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20th Century & Contemporary Art Day Sale, Afternoon Session New York, 15 May 2019, 2pm


341. KAWS


315. Calvin Marcus


364. Jim Lambie


336. Tomoo Gokita


353. artist Peter Halley 00.


343. Kehinde Wiley


20th Century & Contemporary Art Day Sale Afternoon Session New York, 15 May 2019, 2pm

20th Century & Contemporary Art Department Contact

Head of Sale Rebekah Bowling +1 212 940 1250 rbowling@phillips.com Cataloguer Carolyn Mayer +1 212 940 1206 cmayer@phillips.com Administrator Julia Hirschberg +1 212 940 1264 jhirschberg@phillips.com

Auction & Viewing Location 450 Park Avenue New York 10022

Auction Wednesday, 15 May 2019, 2pm

Viewing 3 – 15 May Monday – Saturday 10am–6pm Sunday 12pm–6pm

Sale Designation When sending in written bids or making enquiries please refer to this sale as NY010519 or 20th Century & Contemporary Art Day Sale, Afernoon Session.

Absentee and Telephone Bids tel +1 212 940 1228 fax +1 212 924 1749 bidsnewyork@phillips.com


Our Team. Executives. Ed Dolman

Cheyenne Westphal

Chief Executive Ofcer

Chairman

+1 212 940 1241 edolman@phillips.com

+44 20 7318 4044 cwestphal@phillips.com

Š Brigitte Lacombe

20th Century & Contemporary Art. Jean-Paul Engelen

Robert Manley

Worldwide Co-Head of 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Deputy Chairman

Worldwide Co-Head of 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Deputy Chairman

+1 212 940 1390 jpengelen@phillips.com

+1 212 940 1358 rmanley@phillips.com

Senior Advisors. Hugues Jofre

Arnold Lehman

Ken Yeh

Senior Advisor to the CEO

Senior Advisor to the CEO

+44 207 901 7923 hjofre@phillips.com

+1 212 940 1385 alehman@phillips.com

Senior International Specialist +1 212 940 1257 kyeh@phillips.com

Deputy Chairmen. Svetlana Marich

Jonathan Crockett

Peter Sumner

Miety Heiden

Alexander Payne

Vanessa Hallett

Vivian Pfeifer

Marianne Hoet

Worldwide Deputy Chairman

Deputy Chairman, Asia, Head of 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Asia

Deputy Chairman, Europe, Senior International Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art

Deputy Chairman, Head of Private Sales

Deputy Chairman, Europe, Worldwide Head of Design

+44 20 7901 7943 mheiden@phillips.com

+44 20 7318 4052 apayne@phillips.com

Deputy Chairman, Americas, Worldwide Head of Photographs

Deputy Chairman, Americas, Head of Business Development, Americas

+1 212 940 1243 vhallett@phillips.com

+1 212 940 1392 vpfeifer@phillips.com

Deputy Chairman, Europe Senior Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art

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20th Century & Contemporary Art New York.

Scott Nussbaum

Takako Nagasawa

Rachel Adler Rosan

Kevie Yang

Amanda Lo Iacono

John McCord

Rebekah Bowling

Sam Mansour

Head of Department

International Specialist

Senior Specialist

Senior Specialist

Head of Evening Sale

Head of Day Sale, Morning

Head of New Now Sale

+1 212 940 1354 snussbaum@phillips.com

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+1 212 940 1254 kyang@phillips.com

+1 212 940 1278 aloiacono@phillips.com

+1 212 940 1261 jmccord@phillips.com

Head of Day Sale, Afernoon

Katherine Lukacher

Jeannette van Campenhout

Patrizia Koenig

Annie Dolan

Carolyn Mayer

Maiya Aiba

Avery Semjen

Martin Fox

Associate Specialist

Cataloguer

Cataloguer

Cataloguer

Cataloguer

Researcher/Writer

+1 212 940 1279 pkoenig@phillips.com

+1 212 940 1288 adolan@phillips.com

+1 212 940 1206 cmayer@phillips.com

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+1 212 940 1207 asemjen@phillips.com

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Head of Online Sales +1 212 940 1215 klukacher@phillips.com

Specialist +1 212 940 1391 jvancampenhout@phillips.com

+1 212 940 1250 rbowling@phillips.com

+1 212 940 1219 smansour@phillips.com


355. Barbara Kruger


347. David Wojnarowicz


20th Century & Contemporary Art. London. Dina Amin Senior International Specialist

Nathalie Zaquin-Boulakia International Specialist

Matt Langton

Henry Highley

Rosanna WidĂŠn

Tamila Kerimova

Kate Bryan

Simon Tovey

Senior Specialist

Senior Specialist

Head of Evening Sale

Head of Day Sale

Head of New Now Sale

+44 20 7318 4074 mlangton@phillips.com

+44 20 7318 4061 hhighley@phillips.com

+44 20 7318 4060 rwiden@phillips.com

+44 20 7318 4065 tkerimova@phillips.com

Head of Evening Sale, October

+44 20 7318 4025 damin@phillips.com

+44 20 7901 7931 nzaquin-boulakia@ phillips.com

Lisa Stevenson

Charlotte Gibbs

Louise Simpson

Clara Krzentowski

Cataloguer

Cataloguer

Cataloguer

Researcher/Writer

+44 20 7318 4093 lstevenson@phillips.com

+44 20 7901 7993 cgibbs@phillips.com

+44 20 7901 7911 lsimpson@phillips.com

+44 20 7318 4064 ckrzentowski@phillips.com

Isaure de Viel Castel

Charlotte Raybaud

Danielle So

Delissa Handoko

Head of Department, Asia

Head of Day Sale

Cataloguer

Cataloguer

+852 2318 2025 isauredevielcastel @phillips.com

+852 2318 2026 craybaud@phillips.com

+852 2318 2027 dso@phillips.com

+852 2318 2000 dhandoko@phillips.com

Hong Kong.

Business Development. Americas.

Europe.

Vivian Pfeifer

Guy Vesey

Deputy Chairman, Americas, Head of Business Development, Americas

Head of Business Development & Marketing, Europe

+1 212 940 1392 vpfeifer@phillips.com

+44 20 7901 7934 gvesey@phillips.com

Client Advisory. Americas. Philae Knight

Jennifer Jones

Liz Grimm

Client Advisory Director

Director of Trusts, Estates & Valuations

Business Development Associate

+1 212 940 1272 jjones@phillips.com

+1 212 940 1342 egrimm@phillips.com

Yassaman Ali

Vera Antoshenkova

Client Advisory Director

Client Advisory Manager

Giulia Campaner Mendes

+44 20 7318 4056 yali@phillips.com

+44 20 7901 7992 vantoshenkova@ phillips.com

+1 212 940 1313 pknight@phillips.com

Europe.

Asia. Jasmine Yan

Iori Endo

Client Advisory Director

Client Advisory Manager

+852 2318 2015 jasmineyan@phillips.com

+44 20 7318 4039 iendo@phillips.com

Associate Client Advisory Manager +44 20 7318 4058 gcampaner@phillips.com

Margherita Solaini Business Development Associate +39 02 83642 453 msolaini@phillips.com

+44 20 7318 4050 kbryan@phillips.com

+44 20 7318 4084 stovey@phillips.com


International Specialists & Regional Directors. Americas. Cândida SodrÊ

Carol Ehlers

Lauren Peterson

Melyora de Koning

Blake Koh

Valentina Garcia

Regional Director, Consultant, Brazil

Regional Director, Specialist, Photographs, Chicago

Regional Representative, Chicago

Senior Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Denver

Regional Director, Los Angeles

Specialist, Miami

+55 21 999 817 442 csodre@phillips.com

+1 323 383 3266 bkoh@phillips.com

+1 773 230 9192 cehlers@phillips.com

+1 310 922 2841 lauren.peterson @phillips.com

Cecilia Lafan

Maura Smith

Silvia Coxe Waltner

Regional Director, Consultant, Mexico

Regional Director, Palm Beach

Regional Director, Seattle

+52 1 55 5413 9468 clafan@phillips.com

+1 508 642 2579 maurasmith@phillips.com

+1 206 604 6695 scwaltner@phillips.com

Laurence Calmels

Clara Rivollet

Maria Cifuentes

Laurence Barret-Cavy

Regional Director, France

International Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, France

Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, France

Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, France

+33 142 78 67 77 mcifuentes@phillips.com

+33 633 12 32 04 lbarret-cavy@phillips.com

+41 22 317 81 83 nmonbaron@phillips.com

+1 917 657 7193 mdekoning@phillips.com

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Europe.

+33 686 408 515 lcalmels@phillips.com

+33 6 42 09 97 39 crivollet@phillips.com

Carolina Lanfranchi

Maura Marvao

Kalista Fenina

Regional Director, Senior International Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Italy

International Specialist, Consultant, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Portugal and Spain

Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Moscow

+39 338 924 1720 clanfranchi@phillips.com

+351 917 564 427 mmarvao@phillips.com

Dr. Nathalie Monbaron Regional Director, Geneva

Dr. Alice Trier Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Germany +49 173 25 111 69 atrier@phillips.com

+7 905 741 15 15 kfenina@phillips.com

Asia. Kyoko Hattori

Jane Yoon

Sujeong Shin

Wenjia Zhang

Alicia Zhang

Cindy Yen

Regional Director, Japan

International Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Regional Director, Korea

Associate Regional Representative, Korea

Regional Director, Shanghai

Associate Regional Representative, Shanghai

+82 10 7305 0797 sshin@phillips.com

+86 13911651725 wenjiazhang@phillips.com

+86 139 1828 6589 aliciazhang@phillips.com

Senior Specialist, Watches & Jewellery, Taiwan

+81 90 2245 6678 khattori@phillips.com

+82 10 7389 7714 jyy@phillips.com

Meiling Lee

Christine Fernando

Sandy Ma

International Specialist, Taiwan

Associate Regional Representative, Singapore

International Specialist, South East Asia

+886 908 876 669 mlee@phillips.com

+65 9128 6277 christinefernando @phillips.com

+852 2318 2025 sma@phillips.com

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“The success that I am experiencing today has everything to do with Artadia’s willingness to believe in my practice, take risks on artists of note and promise, and really cast the widest net possible for talent throughout this country.” Theaster Gates, Artist and 2008 Chicago Artadia Awardee


Artadia 20th Anniversary Capsule Sale at Phillips

PHILLIPS IS HONORED TO PARTNER WITH ARTADIA,

a non-proft organization dedicated to identifying and supporting innovative visual artists, to celebrate their 20th Anniversary. Our inaugural capsule auction will feature 14 unique works donated by some of the most celebrated contemporary artists working today, with proceeds going to support and expand Artadia’s vital mission.

Artadia has awarded over $5 million in unrestricted funds to 332 artists in 7 cities. Founded in 1999 in San Francisco by Christopher E. Vroom and a group of passionate art collectors and philanthropists, Artadia created a crucial national network of support for artists, while fostering a deeper understanding of the immense contributions artists make to our society. Recognizing a need for increased fnancial and professional support in this realm, over the past twenty years, Artadia has awarded over $5 million in unrestricted, merit based grants to 332 artists across America. Afer relocating to New York in 2002, Artadia has expanded the

geographical scope of its mission, extending its grantmaking program to artists living and working in seven unique urban communities: Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco. Today, in its six active Award cities, Artadia annually awards grants directly to artists through a curatordriven process. Artadia works to connect emerging talent with a network of opportunities, continually propelling their careers to new heights. A number of Award artists have been the subject of solo shows at renowned institutions such as The Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, among others. This year, six recipients will be featured in the 2019 Whitney Biennial in New York, a true testament to the enduring impact and infuence of the Artadia Award. Understanding the immeasurable impact of their mission, Phillips’ expertise and commitment to the defning aesthetic movements of the last century makes it the perfect venue for Artadia’s 20th Anniversary capsule sale. Through our collaboration, Phillips is privileged to contribute to Artadia’s essential work, ensuring that this important organization can continue to make a diference in the lives of artists for the next twenty years and beyond.

Summer Wheat (NADA New York 2016); Carolyn Ramo, Artadia Executive Director; Nick Cave (Chicago 2006), Artadia Board Member; Marilyn Minter, Artadia Board Member; Courtesy Ben Rosser/BFA.com


301. Sarah Crowner

b. 1974

Untitled acrylic on sewn canvas 48 x 36 in. (121.9 x 91.4 cm.) Executed in 2018, this work is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Courtesy of the Artist and Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York

Artadia 20th Anniversary Capsule Sale at Phillips


302. Shara Hughes

b. 1981

Clifhanger signed, titled, inscribed and dated “SHARA HUGHES 2018 “Clifhanger” NYC” on the reverse oil, acrylic and dye on canvas 14 x 11 in. (35.6 x 27.9 cm.) Executed in 2018. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Courtesy of the Artist and Rachel Ufner Gallery, New York All proceeds from the sale of this artwork will beneft the Artadia Award program in Atlanta, Georgia. The buyer of this lot will be required to sign a written agreement regarding resale restrictions with Rachel Ufner Gallery, representative for the artist.

Artadia 20th Anniversary

Capsule Sale at Phillips


303. Jonas Wood

b. 1977

Mini Four Majors each signed with the artist’s initials, titled, respectively numbered and dated “MINI FOUR MAJORS JBRW [1-4] 2018” on the reverse gouache and colored pencil on paper, in 4 parts each 4 x 2 3/4 in. (10.2 x 7 cm.) Executed in 2018. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Courtesy of the Artist

Artadia 20th Anniversary Capsule Sale at Phillips


304. Shio Kusaka

b. 1972

(square 36) artist signature carved on bottom porcelain 8 x 6 3/4 x 6 3/4 in. (20.3 x 17.1 x 17.1 cm.) Executed in 2018. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Courtesy of the Artist

Artadia 20th Anniversary

Capsule Sale at Phillips


305. Walter Price

b. 1989

Clown Shoes signed and dated “Walter Price ‘17” on the reverse pen, marker and graphite on paper 13 7/8 x 10 7/8 in. (35.2 x 27.6 cm.) Executed in 2017. Estimate $2,500-3,500 Provenance Courtesy of the Artist and Karma, New York

Artadia 20th Anniversary Capsule Sale at Phillips


306. Caitlin Keogh

b. 1982

Lines in a Nymph’s Body signed, titled and dated “LINES IN A NYMPH’S BODY FEBRUARY 2019 Caitlin Keogh” on the reverse acrylic on canvas 84 x 63 in. (213.4 x 160 cm.) Painted in 2019. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Courtesy of Bortolami Gallery, New York

Artadia 20th Anniversary

Capsule Sale at Phillips


307. Joe Bradley

b. 1975

Untitled signed and dated “Joe Bradley 16� on the reverse charcoal on paper 17 3/4 x 15 1/4 in. (45.1 x 38.7 cm.) Executed in 2016. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Courtesy of the Artist and Gagosian Gallery, New York

Artadia 20th Anniversary Capsule Sale at Phillips


308. Roe Ethridge

b. 1969

Scissors at Andy’s Studio signed “Roe Ethridge” on a label afxed to the reverse dye sublimation print on aluminum 33 x 49 1/2 in. (83.8 x 125.7 cm.) Executed in 2014, this work is number 4 from an edition of 5 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Courtesy of the Artist and Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York

Artadia 20th Anniversary

Capsule Sale at Phillips


309. Diana Al-Hadid

b. 1981

Untitled signed and dated “Diana Al-Hadid 2018” on the reverse Conté, charcoal, pastel and acrylic on Mylar 24 x 17 7/8 in. (61 x 45.4 cm.) Executed in 2018. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Courtesy of the Artist and Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York and Aspen

Artadia 20th Anniversary Capsule Sale at Phillips


310. Cecily Brown

b. 1969

Sleeping Through the Tempest signed and dated “Cecily Brown 2016� on the reverse pastel and watercolor on paper 31 3/4 x 47 3/4 in. (80.6 x 121.3 cm.) Executed in 2016. Estimate $35,000-45,000 Provenance Courtesy of the Artist

Artadia 20th Anniversary

Capsule Sale at Phillips


311. Katherine Bernhardt

b. 1975

Untitled signed and dated “Katherine Bernhardt 2018� on the reverse acrylic on paper 24 x 18 in. (61 x 45.7 cm.) Executed in 2018. Estimate $3,000-4,000 Provenance Courtesy of the Artist and CANADA, New York

Artadia 20th Anniversary Capsule Sale at Phillips


312. Tala Madani

b. 1981

Popular Toys signed and dated “Tala Madani 2013� on the overlap oil on linen 38 1/4 x 24 3/8 in. (97.2 x 61.9 cm.) Painted in 2013. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Pilar Corrias Gallery, London Courtesy of Lynn and Craig Jacobson

Artadia 20th Anniversary

Capsule Sale at Phillips


Courtesy the Artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong and Seoul

313. Angel Otero

b. 1981

Sand of Silence signed “Angel Otero” on the overlap; further signed and dated “Angel Otero 2015” on the reverse silicone and cadmium pigment on canvas 36 x 48 in. (91.4 x 121.9 cm.) Executed in 2015. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Courtesy of the Artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong and Seoul

Artadia 20th Anniversary Capsule Sale at Phillips


314. Larry Bell

b. 1939

CS 9.22.15 signed, partially titled and dated “9-22-15 L. BELL. ‘15” on the reverse mixed media, aluminum and silicon monoxide on red Hiromi paper laid on canvas, in artist’s frame 62 1/4 x 44 1/4 x 3 3/4 in. (158.1 x 112.4 x 9.5 cm.) Executed in 2015. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Courtesy of the Artist and Hauser & Wirth, New York

Artadia 20th Anniversary

Capsule Sale at Phillips


315. Calvin Marcus

b. 1988

Automatic Drawing #1 signed and dated “CALVIN MARCUS 2014� on the reverse oil crayon and Flashe on gessoed linen 48 1/8 x 96 1/8 in. (122.2 x 244.2 cm.) Executed in 2014. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance White Cube, London Acquired from the above by the present owner


316. Julie Curtiss

b. 1982

Princess signed, titled and dated “Princess, 2016 Julie Curtiss� on the reverse oil on canvas 18 x 14 in. (45.7 x 35.6 cm.) Painted in 2016. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Private Collection, New York Exhibited New York, Field Projects, Show #38: Body/ Head, February 18 - March 25, 2017

317. Harold Ancart

b. 1980

Untitled oilstick and graphite on paper mounted to panel 51 5/8 x 37 5/8 in. (131.1 x 95.6 cm.) Executed in 2015. Estimate $80,000-120,000 Provenance Xavier Hufens, Brussels Acquired from the above by the present owner


318. Christina Quarles

b. 1985

Moon (Lez Go Out N’ Feel Tha Nite) signed, titled and dated “Christina Quarles 2017 “MOON (LEZ GO OUT N’ FEEL THA NITE)”” on the reverse acrylic on canvas 50 x 40 in. (127 x 101.6 cm.) Painted in 2017. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Private Collection, Miami

“I’m interested in depicting an experience of living in a body rather than looking at a body. I’m interested in fnding diferent ways to explore my experience of certain identity positions that I’m familiar with.” Christina Quarles

Exhibited University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacifc Film Archive, Christina Quarles: Matrix 271, September 19 - November 18, 2018

In Moon (Lez Go Out N’ Feel Tha Nite), 2017, Christina Quarles creates a hybrid universe where meanings are in fux and identities remain fuid. Informed by the artist’s self-identifcation as “a queer, cisgender woman who is black but is ofen mistaken as white”, Quarles’ fgures are decidedly ambiguous, their polymorphous bodies caught between shifing perspectives and planes. Suspended in a state of painterly metamorphosis, these fgures refect the artist’s own subjective experience of displacement in relation to personal topics like race, gender and human relationships. Charged with expressive brushwork and a phantasmagoric array of colors, Quarles’ unique style and approach to painting have recently garnered signifcant critical and institutional attention. Since 2017, her works have been included in major group exhibitions at the New Museum, New York, the Studio Museum in Harlem, and the 2018 biennial Made in L.A. at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, where art critic Christopher Knight championed her “as perhaps the biennial’s most exciting discovery” (Christopher Knight, “Made in L.A. 2018”, Los Angeles Times, June 5, 2018, online). In Moon (Lez Go Out N’ Feel Tha Nite), a couple embraces, their androgynous bodies morphed into one. Set against a mysterious backdrop of shifing forms and foating planes of color, Quarles’ fgures are suspended in an unidentifable landscape, stretching, bending and compressing into the

rectilinear frame of the composition. A moonlit panorama hovers to their lef, the stark outline at odds with the sinuous contours of the intertwined couple. Perhaps a window to an outside world or a two-dimensional picture hanging on the wall, the planar form creates a spatial divide against which the bodies resist, abut and fow through. Shifing between interior and exterior space, Quarles’ seductive vignettes probe margins and destabilize fxed notions of identity, eluding viewers’ attempts to fx them in a specifc time and place. Recalling the gestural brushstrokes of Abstract Expressionism and embodying the seductive aura of Surrealism, Moon (Lez Go Out N’ Feel Tha Nite) oscillates between fguration and abstraction with sophisticated ease. The fgure’s blonde, cascading hair is rendered with a precise tactility, mimicking the striated texture of actual hair. Carefully articulated fngers and toes extend in all directions, as the artist considers hands to be the most fully realized extension of ourselves. At the center of the composition, Quarles paints a vivid bouquet of fowers with heavy impasto, signifying femininity and the domestic sphere. In an alternate dimension, a full moon – a symbol of spiritualism and sexuality – foats in a smooth, dark sky over a mountain range. Ripe with metaphor and pulsing with painterly fnesse, Moon (Lez Go Out N’ Feel Tha Nite) ofers a unique window into Quarles’ intimate world, where race, gender and identity are as fuid as the bodies that inhabit it.


319. Stanley Whitney

b. 1946

SunRa signed and dated “2016 Stanley Whitney” on the reverse oil on canvas 96 1/8 x 96 1/8 in. (244.2 x 244.2 cm.) Painted in 2016. Estimate $120,000-180,000 Provenance Team Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, FOCUS: Stanley Whitney, January 21 – April 2, 2017


320. Rashid Johnson

b. 1977

Glenn signed “Rashid Johnson� on the reverse branded red oak fooring, black soap and wax 84 3/4 x 60 1/2 in. (215.3 x 153.7 cm.) Executed in 2013. Estimate $60,000-80,000 Provenance Hauser & Wirth Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2013


321. Adam Pendleton

b. 1984

Afro Futuristic (Top Type) signed and dated “Adam Pendleton 2006” on the overlap of the top panel silkscreen on canvas, in 2 parts 70 3/4 x 48 in. (179.7 x 121.9 cm.) Executed in 2006. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Perry Rubenstein Gallery, New York Private Collection Sotheby’s, New York, September 24, 2014, lot 277 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner


Collection of Deone Jackman, Chicago

322. Mark Bradford

b. 1961

NTSC signed with the artist’s initial, titled and dated “NTSC 2010 M” on the reverse mixed media on panel 34 x 22 in. (86.4 x 55.9 cm.) Executed in 2010. Estimate $350,000-450,000 Provenance Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2011 Exhibited Columbus, Wexner Center for the Arts; Boston, Institute of Contemporary Art; Chicago, Museum of Contemporary Art; Dallas Museum of Art; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Mark Bradford, May 8, 2010 - May 20, 2012, no. 49, pp. 218, 228 (illustrated, p. 219) Smart Museum of Art, University of Chicago, Expanding Narratives: The Figure and the Ground, April 24 - December 16, 2018


Selected for inclusion in Bradford’s frst major traveling exhibition organized by the Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, the same year as its execution, NTSC is a hallmark example of the artist’s characteristic style of “social abstraction” or abstract art imbued with a social and political context. When considering the foundations of Bradford’s practice, one can imagine how his works might resonate with socially-conscious patrons as well. Since 2011, NTSC has resided in the esteemed collection of Deone Jackman, a passionate and beloved supporter of the arts on the South Side of Chicago. In 2007, Jackman experienced artist Theaster Gates’ seminal exhibition Plate Convergences at the Hyde Park Arts Center in Chicago. She would go on to fund the development of what would become Gates’ Dorchester Projects, embodying a true testament to her visionary purpose and unparalleled support of the arts. Showcasing her continued commitment to enriching the city’s arts scene, Jackman loaned NTSC to the University of Chicago’s Smart Museum of Art for its 2018 group exhibition Expanding Narratives: The Figure and the Ground.

Vija Celmins, Ocean Surface, 1992. The Museum of Modern Art, NY, Digital Image © The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, NY, Artwork ©Vija Celmins, Courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery

A tactile exploration of undulating grays, NTSC belongs to Bradford’s series of graphite collages, which he began in 2009 as an exploration of the formal qualities of paper through an intense, handmade process. To create these works, Bradford layers sheets of blank carbon newsprint – his “graphite” – bleaching one side and then binding them with a clear acrylic medium. Air bubbles, tears and misaligned sheets of paper inevitably result from this process, as the artist is forced to work against the limits of the fastdrying acrylic. In his fnal step, Bradford sands down these layers to create gradations of gray, producing compositions with exquisite, rippling patterns. In NTSC, transparency, nuance and depth materialize in the subtly variegated, alluring surface. This complex visual result is the manifestation of a laborious, yet fortuitous process which engages the viewer’s eye in its delicate intricacies. Bradford explains: “You normally want the paper to be smooth, but what happens with the blanks is that when I layer them, I get all of these wrinkles. And then when I sand it, the color comes of…


And the more layers there are…the sanding catches the layers underneath and you get this really interesting variation of charcoal grays. It starts to look like a Vija Celmins from far away” (Mark Bradford, quoted in Carol S. Eliel, “Dynamism and Quiet Whispers: Conversations with Mark Bradford”, Mark Bradford, exh. cat., Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, 2010, p. 62). Beyond his interest in process, Bradford embraces a philosophy of art making that is anchored frmly in the social world. Titled afer the National Television System Committee, one of the most common systems for delivering television signals, NTSC alludes to the transfer and dissemination of information in our contemporary society. Bradford titles his works with purpose, explaining: “sometimes they will have a social or philosophical point that I am trying to make…I want the title to create a layer of social vocabulary underneath the painting” (Mark Bradford, quoted in Mark Bradford, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, wall text). Much like the multilayered physical process Bradford uses in creating his works, his titles, too, reveal diferent strata of meanings. In the present lot, the vibrating shades of blacks, whites and grays immediately call to mind television static, simulating the appearance of a familiar conduit, yet intentionally obscuring the content within. Measuring approximately the size of a standard newspaper, complete with a half-inch white border, NTSC visually mimics what is perhaps the ultimate tool for the circulation of information. Here, Bradford situates himself within an art historical lineage, ranging from Dada to Pop to the present day, exploring the media outlet as a powerful instrument through which social, political and cultural norms are constructed. However, through his own distinctive manipulation of this charged medium, Bradford blurs the content of the source material, eschewing narrative and instead inviting viewers to insert their own personal stories. Typical of the works in his celebrated oeuvre, NTSC is a visually powerful composition that is also rich with content, actively exploring ideas about people and places, and the diferent networks that bind them.

“I understand transparency because of the erosion of paper. What fascinates me about surface is the way in which paper creates depth, but at the same time it still has its singular form. It’s one complete thing on top of another paper, and part of it’s eroded and bleeding through the other.” Mark Bradford


323. Rashid Johnson

b. 1977

Color Men spray enamel, black soap and wax on ceramic tile 96 x 80 in. (243.8 x 203.2 cm.) Executed in 2016. Estimate $200,000-300,000 Provenance Hauser & Wirth Acquired from the above by the present owner

Jean Dubufet, Barbu Hirsute, 1945. Artwork © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris

Executed in 2016, Rashid Johnson’s Color Men exudes a raw, visceral immediacy that implicates both the artist and viewer in its poignant interrogation of today’s America. Wild and agitated, Johnson’s scrawled faces emerge from a thick, black impasto employing a kind of drawing through erasure. A candid recording of the frenetic motions of the artist’s hand, the present lot developed out of a body of work titled Anxious Men, portraits made of black soap and wax on tile which were created for his 2015 solo exhibition at the Drawing Center in New York. Working during a time of violence, racial injustice and political instability, Johnson described the making of these portraits as a cathartic process by which he was able to explore his own fears and anxieties, the notion of collective black identities, and the ongoing dialogue between fguration and abstraction. In Color Men, a grid of crudely etched faces is rendered in black soap and wax applied to household tile. Johnson has employed black soap throughout his oeuvre, alluding to the idea of cleanliness and the notion that skin color cannot be washed away. The material usage of black soap in Johnson’s portraits mimics the palpable concerns of racial anxiety felt by the artist and the African American community at large. In Color Men, these anonymous faces with their violent, slashed mouths and crazed eyes confront the viewer with a frightening candidness. For Johnson, the repetition of faces becomes a literal depiction of crowds – a powerful visual rendering of collective memory and shared experience. The two-dimensional fatness of the composition further emphasizes the compressed nature of simplifed narratives of black identity in America – constructed, portrayed and perceived by various sociopolitical perspectives.

Johnson’s engagement with and treatment of materials is deeply engrained within the history of painting. Scratching and scraping, spreading and scoring, he creates a dense, variegated surface from which his Color Men emerge. Reminiscent of the “art brut” aesthetic popularized by Jean Dubufet nearly a century prior, Johnson’s portraits are deliberately visceral and rudimentary in appearance. A champion of “anti-art”, Dubufet believed his works were embodiments of emotion and instinct, as exemplifed in his powerfully charged portraits brutishly carved from a mixture of oil, sand and rock. Like Dubufet, Johnson’s portraits are primitive and flled with an undeniable urgency, necessitated by the rapidity with which the black soap dries. Of his materials, Johnson explains: “There’s something about those pieces that is very much about the anxiety of movement… You’re dealing with a material that has to be negotiated in a short period of time. The black soap and wax is melted down into a liquid, and afer it’s poured you have between fve and ten minutes to manipulate it” (Rashid Johnson, quoted in Dylan Kerr, “My Body of Art – Rashid Johnson on the hidden depths in Jackson Pollock’s Full Fathom Five”, Phaidon, 2015, online). The immediacy of Johnson’s process emulates his forbearer, as materiality dictates form and conventional notions of beauty are eschewed in favor of pure expression. The resulting wide-eyed subjects in Color Men indeed express the terrifying realities confronting contemporary America, demanding an audience for such difcult topics and refecting the artist’s own anxieties at large.


324. Secundino Hernández

b. 1975

Boca Seca signed and dated “Secundino Hernández 13” on the reverse gouache, acrylic, alkyd and oil on canvas, in artist’s frame 88 5/8 x 74 3/4 in. (225 x 190 cm.) Executed in 2013. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Heinrich Ehrhardt, Madrid Acquired from the above by the present owner


325. Cheyney Thompson

b. 1975

Chronochrome II oil on canvas 27 1/2 x 27 1/2 in. (69.9 x 69.9 cm.) Painted in 2009. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner


326. Jacqueline Humphries

b. 1960

The Mirror and the Mask signed and dated “Humphries 2010� on the reverse oil on canvas 80 x 87 in. (203.2 x 221 cm.) Painted in 2010. Estimate $120,000-180,000 Provenance Modern Art, London Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited London, Modern Art, Jacqueline Humphries, March 25 April 24, 2010


327. Cecily Brown

b. 1969

Untitled #54 signed and dated “Cecily Brown 2007” on the reverse oil on canvas 17 x 12 5/8 in. (43.3 x 32.2 cm.) Painted in 2007. Estimate $180,000-250,000 Provenance Contemporary Fine Arts, Berlin Acquired from the above by the present owner

“I have always wanted to make paintings that are impossible to walk past, paintings that grab and hold your attention. The more you look at them, the more satisfying they become for the viewer. The more time you give to the painting, the more you get back.” Cecily Brown


328. Elizabeth Peyton

b. 1965

Peconic (Ben) signed, titled and dated “Peconic (Ben) Elizabeth Peyton AUGUST 2002” on the reverse oil on board 14 1/8 x 11 1/4 in. (36 x 28.5 cm.) Painted in 2002. Estimate $250,000-350,000 Provenance Sadie Coles HQ, London Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited London, Royal Academy of Arts, The Galleries Show 2002, Contemporary Art in London, September 14 - October 12, 2002

Executed in 2002, Peconic (Ben) immortalizes the eponymous Ben in a luminous, jewel-like portrait. Elizabeth Peyton is known for her intimate, small-scale portraiture of close friends and family, and the friend depicted here has been rendered numerous times in other works. In the present lot, Ben leans away from the viewer, his long dark hair falling over a thin shoulder. His fgure is framed by the blue and gold hues of a beach, while in the distance the deep indigo of the ocean meets the sharp crest of a white sky. Peyton herself describes capturing these moments of vulnerability with touching clarity: “You can feel everything more than you need to see it…familiarity is the best for me, actually knowing them. And a lot of times people will say, ‘These men don’t look like that. There’s no way they have red lips like that, and such skin.’ But they do” (Elizabeth Peyton, quoted in “Elizabeth Peyton with Rob Pruitt and Steve Lafreniere”, Index, 2000, online). Peyton works from small snapshots, lending her portraits a tender, feeting sense of temporality. As is characteristic of Peyton’s practice, Peconic (Ben) evokes the 1990s youth culture from which it emerged – from the delicate androgyny of her subject to the close-up, magazine-aesthetic composition, Ben is imbued with the romantic nostalgia associated with a teenage crush. As the critic Ken Johnson noted, “A kind of erotic yearning animates how she sees her subjects and how she makes her pictures. To paint, Ms. Peyton’s works imply, is to be in love: to be in love with certain people and with painting itself” (Ken Johnson, “Beautiful People Caught in Passivity by Peyton and Warhol”, The New York Times, August 18, 2006, online).


329. Mernet Larsen

b. 1940

Holding Back signed “Mernet Larsen” on the stretcher oil on canvas, in artist’s frame 51 x 47 1/2 in. (129.5 x 120.7 cm.) Painted in 1988. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Johannes Vogt Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner


330. Rose Wylie

b. 1934

Green Grass, White Cat signed and dated “Rose Wylie ‘97” on the reverse oil on canvas laid on canvas 72 1/2 x 65 in. (184.2 x 165.1 cm.) Painted in 1997. Estimate $70,000-100,000

Provenance Royal Academy of Arts, London Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited London, Royal Academy of Arts, The 232nd Royal Academy of Arts Summer Exhibition, May 29 - August 7, 2000


331. Dana Schutz

b. 1976

Spiderman 3 signed “Dana Schutz� on the reverse oil on canvas 60 x 78 1/8 in. (152.4 x 198.4 cm.) Painted in 2008. Estimate $100,000-150,000 Provenance Contemporary Fine Arts, Berlin Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Berlin, Contemporary Fine Arts, Dana Schutz: If it Appears in the Desert, March 15 - April 26, 2008, no. 10, n.p. (illustrated) Literature Barry Schwabsky and Jonathan Safran Foer, Dana Schutz, New York, 2010, p. 139 (illustrated, p. 124)


332. Raúl Cordero

b. 1971

Flared Scene (with Condo like fgure in the background) signed, titled and dated “Raúl Cordero “Flared Scene with (Condo like) fgure) in the background.” 2013” on the reverse oil on canvas 78 3/8 x 67 in. (199.1 x 170.2 cm.) Painted in 2013. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Mai 36 Galerie, Zurich Acquired from the above by the present owner


333. Garth Weiser

b. 1979

Shifed, Perc, Speedy J, Etc. signed and dated “Garth Weiser 2013� on the reverse oil on canvas 51 x 43 in. (129.5 x 109.2 cm.) Painted in 2013. Estimate $30,000-50,000 Provenance Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York Two x Two: For AIDS and Art, Dallas Museum of Art, October 26, 2013, lot 138 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner


334. Michael Williams

b. 1978

Did you get more Sofa than you Bargained for? signed, titled and dated “DID YOU GET MORE SOFA THAN YOU BARGAINED FOR? Michael Williams 2013” on the reverse inkjet and airbrush on canvas 87 7/8 x 72 7/8 in. (223.2 x 185.1 cm.) Executed in 2013. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Michael Werner Gallery, New York and London Acquired from the above by the present owner


335. Katherine Bernhardt

b. 1975

Tacos and Money signed, titled and dated “Katherine Bernhardt 2013 Tacos + Money $� on the reverse acrylic and spray paint on canvas 76 x 84 in. (193 x 213.4 cm.) Executed in 2013. Estimate $30,000-50,000

Provenance Roberto Paradise, San Juan Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Dan Nadel, ed., Katherine Bernhardt, New York, 2017, p. 170 (illustrated, p. 5)


Property from a Private Collection

336. Tomoo Gokita

b. 1969

Our Anniversary signed, titled and dated “OUR ANNIVERSARY Tomoo Gokita ‘15” on the reverse acrylic gouache on canvas 76 3/8 x 50 7/8 in. (194 x 129.2 cm.) Executed in 2015. Estimate $250,000-350,000 Provenance Honor Fraser, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Los Angeles, Honor Fraser, Tomoo Gokita: Bésame Mucho, April 11 - May 16, 2015

Tomoo Gokita’s, Our Anniversary, 2015, is a captivating example of the artist’s ongoing fascination with issues of representation. The large double portrait rendered in blackand-white acrylic gouache features an anonymous couple whose faces have been swept away, replaced by swaths of paint that swirl around them like inky crowns or halos. The erasure renders the couple mute and disconnected, while the surreal imagery lends Our Anniversary the unsettling, dreamlike impression of strangers in a photograph disfgured by time and memory. Since his exhibition Tomoo Gokita: The Great Circus in 2014 at Kawamura Memorial Museum of Art in Japan, Gokita’s recent works feature increasingly monumental fgures cropped to fll the canvas with a Pop-sensibility suggesting shades of Andy Warhol. Gokita’s background as a graphic designer and illustrator has a clear infuence in the stylized precision of his paintings, which ofen build upon magazine stills of voluptuous women or flm noir archetypes. The stylized zigzag pattern across the male fgure, a typical motif in Gokita’s work, intensifes the fatness of the surface and demonstrates the infuence of the Superfat movement as spearheaded by Takashi Murakami. Recalling his childhood interest in Chinese calligraphy and manga, Gokita employs grayscale to heighten the drama of shadow and line, reveling in the visual play between smooth chiaroscuro and sharp linearity in the contrast between fesh and fabric. The sinuous shape of the woman’s body

mimics the smooth surface of skin in satiny-gray, divided by the jet-blackness of her strapless dress, reminiscent of a sultry pulp fction protagonist. As Roberta Smith noted: “Mr. Gokita’s vocabulary barrels across illustration, pornography, abstraction, children’s drawing, calligraphy and sign-painting, with a perfect control, velvety surfaces and tonal range that makes black-and-white feel like living color” (Roberta Smith, “Invading Genres Breach the Art World’s Porous Borders”, The New York Times, March 9, 2005, online). While engaging with a rich tradition of post-modern portraiture, Gokita’s painterly investigation of the photographic portrait perhaps recalls most vividly Gerhard Richter’s photo-realist paintings. Gokita shares Richter’s profound sense of the ambiguous nature of memory, yet his jarringly cartoonish disfgurations introduce a more discomfting humor. In Our Anniversary, eyes are replaced by spider-like foating orbs peering uneasily out at the viewer, an enigmatic suggestion of dissonance between the internal narrative and its artistic representation. Compelling the viewer to question the illusory nature of representation and connection, the obscured faces in Our Anniversary allude to an unreachable foreignness among familiar fgures. As Jennifer Li remarked in a recent review of Gokita’s work, “His canvases require us to interrogate the images and stories we surround ourselves with…Without faces, we are forced to attempt to look beyond the surface” (Jennifer Li, “Tomoo Gokita”, ArtAsiaPacifc, November/December 2018, Issue 111, online).


337. Jon Rafman

b. 1981

New Age Demanded (Swerveman Black) 3D printed photopolymer resin and auto body paint 17 3/4 x 9 7/8 x 8 5/8 in. (45.1 x 25.1 x 21.9 cm.) Executed in 2013. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Future Gallery, Berlin Acquired from the above by the present owner


338. KAWS

b. 1974

UNTITLED signed and dated “KAWS..00” on the underside acrylic on wood 10 3/8 x 7 3/8 x 2 3/4 in. (26.4 x 18.7 x 7 cm.) Executed in 2000. Estimate $60,000-80,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner


339. KAWS

b. 1974

UNTITLED signed and dated “KAWS..97� on the reverse acrylic on canvas 16 1/8 x 16 1/8 in. (41 x 41 cm.) Painted in 1997. Estimate $60,000-80,000 Provenance Hong Kong Gallery Limited, Hong Kong Acquired from the above by the present owner


340. KAWS

b. 1974

UNTITLED signed and dated “KAWS..13� on the reverse acrylic on canvas 26 x 32 in. (66 x 81.3 cm.) Painted in 2013. Estimate $60,000-80,000 Provenance Honor Fraser, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner


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341. KAWS

b. 1974

UNTITLED signed and dated “KAWS..16” on the reverse acrylic on shaped canvas 72 x 52 in. (182.9 x 132.1 cm.) Painted in 2016. Estimate $450,000-550,000 Provenance Private Collection, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner


“I’m not thinking about a narrative, just the aesthetic and the shapes – how I can manipulate an image and reuse it.” KAWS

In Untitled, 2016, KAWS embraces both popular culture and the tradition of abstraction through his iconic vocabulary of cartoon imagery. Executed the same year as the artist’s major solo exhibition KAWS: WHERE THE END STARTS at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, which later traveled to the Yuz Museum in Shanghai, Untitled is a striking example of KAWS’ signature shaped canvas paintings. In the present work, KAWS’ use of the dolphin-shaped canvas immediately calls to mind the ubiquitous symbols associated with popular beach vacation destinations, signifying a new direction in the artist’s ever-playful, whimsical oeuvre. Imbued with a palpable, almost humorous energy, Untitled transports viewers to a holiday locale where KAWS reigns supreme. Fusing his signature cartoons with geometric abstraction, Untitled is exemplary of KAWS salient visual lexicon that has made him a leading purveyor of a new iteration of Pop artists in the 21st century. Around 2001, KAWS conceived of his frst formal acrylic paintings on canvas. Executed ffeen years later, Untitled is a mature example of his unwavering exploration of the possibilities of this medium, moving beyond the traditional rectilinear limits of the canvas plane. Rendered on a monumentally-scaled, shaped canvas, Untitled appears to literally leap of the wall and into the viewers’ space. Infused with a highlysaturated palette of neon pinks, blues, yellows and greens, the composition reads almost as a coloring

book, replete with black contour lines flled with uniform blocks of smooth color. Here, borders and depth become immaterial, as the geometric abstractions resist correlation to the underlying shape of the support. With works such as Untitled, KAWS explores both the fgurative iconicity and the abstract nature of cartoons. Of the reciprocity between these two elements in the artist’s practice, Michael Auping writes, “Looking at KAWS’ paintings is to witness someone who very naturally approaches cartoons and abstraction as symbiotic languages of visual tropes. This is not a simple mixing of the cartoon fgure with the abstract, but a blurring of the two” (Michael Auping, KAWS: WHERE THE END STARTS, exh. cat., Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Fort Worth, 2016, p. 71). In Untitled, KAWS magnifes and distorts recognizable animations to the point of abstraction, removing the cartoon from its traditional context and inserting it into the realm of fne art. Yet from this highly fractured picture plane, a pair of KAWS’ signature X’ed out eyes emerges, pulling us back into the world of fguration. This bridging of the cartoon – a symbol of consumerism and mass media – with abstraction – considered to be the apex of fne art – exemplifes KAWS’ own reckoning with these high/low aspects of American culture. Reminiscent of Andy Warhol’s iconic Pop Art, to Ellsworth Kelly’s monumental shaped canvases, to Jef Koon’s predilection for kitsch, Untitled is not without


KAWS at work on a shaped canvas in his Williamsburg studio, 2013. Photographed by Rebecca Smeyne. Artwork © KAWS

art historical precedence. As Auping notes, “American abstract painters employed the shaped canvas to objectify the canvas support, to give it the look of a self-contained painted object. KAWS uses it for just the opposite reason, as a form of physical animation, energizing the characters so that they appear to be moving across the landscape of the wall” (Michael Auping, KAWS: WHERE THE END STARTS, exh. cat., Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Fort Worth, 2016, p. 74). In Untitled, KAWS pays homage to his distinguished predecessors, while simultaneously looking to the future. Animating the dolphin with his signature playful guise, Untitled engages with its audience, ofering a contemporary lens into the imagesaturated world in which we live.


342. Jonas Wood

b. 1977

Lew Alcindor signed with the artist’s initials, titled and dated “LEW ALCINDOR JBRW 2010” on the reverse oil and acrylic on linen 54 x 40 in. (137.2 x 101.6 cm.) Painted in 2010. Estimate $100,000-150,000 Provenance Anton Kern Gallery, New York Brand New Gallery, Milan Private Collection, Italy Private Collection, United Kingdom Exhibited Milan, Brand New Gallery, The Shortest Distance Between 2 Points Is Ofen Intolerable, January 13 February 26, 2011

Andy Warhol, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, 1978. Private Collection / Photo © Christie’s Images / Bridgeman Images, Artwork © 2019 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Andy Warhol, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, 1978. Private Collection / Photo © Christie’s Images / Bridgeman Images, Artwork © 2019 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

“I had made sports images, but I realized that I could appropriate images, like sports cards, which I had collected in high school. I realized they were perfect for my work. The colors are interesting, and they are designed in a fat, Pop way, with text. They also are portraits, which I can romanticize, because I love sports.” Jonas Wood

Depicting one of the most celebrated athletes in NBA history, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Jonas Wood’s Lew Alcindor from 2010 is a stand-out example from the artist’s celebrated sports card series. Driven by Wood’s interest in experimenting with the traditional genre of portraiture, this series depicts various athletes’ trading cards, which the artist has selected for either the particular player’s esteem or the attractive aesthetic of the card itself. Borrowing from his Pop predecessors, Wood provides a new context for this familiar imagery by rendering the subject as a large scale painting on canvas, granting the formerly banal object a sense of gravitas. In the present lot, Wood illustrates one of the NBA’s most legendary players, Lew Alcindor, who would later adopt the name Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. The renowned seven-foottwo basketball player was honored with several revered titles including six-time “NBA Most Valuable Player” and one of the “50 Greatest Players in NBA History”. Wood’s composition is inspired by one of Abdul-Jabbar’s frst trading cards as a professional athlete, made just afer he lead the Milwaukee Bucks to their frst NBA championship in 1971.

Re-defning a traditional style of portraiture, Wood seamlessly combines nostalgic imagery from youth culture with his signature aesthetic. Emphasizing the physicality of the trading card itself, Wood utilizes a vertically-oriented composition, stylized block letters and a contrasting red backdrop that allow the fgure to stand prominently of the canvas. Nearly identical to Abdul-Jabbar’s photograph on the original card, the fgure’s energetic posture and focused facial expression imbue a liveliness that refects Wood’s desire to express the athlete’s passion. Defning his work in the details, Wood is particularly attentive to Kareem’s individualizing characteristics, such as his angular side burns and lean muscularity, which make him immediately recognizable. He gazes intimately at his spectators, indicative of the artist’s style, but unique to the popularized imagery of athletes, who are ordinarily pictured while engaged in their sport and unaware of the camera. In both concept and execution, Lew Alcindor is an expert example of Wood’s defning style of contemporary portraiture, which is at once personal, familiar and uniquely his own.


343. Kehinde Wiley

b. 1977

Defend and Develop the Island Together oil on canvas, in artist’s frame 106 5/8 x 82 1/2 in. (270.8 x 209.6 cm.) Painted in 2006. Estimate $120,000-180,000 Provenance Deitch Projects, New York Private Collection (acquired from the above in December 2006) Phillips, New York, May 10, 2016, lot 260 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner Exhibited Beijing, National Art Museum of China; Shanghai Art Museum, Art in America: 300 Years of Innovation, February 9 - June 30, 2007 New York, School of Visual Arts, Being American, November 22 - December 21, 2011, pp. 23, 80 (illustrated) Literature Jennifer Jankauskas, Greg Tate and Paul Miller (aka DJ Spooky), Kehinde Wiley: The World Stage, China, exh. cat., John Michael Kohler Arts Center, Milwaukee, p. 39 (illustrated, p. 32)


Property from a Distinguished American Collection

344. McArthur Binion

b. 1946

stuttering:standing:still ink, laser print collage, oilstick and Staonal crayon on panel 48 x 32 in. (121.9 x 81.3 cm.) Executed in 2013. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Kavi Gupta, Chicago Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2013


345. Theaster Gates

b. 1973

Stack 6901.11 concrete, pulverized glass and lathe 48 x 12 x 12 in. (121.9 x 30.5 x 30.5 cm.) Executed in 2011. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Kavi Gupta, Chicago Private Collection Exhibited Los Angeles, The Gefen Contemporary at MOCA, Theaster Gates: Epitaph for Civil Rights, October 1, 2011 - February 13, 2012


346. David Hammons

b. 1943

Untitled signed and dated “5/17/08 Hammons” on the reverse mixed media canvas 80 x 70 in. (203.2 x 177.8 cm.) installed 102 x 84 x 10 in. (259.1 x 213.4 x 25.4 cm.) Executed on May 17, 2008. Estimate $1,800,000-2,500,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Exhibited Canberra, National Gallery of Australia, 2015 (on extended loan) Literature David Hammons, exh. cat., L&M Arts, New York, 2012, n.p. (illustrated)

One of the most consequential artists working today, David Hammons has spent the past fve decades constructing deeply insightful works that eschew easy categorization. Untitled, 2008, a powerful example from the artist’s acclaimed series of tarp paintings, is no exception. Combining diverse art historical references from antiquity to the present day, Untitled is the culmination of Hammons’ questioning of the hierarchy of artistic materials and representation. A staunch critic of institutional elitism, Untitled illustrates Hammons’ deep-seeded views regarding the dynamics of race and power in America. Though strikingly elegant in form, the work possesses an undeniable rawness achieved through the artist’s characteristic use of found or ephemeral materials. An embodiment of paradoxes, Untitled straddles the line between sculpture and painting, high art and the everyday, highlighting the importance of accessibility and familiarity in his celebrated oeuvre. In Untitled, Hammons cloaks a half-painted canvas marked with silvery brushstrokes with a plastic, industrial tarp. Only through the rips and holes in the found material does Hammons allow glimpses of the gestural brushstrokes beneath. Painted in an Abstract Expressionist style – an indisputable mark of value in today’s art market – Untitled challenges these established hierarchies, physically obscuring them with quotidian materials. A conscious questioning of the preciousness of painting, Hammons’ work visually denies the canon of its traditional reverence.

Aphrodite leaning against a pillar (headless), replica afer Alcamenes, Greek, Classical Period, 420-410 BCE. Musée du Louvre, Paris, Image © RMN-Grand Palais/Art Resource, NY


“Nearly every one of these works belongs in a museum, in a room of its own. Any other art juxtaposed with it would curl up and die.” The New Yorker

Through the act of draping, Hammons inevitably references Classical Greek sculpture and the female nude. Recalling the extensive history of the fgure obscured by drapery, Hammons plays within the sphere of visibility and invisibility, and the plethora of connotations that coincide. In Untitled, the veiled painting is a substitute for the nude form, shrouded in a cloth that both masks and reveals what lies beneath. Through this wrapping, the painting itself – a symbol of the elitism of the art world – is unattainable in all that it represents. By replacing the immaculate white marble characteristic of Classical sculpture with a black tarp, Hammons presents a new form of veiling, calling attention to the overwhelming homogeneity of the entire canon of art history with his own representation of the historically marginalized, black urban experience. In 2011, Hammons partnered with L&M Arts in New York to curate an exhibition of his tarp paintings. Shortly thereafer, The Museum of Modern Art, New York acquired a work from this series, Untitled, 2010, for their permanent collection. By presenting works that allude to homelessness in a pristine, white cube environment, Hammons both engages with and ridicules the elitism of these institutions, commenting on the ways in which reputations are manufactured and value is assigned. The New Yorker published a review of the L&M Arts exhibition, boldly asserting that this body of work: “… achieved a perfect synthesis of [Hammons’] political animus and his aesthetic avidity. Call it Minimalist Expressionism. Nearly every one of these works belongs in a museum, in a room of its own. Any other art juxtaposed with it would curl up and die” (“Goings on About Town”, The New Yorker, February 2011, online).

Detail of present lot

Portrait of David Hammons, 1999. Photo © Chris Gelver/Getty Images


347. David Wojnarowicz

1954-1992

Untitled signed, inscribed and dated “WOJNAROWICZ 1983 NYC” lower lef; further signed, inscribed and dated “© Wojnarowicz ‘83 NYC” on the reverse spray paint, marker and acrylic on paper 37 7/8 x 49 3/4 in. (96.2 x 126.4 cm.) Executed in 1983. Estimate $80,000-120,000 Provenance Collection of Richard Hambleton Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1984

An impassioned writer, profound thinker, and accomplished mixed-media artist, David Wojnarowicz was one of the most articulate voices of the 1980s New York art scene to confront the corporate greed and political corruption that contributed to the AIDS crisis. In Untitled, 1983, Wojnarowicz engages social activism, critical theory, and art history with a sense of timeliness and timelessness that demonstrates his deep understanding of the cultural distribution of power. Wojnarowicz’s 2018 retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art proved the artist’s diverse oeuvre to be as poignant and impactful today as it was during his lifetime. Moving to the East Village in 1979, Wojnarowicz quickly embedded himself as a queer artist within the budding energy and expression of the downtown art scene and became fascinated with the derelict Hudson River piers, which became an unofcial gay men’s playground. A prodigious writer, Wojnarowicz shifed his poeticism to art, operating outside of and ofen in opposition to the traditional art world context. Collaborating with friends on a band called 3 Teens Kill 4, Wojnarowicz’s self-appointed task was to design, produce, and distribute posters for their gigs. When the posters were inevitably torn down, he created templates that could be used to spray-paint his designs directly on SoHo walls and West Side piers. These stenciled symbols would become the groundwork of his burgeoning visual lexicon. Under the mentorship of Peter Hujar, a photographer whom he met in 1981, Wojnarowicz quickly adapted his street sensibility to the studio. Believing that his queerness made him uniquely attuned to the mechanisms of cultural exclusion, Wojnarowicz expanded the scope of his art to confront the pervasiveness of what he termed the “pre-invented world” of cultural and linguistic structures that construct and regulate fabricated borders and hierarchies. He realized that he could use his outsider status to create his own symbolic vocabulary to disrupt the veneer of the oppressive social and political systems that sought to exclude and silence both him and the communities for which he stood.

Created the same year as his frst solo show at Civilian Warfare, New York, Untitled plays host to the graphic symbols of Wojnarowicz’s early grafti stencils, while representing a pivotal moment of artistic development towards more technically and visually sophisticated compositions. His vibrant, trademark motifs – the target, wolf head, cross, phallus, hand – invite the viewer to foat within this dizzying collage of Wojnarowicz’s personal symbolic order. He explained, “Ever since my teenage years, I’ve experienced the sensation of seeing myself from miles above the earth, as if from the clouds…This clockwork of civilization – this huge ticking mass on it…all looks like something out of everyone’s control. Or rather, in the control of only a few: those that made up the gears and springs of the preinvented machine” (David Wojnarowicz, quoted in “Found Materials”, David Wojnarowicz: History Keeps Me Awake at Night, exh. cat., Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 2018, p. 153). Untitled places the viewer within Wojnarowicz’s perspective, hovering over and out of reach of the restrictive systems of the “pre-invented world”. Wojnarowicz weaponized his outsider citizenship to unabashedly turn the private into something public. During a time when little was known about HIV and AIDS, he shared the narrative of fear and alienation that gripped the LGBTQ community. In 1981, just two years before Wojnarowicz created Untitled, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced that they had discovered a new “gay cancer”. The frst AIDS antibody test became available in 1985, and two years later, Peter Hujar became one amongst many of Wojnarowicz’s dear friends to die from AIDS. Wojnarowicz, too, became a victim of this harrowing epidemic and passed away in 1992 at the age of 37. Years later, the Whitney Museum of American Art’s 2018 retrospective presented a reevaluation of Wojnarowicz’s enduring legacy as one of America’s most outspoken artistic voices from the second half of the 20th century, whose unrelenting commitment to creating provocative and challenging artwork still resonates today.


348. Joe Bradley

b. 1975

Untitled Freek signed, titled, indistinctly inscribed and dated “Joe Bradley 2010 UNTITLED FREEK” on the overlap; further signed and dated “Joe Bradley 2010” on the reverse oil, spray paint and mixed media on canvas 78 x 56 in. (198.1 x 142.2 cm.) Executed in 2010. Estimate $400,000-600,000 Provenance Peres Projects, Berlin Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Berlin, Peres Projects, Joe Bradley: FREEKS, October 8 - November 5, 2010


“I like to see what someone who doesn’t draw does draw when they draw. It’s always the same stuf...I’ve been paying attention to grafti too, tags and that sort of thing. It’s funny. It’s just visual background noise until you start to engage with it, and then you just realize that it’s everywhere.” Joe Bradley

Jean-Michel Basquiat, Untitled, 1982. The Museum of Modern Art, gif of Norman Dubrow, Digital Image © The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by SCALA/Art Resource, NY, Artwork © 2019 The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat/ADAGP, Paris/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


Executed in 2010, just two years afer his careeraltering inclusion in the Whitney Biennial, Untitled Freek exemplifes the ever-evolving nature of Joe Bradley’s artistic practice. The present lot marks the artist’s pivotal transition away from his minimalist-inspired modular monochromes toward a more painterly process. In Untitled Freek seemingly haphazard paint smears, canvas creases and scattered footprints narrate its creation through Bradley’s unconventional methods of working with an unprimed canvas on the studio foor. Successfully breaking the mold of stale art historical conventions of composition, Bradley relishes in the radical themes emphasized in his work. Introducing dimension and vibrant primary colors into his work proceeding the very sparse Schmagoo series, Bradley features raw yellow scribbles and bold graphic lines throughout Untitled Freek. His quasi-fgurative style further encourages viewers to intently peruse the painting and make sense of the large-scale doodles. Resisting confnement as an abstractionist, Bradley afrms that there are fgurative elements present in every work that enable one to extract a narrative within

Detail of present lot

his imagery. “I had been thinking of them as having personality or hoping they would have personality. I liked the idea of a painting having a sort of ambiance, giving of a vibe. Like you could look at one out of the corner of your eye like you would a stranger in the room” (Joe Bradley, quoted in Ross Simonini, “An Interview with Joe Bradley”, The Believer, November 1, 2012, online). These fgurative themes take form in Untitled Freek, most noticeably in the blue peace sign, which stands out prominently against the clutter of seemingly abstract sketches behind it. When digesting the work in totality, it appears that the red, almond-shaped outline resembles the outer edge of a plump pair of lips and the triangular shapes in the center, an expressive set of eyes. Bearing a visual resemblance to Jean-Michel Basquiat’s evocative marks, Bradley scrawls simplifed pictorial symbols inspired by primitive cave paintings, hieroglyphs, and grafti. Untitled Freek expertly channels the same energetic quality and functions as a liberated example of self-expression that rejects traditional modes of representation.


349. Julian Schnabel

b. 1951

Little Bo Peep signed and dated “Julian Schnabel 2003” on the overlap oil, wax and resin on digitally printed polyester, in artist’s frame 81 5/8 x 68 3/8 in. (207.2 x 173.8 cm.) Executed in 2003. Estimate $60,000-80,000 Provenance Galleria Cardi & Co, Milan Galeria Ramis Barquet, New York Private Collection Subastas Segre, Madrid, March 11, 2008, lot 182 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner Exhibited Milan, Galleria Cardi & Co, Julian Schnabel: New Paintings, February 3 - March 31, 2004, no. 7, n.p. (illustrated)


Property from a Distinguished Midwestern Collection

350. George Condo

b. 1957

Electric Ballerina incised with the artist’s signature, number and date “Condo 89 1/6” on the base bronze 85 x 22 1/2 x 25 1/2 in. (215.9 x 57.2 x 64.8 cm.) Executed in 1989, this work is number 1 from an edition of 6 plus 1 artist’s proof. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance The Pace Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in October 1989 Exhibited New York, The Pace Gallery, Sculpture by Painters, June 23 - September 1, 1989 Zurich, Gallery Bruno Bischoferger, George Condo: Sculpture, September 25 - November 15, 2003, pp. 12-13, 108 (another example exhibited and illustrated; installation view from The Pace Gallery illustrated, p. 37) Museum der Moderne Salzburg; Kunsthalle Bielefeld, George Condo: One Hundred Women. Retrospektive, March 12 - August 14, 2005, pp. 110-111 (another example exhibited and illustrated) Literature Michael Brenson, “‘Sculpture by Painters’ at the Pace”, The New York Times, June 30, 1989, p. C00021


351. Richard Hambleton

1952-2017

Black and White Jumper signed “R. HAMBLETON� lower lef acrylic on canvas 73 1/2 x 65 in. (186.7 x 165.1 cm.) Painted in 1997. Estimate $100,000-150,000 Provenance Private Collection, New York Exhibited New York, Phillips de Pury & Company (in collaboration with Giorgio Armani), Richard Hambleton: A Retrospective, September 10 September 13, 2011, n.p. (illustrated)


352. David Salle

b. 1952

Swirl with Blue Torso signed, titled and dated “David Salle 2004 “Swirl with Blue Torso”” on the reverse oil on canvas 66 x 96 in. (167.6 x 243.8 cm.) Painted in 2004. Estimate $70,000-100,000 Provenance Mary Boone Gallery, New York Baldwin Gallery, Aspen Acquired from the above by the present owner in May 2007 Exhibited New York, Mary Boone Gallery, David Salle: The Vortex Paintings, November 5 - December 17, 2005, p. 30 (illustrated, p. 9)

“In his new Vortex paintings, each picture has at its heart a whirling tornado that sucks the eye into nothingness, set against wallpaper-like backdrops of appropriated imagery, and objects like shells, baseballs, dessert plates and airplanes fying out towards the viewer. Using both painting and collage techniques, these large works merge fguration and abstraction. In these paintings Mr. Salle plumbs new depths of kitsch and scales new heights of painterly fnesse. His touch and vision have a cold, macabre meticulousness to rival Dalí who shared a similar passion for anamorphy and other tricks and quirks of perception. Mr. Salle dispatches his fast, gooey, distortive swirls with a slick precision.” Jefrey Deitch, David Salle: The Vortex Paintings, exh. cat., Mary Boone Gallery, New York, 2005


Property from a Distinguished Midwestern Collection

353. Peter Halley

b. 1953

303 acrylic, fuorescent acrylic and Roll-a-Tex on canvas, in 2 parts 88 1/2 x 91 1/2 in. (224.8 x 232.4 cm.) Executed in 1991. Estimate $350,000-450,000 Provenance Private Collection (acquired via Rhona Hofman Gallery, Chicago in May 1991) Exhibited Bordeaux, CAPC Musée d’art Contemporain; Pully/Lausanne, FAE Musée d’Art Contemporain; Madrid, Museo National Centro de Arte Reina Sofía; Amsterdam, Stedelijk Museum, Peter Halley, December 6, 1991 - September 12, 1992, p. 2 (illustrated) Des Moines Art Center, Peter Halley: Paintings 19891992, October 3, 1992 - January 10, 1993, pl. 8, p. 36 (illustrated on the cover) Sarah Campbell Blafer Gallery, University of Houston; Calgary, Illingworth Kerr Gallery, Alberta College of Art; Lincoln, Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery, University of Nebraska; Armand Hammer Museum of Art, University of California, Los Angeles; Sacramento, Crocker Art Museum; Corpus Christi, Museum of South Texas; Miami, Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami; Lakeland, Polk Museum of Art; Minneapolis, Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum, University of Minnesota, Critiques of Pure Abstraction, January 28, 1995 - June 15, 1997, pp. 34, 66 (illustrated, p. 35) Literature Arturo Schwarz, “Peter Halley: Utopia’s Diagrams”, Tema Celeste Editions and Gabrius Multimedia, Milan, 1998, p. 13 (illustrated) Chantal Michetti-Prod’Hom, “Géométrie et société”, IAS Ingénieurs et Architectes Suisses, Geneva, no. 11, May 13, 1992, p. 233 (illustrated) Celia Montolio, “Geometrías escondidas”, Revista Internacional de Arte Lapiz, Madrid, no. 88, 1992, p. 42 (illustrated) Cory Reynolds, ed., Peter Halley, Maintain Speed, New York, 2000, p. 204 (illustrated)


A monumental network of interconnected cells, Peter Halley’s 303, 1991, is a powerful display of postmodern geometric abstraction rendered in the artist’s signature Roll-a-Tex medium and fuorescent hues. Included in the artist’s seminal traveling retrospective in Europe the same year as its execution, 303 exemplifes Halley’s rigorous formal language and bold aesthetic, engrained with cynicism, irony and, at times, humorous wit. Profoundly inspired by New York’s intense urban environment and the burgeoning fow of information generated by computer technology during the 1980s, Halley conceived of a formal vocabulary of squares, rectangles and bars as coded referents to the ways in which geometry pervades modern life. For Halley, a square symbolizes a cell or prison; a rectangle represents an ofce tower or high-rise apartment building; and a series of bars or lines signifes the urban grid. An acutely cynical approach to these late capitalist

Detail of present lot

“My images seem, step by step, to have grown more complex and fast-paced in a way that somehow parallels the acceleration of the movement and information in the new computer culture…I take great pleasure in the idea that my work could be a mirror of this era of change.” Peter Halley


structures, Halley’s compositions serve as metaphors for the isolating efects of these modern developments recast as zones of confnement. Building upon the vocabularies of Minimalism, Color Field painting and Constructivism, Halley defes such categorizations in his endeavor to place content back into formalism. Informed by the writings of French philosopher and social theorist Paul-Michel Foucault, he considers his paintings to be referential rather than abstract, actively questioning the supposed neutrality of traditional modes of abstraction. In 303, a neon green square dominates the composition – a nucleus from which a network of conduits enters from every direction. The increasing visual complexity of these early 1990s paintings evokes a plethora of references to our postmodern age: “a diagram of a microprocessor plugged into a circuit board; a hospital patient attached to drips and monitors; a swinger seeking polymorphous satisfaction” (Pepe Karmel, Conceptual Abstraction, New York, 2012, p. 30). Executed in textured Roll-a-Tex, Halley’s ready-made parody of painterly impasto, 303 takes on a distinct architectural quality, amplifed by the geometric, structural rigidity of the composition. Reminiscent of the ceiling of a suburban motel or hospital clinic, this stucco surface evokes a sense of manufactured artifce consistent with Halley’s critique of late 20th century society. In 303, this architectural rendering of the square – previously a symbol of transcendence and avant-garde aspiration for artist’s such as Kazimir Malevich – is ultimately transformed into a physical and literal site of imprisonment and social isolation.

Despite its misanthropic undertones, 303 belongs to a period of artistic liberation and exploration for Halley. In an interview with art critic and curator Kathryn Hixson in 1991, he explains: “I think of the new paintings as much more verbal, they are more about motion. They are about being in the space rather than looking at a picture of it. They give me the feeling of rushing around in that space, of fowing through it rather than looking at a diagram of that fow” (Peter Halley, quoted in Kathryn Hixson, “Interview with Peter Halley”, Peter Halley, exh. cat., FAE Musée d’Art Contemporain, Pully/Lausanne, 1992, p. 28). In 303, the sense of movement is palpable, as the pulsing hues and dizzying network of conduits mimic the very feeling of “rushing around” in space. Previously saturated with an undeniable skepticism, these early 1990s paintings breathed new life into Halley’s practice. He notes, “The crisis of my public identity came to a head in ‘88 or ‘89. At that time, I think, the work underwent a profound change. I came out of that period with a very liberating sense of being in a marvelously absurd position. I gained a sense of play about my own position, and about the subject matter I was dealing with, and that really began to afect the work…I began to think it was funny rather than depressing” (Peter Halley, quoted in Kathryn Hixson, “Interview with Peter Halley”, Peter Halley, exh. cat., FAE Musée d’Art Contemporain, Pully/Lausanne, 1992, p. 26). Indeed, 303 is “marvelously absurd” – equal parts playful and cynical, humorous and critical, this masterful example embodies the iconic brand of geometric abstraction for which Halley is so renowned today.


Property from a Distinguished Midwestern Collection

354. Peter Halley

b. 1953

Black Cell signed, titled, inscribed and dated “BLACK CELL PETER HALLEY 1988 Peter Halley Peter Halley” on the reverse acrylic, fuorescent acrylic, Flashe and Roll-a-Tex on canvas 70 x 119 in. (177.8 x 302.3 cm.) Executed in 1988. Estimate $150,000-200,000 Provenance Jablonka Galerie, Cologne Reinhard Onnasch, Berlin Acquired from the above via Luhring Augustine, New York by the present owner in November 1993 Exhibited Cologne, Jablonka Galerie, Peter Halley, November 11 December 17, 1988, n.p. (illustrated) Kunstverein München, Gober, Halley, Kessler, Wool: Four Artists from New York, September 15 - October 22, 1989, p. 43 (illustrated) Antwerp, Galerie Ronny Van de Velde, The Future of the Object! A Selection of American Art; Minimalism and Afer, May 20 - July 28, 1990, p. 83 (illustrated) Des Moines Art Center, Peter Halley: Paintings 19891992, October 3, 1992 - January 10, 1993, pl. 2, p. 30 (illustrated) Literature Achille Bonita Olivia, Superart, Milan, 1988, p. 17 (illustrated) John Miller, “Peter Halley’s Geometry and the Social”, Artscribe, no. 74, March - April 1989, p. 64 (illustrated) Jorge Luis Marzo, “L’abstracció geomètrica americana. L’ingrés en el social: Peter Halley i la crítica tecnològica”, Quaderns: Fundació Caixa de Pensions, no. 44, September 1989, p. 42 (illustrated) Bernhard Keber and Reinhard Onnasch, Bestände Onnasch, Berlin, 1992, p. 281 (illustrated) Cory Reynolds, ed., Peter Halley: Maintain Speed, New York, 2000, p. 203 (illustrated) Cara Jordan and Clément Dirié, eds., Peter Halley: Paintings of the 1980s, The Catalogue Raisonné, Zurich, 2019, p. 164 (illustrated)

“I strongly believe in making art that can be looked at quickly. We live in a society of information and cultural overload… I want to make something explosive and immediate. And hopefully explosive and immediate each time you go by and take a quick look at it.” Peter Halley


355. Barbara Kruger

b. 1945

Tears digital print on vinyl 114 7/8 x 114 in. (292 x 289.7 cm.) Executed in 2012. Estimate $200,000-300,000 Provenance Sprüth Magers, Berlin Maruani Mercier Gallery, Brussels Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Edward Ressle Gallery, Pay Attention, May 9 - July 5, 2016

Installation of Barbara Kruger’s Untitled (Tears) at Kunsthaus Bregenz, 2013. Photographed by Markus Tretter, Courtesy of Mary Boone Gallery, New York, Artwork © 2019 Barbara Kruger

Few artists have succeeded in harnessing the efects of mass media and consumerism on postmodern society so efcaciously as Barbara Kruger. Since the 1970s, Kruger’s bold and iconic aesthetic has refected her intensely political leanings, addressing themes of power, feminism and consumer culture, while continually probing viewers to question established socio-cultural norms. Executed in 2012, Tears is both timeless and distinctly of our time in all that it embodies. Employing Kruger’s signature agitprop style, which combines photographic black-and-white images culled from advertising with overlaid red text, the present work is emblematic of the artist’s ever-provocative and instantly recognizable oeuvre. It is also unequivocally contemporary, referencing the infuence of social media on our daily systems of communication ofen distilled down to simple emoticons. Captivating in its directness and immediacy, Tears is a resounding testament to Kruger’s remarkable ability to both retain the iconicity of her aesthetic and simultaneously propel her practice into the 21st century. At frst glance, Tears seems to capture an extreme close-up, cropped image of a young woman crying. The monochromatic palette and bordered, square format of the composition are evocative of a flm noir still, replete with the visual drama and heightened emotions of the silver screen. Yet when superimposed with a striking red smiley face, Tears jolts the viewer from passive spectatorship to active engagement with the meaning of this puzzling visual dichotomy. The incongruity between the implied sadness of the woman, with tears welling in her eyes, and this contrived symbol of happiness is immediately confounding. Upon closer examination, the fgure reveals itself to not be a woman at all, but rather a doll, evidenced by the diagonal crack running across her porcelain, too-perfect face. Kruger opens up yet another contradiction, in her choice of using a mannequin, an inanimate object incapable of expressing emotions. Ultimately, by juxtaposing

the doll’s impossible tears with a symbol of joy, Kruger dismantles the gender-specifc notion of crying, asserting her own feminist critique of the mass-media-imposed structures that dictate contemporary society. When asked about the signifcance of the smiley face in her practice, Kruger responded: “I think that it serves as comic relief, but it can also be used ironically. In the middle of more serious questions, having a smiley face works both as an absolute ‘smiley face’ and an irony, too” (Barbara Kruger, quoted in Cedar Pasori, “Interview: Barbara Kruger Talks Her New Installation And Art In the Digital Age”, Complex, August 21, 2012, online). Indeed, Tears presents an astute, ironic vocabulary for viewers to decipher Kruger’s ongoing political, social and feminist provocations, creating a visual fssion that is as humorous as it is provoking. In 2013, Kruger selected the imagery used in Tears for a monumental installation at the Kunsthaus Bregenz in Austria. Especially conceived for the unique architecture of the museum, Untitled (Tears), 2013 spanned the entire façade of the building in a 400-square meter installation. This imagery, signifcant for its utilization of a symbol as a stand-in for language in our digital age, builds upon Kruger’s use of text throughout her oeuvre. By replacing her pithy, ofen ironic, aphorisms or clichés with a single smiley face, Kruger comments on the increasing triviality of language in today’s virtual world, as emoticons continue to push the written word towards obsolescence. Furthermore, the square format of the composition recalls an Instagram post, signifying what is perhaps the apex of today’s media-crazed, consumer-driven society. While Kruger’s works have proven to be timeless in their overarching themes, Tears is indisputably of the 21st century. Demonstrating the artist’s exceptional ability to resonate with contemporary audiences, Tears invites viewers into Kruger’s ongoing interrogation of the world in which we live.


356. Glenn Ligon

b. 1960

Figure #42 signed, titled and dated “Glenn Ligon Figure #42 2010 2010” on the overlap; further signed, titled and dated “Glenn Ligon Glenn Ligon Figure #42 2010” on the reverse acrylic, silkscreen and coal dust on canvas 60 1/4 x 48 in. (153 x 122 cm.) Executed in 2010. Estimate $400,000-600,000 Provenance Regen Projects, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner

“I’m interested in when language fails, when it is opaque.” Glenn Ligon

Belonging to Glenn Ligon’s acclaimed Figure series, Figure #42, 2010, luminously distills Ligon’s continual investigations into the erasure of black narratives and verbal representation. Exemplifying Ligon’s signature juxtaposition of pictures and captions, blocks of text superimposed on the composition ficker in the viewer’s eye, coalescing into a black mass of glittering dusk in the lower half of the enormous golden canvas. Ligon’s deeply personal amalgams of text and image have cemented his place in the annals of abstraction, and his works are currently held in the permanent collections of major institutions worldwide, including The Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. The Figure series developed out of Ligon’s Stranger in the Village paintings, in which the artist initially began to use coal dust to trace the shadows of black fgures atop seemingly abstract paintings, and the present work is directly based on Ligon’s 2002 painting Masquerade of that series. In Masquerade, Ligon rendered a page from James Baldwin’s 1953 essay “Stranger in the Village”, a poignant recording of Baldwin’s experience as the only black man living in a Swiss village during a trip to Europe in 1951. Baldwin used this experience to refect upon the racial history of the United States and the unresolved efects of systematic discrimination against black Americans. Ligon’s ironic self-appropriation of his own work can be construed as simultaneously a joke on postmodernist appropriation techniques and an artist gifed in literary

deconstruction, working through classic textual sources to unravel the ambiguities in writing. As James Meyer wrote on Ligon’s practice: “Slowing down the processes of seeing and reading, he troubled the modernist distinction between these modes of cognition…He became a painter of signs, a sign painter” (James Meyer, “Glenn Ligon: Whitney Museum of American Art”, Artforum 49, no. 10, Summer 2011, p. 293). To create the richly worked surface and delicate spiking peaks in Figure #42, Ligon took inspiration from Andy Warhol’s incorporation of diamond dust in his Shadows series, 1975-1979. Yet Ligon’s decision to use coal dust is also a political one, complicating the image with its material symbolism even as it destabilizes the spectator’s reading of the text by rendering it illegible. Ligon refected that coal dust “was very visceral and bumped up the physicality of the text, but at the same time obscured the text…Coal dust is an interesting material for me because it’s beautiful; it’s a black, shiny material, but it’s also a waste product lefover from coal processing…I am drawn to it because of all of the contradictory readings it engenders. Worthless. Waste. Black. Beautiful. Shiny. Refective. I think it’s interesting also because Baldwin takes this sense of perceived negatives being black, being gay, and being poor and sees them as ‘hitting the jackpot.’ It is from that position, that of the outsider, from which you can actually say the most” (Glenn Ligon, quoted in Glenn Ligon: Stranger, exh. cat., The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York, 2001, n.p.).


Property from a Private Collection, Florida

357. Richard Prince

b. 1949

Untitled (Protest Painting) signed and dated “R. Prince 1990” on the reverse pencil and silkscreen on canvas, in 5 parts 38 3/8 x 18 1/4 in. (97.5 x 46.4 cm.) Executed in 1990. Estimate $300,000-400,000 Provenance Barbara Gladstone Gallery, New York Private Collection Galerie Gmurzynska, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in June 2009 Exhibited Minneapolis, Walker Art Center, Richard Prince: Spiritual America, March 22 - September 13, 2008, p. 38 (illustrated) Literature Richard Prince: Protest Paintings, exh. cat., Skarstedt, London, 2014, pl. 34, pp. 120, 160 (illustrated, p. 121)

“In contrast to the formulaic design of the earlier monochrome Joke Paintings, in the Protest Paintings we see Prince’s full creative involvement. Carefully assembling diferent segments of canvas to form the symbolic crossbow shape of the protest placard, Prince combines gestural brushstrokes with underpainting, silkscreen and disjointed signs to create a palimpsest of art historical reference and his own particular brand of humor. A visual expression of the performativity that is both characteristic of a protest and a constant element throughout Prince’s oeuvre, the Protest Paintings are a masterful example of Prince’s unique artistic practice.” “Richard Prince. Protest Paintings”, Wall Street International Magazine, November 12, 2013


358. Sherrie Levine

b. 1947

Large Cradle incised with the inscription and number “LV 5/5” on the underside cast bronze 18 7/8 x 39 3/8 x 23 5/8 in. (47.9 x 100 x 60 cm.) Executed in 2009, this work is number 5 from an edition of 6 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Estimate $250,000-350,000 Provenance Simon Lee Gallery, London Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2010 Exhibited London, Simon Lee Gallery, Sherrie Levine, May 29 - July 31, 2009 (another example exhibited) New York, Paula Cooper Gallery, Sherrie Levine, November 6 - December 15, 2010 (another example exhibited) South Hadley, Mount Holyoke College Art Museum, Conversations (works from the Permanent Collection), August 30, 2013 June 1, 2014 London, Simon Lee Gallery, Elective Afnities, July 11 - August 27, 2014 (another example exhibited) South Hadley, Mount Holyoke College Art Museum, Unlimited: Recent Acquisitions in Honor of the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum’s 140th Anniversary, September 6, 2016 - May 28, 2017

Vincent van Gogh, La Berceuse (Woman Rocking a Cradle), 1889. Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Art Resource, NY

In Sherrie Levine’s Large Cradle, 2009, narrative, history and seduction coalesce in a single, elegant form. Cast in polished bronze, Large Cradle stands as a self-contained object, conjuring reference to a rich lineage of art historical precedents. Acutely cognizant of the male-dominated feld in which she operates, Levine endeavors to subvert this patriarchal authority through works such as Large Cradle. By selecting a decidedly feminine subject and re-contextualizing it through the lens of art historical masters from Van Gogh to Brancusi, and Duchamp to Judd, Levine embraces inspiration drawn from the past, while simultaneously situating herself as a female pioneer of contemporary art theory and practice. In Large Cradle, Levine references van Gogh’s celebrated painting La Berceuse from 1889, which depicts a maternal fgure seated with a rope in hand. The painting’s title, which translates to “lullaby” or “woman rocking a cradle”, alludes to the unseen cradle, which the artist has deliberately omitted from the picture plane. Levine’s re-appropriation of La Berceuse pays homage to van Gogh’s masterpiece while simultaneously challenging it, making manifest the very object that van Gogh has chosen to exclude. In Large Cradle, Levine invites the viewer to meditate on the iconicity of this feminine, maternal, and even sensual form, and, in doing so, inverts the art historical canon of works by male artists made for male consumption. Large Cradle cannot be examined without noting its direct reference to Minimalism, particularly the specifc objects created by Donald Judd. In 1965, Judd dramatically changed the course of contemporary sculpture, proclaiming a reductive new approach to art-making. Levine discusses the process by which she came to accept the inevitable inspiration drawn from her male predecessors: “I had the feeling I was reinventing the wheel. There was no way to do it better than the New York Minimalists were doing it. Eventually, I decided to make that a virtue, as

opposed to a problem, in my work” (Sherrie Levine, quoted in Constance Lewallen, “Sherrie Levine”, Journal of Contemporary Art 6, no. 2, Winter 1993, online). In the present lot, Levine plays with the concept of Judd’s specifc object – creating a self-contained sculpture that stands sans pedestal – yet takes a distinctly feminine twist. Thinking beyond the strictly conceptual nature of the object, Levine imbues her works with beauty, reference and narrative, explaining: “I am interested in making a work that has as much aura as its reference…There’s a level of seduction in the work that keeps you...It’s a visceral, sensual seduction that always draws you back. That’s where the hook is. Otherwise it would be an idea...I want it to be an experience” (Sherrie Levine, quoted in Constance Lewallen, “Sherrie Levine”, Journal of Contemporary Art 6, no. 2, Winter 1993, online). Seductive, feminine and emotionally complex, Large Cradle is a hallmark of Levine’s celebrated oeuvre, which continually circles back to appropriation and her fascination with recontextualizing the readymade object. In his 2011 review of Levine’s retrospective, Mayhem, at the Whitney Museum of American Art, art critic Jerry Saltz highlights the revolutionary nature of her practice: “Imagine it’s 1981. You’re an artist, in love with art, smitten with art history. You’re also a woman, with almost no mentors to look to; art history just isn’t that into you. Any woman approaching art history in the early eighties was attempting to enter an almost foreign country, a restricted and exclusionary domain that spoke a private language. Merely the act of creating art while female, in this atmosphere, was insurrectionary” (Jerry Saltz, “It’s Payback Time”, New York Magazine, November 10, 2011, online). Large Cradle exemplifes the groundbreaking nature of Levine’s pioneering practice– saturated with a feminine aura that is perhaps only achieved by the hand of a female artist, Levine succeeds in inserting herself within the canon of art history with her uniquely charged and challenging artworks.


Property from a Private Collection, Florida

359. Francis Alÿs

b. 1959

Miss Amazonia, Miss Costa Rica, Miss Ecuador, Miss Lacandona, Miss Sumatra signed and dated “FRANCIS MARS 93” on the reverse of Miss Amazonia, Miss Costa Rica and Miss Ecuador embroidery and oil on canvas, in artist’s frames, in 5 parts Miss Amazonia 17 x 14 3/4 in. (43.2 x 37.5 cm.) Miss Costa Rica 16 3/4 x 12 7/8 in. (42.5 x 32.7 cm.) Miss Ecuador 16 3/8 x 14 1/4 in. (41.6 x 36.2 cm.) Miss Lacandona 14 7/8 x 13 1/8 in. (37.8 x 33.3 cm.) Miss Sumatra 14 1/4 x 11 3/4 in. (36.2 x 29.8 cm.) Executed in 1993. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Private Collection, Monterrey Sotheby’s, New York, November 16, 2004, lot 50 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner Exhibited Mexico City, Museo de Arte Moderno, Lesa Natura: Refexiones sobre ecología, June 3 - August 17, 1993, nos. 4-8, p. 54 (Miss Amazonia illustrated, p. 37)


Property from a Distinguished American Collection

360. Sherrie Levine

b. 1947

Silver Mirror: 3 signed with the artist’s initials, titled and dated “SILVER MIRROR 3 SML 2010” on the reverse frosted mirror, in artist’s maple frame 21 1/8 x 17 1/8 in. (53.7 x 43.5 cm.) Executed in 2010. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Paula Cooper Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2010


Property from an Esteemed Private Collection

361. Katharina Fritsch

b. 1956

Schwarzer Schirm (Black Umbrella) carbon, aluminum, plastic and lacquer 47 1/4 x 39 3/8 x 39 3/8 in. (120 x 100 x 100 cm.) Executed in 2004, this work is number 11 from an edition of 16. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Matthew Marks Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2007

Exhibited New York, Matthew Marks Gallery, Katharina Fritsch, November 6 - December 24, 2004 (another example exhibited) Kunsthaus ZĂźrich; Deichtorhallen Hamburg, Katharina Fritsch, June 3, 2009 - January 31, 2010, p. 141 (another example exhibited and illustrated, pp. 82, 84-85, 97) Literature Barbara Glasner and Petra Schmidt, Chroma: Design, Architecture and Art in Color, Basel, 2010, p. 186 (another example illustrated, p. 187)


362. Jenny Holzer

b. 1950

(FBI) BLUE (i-ii) each signed with the artist’s initials, inscribed and respectively numbered “JH1107.u ele [1-2]/3” on the overlap (iii) signed, signed with the artist’s initials, inscribed, numbered and dated “JH1107.u ele 3/3 Jenny Holzer 2006” on the overlap oil on canvas, triptych overall 33 1/8 x 76 1/2 in. (84.1 x 194.3 cm.) Painted in 2006. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Cheim & Read, New York Yvon Lambert, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Cheim & Read, Jenny Holzer: Archive, May 12 - June 17, 2006, p. 107 (illustrated, pp. 46-48) Paris, Yvon Lambert, Nothing Follows, March 10 April 14, 2007


Property from an Esteemed Private Collection

363. Sarah Charlesworth

1947-2013

Untitled (Voyeur) from the Doubleworld series stamp embossed with the artist’s signature and inscription “Sarah Charlesworth New York” lower right Cibachrome print, in artist’s mahogany frame 51 1/4 x 41 1/4 in. (130.2 x 104.8 cm.) Executed in 1995, this work is number 2 from an edition of 6 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Gorney Bravin & Lee, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Jay Gorney Modern Art, Doubleworld, October 21 - November 25, 1995 (another example exhibited) Toronto, S. L. Simpson Gallery, Natural Magic, September 8 - October 5, 1995 (another example exhibited) Los Angeles, Margo Leavin Gallery, Doubleworld, February 24 - March 23, 1996 (another example exhibited) Atlanta, Fay Gold Gallery, Doubleworld, 1998 (another example exhibited) Santa Fe, SITE; San Diego, Museum of Contemporary Art; Washington, D.C., National Museum of Women in the Arts; Cleveland Center for Contemporary Art; Waltham, Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, Sarah Charlesworth: A Retrospective, November 1, 1997 - January 24, 1999, p. 131 (another example exhibited and illustrated) New York, New Museum, Sarah Charlesworth: Doubleworld, June 24 - September 20, 2015, p. 157 (illustrated, p. 95) Literature Sarah Charlesworth: Stills, exh. cat., Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, 2014, p. 26 (another example illustrated) Rochelle Steiner, Sarah Charlesworth, Munich, 2017, p. 228 (another example illustrated, p. 150)


364. Jim Lambie

b. 1964

Jumping Jack signed, titled and dated “Jim Lambie 2014 JUMPIN’ JACK” on the reverse printed paper and painted fowers on canvas 65 7/8 x 24 7/8 in. (167.3 x 63.2 cm.) Executed in 2014. Estimate $30,000-50,000 Provenance Anton Kern Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner


365. Jim Hodges

b. 1957

AGAIN? (TRA LA LA LA LA) silk fowers and pins, in 21 parts installed 23 x 23 in. (58.4 x 58.4 cm.) Executed in 1995, this work is accompanied by a photocertifcate of authenticity signed by the artist. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance CRG Gallery, New York Anthony Meier Fine Arts, San Francisco Private Collection Phillips, New York, May 17, 2017, lot 123 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner


366. Sue Williams

b. 1954

Selected Tufs signed and dated “Sue Williams 2006” on the reverse oil on canvas 72 x 84 in. (182.9 x 213.4 cm.) Painted in 2006. Estimate $60,000-80,000 Provenance David Zwirner, New York Private Collection (acquired from the above in 2006) Sotheby’s, New York, November 14, 2013, lot 523 Maruani Mercier Gallery, Brussels Acquired from the above by the present owner


367. George Condo

b. 1957

Untitled signed and dated “Condo 83.8� lower right oil on canvas 68 x 62 in. (172.7 x 157.5 cm.) Painted in 1983. Estimate $80,000-120,000 Provenance The Pace Gallery, New York Edward Totah Gallery, London Acquired from the above by the present owner


Property from a Distinguished Midwestern Collection

368. George Condo

b. 1957

Gold Nude signed “Condo” lower right oil on canvas 78 5/8 x 70 7/8 in. (199.7 x 180 cm.) Painted in 1989. Estimate $300,000-400,000 Provenance Galerie Bruno Bischoferger, Zurich Acquired from the above by the present owner in July 1989

Painted in 1989, Gold Nude is a compelling early example of George Condo’s iconoclastic take on the female nude. Gold Nude depicts a naked woman sitting cross-legged with arms akimbo, framed by viscous, dripping gold paint, a miniature halo of short green brushstrokes circling her head. Created while Condo was a student in Paris beginning to solidify his mature pictorial vocabulary, the present work takes up this theme vis-à-vis Picasso and Matisse, synthesizing the lessons of modernist masters with his own virtuoso painterly technique. The exaggeratedly small scale of the woman’s head anticipates Condo’s seminal Antipodes series of the late 1990s and 2000s, which feature geometric, distorted fgures characterized by bulging eyes and shrunken heads, ciphers for witty commentary on the nature of alienation and disconnection in contemporary life. Similarly, the carnivalesque disposition of arms and breasts evokes Picasso’s approach to the female form. As such, Gold Nude prefgures Condo’s revolutionary approach to Cubism in his mature portraiture, in the form of the pictorial language he calls

“psychological cubism”. As Condo explained “I don’t want to simply look at Picasso on the wall or read about Picasso, I want to actually paint through him… I want to paint that understanding” (George Condo, quoted in Thomas Kellein, “Interview with George Condo 2004”, George Condo: 100 Women, exh. cat., Museum der Moderne Salzburg, Salzburg, p. 34). The thickly outlined fgure and saturated gold ground also suggest a source of inspiration in Matisse’s iconic semi-abstract nudes of the early 1900s, which represented the frst instances of anti-naturalistic color being used in otherwise classical iterations of the female nude. In Gold Nude, Condo shares in his predecessor’s sense of profound reverence for the fgure, exemplifed here by the archaic simplicity of the body and sumptuous beauty of the gilded canvas. With its skillful execution and def referentialism, Gold Nude is a masterful example of Condo’s early entries into a time-honored theme that he continues to explore to this day.


Property from a Distinguished Midwestern Collection

369. Julian Schnabel

b. 1951

No. 17 (Red Cross Painting for N. Fisher, 1978) signed, titled, indistinctly inscribed and dated “Julian Schnabel 1977-78 Red Cross Painting for Norman Fischer No. 16 in Germany” on the reverse oil on canvas 95 7/8 x 52 1/2 in. (243.5 x 133.4 cm.) Painted in 1977-1978. Estimate $200,000-300,000 Provenance Gagosian Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in November 1988

“What the surface of a painting can be is an obsession of mine. I like dealing with physical problems and rudimentary concerns about trying to stick things to a surface.” Julian Schnabel

Painted in 1977-1978, No. 17 (Red Cross Painting for N. Fisher, 1978) is a monumental early example of celebrated American artist Julian Schnabel’s innovative style. Painted just afer Schnabel’s graduation from the Independent Study Program at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, the present work was created at a time when conceptual minimalism dominated the New York art scene. Schnabel, along with contemporaries like Eric Fischl and JeanMichel Basquiat, was responsible for upending this period of austerity in favor of a gestural return to fgurative painting. In many ways, the present work forecasts the boldly ornamented and richly colored treatment of the surface that would come to characterize Schnabel’s mature pictorial idiom. The face of No. 17 is thickly encrusted in marigold yellow paint and covered in jagged fssures that prefgure the broken crockery and dense paint of his 1980s plate paintings.

Like the plate paintings, the cracked facture in No. 17 physically denotes textural brush strokes, while metaphorically suggesting emotional symbols of ruin; indeed, Schnabel would create his frst plate painting a mere few months later. Thematically, too, No. 17 declares a strong return to painting in the shape of long, thin forms reaching upwards like knives over the canvas. Veering between fguration and abstraction, these indecipherable forms are half image, half sign in the manner of Paul Klee’s cryptographic markings. Schnabel describes these liminal pictorial elements as “a catalogue of variables” he has used since the 1970s and continues to incorporate in his most recent works (Julian Schnabel, quoted in Louise Neri, “Julian Schnabel in Conversation with Louise Neri”, Julian Schnabel, exh. cat., Gagosian Gallery, Beverly Hills, 2008, p. 1). Deconstructing the tenets of formalism with skill and agility, No. 17 is a stellar example of Schnabel’s early painting practice.


“Mathematically, with the spot paintings, I probably discovered the most fundamentally important thing in any kind of art, which is the harmony of where color can exist on its own, interacting with other colors in a perfect format.” Damien Hirst

370. Damien Hirst

b. 1965

Oleandrin signed, titled and dated “Damien Hirst ‘Oleandrin’ 2010” on the reverse; further signed and stamped “Damien Hirst” on the stretcher; further stamped “Damien Hirst” on the overlap household gloss on canvas 14 5/8 x 13 in. (37 x 33 cm.) Executed in 2010. Estimate $100,000-150,000 Provenance Gagosian Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2013 Exhibited Rome, Gagosian Gallery, Damien Hirst: The Complete Spot Paintings, 1986-2011, January 12 March 17, 2012, p. 861 (illustrated, p. 698)


371. Ai Weiwei

b. 1957

Grapes signed, titled and dated “Ai Weiwei [in Chinese] “Grapes” 2011” on the underside 25 antique stools 64 7/8 x 76 3/4 x 70 3/8 in. (164.9 x 195 x 178.6 cm.) Executed in 2011. Estimate $300,000-400,000 Provenance Lisson Gallery, London Acquired from the above by the present owner

“These stools are commonly used household furniture with hundreds of years of history in China. This symbol is present in every household. I wanted to fnd how to take this symbol and reassemble it completely, but using the original logic so that it remains true to its original form.” Ai Weiwei

Ripe with symbolism and imbued with social commentary, Grapes, 2011 exemplifes the indomitable spirit and unparalleled artistic genius of Chinese artist, activist and curator Ai Weiwei. Executed the same year as Ai’s highly publicized detainment by the Chinese police, the present work brims with political undercurrents, sparking a dialogue between the contemporary world and traditional Chinese modes of thought and production. Transforming the humble wooden stool into a monumental trompe l’oeil, Grapes dismantles boundaries of geography and time, engaging with a rich tradition of Chinese crafsmanship while simultaneously inserting itself into Western art historical discourse. An irreverent nod to the legacy of Marcel Duchamp, Grapes is composed of 25 antique stools dating back to the Qing Dynasty. Ofen passed down from generation to generation, the three-legged stools are a powerful display of the centuries-old aesthetic of rural China. Here, Ai exposes the ways in which concepts are constructed, inscribed and passed down, calling into question the referential values imposed on

culturally signifcant artifacts. He explains, “it’s an exploration and display of tradition, which adheres to high aesthetic and moral values in a classic sense but at the same time subverts the meaning through manipulating that same language” (Ai Weiwei, quoted in Michael Frahm, “Interview with Ai Weiwei”, Ai Weiwei at Blenheim Palace, exh. cat., Blenheim Art Foundation, Woodstock, 2015, p. 90). In Grapes, the wooden stools are woven together and fan out in a gigantic sculptural display, creating a spherical form akin to a cluster of grapes. This clustering serves as a metaphor for China’s socialist history, which required individuals to set aside their own personal interests in favor of the state. Yet by titling Grapes afer the cherished subject of Western still-life painting – the nature morte – Ai melds these discourses and infuses his work with strata of meaning. Bridging East and West with seamless poeticism, Grapes is a powerful example of the way Ai’s practice is both deeply personal and powerfully global in its scope.


372. Takashi Murakami

b. 1962

DOB Splash (walkman) signed, inscribed and dated “Director Yoshikazu Hirata staf. Mr. Takahiro Inamori Takashi ‘99” on the reverse acrylic on canvas on board 47 1/2 x 35 1/2 in. (120.7 x 90.2 cm.) Executed in 1999. Estimate $220,000-280,000 Provenance Blum & Poe, Los Angeles Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

Equal parts playful and critical, cute and menacing, Takashi Murakami’s DOB Splash (walkman), 1999, is an astute refection of the artist’s ongoing exploration of Japanese culture. Murakami frst created his recurring motif, Mr. DOB, in 1992 as a kind of self-portrait – an alter ego inspired by anime and manga characters that have attained cult status in Japan. A synthesis of language and cartoon imagery, Mr. DOB is a physical manifestation of the letters “D-O-B” – “D” and “B” inscribed on each ear, with an “O”-shaped face situated in between. A contraction of the Japanese slang expression “dobojite”, or “why?”, his name alludes to the artist’s critical attitude towards more complex themes of consumerism, technology and violence. The hyper-compressed, depthless surface of DOB Splash (walkman) is characteristic of Murakami’s signature Superfat aesthetic, a fusion of traditional Japanese painting with the fat-screen imagery of the digital age. In DOB Splash (walkman), the foating character is juxtaposed against an expanse of monochromatic blue, emphasizing the extreme two-dimensionality of the composition. For Murakami, this rendering highlights the fattening of Japanese culture and democracy as a byproduct of technology and consumerism. In DOB Splash (walkman), Mr. DOB hovers in the air against a dazzling blue background, a zigzagged spray trailing in his wake. A symbol of mass consumption, he is reminiscent of the American icon Mickey Mouse – with his white gloves and cartoonish ears – yet he retains a distinct cuteness synonymous with Japanese youth culture. However, beneath this playful guise, Mr. DOB assumes a more villainous character, revealing the superfciality of consumerist culture, hedonism, and the way in which excess can overwhelm. As Paul Schimmel explains, “Murakami has created a constantly evolving character that embodies all the complexities and nuances of his ever-changing personal and corporate identity” (Paul Schimmel, “Making Murakami”, ©Murakami, exh. cat., The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 2007, p. 67).


373. Dan Colen

b. 1979

Great Big Kiss chewing gum and wrappers on canvas 84 x 60 in. (213.4 x 152.4 cm.) Executed in 2010. Estimate $120,000-180,000 Provenance Gagosian Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

Detail of present lot


374. Sterling Ruby

b. 1972

BC (4007) signed with the artist’s initials, titled and dated “BC (4007) S.R. 12” on the reverse collage, paint, bleach, glue and fabric on wood, in artist’s brass frame 29 3/8 x 24 3/4 in. (74.6 x 62.9 cm.) Executed in 2012. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Xavier Hufens, Belgium Acquired from the above by the present owner


375. Blake Rayne

b. 1969

Cover Letter signed, signed with the artist’s initials and dated “Blake Rayne 2010 BR” on the overlap synthetic felt and acrylic on canvas 79 x 48 in. (200.7 x 121.9 cm.) Executed in 2010. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2010 Exhibited New York, Miguel Abreu Gallery, Folder and Application, May 9 - June 26, 2010 Paris, Sutton Lane, Coastal Graphics, April 14 May 14, 2011


“I’m not hoping for an accident or even courting disaster. The works on linen are a record of their own making…” Wade Guyton

376. Wade Guyton

b. 1972

Untitled signed and dated “Wade Guyton 2008” on the overlap Epson UltraChrome inkjet on linen 34 1/8 x 24 1/8 in. (86.7 x 61.3 cm.) Executed in 2008. Estimate $80,000-120,000 Provenance Francesca Pia, Zurich Ribordy Contemporary, Geneva Acquired from the above by the present owner


377. Jef Elrod

b. 1966

Ice Age signed and dated “Jef Elrod 2013” on the overlap acrylic and UV ink on canvas 90 1/4 x 65 in. (229.2 x 165.1 cm.) Executed in 2013. Estimate $100,000-150,000 Provenance Simon Lee Gallery, London Private Collection #TTTOP, Sotheby’s, Hong Kong, October 3, 2016, lot 611 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner Exhibited London, Simon Lee Gallery, Jef Elrod, October 15 November 23, 2013


378. Kelley Walker

b. 1969

Untitled signed and dated “Kelley Walker 2009� on the reverse four-color process silkscreen and acrylic on canvas with collage, Newsweek: December 2, 1974 96 x 10 in. (243.8 x 25.4 cm.) Executed in 2009. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Paula Cooper Gallery, New York Capitain Petzel, Brussels Marcel Katz, Paris Catherine Bastide, Brussels Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Berlin, Capitain Petzel, Kelley Walker, November 6 December 19, 2009


379. Math Bass

b. 1981

Newz! signed with the artist’s initials and dated “MB 16” on the overlap gouache on canvas 42 x 40 in. (106.7 x 101.6 cm.) Painted in 2016. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Overduin & Co., Los Angeles Private Collection Acquired from the above by the present owner


380. Andra Ursuta Dumb Belles 2 brushed steel, glass tiles, cement board and wood 92 x 30 x 15 1/2 in. (233.7 x 76.2 x 39.4 cm.) Executed in 2013, this work number 1 from an edition of 2 plus 1 artist’s proof. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Venus Over Manhattan, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Venus Over Manhattan, Andra Ursuta: Solitary Fitness, February 13 - March 30, 2013


381. Ida Ekblad

b. 1980

Untitled signed with the artist’s initials “I.E” lower right acrylic-based air brush inks and spray paint on linen 86 5/8 x 70 7/8 in. (220 x 180 cm.) Executed in 2014. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Greene Nafali, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner


382. Elizabeth Neel

b. 1975

Routes and Pressures signed and dated “Elizabeth Neel 2012� on the reverse oil and spray paint on canvas 76 x 96 in. (193 x 243.8 cm.) Executed in 2012. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Los Angeles, Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects, Routes and Pressures, April 7 - May 12, 2012


383. Petra Cortright

b. 1986

salad dressings orange yogart digital painting on aluminum 78 1/2 x 59 in. (199.4 x 149.9 cm.) Executed in 2014. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner


384. Louisa Gagliardi

b. 1989

Powerful relief signed and dated “Louisa Gagliardi 2016� on the overlap ink and gel medium on PVC 65 x 45 1/4 in. (165.1 x 114.9 cm.) Executed in 2016. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance rodolphe janssen, Brussels Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Brussels, rodolphe janssen, Louisa Gagliardi: Notes for later, January 12 - February 11, 2017


385. Mark Grotjahn

b. 1968

Untitled signed, inscribed and dated “Happy Birthday For Jonny 07 M. Grotjahn” on the reverse wax crayon on paper 11 3/4 x 7 3/8 in. (29.8 x 18.7 cm.) Executed in 2007. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Private Collection (acquired directly from the artist in 2007) Christie’s, New York, March 1, 2018, lot 261 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner


386. Jonas Wood

b. 1977

Untitled signed with the artist’s initials and dated “JBRW 2008” on the reverse acrylic and ink on paper 13 3/4 x 16 in. (34.9 x 40.6 cm.) Executed in 2008. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner


387. Nicolas Party

b. 1980

Still Life No 107 signed, titled and dated “Nicolas Party 2012 Still Life No 107� on the reverse graphite on paper 8 3/8 x 5 3/4 in. (21.3 x 14.6 cm.) Executed in 2012. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance ACRIA, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in June 2017


388. Yoshitomo Nara

b. 1959

Sleepless Night signed and dated “Yoshitomo Nara 98� on the reverse ballpoint pen and colored pencil on paper 9 x 6 in. (22.9 x 15.2 cm.) Executed in 1998. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance NADif, Tokyo Private Collection, Tokyo Cordelia Fine Art, London Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Tokyo, NADif, In the Floating World, April 2 May 10, 1999 Literature Noriko Miyamura and Shinko Suzuki, eds., Yoshitomo Nara: The Complete Works, Volume 2: Works on Paper, San Francisco, 2011, no. D-1998-228, p. 356 (illustrated, p. 134)


389. Elizabeth Peyton

b. 1965

Piotr signed, titled and dated “Piotr 1996 Elizabeth Peyton� on the reverse graphite and ink on paper 13 1/2 x 11 in. (34.3 x 27.9 cm.) Executed in 1996. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Neugerriemschneider, Berlin Acquired from the above by the present owner


390. Elizabeth Peyton

b. 1965

Louis XIV Dejeuner Age 11 signed, titled and dated “LOUIS XIV DEJEUNER AGE 11 Elizabeth Peyton 1995� on the reverse charcoal on paper 14 x 17 1/8 in. (35.6 x 43.5 cm.) Executed in 1995. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Neugerriemschneider, Berlin Acquired from the above by the present owner


391. Eric Fischl

b. 1948

Untitled signed and dated “Fischl 97� lower lef oil on paper 39 1/4 x 27 1/2 in. (99.7 x 69.9 cm.) Executed in 1996. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Baldwin Gallery, Aspen Private Collection, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2007 Exhibited Aspen, Baldwin Gallery, Eric Fischl, Works On Paper 1995-97, March 1997


392. Robert Longo

b. 1953

Study for Luther B titled “Study for Luther B” lower lef and signed and dated “Robert Longo 2016” lower right; further inscribed “#4414” lower right margin ink and charcoal on vellum 17 3/4 x 23 3/4 in. (45.1 x 60.3 cm.) Executed in 2016. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Metro Pictures, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner


393. Christopher Wool

b. 1955

Untitled embossed with the artist’s signature “WOOL” lower right enamel on rice paper 74 x 37 1/2 in. (188 x 95.3 cm.) Executed in 1990. Estimate $120,000-180,000 Provenance Luhring Augustine, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1990

Oscillating between the abstract and the fgurative, the mechanical and the handmade, the stenciled black fgures of Christopher Wool’s Untitled, 1990 appear suspended in midair against a white surface. The monochrome fgures, reminiscent of primitive depictions of the human form, are a recurring motif in the artist’s practice. The repetitious nature of the composition pushes the boundaries of image production and reproduction in contemporary art. As Ann Goldstein explains, “through process, technique, scale, composition, and imagery, Wool’s work accentuates the tensions and contradictions between the act of painting, the construction of a picture, its physical attributes, the visual experience of looking at it, and the possibilities of playing with and pushing open the thresholds of its meanings. They are defned by what they’re not—and what they hold back” (Ann Goldstein, Christopher Wool, exh. cat., The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 1998, p. 263). In an exploration of the relationship between painting and process, Wool’s stenciled works on paper pay homage to Pop predecessors like Andy Warhol, whose developments in silkscreen printing propelled his artistic ambition to become as machine-like as possible. Decades later, Wool embraces these tenets by employing a variety of appropriated symbols, his own novel application techniques, and compositional variety, developing a unique visual vocabulary that reestablishes the primacy of contemporary painting.


Property from a Distinguished American Collection

394. Christian Marclay

b. 1955

Silence (The Electric Chair) signed and dated “Christian Marclay 2006� on the reverse silkscreen ink on colored paper 20 1/2 x 30 3/4 in. (52.1 x 78.1 cm.) Executed in 2006. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Paula Cooper Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2006 Exhibited New York, Paula Cooper Gallery, Christian Marclay: The Electric Chair, October 6 - November 4, 2006


Property from a Distinguished American Collection

395. Gabriel Orozco

b. 1962

Obit: ÔA General in Three WarsÕ archival Epson inkjet print with UltraChrome K3 pigment ink on Awagami, Kozo natural 70 gm paper 83 x 43 3/4 in. (210.8 x 111.1 cm.) Executed in 2008, this work is number 1 from an edition of 3. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Marian Goodman Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2008 Exhibited New York, Marian Goodman Gallery, Gabriel Orozco, May 6 - June 14, 2008


396. Los Carpinteros

b. 1969, b. 1970, b. 1971

Downtown Verde titled ““Downtown Verde”” lower center and signed and dated “Los Carpinteros 01” lower right watercolor and charcoal on paper 51 1/2 x 72 in. (130.8 x 182.9 cm.) Executed in 2001. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance The Artist Anthony Grant Inc., New York Martha Parrish and James Reinish Inc., New York Acquired from the above by the present owner


397. Guillermo Kuitca

b. 1961

Opera de Paris, Palais Garnier signed and dated “Kuitca 05� lower right mixed media on paper 58 5/8 x 58 5/8 in. (148.9 x 148.9 cm.) Executed in 2005. Estimate $35,000-45,000 Provenance Sperone Westwater, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Sperone Westwater, Guillermo Kuitca: Acoustic Mass, November 3 - December 17, 2005


398. Oscar Muñoz

b. 1951

Luz Interior signed and dated “Oscar Muñoz 82” lower right charcoal on paper laid on canvas 43 3/8 x 31 7/8 in. (110.2 x 81 cm.) Executed in 1982. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Cecilia Zambrano de Botero, Bogotá (acquired directly from the artist) Private Collection, Cali Private Collection, Bogotá Exhibited Roldanillo, Museo Rayo Dibujo y Grabado Latinoamericano, Oscar Muñoz, January - March, 2017


399. Harold Ancart

b. 1980

Contorsions oil, graphite and ink on paper, double-sided 45 1/8 x 35 3/8 in. (114.6 x 89.9 cm.) Executed in 2011. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance C L E A R I N G, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

alternate view


400. Richard Tuttle

b. 1941

Blue Star Transparent Orange mixed media paper construction 18 x 11 x 5 3/8 in. (45.7 x 27.9 x 13.7 cm.) Executed in 1986. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Galerie Yvon Lambert, Paris Phillips de Pury & Company, New York, May 11, 2012, lot 189 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner Exhibited Los Angeles, Museum of Contemporary Art, The Art of Richard Tuttle, April 22 - July 30, 2007


Property from a Distinguished American Collection

401. Georg Baselitz

b. 1938

Untitled (Elke-head) signed and dated “G. Baselitz 9.I 79� lower right charcoal on paper 33 7/8 x 24 in. (86 x 61 cm.) Executed in 1979. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Galerie Gillespie-Laage-Salomon, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1984 Exhibited Paris, Gillespie - Laage - Salomon, Georg Baselitz, November 22, 1980 - January 7, 1981


402. David Hammons

b. 1943

Untitled (Body Print) signed and dated “Hammons 74” lower right pigment on graph paper 22 x 17 1/2 in. (55.9 x 44.5 cm.) Executed in 1974. Estimate $200,000-300,000 Provenance Private Collection (acquired directly from the artist in 1975) Sotheby’s, New York, September 25, 2013, lot 120 Salon 94, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

“When I lie down on the paper which is frst placed on the foor, I have to carefully decide how to get up after I have made the impression that I want. Sometimes I lie there for perhaps three minutes or even longer just fguring out how I can get of the paper without smudging the image that I’m trying to print.” David Hammons

David Hammons’ Untitled (Body Print), 1974 is a riveting self-portrait charged with political poignancy that refects the burgeoning Black Power Movement in America during the 1960s and 1970s. The present work belongs to the artist’s celebrated Body Prints series, which he began in the late 1960s while living in Los Angeles. Using his own body as a template, Hammons coated himself with margarine or grease and then pressed himself against a sheet of paper laid on the foor. He then dusted the composition with fne chalk or other pigments to set the impression, creating expressive works of art that are at once feeting and deeply corporeal. Executed the same year as Hammons’ move from Los Angeles to New York, Untitled (Body Print) is a striking culmination of the artist’s years-long exploration of this process. Exquisitely tactile and delicately transient, the present work vacillates between fguration and abstraction, capturing a blurry, albeit precise, record of the artist’s physical presence. At the center of the composition, Hammons’ eyes, nose and mouth are recorded with nearphotographic clarity. Belying this detailed record, the radiating motifs become increasingly abstracted, until they dissipate altogether. With all of its paradoxes, Untitled (Body Print) presents a complex refection on the very nature of the human condition. A re-examination of the self-portrait, Untitled (Body Print) is exemplary of Hammons’ own reckoning with the absence of black-portraiture and representation in 1970s America. By physically recording his presence into the annals of fne art and bringing visibility to the narratives and experiences of racism that had been overlooked by art historical discourses, Hammons endeavors to rectify this jarring void. Hammons’ Body Prints are indeed cemented in the art historical canon, as works from this series reside in esteemed institutions such as of The Museum of Modern Art, New York and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Ultimately, Untitled (Body Print) is a piece of history in of itself, allowing the viewer a personal glimpse into the elusive phenomenon that is Hammons.


Property from the Collection of Blake Byrne A visit to Blake Byrne’s home was always a learning experience, as Blake would proudly point out not just works by well-known artists such as Alexander Calder, Mark Bradford and Marlene Dumas, but would also point to work by artists who were not well known, or whom he had just discovered at a gallery or art fair. Blake’s infuence was not only felt by those who visited his home, but also by the people who visit MOCA in L.A., seeing some of the 123 works he donated to the museum in 2005, and by the many visitors to the Nasher Museum at Duke University where he donated 283 works representing 57 artists and was also instrumental in raising the funds for the museum’s construction. Blake was a larger than life presence in the Los Angeles art world, and for those of us learning about the community in L.A., Blake was someone to listen to, to learn from, and look to as an example of how to give back to the city, to the community and to the world at large. His love for the art, for the artists, and for the mission of art to speak to people was always clear in the art that he chose to live with, and in the joy he expressed when speaking about art. We are honored to have this small group of works that Blake decided to sell a few months before his unexpected passing in March. The selection shows Blake’s long-standing interest in young artists and in artists whose signifcance had not yet been recognized by the wider art world. Blake Koh Director, Phillips Los Angeles

Property from the Collection of Blake Byrne

403. Mark Bradford

b. 1961

Untitled signed with the artist’s initial and dated “M 2006” on the reverse acrylic and billboard paper collage on card 22 x 13 3/4 in. (55.9 x 34.9 cm.) Executed in 2006. Estimate $60,000-80,000 Provenance Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York Private Collection (acquired from the above in 2007) Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2014 Exhibited Aspen Art Museum, Mark Bradford: Merchant Posters, February 12 - April 4, 2010, no. 25, p. 151 (illustrated, p. 38)


Property from the Collection of Blake Byrne

404. Noah Davis

1983-2015

Bust 3 signed and dated “Noah Davis 2010� on the reverse oil on canvas 36 x 36 in. (91.4 x 91.4 cm.) Painted in 2010. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Roberts & Tilton, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner


Property from the Collection of Blake Byrne

405. Rodney McMillian

b. 1969

Untitled (target) vinyl, thread and zipper 107 x 89 1/4 in. (271.8 x 226.7 cm.) Executed in 2012, this work is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist.

Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner


Property from the Collection of Blake Byrne

406. Lamar Peterson

b. 1974

Untitled signed with the artist’s initials and dated “L.P. 05” on the overlap; further signed, titled and dated “Untitled LAMAR PETERSON 05” on the reverse acrylic and gouache on paper mounted to canvas 12 x 10 in. (30.5 x 25.4 cm.) Executed in 2005. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Richard Heller Gallery, Santa Monica Acquired from the above by the present owner


Property from the Collection of Blake Byrne

407. Lamar Peterson

b. 1974

Untitled signed and dated “LAMAR PETERSON 01� on the reverse gouache and acrylic on paper 22 1/4 x 18 1/8 in. (56.5 x 46 cm.) Executed in 2001. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Richard Heller Gallery, Santa Monica Acquired from the above by the present owner


alternate view

Property from an Important West Coast Collection

408. Robert Pruitt

b. 1975

Fantastic Sagas: Soldier ContĂŠ and mixed media on hand-dyed paper, double-sided 58 x 47 5/8 in. (147.3 x 121 cm.) Executed in 2013. Estimate $7,000-10,000

Provenance Koplin Del Rio, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Los Angeles, Koplin Del Rio, Robert Pruitt: Fantastic Sagas, September 14 - October 18, 2013


Property from the Collection of Blake Byrne

409. Jef Sonhouse

b. 1968

Papi Shampoo signed, titled and dated “Jef Sonhouse 2010 “Papi Shampoo”” on the reverse mixed media, mirror and oil on fberboard 47 7/8 x 46 1/2 in. (121.6 x 118.1 cm.) Executed in 2010. Estimate $10,000-15,000

Provenance Jack Tilton Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Los Angeles, Martha Otero Gallery, Jef Sonhouse: Better Of Dead Said The Landlord, September 11 October 23, 2010 Warszawa, Zachęta National Gallery of Art, In God We Trust, September 6 - November 11, 2013


Property from the Collection of Blake Byrne

410. Fred Wilson

b. 1954

Shatter Murano glass candlesticks, water and food coloring, in 5 parts overall 17 3/8 x 23 5/8 x 23 5/8 in. (44.1 x 60 x 60 cm.) Executed in 2003, this work is number 4 from an edition of 10, and is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Metro Pictures, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited 50th Venice Biennale, Fred Wilson: Speak of Me as I Am, June 15 - November 2, 2003


Property from the Collection of Blake Byrne

411. Brenna Youngblood

b. 1979

Against the Wall 1 signed and dated “youngblood 2007� on the reverse acrylic on canvas 48 x 36 in. (121.9 x 91.4 cm.) Painted in 2007. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Margo Leavin Gallery, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner


Property from an Esteemed Private Collection

412. Bill Viola

b. 1951

Study for the Path color DVD on three LCD fat panel screens, triptych 15 x 69 1/8 x 2 3/8 in. (38.1 x 175.6 x 6 cm.) Executed in 2002, this work is number 3 from an edition of 5, and is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist. Estimate $150,000-200,000 Provenance James Cohan Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Seoul, Kukje Gallery, Bill Viola, March 19 - April 30, 2003 (another example exhibited) Milan, Basilica of San Marco, April 3, 2008 - present day (another example on extended loan)

“Moving images take time, and that is what I hope I can give to the viewer; time for refection and most importantly, for self-refection.� Bill Viola


© Bill Viola. Courtesy Bill Viola Studio and James Cohan, New York.


413. Wolfgang Tillmans

b. 1968

End of Broadcast VIII inkjet print mounted to Dibond, in artist’s frame 65 1/4 x 96 in. (165.7 x 243.8 cm.) Executed in 2014, this work is number 1 from an edition of 1 plus 1 artist’s proof. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Galerie Buchholz, Berlin Acquired from the above by the present owner

Exhibited Paris, Galerie Chantal Crousel, Lignine Duress, April 18 May 23, 2015 (another example exhibited) Literature Wolfgang Tillmans, exh. cat., Tate Modern, London, 2017, p. 83 (installation view from Galerie Chantal Crousel illustrated)


Property from a Distinguished American Collection

414. Wolfgang Tillmans

b. 1968

Lighter 33 titled “Lighter 33” on the reverse of the artist’s frame chromogenic print, in artist’s Plexiglas frame 25 x 21 1/8 in. (63.5 x 53.7 cm.) Executed in 2007, this work is unique. Estimate $35,000-45,000

Provenance Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2007 Exhibited New York, Andrea Rosen Gallery, Wolfgang Tillmans: Atair, October 20 - December 1, 2007


(i)

(ii)

415. Bernd and Hilla Becher 1931-2007 and 1934-2015

(iii)

Chemische Fabrik Wesseling Bei Köln (i) signed, titled, numbered and dated “Bernhard Becher Hilla Becher 1 CHEMISCHE FABRIK WESSELING BEI KÖLN 1998 AP” and inscribed with a diagram on the reverse (ii, iv) each signed, titled, respectively numbered and dated “Bernhard Becher Hilla Becher [2, 4] CHEMISCHE FABRIK WESSELING BEI KÖLN 1998 AP” on the reverse (iii) signed, titled, numbered and dated “Bernhard Becher Hilla Becher 3 CHEMISCHE FABRIK WESSELING BEI KÖLN 1983 AP” on the reverse gelatin silver print, in 4 parts each 19 3/4 x 24 1/2 in. (50.2 x 62.2 cm.) (i-ii, iv) Executed in 1998, this work is an artist’s proof aside from an edition of 5. (iii) Executed in 1983 this work is an artist’s proof aside from an edition of 5. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Leo Koenig Inc., New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

(iv)


Property from a Distinguished American Collection

416. Thomas Struth

b. 1954

The Richter Family 2 Köln signed “Thomas Struth” on a label afxed to the reverse chromogenic print, mounted to Plexiglas 51 1/8 x 68 3/4 in. (129.9 x 174.6 cm.) Executed in 2002, this work is number 6 from an edition of 10. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Marian Goodman Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner

Exhibited Cologne, Museum Ludwig, Cruel and Tender, June 12, 2003 - February 18, 2004 (another example exhibited) Kunstmuseum Bonn, Gerhard Richter: Printed!, June 9 – September 5, 2004 (another example exhibited) Cologne, Die Photographische Sammlung, SK Stifung Kultur, Thomas Struth: Familienleben, 2008 (another example exhibited) Amsterdam, Galerie Paul Andriesse, Thomas Struth: Family Portraits, January 5 - February 16, 2008 (another example exhibited) Tilburg, De Pont Foundation, Thomas Struth: Family Life, November 29, 2008 - February 22, 2009 (another example exhibited)


Property from an Esteemed Private Collection

417. Thomas Ruf

b. 1958

Nudes pt 21 signed, partially titled, numbered and dated “pt 21 Thomas Ruf 2/5 2001” on the reverse chromogenic print face-mounted to Diasec, in artist’s frame 37 7/8 x 48 3/8 in. (96.2 x 122.9 cm.) Executed in 2001, this work is number 2 from an edition of 5 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Estimate $10,000-15,000

Provenance Mai 36 Galerie, Zurich Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2001 Literature Matthias Winzen, ed., Thomas Ruf: 1979 to the Present, Cologne, 2001, p. 240 (another example illustrated)


418. Thomas Ruf

b. 1958

Nudes fn 06 signed, partially titled, numbered and dated “Thomas Ruf 4/5 2001 fn06” on a label afxed to the reverse chromogenic print, in artist’s frame 62 x 44 in. (157.5 x 111.8 cm.) Executed in 2001, this work is number 4 from an edition of 5 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Mai 36 Galerie, Zurich Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2001 Literature Matthias Winzen, ed., Thomas Ruf: 1979 to the Present, Cologne, 2001, p. 240 (another example illustrated) Michel Houellebecq, Thomas Ruf Nudes, New York, 2003, p. 150 (another example illustrated, p. 49)


419. Anne Collier

b. 1970

Woman With A Camera (Persona) signed “Anne Collier” on a label afxed to the reverse chromogenic print 49 3/4 x 62 in. (126.4 x 157.5 cm.) Executed in 2013, this work is number 3 from an edition of 5 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Marc Foxx Gallery, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner

Exhibited Los Angeles, Marc Foxx Gallery, Anne Collier, October 11 - November 16, 2013 (another example exhibited) Sotteville-lès-Rouen, Frac Normandie Rouen, Anne Collier, January 27 - March 25, 2018 (another example exhibited)


Property from a Distinguished American Collection

420. Anne Collier

b. 1970

Developing Tray #1 (White) chromogenic print 42 x 49 3/8 in. (106.7 x 125.4 cm.) Executed in 2008, this work is number 1 from an edition of 5 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Harris Lieberman, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2009 Exhibited Los Angeles, Marc Foxx Gallery, Anne Collier, November 15 - December 20, 2008


421. Christopher Williams

b. 1956

Boeing Retroft, Overhead Storage Bins, 1970, For Boeing Model 747-200 B / (Open / Color) / Aeromock-Ups, Inc. / North Hollywood, California / August 6, 1997 signed, titled, numbered and dated “BOEING RETROFIT...1997 9/10 C. Williams� on the reverse chromogenic print 16 x 20 in. (40.6 x 50.8 cm.) Executed in 1997, this work is number 9 from an edition of 10. Another work from the edition is housed in the permanent collection of The Art Institute of Chicago. Estimate $7,000-9,000

Provenance Los Angeles Center of Photography, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited The Art Institute of Chicago; New York, The Museum of Modern Art; London, Whitechapel Gallery, Christopher Williams: The Production Line of Happiness, January 25, 2014 - June 21, 2015, no. 20, p. 138 (another example exhibited)


Property from a Distinguished American Collection

422. Christopher Williams

b. 1956

Fachhochschule Aachen, Fachbereich Gestaltung, Studiengang: Visuelle Kommunikation, Fotolabor für Studenten, Boxgraben 100, Aachen, November 8, 2010 archival pigment print on cotton rag paper 24 x 20 in. (61 x 50.8 cm.) Executed in 2010, this work is number 6 from an edition of 10 plus 4 artist’s proofs, and is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist on a label afxed to the reverse. Another work from the edition is housed in the permanent collection of The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance David Zwirner, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2011 Exhibited New York, David Zwirner, Christopher Williams. For Example: Dix-Huit Leçons Sur La Société Industrielle (Revision 12), January 7 - February 12, 2011, p. 64 (another example exhibited and illustrated) Deurle, Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens, Christopher Williams, March 27 - June 5, 2011 (another example exhibited) Leverkusen, Museum Morsbroich, Christopher Williams. For Example: Dix-Huit Leçons Sur La Société Industrielle (Revision 15), December 4, 2011 - February 12, 2012 (another example exhibited) The Art Institute of Chicago; New York, The Museum of Modern Art; London, Whitechapel Gallery, Christopher Williams: The Production Line of Happiness, January 25, 2014 - June 21, 2015, no. 54 (supplement no. 57), pp. 142-143, 185 (another example exhibited and illustrated, p. 181) Literature Christopher Williams, Christopher Williams: Printed in Germany, Cologne, 2014, n.p. (another example illustrated) Lyle Rexer, “About The Cover”, Photograph, January/February 2014, p. 6 (another example illustrated on the cover) Annabel Fenwick Elliot, “What would advertising look like without airbrushing?”, dailymail. co.uk, August 4, 2018, online (another example illustrated) Colin Herd, “Dismantling the Spectacle”, Aesthetica, August/September 2014, p. 53 (another example illustrated)


423. Zoe Leonard

b. 1961

Four works: (i) Yellow, Pink, Blue Bundle; (ii) Coca Cola shack; (iii) Two Pairs; (iv) Drop Of A.M. Pick Up P.M. (i) signed, signed with the artist’s initials, titled, numbered and dated “Yellow Pink Blue Bundle 2001/2006 Zoe Leonard 1/6 ZL-293-PH” on the reverse (ii) signed, signed with the artist’s initials, titled, numbered and dated “Coca Cola Shack 2004/2006 Zoe Leonard 3/6 ZL-303-PH” on the reverse (iii) signed, signed with the artist’s initials, titled, numbered and dated “Two Pairs 1999/2000 Zoe Leonard 5/6 ZL-224-PH” on the reverse (iv) signed, signed with the artist’s initials, titled, numbered and dated “Drop of A.M. Pick up P.M. 1999/2000 Zoe Leonard 5/6 ZL-232-PH” on the reverse 4 dye transfer prints each image 8 3/4 x 8 3/4 in. (22.2 x 22.2 cm.) each sheet 20 x 16 in. (50.8 x 40.6 cm.) (i) Executed in 2001/2006, this work is number 1 from an edition of 6. (ii) Executed in 2004/2006, this work is number 3 from an edition of 6. (iii-iv) Executed in 1999/2000, this work is number 5 from an edition of 6. Estimate $40,000-60,000

Provenance Tracy Williams, Ltd., New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Columbus, Wexner Center for the Arts, Analogue: Zoe Leonard, May 12 - August 12, 2007, pp. 88-89, 102103, 136-137, 164-165 (another example exhibited and illustrated) New York, The Museum of Modern Art, Zoe Leonard: Analogue, June 27 - August 30, 2015 (another example exhibited) Los Angeles, Hauser & Wirth, Zoe Leonard: Analogue, October 27, 2018 - January 20, 2019 (another example exhibited) Literature Zoe Leonard: Survey, exh. cat., The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 2018, pp. 197, 199 (another example of Yellow, Pink, Blue Bundle and Coca Cola shack illustrated)


(i)

(ii)

(iii)

(iv)


424. Lutz Bacher

b. 1943

“Jokes” (William) signed and numbered “Lutz Bacher 1” on the reverse black and white photograph 8 x 10 in. (20.3 x 25.4 cm.) Executed in 1988. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Pat Hearn Gallery, New York Greene Nafali, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Annandale-on-Hudson, Hessel Museum of Art, The Conditions of Being Art: Pat Hearn Gallery & American Fine Arts, Co. (1983-2004), June 23 December 14, 2018


Property from an Esteemed Private Collection

425. Roni Horn

b. 1955

a.k.a (SUBGROUP IV) signed “Roni Horn” on a label afxed to the reverse of Pair A, Lef Image inkjet print on rag paper, 6 paired photographs each 15 x 13 in. (38.1 x 33 cm.) Executed in 2008-2009, this work is number 1 from an edition of 5. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Hauser & Wirth Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Arles, Grande Halle, Parc des Ateliers, Rencontres d’Arles. Photographie, July 7 - September 13, 2009, p. 205 (another example exhibited and illustrated) New York, Whitney Museum of American Art, Roni Horn aka Roni Horn, November 6, 2009 January 24, 2010, pp. 1, 3, 5 (another example exhibited and illustrated) Literature Dave Hickey, Roni Horn: aka, Göttingen, 2010, n.p. (another example illustrated) Faces: Between Figures, Portraits and Masks’, exh. cat., Neues Museum, Nuremberg, 2015, p. 63 (another example illustrated, pp. 26, 64)


426. Mike Kelley

1954-2012

Three Valleys each signed, numbered and dated “2/5 [#1-12] M. Kelley 1980/98” on the reverse Fuji crystal archive color photograph, in 12 parts [1-5, 8-12] 19 7/8 x 23 7/8 in. (50.5 x 60.6 cm.) [6-7] 23 7/8 x 19 7/8 in. (60.6 x 50.5 cm.) Photographed in 1980 and printed in 1998, this work is number 2 from an edition of 5 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Patrick Painter Inc, Los Angeles Private Collection, Los Angeles

Literature Eva Meyer-Hermann and Lisa Gabrielle Mark, eds., Mike Kelley, exh. cat., Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, 2013, p. 232 (another example of numbers 1, 4, 10 and 12 illustrated, p. 235) Daniel Congdon, ed., Patrick Painter Editions 1991-2005, Santa Monica, 2006, p. 437 (another example illustrated)


Property from an Esteemed Private Collection

427. Paul McCarthy

b. 1945

Basement Bunker: Painting Queens in the Red Carpet Hall 3 Cibachrome print on aluminum 72 x 48 in. (182.9 x 121.9 cm.) Executed in 2003, this work is number 1 from an edition of 3 plus 1 artist’s proof, and is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Hauser & Wirth Zßrich London Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2003


428. Vik Muniz

b. 1961

Afer Van Gogh from Pictures of Color signed and dated “Vik Muniz 2001” on a label afxed to the reverse Cibachrome print 69 x 52 in. (175.3 x 132.1 cm.) Executed in 2001, this work is number 9 from an edition of 10 plus 5 artist’s proofs. Estimate $18,000-22,000 Provenance Galerie Xippas, Paris Private Collection, New York Exhibited New York, Edward Tyler Nahem, Vik Muniz Pictures of Color, November 17 - December 9, 2011 Literature Vik Muniz, exh. cat., Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, Rome, 2003, p. 157 (another example illustrated, p. 97) James Elkins, Moacir Dos Anjos and Shelley Rice, Obra Incompleta: Vik Muniz, Rio de Janeiro, 2004, p. 209 (another example illustrated) Lesley A. Martin, ed., Refex: A Vik Muniz Primer, New York, 2005, p. 144 (another example illustrated) Pedro Corrêa do Lago, ed., Vik Muniz: Obra Completa, 1987-2009 Catálogo Raisonné, Rio de Janeiro, 2009, p. 453 (another example illustrated) Pedro Corrêa do Lago, ed., Vik Muniz Catalogue Raisonné: 1987-2015, Everything So Far, Vol. 1, Rio de Janeiro, 2015, p. 499 (another example illustrated)


429. Vik Muniz

b. 1961

Wheat Field with Cypresses, afer Van Gogh from Pictures of Magazines 2 signed and dated “Vik Muniz 2011” on a label afxed to the reverse chromogenic print 71 x 89 1/2 in. (180.3 x 227.3 cm.) Executed in 2011, this work is number 1 from an edition of 6 plus 4 artist’s proofs. Another work from the edition is housed in the permanent collection of the Milwaukee Art Museum. Estimate $50,000-70,000

Provenance Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Pedro Corrêa do Lago, ed., Vik Muniz: Catalogue Raisonné 1987 - 2015: Everything So Far (Tudo Até Agora), Rio de Janeiro, 2015, p. 773 (another example illustrated)


Property from a Private Collection, Miami

430. Vik Muniz

b. 1961

The Best of LIFE - Portfolio Individual Titles: Memory Rendering of 3-D Screening; Memory Rendering of John Lennon in Manhattan; Memory Rendering of Kiss at Times Square; Memory Rendering of Trang Bang; Memory Rendering of Flag Raising at Mount Suribachi, Iwo Jima; Memory Rendering of Saigon Execution of a Vietcong Suspect; Memory Rendering of Kent State Shooting; Memory Rendering of Man On The Moon; Memory Rendering of Man Stopping Tank In Beijing; Memory Rendering of John John Saluting each signed, respectively titled, numbered and dated “[Title] from the Best of Life Portfolio Vik Muniz 1989/95 1/10” lower margin gelatin silver print, in 10 parts each sheet 13 7/8 x 11 in. (35.2 x 27.9 cm.) or the reverse installation dimensions variable Photographed in 1989 and printed in 1995, this work is number 1 from an edition of 10 plus 2 artist’s proofs and is accompanied by a black clamshell portfolio case. Estimate $80,000-120,000 Provenance Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature James Elkins, Vik Muniz: Incomplete Works, Rio de Janeiro, 2004, pp. 89-99 (another example illustrated) Pedro Corrêa do Lago, ed., Vik Muniz: Obra Completa, 1987-2009 Catálogo Raisonné, Rio de Janeiro, 2009, pp. 112-113, 115-121 (another example illustrated) Pedro Corrêa do Lago, ed., Vik Muniz Catalogue Raisonné: 1987-2015, Everything So Far, Vol. 1, Rio de Janeiro, 2015, pp. 35, 158-166 (another example illustrated)


431. Oscar MuĂąoz

b. 1951

Proyecto para un Memorial IV color photograph, in 9 parts each 7 x 9 1/2 in. (17.8 x 24.1 cm.) Executed in 2005. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Iturralde Gallery, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner


Property from an Esteemed Private Collection

432. Lorna Simpson

b. 1960

Corridor (Night) signed “Lorna Simpson” on a label afxed to the reverse digital chromogenic print face-mounted to Plexiglas 27 x 71 3/4 in. (68.6 x 182.2 cm.) Executed in 2003, this work is number 3 from an edition of 5 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Sean Kelly Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2004 Exhibited New York, Sean Kelly Gallery, Lorna Simpson, April 24 - June 5, 2004


433. Hiroshi Sugimoto

b. 1948

Grand Lake, Oakland signed, titled, numbered and dated “Grand Lake Oakland 1992 Hiroshi Sugimoto 3/25 240” lower right of mount; further blindstamped with the title and number “GRAND LAKE 3/25 240” lower margin gelatin silver print image 16 1/2 x 21 1/4 in. (41.9 x 54 cm.) sheet 19 x 23 5/8 in. (48.3 x 60 cm.) Executed in 1992, this work is number 3 from an edition of 25. Estimate $12,000-18,000

Provenance Private Collection Exhibited Locarno, Galleria SPSAS, Motion Picture by Hiroshi Sugimoto, August 5 - September 24, 1995, n.p. (another example exhibited and illustrated)


434. Thomas Demand

b. 1964

Junior Suite signed, numbered and dated “Thomas Demand 4/6 2012” on the reverse chromogenic print on Dibond, facemounted to Plexiglas 55 1/8 x 45 3/8 in. (140 x 115.3 cm.) Executed in 2012, this work is number 4 from an edition of 6 plus 1 artist’s proof. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance The Artist, Courtesy of Sprüth Magers, Berlin and London and Matthew Marks Gallery, New York and Los Angeles Two x Two: For AIDS and Art, Dallas Museum of Art, October 20, 2012, lot 25 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner Exhibited New York, Matthew Marks Gallery, Thomas Demand, May 5 - June 23, 2012 (another example exhibited) Literature Carol Vogel, “A Remade Tabloid Image of Houston’s Last Meal”, The New York Times, April 26, 2012, online (another example illustrated)


(i)

(iii)

(ii)

Property from an Esteemed Private Collection

435. Wolfgang Tillmans

(iv)

(v)

b. 1968

Five works: (i) playground, Luxembourg; (ii) charterhouse; (iii) still life, Herold Street; (iv) Volker, lying; (v) Weihnachtsstern (i) signed, titled, inscribed, numbered and dated “playground Luxembourg photo 85 print WT 06-01 2/10 + 1 Wolfgang Tillmans 85-002-2/10” on the reverse (ii) signed, titled, inscribed, numbered and dated “charterhouse ph 07-01 pr WT 07-01 1/10 + 1 Wolfgang Tillmans 189-1/10” on the reverse (iii) signed, titled, inscribed, numbered and dated “still life, Herald Street photo 00 print WT 05-01 3/10 + 1 Wolfgang Tillmans 00-158-3/10” on the reverse (iv) signed, titled, inscribed, numbered and dated “Volker, lying photo 12-00 print WT 05-01 6/10 + 1 Wolfgang Tillmans 00-162-6/10” on the reverse (v) signed, titled, inscribed, numbered and dated “Weihnachtsstern photo 12-00 print WT 03-01 7/10 + 1 Wolfgang Tillmans 01-016-7/10” on the reverse chromogenic print (i, iii, iv) 12 x 16 in. (30.4 x 40.6 cm.) (ii, v) 16 x 12 in. (40.6 x 30.4 cm.) (i) Executed in 1985, this work is number 2 from an edition of 10 plus 1 artist’s proof. (ii) Executed in 2000, this work is number 1 from an edition of 10 plus 1 artist’s proof. (iii) Executed in 2000, this work is number 3 from an edition of 10 plus 1 artist’s proof. (iv) Executed in 2000, this work is number 6 from an edition of 10 plus 1 artist’s proof. (v) Executed in 2001, this work is number 7 from an edition of 10 plus 1 artist’s proof. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2001


436. James Welling

b. 1951

FDFV 1 signed and numbered “James Welling 1/5” on a label afxed to the reverse archival inkjet print 56 x 48 in. (142.2 x 121.9 cm.) Executed in 2012, this work is number 1 from an edition of 5 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Estimate $12,000-18,000

Provenance Courtesy of the Artist and David Zwirner Gallery, New York 23rd Annual Recognition Dinner, Anderson Ranch Arts Center, Aspen, July 19, 2014 Private Collection


437. Alec Soth

b. 1969

Falls 02 signed, titled, numbered and dated “FALLS #02 Alec Soth 2006 2/5” on a label afxed to the reverse chromogenic print 69 1/2 x 57 1/2 in. (176.5 x 146.1 cm.) Executed in 2006, this work is number 2 from an edition of 5. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Gagosian Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Gagosian Gallery, Alec Soth: NIAGARA, January 21 - February 25, 2006 (another example exhibited) Literature Alec Soth, Niagara, Göttingen, 2006, p. 85 (another example illustrated)


438. Jennifer Steinkamp

b. 1958

Formation C computer video installation installation dimensions variable Executed in 2006, this work is unique and is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Lehmann Maupin, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2008 Exhibited New York, Lehmann Maupin, Jennifer Steinkamp, October 21 - November 25, 2006

Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong and Seoul.


439. Olafur Eliasson

b. 1967

Mirror mirror mirror, transparent colored glass and steel diameter 18 1/4 in. (46.4 cm.) Executed in 2002, this work is number 10 from an edition of 12 plus 3 artist’s proofs.

Exhibited Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg, Olafur Eliasson: Your Lighthouse. Works with Light 1991-2004, May 28 September 4, 2004, no. 87, p. 131 (another variant exhibited and illustrated)

Estimate $25,000-35,000

Literature Anna Engberg-Pedersen and Michelle Kuo, Olafur Eliasson: Experience, London, 2018, p. 44 (another variant illustrated, p. 42)

Provenance Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2002


440. Iván Navarro

b. 1972

Stay fuorescent light, color sleeves, mirror, one-way mirror, Plexiglas letters, wooden box and electrical energy 33 1/2 x 33 1/2 x 6 1/4 in. (85.1 x 85.1 x 15.9 cm.) Executed in 2005, this work is number 2 from an edition of 3 plus 1 artist’s proof and is accompanied by a certifcate of authenticity signed by the artist. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Roebling Hall, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2005 Literature John B. Ravenal, Iván Navarro, Paris, 2007, p. 26 (another example illustrated)


441. Aaron Fowler

b. 1988

Nigga F**k Yo Cousin mixed media on wood panel, in 3 parts 91 3/4 x 111 1/4 x 12 in. (233 x 282.6 x 30.5 cm.) Executed in 2013. Estimate $18,000-22,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Exhibited New York, Thierry Goldberg Gallery, Aaron Fowler & Michael Shultis, September 8 October 6, 2013

442. Oscar Murillo

b. 1986

Everyday activity #12 oil and oilstick on canvas 85 7/8 x 54 1/8 in. (218.1 x 137.5 cm.) Executed in 2013. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi, Berlin Acquired from the above by the present owner


443. Oscar Murillo

b. 1986

Work demographics wood, steel, copper brass, corn and black beans 54 5/ 16 x 96 7/8 x 19 5/ 16 in. (138 x 246 x 49 cm.) installation dimensions variable Executed in 2014. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance Marian Goodman Gallery, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Paris, Marian Goodman Gallery, We Don’t Work Sundays, May 23 - July 18, 2014 Literature Capsule 07 / Oscar Murillo, exh. cat., Haus der Kunst, Munich, 2017, pp. 91-92 (installation view from Marian Goodman Gallery illustrated)


444. Haim Steinbach

b. 1944

Landscape A-1 signed and dated “Haim Steinbach 2009� on the reverse of the shelf plastic laminated wood shelf with plastic reptile cave, wood and metal salt and pepper shakers, plastic reptile landing and rubber dog chews 24 1/2 x 79 x 12 7/8 in. (62.2 x 200.7 x 32.7 cm.) Executed in 2009. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner


445. Juan Genovés

b. 1930

Cumbre signed and dated “genovés 14” lower right; further signed, titled and dated “GENOVÉS “CUMBRE” 2014” on the reverse acrylic and mixed media on canvas mounted to board 70 7/8 x 98 3/8 in. (180 x 249.9 cm.) Executed in 2014. Estimate $80,000-120,000 Provenance Marlborough Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2015 Exhibited New York, Marlborough Gallery, Summer Exhibition, May 30 - September 1, 2015

“We gather to defend ourselves, to recognize ourselves, to be one among many. When we fnd ourselves engulfed in a crowd, we always feel, albeit in diferent ways, that we are here, alive – and in the face of the unknown, the mystery of being alive, we know that we are not alone.” Juan Genovés


446. Jaume Plensa

b. 1955

ENDLESS IV stainless steel 88 1/4 x 98 3/8 x 98 3/8 in. (224 x 250 x 250 cm.) Executed in 2012. Estimate $250,000-350,000 Provenance Galerie Lelong & Co., Paris Haunch of Venison, London Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2012

Internationally renowned Spanish artist Jaume Plensa is celebrated for his large-scale, textbased sculptures in stainless steel, which, despite their striking originality, share much thematically with classical sculpture in their concern with aesthetic beauty and earnest expression of the human soul. Towering over seven feet tall, ENDLESS IV is a remarkable example of Plensa’s ability to weave symbols together in a compelling alphabetical chainmail that probes ideas of collective memory and the duality between the concrete and the intangible. The present work depicts a seated fgure with arms clasped around his body, his evocative pose alluding to Auguste Rodin’s seminal The Thinker, circa 1910. Like Rodin’s sculpture, the fgure in ENDLESS IV seems lost in thought, yet his muscles are coiled and tensed as if ready to spring into motion, embodying both dream and action.

While Plensa’s frst text-based sculptures were ofen calibrated in recognizable fragments of texts, in recent years his works have become increasingly abstract as Plensa draws together characters from diverse lexicons to suggest the rich multiculturalism of society. The present work fuses symbols from myriad alphabets, providing visual dimension and texture through the disparate shapes formed in the fragments of each language. As Plensa explains, “I’ve always been fascinated by words and poetry. I remember one day I decided to use, as a material, all this information that I collected in childhood…I understood the text as a beautiful metaphor about community, about society. One letter alone is nothing, but together with other letters you get a word. A word with a word becomes a text, and so on. A person alone is nothing, but together with others we become family, a neighborhood, a city, a county, a country” (Jaume Plensa, quoted in Ginny Van Alyea, “An Interview with Artist Jaume Plensa”, Chicago Gallery News, November 8, 2017, online).

Courtesy of Plensa Studio, Barcelona


447. Richard Deacon

b. 1949

Alphabet R stainless steel 88 1/8 x 52 3/4 in. (223.9 x 134 cm.) Executed in 2013. Estimate $35,000-45,000 Provenance Galerie Thomas Schulte, Berlin Maruani Mercier Gallery, Brussels Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Berlin, Galerie Thomas Schulte, Richard Deacon: Something Else, November 16, 2013 - February 1, 2014


448. Tom Otterness

b. 1952

Jack and Jill incised with the artist’s signature, number and date “OTTERNESS 1/3 1985” on the reverse of the trousers bronze 27 x 39 x 19 in. (68.6 x 99.1 x 48.3 cm.) Executed in 1985, this work is number 1 from an edition of 3. Estimate $60,000-80,000 Provenance Jason McCoy Gallery, New York Thomas Ammann Fine Art AG, Zurich Private Collection (acquired from the above in 1989)


449. Tom Otterness

b. 1952

Sphere Holding Cube stainless steel and limestone 26 x 24 1/2 x 22 in. (66 x 62.2 x 55.9 cm.) Executed in 2014, this work is unique. Estimate $50,000-70,000 Provenance The Artist Marlborough Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2014 Exhibited New York, Marlborough Gallery, Tom Otterness: Creation Myth, October 22 - November 25, 2014, p. 22 (illustrated)


450. Dimitri Hadzi

1921-2006

Levitation incised with the artist’s signature and number “D. HADZI I/VII” lower edge bronze 59 x 28 3/4 x 18 1/2 in. (149.9 x 73 x 47 cm.) Executed in 1961, this work is number 1 from an edition of 7. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Danese Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner


Property from an Esteemed Private Collection

451. Liu Jianhua

b. 1962

Games signed and dated “Liu Jianhua [in Chinese] 20022006” on the underside of four of the fgures; further signed and dated “Liu Jianhua [in Chinese] 2002” on the underside of one of the fgures; further signed and dated “Liu Jianhua [in Chinese] 2001-2006” on the underside of the plate polychrome ceramic, in 6 parts diameter 44 3/4 in. (113.7 cm.) Executed in 2001-2006. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Jiuchang Art Complex, China Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2007


452. Tom Sachs

b. 1966

HermĂŠs Value Meal ink and thermal adhesive on cardboard and HermĂŠs paper, in 60 parts tray 7/8 x 17 x 11 in. (2.2 x 43.2 x 27.9 cm.) fries 6 1/2 x 4 7/8 x 2 in. (16.5 x 12.4 x 5.1 cm.) bottle 10 x 3 5/8 x 3 5/8 in. (25.4 x 9.2 x 9.2 cm.) Big Mac box 4 1/2 x 5 1/2 x 3 1/4 in. (11.4 x 14 x 8.3 cm.) Executed in 1997. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance John Berggruen Gallery, San Francisco Acquired from the above by the present owner in 1997 Exhibited San Francisco, John Berggruen Gallery, Tom Sachs: Cultural Prosthetics, November 6 - December 6, 1997


453. Tom Friedman

b. 1965

Untitled toilet paper 4 5/8 x 3 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. (11.7 x 8.9 x 8.9 cm.) Executed in 1990. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Feature Inc., New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, New Museum, Tom Friedman, October 12, 2001 – February 3, 2002 Literature Bruce Hainley, Tom Friedman, London, 2001, p. 13 (illustrated) Tom Friedman, exh. cat., Fondazione Prada, Milan, 2002, p. 12 (illustrated) Tom Friedman: Monsters and Stuf, exh. cat., Gagosian Gallery, London, pp. 34, 294 (illustrated, p. 35)


454. Blair Thurman

b. 1961

Jify Pop I (CCKSCKR HAT III) acrylic and canvas on wood 74 5/8 x 61 3/4 x 4 in. (189.5 x 156.8 x 10.2 cm.) Executed in 2012. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Gagosian, New York McCabe Fine Art, Stockholm Dr. Frederic S. Brandt, Miami Phillips, London, December 9, 2015, lot 123 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner


(i)

(ii)

455. Peter Dreher

b. 1932

Two works: (i) Tag um Tag Guter Tag (Day by Day Good Day) II No. 1529; (ii) Tag um Tag Guter Tag (Day by Day Good Day) II No. 1646 each signed, titled and respectively dated “Tag um Tag Guter Tag II Peter Dreher [2000-2001]” on the reverse oil on canvas each 9 7/8 x 7 7/8 in. (25.1 x 20 cm.) (i) Painted in 2000. (ii) Painted in 2001. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Galerie Wagner + Partner, Berlin Acquired from the above by the present owner


456. William Bailey

b. 1930

Room by the Sea signed and dated “Bailey 2006-7� on the reverse oil on canvas 75 x 65 in. (190.5 x 165.1 cm.) Painted in 2006-2007. Estimate $30,000-40,000

Provenance Betty Cuningham Gallery, New York Dunn and Brown Contemporary, Dallas Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Betty Cuningham Gallery, William Bailey On Canvas, October 18 - November 24, 2007, p. 18 (illustrated, p. 19)


457. Mary Heilmann

b. 1940

R.E.M. signed with the artist’s initials, titled and dated “ReM MH 96” on the reverse oil on gessoed paper 41 x 29 1/2 in. (104.1 x 74.9 cm.) Executed in 1996. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Pat Hearn Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner


458. Mary Weatherford

b. 1963

Cho-Cho-San signed, titled and dated “Cho-Cho-San MK Weatherford 1990� on the overlap oil and ink on canvas 60 x 60 in. (152.4 x 152.4 cm.) Executed in 1990. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Diane Brown Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner


459. Ryan Sullivan

b. 1983

December 28, 2010 - January 8, 2011 signed, titled and dated “RYAN SULLIVAN 2011 “DECEMBER 28, 2010 - JANUARY 8, 2011”” on the reverse oil, enamel and latex on canvas 59 x 45 in. (149.9 x 114.3 cm.) Executed in 2011. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Maccarone Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2011


460. Mark Flood

b. 1957

Green Ice signed, titled and dated ““GREEN ICE” Mark Flood 1-20-2014” on the overlap acrylic on canvas 72 x 48 in. (182.9 x 121.9 cm.) Painted in 2014. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Zach Feuer Gallery, New York


461. Olivier Mosset

b. 1944

Untitled signed and dated “Mosset 2000” on the overlap polyurethane and acrylic on canvas 93 3/4 x 47 1/2 in. (238.1 x 120.7 cm.) Executed in 2000. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Galerie Andrea Caratsch, St. Moritz Acquired from the above by the present owner

462. Heimo Zobernig

b. 1958

Untitled signed, inscribed and dated “Heimo Zobernig 2013 HZ 2013-099” on the overlap acrylic on canvas 79 x 79 in. (200.7 x 200.7 cm.) Painted in 2013. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Galerie Nagel Draxler, Berlin Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2014


128909


463. Anselm Reyle

b. 1970

Untitled mixed media on canvas, in acrylic box 56 1/4 x 47 5/8 x 7 1/4 in. (143 x 121 x 18.5 cm.) Executed in 2007. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Almine Rech Gallery, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2007

Photo Matthias Kolb, Courtesy Atelier Anselm Reyle


464. Ross Bleckner

b. 1949

Birdland signed, signed with the artist’s initials, titled, numbered and dated “RB 3215 2002 Ross Bleckner 2002 Birdland” on the reverse oil on linen 96 x 96 in. (243.8 x 243.8 cm.) Painted in 2002-2003. Estimate $50,000-70,000

Provenance Lehmann Maupin, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in April 2003 Exhibited New York, Danese, Other As Animal, June 3 August 6, 2010


465. Wang Yigang

b. 1961

Abstract H3 signed, signed with the artist’s initials and dated “Wang Yigang [in Chinese] 2016 WYG” lower right oil on canvas 77 1/2 x 57 in. (196.9 x 144.8 cm.) Painted in 2016. Estimate $30,000-50,000 Provenance Martinelli Gallery, Lodi Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Absolute Art Modern & Contemporary, Wang Yigang: Through Color II Edition, Lugano, 2018, p. 140 (illustrated, p. 85)


466. Juan Uslé

b. 1954

Untitled signed, inscribed and dated “N.Y. Uslé 96” and stamped by the artist’s studio on the reverse vinyl and pigment on canvas on panel 22 x 16 in. (55.9 x 40.6 cm.) Executed in 1996. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Robert Miller Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner


467. OSGEMEOS

b. 1974

Cleidilsom e Asvania signed and dated “Gemeos 08” on the reverse acrylic, latex, lights, spray paint and sequins on wooden tabletop 43 x 61 x 5 in. (109.2 x 154.9 x 12.7 cm.) Executed in 2008. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Deitch Projects, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Deitch Projects, Os Gêmeos: Too Far Too Close, June 28 - August 9, 2008 Literature Os Gêmeos, exh. cat., The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, 2012, pp. 60, 69 (installation view from Deitch Projects illustrated)


468. Enoc Pérez

b. 1967

Don Q signed, titled and dated “Enoc Pérez Don Q February 2008” on the reverse oil on canvas 82 x 74 in. (208.3 x 188 cm.) Painted in February 2008. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2008


469. Josh Smith

b. 1976

Black signed, inscribed and dated “JOSH SMITH 2013 JSP13057� on the reverse oil on panel 60 x 48 in. (152.4 x 121.9 cm.) Painted in 2013. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Luhring Augustine, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner


470. Dan Colen

b. 1979

I Knew Nothing dirt on canvas 50 x 50 in. (127 x 127 cm.) Executed in 2013. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Massimo De Carlo, Milan Acquired from the above by the present owner

Exhibited Galleria d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea di Bergamo, Confronti - Enrico Castellani, Dan Colen, Dadamaino, Piotr Uklański, May 18 July 21, 2013


471. George Cohen

b. 1953

Two Circles and Three Squares signed, titled, inscribed and dated twice “George Cohen Two Circles and three Squares George Cohen Cologne 2018� on the reverse acrylic on canvas 94 1/2 x 94 1/2 in. (240 x 240 cm.) Painted in 2018. Estimate $30,000-50,000

Provenance Private Collection, Europe


472. Michael Riedel

b. 1972

26 silkscreen on linen 90 1/2 x 67 in. (229.9 x 170.2 cm.) Executed in 2011. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance David Zwirner, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner in 2011


473. Rita Ackermann

b. 1968

Fire by Days X signed, titled and dated “F-B-D X 2011 Rita Ackermann� on the lef turnover edge oil, pigment, wax, modeling paste, enamel, rabbit skin glue and spray paint on canvas 64 x 41 in. (162.6 x 104.1 cm.) Executed in 2011. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance CANADA, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner


474. Nigel Cooke

b. 1973

Gifs of the Garden signed, titled and dated “NIGEL COOKE GIFTS OF THE GARDEN 2004-2005 N. Cooke” on the overlap oil on canvas 72 x 107 7/8 in. (182.9 x 274 cm.) Painted in 2004-2005. Estimate $30,000-40,000

Provenance Stuart Shave/Modern Art, London Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Mexico City, Museo del Palacio de Bellas Artes, Panorámica. Paisajes 2013-1969, April 25 - July 7, 2013


475. Adam McEwen

b. 1965

Untitled signed and dated “A. McEwen 2013” on the reverse inkjet print on cellulose sponge 38 1/2 x 28 5/8 in. (97.8 x 72.7 cm.) Executed in 2013. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance The Artist Christie’s, New York, May 14, 2014, lot 338 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner


476. Richard Prince

b. 1949

Northeast signed, titled and dated “Richard Prince “NORTHEAST 2006” on the reverse inkjet and acrylic on canvas 22 x 27 in. (55.9 x 68.6 cm.) Executed in 2006. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Gladstone Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner


477. Invader

b. 1969

Rubik Mr. Pink and Mr. White signed, signed with the artist’s monogram, titled and dated ““RUBIK MR. WHITE & MR. PINK” INVADER 007” on the reverse Rubik cubes on wood panel 28 3/8 x 43 3/4 in. (72.1 x 111.1 cm.) Executed in 2007. Estimate $30,000-40,000

Provenance Lazarides Gallery, London Private Collection, United Kingdom Private Collection, United Kingdom Artnet Auctions, June 21, 2012, lot 68132 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner Exhibited London, Lazarides Gallery, Invader: Invasion London/ Bad Men Part II, October 5 - November, 2007, p. 15 (illustrated)


478. Piotr Uklański

b. 1968

Untitled (Bloody Mary) signed with the artist’s initials, titled and dated “‘UNTITLED (BLOODY MARY)’ 2012 P.U.” on the stretcher ink and gesso on canvas 58 x 75 in. (147.3 x 190.5 cm.) Executed in 2012. Estimate $60,000-80,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner Exhibited Dallas Contemporary, Piotr Uklański: Paintings, September 21 - December 21, 2014, p. 57 (illustrated)


479. Nate Lowman

b. 1979

Orders From Corporate (Randall’s Island?) alkyd on linen, in 2 parts 40 x 60 in. (101.6 x 152.4 cm.) Painted in 2014. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Maccarone, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner


(i)

(ii)

(iii)

480. Nate Lowman

(iv)

b. 1979

(i) Krystle; (ii) Alexis; (iii) Fallon; (iv) Blake; (v) Steven chromogenic print mounted to Sintra, in artist’s frames, in 5 parts (i-ii) 47 3/4 x 70 3/4 in. (121.3 x 179.7 cm.) (iii-v) 70 1/4 x 47 3/4 in. (178.4 x 121.3 cm.) Executed in 2005, this work is number 1 from an edition of 3. Estimate $30,000-40,000

Exhibited New York, The Museum of Modern Art P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center, Greater New York, March 13 - September 26, 2005, p. 374 (Krystle, Alexis, Fallon and Steven illustrated, pp. 228-229) Literature Nate Lowman: The Natriot Act, exh. cat., Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art, Oslo, 2009, pp. 4-5, 13 (another example of Alexis, Krystle, and Steven illustrated)

Provenance Maccarone, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner (v)


481. Fredrik Værslev

b. 1979

Untitled signed, titled and dated “Untitled (Brest 3) Fredrik Værslev, 2014” on the overlap primer, spray paint, silkscreen, acrylic and white spirit on cotton canvas, steel construction 82 1/4 x 57 1/4 in. (208.9 x 145.4 cm.) Executed in 2014. Estimate $20,000-30,000

Provenance Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner


482. David Hominal

b. 1976

Untitled acrylic on canvas 86 5/8 x 70 7/8 in. (220 x 180 cm.) Painted in 2014. Estimate $10,000-15,000

Provenance kamel mennour, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited Paris, kamel mennour, David Hominal: 1/2 haehnchen, pommes/ reis oder salat, February 5 March 8, 2014


483. Peter Schuyf

b. 1958

Untitled signed and dated “Schuyf 84” on the reverse acrylic on canvas 90 x 66 1/8 in. (228.6 x 167.8 cm.) Painted in 1984. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Pat Hearn Gallery, New York Christie’s, New York, May 8, 1990, lot 498 Acquired at the above sale by the present owner Literature Peter Schuyf: Has Been, exh. cat., Fri Art, Kunsthalle, Fribourg, 2017, p. 72 (illustrated, p. 16 and on the back cover)


484. Kenny Scharf

b. 1958

Mandaleigh signed, titled and dated “Kenny Scharf ‘98 Mandaleigh” on the reverse oil on canvas, in artist’s frame 27 1/2 x 21 1/2 in. (69.9 x 54.6 cm.) Executed in 1998. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner


Property from an Important European Collection

485. Michael Bevilacqua

b. 1966

Surface to Air titled ““Surface to Air”” on the stretcher of the middle panel; further signed, titled and dated “Michael Bevilacqua 2004 Surface to Air”” on the reverse of the right panel acrylic on canvas, triptych each 72 x 96 in. (182.9 x 243.8 cm.) overall 72 x 288 in. (182.9 x 731.5 cm.) Painted in 2004. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Deitch Projects, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Deitch Projects, Michael Bevilacqua: Surface to Air, April 5 - 30, 2005


486. KAWS

b. 1974

SEEING signed and dated “KAWS..18” and stamped with the artist’s name, title, number and date “SEEING 092/250 ©KAWS..18” on the underside of the lef foot alloy, ceramic, LED light and mixed media fgure 14 5/8 x 6 7/8 x 7 3/8 in. (37 x 17.4 x 18.6 cm.) pedestal 7 x 4 x 7 7/8 in. (17.8 x 10.2 x 20.3 cm.) Executed in 2018, this work is number 92 from an edition of 250, and is accompanied by an ID card issued by AllRightsReserved, Hong Kong. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance AllRightsReserved, Hong Kong Private Collection, New York


487. KAWS

b. 1974

PERMANENT THIRTY-THREE painted bronze 11 x 6 1/4 x 9 1/2 in. (27.9 x 15.9 x 24.1 cm.) Executed in 2008, this work is from a series of 33 unique color variants. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Gering & Lรณpez Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited New York, Gering & Lรณpez Gallery, KAWS, November 6 December 23, 2008 Literature WHERE THE END STARTS, exh. cat., Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Forth Worth, 2016, no. 12, pp. 45, 74, 194 (installation view from Gering & Lรณpez Gallery illustrated, p. 44)


488. Jef Koons

b. 1955

Three works: (i) Balloon Swan (Yellow); (ii) Balloon Rabbit (Red); (iii) Balloon Monkey (Blue) (i) impressed with the artist’s signature, title, number and date “Jef Koons 402/999 ‘17 JEFF KOONS BALLOON SWAN (YELLOW)” on the underside (ii) impressed with the artist’s signature, title, number and date “Jef Koons 096/999 ‘17 JEFF KOONS BALLOON RABBIT (RED)” on the underside (iii) impressed with the artist’s signature, title, number and date “Jef Koons 386/999 ‘17 JEFF KOONS BALLOON MONKEY (BLUE)” on the underside mirror-polished stainless steel with transparent color coating (i) 9 1/2 x 6 1/2 x 8 1/4 in. (24.1 x 16.5 x 21 cm.) (ii) 11 1/2 x 5 3/8 x 8 1/4 in. (29.2 x 13.7 x 21 cm.) (iii) 9 3/4 x 8 1/4 x 15 3/8 in. (24.8 x 21 x 39.1 cm.) (i) Executed in 2017, this work is number 402 from an edition of 999 plus 50 artist’s proofs, published by Bernardaud, Limoges, France. (ii) Executed in 2017, this work is number 96 from an edition of 999 plus 50 artist’s proofs, published by Bernardaud, Limoges, France. (iii) Executed in 2017, this work is number 386 from an edition of 999 plus 50 artist’s proofs, published by Bernardaud, Limoges, France. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles Acquired from the above by the present owner


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Sale Information Auction & Viewing Location 450 Park Avenue New York 10022

20th Century & Contemporary Art Department

Auction License 2013224

Auction Wednesday, 15 May 2019, 2pm

Head of Sale Rebekah Bowling +1 212 940 1250 rbowling@phillips.com

Auctioneers Hugues Joffre - 2028495 Sarah Krueger - 1460468 Henry Highley - 2008889 Adam Clay - 2039323 Jonathan Crockett - 2056239 Samuel Mansour - 2059023 Rebecca Tooby-Desmond - 2058901 Susan Abeles - 2074459 Aurel Bacs – 2047217 Blake Koh – 2066237 Susannah Brockman – 2058779 Rebekah Bowling - 2078967

Viewing 3 – 15 May Monday – Saturday 10am–6pm Sunday 12pm–6pm Sale Designation When sending in written bids or making enquiries please refer to this sale as NY010519 or 20th Century & Contemporary Art Day Sale, Afernoon Session. Absentee and Telephone Bids tel +1 212 940 1228 fax +1 212 924 1749 bidsnewyork@phillips.com

Cataloguer Carolyn Mayer +1 212 940 1206 cmayer@phillips.com Administrator Julia Hirschberg +1 212 940 1264 jhirschberg@phillips.com Property Manager Ryan Russo +1 347 703 4344 rrusso@phillips.com Photography Jean Bourbon Kent Pell Mark Babushkin

Catalogues catalogues@phillips.com New York +1 212 940 1240 London +44 20 7318 4024 Hong Kong +852 2318 2000 $35/€25/£22 at the gallery Client Accounting Sylvia Leitao +1 212 940 1231 Michael Carretta +1 212 940 1232 Buyer Accounts Dawniel Perry +1 212 940 1317 Seller Accounts Carolina Swan +1 212 940 1253 Client Services 450 Park Avenue +1 212 940 1200 Shipping Anaar Desai +1 212 940 1320 Daren Khan +1 212 940 1335

Front cover Harold Ancart, Untitled, 2015, lot 317 © Harold Ancart Inside front cover KAWS, UNTITLED, 2016, lot 341 (detail) © KAWS Frontispieces Calvin Marcus, Automatic Drawing #1, 2014, lot 315 (detail) © Calvin Marcus Jim Lambie, Jumping Jack, 2014, lot 364 (detail) © 2019 Jim Lambie/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/DACS, London Tomoo Gokita, Our Anniversary, 2015, lot 336 (detail) © 2019 Tomoo Gokita Peter Halley, 303, 1991, lot 353 (detail) © Peter Halley Kehinde Wiley, Defend and Develop the Island Together, 2006, lot 343 (detail) © Kehinde Wiley Barbara Kruger, Tears, 2012, lot 355 (detail), Courtesy Barbara Kruger, Courtesy Sprüth Magers

David Wojnarowicz, Untitled, 1983, lot 347 (detail) © Courtesy of the Estate of David Wojnarowicz and P•P•O•W, New York Jonas Wood, Lew Alcindor (detail), 2010, lot 342 © Jonas Wood Stanley Whitney, SunRa, 2016, lot 319 (detail) © Stanley Whitney Joe Bradley, Untitled Freek, 2010, lot 348 (detail) © Joe Bradley George Condo, Gold Nude, 1989, lot 368 (detail) © 2019 George Condo/ Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Cecily Brown, Untitled #54, 2007, lot 327 (detail) © CECILY BROWN Inside back cover Rashid Johnson, Color Men, 2016, lot 323 (detail) © Rashid Johnson Back cover David Hammons, Untitled, 2008, lot 346 © David Hammons


Art. Design. Hong Kong. 20th Century & Contemporary Art & Design Evening & Day Sales Hong Kong, 26 May 2019 JW Marriott Hong Kong Zhang Xiaogang Bloodline: Big Family No. 11 oil on canvas 148.7 x 189.9 cm ( 58 1/2 x 74 3/4 in.) Executed in 1998. Estimate on request To be ofered in our Evening Sale

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Enquiries Isaure de Viel Castel isauredevielcastel@phillips.com


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Design Auction 6 June 2019 New York

Public viewing 2 - 6 June at 450 Park Avenue, New York. Enquiries designnewyork@phillips.com

Isamu Noguchi Rare chess table, model no. IN-61 circa 1944

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Index Ackerman, R. 473

Gagliardi, L. 384

Madani, T. 312

Sachs, T. 452

Ai Weiwei 371

Gates, T. 345

Marclay, C. 394

Salle, D. 352

Al-Hadid, D. 309

Genovés, J. 445

Marcus, C. 315

Scharf, K. 484

Alÿs, F. 359

Gokita, T. 336

McCarthy, P. 427

Schnabel, J. 349, 369

Ancart, H. 317, 399

Grotjahn, M. 385

McEwen, A. 475

Schutz, D. 331

Guyton, W. 376

McMillian, R. 405

Schuyf, P. 483

Mosset, O. 461

Simpson, L. 432

Bacher, L. 424 Bailey, W. 456

Hadzi, D. 450

Muniz, V. 428-430

Smith, J. 469

Baselitz, G. 401

Halley, P. 353, 354

Muñoz, O. 398, 431

Sonhouse, J. 409

Bass, M. 379

Hambleton, R. 351

Murakami, T. 372

Soth, A. 437

Becher, B. and H. 415

Hammons, D. 346, 402

Murillo, O. 442, 443

Steinbach, H. 444

Bell, L. 314

Heilmann, M. 457

Bernhardt, K. 311, 335

Hernández, S. 324

Nara, Y. 388

Struth, T. 416

Bevilacqua, M. 485

Hirst, D. 370

Navarro, I. 440

Sugimoto, H. 433

Binion, M. 344

Hodges, J. 365

Neel, E. 382

Sullivan, R. 459

Bleckner, R. 464

Holzer, J. 362

Bradford, M. 322, 403

Hominal, D. 482

Orozco, G. 395

Thompson, C. 325

Bradley, J. 307, 348

Horn, R. 425

OSGEMEOS 467

Thurman, B. 454

Brown, C. 310, 327

Hughes, S. 302

Otero, A. 313

Tillmans, W. 413, 414, 435

Humphries, J. 326

Otterness, T. 448, 449

Tuttle, R. 400

Invader 477

Party, N. 387

Uklański, P. 478

Pendleton, A. 321

Ursuta, A. 380

Pérez, E. 468

Uslé, J. 466

Peterson, L. 406, 407

Værslev, F. 481

Steinkamp, J. 438

Charlesworth, S. 363 Cohen, G. 471 Colen, D. 373, 470 Collier, A. 419, 420

Johnson, R. 320, 323

Condo, G. 350, 367, 368 Cooke, N. 474

KAWS 338-341, 486, 487

Peyton, E. 328, 389, 390

Cordero, R. 332

Kelley, M. 426

Plensa, J. 446

Cortright, P. 383

Keogh, C. 306

Price, W. 305

Crowner, S. 301

Koons, J. 488

Prince, R. 357, 476

Walker, K. 378

Curtiss, J. 316

Kruger, B. 355

Pruitt, R. 408

Wang Yigang 465

Kuitca, G. 397

Viola, B. 412

Weatherford, M. 458

Kusaka, S. 304

Quarles, C. 318

Demand, T. 434

Lambie, J. 364

Rafman, J. 337

Whitney, S. 319

Dreher, P. 455

Larsen, M. 329

Rayne, B. 375

Wiley, K. 343

Leonard, Z. 423

Reyle, A. 463

Williams, C. 421, 422

Ekblad, I. 381

Levine, S. 358, 360

Riedel, M. 472

Williams, M. 334

Eliasson, O. 439

Ligon, G. 356

Ruby, S. 374

Williams, S. 366

Elrod, J. 377

Liu Jianhua 451

Ruf, T. 417, 418

Wilson, F. 410

Ethridge, R. 308

Longo, R. 392

Wojnarowicz, D. 347

Los Carpinteros 396

Wood, J. 303, 342, 386

Lowman, N. 479, 480

Wool, C. 393

Davis, N. 404

Fischl, E. 391 Flood, M. 460

Weiser, G. 333 Welling, J. 436

Deacon, R. 447

Wylie, R. 330

Fowler, A. 441 Friedman, T. 453

Youngblood, B. 411

Fritsch, K. 361 Zobernig, H. 462


342. Jonas Wood


319. Stanley Whitney


348. Joe Bradley


368. George Condo


327. Cecily Brown


323. Rashid Johnson


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20TH CENTURY & CONTEMPORARY ART DAY SALE AFTERNOON SESSION [Catalogue]  

Phillips presents the 20th Century & Contemporary Art Day Sale Afternoon Session on 15 May 2019 in New York.

20TH CENTURY & CONTEMPORARY ART DAY SALE AFTERNOON SESSION [Catalogue]  

Phillips presents the 20th Century & Contemporary Art Day Sale Afternoon Session on 15 May 2019 in New York.