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WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM | 05.22/05.29.2013

FOR MORE EXCITING ELECTION NEWS AND ANALYSIS, CHECK WWW.PGHCITYPAPER.COM!


EVENTS 6.6 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: THE UNCLUDED (KIMYA DAWSON & AESOP ROCK) Tickets $15/$12 Members FREE parking in The Warhol lot

6.14 – 10am-5pm SPECIAL HOURS The Warhol will close at 5pm due to a private event.

7.13 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: BELLE & SEBASTIAN WITH SPECIAL GUESTS YO LA TENGO Stage AE Co-presented with PromoWest North Shore & Opus One Productions Tickets: $35

7.19 – 7pm OUT OF THE BOX: TIME CAPSULE OPENING WITH TIME CAPSULES CATALOGUERS Free with Museum admission/ Members Free

8.16 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: PSYCHIC TV / PTV3 New Hazlett Theater Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

Three provocative exhibitions under one roof. Summer is different here.

GENESIS BREYER P-ORRIDGE/CALDWELL LINKER/NICK BUBASH /june 15 - sept 15.2013/

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The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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Glass in the Gardens. SUMMER FLOWER SHOW THROUGH OCTOBER 6 Come discover a sparkling, imaginative world where lush foliage and colorful blooms mingle with the dazzling creations of local glass artists. A perfect combination of artistry, whimsy and beauty, it’s all part of Summer Flower Show: Glass in the Gardens at Phipps. For details, visit phipps.conservatory.org.

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{EDITORIAL}

05.22/05.29.2013 {COVER PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

VOLUME 23 + ISSUE 21

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers AMYJO BROWN, LAUREN DALEY Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns TRACEY HICKEY, OLIVIA LAMMEL, JOHN LAVANGA

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers MICHAEL ARTMAN, SHEILA LETSON, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

to other cuts over the past 06 “Added few years, we see a significant impact

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives TOM FAULS, PAUL KLATZKIN, SANDI MARTIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives MATT HAHN, JESSE HERRLE, CHRIS JURAN, SCOTT KLATZKIN, MELISSA LENIGAN, JUSTIN MATASE, JEANNE MUMFORD, EMILY POZZUTO, MICHAEL RANALLO Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES Classified Advertising Representative TERRANCE P. MARTIN Radio Sales Manager CHRIS KOHAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

at a time when there is an increasing need.” — Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank CEO Lisa Scales on the effect of the federal sequester

[NEWS] “Am I a little outside-of-the-box? Sure, but I think you have to go outside of the box sometimes to find solutions.” — Mayoral candidate AJ Richardson on his campaign and facial tattoos

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Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY GUARD Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Marketing and Promotions Interns JODI SHERER, SHELBEY SURGENT Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

[SCREEN] a literal dialogue between 33 “It’s representatives of the United States and Pakistan.” — Al Hoff, reviewing The Reluctant Fundamentalist

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA

[ARTS] Gruber’s attitude is closer to 36 “DeRoy the ethos of crowd-pleasing op art than to the oft off-putting severity of minimalism.” — Robert Raczka on an exhibit of work by the late Pittsburgh art icon Aaronel deRoy Gruber

[LAST PAGE] whole brunch is set up like a 55 “LeMont’s firehall wedding of the rich and famous.” — Roxanne Tuinstra on the eternal delights of LeMont’s Mother’s Day brunch

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 40 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 47 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 49 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 54 N E W S

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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INCOMING

“I THINK IT’S A DISGRACE THAT CONGRESS EVER CREATED THIS SEQUESTRATION PROCESS.”

Letter to the Editor Thanks for bringing the Pens parking lot back into the light again. The pitches and plans laid before the Hill and the media I see are the same five years on. The rest — the street grid one way or another, the historical responsibility to the Hill, the “design,” the green spaces, [the Penguins] swearing they’d never have to take federal money — it’s all just cant. Ask them — they’ll answer honestly, which you kind of have to admire — “Is any of this ‘plan,’ any of your promise toward the Hill, set in stone?” And the Pens will tell you, “It’s all up to the developer.” [A developer] who does not exist. Twenty-eight acres in the middle of a major American city left to “the market.” Any great development is built around a core need, then defined and redefined by process. The Pens’ process, and that of City Hall, was, “It’s ours.” Their core need was parking. As AmyJo Brown’s final word made clear, they got it. — David Conrad Braddock

“Wit[h] his size and speed Plaxico should have been Randy Moss-Ian. Nice player. Not great. Good career except for the little prison issue.”

‘DEATH BY A THOUSAND CUTS’ Budget cuts from federal sequester taking toll on local social programs {BY DAN SLEVA}

{PHOTOS BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

— May 19 tweet from “John Steigerwald” (@steigerworld)

“Tom Corbett is a great governor — shit no one says.” — May 19 tweet from “Brad Horn” (@slimbradley95)

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Lisa Scales, CEO of the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank, says the federal sequester has caused cuts to agency programs.

I

N TOUGH economic times, organi-

zations like the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank usually see an increase in the number of people who need their services. But thanks to budget cuts brought on by the federal government’s sequester, money to fund those services is getting harder to come by. “The changes that we see due to the sequester may appear to be minor, but they are what one staff member called ‘death by a thousand cuts,’” says Lisa

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.22/05.29.2013

Scales, CEO of the food bank. “Small ones here, loss of administrative money there, but it all adds up. “Added to other cuts over the past few years, we see a significant impact at a time when there is an increasing need.” The federal sequester is a set of automatic budget cuts that went into effect on March 1. Signed into law as part of the Budget Control Act of 2011, as part of the deal to raise the nation’s debt ceiling, the cuts were divided equally

among defense and domestic spending. Pundits at the time predicted the cuts were too severe to ever be allowed to go into effect; it was a bill meant to force compromise. The compromise never came, and now safety-net programs face reduced funding. Overall, the sequester calls for a total of $1.2 trillion in budget cuts over nine years, with cuts for 2013 totaling $85 billion. Sequester cuts to domestic spending will affect unemployment benefits; the


‘DEATH BY A THOUSAND CUTS’, CONTINUED FROM PG. 07

smarter and better with less resources. In 2010, we were twice the size we are now.” Quinlan says that that reduction in size, and in services offered, happened because grant money for programs like mental-health services ran out.

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AT THE GREATER Pittsburgh Community Food Bank, Scales says the sequester is cutting programs such as the Community Supplemental Food Program (CSFP), which provides monthly boxes of food to senior citizens. Scales says the food bank provides 6,600 seniors in an 11-county region with food through this program. There will be a cut of 414 participants in the program statewide. “That may appear to be a small number, but then my question is, what happens to the people who do lose their monthly box of food? Will they need to apply for SNAP [commonly referred to as food stamps]? Or will they be forced to go without food and then because of poor nutrition be hospitalized?” Scales asks. “We will still end up paying for it, but on the other end.” Although the full effect of the sequester on her organization will not be clear for a few months, Scales says the hits seem to be coming on a steady basis. For example, the food bank receives federally funded volunteers through the AmeriCorps program. The

individuals work at the food bank for 11 months, but Scales recently received word that they will be receiving fewer than usual. “The volunteers were going to be placed in each one of the counties in our coverage areas. Now, each will most likely have to cover a county-and-a-half,” Scales says. “This could lead them to be less effective as they try to cover more territory with less staff.” Despite the reduction in funding, the food bank’s usage by the public has increased by 57 percent during the economic downturn of the past few years. These new cuts come at a time when eligibility for unemployment benefits, medical assistance and SNAP benefits has risen. Cuts to those programs will lead to more people seeking food at food pantries. Scales says the driving forces of hunger are unemployment and poverty. Both, she says, have risen. In the 11county region that the Greater Pittsburgh Food Bank covers, 3,200 new households each month are seeking help from food pantries. And while it’s common when discussing budget cuts to think about numbers, Scales says it’s important for legislators to keep one thing in mind as the sequester drags on. “Each one of those numbers represents a person, a senior citizen or a person who is hungry,” Scales says. “These people are in need.” I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FIRST AID County offers program to help residents identify signs of mental illness {BY LAUREN DALEY} WHEN IT COMES to discussing the stigma

around mental illness, Mike Gruber easily rattles off a list of myths that the public often holds: People who have mental illness or substance-abuse disorders are dangerous, lazy, weak or even immoral. “All of those myths can cause shame and embarrassment,” says Gruber, systemtransformation coordinator in the Office of Behavioral Health at Allegheny County’s Department of Human Services. “As a result, they don’t seek help.” That’s something Gruber and a collaborative of the Office of Behavioral Health and Allegheny Health Choices Inc. are trying to change by offering free Mental Health First Aid Training. “People really believe in it and are enthusiastic,” he says. “They see the value of working with people who have the illness and see the stigma and the devastation it causes.” The training is open to community groups, schools, colleges, faith organizations and other interested groups. It’s conducted by a number of providers certified in Mental Health First Aid. On May 7 and 8, for example, Gruber and Cecilia Reinheimer, Office of Behavioral Health acute consumersupport planning coordinator, brought the training to the Pittsburgh Technical Institute, in Oakdale. The two-day interactive session taught the class, consisting of future licensed practical nurses, how to identify, understand and respond to mental-health issues and substance-use disorders.

COMCAST 21, VERIZON 47

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT MENTAL HEALTH FIRST AID please visit www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org or contact Mike Gruber at Michael.Gruber@ AlleghenyCounty.US or 412-350-4271.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.22/05.29.2013

Student Amy Roche learned about the training during a previous class and wanted to bring the opportunity to campus. So she contacted the county. “I’m always concerned about our children and events in life that they have to deal with and how it affects everyone,” says Roche, of the North Hills. And it’s a prevalent issue: According to the National Institutes of Mental Health, one in four adults suffers from a diagnosable mental disorder in a given year. “These are friends, family, people we sit next to in church on Sunday,” Gruber says. But only a little more than half of adults with a serious mental illness receive treat-

{PHOTO BY LAUREN DALEY}

Mike Gruber teaches Mental Health First Aid.

ment for it, according to NIMH. “People lack knowledge on mentalhealth problems in the county,” Reinheimer says. “Professional help isn’t always available if someone is having a crisis, but a person may be able to help if they know how to respond.” That’s where the training comes in. Upon completion, students receive a certificate for Mental Health First Aid. While it doesn’t offer any clinical certification, it’s specially designed for people who aren’t mental-health professionals to help friends, neighbors, coworkers and clients. The interactive course covers topics such as recognizing signs, symptoms, causes and interventions for depression, anxiety, nonsuicidal self-injury, substance use and eating disorders. At the heart of the training are skills summed up by the acronym ALGEE: Assessing for risk of suicide or harm; Listening nonjudgmentally; Giving reassurance and information; Encouraging appropriate professional help; and Encouraging self-help. The hands-on element, Gruber and Reinheimer note, makes their approach more effective at reducing stigma than would a public-awareness campaign. One role-playing scenario from the course shows how to approach a neighbor who’s experiencing an emotional crisis and suggesting an action plan for help. During the May 8 training at PTI, for example, students learned the behavioral signs of eating disorders. They were presented with scenarios involving patients, and developed a plan of care to help educate the patient while suggesting resources for treatment, like counseling and self-help books. “Not every hospital or [health-care] setting has a psych unit, so it’s important to have knowledge on what to do and how to get resources for patients,” says Andrea Nicholson, a PTI instructor whose class participated in the training. “We need to know, recognize and differentiate the symptoms, the same way you would a heart attack.” L D A L E Y @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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{BY CHARLIE DEITCH} HISTORIANS MAY eventually say that City

Paper erred in calling the 2013 Democratic mayoral primary for AJ Richardson before the election actually took place But in case we’re wrong, and one of those other guys manages to pull out the win, we wanted to check in with Richardson, of Sheraden, to find out what his experience was like running for the city’s top job, and whether he had further political plans. ARE YOU GLAD YOU RAN FOR MAYOR? WHAT WAS THE EXPERIENCE OF YOUR FIRST CAMPAIGN LIKE? It’s been an awesome journey for me. There were obviously one or two minor hits. But I’ve grown from it and learned to keep moving forward. I think there are seasoned politicians who would have dropped out after taking some of the hits I took in this campaign.

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

Theresa [Kail-Smith] for city council in YOU GOT A DUI DURING THIS the fall, either as an independent or a CAMPAIGN. DO YOU THINK YOU GOT write-in. District 2 is my home. Living in AN UNFAIR SHAKE OVER IT AND IF this area for several years now, you deSO, WHY? velop an understanding of what people I think if I was a typical candidate with want and need. There are very different a traditional look, it wouldn’t have got- communities in District 2 with varying ten the play that it did. If people needs, but they all have the comwould close their eyes and lismon goal of a better quality ten to me, they would see of life. They need a coun. w that what I’m saying makes w cilperson who will strive w k Chec er a lot of sense. A campaign p and work for the entire a p y it c pgh is not about how a person district, and that’s not .com for s lt looks: It’s about issues, u what Theresa Smith has s e r election and these issues affect evis done. … She’s had two s ly a n a and eryone regardless of who terms to make a difference, you are. Do I look different and it’s time for her time on than the other candidates? Am council to end. I a little outside-of-the-box? Sure, but I think you have to go outside of the WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO box sometimes to find solutions. SOMEONE CONSIDERING A RUN FOR PUBLIC OFFICE? DO YOU THINK IF JACK WAGNER WERE Make sure that you’re familiar with THE SAME PERSON BUT WITH FACE prayer, because your faith is definitely TATTOOS, HE’D HAVE HAD AS MUCH going to be tested in this process. On the SUCCESS IN PUBLIC OFFICE? political side, make sure you have at least If Jack Wagner had face tattoos, he’d some money available for your camfinally get my vote. Though I’d probably paign. Flyers and lawn signs aren’t that be the only one. expensive, but when you’re paying for it out of your own pocket and trying to pay IF YOU DON’T WIN THE MAYOR’S RACE, your own personal bills, it’s difficult. You WHAT ARE YOUR POLITICAL PLANS? can have the biggest heart and the best WILL YOU RUN FOR OFFICE AGAIN? intentions, but you still need that money If I don’t win, I plan on challenging to help get that message across. C D E I T C H @ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.22/05.29.2013


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S E N D YO U R W E IRD N E W S TO WE IR DNE WS @ E ART HL I N K . N E T O R WWW. NE WS O F T HE WE I R D. C OM

NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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The beauty pageant each April at the Rattlesnake Roundup in Sweetwater, Texas, requires traditional skills like interview poise, evening-gown fashion and talent, but also some ability and inclination to milk and skin rattlers. High school senior Kyndra Vaught won this year’s Miss Snake Charmer, wearing jeweled boots one night for her country-western ballad, then Kevlar boots and camouflage chaps the next as she took on dozens of rattlers in the wooden snake pit. Vaught expertly held up one serpent, offered its tail-end rattles for a baby to touch, then helped hold, measure, milk and skin a buzzing, slithery serpent. A Los Angeles Times dispatch noted that Vaught hoped to be on her way soon to the Berklee College of Music in Boston.

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That there are flea “circuses” is bizarre enough, but in March a cold spell in Germany wiped out an entire troupe of “performing” fleas, requiring the flea whisperer to secure replacements (because, of course, the show must go on). Trainer Robert Birk reached out to a university near MechernichKommern for 50 substitutes, which he apparently worked into the act over one weekend. (Fleas, with or without training, can pull up to 160,000 times their own weight and leap to 100 times their own height.)

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The owner of a restaurant in southern Sweden told authorities in March that the former owner had assured him that “everything had been approved,”

apparently including the appliance the restaurant used for mixing salad dressings and sauces — which was a table-model cement mixer. When health officials told the owner that it certainly was not “approved,” he immediately bought another, “rust-free,” mixer. (Health authorities had come to the restaurant on a complaint that a screw had turned up in a customer’s kabob.)

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Chad Pregracke, 38, a Mississippi River legend, spends nine months a year hauling heavy-duty litter out of waterways with his crew of 12. He told CNN in March that he has yanked up 218 washing machines, 19 tractors, four pianos and nearly 1,000 refrigerators — totaling more than 3,500 tons of trash — and has collected the world’s largest array of bottles with messages inside (63).

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Eliel Santos fishes the grates of New York City seven days a week, reeling in enough bounty to sustain him for the last eight years, he told the New York Post in April. The “fishing line” Santos, 38, uses is dental floss, with electrician’s tape and BlueTouch mouse glue — equipment that “he controls with the precision of an archer,” the Post reported. His biggest catch ever was a $1,800 (pawned value) gold and diamond bracelet, but the most popular current items are iPhones, which texting-on-the-move pedestrians apparently have trouble hanging onto.

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Tyshekka Collier, 36, was arrested in Spartanburg, S.C., in March after she had rushed to her son’s elementary school after a call

that he was suspended. As she burst into the office, angry at her son for getting into trouble, she saw a pouting boy with his head down and slapped him, thinking he was hers. He wasn’t. (After apologizing, she then managed to locate her son and promptly slapped him around).

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When Evan Ebel was killed in a roadside shootout in March, it was clear that he was the man who had days earlier gunned down the head of the Colorado prison system (and his wife) at the front door of their home and then fled (and killed another man while on the lam). Ebel should not even have been free at the time, having been accidentally released from prison in January only because a judge’s assistant had mistakenly marked Ebel’s multiple prison terms to be served “concurrently” instead of one following the other (“consecutively”). (The supervising judge “extend[ed] condolences” to the families of Ebel’s victims.)

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The Discovery Channel announced a new survival show to debut this summer, Naked and Afraid, dropping off a man and a woman (strangers), without tools or clothes, to fend for themselves on an isolated Maldives island. Among the previews: Ms. Kellie Nightlinger, 38, a self-described “ultimate survivalist,” finally thought after two weeks of nearly starving that she could attract fish close enough to be snatched up (as a New York Daily News reporter put it) “us[ing] her ladyparts as bait to catch fish between her legs.” Said a Discovery Channel executive: “Survival shows are so common now that it’s gotten more and

more difficult to convince the audience that what they’re watching is something extreme.”

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The New Delhi, India, neighborhood of Lutyens’ Delhi houses some of the richest people in the country in comparatively modest mansions, with the city’s real-estate bubble inflating prices into nine figures, though home sales are rare, according to a March New York Times dispatch. In the similarly wealthy city of Hong Kong, in the “gritty, working-class West Kowloon neighborhood” where the laborers serving the rich live, about 100,000 dwell in pitiable housing, including the increasing number who rent what are basically stacks of wire sleep cages, measuring about 16 square feet each (and offering no protection against bedbugs). An Associated Press reporter found one tenant paying the equivalent of about $167 a month for his mesh digs.

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A 5-year-old boy in rural Cumberland County, Ky., accidentally shot and killed his 2-year-old sister in April, firing his own .22-caliber rifle. The weapon (a “Crickett”) is marketed as “My First Rifle” by the Keystone Sporting Arms company.

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Henry Gribbohm, 30, admitted in April that he had blown his $2,600 life savings trying to win an Xbox at a rigged ball-toss game at a Manchester, N.H., carnival, lamenting to WBZ-TV, “For once in my life, I happened to become that sucker.” (Gribbohm complained to the operator, but was given only a large stuffed banana as consolation. However, when news broke, an Internet website took up a collection and purchased the banana from him for $2,600.)

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.22/05.29.2013

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THE MENU CAPTURES THE ELEGANTLY CASUAL, OLD WORLD VIBE

TEA TIME {BY ANDY MULKERIN} Tea wasn’t Gryphon Saldin’s first passion — after high school, he wanted to go into video-game design. But little by little, the Ingram resident began to realize that perhaps his interest in tea was a more feasible way to make a living. “I was watching the game industry change,” he explains. “It got to where it chews people up and spits them out. Between the prospects not being great, and the debt I’d rack up going to one of the schools I’d want to go to, it didn’t seem worth it.” What did seem worth it was taking the helm of the herbs-and-teas company his mother, Zoe, had been running in the West End. What was Zoe’s Herbs and Teas morphed into Gryphon’s Tea. After being a vendor at Pittsburgh Public Market for about a year, Gryphon’s moved into Lawrenceville full time this month. Gryphon’s storefront on Butler Street is furnished with rustic wood furniture, nearly all reclaimed, and offers teas hot or iced. Behind the counter is a wall of teapots, culinary herbs and loose teas. Many of the teas are blended by Saldin, who’s been traveling and taking correspondence classes to become certified by the Tea Association of the U.S.A. Soon he hopes to offer tasting sessions. The real value of Gryphon’s lies in the personal touch, given that Saldin himself orders or blends all of the teas. “We have a little more flexibility than a chain,” he says. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Open daily, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. 4127 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-877-4223

the

FEED

Pittsburgh’s long-running

Microbrewers Fest — 17 years! — happens Sat., June 1. Food, entertainment and suds galore from more than 25 craft breweries. Two sessions: 1-4 p.m. and 6-9 p.m., at Penn Brewery, 800 Vinial St., Troy Hill. Tickets are $45, and can be purchased in advance at www.pennbrew.com.

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SQUARE STAR {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

T

HE EXTENSIVE reconstruction of

Market Square was meant to create a European-style plaza, a curb-free zone where cars creep through, yielding to pedestrians who would converge there to commingle with their myriad agendas: coffee, meetings, lunch, errands, dinner, drinks. Improbably enough, the new square works pretty much as advertised, and has ushered in an astonishing profusion of new eateries, from fast food to fine dining. And what would a European plaza be without at least one European-style eatery? Not just cuisine, but that inimitable feel of contemporary sensibility in a place that has sheltered generations. Sienna Sulla Piazza captures that feel for us, thanks partly to its moody lighting and decor that relies on the old bones of its space and the character of its furnishings, rather than on fine finishes or eye-catching fixtures. Truthfully, the interior is largely unchanged from Sienna’s predecessor, an Italian restaurant that, in opening near the beginning of the Square’s reconstruction, was perhaps ahead of its time. But the menu by

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.22/05.29.2013

Roasted beet on herbed ricotta

chef Matthew Porco (formerly of the excellent Mio in Aspinwall) captures the elegantly casual, Old World vibe, leaning toward small plates and starters without conceding an inch to American pub-grub conventions. Perhaps nothing exemplified this better than the grilled octopus, a far cry from Pittsburgh’s ubiquitous fried calamari. Tender,

SIENNA SULLA PIAZZA 22 Market Square, Downtown. 412-681-6363 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Fri. 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; Sat. noon-11 p.m. PRICES: Lunch $7-19. Dinner: soups, salads and antipasti $7-12; entrees $15-22. LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED slightly smoky rings and chunks of tentacle were tossed with roasted red peppers and toasted garlic in a light yet flavorful sherry vinaigrette and served atop grilled crostini. The effect was refined, but not quite haute: Like the best restaurant in an ancient seaside village, it offered nothing flashy, just excellence by dint of well-chosen ingredi-

ents and expert preparation. Beans and greens extended this rustic feel, adding tomatoes and a sauce deepened and enriched by browned, housemade sausage. The cannellini beans were rich and creamy, the escarole satisfyingly crunchy but not raw, while tomatoes contributed fruity notes to the otherwise stew-like dish, keeping it light and fresh. Flatbread has become almost inevitable on contemporary Italian menus, but Sienna’s was far from perfunctory. An oblong disk of heartily crisp dough was substantial enough to hold toppings, but thin enough not to outweigh them. The classic combo of prosciutto and arugula was satisfying, but we were a bit surprised at the almost pizzalike proportions of tomato sauce and cheese beneath them, and the overall flavor was heavy on the salt. The entrees upped the sophistication factor, even with something as seemingly simple as spaghetti and meatballs. Actually, the pasta on the menu for this dish is bucatini, but spaghetti was substituted the night we were there. No matter: The house-


made noodles were top-notch, firmly al dente, resilient yet slightly chewy. The marinara sauce was chunky, brightly flavored with tomato and peppery with fresh basil, while a single, nearly baseball-sized veal meatball, stuffed with molten mozzarella, verged on the decadent. Agnolotti, a kind of folded ravioli, were filled with ricotta and spinach and topped with a diced salad of smoky, house-cured pancetta, leeks, asparagus, tomato and arugula. The medium for all these flavors was an appropriately simple butter and whitewine emulsion. The effect was like spring on a plate: mild, delicate, and colorful.

Chef Matthew Porco

Jason’s beautifully roasted redtail bass was served on a modern-tasting bed of savoy cabbage lightly braised with bacon and cream, accompanied by crispy potato, and finished with port-wine butter. The fish itself was simple and succulent, lightly crusted from the oven, so that the rich yet subtle flavors of its accompaniments took the lead. Though the port-wine butter was refined, the spirit of the dish — simple fish served alongside cabbage enriched with smoked pork and cream — seemed grounded in country cooking. By now our appetites were more than sated, but the temptations at Sienna Sulla Piazza don’t end there. Our confidence in the kitchen leads us to predict we’ll be enjoying future lunchtime sandwiches, such as grilled chicken with basil pesto aioli on focaccia, Sienna burger with tomato-basil jam, and even grilled cheese. There are more dinner entrees we’d like to try, as well — handmade gnocchi with braised lamb, red Swiss chard and pearl onions, for one; tagliatelle with rabbit, root vegetables, truffle and sweet peas, for another. With understated style, Sienna Sulla Piazza merges ancient Mediterranean cuisine with contemporary trends to create perhaps the best Italian restaurant in Pittsburgh. INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

SOCIAL HUB For local cyclists, all roads lead to the OTB Bike Café The first thing most people notice when walking along the 2500 block of East Carson Street is that 45 feet of premium car parking has been transformed into a bike corral. Convincing the city to give up automobile parking in an area where finding a spot is nearly impossible “was a really big achievement” says Mike Kotyk, owner of OTB Bike Café. It’s also just one of the bike-friendly community initiatives Kotyk has fostered in his bar, which goes well beyond the normal conviviality associated with a neighborhood watering hole. “I wanted to be a community hub [for Pittsburgh bikers] when we opened the place,” says Kotyk. Inside the bar, colorful murals of bikers brighten the ceiling. Bikes and their component parts hang from the rafters and walls. There are signed biking shirts, and the walls are peppered with pro-bike propaganda. The selection of craft beer at OTB is deep enough to satisfy anyone’s thirst after a long ride. Bike-centric breweries like Colorado’s Oskar Blues, and, of course, Pittsburgh’s East End Brewery, are featured. “It’s amazing to see the level of advocacy for biking in Pittsburgh in all fronts,” says patron and East End brewmaster Scott Smith. “To tie all that in with beer and do that in a responsible way — it’s not about drunken bike rides — that’s pretty cool.” Lou Fineberg, programming director of the bipedal advocacy organization Bike Pittsburgh, also praises OTB’s commitment to Pittsburgh cycling. “OTB’s been pretty amazing from day one,” he says. “They just recognized there was a big bike community emerging in Pittsburgh, and they’ve been supportive on so many different levels.” Take the Underwear Bike Ride, for example. Held in warm months, the monthly ride from Lawrenceville to OTB isn’t simply an excuse for cyclists to go pantless: It’s also a fundraiser. OTB donates nearly all its beer sales from the post-ride party to a worthy organization; the May 23 ride will support Planned Parenthood. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

2518 E. Carson St., South Side. 412381-3698 or www.otbbicyclecafe.com

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PATIO Now Open!

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all BOTTLES of WINE

So thern South rn Hospititalit Hosp lity. Who said you can’t find

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DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

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BANGKOK IN THE STRIP

Authentic Thai Cuisine

ALMA PAN-LATIN KITCHEN. 7600 Forbes Ave., Regent Square. 412-727-6320. This venue offers a vibrant spectrum of African-Latin American fusion cuisine, riffing on common elements (lime, legumes and chilies) while bringing out distinctive identities (the rich, stew-like meat dishes of Cuba against the simple, citrusy seafood of the Peruvian coast). Indulge your sweet tooth with a cake filled with dulce de leche. EK BISTRO 19. 711 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412-306-1919. Bistro 19 fits within the upper echelon of the region’s dining scene, while keeping its cozy neighborhood feel. It offers a broad range of surf and turf, pastas and poultry. Its inventive preparations, and the kitchen’s attention to detail, make even now-familiar items such as pot-stickers and flatbreads exciting. LE BRASSERIE 33. 5863 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-363-3090. The food is unpretentious but not dumbed down in this classic French brasserie. The appetizers offer a greatest-hits collection of French food, from escargot and charcuterie to rillettes of rabbit and Roquefort flan. Entrees, including New York Strip steak, pork chops, coq au vin and duck, are generously proportioned, with tasty vegetable and potato sides. KE

Teppanyaki Kyoto {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} THE CHELSEA GRILLE. 515 Allegheny Ave., Oakmont. 412-828-0570. The menu here covers mostly familiar ground, with red-sauce pasta, chops and an unusual predilection for Mornay sauce. But that’s not to say that dinner here is rote. From the fritto baguette to the rarebit-ish Chicken Wisconsin, the classics prove quite surprising. JE DIAMOND MARKET. 430 Market St., Downtown. 412-325-2000. The tavern-like décor provides a comfortable, unpretentious setting for socializing, and the menu bridges retro and au courant in a now-familiar way, with grownup comfort food and big burgers on brioche buns with fancy toppings. Try the excellent mac-and-cheese, accented with bacon and truffle oil, or the donut-sized onion rings drizzled with balsamic vinegar. KE

PALAZZO 1837 RISTORANTE. 1445 Washington Road, North Strabane. 724-223-1837. This restored mansion provides a charming setting for fine dining. The menu is primarily Italian, with traditional but thoughtfully considered dishes. The hearty, but refined, farfalle rustica pairs wild-boar sausage with wild mushrooms and a sherry sage cream sauce, while housemade crepes substitute for noodles in the crepe lasagna. LE THE PORCH. Schenley Plaza, Forbes Avenue and Schenley Drive, Oakland. 412-687-6724. An attractive wood-and-stone structure set in the verdant heart of Oakland, The Porch offers cuisine that is modern without being stark, homey without being heavy. Consider a pizza dressed with butternut squash, pork belly atop roasted pumpkin, or lasagne with house-made chive pasta. KE

IL PIZZAIOLI. 703 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412344-4123. This popular SPADAFORA’S. neighborhood café 3932 Route 8, Allison serves NeapolitanPark. 412-486-1800. style pasta and Though little . www per pizza, including the more than an a p ty pghci m scandalously cheesy unassuming .co quattro formaggi pizza. concrete-block box The front room overlooks on the outside, inside bustling Washington Avenue; this is a warm, welcoming in season, lucky diners can enjoy family-run trattoria offering the rear garden courtyard. KE Southern Italian specialties as well as Italian-American fare. NINE ON NINE. 900 Penn Quality ingredients, thoughtful Ave., Downtown. 412-338-6463. preparation and friendly s This elegant restaurant and ervice make this restaurant lounge offers a maturation stand out. KE of contemporary American cuisine, effortlessly shifting from STOKE’S GRILL. 4771 McKnight refined Continental to Asian Road, Ross Township. 412-369fusion to ingredient-focused 5380. There is an art to making invention. Instead of showy a really good sandwich, and the creations, the kitchen produces technique has been mastered dishes that instantly seem here. The lengthy menu spans right, such as miso cod or thymetraditional sandwiches but also roasted Amish chicken with burgers, quesadillas and wraps, as asparagus flan. LE well as salads and homemade

FULL LIST ONLINE

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THE LOCAL PRODUCE FROM THE STRIP

Don’t be late.

Shiloh GrilL

123 Shiloh Street, Mt. Washington

412.431.4000 18

THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

theShilohGrill.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.22/05.29.2013

Mon 11:30-3:00 Tue-Thu 11:30-9:00 Fri-Sun 11:00-9:00

Dine in / Take Out BYOB

1906 Penn Avenue Strip District 412-586-4107 GOUTDOOR DINING F LITTLEBANGKOK INTHESTRIP.COM

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

The Chelsea Grille CARMI’S. 917 Western Ave., North Side. 412-231-0100. A soulfood restaurant offers traditional home-style Southern cooking on the North Side. On offer: waffles and fried chicken; hearty chickenand-dumpling soup; greens, studded with smoked meat; mashed potatoes; spare ribs; and a stand-out, Cajun shrimp paired with creamy grits. KF

CONTINUES ON PG. 20


DINING OUT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 18

SUMMER

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412-415-0338 538 California Ave. Pittsburgh, PA, 15202

STILLS IN THE HILLS June 15 - 16 INDEPENDENCE DAY FIREWORKS SHOW Wednesday, July 3

RIB & WING FESTIVAL July 26 - 28

WINE & FOOD FESTIVAL August 24 - 25

800.452.2223

AUTUMNFEST September 28 - 29 October 5 - 6 October 12 - 13 October 19 - 20

7springs.com

SUMMER EVENTS

www.skinnypetes.com

{BY AMYJO BROWN}

TANA ETHIOPIAN CUISINE. 5929 Baum Blvd., East Liberty. 412-665-2770. The menu offers a variety of stewed meats, legumes and veggies, all rich with warm spices. Order the sampler platters for the best variety of flavors, and ask for a glass of tej, a honey-based wine that is the perfect accompaniment. KE

ONE MORE SLICE Customers pay respects to late pizza-shop owner PITTSBURGH CITY Councilor Corey O’Connor’s usual or-

TASTE OF INDIA. 4320 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-681-7700. Yogi Berra groused about the restaurant nobody went to — because it was always too crowded. Taste of India is the opposite: Everyone goes there partly because you can always get a table. The atmosphere is almost surreally quiet, but the food is consistently good (try the paneer). Portions are ample, prices reasonable. JE TEPPANYAKI KYOTO. 5808 Bryant St., Highland Park. 412-441-1610. This Japanese restaurant offers fare drawn from the menus of lunch counters, train stations and family kitchens. From salads containing burdock root and rice balls to cabbage pancakes and stir-fried noodles, this diner-style venue lets casual eaters expand beyond sushi. KE UNION PIG AND CHICKEN. 220 N. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-363-7675. This lively familystyle BBQ venue hews closely to tradition. The smoked meats (ribs, brisket, pork shoulder and chicken) are “dry” (with sauces at table), and the sides are wellprepared classics: mac-and-cheese, baked beans, collard greens and coleslaw. Prices are higher than a roadside stand, but the quality is top-notch. KE WILD ROSEMARY. 1469 Bower Hill Road, Upper St. Clair. 412-221-1232. At this cozy, contemporary, candle-lit cottage, the Italian- and Mediterraneaninspired menu changes every two weeks to showcase the freshest in-season ingredients. The menu offers fewer than 10 entrées, each matched with a small suite of carefully selected sides. Expect quality ingredients — dayboat scallops, Maytag cheese, lamb, steak — and exquisitely prepared meals. LF THE WINE LOFT. 2773 Tunnel Blvd., SouthSide Works, South Side. 412-586-5335. A wellcurated wine list, cozy seating options and an expanded menu make this a convivial spot for socializing. Share a pizza — or try an entrée such as filet sliders, Hawaiian tuna tartare or pumpkin ravioli. Wines include unusual varietals alongside the more familiar chardonnays and shirazes. KE

Pittsburgh City Councilor Corey O’Connor orders a pizza to go. {PHOTO BY AMYJO BROWN}

MELLON SQUARE

MOTHER EARTH NEWS FAIR September 20 - 22

offMenu

soups. Originality is a hallmark: “Green fries” are shoestrings tossed with pesto, artichoke hearts and bits of brie. FJ

der at Aiello’s Pizza has always been “two off the top” — a couple of slices, plain — to which he has always added crushed red pepper. And Joe Aiello, the late owner of the Squirrel Hill pizza shop, would always scold. “He would say, ‘What the hell are you doing?’” O’Connor says. O’Connor visited Aiello’s several times last week, after he learned of Aiello’s death on May 13 at the age of 71. Aiello emigrated from Sicily in 1967 and opened his pizza shop in 1978 after working at what would become his good-natured rival down the street, Mineo’s Pizza. O’Connor’s loyalty started early: “I went to Central [Catholic High School] and his kids went to Central.” And it extends through local politics when, with a wink, he answers the inevitable question: Mineo’s or Aiello’s? “I typically respond that ‘all the pizza in Squirrel Hill is very good,’” O’Connor says. O’Connor, 28, grew up just a few blocks away from Aiello’s. “Every day, if you could come up with 60 cents, you could get a slice,” he says.

“IT’S GOING TO BE DIFFERENT.” He and a childhood friend, Merritt Russell, both describe Aiello as the “old father figure” on the street. “He had a real good sense of humor. You’d come in just to talk to Joe,” Russell says. And he made good pizza. Customers tell of Aiello growing the vegetables he’d use — long before it became trendy in the restaurant scene to use local produce. Staff say he was a stickler for doing things the right way. “He made [the shop] come to being without advertising and without delivery,” says Tim Watts, an Aiello’s employee. “Think about that: Don’t advertise and don’t deliver. You really have to stand on your recipe.” As word spread that Aiello was gone, Russell sat in a booth in the back of the shop with O’Connor, having “a slice for Joe.” The shop is set to continue in much the same tradition with Aiello’s two sons in charge. But, “this is like your regular routine,” O’Connor says. “It’s going to be different.” A B ROW N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.22/05.29.2013


LOCAL

“RECONCEPTUALIZING SAMPLES — I’D SAY THAT’S STILL REALLY THE BASIS OF OUR BAND.”

BEAT

{BY RORY D. WEBB}

BEACON OF HOPE

AUTEUR

POP {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

T

HE VAN Allen Belt has, in the six

Profound Myndz

“It all started with a pencil and some yellow lined paper,” says Kielle Deanda of hip-hop/soul collective Profound Myndz. “Mr. Phill forced me to sit next to him and write a song. At first he helped me come up with a concept. He said, ‘What do you think of when you hear this beat?’ And we started writing down words, and ‘seasons’ came out.” Mr. Phill is Phill Thompson, program coordinator of the YMCA Lighthouse Project. The after-school multimedia arts program started at Westinghouse High School in 2007, and since then more than 300 teen-age students have participated. Since its start, the program has grown to include visual arts, music production, photo and video production, a step team, a theater project and even an urban garden. Profound Myndz is one of the program’s current groups. Deanda, now 17, started the program as a ninth-grader. In her song “In Good Time,” she sings, “seasons change.” “I like to write about inspirational stuff sometimes, ’cause it’s easier for me to write when I’m vaguely talking about how I’ve gotten through tough situations. So, I was just thinking about how to encourage people. That’s why I was saying ‘seasons change.’ [No matter what you’re going through,] you can make it through it.” That was her first solo song — helped along by Thompson’s encouragement. “I critique them like I would critique an adult,” says Thompson. “In my opinion, we have some of the most talented people in the city here. Their songs should be able to stack up against anybody else’s.” The program serves young people from neighborhoods throughout the eastern part of the city. It also provides transportation and dinner for the kids. “It’s a program that utilizes the multimedia arts to advance three goals,” explains program director James Armstead Brown. “And that’s to give kids a creative outlet for their expression, to build technical skills that will help lead to successful career paths, and to help kids connect to the community.” Profound Myndz is currently in a competition for a chance to perform at the YMCA National General Assembly in Philadelphia. Also, the Lighthouse Project is raising funds for Pittsburgh to Prague, a project that will cover the expenses for the group to perform at a conference in Prague. More on the Lighthouse Project: www.facebook.com/ymcalighthouse

years since its first release, grown into a Pittsburgh band with an outof-Pittsburgh reputation, a band that’s toured the West Coast and plays as much out of town as it does in. But it started out as a pretty cerebral project — a filmmaker’s quest to make music while applying techniques from film. “While I was in film school, I started recording a lot of music,” says primary songwriter Ben Ferris. “I recorded solo albums, and I started doing soundtrack work. I was really into Guy Maddin’s movies, and I wanted to make music that was the audio equivalent of that. I was also really into White Noise’s An Electric Storm, and saw that splicing samples could be used in a way that’s far more creative than how they’re generally used. “Reconceptualizing samples — I’d say that’s still really the basis of our band.” Tamar Kamin, a classically trained vocalist, began working with Ferris on his soundtrack work, and it was as a duo that they released their first album as The Van Allen Belt, 2007’s Meal Ticket to Purgatory. Ferris’s film-school friend Scott Taylor would join as a sound engineer and drummer. (“He graduated; I’m a film-school drop{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} Movie music: The Van Allen Belt (from left: Tamar Kamin, Ben Ferris, Scott Taylor) out,” Ferris says with a laugh.) Bassist Tom Altes rounds out the band’s lineup. Meal Ticket is a psychedelic sound-col- peared — in some ways more traditional showcases Kamin’s jazz vocals. The Van Allen Belt’s latest is a 7-inch lage anchored by Kamin’s friendly vocals; in its sound, but still full of topsy-turvy the simple, almost childlike melodies and samples and synths. It also more directly vinyl release called “Songs,” named for the eponymous B-side tune. It’s a collecthe innocence of Kamin’s delivery are offtion of three songs from the same sessions set by the unsettling samples and discorthat gave rise to the band’s forthcoming dant notes in a way that simultaneously THE VAN ALLEN BELT full-length, to be issued later this year. recalls Olivia Tremor Control, Stereolab and 7-INCH RELEASE While Ferris started his writing for The Brazilian psych-rock. WITH MRS. PAINTBRUSH, Van Allen Belt with sampling and editing On the tails of Meal Ticket, the band did DJ RICHARD ELMSWORTH as his M.O., the songs are crafted first in a bit of touring, including some dates open9:30 p.m. Fri., May 31. Brillobox, a pretty classic manner. ing for Stereolab and Atlas Sound. In 2010, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $5. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net “I write everything on piano and guitar,” the follow-up full-length Superfragilis ap-

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AUTEUR POP, CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

2013

LEASE FOR

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$ *36 MONTH LEASE. $2,679.00 DUE AT SIGNING. TAX AND STATE FEES ADDITIONAL.

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Ferris explains. “Everything starts out in a pretty traditional way; the sampling is used to fill in the space. They’re not complete until they’re recorded; they’re planned in how they’ll play out, but the arrangement is always a surprise. It never comes out sounding how it did in your head. Which I enjoy.” That makes studio work more complicated than it is for many bands. “A lot of bands just show up to a studio, play the song a few times and take a couple of takes,” says Ferris. “This is more like making a movie: You’re editing — scene by scene, frame by frame, measure by measure.” “We also got to a point,” says bassist Taylor, “where the gear caught up with the concept. Originally, I had hardware samplers and drum machines; eventually we got to the point where we have multi-track recording equipment.” Even what would seem the most organic parts of the songs — the vocals — are put together through editing. Kamin records parts, which Ferris then loops and layers to fit. The A-side to the “Songs” 7-inch features two tunes: “Humanist Hymns” and “Taste.” The former is a piano tune with string and percussion samples and increasingly complex layering of Kamin’s vocals in harmony; it’s reminiscent of contemporary psych-pop outfits like Secret Cities. “Taste” is more Stereolab-style, with lots of synths and dreamy, wavering vocals. The title track, clocking in at just under five minutes, is a sprawling beauty. The pace, key and general melody remain the same throughout, but change comes often in the form of new samples and shifts in the instrumentation. One moment, it’s bassy synthetic drumbeats; the next, it’s nothing but piano. Kamin’s vocals here are matterof-fact, barely singing as much as precise, tuneful talk. The new material also represents something of a shift in the band’s execution. While Ferris insists he still thinks of The Van Allen Belt as by and large a studio band, the band’s approach is changing. “This is the first album where we’ve performed the songs live before we released them,” Ferris says. “The songs on the 7-inch and on the full-length that’s coming, we’ve been playing some of them out for a year.” “Some songs can be more difficult to approach than others,” Kamin says. “And when we play live, it’s a whole different level. The songs are different, obviously, than on the recordings.” “I’ve always thought that it should be different,” says Ferris. “If you want to hear it as it sounds on the album, buy the album and play it. If you see us live, you’re going to hear a different version of the music.” AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.22/05.29.2013

NEW RELEASES

NIGHTLY STANDARD NIGHTLY STANDARD (SELF-RELEASED)

Great songwriting, excellent performance and top-quality recording on this five-song EP from the local soul-rock-jazz outfit. Laura Frederickson’s powerful vocals open the disc with a bang on the barn-burner “Not Meant to Be,” and the shifts in energy throughout the next four tunes are pulled off masterfully. This one does everything an EP should; fans of rock jams with horns should snap it up. BY ANDY MULKERIN

NIGHTLY STANDARD CD RELEASE. 9 p.m. Sat., May 25. Thunderbird Café, 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $5. 412682-0177 or www.thunderbirdcafe.net

BEN VALASEK AND THE GROWLERS TIME WAITS FOR NO ONE (SELF-RELEASED)

Nine new tracks of singer-songwriter material from Valasek and his band. While nothing stands out about the album per se, it’s solid songcraft with poetic aspirations that make it worth a listen. Valasek is at his best when he keeps it in the pocket and doesn’t try to go too dramatic or too funky. BY ANDY MULKERIN

BEN VALASEK AND THE GROWLERS CD RELEASE. 7 p.m. Sat., June 1. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $6. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

NEW VEGAS MORE THAN MYTHOLOGY (SELF-RELEASED)

New Vegas’ new full-length melds posthardcore grit with melodic storytelling. Using elongated instrumental segments, the nine-track album builds a captivating tension, releasing it through lead singer Jon Coulter’s varying vocal style. The Pittsburgh natives balance aggressive with tranquil, giving each song a pleasing duality, especially “Les Enfantes Terribles,” which starts with a simple croon and leads into a mighty guitar riff. The songs run longer than the average four-minute tune, but the progressions are worth the wait. BY NICOLE CHYNOWETH


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OPUS ONE PRESENTS

COMMERCIAL SUCCESS {BY KATE MAGOC} AFTER FORMING in the mid-’90s, The Dandy

Warhols gained prominence in the early 2000s, with help from a major British commercial placement. The band is currently on a tour playing the entirety of its 2000 breakthrough album, Thirteen Tales From Urban Bohemia. CP spoke with keyboardist Zia McCabe. GAINING COMMERCIAL SUCCESS AS AN ARTIST HAS ITS PERILS. IT CAN SEEM, TO CERTAIN FANS, LIKE YOU’RE SELLING OUT. BUT A COMMERCIAL ACTUALLY LAUNCHED THE DANDYS INTO GREAT SUCCESS. CAN YOU TELL ME ABOUT THAT ROLLER-COASTER RIDE? [Thirteen Tales From Urban Bohemia] had come out, but it didn’t really hit the way that we thought it was going to. It just made a sort of soft thud in Europe. And then [British telecom company] Vodafone decided to use it in that ad. It’s like they made us a music video and put a million-dollar ad campaign behind it to make sure that everybody saw it. It was like the best thing that could happen to a band. So the album was re-released because of that ad. And then we were off and running. It was surreal to understand that advertising was breaking a band instead of a traditional method, because that hadn’t really happened. There was a lot of confusion about whether it was ethical for an artist to get paid for their music to be in advertising. And I couldn’t really see the harm in it. We were just getting paid for what we do. People wanted to use our music in a really cool commercial. I guess it was a little ironic, but it was just neat. It was neat to finally have the career that we had been working towards.

Bohemian upholstery: The Dandy Warhols

transition into licensing so easily, it’s what secured a future for us. FROM YOUR EXPERIENCE WITH CAPITOL RECORDS, WOULD YOU SAY THAT A BIG LABEL MADE YOUR CAREER EASIER OR MORE DIFFICULT IN THE LONG RUN? It depends on your experience. We were lucky with big labels. We were very stubborn with them trying to tell us what to do. We weren’t extremely cooperative. But because of that we ended up not going into huge debt. Most people on major labels overspent so much that they almost become indentured to the label with no hope for paying them back. Since we didn’t cooperate, in turn, they didn’t dump all that money on us the way that they normally would. We came out OK with the major-label thing.

“IT WAS SURREAL THAT ADVERTISING WAS BREAKING A BAND INSTEAD OF A TRADITIONAL METHOD.”

06/07-08 LOTUS 06/14 BARONESS 06/17 THE BOXER REBELLION

05/23 05/24 05/24 05/25 05/25 05/30 05/31 06/04 06/07 06/07

ANNE FEENEY MR. CHRIS COMBO & MOTOMETER (EARLY) AN EVENING OF COMEDY WITH KRISH MOHAN KINETIC (EARLY) THE TRUTH FT. PAUL BENSON & AYESHA SCOTT (EARLY) PETER CASE PAUL KELLY (EARLY) THE DIRTY RIVER BOYS CALIFORNIA GUITAR TRIO (EARLY) CHARLIE MARS (LATE)

TICKETWEB.COM/OPUSONE | FACEBOOK.COM/OPUSONEPROD | TWITTER.COM/OPUSONEPROD FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SHOWS VISIT WWW.OPUSONEPRODUCTIONS.COM

THE DANDY WARHOLS WITH THE SHIVAS

8 p.m. Tue., May 28. Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $35. All ages. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

We survive because of licensing. We don’t make a ton of money on touring. Nobody makes money from record sales anymore. But because we were able to

SEVERAL REVIEWS SAID THAT THIRTEEN TALES WAS A SHOCKINGLY MATURE ALBUM FOR SUCH A YOUNG BAND. THE SUBJECTS WITHIN IT ARE VERY STEEPED IN YOUTH CULTURE, BUT THE LYRICS CAN BE SO SARCASTIC. WHERE DID ALL THE SNARK COME FROM? I think the way that [frontman Courtney Taylor-Taylor] deals with any sort of emotional turmoil or conflict is through sarcasm and wit. It’s a great advantage that that’s the way that he processes, because it’s very lyrical. And that’s the way he talks. He’s not sitting down and turning into a poet for these lyrics. This is what he sounds like when he’s communicating. He has the cynicism, and he’s very articulate and very pointed and can also be intense. I think that, in turn, it becomes very relatable. It’s not so serious. He doesn’t take it too seriously. I N F O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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CRITICS’ PICKS

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JO MCCAUGHEY}

JEFF the Brotherhood

[ACOUSTIC] + THU., MAY 23 Blues guitarist Scott Ainslie is just as much a preserver of the art of blues as he is a musician. He has transcribed recordings by Delta blues musicians, and learned a trick or two from Southern Appalachian fiddlers and many others. It’s this knowledge of blues history that really sets him apart; listening to him play is like hearing hints of decade after decade Scott of blues history as Ainslie it unfolds before you. His songs are soulful and driven, just as they should be, and it makes for a worthy show on a number of levels. Ainslie plays a “Blues BBQ” show sponsored by Calliope tonight, at the Roots Cellar at the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. John Lavanga 7:30 p.m. 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. $28-79. All ages. 412-361-1915 or www.calliopehouse.org

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.22/05.29.2013

Welsh 9:30 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $10. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

[SLUDGE] + MON, MAY 27 From releasing KISS-style “solo” EPs, to collaborating with Lustmord and Jello Biafra, to inviting the band Big Business to join them as regular members, Melvins — appearing tonight at Mr. Small’s Theatre — have made some unconventional choices over the past 30 years. In someone else’s hands, these might look like stunts, but Buzz Osborne and Dale Crover have built livelihoods on doing whatever they feel like. Their new covers album, Everybody Loves Sausages, includes sludged-up — but exuberantly faithful — versions of songs by Queen, David Bowie, Throbbing Gristle and others. MW 7 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $16-18. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

[GARAGE ROCK] + FRI., MAY 24

[POP] + TUE., MAY 28

Jake and Jamin Orrall’s previous Pittsburgh stop was on Thanksgiving night last year, but summertime brings the real JEFF the Brotherhood weather. The brothers’ sun-baked garage rock brings to mind the Ramones, by way of Sloan, by way of Jack White (they’re on his label, Third Man Records), striking a balance between muscular and breezy. JEFF’s records make good soundtracks for drinking beer by the river, or cruising with the windows down, but they’re no substitute for the heavy charm of the Nashvillians’ live shows. Check them out tonight at Brillobox. With Hunters, Chrome Moses. Margaret

Welsh singer-songwriter Marina Diamandis, known mainly by her stage name Marina and the Diamonds, has developed a following for her delightfully poppy synth arrangements. Her second LP, Electra Heart, is an upbeat collection of tracks, many of which are more about breaking hearts than falling in love. She’s no one-note pop star; her intuitive understanding of how to construct a hit is rooted in her knowledge of musicians like Tom Waits and PJ Harvey as well as such pop mainstays as Madonna. Tonight, she plays Stage AE with another poppy songwriter, Charli XCX. JL 7 p.m., 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $22. All ages. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} BRILLOBOX. JEFF The Brotherhood, Hunters, Chrome 31ST STREET PUB. The Moses. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. Highballers, The Bessemers, Tex CLUB CAFE. The Mr. Chris Railer’s Doomtown. Strip District. Combo, MotoMeter,. South Side. 412-391-8334. 412-431-4950. 406 MILL ST. Dena Miller Trio, EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. The The End Here On, Albion Cross. Southside Groove Squad. Coraopolis. 412-262-2706. South Side. 412-431-4090. CLUB CAFE. Kinetic, Mike Hickey THE FALLOUT SHELTER. (Early) The Truth ft. Paul Benson & Communication Breakdown, Astro Ayesha Scott, Hounds of Jezebel Kinetic, Shirt Collar Smile, DJ Rizzo, (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. SHN, DJ Fox, DJ Warfare, EMT COACH’S BOTTLESHOP AND Stepz. Aliquippa. 724-375-5080. GRILLE. Paddy’s Drunken Uncles. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Dormont. 412-207-9397. Flashlights, 2 Po, Media DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Luna, Doorstep Rebellion. Electric Lunch. Robinson. Garfield. 412-361-2262. 412-489-5631. INN-TERMISSION EXCUSES BAR & LOUNGE. Joe Stump, GRILL. Ray Lanich ww. r w e Pete Rossi. South Side. pap Band. South Side. pghcitym 412-381-3494. .co 412-431-4090. LINDEN GROVE. Dancing THE FALLOUT SHELTER. Queen. Castle Shannon. The Next Doors. Aliquippa. 412-882-8687. 724-375-5080. REX THEATER. John Brown’s Body. GATEWAY CLIPPER FLEET. PGH. South Side. 412-381-6811. Rock dance cruise. Station Square. SMILING MOOSE. New Vegas, 412-355-7980. Lakota De Kai, Motives, Amplifiers HEINZ HALL. Pittsburgh (early). South Side. 412-431-4668. Symphony Orchestra: Heart Strings. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Good Tribute to Sir Paul McCartney Brother Earl, The Hawkeyes. feat. North American premiere Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. of NOVA, composed by Linda

SAT 25

ROCK/POP THU 23 31ST STREET PUB. The Murder Junkies, Porno Tongue, Iron City Hooligans, Scratch & Sniffs. Strip District. 412-391-8334. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Vaughn Trio. Strip District. 412-281-6593. EVOLVER TATTOO ARTS. Andrew Winter & the Reckless Dodgers, Nick Malburg, Fun Home, Average Joey, Whoovez. South Side. 412-706-1643. LAVA LOUNGE. City Buses, The Dressed Frets, Chrome Baby Jesus. South Side. 412-431-5282. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Cabinet. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FRI 24 31ST STREET PUB. Solarburn, Pipewrench, Embers to Ashes. Strip District. 412-391-8334. ALTAR BAR. Le Shook. Strip District. 412-263-2877. ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Foreigner, Silent Partner. Carnegie. 412-368-5225.

The City’s Hottest Live Music Scene!

UPCOMING NATIONAL SHOWS

FULL LIST ONLINE

McCartney. Presented by Rock for The Heart Foundation. Downtown. 412-392-4900. MOUSETRAP. The Dave Iglar Band. Beaver. 724-796-5955. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Bloody Beetroots, Valentino Khan, Tenova. Millvale. 866-468-3401. PENN BREWERY. The Kardasz Brothers. North Side. 412-237-9400 x120. THE R BAR. The Gum Band. Dormont. 412-942-0882. THE SHOP. Arrington de Dionyso’s Malaikat Dan Singa, Gangwish, Dean Cercone, Burnout War Cry. Bloomfield. 412-951-0622. SMILING MOOSE. Bury Thy Kingdom, Syzygia, Save Us From The Archon, Of Myth & Legend, Insult To Injury (early) The Beauregards, The Neffs, City Steps, Rollergirl (late). South Side. 412-431-4668. SPEAL’S TAVERN. Stone Broke. New Alexandria. 724-433-1322. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Dead Confederate Nightly Standard, The Rock Run Retreat, Nice Hair. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

MP 3 MONDAY B. WHITE

Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local artist. This week’s offering comes from McKeesport rapper B. White; “Tempted” features vocalist Anna Ciaccio. Stream or download it free on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

SUN 26 BAJA BAR AND GRILL. Kings Ransom. Fox Chapel. 412-963-0640. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Vinyl Williams, Sound Elevator, Dreamweapon. Garfield. 412-361-2262.

SUNDAY

DOGS ARE ALWAYS WELCOME ON THE PATIO!

Special Pup Menu IS PUPDAY at Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Available Sundays starting at 1pm

SHOWS THIS WEEK Thu 5.23 JAISON RIVAS/ZUMBA // international dance // 7 - 8:30 pm // $25 MIAMI DEEJAY FRANCIS // 8:30 - midnight Fri 5.24 NO BAD JU JU // up tempo; dance // 9 pm // $7 Sat 5.25 VELVEETA // 80's covers // 9 pm // $7 Sun 5.26 JAZZ CONSPIRACY BIG BAND w/ free swing dance lessons jazz // 7 pm // $5

103 Slade Lane, Warrendale, PA 15086

CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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music

10 days of free

June 7—16, 2013 3riversartsfest.org Corporate Sponsors

s n a i c i s u m 0 4 2 z z a j f o s r u o h

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.22/05.29.2013

FANRD OEPEEN

TO THE PUBLIC


Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros Glen Hansard s Ralph Stanley Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra

The Blind Boys of Alabama Red Baraat s Grupo Fantasma The Airborne Toxic Event s Lucius Cello Fury with Scott Blasey & Joy Ike

+art

5

2013 lineup 6

Hugh Hayden Chang-Jin Lee Vanessa German Yvette Mattern &

Lightwave International Susan Goethel Campbell Artist Market 300+ artistisans Juried Visual Art Exhibition Foundation & Government Support

#LAUDE7ORTHINGTONs"ENEDUM&OUNDATIONs"UHL&OUNDATIONs#OLCOM&OUNDATIONs,AUREL&OUNDATIONs"ESSIE&!NATHAN#HARITABLE4RUSTOFTHE0ITTSBURGH &OUNDATIONs 4HE'RABLE&OUNDATIONs4HE&INE&OUNDATIONs4HE0ITTSBURGH&OUNDATIONs6IBRANT0ITTSBURGHs0ENNSYLVANIA#OUNCILONTHE!RTS

Don’t miss

Chaka Khan Rudresh Mahanthappa Eddie Pamieri Salsa Orchestra Marcus Miller and so many more... N E W S

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LANDMARKS HOUSING RESOURCE CENTER — A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation

Tools for Historic Preservation

UPCOMING 7 4 4 R E B E C C A A V E N U E WORKSHOP:

SATURD AY, M AY 25

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

10:00 - 11:30AM

Join hand tool enthusiast Regis Will as he shares how he built his tool set. You’ll learn what you need, where to get it, and what to do once you have them. The workshop will cover feasible repairs, getting the best deals, and strategies for building a valuable and useful collection. This workshop is FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. RSVPs are appreciated. Contact Mary Lu Denny: marylu@phlf.org or 412-471-5808 ext. 527.

744 REBECCA AVENUE

WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

HARD ROCK CAFE. Nied’s Hotel Band. Station Square. 412-481-7625. SMILING MOOSE. Until We Have Faces, Led by the Blind, Lou Garou, Stratega. South Side. 412-431-4668. STONE VILLA WINE CELLARS. The Elliotts. Acme. 724-423-5604.

MON 27 412-471-5808

Clinical Trials Research Services, LLC is currently conducting clinical trials in the following areas:

IBS with Diarrhea Endometriosis Constipation Vaginal Dryness/Hot Flashes Gout Osteoporosis

CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 27

Chronic Diarrhea High Cholesterol High Blood Pressure Diabetes Over Eating and Obese Menstrual Cramps

Principal Investigators – Dr. S. Berg, Dr. G. Rosenberg, Dr. L. Dobkin Do you have a medical condition that is not listed? Give us a call. Our studies change regularly and we may have a study that’s right for you. Please call 412-363-1900 for more information.

GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Rey Renteria, Highwayyys, Good Thing, Crisp Lake. Garfield. 412-361-2262. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Melvins. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

TUE 28

SUN 26

FULL TUE 28 LIST E ONLIN

WED 29 HARD ROCK CAFE. Adelaide In Autumn. Station Square. 412-481-7625. ROCK BOTTOM. Good Brother Earl. Waterfront. 412-462-2739. SMILING MOOSE. Craving Strange Dead Batteries. South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. John Wayne & the Pain. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

THU 23 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. PARK HOUSE. Jx4. North Side. 412-224-2273.

FRI 24 AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Summer Fling Fridays. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. Downtown. 412-456-6666. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Reggae Fridays. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Harry Lurker. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. REDBEARDS. DJ Kayoss. Dance/ top 40 hits. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3730. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.22/05.29.2013

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. MEXICO CITY. DJ Juan Diego VII. Salsa & Latin music. Downtown. 412-980-7653. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Vex. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. REDBEARDS. DJ Kayoss. Dance/ top 40 hits. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3730. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-481-7227.

31ST STREET PUB. Project Pitchfork, Shutterdown, Hex Weapon. Strip District. 412-391-8334. 6119 PENN AVE. oOoOO. East Liberty. AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Caroline RIVERS CASINO. DJs Bill Bara Smith & The Good Night Sleeps. & Digital Dave. North Side. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. 412-231-7777. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Dandy Warhols, The Shivas. Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Millvale. 866-468-3401. Electro, post punk, industrial, new SMILING MOOSE. Arsis, Wrought wave, alternative dance. South Iron, Victims of Contagion. Side. 412-431-4668. South Side. 412-431-4668. STAGE AE. Marina & The Diamonds, Charli AVA BAR & LOUNGE. XCX. North Side. Open Turntable . w THUNDERBIRD CAFE. ww per Night. East Liberty. a p ty ci Space Exchange feat. h pg 412-363-8277. .com Series Colter Harper ECLIPSE LOUNGE. DJ Trio. Lawrenceville. Zan Naz, DJ Outtareach. 412-682-0177. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

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SAT 25

WED 29 AVA BAR & LOUNGE. When Life Gives You Lemons.DANCE. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Ritmo Wednesdays. DJ Juan Diego, DJ Carla. Downtown. 412-325-6769. HAMBONE’S. DJ Mangler. 50s-70s Old Time Rock N Roll. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B FRI 24 SMILING MOOSE. Tracksploitation, Reason & EOS, Billy Pilgrim, CreativeChemistry, Pav Medicinal, Eye of the Storm. The Dawn of Illumination. South Side. 412-758-8575.

SAT 25 ALTAR BAR. B. White. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CJ’S. The Tastee Flavor Band. Strip District. 412-642-2377.

BLUES THU 23 ATRIA’S RESTAURANT & TAVERN. John Gresh Gris Gris. North Side. 412-322-1850.

FRI 24 CAFE NOTTE. Shari Richards & Hermi Granati. Emsworth. 412-761-2233.

THE HANDLE BAR & GRILLE. Gary Prisby. Canonsburg. 724-746-4227. MOONDOG’S. The Soul Survivors. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. MUGSHOTS CAFE. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Crafton. 412-921-7474. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Billy Price & the Lost Minds. Shaler. 412-487-6259.

SAT 25 INN THE RUFF. The Witchdoctors. Penn Hills. 412-793-9779. INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. The Rhythm Aces. South Side. NOLA ON THE SQUARE. Olga Watkins Band. Downtown. 412-471-9100.

SUN 26 BOSTON WATERFRONT. Jill West & Blues Attack. McKeesport. 412-751-8112. DUKE’S STATION. The Witchdoctors. Bethel Park. 412-835-0176. GUARDIAN SELF STORAGE. Jimmy Adler Band. Leukemia Benefit. Shadyside. 412-441-7368.

WED 29 MOONDOG’S. John Nemeth. Blawnox. 412-828-2040.

JAZZ THU 23 CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Jimmy Z & Friends. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

FRI 24 BONNIE & CLYDE’S. RML Jazz. Wexford. 412-370-9621. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Stranger Convention. North Side. 412-237-3400. LA CASA NARCISI. The Etta Cox Trio. Gibsonia. 724-444-4744. LITTLE E’S. Jared Wilson & The Vibe. Downtown. 412-392-2217. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo & Pat Crossley. Downtown. 412-553-5235. SMILING MOOSE. Reason, EOS, Pav Medicinal, Billy Pilgrim, Creative Chemistry, Tracksploitation. South Side. 412-431-4668. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Greensburg. 724-850-7245.

SAT 25 CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Lilly Abreu. Downtown. 412-392-2217. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. Bridgeville. 412-370-9621.

SUN 26 JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. The


EARLY WARNINGS

FRI 24 FERRANTE’S LAKEVIEW. Cahal Dunne’s Grand To Be Irish. Presented by Latshaw Productions. Greensburg. 724-834-4590. PENN BREWERY. Autobahn Band. North Side. 412-237-9400.

We buy all day-every day

SAT 25

SOUTH HILLS PREMIER SPORTS BAR & EATERY

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

BEULAH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Watoto Children’s Choir. Churchill.

21 H D TVs

REGGAE SAT 25 FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

PENS PRE GAME MON-FRI

COUNTRY THU 23

Big Boi Altar Bar, 1620 Penn Ave., Strip District {TUE., JULY 16}

CLASSICAL

The Flaming Lips, Spiritualized

THU 23 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. The Music of John Williams feat. conductor, Lawrence Loh. Scottish Rite Cathedral, New Castle. 412-392-4900.

Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side {FRI., SEPT. 6}

Pinback, Deathfix Mr. Small’s Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale

Jazz Conspiracy Big Band. Warrendale. 412-256-8234. OMNI WILLIAM PENN. Frank Cunimondo. Downtown. 412-553-5235. UP MODERN KITCHEN. Dave Roth. Jazzed-up brunch. Shadyside. 412-688-8220.

FRI 24

FRI 24 BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Rick Bruening. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. SEWICKLEY HOTEL. Rick Revetta. Sewickley. 412-741-9457. STARLITE LOUNGE. The Night Tones. Blawnox. 412-828-9842.

SAT 25

MON 27 AVA BAR & LOUNGE. Interval Jazz Mondays. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. FOX CHAPEL YACHT CLUB. The Etta Cox Band. O’Hara. 412-963-8881. ROYAL PLACE. Jerry Lucarelli, Vince Taglieri, Sunny Sunseri. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8000.

WED 29 720 RECORDS. James Johnson, Paul Thompson, Cliff Barnes. Lawrenceville. 412-904-4592. SEWICKLEY HOTEL. Daval/ Stater Guitar Duo. Sewickley. 412-427-9979.

ACOUSTIC

BIDDLE’S ESCAPE. Stacy Lee Lucas. Regent Square. 412-999-9009. CIP’S. The Colin McCann Band. Dormont. 412-668-2335. ELWOOD’S PUB. Acoustic Gruuve. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. PENN BREWERY. The Kardasz Brothers. North Side. 412-237-9400.

MON 27 HAMBONE’S. Monday Night Whiskey Rebellion Bluegrass Jam. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. NORTH COUNTRY BREWING. Bluegrass Night. Slippery Rock. 724-794-2337.

WED 29

THU 23 BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. CLUB CAFE. Anne Feeney. South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Jay Wiley. Robinson. 412-489-5631. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Scott Ainslie. Shadyside. 412-361-1915.

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ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Weds. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Bluegrass Jam w/ The Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

WORLD THU 23 ALLEGHENY WINE MIXER. AquiTango. Lawrenceville. 412-252-2337.

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HAPPY HOUR 5-7 PM ½ PRICE APPETIZERS

BUY • SELL • TRADE GUITARS • DRUMS • AMPS PRO SOUND • KEYBOARDS

ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fern Hollow Boys. Cheswick. 724-265-1181.

{THU., JUNE 13}

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. “A Celebration of Music & Community.” Copland, Brahms, Vivaldi, more. Wilkinsburg High School, Wilkinsburg. 412-871-2125.

$1 OFF ALL DRINKS • $1 OFF ALL 33 DRAFTS

Wednesday

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TUE 28 CAPA ANTITHESIS, CAPA ELEKTRO-ACOUSTIK ENSEMBLE. Pittsburgh CAPA, Downtown. 412-338-6100. THE PITTSBURGH TRIO. Mansions on Fifth, Shadyside.

OFF CRAFT

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Friday

Prime Rib Specials

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OTHER MUSIC THU 23 CLUB COLONY. Mark Vennere. Scott. 412-668-0903.

Seafood Specials

FRI 24 LEMONT. Dr. Zoot. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

SAT 25

Saturday

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11 amMidnight

BOOTTLESS/DRAFTS BOTTLES/DRAFTS

MON 27 HAMBONE’S. Cabaret. Jazz Standards & Showtunes singalong. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

Sunday

WED 29

World Famous

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Hello Donny: A Showtunes Sing-Along. http://trustarts.culturaldistrict. org/event/3941/hello-donny-ashowtunes-sing-along. Downtown. 412-325-6769. CLUB COLONY. Mark Vennere. Scott. 412-668-0903.

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All BOTTTLES/DRAFTS BOTTLES/DRAFTS

$ 50

CAFE NOTTE. Sal Ventura. Emsworth. 412-761-2233. LEMONT. Mark Vennere. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

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BEERS ON TAP

FOR ALL THE PLAYOFF GAMES

99 BOTTLES. The Flow Band. Carnegie.

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What to do

IN PITTSBURGH

May 22 - 28 Crown The Empire

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests Capture The Crown, Palisades and more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 6:30p.m.

THURSDAY 23 DelFest

CUMBERLAND MARYLAND. For more info & tickets visit delfest.com. Through May 26.

Cabinet THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

Tigers Jaw ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Pianos Become The Teeth & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

SUNDAY 26

Anne Feeney CLUB CAFE South Side. 412431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

New York Disco Review (Abba Tribute)

FRIDAY 24

PHOTO BY Eric Hayden Weiss

WEDNESDAY 22

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

Foreigner

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-368-5225. With special guests Silent Partner. All ages show. Tickets: carnegieconcerts.com. 8p.m.

THE CLARKS AT PYROFEST SATURDAY, MAY 25 HARTWOOD ACRES.

Le Shook ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests OGWS. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

The 58's & The Anomaly. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7:30p.m.

Rockin The Paradise (STYX Tribute)

Pittsburgh Power vs. Cleveland Gladiators

RIVERS CASINO North Shore. Over 21 show. Free event. 7p.m.

CONSOL ENERGY CENTER Downtown. Tickets: consolenergycenter.com or 800-745-3000. 7p.m.

SATURDAY 25 B. White

PyroFest

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests

HARTWOOD ACRES. Produced by Pyrotecnico. For more info

& tickets visit pyrofest.com. 3p.m.

MuckFest MINES AND MEADOWS Wampum. For more info & to register visit muckfestms.com. 7:30a.m.

Bret Michaels THE HARV - MOUNTAINEER CASINO WV. Tickets: moreatmountaineer.com or 1-800-80-40-HOT. 8p.m.

Kinetic CLUB CAFE South Side.

412-431-4950. With special guest Mike Hickey. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 7p.m.

The Blood Beetroots Live MR.SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Valentino Khan All ages show. Tickets 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 9p.m.

RIVERS CASINO North Shore. With special guests Abba Girlz. Over 21 show. Free event. 7p.m.

MONDAY 27 Melvins

MR.SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

TUESDAY 28 Marina and the Diamonds

STAGE AE North Side. With special guests Charli XCX. All ages show. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 800-7453000. Doors open at 7p.m.

The Dandy Warhols MR.SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests The Shivas. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

NOW THROUGH MEMORIAL DAY, MAY 27

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Open Memorial Day 10-5PM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.22/05.29.2013


TOO BOLDLY GONE

IT’S A LITERAL DIALOGUE, BETWEEN REPRESENTATIVES OF THE U.S. AND PAKISTAN

{BY HARRY KLOMAN} Well, first: Into Darkness — worst title ever. Star Trek dramas have been darker. (Borg, anyone?) The movie, though, is better than its name, and certainly better than director J.J. Abrams’ first Star Trek revival four years ago, when he flipped a big fat two-handed bird to the series’ fans and insolently blew up (literally) the future we’ve watched unfold for 40 years.

Men of action: Chris Pine and Zachary Quinto

Into Darkness is still a mess: too loud, too kinetic and with too much ham-handed action and “suspense” that you know will ultimately mean nothing. (Mee’sa thinkin’ no one gonna die.) It’s as much a generic sci-fi action movie as it is Star Trek, and those strains are tiresome. Still, enough of Into Darkness embraces and respectfully reworks the cherished past. Abrams re-imagines The Wrath of Khan, with the sinewy British actor Benedict Cumberbatch as its genetically engineered superman, and Robocop (Peter Weller) as a Starfleet megalomaniac with an important name (and daughter). If the plot has too many black holes (don’t they always?), at least we begin to recognize the characters again. Chris Pine is becoming a likable Kirk, and whereas the miscast Zachary Quinto is still a lifeless young Spock, the rest of the cast prospers. I’ll give Abrams one more chance to get it all right. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Last week’s review of From Up on Poppy Hill erroneously stated that the film’s screenwriter, Hayao Miyazaki, was dead; he is not. We regret the error.

BOTH SIDES NOW {BY AL HOFF}

It’s just business: Kiefer Sutherland and Riz Ahmed

H

OW SEEMINGLY ordinary people

turn to espousing and acting on extreme views is the investigation of The Reluctant Fundamentalist, adapted from Mohsin Hamid’s novel and directed by Mira Nair (The Namesake). But its protagonist, a possibly radicalized young Pakistani professor named Changez (an engaging Riz Ahmed), cautions upfront: “The answer to that question may challenge some of your preconceived notions.” It’s 2011, and Changez is speaking to an American reporter named Bobby Lincoln (Liev Schreiber); the two are in a Pakistani tea shop, as tensions are ratcheting up over a kidnapped Westerner. Lincoln worries that Changez may be part of “Pakistan’s new militant academia,” but Changez professes to be “a lover of America.” The film then jumps back to 2001, when, after graduating from Princeton, Changez is hired as a financial analyst at a prestigious Manhattan firm. Under the tutelage of his mentor (Kiefer Sutherland), he rises quickly, adapting easily to the firm’s brutally executed capitalism.

Then comes Sept. 11, and from within and without, things begin to change. Changez suffers racial profiling, and finds his relationships with his American girlfriend and to his job increasingly challenging his sense of self.

THE RELUCTANT FUNDAMENTALIST DIRECTED BY: Mira Nair STARRING: Riz Ahmed, Kiefer Sutherland, Liev Schreiber, Kate Hudson In English, and Urdu, with subtitles Starts Fri., May 24. Regent Square

So he returns to Lahore, a different man, and in 2011, he is explaining his transformation to a reporter. But all is not as it seems, and people are not necessarily who we assume they are. And once we know who they actually are, isn’t how they arrived there, and what internal and external forces drove that journey, relevant information? “I picked a side,” says Lincoln, who has his own history to relate. “It was picked for me,” counters Changez.

Most of the film employs a bifurcated narrative — the conversation at the tea shop intercut with flashbacks chronicling Changez’s life, until the unsatisfying final reel opts for a garbled action sequence. It’s structured as a literal dialogue, between representatives of the two mutually misunderstood cultures of the United States and Pakistan. It’s also a side-by-side examination of the perils of fundamentalism, be it religious or economic; both can be destructive, even as their adherents brandish supporting ideology. The film is mildly provocative, though its message about false assumptions and the various shades of gray that make up human interactions isn’t newly illuminating. As befits its title, The Reluctant Fundamentalist is meant to forefront ambiguity, but the film’s sympathies and themes are quite straightforward and even heavyhanded. (Some of the dialogue is a little too on the nose, with lines that likely come off better in print than spoken aloud.) But as real-life events continue to remind us, it’s a conversation, even if imperfectly delivered, that bears repeating. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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and

present Expert care. With a passion.

, Join us rain or shine!

Epic Steven Spielberg’s aqua-thriller that CP JAWS. terrified beach-goers in the summer of 1975, when it unspooled the tale of a great white shark eating swimmers along the Atlantic seaboard. Richard Dreyfuss, Robert Shaw and Roy Scheider hit the waves to capture the man-eater: They’re gonna need a bigger boat, and you should see this on a bigger screen. It’s still lots of scary fun. 4 p.m. Fri., May 25; and 4 and 7 p.m. Sun., May 26. Hollywood (AH) THE WILD WORLD OF HASIL ADKINS. Julien Nitzberg’s shortish 1993 film profiles idiosyncratic West Virginian psychobilly musician Hasil Adkins. At 7 p.m., the Hillbilly Varmints play, which promises to be “a riotous white-trash rock-out.” 8 p.m. Fri., May 24. Hollywood THE GOONIES. A treasure map! A spooky cave! A group of kids embark on an adventure in this 1985 comedy from Richard Donner. The film opens the summerlong Moonlit Matinee series of classic films from the 1970s and ’80s. 10 p.m. Fri., May 24, and 10 p.m. Sat., May 25. Oaks STRANGE BREW. Insomuch as there is a sporadically funny movie about beer based on Shakespeare’s Hamlet, this 1983 comedy from Rick Moranis and Dave Thomas would be it. The slacker brothers of SCTV’s “The Great White North” discover nefarious activities at the Elsinore Brewery, where the evil Max von Sydow is chewing scenery, mind-controlling hockey players and plotting to take over the world. It all mostly works because the film never takes itself too seriously: A prologue and epilogue both warn the viewer that the film isn’t worth the price of admission. There will also be a beer-tasting, to ease any pain. 8 p.m. Sat., May 25. Hollywood (AH)

than any other, but through the carelessness of adults, he falls through the cracks. Truffaut’s careful direction and keen sense of empathy make this beautifully constructed film feel loose and natural, until we are jolted — not by events, but by one unforgettable shot. In French, with subtitles. 8 p.m. Wed., May 29. Melwood. $2 (AH)

100 Bloody Acres

za! n a g a v a r t x e lk wa 5K run and dog

PING PONG. Hugh Hartford’s recent documentary follows eight senior citizens (ages 81 to 100) from around the world as they compete in a table-tennis competition in Inner Mongolia. In English, and various languages, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Thu., May 30, and 11 a.m. Sat., June 1. SouthSide Works

Cris Winter of

Today's WISH 99.7 will lead the fun, dog party and pet vendor fair.

100 BLOODY ACRES. An organic-fertilizer business owes its success to the luckless people who get ground up as the secret ingredient. (See also, 1980’s Motel Hell.) Brother Colin and Cameron Cairnes direct this horror comedy from Australia. 7:30 p.m. Thu., May 30. Hollywood ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org

Sunday,

June 2

THE MAN IN THE WHITE SUIT. Alec Guinness stars in Alexander McKendrick’s 1951 satire about a man who accidentally invents the perfect fabric (never wears out, never gets dirty) and thus incurs the wrath of the textile industry. The film concludes a month-long, Sunday-night series of classic comedies. 8 p.m. Sun., May 26. Regent Square FERRIS BUELLER’S DAY OFF. A teen bunks off school; crazy stuff happens. Matthew Broderick stars in this beloved 1986 comedy from John Hughes. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 29. AMC Loews. $5 THE 400 BLOWS. Adolescence is presented unsentimentally, but not without poignancy, in François Truffaut’s semi-autobiographical 1959 film. Antoine is a lively Parisian teen, no better or worse

South Park Fairgrounds Registration: 8:30am | 5K: 9:30am | Dog walk: 10am by Eileen Moushey

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Special thanks to our sponsors

at Gaetano’s Restaurant 1617 BANKSVILLE ANKSV ROAD R AD

CP

N E W S

Register at www.ThinkingOutsideTheCage.org/MuttStrut2013 today!

May 25, June 15 & 29 O d tickets Order tc online: on n www. www.eatdrinkmurder.org .org

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[BOOK REVIEW]

WARMING FIRE

I ENTERED A VERITABLE FUNHOUSE

{BY FRED SHAW}

[ART REVIEW]

Nostalgia is something I’ve pondered more since my 40th birthday. From the 65 pages of poems in Scott Silsbe’s new collection from Six Gallery Press, Unattended Fire, it seems he’s been ruminating over his life, as well. This is no knock, as poetry is often at its best when being clear and contemplative rather than overbearing and academic. Silsbe, an editor at The New Yinzer magazine, is a Detroit native who lives in Pittsburgh; both are cities known for reveling in their pasts. The collection is strongest when its even-keeled speaker grapples with relationships in varying stages of success or failure. In “Post No Bills,” he writes: So much of memory is a breaking up of beginnings and endings, major keys transposed to minors. I should know by now. Handwriting can reveal only so much. “She was lucky,” you said once. And now someone else says, “Her loss.”

Silsbe has a nice way with metaphor and frequently relies on poetic ventriloquism to put words in others’ mouths as a way to add layers of voice to his work. While the speaker’s relationships seem fickle, the tone of these poems is rarely morose. In fact, there’s a refreshing sense of romantic buoyancy concerning love and writing that grounds Silsbe’s work. When he writes in “From the Dictionary of Long-Distance Love,” “And then there’s the problem of times. / She tells me the sun’s setting at midnight / and I believe her. And my head is a motorcycle / on fire at the base of a bridge. Which is to say / I’m a sucker for the possible,” I find myself cheering for both the image and the underdog in all of us. The celebratory nature of poems like “Big Star” and “After the Show” affirms the hedonism of youth as redemptive in its own way. In the latter, he concludes, “We’re here, we’re alive, we’ll be here again.” Poems like “Two Cents from a Pajich” and “Remembering on a Birthday” further stoke the optimism with a rebelliousness that seems required for choosing a life in literature. While there are patches of opacity and abstraction that left me feeling detached, overall, Unattended Fire burns with a sense of positivity and tenderness toward the speaker’s sometimes unforgiving world.

MOVE IT {BY ROBERT RACZKA}

M

AKING THE ROAD trip to the West-

moreland Museum of American Art, in closer-than-I-remembered Greensburg, I expected small sculptures on widely spaced pedestals. Instead, I entered a veritable funhouse, an arcade-like gallery packed with colored Plexiglas and chrome constructions — some kinetic, some illuminated — that were originally futuristic and are now retro, as well. Picture an exceptional 1960s-’70s vintage shop and you’ve got the mood. Put Mad Men aside; this is the real thing. While Art(ist) in Motion emphasizes Aaronel deRoy Gruber’s sculpture, I’d tag the exhibit a survey and almost a retrospective, with more than 50 sculptures, a dozen photographs, jewelry, early paintings, a video work and photo documentation. The main difference between this and a retrospective, besides the lack of a catalog, is that a retrospective would take a more balanced approach to deRoy Gruber’s split-toned infrared photographs. These dominated her art-making from the ’80s to the ’00s, and it’s for them that she is best known. She died in

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.22/05.29.2013

Aaronel deRoy Gruber’s “In a Spin Maxi Cycloplexis” (detail) (1976)

2011, just shy of 93. DeRoy Gruber’s sculptures also have something of a following, remembered by some and revisited in recent exhibits around town. In a welcome civic action last year, her large aluminum “Steel Cityscape” (1976) was installed in Mellon Park. Its precise jumble of interlocking rounded squares is pressed up against Penn Avenue, where it can be appreciated at a glance by car or lingered over on foot.

AARONEL DEROY GRUBER: ART(IST) IN MOTION continues through June 2. Westmoreland Museum of American Art, 221 N. Main St., Greensburg. 724-837-1500 or wmuseumaa.org

While some of the sculptures here are from as recent as the ’80s, along with some of the slicker undated pieces that are presumably “later,” the exhibit is dominated by examples from the late ’60s and ’70s,

with their vaguely utopian, countercultural aesthetics. While acidheads doodled away in horror vacui, “serious” sculpture in the ’60s was dominated by minimalism, shedding the embellishments of the past as aggressively as did modern architecture. DeRoy Gruber shares minimalism’s constrained vocabulary of geometric form as well as its penchant for shrugging off narrative, iconography, the emotion-signifying surfaces of abstract expressionism and most symbolic associations except for artistic freedom. Once deRoy Gruber got started in sculpture — at the urging of legendary sculptor David Smith, no less — she threw herself into it. She employed the relatively new material of colored Plexiglas, and worked permutations of circle, square, cube and her signature rounded square in hundreds of sculptures large and small. DeRoy Gruber’s foray into sculpture coincides with a less-ismore time when freedom meant clearing the decks to make way for the new world to come. But deRoy Gruber seems to have been more interested in reaching out to viewers


and inspiring them than in challenging or affronting them. Her attitude is closer to the ethos of crowd-pleasing op art than to the oft off-putting severity of minimalism. And there’s more than a little techno-utopianism in deRoy Gruber’s work, too, from the rounded plastic forms reminiscent of early televisions and personal computers to the embrace of (petroleum-based) acrylic Plexiglas, fully in line with the simple career advice in 1967’s The Graduate: “plastics.” There are exceptions, but a typical deRoy Gruber sculpture features a strongly stated base, which for the many motorized kinetic pieces is a good place to conceal the motor. Atop that rests a metal bracket on which a Plexiglas construction can rotate. Even the static sculptures feel as if they’re in motion because, as we move around them, the shifting overlaps and reflections of the Plexiglas create a rippling effect. It was no small matter for deRoy Gruber to move into this area of artistic production requiring collaborations within the almost entirely male industrial world of the time, including the need to develop new techniques and, sometimes, large-scale fabrication. A pleasant surprise at the tail end of the exhibit is a case filled with deRoy Gruber’s Plexiglas jewelry — simple in form, cheerful and emphatic in what it is not,

A T T E N T I O N

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OVERDRAFT FEE in the last five years?

Aaronel deRoy Gruber’s “Triatica, Go Within”

namely, filigreed and old-fashioned. Aaronel deRoy Gruber was a stalwart of Pittsburgh’s art community while exhibiting widely, and the timing could hardly be better for re-recognizing her sculptural work, which straddles art and industrial design. It’s a crossover of significance in contemporary art from internationally acclaimed artists such as Liam Gillick to some commissioned works in The Andy Warhol Museum’s recent “Factory Direct.” Plus, the interest in retro-futurism just won’t quit; perhaps you’ve noticed Yvan Pestalozzi’s 1972 playground recently installed in front of the Carnegie Museum of Art for the approaching International. What once looked dated has again come to seem fresh.

Attorneys are investigating whether these banks violated PA law. You may be entitled to compensation. Call Attorney Kenneth Grunfeld today to learn more.

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I N F O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

OPTIONS NOW RESEARCH STUDY FOR MEN AND WOMEN Magee Womens Research Institute is looking for HIV-negative men and women (who are not pregnant or breast-feeding) between the ages of 18 and 45 to participate in a research study.

This study will assess the safety and acceptability of an investigational medication given as an injection. In the future, it is hoped that this medication will be developed to help prevent HIV infection.

For more information and to see if you qualify for this study, please call 412-463-9053 or 412-852-0390. You may be compensated up to $2,550 (females) or $1,775 (males) for your time.

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ACTING WORKSHOPS 0U[YV‹0U[LYTLKPH[L‹;LLUZ‹7YVMLZZPVUHS

www.mossercasting.com/workshops Come & Meet Those Dancin’ Feet! Featuri Joey Fatonng e!

[ART]

STRIP SHOW {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} YOU MIGHT figure professional cartoonists would be a wacky bunch, and you might be right. Yet when the annual National Cartoonists Society Conference lands in a town, most locals don’t notice, any more than they would any other convention drawing 350 guests. Sure, there have been charitable initiatives. (Picture cartoonists helping Habitat for Humanity build houses in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.) But mostly, these folks are as under-the-radar as their drawings can be over-the-top.

THE REUBEN AWARDS EXHIBITION opens Thu., May 23 ($150 VIP ticket for 7:30 p.m. reception). Exhibit continues through Aug. 25. 945 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-232-0199 or www.toonseum.org

May 31 - June 9 Cast of Pittsburgh CLO’s 42nd Street | Photo: Matt Polk

412-456-6666

pittsburghCLO.org Groups 412-325-1582

picttheatre.org or 412-561-6000

Henry Heymann Theatre, Oakland

May 30 - June 22, 2013

At the Benedum Center

A Play by Nancy Harris based on the Tolstoy novella

Not so May 23-26, when Pittsburgh gets its first shot at hosting. Thanks to Pittsburgh’s ToonSeum, NCS members and their work will be highly visible, from the artists behind strips like “Bizarro” and “Mutts” to Pittsburgh Post-Gazette editorial cartoonist Rob Rogers and Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus author and illustrator Mo Willems. Most notably, on Sun., May 26, the Pittsburgh Comic Arts Festival will close down a block of Liberty Avenue for costumed characters (Betty Boop, Popeye), live music and autograph and sketch sessions with some 60 artists. There’s also a ticketed panel discussion on women in cartooning, featuring Cathy Guisewite (“Cathy”), Lynn Johnston (“For Better or Worse”), Jen Sorensen (“Slowpoke”) and others. “This [festival] is definitely an unprecedented sort of thing,” says NCS president and Mad Magazine artist Tom Richmond. Festival proceeds benefit a ToonSeum cartooning program for at-risk youths. Equally enticing for comics fans, on May 23, the ToonSeum opens the first-ever exhibition of winners of the NCS’s Reuben Award, cartooning’s highest honor. Past winners include Walt Kelly, Charles Schulz and Gary Larson (“The Far Side”). The show includes original art by every winner since 1947 — including, opening weekend only, an original, hand-colored piece by Bill Watterson (“Calvin & Hobbes”). “Even we professionals who are in the business are excited about this [exhibit],” says Richmond by phone from his home in the Minneapolis-St. Paul region. This year’s Reuben will be awarded at

{ILLUSTRATION BY TOM RICHMOND (FROM COVER OF NATIONAL CARTOONISTS SOCIETY CONFERENCE PROGRAM)}

Cartoonists do Pittsburgh (clockwise from upper left): Mo Willems, Brad Anderson, Rob Rogers, Joe Wos and Terri Libenson

a private, black-tie affair on Saturday. So will NCS honors in categories ranging from comic strips and magazine illustrations to editorial cartoons and feature animation. All the awards are voted on by NCS members. Pittsburgh, a city with its own NCS chapter, boasts seven finalists. “To have that high [a number] for Pittsburgh is really phenomenal,” says ToonSeum executive director Joe Wos.

PITTSBURGH COMIC ARTS FESTIVAL 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun., May 26. Various venues, 900 block of Liberty Avenue, Downtown. Street fest is free, other ticket prices vary. www.pghcomicartsfest.com

“It’s pretty huge” to be nominated for or win an NCS award, says Pittsburgh-based Michael McParlane, a previous winner whose syndicated “Mac” is nominated this year for best short-form online comic. Still, for all the family-friendly fun this weekend, if you see a cartoonist out partying, don’t be too shocked. “These people are chained to a desk 365 days a year in a very solitary job,” says Wos. “This is their chance to let loose.” D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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[PLAY REVIEW]

TALK SHOW {BY TED HOOVER} AS I WAS SITTING at South Park Theatre reviewing its production of Ellen Simon’s Moonlight & Valentino, I kept coming back to the question “Why?” Not “why?” as in “Why do I review theater?” but “Why this particular play? When there’s so much great theater out there, why this?” Moonlight & Valentino concerns a woman whose husband has just died in a traffic accident. Her best friend, her sister and her ex-stepmother show up offering time-tested grieving tips and supportive shoulders to cry on.

MOONLIGHT & VALENTINO continues through June 1. South Park Theatre, Corrigan Drive and Brownsville Road, South Park. $12. 412-831-8552 or www.southparktheatre.com

Somewhere in the play’s background, there’s an interesting idea about how women have always turned to other women for emotional support. But that slender thought is buried under Simon’s avalanche of flat, monotonous writing. These are characters who talk at rather than to each other, and I wonder why Simon doesn’t realize that her audience reaches the play’s emotional ending long before her characters do. Given that we know exactly what’s going to happen, it’s unsporting of Simon to litter the path with endless palaver. Which reminds me that theater isn’t, or

shouldn’t be, people just sitting in furniture and talking for two hours. We need action! As they’ll tell you in any drama school, theater is about objectives, obstacles and conflict. But in Moonlight & Valentino, we get four women banging on about the same stuff over and over. “I can’t go on.” “Yes, you can.” “No, I can’t.” “You can.” “Can’t.” “Can.” “You’re right!” I’ve just saved you two hours. I give credit to director Jen James, who keeps moving her cast around the stage like a meth-fueled puppet master. Perhaps realizing the static nature of the script, she refuses to allow anyone to sit in the same place for longer than two minutes. If these four actresses — Kathleen Caliendo, Adrienne Fischer, Katy Grant and Heather Irwin — get paid per mile, they’ll be able to retire. Each woman certainly does a lot of work trying to provide immediacy to the production, but Moonlight remains a tepid, wet blanket from start to finish. So why? Why did anyone read this relentlessly stagnant script and decide to stage it? Why has any theater company ever performed it? A trip to the Internet seemed called for … which only added to my confusion. Moonlight & Valentino was actually made into a poorly received film in 1995. Why did anyone think such a talky play could translate to the screen? And then, finally, I stumbled across a piece of information which answered all of my questions: The writer, Ellen Simon, is the daughter of Neil Simon. Moonlight & Valentino might not be a good example of how theater works, but it’s an excellent demonstration of how show business functions.

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FOR THE WEEK OF

05.2305.30.13

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

MAY 23 Side by Side by Sondheim

+ THU., MAY 23 {MUSIC} Like Sondheim? You’ll get a lovely earful at Side by Side by Sondheim, the ever-popular musical revue newly staged by Pittsburgh CLO. It’s 34 songs from classic shows like Company, ompany, y Follies and Anyone Can Whistle, plus selections ions from works the Broadway ay master co-composed, like Gypsy and West Side Story. yy. Tunes including “You Must st Meet My Wife,” “Broadway way Baby” and “Send in the Clowns” lowns” are performed by a cast of four: Billy Hepfinger, er, Daniel Krell, Caroline Nicolian lian and Broadway vet Lenora Nemetz. A summer-long r-long run starts tonight. Bill O’Driscoll 7:30 p.m. m. Continues through Aug. 18. CLO Cabaret, ret, 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $34.75-39.75. 412-456-6666 6 or www.clocabaret.com m

{COMEDY} Tonight, comedian John Henton visits the Steel City for the first of six shows ws this weekend at Pittsburgh Improv. Starting in 1993, Henton enton

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swapped the comedy-club audience for a laugh track in a sitcom stint that included roles in Living Single and The Hughleys, but now this Cleveland native revisits his standup roots. In recent routines, Henton picks apart topics such as parental discipline, rap songs and weird stuff on the news. Olivia Lammel 8 p.m. Continues through Sun., May 26. 166 E. Bridge St., The Waterfront, West Homestead. $15

MAY 23 JJohn oh hn Henton Hen ent

(subsequent shows are $17). 412-462-5233 or www. pittsburgh.improv.com

+ SAT., MAY 25 {WORDS} Pittsburgh-based Creative Nonfiction marks its 20th year outlet for true as a top out artfully told. Today, stories, art quarterly’s founder, the quart Gutkind, welcomes Lee Gutk working and aspiring writers to the inaugural Best of o Creative Nonfiction Conference Nonfic with a talk titled “Why Stories Matter.” True Sto Afternoon o panels Downinclude talks about the town includ business of creative craft and bu nonfiction, with local luminonfiction including memoirist naries inc Jane Bernstein; nurse and Be author Theresa Brown; and Creative Nonfiction C managing editor Hattie mana Fletcher. In writerly Fletch fashion, the day ends fashi with a happy hour. BO O 9:30 a.m.p.m. (Registration 7p for Sunday’s workshops is closed.) sh $150-165. Trust Arts $1 Education Center, Edu 805-807 Liberty Ave., 805-8 Downtown. www. Dow creativenonfiction.org crea


sp otlight All the hoopla over that nesting pair of bald eagles along the Mon, in Hays — and their presumably adorable eaglet — obscures the fact that not all birds of prey are so revered. Take vultures. They won’t win any beauty contests, and feasting on carrion isn’t a ticket to Animal Planet celebrity. (Has anyone ever put a vulture on money?) But without vultures to eat, say, dead cattle, populations of feral dogs and cats would boom, and diseases like rabies would spread. That’s just what’s happened in parts of Asia, where vulture population cratered thanks to a drug ranchers fed cattle. This eco-knowledge and more is embedded in Talons!, the otherwise upbeat and fast-paced new indoor live-flight show at the National Aviary. Imposing creatures like a male and female Eurasian eagle-owl sweep overhead; a lightning-quick Lanner falcon snatches from mid-air a snack tossed by trainers like Aviary manager of animal training Cathy Schlott (pictured). Along with a couple hooded vultures (native to Africa), peregrine falcons and even the common crow figure into the show, complete with its own “forest” set, light and sound show, and video projections. Talons! has two shows daily starting May 25. It’s all enough to make you want to hug a vulture. Bill O’Driscoll Noon and 2:30 p.m. daily. 700 Arch St., North Side. $5 plus Aviary admission ($11-13). 412-323-7235 or www.aviary.org

{FIREWORKS}

Mountains, and Fields: Small Not that there’ll be any Landscapes, Big Views, shortage of them this sumopens today at Box Heart mer, but you can likely get Expressions. A public recepyour largest and most contion with the artist is set for centrated dose of fireworks June 1. BO 11 a.m-6 p.m. at today’s Pyrofest. The annual Hartwood Acres show includes live music and food along with the flashing and booming of several different expert pyro groups. Bands include MAY 25 Cello Fury and Pyrofest The Clarks. Fireworks highlights include “Rock Love II,” a sequel to last year’s climactic display, and a show by Spain’s Ricardo Caballer Ricasa, the internationally acclaimed outfit whose credits include the closing ceremonies at the 2000 Sidney Olympics. 4523 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. BO 3-11 p.m. Middle Road, Free. 412-687-8858 or Hampton Township. $13-60 www.boxheartgallery.com (free for kids 6 and under). www.pyrofest.com {MUSIC} If you were touring with Stanley Turrentine nearly 50 years ago, you qualify as a jazz legend. But drummer {ART} Roger Humphries went on to Few art movements are as do much more, and he’s still closely identified with a single doing it. From classic recordlandscape as is the 19th cenings with the Horace Silver tury’s Hudson River School Quintet to sessions with everyPainters. Its heirs include one from Lionel Hampton Crista Pisano, who lives near to Nancy Wilson, Humphries New York’s Hudson Valley is nationally celebrated, and and paints in some of the known locally as a music same locations as her artistic educator. At 69, he remains forebears. Working in oils, a mainstay of the scene, in plein air and on a small anchoring weekly jams at CJ’s scale, she’s also inspired by Lounge, in the Strip. Tonight, scenes in North Carolina, Humphries holds down the the Adirondacks and coastal early slot at the Pittsburgh Maine, and by the marshes Cultural Trust’s free weekly of Connecticut. An exhibit of JazzLive series at Downtown’s Pisano’s work, titled Marshes, Backstage Bar. If you want

more, the late show features renowned bassist Dwayne Dolphin. Next week, the series moves outdoors, to Katz Plaza, for the summer. BO 5-8 p.m. (Late show: 8-11 p.m.). 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. Free. 412-4566666 or www.trustarts.org

MAY 28

Marshes, Mountains, and Fields: Small Lanscapes, Big Views

Art by Crista Pisano

+ WED., MAY 29 {TALK} This week, Pittsburgh Glass Center hosts worldrenowned contemporary glass artists Janusz Pozniak and Christopher McElroy. Tonight these artistsin-residence break from teaching week-long classes to discuss their work with the broader community of collectors and artists. This is a chance for glass-art junkies to interrogate the masters and find out what moves them to create their strange and striking sculptures. The weekly

talks continue the Center’s weekly summer lecture series. OL 6 p.m. 5472 Penn Ave., Friendship. Free. 412-365-2145 or www. pittsburghglasscenter.org

+ THU., MAY 30 {STAGE} “And in general music is a terrifying thing! What is it? I don’t understand it. What

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is music? What does it do? And why does it do what it does? They say music exalts the soul. Nonsense, it is not true!” The protagonist of Tolstoy’s novella The Kreutzer Sonata was undone by a tune — one that suggested that his wife was cheating with an old friend of his. But was she? Pozdnyshev, the stranger on this train, tells his story again in Irish playwright Nancy Harris’ stage adapta-

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tion. The play’s Pittsburgh premiere, from Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre, features Martin Giles as Pozdnyshev, and Beethoven’s music performed live by Juan Jaramillo and Alaine Fink. Alan Stanford directs; the first performance is tonight. BO 8 p.m. Continues through June 22. Henry Heymann Theatre, Stephen Foster Memorial, 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $25-48. 412-5616000 or www.picttheatre.org

In 2005, Nathan James debuted his solo show Growing Pains, about coming up black in Pittsburgh, amidst street violence, in the 1990s. The spoken-word work then lay dormant for some years. James himself kept busy: The Kuntu Repertory Theatre alum attended grad school for acting, remained a top-ranked slam poet, acted on The Wire and was singled out by The New York Times for his work in a production of Strindberg’s Easter. But last year, following the killing of Florida teen-ager Trayvon Martin, something angered James: He’d watched mainstream rappers rally to the cause of jailed rap star Lil Wayne while remaining virtually silent over outrages like Martin’s death and the controversial execution of Georgia inmate Troy Davis. In hopes of offering a more socially conscious vision — and with the help of a fellowship from the August Wilson Center for African American Culture — James revived and retooled Growing Pains. A few poems remain from the original, but now there are more stories and characters, and James says the piece is structured better. The 75minute show includes autobiographical material about growing up in Beltzhoover, uneasily poised between street life and the arts, and scenes with fictional characters like “Venom,” a posturing rapper. In October, James performed Growing Pains at the prestigious United Solo Theater Festival, on New York City’s Theatre Row. On Sat., May 25, the revamped Growing Pains gets its Pittsburgh premiere as part of the Wilson Center’s annual First Voice Festival. Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Sat., May 25. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10. 412-258-2700 or www.augustwilsoncenter.org

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

THEATER ABIGAIL/1702. The story of The

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Crucible’s Abigail Williams, 10 years later. Tue-Sun. Thru May 26. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. MOONLIGHT & VALENTINO. A light-hearted comedy that captures the warmth & spirit of 4 women seeking answers to life’s biggest questions. Thu-Sun. Thru June 1. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. NUNSET BOULEVARD. Fri, Sat. Thru June 8. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. ROBIN HOOD. The classic tale w/ a twist. Presented by Stage & Steel. Fri, Sat. Thru May 25. SS Peter & Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church Hall, Carnegie. 412-480-4758. SIDE BY SIDE BY SONDHEIM: A MUSICAL CELEBRATION. Collection of songs from Company, Follies, A Little Night Music, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, more. Wed-Sun. Thru Aug. 18. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769. THE WEDDING FROM HELL. Interactive murder mystery dinner

theater. Sat, 7 p.m. Thru May 25. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 412-343-6640.

COMEDY THU 23 COMEDY OPEN MIC. Thu, 9 p.m. Thru June 27 Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

THU 23 - SUN 26 JOHN HENTON. May 23-26 The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 24 CHRIS LEVKULICH. 8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. KRISH MOHAN, DAN JENNICHES, JOHN RALICH, HOSTED BY ZACH FUNK (LATE). 10 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950. MIDSEASON REPLACEMENT: AN IMPROVISED SITCOM. Fri, 8 p.m. Thru May 31 Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695. PITTSBURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE W/ MIKE WYSOCKI.

Pizza & Beer Night tuesdays $15 large pizza & pitcher domestic beer FREE POOL all night

Wind Up wednesdays

$2 Miller Lite Drafts til 12am FREE POOL all night ½ off Select Appetizers 9-11pm

Thirsty thursdays

$7 Yuengling Pitchers til 12am Karaoke 9:30-1:30am

Happy Hour

6-8pm

Tues-Fri

Cheer on the Pittsburgh Penguins at Cattivo

Now Booking Events, Parties & more Open 7 days a week for special events contact cattivo44@comcast.net

146 44th Street Lawrenceville PA 15201 412.687.2157 www.cattivo.biz Open Tues-Sat 4-2am Check our website & Facebook page for more events

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

Fri, 9 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995.

FRI 24 - SUN 25 NICK GAZA. May 24-25 Latitude 40, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

SAT 25

WED 29 JOKEE OAKEE. Comedy open stage hosted by Tonnochi:B. Wed Younger’s, North Side. 412-452-3267. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

THE LUPONES: MADE UP MUSICALS. Sat, 8 p.m. Thru ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY July 27 Steel City Improv Theater, HERITAGE MUSEUM. Shadyside. 323-401-0465. Military artifacts THIS IMPROVISED and exhibits on the LIFE. 8 & 10 p.m. Allegheny Valley’s Arcade Comedy industrial heritage. Theater, Downtown. www. per Tarentum. a 412-339-0608. pghcityp 724-224-7666.

EXHIBITS

FULL LIST ONLINE .com

MON 27 TOTALLY FREE MONDAYS. Mon, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-404-2695.

TUE 28 OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

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Weddings, Nightclubs, Proms, Corporate Events... We’ll do our part to make it perfect.

AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. A Stitch in Jewish Time: Provocative Textiles. Group exhibition feat. contemporary artists from the United States & abroad. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8010. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix. Feat. imagery, film & oral history narratives to explore communities, cultures, & innovations. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic roll-played musical instruments and music boxes in a mansion setting. Call for appointment. O’Hara. 412-782-4231. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. BugWorks. Feat. beautiful photography of insects, amazing specimens, & live bugs! Garden of Light: Works by Paula Crevoshay. Feat. nearly 70 fine art jewelry pieces. Ongoing: Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II iron-making technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. CONTINUES ON PG. 44

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Humanity is a turning point and we have a choice: Continue on the same destructive path of greed, corruption and competition or build a saner and fairer way of life for everyone.

VISUAL

Come to a free multi-media presentation & talk offering a message of hope that covers the following topics & more.

ART

• Humanity at the Crossroads • The Rise of People Power • Our Spiritual Heritage • Crop Circles and the UFO phenomena • The Age of Miracles • The Coming of A World Teacher • A Brilliant Future Civilization

“Cicada,” by Garrett Hain, from Significant and Sublime at Panza Gallery

NEW THIS WEEK BOXHEART GALLERY. Marshes, Mountains, & Fields. Paintings by Crista Pisano. Opening May 28, reception: June 1, 5-8 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858.

ONGOING 28 WEST SECOND GALLERY & STUDIO SPACE. The Female Construction. Annual Women Exhibition. Greensburg. 724-205-9033. 3RD STREET GALLERY. Waterworks. Pittsburgh Watercolor Society annual member show. “Off the Walls Blast” Closing Reception: May 25, 5-8 p.m. Carnegie. 412-276-5233. 709 PENN GALLERY. Abstract Jazz Works. Abstract oil paintings created during live performances with Jesse Dandy, Art Blakey, Winton Marsalis, Jimmy Owens, & others. Live painting w/ musician Roger Humphries, June 9, 4:45-6:15 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. The National Society of Arts & Letters’ National Visual Art Competition. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. SOLO Exhibits. Work by Leslie Ansley, Jo-Anne Bates & Tina Brewer. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BE GALLERIES. The Latest Works. Work by Vivian Fliegel. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2606. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. Original Belgian Botanical Illustrations. Bruxelles 1828 Hand Colored Lithography, presented by J. & K. Willison. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Good Things Come In

Threes. Work by Michael Flaherty, Jennifer RobbinsMullin, & George Yancura. Harmony. 724-452-0539. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Travels Behind the Lens. Work by Mary Beth Kratsas, Aldrich Jenkins, & Ted Scanga. Verona. 412-828-1031. THE BREW HOUSE. Botanizing the Asphalt. Site-specific work by Edith Abeyta. South Side. 412-381-7767. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh Annual Exhibition. The 102nd show from the oldest continuously exhibiting visual arts organization in the country. One & the Same. Sound installation by Susan Philipsz. Japan is the Key: Collecting Prints & Ivories, 1900–1920. Collections from the early years of the Carnegie Institute. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Rebirth. Work by Connie Cantor, Jean-Gaudaire Thor, & Heather Tabacchi. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. EASTSIDE GALLERY. New Door. Work by Joan Downing, Bernie Pintar, Phiris Kathryn, Sickles, more. East Liberty. 412-465-0140. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. E Block. Photography by Mark Perrott. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. A Kind of Alchemy: Medieval Persian Ceramics. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Live, Waste, Live. Window exhibit by Marie Barcic feat. printed & stenciled full body portraits of Pittsburghers grown from compost. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALERIE WERNER, THE

MANSIONS ON FIFTH. RetroFRESH. Contemporary paintings by James Kennedy, Claire Hardy, Donald Deskey, Alexander Minewski, Louise Evans-Scott, Vladimir Naiditch, & Henri de Waroquier. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Material Matters: An Adventure! Work by Priscilla Hollingsworth & Jeffrey Moyer. Shadyside. 412-441-6605. THE GALLERY 4. Toys in the Attic. Work by Alessandra Sulpy. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Faith in Rituals. Work by Dave D’Incau Jr., Lindsey Hayakawa, & Stephen Haynes. Garfield. 412-361-2262. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. INTERNATIONAL IMAGES. 1st Annual Student Show. Work by Bethany Summers, Carter Warren, Chloe Newman, Nicole Catalfamo, Rigel Richards, more. Sewickley. 412-741-3036. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Valencia. 724-316-9326. MAKE YOUR MARK ARTSPACE & COFFEEHOUSE. Steel City Medley. Photographs by Jay Ressler. Point Breeze. 412-365-2117. MATTRESS FACTORY. Feminist and.., Ongoing Installations. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Rare Gems. Work by Thommy Conroy. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. In- Visible’ : When Personal Is Political. Artworks of Dafna Rehavia-Hanauer. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. teapots! Shadyside. 412-441-5200. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Natalie Gable. Paintings. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915.

BABUSHKAS, HARD HATS & CARRIE FURNACES TOUR Enjoy the magical mix of immigrants and industry! Tour highlights include a historic steel mill Pump House, a steel-heritage museum, an awe-inspiring blast furnace and much more!

SATURDAYS JUNE 8, JULY 13, AUG. 10, AUG. 31 AND OCT. 19

www.coachride.com 1-800-342-2349

CARRIE BLAST FURNACE TOUR

Experience the scale and awe-inspiring Carrie Blast Furnaces! Learn the entire iron-making process, with a tour led by a retired steelworker, and why Pittsburgh was once the steel-making capitol of the world! Shuttle service provided by Lenzner.

WWW.RIVERSOFSTEEL.COM

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NEXT WEEK: 2012 AVN Best New Starlet

E COUPLE’SANYIT22 WED, M

Samantha Saint MAY 29-JUNE 1

135 9th Street 412-281-7703 www.blushexotic.com DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.22/05.29.2013

FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. LAWRENCE HALL GALLERY. Silk Road. Photo exhibition of images taken along the Silk Road in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Nepal & India in 1972 by Albin & Virginia Curtze. Downtown. 412-391-4100. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. MCG Invitational Arts Exhibition. Juried exhibition for students in Pittsburgh Public Schools. North Side. 412-322-1773. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Butterfly Forest. Watch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises to flutter among tropical blooms. Summer Flower Show. Glass art surrounded by colorful blooms. Feat. work by Daviea Davis, Jason Forck, Steven Sadvary, Lisa Platt, more. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on

VISUAL ART

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NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Regional Multi-Media Art Show. Juried art show feat. amateur & professional artists. Ross. 412-364-3622. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. Faces & Places: Photographs of Old Economy. Never before seen photography from the late 19th & early 20th centuries. Ambridge. 724-266-4500. PANZA GALLERY. Significant & Sublime: The Critical Role of Art Teachers in Public Education. Feat. work of 23 Pittsburgh-area public school teachers. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. Photography of the Great Gatsby Era. See what cameras were popular in the Roaring 20’s including Kodak Vest Pocket Cameras & Vanity Cameras, beautifully housed in Art Deco styled cases. Some even came complete with a mirror and lipstick for those flappers on the go! North Side. 412-231-7881. PICTURESQUE PHOTOGRAPHY & GIFTS. Photography by Brenda Knoll. Lawrenceville. 412-688-0240. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Fiberart International 2013. Juried exhibition of contemporary fiber art. Presented by the Fiberarts Guild of Pittsburgh. 30:2. Group exhibition presented by Associated Artists of Pittsburgh. Coming Home. Fabric installation by Kay Healy. Friday Nights at Guitar Center. Work by Allison Kaufman. Rites of Passage. Oil paintings by Maggie Mills. Shadyside.

local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Lost & Found: Sustainable High Fashion. Contemporary fashions created w/ repurposed & upcycled elements. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Cartoon Legends: 65 Years of the Reuben Awards. Feat. a who’s who of comics & cartooning spanning

412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Consciousness. Flameworked glass by Eunsuh Choi. Friendship. 412-365-2145. SCHOOLHOUSE ART CENTER. Cinco de Mayo Art Show. Work by South Arts artists. Bethel Park. 412-831-8156. SHADY SIDE ACADEMY. Art Beat. Group show feat. Atticus Adams, Kim Beck, Seth Clark, Sarika Goulatia, Ryder Henry, Lori Hepner, Thaddeus Mosley, more. Fox Chapel. 412-968-3000. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Continuum. Work by Doug DuBois & Aaron Blum. South Side. 412-431-1810. SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Kevin Turner: New Work. Sculpture. Downtown. 412-261-7003 x 15. SPACE. Thad Kellstadt: On the Glass Surf. Video, installation & sound create a haunted paradise on the border of fracture & utopia. Downtown. 412-325-7723. TRINITY GALLERY. Adrienne Borkowski: A Solo Exhibition. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2458. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. An Art(ist) in Motion. Work by Aaronel deRoy Gruber. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Memento Mori. Sculpture by Gregory Barsamian. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

over 60 years & rarely seen original art. Opens May 23, part of the Pittsburgh Comic Arts Festival. Downtown. 412-232-0199. WILDCARD. Highlights From PGH365: AIGA Pittsburgh’s Annual Design Competition & Exhibition. Feat. designs by Brett Yasko, Nick Caruso, Eve Faulkes, strawberryluna, MAYA, more. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651.

FESTIVALS SUN 26 PITTSBURGH COMIC ARTS FESTIVAL. Feat. autograph & sketch sessions w/ over 60 of the nations top comic artists & cartoonists, vendors, art activities, chalk artists & caricaturists, panel discussions, more. 900 block of Liberty Ave., Downtown. 12-5 p.m. 412-232-0199.

FUNDRAISERS SAT 25 JAXSON’S JOG. 10k, 5k, & 1 mile

run. All proceeds go to Global CDH. 8:30 a.m. North Park Boathouse, Allison Park. 412-225-2310. NEW JACK SWING OLD SCHOOL PARTY. Feat. vendors, live painting, & performances by Vanessa German, Lhagic, more. Part of the African Liberation Day & benefits the Feed the Hood Project. 8 p.m. Cabaret, Homewood. 412-449-9171.

SUN 26 BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022.

LITERARY THU 23 ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. HOMUNCULUS: A READING FOR THE LAB. Feat. Ed Steck & Nikki Allen. 7:30 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 773-425-1531. SPANISH CONVERSATION CLUB. Second and Fourth Thu of every month, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

FRI 24 JOANNA LOWE. Spoken word performance. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. OAKLAND OPEN MIC. Poetry, music & political speeches welcome. Second and Fourth Fri of every month, 7 p.m. 610-731-1804.

SAT 25 LITANALYSIS: READING FICTION W/ FREUD. The Cat’s Table by Michael Ondaatje. 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-661-4224. SUSTAINING WONDER: REBOOTING YOUR WRITE MIND. Writing workshop. Sat, 10 a.m.12 p.m. Thru May 25 Wilkins School Community Center, Swissvale. 412-244-8458.

MON 27 BRING YOUR OWN BARD: SHAKESPEARE’S MEN. Informal scene night, actors & non-actors read works of Shakespeare. 7:30 p.m. Te Cafe, Squirrel Hill. 412-521-6406. THIRD ON THIRD. Seated readings of screenplays written by local screenwriters. Every third Mon, 7 p.m. Thru Aug. 19 3rd Street Gallery, Carnegie. 412-276-5233.

TUE 28 LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Tue, 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-9650.

WED 29 SANDWICHVILLE: WRITER’S SHOWCASE #9. Feat. Sarah LaPonte, Tameka Cage Conley, & Artnoose. Presented by Cyberpunk


Apocalypse. 7 p.m. Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-999-9009.

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

KIDSTUFF

EVENT: City of Play’s

The City Spree footrace, Bakery

THU 23 SPRING COMICS CLUB. Learn about the visual & narrative elements of comic strips & graphic novels. Thu, 4-6 p.m. Thru May 23 Assemble, Garfield. 773-425-1531.

B Y O L IV IA L AMME L

by Venture Outdoors. 9-11 a.m. Moraine State Park, Butler. 412-255-0564. LAUREL HIGHLANDS HIKING TRAIL QUEST. Sat. Thru May 25 412-255-0564.

AFTERNOON OF THE ELVES. Play based on the book by Janet Taylor ECO-TOUR. Paddle tour presented Lisle. Presented by Playhouse Jr. by Venture Outdoors. 9-11:30 a.m. Sat, Sun. Thru June 9 Pittsburgh Moraine State Park, Butler. Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. 412-255-0564. HONK! JR. A modern version of Hans Christian Andersen’s The Ugly Duckling. Presented CIVILIAN by Playhouse Jr. Sat, Sun. CONSERVATION Thru May 26 Pittsburgh CORPS CAMP TOUR. Playhouse, Oakland. 10 a.m. Raccoon Creek 412-392-8000. State Park, Hookstown. HUCK FINN. www. per a p 724-899-3611. Contemporary pghcitym o .c adaptation of Mark Twain’s novel. Sat, Sun. SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, Thru May 26 Pittsburgh 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. Oakland. 412-477-4677.

SUN 26

MON 27

FULL LIST ONLINE

TUE 28

FRI 24 - MON 27 OUTDOOR EXTRAVAGANZA. Outdoor activities, workshops, evening entertainment, more. Presented by the Butler Outdoor Club. May 24-27 Breakneck Campground, Portersville. 724-283-0191.

SAT 25 BEGINNER PADDLE. Presented

NIGHTLY STANDARD

It’s a pretty interesting event; it’s a race without a course. You get points for going to a checkpoint. They have stickers they give out and the stickers go down in value the more people who have been to that checkpoint before you, so you have to think about strategy. It helps if you know the city. It is definitely different to see it on foot — you notice a lot more. I’ve been to most of the neighborhoods, but I ended up in an area that I wasn’t so familiar with and that made it a little more difficult to find some of the checkpoints. A few months ago, I started [running plan] Couch to 5K because my girlfriend runs marathons and I wanted to be able to keep up with her. This is the farthest I’ve ever run; I actually ended up running 10 miles. I think having a lot of little breaks made that easier.

SAT 25

OUTSIDE

SAT, MAY 24 • 9PM POP/ROCK/JAZZ

May 19

SECOND GRADE SCHOOLTIME: MEET THE ORCHESTRA. 10:30 a.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

PLAY W/ CLAY AT THE HANDBUILDING TABLE. Ages 3+. Sun, 12-3 p.m. Thru May 26 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

GOOD BROTHER EARL WITH THE HAWKEYES

WHEN: Sun.,

FRI 24

SUN 26

FRI, MAY 24 • 9PM ALT COUNTRY

CRITIC: Kenn Hamm, 31, a software engineer from Park Place

ADVENTURES W/ CLIFFORD THE BIG RED DOG. 9-foot tall Clifford w/ tail slide, build a sandcastle on T-Bone’s beach, play instruments in the Musical Marina, more. Thru Sept. 1 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 25 - SUN 26

AMERICANA CABINET

Square, East Liberty

THU 23 - WED 29

DISCOVERY GARDEN DAY. Games, hands-on crafts, seed planting, storytelling, more. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. SATURDAY CRAFTERNOON: RELIEF PRINTING W/ CALLIE GARP. 1-4 p.m. Assemble, Garfield.

THUR, MAY 23 • 8PM

OTHER STUFF THU 23 THE DEN: A SPECIAL PROGRAMMING SERIES FOR NEW ADULTS. Video games, board games, easy drop-in art projects, book discussions, more. Second and Fourth Thu of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. GLOBAL CHALLENGES & LOCAL IMPACTS: VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN. Panel discussion & Q&A. Presented by Global Solutions Pittsburgh. 6-8 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-471-7852. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH.

Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. MEDITATION & WHOLE LIFE TRANSFORMATION. Supreme Meditation & the Science of Transformation w/ Acharya Kedar. Free public program. Doors open at 7:15, seating ends at 8 p.m. 7:15 p.m. Winchester Thurston, Upper School, Shadyside. 724-420-5826. THE MOM CON. Conference series designed to inspire & empower moms to pursue their passions while raising their kids. 8:30 a.m. DoubleTree Hotel - Green Tree, Green Tree. 412-606-7794. PITTSBURGH RECORD FEST #9. Record swap. 7 p.m. Belvedere’s, Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

THU 23 - SAT 25 DALTON LEE: MAGIC & ILLUSION. Premiere performance of BIOHAZARD. May 23-25, 7:30 p.m. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 724-413-6884.

MON, MAY 27 • 9:30PM

OPEN STAGE WITH CRAIG KING TUES, MAY 28 • 9PM JAZZ SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES WITH

Meet and Greet the Team on May 24 at 7pm

COLTER HARPER TRIO WED, MAY 29 • 9PM ROCK

at

JOHN WAYNE AND THE PAIN

in Bloomfield.

Straub American Lager 22 oz. draft will be $3.50

OPEN FOR LUNCH Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 41 2.682.0177

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

TRIVIA

MAY 23 CITY BUSES

with Big Tom

MAY 30

$2.50 LEINENKUGEL BREWS $5 EVIL DRINKS

LET THEM EAT CAKE, GIRL SCOUT, COOKIETOM

WEDNESDAY

JUNE 6 GRANDCHILDREN

ACOUSTIC MUSIC

THURSDAY 10 0p pm m

with Mike D. $2.50 YUENGLING

$2.50 COORS L LIG IGH HT T

$3 AMERICAN HONEY

FRI 24 PARTY IN THE TROPICS. Cocktails, dancing, more. 7-11 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914.

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JEKYL AND HYDE | 140 S. 18TH STREET 412-488-0777 | BARSMART.COM/JEKYLANDHYDE LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

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LUNCHTIME

LIVE AT

SCHENLEY PLAZA

[WORDS] PENN-LIBERTY CULTURAL DISTRICT WALKING TOUR. Fri, 12-1 p.m. Thru May 31 Katz Plaza, Downtown. 412-471-5808.

SAT 25

MON 27 MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

AFRICAN LIBERATION DAY PARADE & CELEBRATION. Speaker: Kofi Taharka. 11 a.m. Crescent Elementary School, East Hills. 412-449-9171. DOWNTOWN HAUNTED WALKING TOUR. Begins at City County Building, Downtown. Sat. Thru Aug. 31 412-302-5223. FREE SAT PRACTICE TEST. 8:30 a.m. College Nannies & Tutors, QUILT IN A DAY. w/ Patricia McCandless. 412-837-2353. Knoechel & Eleanor Burns. HIS HOLINESS THE 33RD MENRI 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Harmony Museum, TRIZIN: ORDINARY MIND & THE Harmony. 724-452-7341. TRUE NATURE OF THE MIND. A SLOVAK LESSONS. For beginning talk & blessing from the spiritual students. Sponsored by the head of Bon. Benefit dinner follows Western PA Slovak Cultural at 6:30 p.m. 3-5 p.m. First United Association. Tue. Thru June 4 Methodist Church Pittsburgh, Mount Lebanon Public Shadyside. 412-904-1112. Library, Mt. Lebanon. INCLINE HAUNTED 412-531-2990. When he was 8 years old, WALKING TOUR. SOCIAL SECURITY Begins at the bottom was taken by his father to a RESCUE. Learn how of the Monongahela monastery where he began learning to read, write www. per to make the best of Incline. Sat. Thru Oct. 26 pa pghcitym and chant. In the mid-1960s, Menri was selected as the the new social security 412-302-5223. .co 33rd spiritual leader of Bon, one of Tibet’s five main changes & benefits. KOREAN FOR 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon religious traditions. Saturday, at First United Methodist BEGINNERS. Korean Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Church of Pittsburgh, he’ll offer a talk entitled grammar & basic conversation. Sat, 412-531-1912. 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. “Ordinary Mind and the True Nature of the Mind,” 412-622-3151. and a blessing. 3-5 p.m. Sat., May 25. Benefit dinner: KOREAN II. For those who already 6:30 p.m. 5401 Centre Ave., Shadyside. $12-30; dinner BACKYARD COMPOSTING have a basic understanding of $55. 412-904-1112 or www.olmoling.org WORKSHOP. Learn the Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat Carnegie importance of compost, how to set up a compost pile, how to Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. maintain & use your compost. submissions for Volume 3, Issue 2. floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA 6:30 p.m. East End Food Co-op, Theme is “travel.” Submit poetry House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by Point Breeze. 412-242-7726. about physical travel/world travels, dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina COMPETITIVE SCRABBLE. travels of the mind, travels outside Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. Seeking new players, no FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. of the box, etc. Submit no more SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. experience necessary. Wednesdays, Auditions for Playbook. than 3 of your best. http://www. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing Squirrel Hill. 412-422-7878. blastfurnacepress.com May 27. Prepare a 32-bar selection, follows. No partner needed. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). BRICOLAGE THEATER. Seeking call for more information. First Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon stories that are true, funny, & Presbyterian Church, Washington, Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. between 1,500 to 2,000 words 412-296-2587. 412-683-5670. 412-531-1912. for WordPlay, a new storytelling THE RAGE OF THE STAGE SWING CITY. Learn & practice event. Email submissions to alan@ swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. olifson.com. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. THE DAP CO-OP. Seeking 412-759-1569. [VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY] performers & artists to participate in First Fridays - Art in a Box. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL For more information, email HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly thedapcoopzumba@hotmail.com. letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. 412-403-7357. The Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival and the Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. GLCC. Seeking 2D art submissions BELLYDANCE CLASS W/ Pittsburgh JazzLive International Festival both begin for Super! Exploring the JEMEENA. Sun, 10 a.m. Thru Homoerotic Subtext of the Superon June 7, and the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust is seeking June 30 Wilkins School Community hero Culture. More info at http:// volunteers for both. Arts Festival volunteers are needed Center, Swissvale. 412-337-1846. www.glccpgh.org/ 724-331-9692. to work as, among other things, booth-sitters, infoCIVIL WAR VETERANS THE PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR booth concierges and gallery assistants. Help is needed CEREMONY. Presented by the SOCIETY. Seeking entries for 67th in a variety of capacities at the various JazzLive Westmoreland County Historical Annual International Aqueous locations in the Cultural District. Call 412-456-2697 or Society. 2 p.m. St. Clair Cemetery, Open exhibition. http://www. visit www.3riversartsfest.org/volunteer. Greensburg. 724-532-1935 x 210. pittsburghwatercolorsociety.com TRIBUTE TO VETERANS. 412-731-0636. Honoring those who have served in WESTMORELAND MUSEUM the nation’s wars, including Tuskegee OF AMERICAN ART. Seeking PLAYERS. Auditions for a sexy, Airmen. Guest speaker: Regis Darrow LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice individual artists & artist groups conversational English. Wed, steampunk play adaptation of Bobonis, Sr. 2 p.m. Homewood for month-long exhibitions in a 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. Oscar Wilde’s horror novel, The Cemetery, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-1822. new transitional gallery measuring. 412-622-3151. Picture of Dorian Gray. Call or WOMEN IN CARTOONING. Panel Artists will be responsible for all THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. visit www.facebook.com/rageof discussion exploring topics & issues aspects of their exhibition. Send A meeting of jugglers & spinners. thestage for info. South Park facing women in cartooning in images & a brief introduction to All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Theatre, Bethel Park. 724-292-8427. the work to: bljones@wmuseumaa. the past, present & future. Part of Union Project, Highland Park. the Pittsburgh Comic Arts Festival. org w/ a cc: to jotoole@wmuseumaa. 412-363-4550. 1:15 p.m. Bricolage, Downtown. org & jmcgarry@wmuseumaa.org. BLAST FURNACE. Seeking 412-232-0199. URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.22/05.29.2013

PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST

SUBMISSIONS

His Holiness


Savage Love

Immunization...

{BY DAN SAVAGE}

Twenty-one-year-old female here. When we were both 14, my first boyfriend took advantage of me. One day, we were kissing with him on top of me. We were both fully clothed, and he started rubbing up against me. I didn’t realize he was dry-humping me until after he had to leave to clean himself up. He never asked for permission. Once I understood what had happened, I felt violated. He’d also groped my boobs on another occasion without asking. He broke up with me a couple months later. I haven’t spoken to him in seven years. This hasn’t scarred me too much. However, it’s very painful to think about what happened. I also avoid having sex with someone on top of me, because it reminds me of what happened and I start panicking. I want some closure so I can move on. I don’t want to report him to the police because it’s not necessary — it happened so long ago. As far as I’m concerned, it wasn’t rape. But I do feel like I was exploited, and it was not consensual. I want to contact him and ask him to apologize because I feel a sincere apology would help me get over this. But he lives on the other side of the country, and I have no way of contacting him besides looking him up on Facebook. I don’t think FB is the right place to talk about this. How can I get in touch with him in a way that’s appropriate without having to see him?

betrayed my trust by sharing these fantasies with others. Fast-forward to wife No. 2. She is fabulous. She is respectful of my trust issues and has helped me in getting over much of it. When she says, “I’ll think about it,” she really does. And the sex has been amazing. We have explored things I only dreamed about. So what is the problem? I can’t bring myself to ask her for two things that are more than bucket-list issues to me. I am a closet crossdresser. I want to make love to her in stockings and a teddy. I made this request to my ex, and it resulted in humiliation. (She even shared it with my son out of spite.) And I want us to try watersports. When this came up during marriage counseling with my first wife, the counselor accused me of degrading my marriage. So how do I screw up the courage to ask wife No. 2 to let me dress up in women’s underwear and have her pee on me? Just writing about it is making my stomach twist, but when I look into her eyes and feel the trust, I almost blurt it out.

WHAT IF YOUR KINKS AREN’T JUST THINGS YOUR SECOND WIFE ISN’T INTERESTED IN EXPLORING, BUT ATTRACTIONKILLERS?

WOULD’VE SAID NO

Let’s game this out. While it’s possible your ex-boyfriend did this on purpose — he knew you wouldn’t agree to it, he did it anyway, you feel violated because you were violated — it’s also possible this was an accident. I’m not excusing his behavior, particularly the nonconsensual boob-groping, but very few boys have achieved complete mastery over their dicks by age 14. Sometimes those things go off when we do not want them to. And accidentally blowing a load in your pants is an experience most boys find deeply humiliating. If your boyfriend was a generally decent guy, and if there’s a chance this was an accident, contacting him — even via Facebook — will probably get the apology you want. But if he was a selfish, manipulative piece of shit who took advantage of your naiveté, odds are good that he remains a selfish, manipulative piece of shit. Ask yourself how you’ll feel if he responds to your request for an apology with GIFs of people laughing their asses off. If the answer is “infinitely worse,” don’t contact him. P.S. Two more tips to avoid feeling worse: Don’t go to the police with this, and stay out of the comments. I am a straight male. The few times I shared fantasies with my first wife, she used them as weapons in the many battles we fought over the years. She also

the Power to Protect

May is Hepatitis can be caused by viruses that attack your liver. Hepatitis B virus can be spread by intimate contact. Each year in the U.S., viral hepatitis kills 5,000 people and sends many to the hospital. You can protect yourself from Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B infections with vaccines. Talk to your health care provider about these immunizations that protect your liver, or contact the Allegheny County Health Department at 412-687-ACHD or www.achd.net.

Immunization strengthens what the body does naturally!

PRETTY UNDER NORMAL THINGS

You love your new wife, she loves you, you’re both GGG — it all sounds so good, so functional, especially compared to your first marriage. Congrats. But you held your two biggest kinks back, and now you’re sweating because the stakes are so high. This is why I urge people to lay those kink cards on the table early. The longer you wait, the more emotionally invested you become, the higher the stakes. Because what if your kinks aren’t just things your second wife isn’t interested in exploring, but attraction-killers? My advice: Find a way to broach the topics of crossdressing and piss play without having to admit that they turn you on, e.g., go see a drag show (drag isn’t crossdressing, but it will allow you to broach the men-in-dresses subject generally) and find a porn film with one brief, not-too-hardcore piss scene and watch it together. If she reacts in a neutral or positive way, lay those last two kink cards on the table. If she reacts negatively, you might just die with those wishes unfulfilled. Pro tip: Nervous kinksters can screw up indirect here-are-two-things-some-people-do conversations by telegraphing disgust. Someone who’s into rubber says, “Isn’t it weird how some people get off on wearing rubber clothes and gas masks?” The non-kinky partner picks up on the word “weird” and responds with, “Yeah, that rubber stuff is fucked up.” If you set a negative tone, your wife is likely to pick up on that. So keep your reactions as neutral as possible. My newest book — American Savage: Insights, Slights, and Fights on Faith, Sex, Love, and Politics — has been called one of the best books of May by Amazon.com, and Publishers Weekly says it’s one of the best books of the summer. And it comes out this week. Look for American Savage in bookstores now!

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Every time you click “reload,” the saints cry.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

05.22-05.29

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman admitted that physicists can’t really define “energy,” let alone understand it. “We have no knowledge of what energy is,” he said. “We do not have a picture that energy comes in little blobs of a definite amount.” While it’s unlikely that in the coming weeks you Tauruses will advance the scientific understanding of energy, you will almost certainly boost your natural grasp of what energy feels like both inside and outside of your body. You will develop a more intuitive knack for how it ebbs and flows. You will discover useful tips about how to make it work for you rather than against you. You’re already a pretty smart animal, but soon you’ll get even smarter.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

Giant sequoias are the biggest trees on the planet. Many are more than 300 feet tall and 30 feet wide. Their longevity is legendary, too. They can live for 2,000 years. And yet their seeds are tiny. If you had a bag of 91,000 seeds, it would weigh one pound. I suspect there’s currently a resemblance between you and the giant sequoia, Gemini. You’re close to acquiring a small kernel that has the potential to grow into a strong and enduring creation. Do you know what I’m talking about? Identify it. Start nurturing it.

The German word Fernweh can be translated as “wanderlust.” Its literal meaning is “farsickness,” or “an ache for the distance.” Another German word, Wandertrieb, may be rendered as “migratory instinct” or “passion to travel.” I suspect urges like these may be welling up in you right now. You could use a break from your familiar pleasures and the comforts you’ve been taking for granted. Moreover, you would attract an unexpected healing into your life by rambling off into the unknown.

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

Don’t take yourself too seriously. The more willing you are to make fun of your problems, the greater the likelihood is that you will actually solve them. If you’re blithe and breezy and buoyant, you will be less of a magnet for suffering. To this end, say the following affirmations out loud. 1. “I’m willing to make the mistakes if someone else is willing to learn from them.” 2. “I’m sorry, but I’m not apologizing anymore.” 3. “Suffering makes you deep. Travel makes you broad. I’d rather travel.” 4. “My commitment is to truth, not consistency.” 5. “The hell with enlightenment, I want to have a tantrum.” 6. “I stopped fighting my inner demons. We’re on the same side now.”

We call it “longing,” says poet Robert Haas, “because desire is full of endless distances.” In other words, you and the object of your yearning may be worlds apart even though you are right next to each other. For that matter, there may be a vast expanse between you and a person you consider an intimate ally; your secret life and his or her secret life might be mysteries to each other. That’s the bad news, Scorpio. The good news is that you’re in a phase when you have extraordinary power to shrink the distances. Get closer! Call on your ingenuity and courage to do so.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Would you buy a stuffed bunny or a baby blanket that was handcrafted by a prisoner on death row? Would you go to a cafe and eat a sandwich that was made by an employee who was screaming angrily at another employee while he made your food? Would you wear a shirt that was sewn by a 10-year-old Bangladeshi girl who works 12 hours every day with a machine that could cut off her fingers if she makes one wrong move? Questions like these will be good for you to ask yourself, Leo. It’s important for you to evaluate the origins of all the things you welcome into your life — and to make sure they are in alignment with your highest values and supportive of your well-being.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Having good posture tends to make you look alert and vigorous. More than that, it lowers stress levels in your tissues and facilitates the circulation of your bodily fluids. You can breathe better, too. In the coming weeks, I urge you to give yourself this blessing: the gift of good posture. I encourage you to bestow a host of other favors, too. Specialize in treating yourself with extra sweetness and compassion. Explore different ways to get excited, awaken your sense of wonder and be in love with your life. If anyone calls you a self-involved narcissist, tell them you’re just doing what your astrologer prescribed.

fall in love with a monkey made of rags. With a plywood squirrel. With a botanical atlas. With an oriole. With a ferret. With the forest one sees to the right when riding in a cart. With human beings whose names still move me.” Your task, Aquarius, is to experiment with his approach to love. Make it a fun game: See how often you can feel adoration for unexpected characters and creatures. Be infatuated with curious objects … with snarky Internet memes … with fleeting phenomena like storms and swirling flocks of birds and candy spilled on the floor. Your mission is to supercharge your lust for life.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Scientists in Brazil discovered a huge new body of water 13,000 feet beneath the Amazon River. It’s completely underground. Named the Hamza River, it moves quite slowly, and is technically more of an aquifer than a river. It’s almost as long as the Amazon, and much wider. In accordance with the astrological omens, Pisces, I’m making the Hamza River your symbol of the week. Use it to inspire you as you uncover hid-

den resources. Meditate on the possibility that you have within you a secret reservoir of vitality that lies beneath your well-known sources. See if you can tap into deep feelings that are so deep you’ve been barely conscious of them.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “I’m still learning,” said Michelangelo when he was 87 years old. For now, he’s your patron saint. With his unflagging curiosity as your inspiration, maybe your hunger for new teachings will bloom. You will register the fact that you don’t already know everything there is to know … you have not yet acquired all the skills you were born to master … you’re still in the early stages of exploring whole swaths of experience that will be important to you as you become the person you want to be. Even if you’re not enrolled in a formal school, it’s time to take your education to the next level. Write your ultimate personal ad. Address it to your current partner if you’re already paired. Share it at Freewillastrology.com.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Are you ready to go deeper, Sagittarius? In fact, would you be willing to go deeper and deeper and deeper? I foresee the possibility that you might benefit from diving in over your head. I suspect that the fear you feel as you dare to descend will be an acceptable trade-off for the educational thrills you will experience once you’re way down below. The darkness you encounter will be fertile, not evil. It will energize you, not deplete you. And if you’re worried that such a foray might feel claustrophobic, hear my prediction: In the long run it will enhance your freedom.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In the course of his 91 years on the planet, artist Pablo Picasso lived in many different houses, some of them rentals. When inspired by the sudden eruption of creative urges, he had no inhibitions about drawing and doodling on the white walls of those temporary dwellings. On one occasion, his landlord got upset. He ordered Picasso to pay him a penalty fee so that he could have the sketches painted over. Given the fact that Picasso ultimately became the best-selling artist of all time, that landlord may have wished he’d left the squiggles intact. In every way you can imagine, Capricorn, don’t be like that landlord in the coming week.

KEEP CALM AND START BEGGING FOR VOTES BEST OF PITTSBURGH

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

VOTING BEGINS 06.05.13

“I was often in love with something or someone,” wrote Polish poet Czesław Miłosz. “I would

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GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

WORK 50 + SERVICES 50 + LIVE 53 + STUDIES 50 + WELLNESS 52

SERVICES

WORK

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CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888420-3808 www.cash4car. com (AAN CAN) Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

HAULING

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ADOPTION Need a job? Looking for a new employee? Call 31-MEDIA to place a Classified ad in Pittsburgh City Paper. Call today to speak with one of our Classified advertising representatives. Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper TODAY! Adoption: A Suburban life, Secure future, love & Laughter for your Newborn. Expenses Paid Call Maria at 866-429-0222

ADOPTION A Loving Family longs to provide everything for first baby. Travel, Laughter, Security. Expenses Paid Rachel

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Pat Catan’s Craft Center *New Store Opening* A value priced craft, floral, and art supplies store is coming to Mt. Nebo Point Plaza in the Pittsburgh area and we are looking to fill the following positions: • Custom Picture Framer: Custom Framers will have 3+ years of custom framing experience and excellent math and measurement skills. • Floral Designer: Designers will have the ability to create original and custom floral designs, an aptitude with floral materials, and a sound knowledge of flower varieties. • Sales Associates/Cashiers Qualified candidates will possess strong customer service skills, be able to work in a fast paced environment, and must be able to work a flexible schedule including some nights and weekends. Applications are available at: 250 Mt. Nebo Point Rd., Pittsburgh in the Mt. Nebo Point Plaza EOE

SURROGATE MOTHERS WANTED Established Program Conducted By A Local Law Firm Seeks Compassionate, Loving Women To Carry Couple’s Biological Babies, Generous Compensation Paid To Those Women Who Qualify. M. Lawrence Shields III Attorney At Law 412-221-0640 X 101

CLASSES AIRLINE CAREERS – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-4923059 (AAN CAN) Advertise Here Today! ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-4819472 www.CenturaOnline.com(AAN CAN) NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

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ABC SELF STORAGE5x10 $45, 10x10 $65, 10x15 $95. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

Looking to hire a qualified employee? Don’t waste time, call 412.316.3342 to place an Employment Classified ad in Pittsburgh City Paper. Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342 Find a new place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

Looking for your next tenant? Advertise in City Paper’s “LIVE” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds! Call 412316-3342 TODAY!

ASTHMA? Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

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OSTEOPOROSIS? CALL TODAY!

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CONSTIPATION? CALL TODAY!

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DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 50

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.22/05.29.2013


STUDIES

Healthy Controls Needed for Research Study (UPMC Oakland) Our board-certified physicians have been conducting clinical trials to advance primary care practice and the health of patients since 2003.

See what our clients are saying been very In the past two years, I’ve ign of our ads and des the both with ed sfi sati When I know I have the response they evoke. subjects in the 24-35 to advertise for research k of using the City thin tely age group, I immedia

We are currently enrolling for clinical trials in the following areas: • Asthma • COPD • Migraine • Diabetes • Cardiovascular • High cholesterol • IBS with diarrhea

Paper. — Mary Beth Tedesco, CRNP, University of Pittsburgh

This study of cognition and schizophrenia is looking for healthy controls of European descent over the age of 30. Participation involves 1-2 appointments lasting a total of between 5-9 hours and the completion of diagnostic interviewing and cognitive testing, donation of a blood sample, and taking part in a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan (fMRI). Participants will be reimbursed $175 upon completion of study procedures. Men and women ages 40 and above with no history of psychotic illnesses and no current problems with substance abuse may be eligible.

For more information, please call 412 246 6356 or 1 800 994 8182

412-650-6155

Sleep for Science Youth, ages 11-14, are needed for a University of Pittsburgh research

Schizophrenia Research Study Participants Needed

study of how sleep impacts emotions, social relationships, and health. If your child is between 11 and 14 years old, and is emotionally and physically healthy, he or she might be eligible to participate. If eligible, sleep patterns will be measured at home during the school year, and again during the summer. During the summer, the study also involves two 48-hour visits to the Child & Adolescent Sleep Lab at the University of Pittsburgh. One of the visits involves sleeping only 4 hours per night. During both summer lab visits, participants are asked to complete an interview, computer tasks & games, and if eligible, fMRI scans to look at brain activity. Groups of 3 youth complete the summer lab study together. Participants are encouraged to invite their friends to join!

Do you or someone in your family have schizophrenia? This UPMC research study examines the effects of schizophrenia on cognition. We are seeking families affected by schizophrenia to take part. Participation involves 1-2 visits; during these visits, you will complete diagnostic interviewing and cognitive testing, provide a blood sample, and complete a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan (fMRI). Participants will be reimbursed $175 for completing all study procedures.

This study does not involve any treatments or medications. Compensation will be provided for participation in the study.

For more details, and to see if your child qualifies,

For more information, please call

Text kidsleep to 412-999-2758 or call: 412-246-5979

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TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville

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$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge 2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

LOCATIONS IN: Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA ~ Butler, PA

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www.ThereToHelp.org We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health And Many Others 52

WE have been there. WE know your pain. Don’t Wait Any Longer!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.22/05.29.2013

Suboxone Services Pittsburgh- 412-281-1521 Beaver- 724-448-9116


GRAND OPENING!

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GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

Appointments & Walk-ins are both welcome 10am to 10pm

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Accepting All Major Cards

Call Today to Advertise Your Business in Pittsburgh City Paper!

412-316-3342

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Ink Well

WE INTERRUPT THIS PROGRAM

{BY BEN TAUSIG}

get your

yoga on! We offer classes 7 days a week!

Alignment-focused Hatha yoga in Point Breeze! We have Prenatal, Baby & Me, Yoga for Athletes, Flow classes & more.

Call for class schedule or visit www.clayyoga.com 4519 Liberty Ave, Bloomfied 412-335-1332

Drop in anytime OR sign up for a session!

www.innerhearthyoga.com 54

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.22/05.29.2013

ACROSS 1. Flow partner 4. They might recede 8. Blood disorder that causes fatigue 14. Virtual adoption 16. Bit of hankypanky, generically 17. Drama about an anonymous soldier who blogs about juicy military scandals? 18. Old actress Renée of “La Bohëme” 19. Shallot cousins 21. A studio apartment generally has one 22. Cantonese cooking vessels 25. Comedy about a government takeover that’s alternately well-organized and absurdly sloppy? 28. Roadside resting spot 29. Place with spinning classes 30. Connect with, commercially 31. “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” author 33. Christmas songs 34. Sitcom that gives the backstory on getting to know a bug? 40. Doesn’t permit 41. Japanese city with geisha 42. Significant other 45. “By the way ...” 47. Fine, as it were 48. Reality show in which psychoanalysts compete? 50. Figure (out)

51. “Real Love” singer Watley 52. Broke 54. They may carry out of bakeries 57. Drama about actress Arthur’s trip to Asia? 61. Setting of a 1975 “Thrilla” 62. Unrest that may occur after an episode of police brutality 63. De Tocqueville who wrote about the U.S. 64. Some specialists 65. Paternity suit evidence

DOWN 1. Part of a stress test 2. Kind of restaurant that may charge a corking fee, for short 3. Little bullets 4. Cheshire Cat’s expression 5. Putting on airs 6. Unit of electrical resistance 7. “Fear Street” author R.L. 8. Botanist Gray 9. Homer’s neighbor 10. Options for those dealing with personal demons? 11. Color for many a ‘70s car or suit 12. Decorate with jewelry, in slang 13. Musical instruction to resume speed 15. Those, in Tijuana 20. Likewise 22. One may be

made after blowing out candles 23. No longer duped by 24. Be sure 26. God, abroad 27. Actor Lindo in several Spike Lee movies 29. Sign before Cancer 32. Forecasting term coined in January 1996 33. Gov. Cuomo’s purview 35. One with a golden parachute, briefly 36. Abraham’s father (and an anagram of HATER) 37. Island where “Lost” was filmed 38. Definitive ring victories

39. Some are made of straw 42. Word before bottoms or party 43. Unconcerned with right and wrong 44. Renovated 45. Twice, Robert Kennedy’s assassin 46. Person who just can’t get enough 49. Mother of pearl 50. Prepare for a bout 53. French articles 55. 2001 Michael Mann biopic 56. Carrier to Oslo 58. Auction entry 59. Forever, more or less 60. “Death ___ Funeral” (2010 Neil LaBute film) {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


THE MOTHER OF ALL BRUNCHES

A yearly ritual in which parental stress — and happiness — reach new heights {BY ROXANNE TUINSTRA} FOR THE PAST six years, my family has been celebrating

Mother’s Day with brunch at the five-star LeMont. And for the past six years, I have had to think to myself, What have I done to deserve this? Or better yet, Why doesn’t my husband keep our three young lunatics while I go to LeMont and stuff myself silly? Because as it is, I spend the morning trying to get the children into their Sunday best, practicing how to use napkins and not shirts, deciding which flip-flops are dressy enough to wear. And at some point I wonder: Does my family hate me? I’ve considered it a few times. Why else would they subject a wife and mother to the French decorum of taking small, polite bites — not to mention the frequent restroom breaks, and having to issue constant reminders not to blow your nose at the table? And then there’s the challenge of keeping children away from giant plate-glass windows overlooking Mount Washington, where they may somehow figure how to break through and fall hundreds of feet. Or even more embarrassingly, drool all over the glass.

was sitting next to us. “There goes our nice quiet brunch,” I’m sure Steidl (or Steinberg) thought to himself “Should’ve just had the breakfast buffet at Eat’n Park.” But that’s what I love about Pittsburgh: Common riff-raff like me can dine right next to Steidl (or Steinberg), have a burger next to Franco Harris, or pancakes with Elsie Hilman. That’s something very few cities can brag about. Le Bec Fin in Philly would rather stay closed forever than let a family like mine in for Mother’s Day. And as for breastfeeding? My experience has been that the Pittsburgh French are pretty progressive, and that with the help of a Hooter Hider, breastfeeding is very polite and innocuous. LeMont’s whole brunch is set up like a firehall wedding of the rich and famous. The buffet has silver warmers that are clearly marked (there’s no mistaking decaf with regular or scrambled eggs with pancakes), an omelet station, a waffle station and a couple of men in giant white hats cutting meat. I treat the buffet line for the children as if I were on Supermarket

THAT’S WHAT I LOVE ABOUT PITTSBURGH: COMMON RIFF-RAFF LIKE ME CAN HAVE A BURGER NEXT TO FRANCO HARRIS, OR PANCAKES WITH ELSIE HILMAN. But my husband has explained to me we should celebrate Mother’s Day as a family. Then too, I love breakfast … and I love breakfast buffets even more. I love desserts … and I love mini desserts even more. At our inaugural Mother’s Day brunch six year ago, my husband parked 14 blocks away and carried our infant daughter in her car carrier, just to be sure the maître d’ didn’t spot us. (I’ve actually never understood what a maître d’ does, although it must have to do with money, because my husband avoids eye contact at all costs.) Our waiter, dressed in tails and a stiff white cloth on his arm, asked us for our drink order. How about a screwdriver? He then watched, paralyzed, as I scoured our carefully laid-out tabletop, gathering up the silverware, glasses, plates, butter, salt-and-pepper shakers, flowers, sugar … anything else the kids could destroy or hurl at one of the guys from the Steidl and Steinberg ads — I’m not sure which is which — who

Sweep — just grab everything and sort it out later. It cuts down the number of trips from 40 to about 15. By that point, the kids are typically wandering around somewhere, probably sitting under Steidl’s (or Steinberg’s) table. But by that point, I am also completely focused on the cookie table — I mean the Cookie Room. Imagine never having to see someone pick up the very last bite-size cheesecake with little cherries on top … because another plate of mini cheesecakes will almost instantaneously appear before your eyes. I feel happy when I think of that story. And where can you find an endless supply of mini cheesecakes? At LeMont Mother’s Day brunch. Each year, my family watches me eat plate after plate of pancakes and scrambled eggs, while I wear my fancy flip-flops. And bring a purse full of plastic bags so I can stuff it full of mini cheesecakes. And at some point I realize: To suffer through an entire brunch with me, my family must love me very much. INF O@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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FRI MAY 24

JOURNEY TRIBUTE (ALMOST JOURNEY) & STYX TRIBUTE (ROCKIN THE PARADISE)

SAT MAY 25

CCR TRIBUTE (GREEN RIVER BAND) & THE WHO TRIBUTE (WHO ARE YOU)

SUN MAY 26

NEW YORK DISCO REVIEW & ABBA TRIBUTE (ABBA GIRLZ)

WED JULY 3

THE BEATLES TRIBUTE (BEATLEMANIA MAGIC)

THUR JULY 4

ROD STEWART TRIBUTE (BLONDES HAVE MORE FUN)

SAT JULY 20

CHRIS HIGBEE WITH ABACUS JONES

SAT JULY 27

PURE GOLD

SAT AUG 24

JIMMY BUFFETT TRIBUTE (BEACH BUMZ) & BEACH BOYS TRIBUTE (BEACH PARTY BOYS)

SUN SEPT 1

EARTH WIND AND FIRE TRIBUTE (SHINING STAR) & MICHAEL JACKSON TRIBUTE (BEAT IT)

Visit RIVERSCASINO.COM or call 412-231-7777 for more upcoming shows.

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH NEXT TO HEINZ FIELD RIVERSCASINO.COM

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-800-GAMBLER. MUST BE 21 YEARS OR OLDER TO BE ON RIVERS CASINO PROPERTY.

Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

May 22, 2013  

Pittsburgh City Paper - Volume 23 - Issue 21

May 22, 2013  

Pittsburgh City Paper - Volume 23 - Issue 21