Knoll Archive. Artwork: Š 2019 Calder Foundation, New York/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.


Florence Knoll Bassett (née Schust), an architect and pioneer of modern interior design, passed away earlier this year at age 101. A true visionary, “Shu”—as she was afectionately called by those who knew her well—was one of the most infuential architects and designers of postwar America, yet her mark on modern design transcends any one of these felds. Her career is inextricably linked with Knoll, Inc., the furniture company founded by Hans Knoll, who later became her husband. During the 1940s, she worked with designers like Eero Saarinen, Harry Bertoia and George Nakashima to create designs that fulflled a need for modern interiors, and along the way produced innovative, high-quality furniture classics that are still relevant today. Born to a baker in Saginaw, Michigan in 1917, Shu was beset by tragedy throughout her early life afer becoming an orphan at 14. She ended up at the Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfeld Hills, Michigan during the 1930s, where she was taken under the wing of the Saarinen family and was exposed to the importance of the overlapping felds of art, craf and design. Later in Chicago, she was introduced to a rationalist design approach with Mies van der Rohe and received her Bachelor of Architecture at the Illinois Institute of Technology in 1941. “Being a woman, I was given interiors,” Shu said. She started moonlighting for Hans Knoll as a drafsman and eventually joined his company as the director of the Knoll Planning Unit, later becoming partner and co-owner. One of her frst projects was to do the interiors for Secretary of War Henry Stimson—the frst of many government projects. “It was an exciting time, but it was mostly hard work. We had to battle the prejudices against contemporary design,” she said. Shu transformed the feld of “interior design” from interior decoration to spatial architecture—which in the 1950s was almost completely dominated by men. She collaborated with the most important mid-century modern architects, including Philip Johnson, Gordon Bunshaf and Marcel Breuer, designing their interiors which were rooted in practical needs and rigorous spatial planning. Her showrooms for Knoll became laboratories for contemporary design on how we could live and work, and came to represent her signature “Knoll look” that would epitomize the style of the 1950s. Her location at 575 Madison Avenue was one of the frst to incorporate contemporary art and included pieces from artists with whom she had personal friendships. She

developed her appreciation of Paul Klee from her mentor Mies van der Rohe, who at the time had a large collection of Klees, and when a group of works from the artist didn’t sell in her showroom, she purchased all of them. Shu visited Black Mountain College to see the painter and teacher Josef Albers, from whom she said she learned about color, and later worked with his wife Anni Albers to develop textiles for the Knoll line. Afer Hans Knoll died in a car crash in 1955, Shu became president of the company and continued to spearhead many innovations such as the Saarinen pedestal furniture collection. She completed large-scale interior projects for companies including Connecticut General Life Insurance, Heinz and CBS, which exemplifed the best in postwar design in the United States. In 1958, Shu—by then the single most powerful fgure in the feld of modern design—married bank executive Harry Hood Bassett and eventually settled in Miami, where she would go on to design commercial Miami interiors in addition to several private residences. Hood Bassett was an important civic leader in Miami, and the corporate art collection that was developed for the Southeast First National Bank became one of the best in the country. At the height of her career, and afer designing thousands of ofce interiors, she resigned from Knoll in 1965. At only 48 years old, she had profoundly infuenced post-World War II design by defning the look for corporate interiors during the 1950s and 1960s and promoting the “open ofce” workspace. She is one of the most infuential architects and designers of post-war America, and she made designers like Saarinen and van der Rohe famous for their furniture—designs that are today considered classics (along with her own pieces)—and still being used in contemporary interiors. She had a curatorial eye for identifying talent and great works of art that she integrated both in her showrooms and in her homes. Shu was of the belief that art was to be lived with and enjoyed on a daily basis, rather than something kept hidden away in storage. Now, Phillips ofers the rare opportunity to share in the joy and memories that Shu experienced over an incredible life of art and design. When mid-century modern furniture was having a resurgence, Shu ofen came across her own furniture when perusing auction catalogues. With her wit and dry sense of humor she would jokingly say to me: “You know, Paul, I’m an antique now.” —Paul Makovsky, Critic and Curator

Paul Makovsky is a writer based in New York City. He is the Editor-in-Chief of Contract Magazine, a publication dedicated to architecture and design. Makovsky has curated countless exhibitions about art and design, including “Knoll Textiles: 1945–2010” at the Bard Graduate Center, and was a contributor to the accompanying catalogue published by Yale University Press. He was a close friend of Florence Knoll Bassett and is currently writing a biography of her life and work.


Consider the Weathervane It may seem surprising that Florence Knoll Bassett, the pioneer of the sleek aesthetic that came to defne the postwar American ofce interior, collected nineteenthcentury weathervanes. What place, exactly, did these trotting horses, glistening gilded fowl, and verdigrispatinated roosters have in the home of one of the leading exponents of modernism? Though these sculptures may seem incongruous, it’s worth remembering that so-called primitive art and modernism go way back. Wassily Kandinsky mined Russian folk art for inspiration while Picasso and other artists working in Paris collected African carvings. Meanwhile in New York, artists such as Elie Nadelman and Charles Sheeler, looking to defne a distinctly American brand of modernism, found their native artistic roots in early American folk art. As Helen Appleton Read wrote for the Brooklyn Daily Eagle in 1924, “A group of our younger artists…have poked about in antique shops, in old saloons and chophouses and brought back quaint pictures and statues. These are now serving as decorations and inspiration in the studios of many of them. Why bother about French Gothic or the frescoes of Santa Croce when we have material primitive at hand that has the humor and tang of our native soil?” Into the late 1950s, which is when Florence discovered weathervanes “on a whim” while on a trip to Paris with her second husband Harry Hood Bassett, early America continued to serve as inspiration for American artists as well as prominent collectors such as Abby and John Rockefeller. To name a few, David Smith had drawn on farm implements and machinery parts gleaned from his upstate New York property for his “Agricola” series of the 1950s, while Andrew Wyeth represented rural America in an entirely diferent manner.

At the same time, the magazine Art in America, with the dedicated folk art collector Jean Lipman at the helm, published articles about the leading contemporary artists of the time alongside articles on Shaker design and New England gravestones. Albert Barnes’s installations of Van Goghs and Matisses next to ornamental strap hinges come to mind as a visual of the same approach of conferring non-traditional art an equal footing with modern masters. Among these writings for Art in America, an article published by Alice Winchester titled “Antiques for the Avant Garde” (1961) is of particular relevance. “There seems to be today among people of advanced taste,” she wrote, “a considerable interest in antiques. Dwellers in glass houses, for instance, will fll them with period furniture.” Listing nineteenth-century American weathervanes among the potential objects for inspiration she continued, “Such things stir modern taste not because of their age but in spite of it, and are appreciated not for quality or rarity but because they ‘look modern.’” While Florence Knoll Bassett does not seem to have included weathervanes in any of her ofce interiors, they do appear in images of her summer home in Vermont. She acquired the vanes in Vermont as well as in the many antiques stores located near the Knoll showroom in midtown Manhattan and treasured her collection enough to bring it with her when she and Bassett relocated to Coral Gables, Florida, in 1965 and fnally to her last residence in Coconut Grove, where she displayed a group to striking efect in a custom grid-shaped display. “Cocks have always been seen, but never as well as in American weathervanes,” Pablo Picasso said, and we might well add that weathervanes have never been as well seen as in the home of Florence Knoll Bassett.


101. Possibly by W.A. Snow Iron Works, Boston, Massachusetts A large full-bodied molded gilt copper “Hackney” horse weathervane late 19th/early 20th century 36 in. (91.4 cm) high Length hoof to hoof: 48 in. (121.9 cm) Length of bar: 51 1/2 in. (130.8 cm) Estimate $10,000-15,000


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102. Attributed to A.L. Jewell, Waltham, Massachusetts A full-bodied molded gilt copper Peacock weathervane 1850-1877 With pressed and gilt sheet copper tail. 22 in. (55.9 cm) high Length beak to tail: 38 in. (96.5 cm) Estimate $5,000-7,000


103. Possibly by J.W. Fiske, New York, New York A full-bodied molded copper and zinc “Horse and Hoop” weathervane circa 1880 With zinc head and pressed sheet mane and tail. Body: 12 1/4 in. (31.1 cm) high, 28 1/2 in. (72.4 cm) long Hoop: 15 in. (38.1 cm) high, 15 1/2 in. (39.4 cm) wide Estimate $3,000-4,000

104. In the Manner of Harry Leech, Woburn, Massachusetts A carved painted and giltwood dog weathervane mold 19th century 17 1/2 in. (44.5 cm) high Length nose to tail: 36 in. (91.4 cm) Estimate $20,000-30,000


“I am not a decorator. The only place I decorate is my own house.� Florence Knoll Bassett


Opposite/below: Entryway towards the living room of Florence Knoll’s home, Coral Gables, Florida. Image courtesy of Florence Knoll Bassett papers, 1932-2000. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Living room of Florence Knoll, Coconut Grove, Florida, 1985. Image © Christoph Kicherer/ Vogue Décoration.


105. Attributed to J. Howard,

Bridgewater, Massachusetts A full-bodied molded gilt copper and zinc “Index” horse weathervane mid 19th century With zinc head and pressed sheet copper tail. Height excluding stand: 17 3/4 in. (45.1 cm) Length nose to tail: 24 3/4 in. (62.9 cm) Stand: 2 3/4 x 19 1/2 x 5 in. (7 x 49.5 x 12.7 cm) Estimate $8,000-12,000


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106. American A full-bodied molded copper gamecock weathervane circa 1875 With pressed sheet copper tail. 18 in. (45.7 cm) high, 17 3/4 in. (45.1 cm) long Estimate $3,000-5,000

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107. Attributed to Rochester Iron Works, Rochester, New Hampshire A large full-bodied molded and cast-iron Rooster weathervane late 19th century With sheet iron tail. Excluding stand: 30 in. (76.2 cm) high Beak to tail: 36 in. (91.4 cm) Estimate $4,000-6,000


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108. American A primitive sheet iron stag weathervane Third quarter 19th century With iron bracing on one side. 31 in. (78.7 cm) high, 22 1/2 in. (57.2 cm) long Estimate $5,000-7,000


Property from an Important Collection

109. Vilhelm Lauritzen

1894-1984

Floor lamp circa 1937 Aluminum, nickel-plated brass, steel. 47 1/2 in. (120.7 cm) high Produced by Louis Poulsen, Copenhagen, Denmark. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance WYETH, Sagaponack Sotheby’s, New York, “WYETH: The Art of Timeless Design,” June 6, 2017, lot 447 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature “Den lille lejlighed,” Nyt Tidsskrif For Kunstindustri, no. 5, May 1937, p. 99 Grete Jalk, Dansk Møbelkunst gennem 40 aar, vol. 2: 1937-1946, Denmark, 1987, pp. 9, 35


110. Hans J. Wegner

1914-2007

“Ox” lounge chair and ottoman, model nos. AP-46 and AP-49 1960s Chromium-plated steel, wool upholstery, leather. Armchair: 35 5/8 x 37 1/2 x 37 3/4 in. (90.5 x 95.3 x 95.9 cm) Ottoman: 14 1/4 x 29 3/8 x 21 in. (36.2 x 74.6 x 53.3 cm) Manufactured by AP Stolen, Copenhagen, Denmark. Underside of armchair with metal roundel impressed FURNITUREMAKERS/DANISH/CONTROL. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Private collection, Virginia, 1964 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Af Bent Salicath, “Købestævnet - idé og virkelighed,” Dansk Kunsthaandværk, no. 34, 1961, p. 67 Johan Møller Nielsen, Wegner: en dansk møbelkunstner, Copenhagen, 1965, pp. 11, 71-72 Christian Holmsted Olesen, WEGNER: just one good chair, exh. cat., Design Museum Denmark, Copenhagen, 2014, pp. 79, 82, 210-11


Property from a Private Manhattan Collection

111. Finn Juhl

1912-1989

Pair of armchairs, model no. FJ 53 circa 1953 Teak, fabric upholstery, brass. Each: 29 3/4 x 28 1/4 x 30 in. (75.6 x 71.8 x 76.2 cm) Executed by master cabinetmaker Niels Vodder, Copenhagen, Denmark. Underside with retailer’s brass plaque impressed with ILLUMS BOLIGHUS/KØBENHAVN. Estimate $20,000-30,000

Literature Erik Wørts, “Den syvogtyvende,” Dansk Kunsthaandværk, no. 11, November 1953, p. 181 Esbjørn Hiort, Modern Danish Furniture, New York, 1956, p. 62 Grete Jalk, ed., Dansk Møbelkunst gennem 40 aar, Volume 3: 1947-1956, Copenhagen, 1987, pp. 271-72, 311 Esbjørn Hiort, Finn Juhl: Furniture, Architecture, Applied Art, Copenhagen, 1990, pp. 58-59 Patricia Yamada, ed., Finn Juhl Memorial Exhibition, exh. cat., Gallery “Air Molèk Kota,” Osaka, 1990, pp. 76-79 and p. 139 for a drawing Noritsugu Oda, Danish Chairs, San Francisco, 1999, p. 98 and p. 99 for a drawing

The present model was exhibited at the Copenhagen Cabinetmakers’ Guild Exhibition at Design Museum Denmark, 1953.


112. Finn Juhl

1912-1989

Desk, model no. BO 69 circa 1953 Teak, teak-veneered wood, painted wood, painted steel, brass. 29 1/2 x 66 7/8 x 33 3/8 in. (74.9 x 169.9 x 84.8 cm) fully extended Manufactured by Bovirke, Copenhagen, Denmark. Estimate $15,000-20,000

Provenance Secher Fine Art & Design, Copenhagen Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Bent Salicath, “Finn Juhl and Danish Furniture,” Architects’ Year Book 6, London, 1955, pp. 150, 152 Dansk Kunsthåndværk, no. 5, 1956, p. 84 for an advertisement Per H. Hansen, Finn Juhl and His House, Ostfldern, 2014, pp. 64, 111


Bow Down

Property from a Private Collection, Philadelphia

113. Finn Juhl

1912-1989

“Chiefain” chair, model no. FJ 49 A circa 1955 Teak, leather upholstery. 36 3/4 x 40 1/2 x 35 in. (93.3 x 102.9 x 88.9 cm) Executed by master cabinetmaker Niels Vodder, Copenhagen, Denmark. Underside impressed NIELS VODDER CABINETMAKER/COPENHAGEN DENMARK/ DESIGN: FINN JUHL. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Private collection, Philadelphia Moderne Gallery, Philadelphia Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1998 Literature Viggo Sten Møller and Svend Erik Møller, Dansk Møbelkunst: Københavns Snedkerlaugs Møbeludstilling, 1927-1951, Copenhagen, 1951, p. 82 Esbjørn Hiort, Modern Danish Furniture, New York, 1956, pp. 54-55 Grete Jalk, ed., Dansk Møbelkunst gennem 40 aar, Volume 3: 1947-1956, Copenhagen, 1987, pp. 124-25, 233, 311 Esbjørn Hiort, Finn Juhl: Furniture, Architecture, Applied Art, Copenhagen, 1990, front cover, pp. 23, 40-41 Noritsugu Oda, Danish Chairs, San Francisco, 1999, pp. 92-93 Arne Karlsen, Danish Furniture Design: in the 20th Century, Volume 2, Copenhagen, 2007, pp. 106, 187-89

First presented at the Copenhagen Cabinetmakers’ Guild exhibition of 1949, Finn Juhl’s “Chiefain” chair is said to have earned its name afer King Frederik IX sat in it during the exhibition, though Juhl also exhibited it alongside tribal objects that are believed to have inspired the chair’s form. The “Chiefain” certainly has a throne-like presence, both in its generous proportions and due to its imposing shieldshaped back. The design, along with Juhl’s “Egyptian” chair (also exhibited in 1949) was further inspired by furniture from the tomb of Tutankhamen, specifcally the triangleshaped sides formed by connecting the stiles that hold the back rest in an elegant step joint with the back legs. Despite these historical references and the chair’s robust presence, the “Chiefain” nevertheless conveys a sense of lightness due to the foating seat and back; all of these characteristics have contributed to the chair’s recognition as a masterwork of Danish modern design. The present example was executed by the master cabinetmaker Niels Vodder, dating this chair to the earliest phase of production before the license was conferred to Ivan Schlechter in 1972 and then to Niels Roth Andersen from 1988 to 2000 (the American furniture manufacturer Baker also produced a version in the 1950s and the design is now produced by House of Finn Juhl). Fewer than 100 examples are believed to have been executed by Vodder and the present example bears all the attributes typical of his mid-1950s production: the classic shape of the horns (which would become more elongated in the 1960s); the three die-cut steel seat tabs with smooth rounded corners; the planished steel arms and the sculpted teak back spacer.


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

114. Ursula Morley-Price

b. 1936

Two “Bottle Form” vessels 2010 Stoneware. Taller: 11 1/8 in. (28.3 cm) high Underside and side of each impressed with artist’s seal. Estimate $3,000-4,000

Provenance Galerie Hélène Porée, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owners, 2011 Literature Ursula Morley-Price: Mouvements, exh. cat., McKenzie Fine Art, New York, 2008, pp. 49-51, 54-55, 57 for similar examples


115. Finn Juhl

1912-1989

Pair of lounge chairs, model no. FJ 45 designed 1945 Teak, fabric upholstery, leather. Each: 33 3/8 x 27 5/8 x 30 1/2 in. (84.8 x 70.2 x 77.5 cm) Executed by master cabinetmaker Niels Vodder, Copenhagen, Denmark. Underside of each branded CABINETMAKER NIELS VODDER/COPENHAGEN DENMARK/DESIGN: FINN JUHL. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Private collection, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2019

Literature Ebbe Kornerup, “Ægte og uægte Form og Konstruktion,” Nyt Tidsskrif For Kunstindustri, no. 12, December 1945, p. 166 Niels Vodder Furniture, Copenhagen, 1959, p. 8 Grete Jalk, ed., Dansk Møbelkunst gennem 40 aar, Volume 2: 1937-1946, Copenhagen, 1987, pp. 276-77, 321 Esbjørn Hiort, Finn Juhl: Furniture, Architecture, Applied Art, Copenhagen, 1990, pp. 20, 25-26, 28, 34-35, 78, 101, 105

The present model was exhibited at the “Copenhagen Cabinetmakers’ Guild,” Kunstindustrimuseet, Copenhagen, September 28-October 14, 1945, stand 14.


Property from a Private Manhattan Collection

116. Kaare Klint

1888-1954

Set of six “Red” armchairs, model no. 3758A designed circa 1927 Cuban mahogany, leather upholstery, brass nailheads. Each: 35 x 24 1/4 x 21 in. (88.9 x 61.6 x 53.3 cm) Executed by cabinetmakers Rud. Rasmussen A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark. Estimate $10,000-15,000

Literature Nyt Tidsskrif For Kunstindustri, no. 10, October 1942, n.p. for an advertisement Noritsugu Oda, Danish Chairs, San Francisco, 1999, p. 22 Arne Karlsen, Danish Furniture Design in the 20th Century, Volume 1, Copenhagen, 2007, p. 92


Property of a Distinguished Collector

117. In the Manner of Axel Einar Hjorth

1888-1959

Table circa 1925 Walnut-veneered wood, brass inlay. 28 1/2 x 53 7/8 x 23 7/8 in. (72.4 x 136.8 x 60.6 cm) Probably produced by Svenska Mรถbelfabrikerna, Bodafors, Sweden. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Galerie Eric Philippe, Paris Barry Friedman Ltd., New York Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2002


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

118. Gwyn Hanssen Pigott

1935-2013

“Still Life” 1998 Porcelain, celadon glaze. Tallest: 8 1/2 in. (21.6 cm) high Underside of 7 pieces impressed with artist’s seal. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Garth Clark Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1998 Literature Gwyn Hanssen Pigott, Caravan: A parade of beakers, bottles, bowls, jugs and cups, exh. cat., Tate St Ives, 2004, pp. 5-6, 11, 13, 15, 19, 23, 25, 31 for similar examples Jason Smith, Gwyn Hanssen Pigott: A Survey 1955-2005, exh. cat., National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2005, pp. 36, 49, 52, 55-57, 60-61, 63, 68, 103 for similar examples

In the late 1980s, Australian ceramist Gwyn Hanssen Pigott began arranging her ceramic bottles, bowls, and cups into groups that she titled Still Life. The present lot is an example of one of these works, now considered her hallmark artistic achievement. In both form and color, the pieces resemble and take inspiration from the works depicted in Giorgio Morandi’s paintings titled Natura morte or “Still Life.” The complementary pastel colors of the individual pieces come together to form a cohesive group that is a work of art rather than an assortment of utilitarian objects, gracefully merging the boundaries of art and design. The artist described this balance, saying, “I love to tread the fne line between the static and the lively.” Hanssen Pigott’s work is in the permanent collections of multiple institutions, including the Victoria and Albert Museum, London and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Giorgio Morandi, Natura morta (Still Life), circa 1952. Sold, Phillips, London, 20th Century & Contemporary Art Evening Sale, March 7, 2019, lot 22. Artwork © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SIAE, Rome.


119. Paavo Tynell

1890-1973

Rare ceiling light 1930s Brass, glass. 47 in. (119.4 cm) drop Manufactured by Taito Oy, Helsinki, Finland. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Helsingin Suomalainen Yhteiskoulu, Helsinki Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Kati Salonen and Mona Schalin Architects, Entinen Helsingin Suomalainen Yhteiskoulu Rakennushistorian selvitys, Helsinki, 2012, pp. 28, 40-41, 66, 150

Paavo Tynell designed the present lot for the banquet hall of Helsingin Suomalainen Yhteiskoulu (SYK), a free private school and the frst coeducation school in Finland.


Property from a Private Collection

120. Axel Einar Hjorth

1888-1959

Daybed, from the “Sandhamn” series designed circa 1929 Walnut, fabric upholstery. 29 1/2 x 91 1/4 x 28 3/4 in. (74.9 x 231.8 x 73 cm) Produced by AB Nordiska Kompaniet, Stockholm, Sweden. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Hostler Burrows, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Christian Björk, Thomas Ekström and Eric Ericson, Axel Einar Hjorth: Möbelarkitekt, Stockholm, 2009, pp. 126-133 for a discussion of the series


Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection

Turning the Centuries The following pages present a selection of works from the collection of Ann and Robert Fromer. Prescient collectors with a shared passion, the Fromers began acquiring decorative arts almost ffy years ago, a fact that is refected in the knowledgeable scope of their collection which spans the late 19th through early 20th centuries. The Fromers’ collection aptly narrates the historicism and innovative spirit of this period, demonstrating how naturalism, Japanese infuences, and historic revivals of the late 19th century gave way to the progressively graphic and pictorial styles of Art Deco. A predilection for layered textures and richly evocative color palettes further unite the collection. The most active years of the Fromers’ collecting, the 1980s, took place roughly a century afer the major exhibitions of the late 19th century that introduced Art Nouveau to the world, a time when this groundbreaking period of creativity was just beginning to be re-examined by a new generation of scholars and collectors. Fify years on, the scholarship has continued to advance. In these early years of rediscovery, without the wealth of scholarship and market history now at our disposal, the Fromers nevertheless assembled a museum-worthy collection of the fnest and most representative works of the period. Perhaps most of all, this collection ofers a fresh glimpse into the artistry of the period through the eyes of Ann and Robert Fromer.


Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection

Paul Jeanneney Paul Jeanneney was an avid ceramist as well as a collector of art and design. Early in his career, he began to acquire works by his contemporaries such as PierreAdrien Dalpayrat and Auguste Delaherche, artists whose work is also included in the present ofering. To his collection, Jeanneny added objects from countries such as China, Korea, and Japan. The confuence of Eastern artifacts with contemporary works (which drew from Asian pottery, themselves) greatly infuenced Jeanneney’s production of Art Nouveau ceramics. The artist ofen worked with drip glazes that produced a beautiful peau de serpent (or snakeskin) efect, as seen in the present lots. The elegance of these forms, paired with his dynamic use of glaze, result in quietly complex pieces that continue to delight today just as much as they did when he revealed them at the turn of the century in France.

121. Paul Jeanneney

1861-1920

Gourd-form vase circa 1900 Glazed stoneware with peau de serpent efect. 6 in. (15.2 cm) high Underside incised Jeanneney. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Alain Cical, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1985


122. Paul Jeanneney

1861-1920

Gourd-form vase 1904 Glazed stoneware with peau de serpent efect. 5 3/4 in. (14.6 cm) high Underside incised Jeanneney/St. Amand/1904. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Alain Cical, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1985

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection


123. Paul Jeanneney

1861-1920

Gourd-form vase with elongated neck circa 1900 Glazed stoneware with peau de serpent efect. 7 3/4 in. (19.7 cm) high Underside incised Jeanneney/PP. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Alain Cical, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1985

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection


Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection

124. Paul Jeanneney

1861-1920

Large vase 1903 Glazed stoneware. 9 7/8 in. (25.1 cm) high Underside incised Jeanneney/1903. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Alain Cical, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1985


125. Pierre-Adrien Dalpayrat

1844-1910

Inkwell with silver mount circa 1900 Glazed earthenware, silver. 5 in. (12.7 cm) high Silver mount produced by Gustave Keller, Paris, France. Underside inscribed with the artist’s seal and silver mount impressed G. KELLER/PARIS and with head of mercury mark. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Alain Cical, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1985

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection


126. Gilbert Méténier

1876-Unknown

Gourd-form vase circa 1900 Glazed stoneware. 6 7/8 in. (17.5 cm) high Underside incised G. Méténier. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Alain Cical, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner, circa 1985 Literature Paul Arthur, Art Nouveau Ceramics: An Illustrated Dictionary, Paris, 2015, p. 273 for a similar example

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection


127. Auguste Delaherche

1857-1940

Vase with four handles 1896-1904 Glazed stoneware. 10 3/4 in. (27.3 cm) high Impressed with artist’s seal and numbered 6191. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Alain Cical, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1985 Literature Auguste Delaherche: Rêves d’argile, secrets d’émail, exh. cat., Fondation Neumann, Gingins, Switzerland, 2001, p. 28 for a similar example

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection


128. Victor Saglier

1809-1894

Vase with decorative mount circa 1894 Glazed earthenware, silver. 6 in. (15.2 cm) high Underside stamped V.S/SEVRES, painted 1-894 and 3-2-95, and incised 333. Silver mount impressed with French control marks. Estimate $2,000-3,000 Provenance Christie’s, New York, “Important 20th Century Decorative Arts,” June 6, 1992, lot 134 Acquired from the above by the present owner

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection


129. Pierre-Adrien Dalpayrat and Alphonse Voisin-Delacroix 1844-1910 and 1857-1893 Gourd-form inkwell with toads 1893-1906 Glazed stoneware. 2 7/8 in. (7.3 cm) high Underside signed Dalpayrat. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Alain Cical, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1985 Literature Arielle and Robert Guillaume, Alphonse VoisinDelacroix: Ou quand un sculpteur rencontre un céramiste, 1892-1893, Besançon, 1993, p. 75 Horst Makus, et al., Adrien Dalpayrat 1844-1910, Stuttgart, 1998, p. 139

Adrien Pierre Dalpayrat and Alphonse VoisinDelacroix signed a working contract in 1892, shortly afer which the pair likely produced the present lot. Voisin-Delacroix created the form while Dalpayrat perfected the glaze. The exact date of production is uncertain as Voisin-Delacroix died in 1893 but his forms may have been posthumously recreated. During their brief collaboration, the pair created a range of works that featured motifs verging on the macabre, such as body parts and small animals. The gourd-form inkwell with the present lot is an example of this type of work which combines a whimsical form with a mesmerizing glaze. Dalpayrat’s glazes typically combined multiple colors, most famously his sang de bœuf glaze—sometimes called “Dalpayrat red”—which he used in his inkwell with silver mount (lot 125).

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection


Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection

Taxile Doat In his treatise on ceramic-making, Taxile Doat wrote “[in my] experimental laboratory...I win from the fre the wares which have brought me a gratifying success.” The following four lots reveal both the experimental nature of the artist’s work as well as his success as a ceramist at the turn of the twentieth century. Whereas other ceramists benefted from a division of labor, Doat preferred to experiment with every stage of the production process—from modeling to fring. He advocated for the use of grand feu ceramics as well as the pâte-sur-pâte technique, which involves creating relief designs by applying multiple layers of slip onto an unfred body. The present works are marked “Sèvres,” which is an indication of the artist’s workshop’s location rather than the Manufacture nationale de Sèvres—though Doat did produce work for the national manufactory until 1905 as well. The present lots demonstrate his expert control over complex techniques and also reveal Doat’s reliance on motifs from Greek mythology, such as Minerva and the Amazons, as well as nature, which were both popular sources of imagery in fn-de-siècle France.


130. Taxile Doat

1851-1939

Vase with applied fowers circa 1900 Glazed porcelain with pâte-sur-pâte decoration. 6 1/4 in. (15.9 cm) high Underside painted T DOAT and Sèvres. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Macklowe Gallery & Modernism, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1988

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection


Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection

131. Taxile Doat

1851-1939

“Profls d’Amazones” vase 1901 Glazed porcelain with pâte-sur-pâte decoration. 10 in. (25.4 cm) high Underside painted T DOAT/1901/Sevres. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Jason Jacques Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2003 Literature Taxile Doat, “Les Céramiques de Grand Feu: La Porcelaine dure et le Grès-Cérame,” Art et Decoration, Tome XX, July-December 1906, p. 154 Irene Sargent, “Taxile Doat,” Keramic Studio, no. 8, December 1906, p. 172 Alastair Duncan, The Paris Salons 1895-1914, Volume IV: Ceramics and Glass, Woodbridge, 1998, p. 190


132. Taxile Doat

1851-1939

“La Dentelle de Minerve” bottle on stand circa 1904 Glazed porcelain with pâte-sur-pâte decoration, silver. 12 1/8 in. (30.8 cm) high, including stand Underside signed T DOAT/Sèvres. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Jason Jacques Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2003 Literature M.P. Verneuil, “Taxile Doat: Céramiste,” Art et Décoration, September 1904, p. 85 for a similar example

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection


133. Taxile Doat

1851-1939

Plaque 1932 Glazed porcelain with pâte-sur-pâte decoration. 6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm) diameter With artist’s monogram in the central medallion. Reverse signed T DOAT/1932/Sèvres. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Alain Cical, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1985

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection


Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection

134. Edmond Lachenal

1855-1948

Vase with lizard handle circa 1899 Glazed stoneware. 10 1/4 in. (26 cm) high Underside impressed LACHENAL. Estimate $7,000-9,000 Provenance Alain Cical, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1980s Literature A. Le Chatelier, “Céramique d’Art,” Art et Décoration, December 1899, p. 188 Paul Arthur, French Art Nouveau Ceramics: An Illustrated Dictionary, Paris, 2015, p. 223

Illustration of ceramics by Edmund Lachenal from Art et DŽcoration, circa 1899.


135. Auguste Delaherche

1857-1940

Large vase 1887-1894 Glazed stoneware. 12 1/4 in. (31.1 cm) high Underside impressed with artist’s seal and numbered 1619. Estimate $7,000-9,000 Provenance Alain Cical, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner, circa 1985 Literature Émile Molinier, “La Céramique a l’Exposition Universelle de 1889,” L’Art Revue Bi-Mensuelle Illustrée, Tome II, 1889, p. 254 for a similar example

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection


136. Alexandre Bigot

1862-1927

Dish circa 1900 Glazed stoneware. 10 1/2 in. (26.7 cm) diameter Underside painted Bigot and 340 and incised with indecipherable number. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Alain Cical, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1985 Literature Jason Jacques, Exotica, Lenox, MA, 2010, p. 261

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection


Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection

137. Auguste Delaherche

1857-1940

Vase with peacock feather decoration circa 1889 Glazed stoneware. 15 in. (38.1 cm) high Underside impressed with artist’s seal and numbered 2194. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Macklowe Gallery & Modernism, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1988 Literature François Guillaume Dumas, Revue de l’Exposition Universelle de 1889, Vol. II, Paris, 1889, p. 259 René Ménard, “Auguste Delaherche,” Art et Décoration, February 1906, p. 57 Auguste Delaherche: Rêves d’argile, secrets d’émail, exh. cat., Fondation Neumann, Gingins, Switzerland, 2001, p. 21 David A. Brenneman, et al., Paris in the Age of Impressionism: Masterworks from the Musée d’Orsay, exh. cat., High Museum of Art, Atlanta, 2002, p. 127


In 1889, Auguste Delaherche won a gold medal at the Exposition Universelle in Paris, where he showcased ceramic vases with peacock feather decorations, including the present model. This presentation established Delaherche as one of preeminent ceramists of his generation and helped to usher in the Art Nouveau style. Later in his career, Delaherche preferred to use drip glazes rather than representational imagery, but the style of his work remained indebted to Eastern infuences. These works demonstrate a shif from the fgural to the abstract in Delaherche’s œuvre, and they reveal mastery at each iteration of his artistic practice. An example of the present model is in the permanent collection of the Musée d’Orsay, Paris.

Ceramics by August Delaherche from his display at the Exposition Universelle, Paris, 1889. Illustration by Ch. David.


138. Maurice Gensoli

1892-1972

Bottle circa 1930 Glazed stoneware. 7 5/8 in. (19.4 cm) high Underside impressed with artist’s monogram, fsh stamp, and calligraphic mark. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Alain Cical, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1985

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection


139. Tifany Studios Phillips would like to thank Dr. Martin Eidelberg for his assistance cataloguing the present lot. An example of the present model lamp base is in the permanent collection of the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art, Winter Park, Florida.

Lamp base 1903-1910 Glazed earthenware. 6 3/4 in. (17.1 cm) high Underside inscribed with LCT monogram. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Sotheby’s, New York, “20th Century Decorative Arts,” March 21, 1992, lot 204 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Robert Koch, Louis C. Tifany: The Collected Works of Robert Koch, Atglen, PA, 2001, p. 115 Martin Eidelberg, Tifany Favrile Pottery and the Quest of Beauty, New York, 2010, p. 23

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection


140. Tifany Studios Early and rare “Horse Chestnut” vase circa 1900 Glazed earthenware. 9 7/8 in. (25.1 cm) high Designed by Edith Lautrup (1875-1963) and produced by Tifany Studios, New York. Underside glazed EL, inscribed with LCT monogram and B, and etched P1217 L.C.T./L.C. Tifany Favrile Pottery. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Sotheby’s, New York, “20th Century Decorative Arts,” March 21, 1992, lot 203 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Martin Eidelberg and Nancy A. McClelland, Behind the Scenes of Tifany Glassmaking: The Nash Notebooks, New York, 2000, p. 177 Martin Eidelberg, Tifany Favrile Pottery and the Quest of Beauty, New York, 2010, p. 94

Phillips would like to thank Dr. Martin Eidelberg for his assistance cataloguing the present lot. As the EL mark on the underside of the present lot indicates, this “Horse Chestnut” vase was executed by Edith Lautrup. A talented and experienced decorator, Lautrup served as the director of Tifany Studios from around 1900 until she relocated to her native Denmark in 1902. In the following years, Tifany Studios created the same form in enameled copper, which the present lot is perhaps meant to emulate through its glaze, making the vase a particularly rare and important early example of Tifany pottery.

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection


141. Tifany Studios Vase with seed pods circa 1906 Glazed earthenware. 6 1/4 in. (15.9 cm) high Underside inscribed with LCT monogram. Estimate $7,000-9,000 Provenance Lillian Nassau, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1988 Literature Martin Eidelberg, Tifany Favrile Pottery and the Quest of Beauty, New York, 2010, pp. 40, 85

Phillips would like to thank Dr. Martin Eidelberg for his assistance cataloguing the present lot.

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection


Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection

142. Tifany Studios “Diatreta” vase circa 1905 Favrile glass. 2 7/8 in. (7.3 cm) high Underside with Tifany Glass and Decorating Company paper label, likely applied later. Estimate $7,000-9,000 Provenance The Estate of Aaron Frank Sotheby’s, New York, “Important Art Nouveau,” March 29, 1979, lot 40 Edwin and Mary Triestman Sotheby’s, New York, “The Edwin & Mary Triestman Collection of Important Glass,” June 14, 2006, lot 303 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Albert Christian Revi, American Art Nouveau Glass, Camden, NJ, 1968, p. 13 for a similar example

Phillips would like to thank Dr. Martin Eidelberg for his assistance cataloguing the present lot.

Louis Comfort Tifany’s career as an artist, designer, and businessman is perhaps best summarized as an exploration of beauty through innovation and relentless experimentation. These four works from the Fromer Collection speak to the diversity of approaches to design that Tifany Studios took at the beginning of the twentieth century. The Diatreta vase is an example of Tifany’s groundbreaking invention of Favrile glass, the term that he used for his iridescent glassware. Diatreta refers to the cup’s form, which originates from Ancient Roman glassmaking traditions in which the lacelike exterior of the vessel is detached from the inner beaker form. Later, Tifany began exploring ceramic making with his lamp bases, such as lot 139, in which he imitated the appearance of metalsmithing techniques. Tifany Studio’s later pottery was ofen monochromatic and relied on motifs from nature, as seen in the vase with seed pods (lot 141).


143. André Méthey

1871-1920

Tazza with reindeer decoration circa 1911 Glazed stoneware. 5 3/8 in. (13.7 cm) high, 9 1/4 in. (23.5 cm) diameter Underside incised with artist’s cipher. Estimate $2,000-3,000 Provenance Alain Cical, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner, circa 1985 Literature Albert Dulac, “Une Visite à André Méthey,” L’Art et les Artistes, no. 72, March 1911, p. 260 for similar examples

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection


144. Jean Mayodon

1893-1967

Vase 1926 Glazed stoneware. 13 5/8 in. (34.6 cm) high Underside painted 1926, incised with artist’s cipher, and with remnants of a period paper label. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Macklowe Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2004 Literature Gérard Landrot, Mayodon, Paris, 2004, pp. 202-7 for similar examples

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection


145. Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

1885-1953

“Feuilles de Chardon” vase circa 1927 Pâte-de-verre. 9 3/4 in. (24.8 cm) high Signed in the mold G. ARGY-ROUSSEAU and FRANCE. Estimate $6,000-8,000

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection

Provenance DeLorenzo Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Janine Bloch-Dermant, G. Argy-Rousseau: Glassware as Art, Paris, 1991, pp. 74, 166, 210


146. Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

1885-1953

“La Danse” vase circa 1923 Pâte-de-verre. 11 7/8 in. (30.2 cm) high Signed in the mold G. ARGY-ROUSSEAU. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance DeLorenzo Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1986 Literature Janine Bloch-Dermant, G. Argy-Rousseau: Glassware as Art, Paris, 1991, pp. 59, 191

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection


147. Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

1885-1953

“Écureuils dans l’Herbe” vase circa 1928 Pâte-de-verre. 7 1/4 in. (18.4 cm) high Signed in the mold G. ARGY-ROUSSEAU and FRANCE. Estimate $8,000-12,000

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection

Provenance DeLorenzo Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Janine Bloch-Dermant, G. Argy-Rousseau: Glassware as Art, Paris, 1991, pp. 87, 216


148. Gabriel Argy-Rousseau

1885-1953

“Scènes de Chasse” bowl circa 1925 Pâte-de-verre. 4 1/4 in. (10.8 cm) high, 6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm) diameter Signed in the mold G. ARGY-ROUSSEAU. Estimate $8,000-12,000

Provenance Galerie Impulsion-B, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1984 Literature Art et Décoration, December 1926, n.p. for an advertisement Janine Bloch-Dermant, G. Argy-Rousseau: Glassware as Art, Paris, 1991, pp. 67, 168, 204

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection


149. Burgun Schverer & Cie. Beaker-form vase with irises circa 1900 Wheel-carved and martelé cameo glass with gilt and internal decoration. 12 1/4 in. (31.1 cm) high Underside printed with frm’s gilt thistle mark and VERRERIE D’ART/DE LORRAINE/ BS&C./déposé. Estimate $7,000-9,000 Provenance Macklowe Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1982

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection


150. Burgun Schverer & Cie. Baluster-form vase with irises circa 1900 Wheel-carved and martelé cameo glass with gilt and internal decoration. 10 1/8 in. (25.7 cm) high Underside printed with frm’s gilt thistle mark and VERRERIE D’ART/DE LORRAINE/BS&C./déposé. Estimate $7,000-9,000 Provenance Mina Rosenblatt Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1982

Important Works from the

Ann and Robert Fromer Collection


Clagett Wilson: The Lewisohn Commission The following three lots are from a set of furnishings designed by Claggett Wilson (1887-1952) for the dining room of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Lewisohn. Wealthy and progressive young members of New York society, the Lewisohns found in Wilson a creative partner who conceived a highly original interior scheme. Discovered in the 1970s and held in private collections until now, this is the frst time the present suite of furniture has come to public market since 1939. Sam Lewisohn (1884-1951) was the son of Adolph Lewisohn (1849-1938), patriarch of the New York branch of the Lewisohn family. Lewisohn senior arrived in the United States in 1867 to join his brothers in the New York branch of his family’s business, the origins of which dated to 18th century Hamburg. The various Lewisohn enterprises dealt primarily in animal-based products and in New York expanded to include metals. Within a few decades the brothers had become extraordinarily successful in copper mining, processing, and trading. Adolph Lewisohn established himself in American society through his advocacy and philanthropy, his political afliations, and not least of all, his art collecting. Sam Lewisohn followed in his father’s footsteps as a prominent businessman and philanthropist, and together with his wife Margaret Valentine Seligman (1895-1954), an accomplished advocate for education and patron of the arts in her own right, also amassed a considerable art collection. Works from the Lewisohn family collections are in the permanent collections of a number of New York museums, including the Brooklyn Museum, The Museum of Modern Art, and The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

In 1915 Adolph Lewisohn commissioned C.P.H. Gilbert to renovate his 881 Fifh Avenue residence, and it was on a foor of this mansion that the young Sam and Margaret Lewisohn established their home. They enlisted Claggett Wilson to convert a former governess’s room into a dining room that would draw inspiration from and complement their modern art collection. An article about the dining room by Wilson’s friend and colleague Augusta Owen Patterson appeared in the June 15, 1930 issue of Town and Country and praised its thoughtful and modernist approach which provided an elegant backdrop to the Lewisohn’s exceptional paintings and views of Central Park. An article about Claggett Wilson, probably published circa 1933 in the Boston Evening Transcript (a photocopy survives in the archives of one of Wilson’s heirs), quotes Henri Matisse remarking on the room: “It is perhaps the most ideal background for my paintings I have yet seen.” Wilson was a modernist American artist best known for his work documenting World War I, for which he was nominated for a Nobel Prize. His paintings are now in the collections of the Smithsonian American Art Museum and The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Like many artists in New York at this time, Wilson did not discriminate among mediums, and in addition to painting and illustrating, he also designed costumes and sets. The Lewisohn dining room has been falsely described as his only known residential commission, when in fact he also worked as an interior decorator, painting murals and selecting interior furnishings for clients such as the actors Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne. The diversity of his projects suggests he may have designed other pieces of furniture in addition to those for the Lewisohn dining room, now the only known extant examples.


Dining room of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Lewisohn, New York, as seen in Town & Country magazine, June 15th, 1930. Photograph by Sara Parsons.


Wilson’s theatre design background was apparent in the iridescent walls (silver leaf applied with “transparent blue green lacquer”), the upper silvered geometric molding behind which uplights illuminated a yellow ceiling, and window niches containing large cactus plants framed by silver gauze curtains with appliques in blue, pink and green. A Paul Cézanne still life with fruit was literally and fguratively refected in a fruitflled, mirrored and lacquered glass surtout de table, also designed by Wilson. The whereabouts of this centerpiece as well as a set of chromium-plated and enameled candlesticks also by Wilson remain unknown.

Amidst this glamorous setting, the present dining room suite of sideboard, dining table, and chairs took center stage. Each displays a motif of interlocking cactusinspired ovals, evocative of the Opuntia (paddle) cacti situated in the window niches. The motif is expressed in an openwork design on the chair backs and table base and as satinwood marquetry on the sideboard. The metal drawer pulls of the sideboard, which were also used as the door handles, are formed as overlaid ovals framed with the tiny points of cactus needles.

Detail of dining room table and chairs from the home of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Lewisohn, New York, as seen in Town & Country magazine, June 15th, 1930. Photograph by Sara Parsons.


Georgia O’Keefe, Porcelain Rooster, 1929, formerly owned by Mr. and Mrs. Sam Lewisohn. Artwork © 2019 Georgia O’Keefe Museum/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

The stylized design of the cactus motif is reminiscent of Wiener Wertstätte designs of earlier decades, of which Wilson would have been familiar. However the motif and color scheme also point in an entirely diferent direction: the Southwest, a region that had captured the imagination of American artists and their patrons during this period. A 1929 painting by Georgia O’Keefe, Porcelain Rooster, originally belonging to Alfred Stieglitz, and later owned by Sam Lewisohn— and notably completed the same year as the dining room, which is also the year O’Keefe began spending part of her year in the Southwest—refects the blues, greens and silver accented by brown and pink of the Lewisohn dining room.

In 1939 the contents of 881 Fifh Avenue were ofered at auction by Parke-Bernet Galleries. The dining room was illustrated in a full-page photograph, and by this time it appears that the Cézanne had been replaced by a painting by Moise Kisling. The curtains were sold together with the furniture and the table’s centerpiece was ofered but went unsold. The original set of fourteen chairs, of which twelve are now on ofer here, were described as having seats upholstered in “old rose velours.” The furniture was acquired by William Henry Vanderbilt III and was then passed down to his daughter. One of the two chairs now separated from the set was included in the exhibition The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920s, at the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum and the Cleveland Museum of Art in 2017 and 2018.


Console table from the home of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Lewisohn, New York, as seen in Town & Country magazine, June 15th, 1930. Photograph by Sara Parsons.

Property from a San Francisco Collection

151. Clagett Wilson

1887-1952

Sideboard circa 1930 Birds-eye maple and satinwood-veneered wood, nickel-plated bronze. 39 x 74 3/8 x 17 1/2 in. (99.1 x 188.9 x 44.5 cm) Estimate $18,000-24,000 Provenance Samuel Adolph and Margaret Valentine Lewisohn, New York, circa 1930 Parke-Bernet Galleries, Inc., New York, May 17, 1939, lot 426 (partial) William Henry Vanderbilt III Thence by descent Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1970s Literature Augusta Owen Patterson, “The Decorative Arts,” Town & Country, June 15, 1930, illustrated p. 68


Property from a San Francisco Collection

152. Clagett Wilson

1887-1952

Set of twelve dining chairs circa 1930 Birds-eye maple and satinwood-veneered wood, fabric upholstery. Each armchair: 39 1/8 x 23 1/4 x 23 1/2 in. (99.4 x 59.1 x 59.7 cm) Each side chair: 38 7/8 x 19 3/8 x 20 1/8 in. (98.7 x 49.2 x 51.1 cm) Estimate $40,000-60,000

Provenance Samuel Adolph and Margaret Valentine Lewisohn, New York, circa 1930 Parke-Bernet Galleries, Inc., New York, May 17, 1939, lot 426 (partial) William Henry Vanderbilt III Thence by descent Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1970s Literature Augusta Owen Patterson, “The Decorative Arts,” Town & Country, June 15, 1930, illustrated pp. 67, 69 Sarah D. Cofn and Stephen Harrison, The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920s, exh. cat., Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, New York and Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, 2017, p. 318


Property from a San Francisco Collection

153. Clagett Wilson

1887-1952

Extendable dining table circa 1930 Birds-eye maple and satinwood-veneered wood. As shown: 29 5/8 x 44 x 100 in. (75.2 x 111.8 x 254 cm) Together with three leaves. Estimate $18,000-24,000

Provenance Samuel Adolph and Margaret Valentine Lewisohn, New York, circa 1930 Parke-Bernet Galleries, Inc., New York, May 17, 1939, lot 426 (partial) William Henry Vanderbilt III Thence by descent Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1970s Literature Augusta Owen Patterson, “The Decorative Arts,” Town & Country, June 15, 1930, illustrated pp. 67, 69


154. Jean Després

1889-1980

Pair of vases circa 1970 Silver-plated brass. Each: 18 3/4 x 7 1/2 x 7 1/2 in. (47.6 x 19.1 x 19.1 cm) Underside of each incised J-Després. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Private collection, Texas Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Melissa Gabardi, Jean Després: Jeweler, Maker and Designer of the Machine Age, London, 2009, p. 136 for a similar example

Phillips would like to thank Philippe Rapin for his assistance cataloguing the present lot.


155. Paul Lester Wiener

1895-1967

Rare armchair, designed for the apartment of Dr. Fritz Wittels, New York circa 1934 Walnut-veneered wood, fabric upholstery. 33 x 29 5/8 x 43 in. (83.8 x 75.2 x 109.2 cm) Estimate $7,000-9,000 Provenance Private collection, Forlì Literature Gio Ponti, “Cronache Americane,” Domus, no. 95, November 1935, p. 11

In 1934, Paul Lester Wiener designed the present model armchair for Dr. Fritz Wittels’ living room in New York City. Dr. Wittels, an early proponent of psychoanalysis and the frst biographer of Sigmund Freud, commissioned Wiener to design a modern apartment that would also serve as a reception and treatment area for his patients. As such, Wiener’s designs were made with their psychological value and efect in mind. The apartment was primarily white with blue and red accents, and much of the furniture relied on geometric and architectonic forms. The present model chair, which was originally lacquered red, ft perfectly within this design scheme. In the November 1935 issue of Domus, Gio Ponti praised Wiener’s modern design and described him as a model for the avant-garde in the United States. Later in his career, Paul Lester Wiener achieved eminence for his collaboration with Le Corbusier on urban planning projects in South America and for redeveloping the Washington Square Park area of New York City in 1958.

Paul Lester Wiener, living room of Dr. Fritz Wittels with the present model armchair, New York, circa 1934. Photograph by Fay S. Lincoln. Used with permission from the Fay S. Lincoln photograph collection (1628), Eberly Family Special Collections Library, Penn State University Libraries.


156. Eckart Muthesius

1904-1989

Pair of stools, designed for the Maharaja of Indore’s Bar, Manik Bagh Palace, Indore circa 1931 Nickel-plated steel, leather upholstery. Each: 33 1/4 in. (84.5 cm) high, 16 1/4 in. (41.3 cm) diameter Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Maharaja Yeshwant Rao Holkar II of Indore, circa 1931 Bina Kilachand, Mumbai Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2017

Eckart Muthesius, bar room of the Manik Bagh Palace, Indore, circa 1931. Artwork © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VG Bild Kunst, Bonn.

Literature Reto Niggl, Eckart Muthesius 1930: The Maharaja’s Palace in Indore, Architecture and Interior, Stuttgart, 1996, p. 98

Eckart Muthesius was just twenty-fve years old when he met Yeshwant Rao Holkar II at a garden party hosted by the Maharaja in Oxford, England and subsequently won the commission to design and decorate his palace. Muthesius recalled years later that “It was like a fairy tale. Three hours later I had the order for the entire palace in my pocket.” This fairy tale palace, known as Manik Bagh, or Garden of Precious Stones, would go on to become one of the most important expressions of pre-war modern design. Muthesius designed everything from the furniture and lighting to the banisters and faucets, while also incorporating furnishings by contemporaries such as Eileen Gray and Émile-Jacques Ruhlmann. Serial production pieces in tubular metal also fgured into the decorative scheme, including seating by Marcel Breuer and the chaise longue designed by Le Corbusier, Charlotte Perriand, and Pierre Jeanneret. Though the use of tubular metal furniture had its roots in progressive art and architecture—Perriand, for example, had hoped to make modern furniture more accessible to the public through the use of the material—these very much remained luxury items, workshop-made and produced in small quantities.

Thonet’s production of certain models for Le Corbusier, Perriand, and Jeanneret numbered in the mere hundreds. Muthesius designed the present pair of bar stools for the palace’s cocktail bar, and while the manufacturer he worked with in Berlin is no longer known, only a handful of examples were created. In 1989 the design went into production with Vereinigte Werkstätten (ClassiCon taking over the license in 1990), which Muthesius personally oversaw, helping to adapt the design to serial production on the kind of scale Perriand had dreamed about all those years prior. There are several key diferences between the present pair, created for the palace in 1931, and the later production. First, the seat of the original version attaches with screws that go directly through the top ring of the frame’s base, as opposed to through four tabs attached to the base, as seen in the ClassiCon version. The dimensions of the frame are also slightly diferent. While the diameter of the tube is the same, the original version is taller and wider. The present pair has been reupholstered but retains remnants of the original red vinyl upholstery, as well as the original webbing and horsehair padding.


Property from an Important Collection

157. Gilbert Rohde

1884-1944

Rare armchair and ottoman circa 1931 Fabric and vinyl upholstery, chromium-plated steel, chromium-plated metal, walnut. Armchair: 29 x 27 x 35 in. (73.7 x 68.6 x 88.9 cm) Ottoman: 15 1/2 x 23 1/4 x 23 1/4 in. (39.4 x 59.1 x 59.1 cm) Manufactured by Heywood-Wakefeld, Portland, Oregon. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Phillips de Pury & Company, New York, “20-21st Century Design Art,” May 24, 2005, lot 63 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature “A new contribution to the art of gracious living,” Good Housekeeping, October 1931, p. 158 for an advertisement


158. Agnoldomenico Pica Agnoldomenica Pica was the curator of the V Milan Triennale in 1933, for which he originally designed the present model desk.

1907-1990

Desk circa 1933 Walnut-veneered wood, chromium-plated metal, brass. 30 1/8 x 58 7/8 x 27 3/8 in. (76.5 x 149.5 x 69.5 cm) Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature “La casa di un architetto umanista,” Domus, no. 75, March 1934, illustrated pp. 32-33


159. Jean-Michel Frank

1895-1941

Pair of foor lamps circa 1940 Painted iron, paper shade. Each: 65 in. (165.1 cm) high Produced by Comte, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Together with a certifcate of authenticity from the Comité Jean-Michel Frank. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Marta Madero Unzué, Buenos Aires, circa 1940 Private collection, Mar del Plata, 2002 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Pierre-Emmanuel Martin-Vivier, Jean-Michel Frank: The Strange and Subtle Luxury of the Parisian Haute-Monde in the Art Deco Period, New York, 2006, p. 316


160. Hammond Kroll

1898-1980

Set of four side chairs 1930s Lacquered wood, chromium-plated metal, vinyl upholstery. Each: 35 x 20 1/2 x 22 in. (88.9 x 52.1 x 55.9 cm) Estimate $12,000-18,000

Provenance Alice Astor, New York Alan Moss, New York Private collection, New York Phillips de Pury & Company, New York, “Design,” June 9, 2010, lot 49 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Diane Dorrans Saeks, Orlando Diaz-Azcuy, New York, 2009, illustrated pp. 33-34


161. Paolo Bufa

1903-1970

Pair of wall lights circa 1930 Silver-plated bronze. Each: 19 x 5 1/4 x 3 3/8 in. (48.3 x 13.3 x 8.6 cm) Produced by Achille Donzelli, Milan, Italy. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Private collection, Forlì Literature Carlo A. Felice, Arte Decorativa 1930 all’Esposizione di Monza, Milan, 1930, pl. 122 “Nella galleria dell’illuminazione moderna,” Domus, no. 31, July 1930, p. 51

The present model was exhibited at the “Gallery of Modern Lights” at the IV Triennale di Monza, 1930.


162. Paolo Bufa

1903-1970

Daybed 1930s Ash-veneered wood, ash, fabric upholstery. 30 1/2 x 82 5/8 x 39 1/4 in. (77.5 x 209.9 x 99.7 cm) Possibly executed by MosĂŠ Turri, Bovisio Mombello, Italy. Together with a certifcate of expertise from the Paolo Bufa Archive. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Private collection, ForlĂŹ


163. Carlo Scarpa

1906-1978

Monumental chandelier circa 1927 Blown glass, painted steel, aluminum. 86 in. (218.4 cm) drop, 50 1/2 in. (128.3 cm) diameter Produced by M.V.M. Cappellin & Co., Murano, Italy. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Phillips, London, “Design,” September 27, 2011, lot 107 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Marino Barovier and Carlo Sonego, eds., The M.V.M. Cappellin Glassworks and the Young Carlo Scarpa, 1925-1931, Milan, 2018, p. 464


164. Pietro Chiesa

1892-1948

Table lamp circa 1940 Nickel-plated brass, glass, paper shade. 16 1/2 in. (41.9 cm) high Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Milan, Italy. Estimate $3,000-5,000

Provenance Private collection, Monaco Literature “Il Prodotto Italiano Dev’Esser Indice di Alta Qualità,” Domus, no. 147, March 1940, p. 52 Sergio Montefusco, Fontana Arte: repertorio 1933-1943 dalle immagini dell’epoca, Genoa, 2012, p. 121


Σ

165. Paolo Bufa

1903-1970

Sideboard 1950s Brazilian rosewood-veneered wood, rosewood, cherry wood-veneered wood, mirrored glass, brass. 50 1/2 x 94 1/8 x 18 7/8 in. (128.3 x 239.1 x 47.9 cm) Together with a certifcate of expertise from the Paolo Bufa Archive. Estimate $12,000-18,000

Provenance Private collection, Pavia Literature Roberto Aloi, Esempi di arredamento moderno di tutto il mondo: Sale di soggiorno, camini, Milan, 1954, fg. 196 for a similar example Roberto Rizzi, I mobile di Paolo Bufa, exh. cat., Mostra Internazionale dell’Arredamento, Cantù, 2002, pp. 33, 35, 37


166. Paolo Bufa

1903-1970

Floor lamp circa 1940 Brass, painted wood, mirrored glass. 68 1/4 in. (173.4 cm) high Possibly executed by Mario Quarti, Milan, Italy. Together with a certifcate of expertise from the Paolo Bufa Archive. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Private collection, Varese


167. Seguso Ceiling light 1940s Pulegoso glass, brass, painted metal. 38 1/2 in. (97.8 cm) drop, 11 1/2 in. (29.2 cm) diameter Produced by Seguso Vetri d’Arte, Murano, Italy. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Private collection, Forlì

168. Paolo Bufa

1903-1970

Desk circa 1939 Walnut-veneered wood, walnut, brass. 29 5/8 x 74 1/2 x 35 1/4 in. (75.2 x 189.2 x 89.5 cm) Possibly executed by Serafno Arrighi or Marelli & Colico, Cantù, Italy. Together with a certifcate of expertise from the Paolo Bufa Archive. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Private collection, Florence Literature Roberto Rizzi, I mobili di Paolo Bufa, exh. cat., Mostra Internazionale dell’Arredamento, Cantù, 2002, p. 41 for a similar example


169. Paolo Bufa

1903-1970

Pair of armchairs circa 1950 Cherry wood, fabric upholstery. Each: 32 1/2 x 26 x 30 3/8 in. (82.6 x 66 x 77.2 cm) Together with a certifcate of expertise from the Paolo Bufa Archive. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature “Alcuni Mobili di Paolo Bufa,” Domus, no. 178, October 1942, p. 431 for a similar example Roberto Aloi, L’arredamento moderno, quarta serie, Milan, 1949, fg. 366 for a similar example

170. In the Manner of Paolo Bufa 1903-1970 Rare sofa circa 1950 Cherry wood, fabric upholstery. 33 3/4 x 79 1/8 x 34 1/4 in. (85.7 x 201 x 87 cm) Estimate $7,000-9,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan


Paolo Bufa rarely made three-seater sofas as they did not ft within his strictly held ideas about furniture proportions. The present model was likely made by the same artisans who worked with Bufa on his pair of armchairs, as it refects the same level of crafsmanship, use of materials, and style as the armchairs. These cabinetmakers had their own showrooms where they displayed their pieces as well as works by Bufa, and it is well known that these designers ofen modifed pieces on view to their customers’ wishes. The original owners of the present lot likely commissioned this piece to be produced in the same manner as the armchairs in order to have a complete set.


171. Pietro Chiesa

1892-1948

Floor lamp circa 1937 Glass, painted metal, painted brass. 67 1/8 in. (170.5 cm) high Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Milan, Italy. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Private collection, Monaco Literature “Alcuni dei Vetri d’Arte Italiani Presentati a Parigi,” Domus, no. 114, June 1937, p. 14 Laura Falconi, Fontana Arte: Una Storia Trasparente, Milan, 1998, p. 206 Franco Deboni, Fontana Arte: Gio Ponti, Pietro Chiesa, Max Ingrand, Turin, 2012, fg. 114 Sergio Montefusco, Fontana Arte: repertorio 1933-1943 dalle immagini dell’epoca, Genoa, 2012, pp. 168, 229, 263


172. Fontana Arte Mirror 1930s Mirrored glass, glass, painted wood, brass. 43 1/4 x 27 1/21 x 1 1/2 in. (109.9 x 68.7 x 3.8 cm) Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Milan, Italy. Reverse with remnants of manufacturer’s paper label. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan


173. Fontana Arte Set of three ceiling lights circa 1955 Acid-etched glass, brass. Each: 13 1/2 in. (34.3 cm) drop, 23 in. (58.4 cm) diameter Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Milan, Italy. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature Franco Deboni, Fontana Arte: Gio Ponti, Pietro Chiesa, Max Ingrand, Turin, 2012, fg. 29 for a similar example Domus, no. 313, December 1955, n.p. for an advertisement


174. Venini Folding mirror, model no. 21 circa 1939 Treccia glass, mirrored glass, brass. 14 7/8 x 43 1/2 x 14 1/2 in. (37.8 x 110.5 x 36.8 cm), fully extended Produced by Venini & C., Murano, Italy. Back plate impressed VENINI/MURANO. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Private collection, Buenos Aires Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Franco Deboni, Venini Glass: Its History, Artists and Techniques, Catalogue 1921-2007, Volume 1, Turin, 2007, The Blue Catalogue (appendix), pl. 44A


175. Gio Ponti

1891-1979

Pair of armchairs circa 1938 Walnut, fabric upholstery. Each: 30 x 32 x 29 in. (76.2 x 81.3 x 73.7 cm) Together with a certifcate of expertise from the Gio Ponti Archives. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Private collection, Pavia Literature “Un Appartamento Risistemato a Milano,” Domus, no. 131, November 1938, p. 15 for a similar example


176. Seguso Four wall lights circa 1954 Glass, brass. Largest: 47 1/4 x 28 7/8 x 10 1/4 in. (120 x 73.3 x 26 cm) Produced by Seguso Vetri d’Arte, Murano, Italy. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Hotel Bristol, Merano


Property of a Private Collector

177. Gilbert Poillerat

1902-1988

Console table circa 1940 Gilt wrought iron, marble. 38 1/4 x 42 x 17 1/4 in. (97.2 x 106.7 x 43.8 cm) Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Barry Friedman Ltd., New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Pierre Kjellberg, Le Mobilier du XXe Siècle, Dictionnaire des Créateurs, Paris, 1994, p. 494 François Baudot, Gilbert Poillerat: Maître Ferronnier, Paris, 1998, pp. 76, 118 for similar examples


178. Gio Ponti

1891-1979

Sofa circa 1930 Walnut-veneered wood, walnut, brass, fabric upholstery. 22 7/8 x 90 1/8 x 34 in. (58.1 x 228.9 x 86.4 cm) Together with a certifcate of expertise from the Gio Ponti Archives. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan


179. Gio Ponti

1891-1979

Pair of stools and two ottomans circa 1930 Walnut-veneered wood, walnut, brass, fabric upholstery. Each stool: 22 1/2 x 30 1/2 x 17 7/8 in. (57.2 x 77.5 x 45.4 cm) Larger ottoman: 14 3/8 x 17 3/4 x 17 3/4 in. (36.5 x 45.1 x 45.1 cm) Together with a certifcate of expertise from the Gio Ponti Archives. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan


180. Giovanni Gariboldi

1908-1971

Large vase circa 1947 Glazed stoneware. 24 3/8 in. (61.9 cm) high Manufactured by Richard Ginori, San Cristoforo, Milan, Italy. Underside with manufacturer’s mark in glaze and RICHARD GINORI/MADE IN ITALY/896. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Private collection, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2002 Literature Valerio Terraroli, Ceramica italiana d’autore, 1900-1950, Milan, 2007, p. 194 Giacinta Cavagna di Gualdana, Gariboldi, Mantua, 2010, p. 62

181. Giovanni Gariboldi

1908-1971

Bar cabinet 1950s Ash-veneered wood, brass inlay, walnut-veneered wood, glass, mirrored glass, frosted glass. 56 1/8 x 63 1/4 x 17 1/4 in. (142.6 x 160.7 x 43.8 cm) Manufactured by Arrighi Serafno, Cantù, Italy. Interior of cabinet with manufacturer’s brass label marked CAV. ARRIGHI SERAFINO/MOBILI D’ARTE/CANTU. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature Roberto Aloi, Esempi di arredamento moderno di tutto il mondo: Sale di soggiorno, camini, Milan, 1954, fg. 194 for a similar example Paolo Bufa designer 30 opere dal 1939 al 1968, Cantù, 1993, p. 28 for a similar example Roberto Rizzi, I mobili di Paolo Bufa, exh. cat., Mostra Internazionale dell’Arredamento, Cantù, 2002, pp. 45-46 for a similar example


Sale Information Design Sale Auction and Viewing Location 450 Park Avenue New York 10022 Auctions 17 December, 2pm Viewing 13 – 16 December Sunday 12pm – 6pm Monday – Thursday 10am – 6pm Sale Designation When sending in written bids or making enquiries please refer to this sale as NY050219 or Design. Absentee and Telephone Bids tel +1 212 940 1228 fax +1 212 924 1749 bidsnewyork@phillips.com

Auction License 2013224 Auctioneers Hugues Joffre - 2028495 Sarah Krueger - 1460468 Henry Highley - 2008889 Adam Clay - 2039323 Jonathan Crockett - 2056239 Samuel Mansour - 2059023 Rebecca Tooby-Desmond - 2058901 Susan Abeles - 2074459 Aurel Bacs – 2047217 Blake Koh – 2066237 Susanna Brockman – 2058779 Rebekah Bowling - 2078967 Catalogues catalogues@phillips.com New York +1 212 940 1240 London +44 20 7318 4024 Hong Kong +852 2318 2000 $35/€25/£22 at the gallery Client Accounting Sylvia Leitao +1 212 940 1231 Michael Carretta +1 212 940 1232 Buyer Accounts Dawniel Perry +1 212 940 1317 Seller Accounts Carolina Swan +1 212 940 1253 Client Services 450 Park Avenue +1 212 940 1200 Shipping Steve Orridge +1 212 940 1370 Anaar Desai +1 212 940 1320 Daren Khan +1 212 940 1335 Photographers Kent Pell Matthew Kroening Jean Bourbon Alex Braun

Front cover Jean Royère, “Ours Polaire” sofa, 1950s, lot 10 © 2019 Estate of Jean Royère/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris Spread following index Jean Royère, Rare “Œuf” chest of drawers, circa 1956, lot 4 (detail) © 2019 Estate of Jean Royère/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris Back cover Paul Jeanneney, Gourd-form vase, circa 1900, lot 121 (detail)

Design Department Head of Design, Europe Senior International Specialist Domenico Raimondo draimondo@phillips.com Senior International Specialist, Americas Meaghan Roddy mroddy@phillips.com Head of Department, New York Cordelia Lembo clembo@phillips.com Interim Head of Sale, London Antonia King antonia.king@phillips.com Head of Sale, London Madalena Horta e Costa mhortaecosta@phillips.com Senior Specialist Sofa Sayn-Wittgenstein ssayn-wittgenstein@phillips.com Specialist Kimberly Sørensen ksorensen@phillips.com Senior Cataloguer Nicola Krohman nkrohman@phillips.com Cataloguers Ben Green bgreen@phillips.com Caroline Pedote cpedote@phillips.com Administrator Georgina Walsh gwalsh@phillips.com International Business Manager Adam Clay aclay@phillips.com Senior Property Manager Oliver Gottschalk ogottschalk@phillips.com Property Manager Jack Ryan jryan2@phillips.com International Ceramics Consultant Ben Williams bwilliams@phillips.com


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NY Guide for Prospective Buyers Each Phillips auction is governed by the applicable Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty. All prospective bidders should read these sections carefully. They govern the purchasing agreement under which you buy at auction from Phillips. They may be also amended by saleroom addendum or auctioneer’s announcement during the auction. The complete Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty applicable to this auction (Version October 18, 2018) are found online at phillips.com, along with detailed information on each lot. Pre-Sale Estimates Pre-sale estimates are intended as a guide for prospective Buyers and are based upon the condition, rearity, quality, provenance of the lot, and on prices recently paid at auction for similar property. Any bid within the high and low estimate range should, in our opinion, ofer a chance of success. However, many lots achieve prices below or above the pre-sale estimates. Where “Estimate on Request” appears, please contact the specialist department for further information. It is advisable to contact us closer to the time of the auction as estimates can be subject to revision. Pre-sale estimates do not include the buyer’s premium or any applicable taxes. All Lots are Subject to ‘Buyer’s Premium’ Phillips charges the successful bidder a commission, or buyer’s premium, on the hammer price of each lot sold. The buyer’s premium is payable by the buyer as part of the total purchase price at the following rates: 25% of the hammer price up to and including $400,000, 20% of the portion of the hammer price above $400,000 up to and including $4,000,000 and 13.5% of the portion of the hammer price above $4,000,000. Condition and Condition Reports Phillips does not warrant or guarantee condition on any lot. Solely as a convenience to clients, Phillips may provide condition reports on many lots, which are also available online on the lot detail pages. If there is not a condition report available, that is not a representation that a lot is in perfect condition. While condition reports are prepared honestly and carefully, our staff are not professional restorers or trained conservators. We therefore encourage all prospective buyers to inspect all lots at our pre-sale exhibitions, and contact our staff with any questions. Electrical and Mechanical Lots All lots with electrical and/or mechanical features are sold on the basis of their decorative value only and should not be assumed to be operative. It is essential that, prior to any intended use, the electrical system is verified and approved by a qualified electrician. Bidding at Auction The auctioneer may, at his or her own option, bid on behalf of the seller up to, but not including the lot’s reserve or above the reserve, either by making consecutive bids or by making bids in response to other bidders. The auctioneer will not identify these bids made on behalf of the seller. You may bid in the auction in person, online, on the phone, or by placing an absentee bid. The easiest way to arrange

or register to bid at auction is to set up a client account online. Go to our homepage, phillips.com and fill out the account form. When you want to register for an auction, click Register on sale pages or lot detail pages, and you’ll confirm your account details, be asked for a credit card number for identification purposes and our Bids Department will process your request. We recommend registering at least 24 hours prior to sale to ensure that you can bid. Good luck! Transport and Shipping As a free service for buyers, Phillips will wrap purchased lots for hand carry only. Alternatively, we will either provide packing, handling and shipping services or coordinate with shipping agents in order to facilitate such services for property purchased at Phillips. In the event that the property is collected in New York by the buyer or the buyer’s designee (including any private carrier) for subsequent transport out of state, Phillips may be required by law to collect New York sales tax, regardless of the lot’s ultimate destination. Please refer to Paragraph 17 of the Conditions of Sale for more information. Some lots are sold under special conditions. Phillips uses the following symbols to designate these lots: O Guaranteed Property Lots designated with the symbol [O] are the subject of a minimum price guarantee. In such cases Phillips has guaranteed to the seller of the lot that regardless of the outcome of the sale the seller shall receive no less than a minimum sum. This guarantee may be provided solely by Phillips or jointly with a third party. ♦ Third Party Guarantee Where Phillips has agreed to a minimum price guarantee it assumes the fnancial risk of a lot failing to sell or selling for less than the minimum price guarantee. Because the sums involved can be signifcant Phillips may choose to share the burden of that fnancial risk with a third party. The third party shares the risk by committing in advance of the sale, usually by way of a written bid, to buy the lot for an agreed amount whether or not there are competing bidders for the lot. If there are competing bidders third party guarantors may also bid above any written bid. In this way the third party guarantor assumes the risk of the bidding not reaching the amount of the minimum price guarantee. In return for underwriting or sharing this risk Phillips will usually compensate the third party. The compensation may be in the form of a fxed fee or an amount calculated by reference to the hammer price of the lot. If the third party guarantor is the successful bidder they will be required to pay the full hammer price and buyer’s premium and will not be otherwise compensated. Disclosure of fnancial interest by third parties Phillips requires third party guarantors to disclose their fnancial interest in the lot to anyone whom they are advising. If you are contemplating bidding on a lot which is the subject of a third party guarantee and you are being

advised by someone or if you have asked someone to bid on your behalf you should always ask them to confrm whether or not they have a fnancial interest in the lot. ∆ Property in Which Phillips Has an Ownership Interest Lots with this symbol indicate that Phillips owns the lot in whole or in part or has an economic interest in the lot equivalent to an ownership interest. •No Reserve Unless indicated by a •, all lots in this catalogue are offered subject to a reserve. A reserve is the confidential value established between Phillips and the seller and below which a lot may not be sold. The reserve for each lot will not exceed the low pre-sale estimate. Σ Regulated Species Items made of or incorporating certain designated plant or animal material, including but not limited to coral, crocodile, ivory, whalebone, Brazilian rosewood, rhinoceros horn or tortoiseshell, (irrespective of age, percentage, or value), may require a license or certificate prior to exportation and additional licenses or certificates upon importation to any foreign country. Please note that the ability to obtain an export license or certificate does not ensure the ability to obtain an import license or certificate in another country, and vice versa. We recommend that prospective bidders check with their own local restrictions regarding such requirements prior to placing a bid. It is the buyer’s sole responsibility to obtain any necessary export or import licenses or certificates as well as any other required documentation. Please note that lots containing potentially regulated plant or animal material are marked as a convenience to our clients, but Phillips does not accept liability for errors or for failing to mark lots containing protected or regulated species. Privacy Our Privacy Policy is available at www.phillips.com or by emailing dataprotection@phillips.com and sets out: (i) the types of personal data we will or may collect and process; (ii) the purposes for which we will or may process your personal data; (iii) the lawful bases we rely on when processing your personal data; (iv) your rights in respect of our processing of your personal data; and (v) various other information as required by applicable laws. Phillips premises, sale, and exhibition venues are subject to CCTV video surveillance and recording for security, client service and bid monitoring purposes. Phillips’ auctions will be filmed for simultaneous live broadcast on Phillips’ and third party websites and applications. Your communications with Phillips, including by phone and online (e.g. phone and on-line bidding) may be recorded for security, client service and bid monitoring purposes. Where we record such information we will process it in accordance with our Privacy Policy.


NEW YORK AUCTION MARCH 2020 Enquiries Sam Mansour smansour@phillips.com Visit us at phillips.com Katharina Grosse Untitled (detail) acrylic on paper 39 5/8 x 26 in. (100.6 x 66 cm.) Executed in 2012. © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn


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Design Auction 26 March 2020 London Public viewing 21 - 26 March at 30 Berkeley Square or at phillips.com Enquiries antonia.king@phillips.com

Lucie Rie Swan-necked vase, circa 1960

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Index Albini, F. 44

Ingrand, M. 27, 28, 30, 56

Ratti, C. 43 Rohde, G. 157

Arad, R. 69 Jeanneney, P. 121–124

Royère, J. 1, 4–10

Jeanneret, P. 18, 20

Ruelland, D. 22

Baldwin, G. 84, 85

Jouve, G. 13, 14

Ruelland, J. 22

Bayer, H. 100

Juhl, F 111–113, 155

Argy-Rousseau, G. 145–148

Saglier, V. 128

Bega, M. 39 Bigot, A. 136

Klint, K. 116

Sarfatti, G. 29

Bufa, P. 23, 161, 162, 165,

Kroll, H. 160

Scarpa, C. 163 Schwarcz, J. 80

166, 168–170 Lachenal, E. 134

Seguso 167, 176

Lalanne, C. 2

Sottsass, Jr., E. 61

Caldas, J.Z. 94

Lamb, M. 68

Stilnovo 25, 40, 41, 45,

Calder, A. 73, 74

Lauritzen, V. 109

46, 49, 50

Castle, W. 79

Lelii, A. 32, 51

Suzuki, H. 71, 72

Chiesa, P. 164, 171

Mayodon, J. 144

Tabuchi, T. 77, 78

Colfesh, D. 95

Mendini, A. 60

Tenreiro, J. 86, 87

Méténier, G. 126

Tifany Studios 139–142

Dalpayrat, P.-A. 125, 129

Méthey, A. 143

Tynell, P. 119

de Poli, P. 33, 36, 37

Monesi, E. 54

de Rougemont, G. 11

Morley-Price, U. 114

Venini 174

de Waal, E. 75, 76

Mouille, S. 16, 19, 21

Venini, P. 24

Delaherche, A 127, 135, 137

Muthesius, E. 156

Verhoeven, J. 66

Després, J. 154

Myrbor 3

Voisin-Delacroix, A. 129

Nakashima, G 91

Ward, J. 88–90

nendo 67

Weathervanes 101–108

Noguchi, I. 92, 98

Wegner, H.J. 110

Burgun Schverer & Cie. 149, 150

Chapo, P. 17

Doat, T. 130–133 Dominioni, L.C. 59 Eames, C. 97, 99

Wiener, P.L. 155

Eames, R. 97, 99 Fontana Arte 31, 38, 172, 173

Ohira, Y. 62–64

Wilson, C. 151–153

Ostuni, A. 55

Wright, F.L. 93

Parisi, I. 57

Yamada, T. 70

Forti, R. 55 Frank, J.-M. 159

Partridge, J. 81 Gardella, I. 48

Paulin, P. 12

Gariboldi, G. 180, 181

Pearson, C. 82

Gensoli, M. 138

Pecorini, G. 35

Gregori, G. 60

Perriand, C. 15

Gregotti, V. 53

Pica, A. 158 Poillerat, G. 177

Hanssen Pigott, G. 118

Ponti, Gio 26, 36, 37, 42, 47,

Hild, E 65

52, 96, 175, 178, 179

Hjorth, A.E. 117, 120

Ponti, Giulio 58

Homoky, N. 83

Zuccheri, T. 34


Editions Evening & Day Sales London, 23 January 2020 2019 has been a record-breaking year for Phillips Editions, realising over $25 million by presenting the defning examples of Modern and Contemporary prints and multiples. We look forward to continuing this momentum and welcoming new collectors with our frst sales of 2020 Public viewing 16–23 January at 30 Berkeley Square or at phillips.com Enquiries editionslondon@phillips.com

Keith Haring Dog, 1986 Keith Haring artwork Š Keith Haring Foundation

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4. Jean Royère


100. Herbert Bayer


60. Alessandro Mendini and Giorgio Gregori


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DESIGN [Catalogue]  

Phillips presents the Design auction in New York on 20 November 2019.

DESIGN [Catalogue]  

Phillips presents the Design auction in New York on 20 November 2019.