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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.06/03.13.2013


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.06/03.13.2013


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Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers AMYJO BROWN, LAUREN DALEY Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Interns TRACEY HICKEY, JEFF IHAZA, JOHN LAVANGA

VOLUME 23 + ISSUE 10

[NEWS]

06

It “will result in an election about the issues instead of the behavior of the incumbent mayor.” — Political analyst Joe Mistick on Luke Ravenstahl’s withdrawal from the mayor’s race

get done … or because they don’t know what else to do?” — Chris Potter on Mayor Luke Ravenstahl’s would-be replacements

[TASTE] bioshelter is one of the bigger 29 “The dreams out there.” — John Creasy, on updates at the Garfield Community Farm

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Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

STEEL CITY MEDIA

“It’s an idealized vision of cities holding possibilities as infinite as the mathematically generated layers of a fractal.” — Robert Raczka on Miguel Chevalier’s installation work “Meta-Cities”

[LAST PAGE] we as Democrats do best when 63 “Iwethink have a full, open debate before the voters.” — City Councilor Patrick Dowd on why he runs without the Democratic Party endorsement — even though he really, really wants it

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 18 EVENTS LISTINGS 46 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 55 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 57 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 62 N E W S

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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“HE DID THE CITY A GOOD TURN BY DROPPING OUT.”

LIVE FROM THE HALLWAY {BY CHARLIE DEITCH} Last Thursday was sort of like a hostage standoff, except no one was actually being held hostage. Standing outside Mayor Luke Ravenstahl’s office for nearly eight hours, I was technically free to leave, but I couldn’t because something might happen. Fueled by media reports that the mayor was making an announcement about his political future at 1 p.m., about two dozen reporters collected in the hallway outside the mayor’s office. There was never any official word of a press conference — just the occasional snack brought out by the mayor’s staff — but still we couldn’t leave. And neither could a lot of you. While reporters were stuck in the hallway, a lot of the public was tethered to the unfolding non-drama through Twitter. You even came up with inventive hashtags — #stepdahn, followed by #Ravenstall, among the favorites. Here are some Twitter highlights from the Great Hallway Stakeout of 2013: I wasted the entire afternoon on Twitter waiting in vain for Luke Ravenstahl to emerge from his burrow & announce his resignation #StepDahn. — “Scottro” (@scottdhoople) This whole #Ravenstahl thing was quite the circus today. A super uneventful and disappointing circus. — “Katie Green” (@AlmanacEditor) I laugh every time I see video on the news of Ravenstahl in his office today. It’s like watching slow motion Big Foot footage. —“Tall Cathy” (@tallcathy)

{PHOTO BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

Mayor Luke Ravenstahl announced last week that he was ending his run for re-election.

POLITICAL SPIN

Breaking: Ravenstahl finally emerges, barreling down 376 in white Ford Bronco driven by Michael Huss. Police are giving chase. — “Souf Oaklin fo’ Life” (@souf_Oaklin) BREAKING: Ravenstahl announces he is sequestering himself in observance of sequestration. Adds, “Rick Earl is still a dick.” — “Anthony of Pgh” (@anthony_of_PGH) “I hope my kids don’t ask what I did at work today. — Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reporter Rich Lord (@richelord)

{CORRECTION} Our Feb. 27 story on a federal investigation of the city’s police bureau [“Target Practice”] misstated local businessman Arthur Bedway’s plea in a case involving a city contract won by his firm. Bedway has pled not guilty to charges related to the contract; his case is pending in U.S. District Court. We regret the error.

W

HEN MAYOR Luke Ravenstahl

took the podium on March 1, he was able to resolve at least one question swirling around him: his political future. Ravenstahl, flanked by his parents, told reporters: “I’m proud of the things I was able to achieve. … This success, however, comes at a cost.” He continued, “The grueling demands of this office are difficult to describe, the sacrifice significant.” With that, Ravenstahl dropped a bid for re-election that had launched just 11 days prior. He insisted the decision wasn’t based on a federal investigation into the police bureau, or because he didn’t think he could win. In fact, Ravenstahl told reporters, “I’m more confident”

than ever that victory was in grasp. But while Ravenstahl put to rest speculation about his election prospects, he opened the door to more questions.

Ravenstahl dropping out puts a new twist on the mayoral primary and the city’s future {BY LAUREN DALEY AND CHRIS POTTER} Would he run again someday? (He didn’t rule it out.) What would he do with the rest of his term? (“It may allow us to do some things that are perhaps bolder than what somebody who has to run for

re-election might consider. … I’m not going to promise you anything.”) What would become of his nearly $1 million campaign war chest? (He’ll speak with his donors and decide the “best course of action” for those dollars.) Would his base support the other two declared candidates, City Controller Michael Lamb or City Councilor Bill Peduto? Or would Ravenstahl back some other contender? (Ravenstahl said he did back someone, but hadn’t spoken with the mystery candidate.) In the wake of Ravenstahl’s announcement, it seems likely that at least one more name will appear on the May primary ballot. But his departure changes the race in other ways as well. It “will result in an election about the issues instead of the behavCONTINUES ON PG. 08

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POLITICAL SPIN, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

ior of the incumbent mayor,” says Joe Mistick, a political analyst and law professor at Duquesne University. “To that extent, he did the city a good turn by dropping out.”

PofE T the

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MINUTES AFTER Ravenstahl’s press conference ended, names of potential new candidates began popping up: former Allegheny County Executive (and former city councilor) Dan Onorato; city council President Darlene Harris; former state Auditor General Jack Wagner; state Sen. Jim Ferlo. By the weekend after Ravenstahl’s announcement, Harris had already begun circulating nominating petitions; Wagner, who was previously considering running as an independent in the November election, has publicly acknowledged he might mount a primary run instead. Ferlo wouldn’t rule it out. (“There’s a lot of fluidity here,” he says. “We had a historical and major announcement. People need time to reflect on it.”) Any new entrant to the race faces two obvious challenges: time and money. The deadline has already passed for candidates to file for the Democratic Party endorsement. With Ravenstahl dropping out, and Peduto’s earlier decision not to seek the endorsement at all, Lamb is the sole candidate eligible to receive it. Ferlo has already called for the e party to refrain from making an n endorsement at all. “If there were e multiple candidates, there would d be a seismic shift in the election,”” he says. Given how much the field d has changed, he says, party leaders rs sitting this race out could lead to “a more principled, grassroots election.” n” But party bylaws make little allowance for such a move. “I participated in the process because I respect the rules,” says Lamb. “The rules require an endorsement and I will be the Democraticendorsed candidate.” Meanwhile, other deadlines are fast approaching. The deadline for seeking the influential Allegheny County Labor Council endorsement, for example, comes Thu., March 9: By press time, council head Jack Shea said Peduto and Lamb were the only mayoral candidates seeking it. Financial constraints are also pressing. Under citywide campaign-finance regulations that apply, for the first time, to this year’s mayoral campaign, candidates can receive only $2,000 from an individual donor for use in the primary, or $4,000 from any given political committee. That means raising money the hard

{PHOTO BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

Cynthia and Robert Ravenstahl were by their son’s side when he dropped his re-election bid.

way in a race where Peduto, for one, had $261,000 in hand at the start of the year. And although Ravenstahl boasted of having nearly $1 million to fund his own campaign, the contribution limits prevent him

State Sen. Jim Ferlo, City Council President Darlene Harris and former Auditor General Jack Wagner are considering mayoral runs.

from bestowing a massive overnight infusion of cash. Those rules also limit how much new entrants can contribute from their own existing accounts. The rules require a candidate seeking city office to set up a committee for that office. If a politician already has committees set up for other races, cash transfers from those campaigns are also limited by the donation cap. So although Wagner, for example, had more than $371,000 left over from his auditor-general campaign at the end of last year, the rules permit him to use only $4,000 of it by the primary. (Ferlo and Harris had $26,765 and $28,045 respectively.) That may not be the end of the story,

“THE GRUELING DEMANDS OF THIS OFFICE ARE DIFFICULT TO DESCRIBE, THE SACRIFICE SIGNIFICANT.”

however. Nothing in city law prohibits independent expenditures of money: Ravenstahl could, for example, set up a committee to spend untold sums attacking Lamb and Peduto. And the law’s enforceability has not been tested: Lamb and Peduto are already at odds on the interpretation of the law, since Lamb rolled his city controller’s account into his mayoral effort. Peduto has asked the county Board of Elections to rule on such activity, and he says if it declines to do so, he’ll bring his challenge to Common Pleas Court. “You can try playing the games with this, but that just shows you are trying to be sneaky,” says Peduto, council’s driving force on the legislation. “The intent of this law was made clear when council debated it.” ALTHOUGH RAVENSTAHL is not running, the election might partly be a referendum on him, anyway. Especially if either Lamb or Peduto, who’ve criticized him sharply over the past few weeks, wins the primary. Some, like Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald, a staunch Peduto ally, think Ravenstahl’s withdrawal gives Peduto momentum. “I’ve gotten a lot of calls from a lot of folks who were previously supporting Luke,” Fitzgerald says. Peduto was already leading the money race — Lamb had $212,000 in his account by the end of 2012, $62,000 of which he’d raised while running for controller. Peduto has also garnered some early endorsements from labor. “I think people see Bill as a front-runner,” Fitzgerald says. Lamb, for his part, calls Ravenstahl’s withdrawal an “opportunity to provide new leadership to this city and to deliver a government where the taxpayers can expect more in every neighborhood.” CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.06/03.13.2013


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LANDMARKS HOUSING RESOURCE CENTER

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.06/03.13.2013

POLITICAL SPIN, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

“Our campaign is moving forward and we look forward to debating anyone on the issues,” Lamb says. Pundits will also be watching to see how Ravenstahl’s legacy affects other candidates. His backing would come with baggage that Mistick, the Duquesne professor, calls “a double-edged sword.” Ravenstahl rose to national prominence after taking the mayor’s office in 2006 when the death of Mayor Bob O’Connor put the then-city council president in the limelight at age 26. He won a special election to hold onto the seat, and won another 2009 race to serve out his current four-year term. In his March 1 address, he touted his accomplishments: balancing city budgets, and helping to launch the Pittsburgh Promise scholarship fund for students of city schools. As for regrets, he said, “I’m not going to get into regrets. We all have regrets in our life.” But Ravenstahl has also generated his share of face-palm moments: trips to the Super Bowl and luxury hotels in New York City; paying country-club dues with campaign donations; crashing a Tiger Woods appearance; and one of most high-profile gaffes: celebrating his birthday at a ski resort during a massive snowstorm in 2010. And for the past month, his administration has been embroiled in public controversy again: the revelation of unauthorized accounts at a police credit union; the forced resignation of police chief Nate Harper; a federal investigation into the police bureau; and criticism over Ravenstahl’s

{PHOTO BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

after-hours use of a security detail. Ravenstahl has vehemently denied any wrongdoing. “Many will speculate about my motives and conclude that the investigation is my reason for [withdrawing] today,” Ravenstahl told reporters at the press conference. “It’s not. I’ve done nothing wrong. That will be proven over time.” For now, though, says Mistick, “I wouldn’t want his endorsement. When you have a public official who steps down because of a cloud, folks don’t want to be associated with it.” C P OT T E R@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Additional reporting by Charlie Deitch

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.06/03.13.2013

LANGUAGE LESSONS

Locals find opportunities teaching English in Korea {BY DAN SLEVA} LIKE MANY young college graduates during the Great Recession, Stephanie Giegel was having a hard time ďŹ nding a job. Fed up with working too many hours for too little pay, she decided to change careers and take a position across the globe. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had been working in the fashion industry in New York City for around six years, for several companies, all of which turned out to be a bad place to work for one reason or another,â&#x20AC;? Giegel wrote in an email interview. Giegel, 28, originally from Observatory Hill, says she was growing more discouraged, depressed and impatient by the day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jobs with a good salary and reasonable working hours became harder and harder to ďŹ nd,â&#x20AC;? Giegel says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After I was laid off for the second time in three years, I decided it was time for a change.â&#x20AC;? For Giegel, that change was drastic. She not only changed careers, she changed continents when she accepted a position to teach English to students in Daejeon, South Korea, last year.

Megan Rees, 26, from McKees Rocks, also moved to Daejeon as part of the English Program in Korea (EPIK) in 2011. EPIK is run by the Korean Ministry of Education, Science and Technology. According to the programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website, EPIK looks for applicants who are native English speakers from Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States. Applicants do not have to have any teaching experience, but they must have earned a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in some ďŹ eld from an accredited university. Monthly salaries vary by Korean province and the metropolitan area teachers are placed in. EPIKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s site shows the minimum salary is about $1,700 per month. Salaries rise for applicants with teaching experience and for those with advanced degrees. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The beneďŹ ts of coming here are great. You make a good salary and have good vacation time. EPIK also pays for your plane ticket, gives you starting money and a furnished apartment that is rent-free,â&#x20AC;? Rees wrote in an email interview. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Americans living in Korea pay no taxes for two years and get the pension deductions from their paycheck back when they leave Korea.â&#x20AC;? Giegel and Rees did not speak any Korean when they accepted the positions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The language barrier was a big shock

â&#x20AC;&#x153;MY DREAM IN LIFE IS TO TRAVEL THE WORLD AND EXPERIENCE LIVING IN DIFFERENT CULTURES.â&#x20AC;?


to me. I did not realize how much of a privilege it is to be able to speak freely,” Rees says. “I have to slow down my speech and be mindful of what I say, avoiding slang and idioms.” Giegel says she got by “mostly with a lot of grunting and pointing. Sometimes if I need something specific from a store I try to bring a picture of it.” Neither Giegel nor Rees had any teaching experience beforehand, something that made them nervous after accepting the job and landing in South Korea “My first time teaching was a little scary and it feels like a blur. I remember one of the exercises I had planned failed miserably,” Rees says. “I have grown so much as a teacher since the first day.” Giegel says teaching various age groups at her school presents interesting challenges. “The younger elementary-school kids with a very low level of English are particularly difficult to teach,” Giegel says. Middle-school students have a better grasp of the language, she says and are well-informed about American pop culture and global affairs. Giegel teaches at Kids Apple English Immersion School, which is a private academy. Rees teaches at Daejeon Girls’ Commercial High School, a public school. Both Giegel and Rees say they sometimes get homesick, but keep in contact with family in Pittsburgh via emails, Skype and Facebook. Stephanie’s father, Steve Giegel of Butler, says he is pleased that his daughter took the job in Korea. “I think it is a great opportunity. She was growing weary in New York. When she told me about it, I thought it would be a good experience for her,” he says. Nancy Rees, of Mckees Rocks, says she is proud of her daughter and not surprised that she ended up finding this calling half way across the globe. “Nothing that Megan does surprises me,” Nancy Rees says. “She has always wanted to live in other countries and when she wants to do something, she finds a way.” EPIK teachers sign a one-year contract and have the option to renew. Giegel is considering signing on for another year. After two years in South Korea, Rees says she has decided to take a job to teach English in Japan beginning in May. “My dream in life is to travel the world and experience living in different cultures,” says Rees. “It gives you the [confidence to start] a new life from scratch, and it teaches you the world is bigger than what you have known growing up.” INFO@ PGHC ITYPAP ER.CO M

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Aaronel deRoy Gruber: Art(ist) in Motion March 9 - June 2, 2013 Opening Celebration: March 9th 6:30 - 8:00 PM

[POTTER’S FIELD]

MATURATION PROCESS

The boy mayor is leaving. Is Pittsburgh ready to grow up? {BY CHRIS POTTER} FRIENDS, Pittsburghers, Democratic com-

mitteemen, lend me your ears. I come not to praise Mayor Luke Ravenstahl. Or to bury him. Although the latter option is tempting. In fact, there was plenty of jubilation among Ravenstahl’s critics last week, after his March 1 announcement that he would not seek re-election, due to the “grueling demands of this office.” But it’s too early to say what Ravenstahl’s legacy will be. He’s got 10 months left before his term expires, and an ongoing federal investigation into the police bureau may turn up surprises … including the possibility that, whatever doubters believe, Ravenstahl didn’t do anything wrong. Unfortunately for Ravenstahl, he’s already been caught up in the kind of scandal that gets the most attention — the kind voters can imagine being involved in themselves. A series of financial transactions involving police overtime and a credit-union account? Meh. But a mayor borrowing a Homeland Security vehicle to see Toby Keith? It’s an outrage! Which brings us to what may be Ravenstahl’s biggest weakness. It’s probably not the dark conspiracies imagined by his critics, but his own frequent lack of imagination. Asked during his press conference about his proudest accomplishment, the mayor cited his early championing of the Pittsburgh Promise, a college-scholarship program for students in city schools. A noble cause, but one that launched within the mayor’s first half-year in office. It’s not that Ravenstahl lacked for accomplishments since: new economic developments, balanced budgets passed without the chaos inflicted by his predecessor, Tom Murphy. And his friendliness to gay causes was more than one would have expected — or than Pittsburgh had previously gotten — from a conservative, Catholic mayor. But the city’s economic resurgence was driven by forces far larger than any politician. And it’s sad to think that for Ravenstahl himself, the most satisfying part of being mayor was over before he’d measured the office for drapes. For good and bad, “peaking early” may be the story of his political career. Still, the nickname many critics attached to Ravenstahl — “Fluke” — was

unfair. In many ways, he was a perfect emblem of the city itself. For all its newfound cultural and economic assertiveness, Pittsburgh’s political life remains passive-aggressive. It’s a one-party town whose loyal opposition has struggled for citywide relevance. Ravenstahl’s rise to power reflects that. As a twentysomething City Councilor, he became council president because his peers were even less mature: Split by warring factions, council compromised by picking Ravenstahl, its least-experienced member. That set up Ravenstahl to assume the mayor’s office when Bob O’Connor died in 2006. And while you might fault council’s choice, the voters ratified it in two subsequent elections. In announcing his decision not to run a third time, Ravenstahl was open, relaxed in a way reporters have rarely seen. (“I feel really good,” he told them. “I’m at peace with my decision.”) The question now is whether the rest of us are willing to grow up. Predictably, reporters seized on Ravenstahl’s coy hints about a potential “mystery candidate” to replace him. It was as if they couldn’t wait to put Ravenstahl in the rearview mirror (and perhaps he couldn’t wait to be there). Although the race already had two challengers — City Controller Michael Lamb and City Councilor Bill Peduto — speculation about new entrants began instantly. Within days, headlines trumpeted candidacies by the likes of City Council President Darlene Harris, former state Auditor General Jack Wagner and state Sen. Jim Ferlo. The question for voters now is: Are these new candidates jumping in because they have a vision? Or merely because they spotted an opening? Are they running for mayor because they have a list of things they want to get done … or because they don’t know what else to do? Years from now, the worst that’s likely to be said about Ravenstahl is that he was a placeholder mayor who somehow lasted seven years. The worst that could be said about us, meanwhile, is that we might elect another mayor just like that, if only because of a familiar name. Because one thing Ravenstahl’s tenure tells us is how difficult it is to oust a Pittsburgh mayor … even if he’s not even sure he wants to be there.

FOR GOOD AND BAD, “PEAKING EARLY” MAY BE THE STORY OF RAVENSTAHL’S POLITICAL CAREER.

Greensburg PA

wmuseumaa.org

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.06/03.13.2013


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NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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An Arizona appeals court ruled in February that someone can be guilty of driving under the influence of marijuana even though its psychoactive ingredient has long left his system. Since tests of marijuana measure both active and inactive ingredients, and since the active substance vanishes quickly but the inactive one remains in the body for weeks, a marijuana consumer may test “positive” even though not the least bit impaired. (In fact, since neighboring Colorado recently legalized some marijuana possession, a Colorado driver motoring through Arizona weeks later could be guilty of DUI for a completely legal, harmless act, as could the 35,000 Arizona medical-marijuana users.) The appeals court majority reasoned that since the legislature did not distinguish the inactive ingredient from the active, neither would the court.

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Richard Blake took the witness stand in Ottawa, Ontario, in January to deny that it was he who had invaded a home and stabbed two people numerous times. With a straight face, he had an answer for all of the incriminating evidence. He had the perp’s car because “a stranger” had just handed him the keys; he didn’t recall what the stranger looked like (but guessed that he probably resembled Blake, because for some reason Blake got picked out of the lineup); he donned the stranger’s bloody knit cap (abandoning his own cap); he handled the stranger’s knife and bloody glove, and that’s why his DNA was on them; he fled at the first sight of police, ramming a cruiser to escape (even though he had “done nothing wrong”); he fled on foot after the collision and hid in a tree (but only to get away from a swarm of black flies). After deliberating politely for a day, the jury found him guilty.

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A 61-year-old man in southern Sweden beat a DUI charge in February even though his blood-alcohol was five times the legal limit. The man told the judge he is a hearty drinker and normally starts in even before work every day, with “no effect” on his performance. According to the Skanskan newspaper, that must have impressed the judge, who was so awed that he tossed out the charge.

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Lisa Biron’s recent biography shows her to be a licensed lawyer in two states, practicing in Manchester, N.H., and also affiliated with a group of volunteer lawyers that advocates “religious liberty, the sanctity of life, and marriage and family,” and issues warnings about the “homosexual agenda.” (She recently represented a church in Concord, N.H., and served on the board of directors of a Christian school in Manchester.) In January, Biron was convicted in federal court in Concord on nine counts involving taking her teen-age daughter to Canada and creating child pornography.

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Jason Starn, formerly a law student at the Laurence Drivon School of Law in Stockton, Calif., filed a lawsuit recently against three Stockton-Modesto-area “head shops” that had sold him Whip-It nitrous oxide, which led him to overindulge and

eventually suffer spinal-cord degeneration. Starn’s attorney told the Sacramento Bee, “At first, he felt a little embarrassed about” filing the lawsuit (but managed to overcome the shame in order to warn all the other nitrousoxide abusers).

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Suspicions Confirmed: (1) A 53-year-old Rosenheim, Germany, postal worker was relieved of criminal charges in January when a judge ruled him innocent of discarding mail (as jealous “whistle-blowers” had charged) after concluding that the carrier finished routes early simply because he worked faster. Although the charge was dropped, he was reprimanded for taking unauthorized (i.e., simpler) routes. (2) After a 400-pound woman broke both arms accidentally falling through a sidewalk in New York City in January, doctors told her that a thinner woman might have died from the same fall. “Thank God, they said that my size was the only thing that saved me.”

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Faith healer Ariel Ben Sherman, 78, died in November in a South Carolina hospital after suffering respiratory arrest while being treated for small-cell cancer. He had been found guilty in May 2012 of neglect in the cancer death of a 15-year-old girl (of whom he had accepted the title of “spiritual father”) for his insistence that the girl’s mother reject medical care and treat the girl only with prayer.

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Australian researchers recently uncovered a minor prison phenomenon in that country that might shed light on isolated cases reported in southwest-U.S. prisons (mentioned in News of the Weird in 2012): inmates inserting objects underneath the skin of their penises, somehow under the impression that (a) it doesn’t hurt and (b) it provides sexual pleasure and virility. Among the items discovered in Australia: buttons, dice, deodorant roller balls.

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From a tag on an item of clothing offered recently at a new-item price by the retailer Urban Outfitters: “This unique found item was hand-selected for you from a yard sale or flea market. Any tears, holes, paint stains or other ‘defects’ we consider a virtue and not a flaw. Wear it well.” Consequently, an item that might have been donated overseas or to a Goodwill or Salvation Army store is sold to “urban” clotheshounds at “new” prices. Urban Outfitters defended the practice, calling any such items “curated” by their expert store buyers, “handpicked” for their “uniqueness,” and sometimes “truly one-of-a-kind, which means that once they’re gone, they’re gone.”

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In December, a 38-year-old male worker at the Social Security office in Baltimore was issued a formal reprimand after coworkers complained that he prodigiously passed gas at his desk. He had been counseled informally in the summer of 2012, and to satisfy “due process,” a log was made later listing 60 specific emissions on 17 separate dates, with, for example, nine blasts on Sept. 19. Seven days after the letter of reprimand was issued, “senior management” at the agency learned of it and withdrew it, without comment, according to a Washington Post report.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.06/03.13.2013


YESTERDAY

TODAY

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ArtCity Summer Camp

Camp Deer Creek

REGISTER NOW. Summer camps for the artistic and imaginative child. Explore new ways to make art and express your creativity with world-renowned artists, musicians and dancers. Workshops include dance, hiphop music and visual art. For registration information, visit the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust website at TrustArts.org/education.

Camp Deer Creek is a family owned and operated traditional summer day camp for boys and girls ages 4 - 15. Our 18 acre layout allows plenty of room for our activities that include swimming in our heated pool, horseback riding, nature, archery, crafts, music, drama and field games. We also provide transportation from many areas and lunch.

W This summer become a TV producer! PCTVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s TV Production Summer Camp

July 8-12, 9am-Noon â&#x20AC;˘ Ages 13-17 Pittsburgh Community Television 412-322-7570 â&#x20AC;˘ www.pctv21.org

Carnegie Museums of Art and Natural History Museum summer camps deliver the world! The entire museum

QAMP! August 19-23rd, 2013 An overnight camp for LGBTQ youth & allies. Ages 13-19. All the fun of traditional camps plus art in a safe space where you can be yourself!

campus is a field for discovery and creativity, where kids investigate Earth, art, dance, science, and more through behind-the-scenes experiences, hands-on encounters, and exciting activities. Weeklong halfand full-day camps accommodate children from Pre-K through high school. 412.622.3288 or www.carnegiemnh.org/camps.

Chatham Music and Arts Day Camp The Chatham Music and Arts Day Camp is located on Chatham Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Shadyside Campus.

The camp offers programs in visual arts, music, drama, dance, nature exploration and sports. Six, three, and one week sessions are available for campers entering kindergarten through ninth grade. Visit www.chatham.edu/daycamp for more information.

Carnegie Science Center Design a video game. Create a musical instrument. Discover distant galaxies and beyond! Carnegie Science Center has your summer covered with aweinspiring camps that will keep inquisitive kids ages 4-14 enter-

Jumpstart your FUTURE Carnegie Mellon University Summer Pre-College Programs June 29 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; August 9, 2013 Advanced Placement Early Admission Fine Arts: Architecture / Art & Design / Drama / Music National High School Game Academy www.cmu.edu/enrollment/pre-college

Financial assistance available.

OfďŹ ce of Admission Pre-College Programs

www.dreamsofhope.org/camp

&ORBES!VENUE 0ITTSBURGH 0!s

Camp Deer Creek . . . since 1933 University of Pittsburgh Campus, July 15-26 (M-F) 9am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Noon, Cathedral of Learning (Grades 4-8) (M-F) 10am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1pm, Cathedral of Learning (Grades 9-12)

Pine-Richland, July 15-25 (Monday - Wednesday) 9am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Noon (Grades 4-8) (Thursdays) 9am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3pm (Grades 4-8)

Mt. Lebanon, June 17-24 Pittsburghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oldest & â&#x20AC;&#x153;Funnestâ&#x20AC;? Family Owned & Operated Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Camp

(Monday - Wednesday) 9am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Noon (Grades 4-8) (Thursdays) 9am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3pm (Grades 4-8)

June 17-August 9, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ Ages 4-15 â&#x20AC;˘ Transportation provided in many Pittsburgh areas 412-767-5351 â&#x20AC;˘ www.campdeercreekonline.com

www.wpwp.pitt.edu/youth/ywi/ or call 412-624-6557

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For more information, please visit:

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tained. Filled with action-packed programs, camps offer hundreds of hands-on exhibits, an Omnimax film, Highmark SportsWorksÂŽ, and a cool T-shirt.

CLO Academy Pittsburgh CLO Academyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s summer performance camps are designed to give kids the opportunity to experience preparing for and performing on the stage. Working with a Director, Music Director and Choreographer, students will create their own exciting musical theater experience! All camps culminate with a life

performance at the CLO Academy.

CMU Soccer

CMU Pre-College Summer Studies

CO-ED DAY CAMP Ages 5 - 14 (9am - 3pm.) Session I: July 29 - August 2. Session II: August 5 August 9. BOYS OVERNIGHT CAMP (High School Boys) July 25 - 27. Call 540-230-6901 or Piranian@ Andrew.CMU.edu.

Is your child going to be a junior or senior in high school? If so, consider spending six-weeks in one of our distinct Pre-College programs. They can either explore Architecture, Art & Design, Drama, Music, the Ntl. High School Game Academy or Advanced Placement Early Admission to prepare them for study at the college level. For more information visit: www.cmu. edu/enrollment/pre-college/

Gemini Theatre Helping children to discover originality, creativity, and develop imagination! Our 5-day camps provide hands-on experience in a real theater. Under the guidance of theater professionals, each age group creates, writes, produces, and

performs their very own show on the last day of camp. Registration begins February 28, 2012

Grier Summer Camp Grier Summer Camp Located in the Allegheny Mountains central Pennsylvania, Grier Summer offers programs using the campus of the Grier School, a historic girls boarding school. A camper can choose horseback riding, visual or per-

Chatham Music & Arts Day Camp 2013 Chatham camps include: Â&#x152; 5][QK)Z\[,Ia+IUX June 17-July 26, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. NEW Pre-K

Half Day Music & Arts Day Camp: 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. (Choose 6-week or 3-week session)

NEW Focus

Week July 29-August 2, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

CO-ED DAY CAMP (Ages 5-14 â&#x20AC;˘ 9am-3pm): Session I: July 29 - August 2 Session II: August 5 - August 9 BOYS OVERNIGHT CAMP (High School Boys): July 25-27.

Call 540-230-6901

or Piranian@andrew.cmu.edu

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Â&#x152; +W]OIZ*I[SM\JITT+IUX August 5-9, 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. www.chatham.edu/daycamp Alicia Danenberg, director: 412-365-1174

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. . . on the campus of the Grier School, an historic girls boarding school in the Allegheny Mountains of Central Pennsylvania.

forming arts or a combination of all three, each venue offering state of the art facilities.

JCC Day Camps

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bestcamp.org bestcamp@grier.org /griersummercamp

The JCC offers campers ages 2 to 16 great experiences and fun activities. Programs include traditional day camps and performing arts and specialty camps at our 100-acre Family Park in Monroeville and at JCC facilities in Squirrel Hill and the South Hills. We encourage children to discover new interests and talents in an environment that promotes respect, cooperation and caring.

Jumonville Come to Jumonville for awesome* arts, adventure, sports, specialty and family camps. From swimming, sports, disc golf and campfires to mountainboards, zip lines, rock climbing or creative and performing arts, this beautiful mountaintop campus is your home away from home this summer. *99% of campers reported an â&#x20AC;&#x153;awesomeâ&#x20AC;? experience! Call or email for your free DVD!

New Story New Storyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s STAP camps are designed to meet the needs of

JCC

Summer Camps Squirrel Hill 412-521-8010 South Hills 412-278-1975

JCCPGH.org â&#x20AC;˘ Open to Everyone

SUMMER PROGRAM for the EDUCATION of AUTISTIC KIDS JULY 1 - JULY 31, 2013 Extended School Year and summer recreation program for students ages 5-21 diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. 412-856-7223

info@autismsocietypgh.org

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children with the most serious and complex behavioral challenges. New Story camps are for children with autism and children with an intellectual disability/ mental health diagnosis. Locations: Indiana, Greensburg, Dubois, Monroeville, Cranberry Twp. and Mt. Lebanon. Visit www.NewStory.com or call 877-622-7245.

PCTV TV Production Summer Camp Ever wonder what goes into the making of a television program? Here’s your chance to find out. Learn all aspects of TV production and produce your own show for air

on PCTV 21. July 8-12, 9 am – 12 pm. Youth age 13-17. Call 412-3227570 or visit www.pctv21.org.

Pittsburgh Center for the Arts Pittsburgh Center for the Arts Summer Art Camps offer a fun and inspiring way to discover creativity. The week-long camps, which start in June and go through August, present a wide range of artistic disciplines. Everything from painting, sculpture, ceramics, photography and video making can be explored.

Pittsburgh Youth Ballet Pittsburgh Youth Ballet has a summer program to fit every dancer

ARTCITY 2013 SUMMER ARTS PROGRAM

Hip Hop on L.O.C.K. DATE: Monday–Friday, June 24-July 5 (no class July 4; July 12 student performance at the Gallery Crawl) AGE: 12-14 TIME: 11–4pm FEE: $ 150 ARTIST EDUCATOR: Emmai Alaquiva

Reed Dance Intensive DATE: Monday-Friday, July 8-19 (July 20 Student Performance, 2pm) AGES: 10-14 TIME: 9 - 4:15pm FEE: $250 ARTIST EDUCATOR: Greer Reed

Green Artists DATE: Monday-Friday, July 22-26 AGES: 8-10 TIME: 10-2pm FEE: $95 ARTIST EDUCATOR: Alison Babusci

Register online at TrustArts.org/education | For additional information call 412-471-6079 A D V E R T I S I N G

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Trust Arts Education Center 805-807 Liberty Avenue TrustArts.org

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from the tiniest baby ballerina to the serious Pre-Professional. Our beautiful facilities and world class teaching staff provide the best dance education the area has to offer. Visit our website www.pybco.org, or email pybco@comcast.net for more information about this wonderful opportunity for your dancer.

PITT Women’s Soccer Camp Come train with the Pitt Women’s Soccer team and staff this summer! The PITT Women’s Soccer Camps are designed to allow each player to develop their individual skill with the ball through various activities

and small-sided games. We help create, instruct, and implement a training environment that challenges and develops each individual. www.PantherSoccerCamps.com

QAMP! An overnight camp for LGBTQ youth and allies on Cheat Lake, Morgantown, WV. A safe space where everyone is encouraged to be themselves. Traditional camp activities like swimming, archery, and campfires. Arts exploration including poetry, crafting, and performance. Workshops on LGBTQ history and coping with bullying. Learn more at www.dreamsofhope.org/camp.

Renzo Gracie Martial Arts Camps We offer the opportunity to sample Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Thai boxing, and even Mixed Martial Arts taught by the areas top experts. Our professionally created program is safe, fun, and designed just for kids. The six day camp (10am5pm) is for ages 6-14. Please contact us at renzograciepittsburgh@ gmail.com or call 412-888-9797 for more information.

Saltworks Young Actors Studio Saltworks Young Actors Studio stresses “process over product” to allow attention to the craft of acting without the pressure of

JUN 10–AUG 23, 2013 Registration begins March 11!

Get ready to uncover the science of video games, explore the cosmos, crack secret cases, or sail the high seas of Pittsburgh’s three rivers! Original art and architecture, dinosaurs, ecology, biodiversity, ancient civilizations, and scientific mysteries inspire fun-filled and creative self-expression and learning. s(ALF ANDFULL DAYSESSIONS s0RE ANDPOST CAMPCAREAVAILABLEFORAGESn s&REEPARKINGFORPICK UPANDDROP OFF UNDERMINUTES

412.622.3288 | carnegiemnh.org/camps

Visit CarnegieScienceCenter.orgor call 412.237.1637 for more details. For kids ages 4–14. Presented in cooperation with

44&ORBES AVEs0ITTSBURG(, 0As52

CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER

Sponsorship provided by:

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preparing a production. Included in the curriculum is monologue preparation, scene study, musical theater, works of Shakespeare, and improvisation. This program builds character and confidence in each student as well as a sense of community where peers encourage each other to succeed.

SPEAK SPEAK is an ESY program that provides education and social interaction training for students diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Instruction is in alignment with students’ EIPs and

prevents or reduces summertime regression. Our high quality program employs an on-site director leading a staff of certified and experienced teachers.

The PITT Women’s Soccer Camps are designed to allow each player to develop their individual skill with the ball through various activities and small-sided games. We help create, instruct, and implement a training environment that challenges and develops each individual. EVENING CAMP June16-19, 2013 Grades 8-12

The Young Writers Institute

YOUTH CAMP June 17-20, 2013 Grades 1-7

TEAM/RESIDENTIAL CAMP July 5-9, 2013 Grades 9-12

CAMP WEBSITE: www. www.PantherSoccerCamps PantherSoccerCamps.com .com

The Young Writers Institute is for young people who like to write, and who want to develop their craft in a community of writers. Program highlights include visiting writers, field trips, readings of student writing and publication in electronic anthologies. Visit www.wpwp.pitt.edu/youth/ywi/

SALTWORKS Young Actors Studio Summer Camps Promising Preschoolers Ages 3-5 · June 3-7 or July 22-26

Grades 1-3 · June 17-28

© Disney

Grades 2-12 · June 3-7 Grades 4-6 · July 1-19 Grades 7-9 · July 22-Aug 9

Quality Theater Training for ages 4-16 Summer Studio Classes for acting, musical theater, improv & more!

LaRoche College:

Grades 4-6 · July 22-Aug 9 Grades 7-9 · July 1-19

June 17-21 and June 24-28 (ages 9-16) July 9-13 (ages 4-8) Grades 6-12 · June 17-July 3

Private Voice & Piano Ages 12 - 18 · June 18 - August 10 Half Hour and Full Hour spaces available

REGISTER ONLINE TODAY! pittsburghCLO.org 412-281-2234

North Hills:

July 8-12 (ages 6-8)

Oakland/Shadyside: July 15-19 (ages 6-8) and July 22-26 (ages 9-16)

www.saltworks.org 4 12 - 6 2 1 - 6 15 0 A D V E R T I S I N G

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DE

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THE MENU SPANNED FROM COCKTAIL-HOUR NOSHES AND LIGHT MEALS TO FULL ENTREES

SPICE IT UP {BY CHRIS POTTER} The woman who walked into Savvy Spices on a recent Friday morning was in the wrong place: She’d been looking for tamarind, which isn’t a spice but a fruit. Yet she was in no hurry to leave. “It smells wonderful,” she said. Which Deb Johnson took as a cue to introduce some of the 130 spices and 60 blends created and curated by her and her husband. The Johnsons’ goal, after all, is to broaden people’s taste for, well, tastes. “Spice use in this country is a fraction of what it is in other places,” says Dave Johnson. That’s one reason sample jars are scattered throughout the tonily austere showroom. Savvy Spices opened in November, after Deb and Dave — both chemists — gave up their day jobs. But “we’ve been spice-blending for 25 years,” says Dave. Along the way, they’ve visited markets in Istanbul, Greece, Spain, Budapest and Mexico City. Their selection is similarly farflung. Along with familiar choices like paprika, you’ll find galangal root and annatto, black cardamom and “Grains of Paradise.” Savvy Spices also offers custom blends — everything from tailgating rubs to garam masala. Often the blends are “designed for a Western palate, to act as a stepping stone,” says Dave. And as befits a pair of chemists, the Johnsons never stop experimenting: They’ve been perfecting a meat rub, “Steak a la Dave,” for 20 years. But the goal never changes: “The idea,” Dave says, “is to demystify spices.” CPOTTER@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

3015 Banksville Road, Banksville. 412-343-3080 or www.savvyspices.com

Fish Report Lent is a great excuse to indulge in deep-fried fish, but you can also get your Fish Friday on with a more healthful alternative. Franktuary is offering a “fishfurter,” a hot dog made from wild-cut salmon. Available e every day of the week until til Good Friday, March 29, at Downtown and Lawrenceville locations. www.franktuary.com

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FOR REAL {PHOTOS BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

B

ACK IN THE days after the South Side

was revivified but before its commerce was dominated by bars — and the partiers they attract — Bingham Square was one of the neighborhood’s most sophisticated nodes. Just off the main drag of East Carson Street, it offered the musical pleasures of Club Café and, as of a dozen years ago, one of Pittsburgh’s best restaurants, an alluring spot called Café Allegro. Today, Club Café still offers a resolutely grown-up venue amid the college bars and bands, but the Allegro space has sat empty for years. We waited to see what would be revealed when the lights went on again. Despite a name that, to our ears at least, is more in sync with the nightclub scene than with upscale dining, Truth Lounge picks up not too far from where Café Allegro left off. The space, spanning two storefronts, remains divided down the middle, but the brick wall separating the sides has been opened up a bit, suggesting continuity between the upscale bar and lounge on one side, and the austerely contemporary dining room on the other. The decor relies upon

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.06/03.13.2013

Bloody Mary-marinated New York strip steak

an interplay between light and dark that is sophisticated, if not exactly romantic: Overhead lights spotlit each tabletop, compensating for the cavernous effect of charcoal-gray walls and lending an almost surgery-room quality to our white tablecloth. The better to see the menu by, and pretty much everything on the mid-length, Mediterranean-inflected list looked worthwhile.

TRUTH LOUNGE

51 S. 12th St., South Side. 412-381-9600 HOURS: Mon.-Wed. 4:30-10 p.m.; Thu.-Sat. 4:30-11 p.m. PRICES: Small plates $12-20; entrees $24-32 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED There was definitely some ingredient efficiency — short rib and tenderloin appeared in three dishes each, duck confit in two. But the kitchen seemed intent on avoiding tired clichés, and the menu was well constructed to span from cocktail-hour noshes and light meals to full-scale entrees. Preferring to go in rather than out in a

blaze of glory, we began with saganaki, Greek cheese flambé. Since bread is a natural complement to cheese of any kind, we were a little surprised that none came with this dish, but it turned out to need no accompaniment. The slab of kefalograviera was served, steak-like, in a still-hot skillet, topped with apple bourbon, and set alight tableside; with lemon squeezed over the top to extinguish the flames, this was a party trick with a luscious payoff. Another novelty, “lambsicles,” were out the night we visited, but duck-confit sliders sated our hunger for a rich starter. Served on soft, sweet Hawaiian rolls (wisely grilled on the cut sides for texture and toastiness), the duck was tender and flavorful without a hint of gaminess. The toppings of sautéed wild mushrooms and Roquefort aioli combined for a superb balance of tangy, earthy, savory and sweet flavors. This served as a reminder of why sliders remain a starter standby. Seafood flatbread showed the kitchen’s extraordinary ability to handle combining delicate shellfish with the high heat


Truth chef Dustin Gregg

Tomatoes made their most subtle appearance of the night in Bloody Mary-marinated New York strip steak. The robust yet tender meat was served with a suitably mild gruyere-potato terrine and perfectly cooked, matchstick-slender green beans. A seasoned red wine sauce and garlic purée punched up the traditional flavors just enough to keep every bite lively. In stark contrast to the rest of our meal, every aspect of our second entrée fell short. The dish, quail stuffed with fennel sausage on a bed of rabe and white beans, consisted of a tough, gamy bird wrapped around dry sausage amid too-firm beans with tiny slices of rabe that could have passed for scallions. It was disappointing, but the truth is, it was hard to complain when everything else was so marvelously good.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

SCHOOL SPIRIT CMU students launch new liquor label

The Fortis team (left to right): Doug Heckmann, Casey Parzych and Anthony Lorubbio

demanded by flatbread dough. Truth’s flatbread was suitably thin and agreeably chewy, with a generous sprinkle of pecorino cheese adding a slightly sharp flavor. But the stars of the dish were diced shrimp, chunks of scallop and whole mussels in perfect harmony, sweet and succulent and just barely briny. Chunks of tomato, roasted to almost-caramelized softness, elevated the off-season fruit into something that ably completed the range of flavors. Bits of short rib studded a ragu served atop an appetizer-size portion of gnocchi, but here the tomato again stood out, with big chunks cooked to tenderness (but not to a mush), reminding us of the peak of late summer. The flavor was slightly sweet, suggestive not of sugar but of ripe fruit. The short rib contrasted with a bit of chew and savor, rather than trying to steal center stage. Meanwhile, the gnocchi were exemplary, light and fluffy pillows whose toasty surfaces provided resistance to the substantial sauce.

Carnegie Mellon University is renowned for producing next-generation robots, world-famous actors and … top-shelf booze? Maybe not quite yet, but adding to CMU’s legacy for innovation is the plan of Doug Heckmann, Anthony Lorubbio and Casey Parzych. The trio established Midnight Madness Distilling last year during an undergraduate entrepreneurship class. Originally, they planned to distill absinthe, but quickly realized they could take an earlier step before diving into the complexities of the Green Fairy. “I tried the neutral spirit that we were making, and as soon as I tasted it I realized we could make some great vodka,” says Lorubbio, the company’s CEO. That vodka is named Fortis — a name that Lorubbio says reflects the boldness of “us young underdogs to move into this industry.” Fortis is distilled from fair-trade, organic sugar cane — an unusual starting point for vodka. (The sub-tropical grass is generally distilled into rum’s potent first cousin, cachaca.) However, thanks to an innovative filtration system designed by head distiller Parzych, Fortis is a smooth, neutral spirit with just a hint of sweetness, grass and vanilla. Parzych, who also serves as the company’s president, says he originally intended to follow his passion as a homebrewer. (In fact, two CMU-founded microbreweries are set to open in the upcoming months.) He says that as he got deeper into the mechanics of making booze, he discovered that he “liked the engineering of distilling a little more than brewing,” because it was more challenging. Pittsburgh will be the only market for the vodka — at least for the moment. “We’re 100 percent focused on Pittsburgh right now. We love the people here,” says Heckmann, who manages the company’s sales strategy. By press time, the guys were barnstorming bars all around the city. In the near future, vodka lovers will be able to special-order a bottle of Fortis online (at $24.99 a bottle) at www.finewineand goodspirits.com, for pick up at a state store. And if all goes as expected, the trio will release their absinthe sometime this summer. www.fortisvodka.com INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

“Show up at Benjamin’s in jeans or in post-party formalwear, and you’ll feel equally at home. The atmosphere is comfortable and welcoming, the food is simply outstanding…” – Pittsburgh City Paper

ENJOY A CASUAL LUNCH AWAY FROM YOUR DESK. This weeks offerings include: Mediterranean Flat Bread | Sesame Chicken Salad Bison Burger | Roast Turkey BLT

Pittsburgh Marriott City Center 112 Washington Place, Downtown 412-471-4000 for Reservations www.thesteelhead.com

Scan to View Steelhead Menus

900 Western Ave. NORTH SIDE Open Daily at 11 am 412-224-2163

BenjaminsPgh.com Little

ANGKO STR TRIIP HE S TH P N T IIN

AUTHENTIC THAI CUISINE

DINING LISTINGS KEY

J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

ALMA PAN-LATIN KITCHEN. 7600 Forbes Ave., Regent Square. 412-727-6320. This venue offers a vibrant spectrum of African-Latin American fusion cuisine, riffing on common elements (lime, legumes and chilies) while bringing out distinctive identities (the rich, stew-like meat dishes of Cuba against the simple, citrusy seafood of the Peruvian coast). Indulge your sweet tooth with a cake filled with dulce de leche. EK BIGELOW GRILLE: REGIONAL COOKING AND BAR. Doubletree Hotel, One Bigelow Square, Downtown. 412-281-5013. This upscale restaurant offers fine foods with Steeltown flair, like “Pittsburgh rare” seared tuna (an innovation borrowed from steelworkers cooking meat on a blast furnace). The menu is loaded with similar ingenious combinations and preparations. KE BISTRO 19. 711 Washington Road, Mount Lebanon. 412306-1919. Bistro 19 fits within the upper echelon of the region’s dining scene, while keeping its cozy neighborhood feel. It offers a broad range of surf and turf, pastas and poultry. Its inventive preparations, and the kitchen’s attention to detail, make even now-familiar items such as pot-stickers and flatbreads exciting. LE

2013

MAGAZINE COMING MARCH 13TH

BYOB B YOB ALL LUNCHES $

7-$9

THE FRESHEST LOCAL PRODUCE FROM THE STRIP Mon 11:30-3:00

Tue-Thu 11:30-9:00

Fri-Sun 11:00-9:00

1906 Penn Ave. Strip District 412-586-4107

LITTLEBANGKOK INTHESTRIP.COM 28

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.06/03.13.2013

lounge offers a maturation of contemporary American cuisine, effortlessly shifting from refined Continental to Asian fusion to ingredient-focused invention. Instead of showy creations, the kitchen produces dishes that instantly seem right, such as miso cod or thymeroasted Amish chicken with asparagus flan. LE

THE CHELSEA GRILLE. 515 Allegheny Ave., Oakmont. 412828-0570. The menu here covers mostly familiar ground, with red-sauce pasta, chops and an unusual predilection for Mornay sauce. But that’s not to say that dinner here is rote. From the fritto baguette to the rarebit-ish Chicken Wisconsin, the classics prove quite surprising. JE

PALAZZO 1837 RISTORANTE. 1445 Washington Road, North Strabane. 724-223-1837. This restored mansion provides a charming setting for fine dining. The menu is primarily Italian, with traditional but thoughtfully considered dishes. The hearty, but refined, farfalle rustica pairs wild-boar sausage with wild mushrooms and a sherry sage cream sauce, while housemade crepes substitute for noodles in the crepe lasagna. LE

DIAMOND MARKET. 430 Market St., Downtown. 412-325-2000. The tavern-like décor provides a comfortable, unpretentious setting for socializing, and the menu bridges retro and au courant in a now-familiar way, with grownup comfort food and big burgers on brioche buns with fancy toppings. Try the excellent mac-and-cheese, accented with bacon and truffle oil, or the donut-sized onion rings drizzled with balsamic vinegar. KE

DINE IN / TAKE OUT

DINING GUIDE

Brasserie 33 {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} CARMI’S. 917 Western Ave., North Side. 412-231-0100. A soulfood restaurant offers traditional home-style Southern cooking on the North Side. On offer: waffles and fried chicken; hearty chickenand-dumpling soup; greens, studded with smoked meat; mashed potatoes; spare ribs; and a stand-out, Cajun shrimp paired with creamy grits. KF

The Porch {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} BRASSERIE 33. 5863 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. 412-363-3090. The food is unpretentious but not dumbed down in this classic French brasserie. The appetizers offer a greatest-hits collection of French food, from escargot and charcuterie to rillettes of rabbit and Roquefort flan. Entrees, including New York Strip steak, pork chops, coq au vin and duck, are generously proportioned, with tasty vegetable and potato sides. KE

THE PORCH. Schenley Plaza, Forbes Avenue and Schenley Drive, Oakland. 412-687-6724. An attractive wood-and-stone structure set in the verdant heart of Oakland, The Porch offers cuisine that is modern without being stark, homey without being heavy. Consider a pizza dressed with butternut squash, pork belly atop roasted pumpkin, or IL PIZZAIOLI. 703 lasagne with houseWashington Road, made chive pasta. KE www. per pa Mount Lebanon. 412pghcitym .co 344-4123. This popular SPADAFORA’S. 3932 neighborhood café serves Route 8, Allison Park. Neapolitan-style pasta and 412-486-1800. Though pizza, including the scandalously little more than an unassuming cheesy quattro formaggi pizza. concrete-block box on the outside, The front room overlooks bustling inside this is a warm, welcoming Washington Avenue; in season, family-run trattoria offering lucky diners can enjoy the rear Southern Italian specialties as garden courtyard. KE well as Italian-American fare. Quality ingredients, thoughtful NINE ON NINE. 900 Penn Ave., preparation and friendly Downtown. 412-338-6463. service make this restaurant This elegant restaurant and stand out. KE

FULL LIST ONLINE


offMenu

STOKE’S GRILL. 4771 McKnight Road, Ross Township. 412-369-5380. There is an art to making a really good sandwich, and the technique has been mastered here. The lengthy menu spans traditional sandwiches but also burgers, quesadillas and wraps, as well as salads and homemade soups. Originality is a hallmark: “Green fries” are shoestrings tossed with pesto, artichoke hearts and bits of brie. FJ

GIMME BIOSHELTER

Garfield Community Farm advancing major project IT WAS POURING rain and the day wouldn’t break

THE WINE LOFT. 2773 Tunnel Blvd., SouthSide Works, South Side. 412-586-5335. A wellcurated wine list, cozy seating options and an expanded menu make this a convivial spot for socializing. Share a pizza — or try an entrée such as filet sliders, Hawaiian tuna tartare or pumpkin ravioli. Wines include unusual varietals alongside the more familiar chardonnays and shirazes. KE

John Creasy, director of the Garfield Community Farm {PHOTO COURTESY OF GARFIELD COMMUNITY FARM}

TASTE OF INDIA. 4320 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 412-681-7700. Yogi Berra groused about the restaurant nobody went to — because it was always too crowded. Taste of India is the opposite: Everyone goes there partly because you can always get a table. The atmosphere is almost surreally quiet, but the food is consistently good (try the paneer). Portions are ample, prices reasonable. JE

WILD ROSEMARY. 1469 Bower Hill Road, Upper St. Clair. 412-221-1232. At this cozy, contemporary, candlelit cottage, the Italian- and Mediterranean-inspired menu changes every two weeks to showcase the freshest in-season ingredients. The menu offers fewer than 10 entrées, each matched with a small suite of carefully selected sides. Expect quality ingredients — dayboat scallops, Maytag cheese, lamb, steak — and exquisitely prepared meals. LF

2nd place Best Chinese in Pittsburgh

{BY AMYJO BROWN}

TANA ETHIOPIAN CUISINE. 5929 Baum Blvd., East Liberty. 412-665-2770. The menu offers a variety of stewed meats, legumes and veggies, all rich with warm spices. Order the sampler platters for the best variety of flavors, and ask for a glass of tej, a honeybased wine that is the perfect accompaniment. KE

UNION PIG AND CHICKEN. 220 N. Highland Ave., East Liberty. 412-363-7675. This lively family-style BBQ venue hews closely to tradition. The smoked meats (ribs, brisket, pork shoulder and chicken) are “dry” (with sauces at table), and the sides are well-prepared classics: mac-and-cheese, baked beans, collard greens and coleslaw. Prices are higher than a roadside stand, but the quality is top-notch. KE

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us

40 degrees — too cold and wet to do much gardening. But there was a sign of progress that recent February day at the Garfield Community Farm. After pulling up in his pickup truck, Owen Finegan, an inspector with the Pittsburgh Bureau of Building Inspection, jumped out to take a look at a partially excavated hill just under the water tower near the intersection of Cornwall and Wicklow streets. Minutes later, John Creasy, the director of the farm, heard Finegan say what Creasy has been waiting to hear for two years. “Go ahead and start,” Finegan said. Creasy is building a bioshelter — a greenhouse containing its own ecosystem. He received approval from the city’s zoning board to add the structure in January, after two years of dotting i’s and crossing t’s to get a special exception to build on a lot without street frontage. “We are above reproach now. We’ve gone through every single process,” Creasy says. Built into the side of a hill, the bioshelter’s north and west walls will be underground to provide insulation in the winter and cooling in the summer. It will rely on solar power and be managed to give plants all they need to grow with as little assistance as possible. Rabbits and worms housed inside, for example, will help create and break down waste that will be returned to fertilize the soil. The 30-by-20-foot structure, supported by a Sprout Fund grant, will be on about 2.5 acres of land that Creasy and his crew of volunteers have been slowly expanding into urban farmland. The vacant lots, once city-owned and planted at first by the group as part of the city’s greening initiative, are now owned by the nonprofit, which hosts educational field trips and runs a farmer’s market every Wednesday June through September. “We’re definitely helping get vegetables and produce into people’s hands,” Creasy explains. “That’s why we do all we do.” The bioshelter, expected to be completed this spring, will increase production and fulfill a goal they’ve had from the start. “The bioshelter is one of the bigger dreams out there,” Creasy says.

AWARD-WINNING CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN CUISINE

China Palace Shadyside

“Toast can serve as an upscale bar for after-work drinks or late-evening conversation. It’s casual and inexpensive enough to go to “just because,” but also serious enough to be a special occasion destination”

Featuring cuisine in the style of

Peking, Hunan, Szechuan and Mandarin

100 VEGETARIAN

- China Millman, Pgh Post-Gazette

PRIVATE DINING ROOMS AVAILABLE

DISHES!

Delivery Hours

TOAST!

11:30 - 2 pm and 5-10pm

KITCHEN & WINE BAR

5102 BAUM BLVD. SHADYSIDE

5440 Walnut Street, Shadyside 412-687-RICE www.chinapalaceshadyside.net

www.toastpgh.com 412-224-2579

PIZZA

HAPPY HOUR

(of course!)

Mon-Fri 5-7PM

Any Slice,Any Time!

Half Off Drafts!

35¢ Wing Nights

EVERYDAY BEER SPECIALS

+ Salads, Hoagies, Calzones, Wedgies, Gyros, Burgers

Pens Hockey Special: $10 Labatt Blue Buckets & $1 Slices

Mon thru Thu 5-9PM

Weekend Entertainment!

412-481-0480 2126 EAST CARSON ST. Open for Lunch, Dinner and Late Night Mon - Sun DELIVERY AVAILABLE!

ABRO WN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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LOCAL

BEAT

“WE’RE BOTH ROCK ’N’ ROLL BANDS, BUT WE GET TO IT THROUGH DIFFERENT ALLEYWAYS.”

{BY JOHN LAVANGA}

In Nashville, Brooke Annibale is another talented musician trying to make a name for herself amongst the droves of independent musicians looking to have their voices heard. On Sat., March 9, though, she’s coming home to Pittsburgh for the release of her new EP Words in Your Eyes — and she’ll get to enjoy a moment where she can stand out as a Pittsburghborn songwriter. She’s quickly drawing attention here and elsewhere, and says that her Pittsburgh upbringing “inspires who I am as a person, so I’m sure it also influences my music.” Annibale’s musical talent was already in full development during her time growing up here; she compiled a fulllength album while still in high school, but moved on to study music at Nashville’s Belmont University in 2005. She returned to Pittsburgh for a spell, but the draw of her newfound connections in Nashville quickly pulled her back there. “A lot of people that I had gone to school with were starting to work in studios,” she says, “so it made it easier to record.” She adds that the similarities between the two cities have made the transition easier, noting that “a lot of the things that I love about both towns are really similar.” Since her return to Nashville, Annibale’s songwriting has truly come into its own. Her 2011 LP, Silence Worth Breaking, was the first album she had recorded in Nashville, and by far her most polished. It’s a fairly mellow album, but don’t mistake mellow for bland. The album is rife with heartfelt tracks that display Annibale’s ability to stir emotion without overstating the mood. Last month, she followed it up with Words in Your Eyes, a six-track EP that boasts a very full sound, derived from teaming up with Nashville musicians Eleonore Denig, Tim Lauer and Justin March. As much as she loves her opportunities in Nashville, Annibale sees her future back home eventually. “I see a lot of promise in coming back to Pittsburgh,” she says, “because its art scene is flourishing.” For now, though, both she and the arts scene need some time to grow before they’re ready for a long-term reunion. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

BROOKE ANNIBALE. 7 p.m. Sat., March 9. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

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A singer of two cities: Brooke Annibale {PHOTO COURTESY OF ALYSSE GAFKJEN}

HOMECOMING NIGHT

GRAND PLANS {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

T

One-side of the story: Grand Piano (from left: Wesley Conroy, Nick DeAngelo, Thomas Cipollone, Ryan Booth, Zak Kane)

HE CONTEMPORARY conundrum for independent bands goes something like this: No one buys CDs anymore, but it’s tough to sell downloads at a show. (Not to mention, it doesn’t feel quite as professional, or accomplished, as having something tangible to sell.) And vinyl — it’s great, but it’s not cheap to press. So some bands — like locals The Red Western and Grand Piano — are revisiting a practice that’s been part of DIY punk for years: the vinyl split. The two bands are close, of course, which has led to them playing shows together, but the big decision to put out a record as a collective effort came down to more than just friendship.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.06/03.13.2013

were doing the same thing,” says Grand Piano’s Thomas Cipollone. “It all lined up. If you have a full record’s worth of material, why not put it on vinyl?” The Red Western is the more established of the two bands, though both have members who have been floating about THE RED WESTERN/ the music scene for years. Grand Piano’s GRAND PIANO Cipollone, Zak Kane and Nick DeAngelo all played in thrashy, math-y punk band SPLIT LP RELEASE 9:30 p.m. Fri., March 8. Brillobox, Red Team Blue Team previously. In 2010, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $7. with that band broken up and some of 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net the members playing solo, they joined up with bassist Wesley Conroy and a horn guitarist Jon Gunnell — helped make the section — saxophone player Ryan Booth idea happen. “Talking to Jon about re- and trumpet player Bob Kircher — to cording a new EP, he mentioned that they create a very different team. “Doing a vinyl split is great because you can afford it,” explains Red Western singer and guitarist Lauren DeLorenze. The fact that both bands were recording EPs at once — both with Red Western

CONTINUES ON PG. 32


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GRAND PLANS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 30

Buying or selling a home? Choose a pro who lives and works in the city. Call today for a consultation: Rick Schweikert Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 5887 Forbes Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15217

412-352-3417

Rick Schweikert rick.schweikert@pittsburghmoves.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.06/03.13.2013

Golden boys (and girl): The Red Western (from left: Jon Gunnell, Sean Soisson, Lauren DeLorenze, Sean Finn, Jay Leon)

Red Team was a more extreme band, right down to the fact that there were two bass players. “Red Team Blue Team was the kind of band where it was like, ‘Let’s play the most-creative, heaviest, most-loud, fast shit that we can, all the time!’” explains DeAngelo. “We’ve got more control now,” adds Cipollone. It might have a bit to do with age and maturity — they’re hitting their mid- to late-20s now. “I think every kid that starts playing music starts with the idea, “I’m gonna shred, and crush, and rock ’n’ roll right away,” says Cipollone. “And you do that. My first band was a punk band. Once you get the thrashy stuff out of the way, you can step back and say, ‘Now I want to listen to what I’m doing.’” Which isn’t to say they’re lacking energy in Grand Piano. “I think it comes out more in the writing than the execution,” says Kane. “We’re not louder than every band we play with anymore.” One thing they do have that most rock bands in town lack is horns; wind players who are willing to play rock shows in dingy bars are seemingly at a premium … and that puts the Grand Piano horns in demand. Do other bands ever try to steal them? “All the time,” says Cipollone. “The

Harlan Twins tried to steal them, and succeeded.” “I appreciate when people steal them,” says Kane. “They’re great dudes and awesome musicians. Go ahead and steal them, and teach them some chord progressions we’re not using, so they can bring those back to us and we can take them.” The Grand Piano horns play on The Red Western’s side of the split as well. And while the two sides are different, they’re also complementary. “We’re both rock ’n’ roll bands,” says Kane, “but we both get to it through different alleyways.” Grand Piano is more eclectic, taking influences from old-timey folk, indie rock and even a little jazz here and there. The Red Western, which started out as more of a country-rock band, has settled into a straightforward, folk-inspired rock outfit. The Red Western began in 2007 when lifelong friends Sean Soisson and Jay Leon began playing with singer and guitarist Lauren DeLorenze (whose main instrument had previously been drums). After a few years of lineup changes, the band finally officially released its first long-player in December of 2011. Putting together this second record took a bit less time. “I think it was a conscious effort to

“ONCE YOU GET THE THRASHY STUFF OUT OF THE WAY, YOU CAN STEP BACK AND SAY, ‘NOW I WANT TO LISTEN TO WHAT I’M DOING.’”


not repeat the process of taking two years to put out a record,” says Soisson. “That last record was done for a year before we released it, which, when you think about it, is crazy!” It was, of course, partly a matter of establishing a lineup that stuck; the revolving door at the drummer’s throne before the arrival of current drummer Sean Finn (Life in Bed, Manifold Splendour) made it hard to make any big moves as a band. (One drummer played one show before leaving town for the West Coast, for example.) Having a bit more permanence makes everything a little less stressful. “It really seems like writing is so easy now,” says Finn. “There hasn’t been any one song that we’ve worked on that hasn’t worked out.” Soisson — whose off-the-clock musical interests lie primarily in metal — notes that on its newer material, The Red Western has gotten a bit more rock ’n’ roll. “The biggest difference is that [the songs are] louder. We kicked the gain up a bit. It’s not as country as the older stuff was.” He begins to explain how the band can’t really rightfully be pigeonholed into the country category exactly. “I don’t know that any of us are really just listening to Loretta Lynn,” he says, and is quickly interrupted. “I listen to Loretta Lynn,” insists DeLorenze. “I don’t know what you’re talking about.” But they can agree on some things. “I would say, playing as a band, especially live, there’s a lot better energy on stage,” says DeLorenze. “I can look back at Finn, and he’s having a blast, sweat dripping off his mustache. And I think we just blend together better now.” Both bands released their respective sides of the split as CD EPs; they’re also available for download. But they expect the vinyl to last longer. “Everyone gets CDs and you might listen to it once, then throw it in the back seat of your car, and your friends step on it or whatever,” says Cipollone. “With a vinyl record, I think you’re more likely to actually keep it and listen to it.” That’s certainly the hope — and there’s little reason why it shouldn’t happen. The split is a good document of two good rock bands, neither clinging too closely to genre, but neither straying too wildly at the same time. And both are happy to complement each other while pursuing their own thing. “We don’t want to sound like other bands,” says Cipollone. “We just want to sound like our band. However that turns out, it’s good by us.”

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

ELEVATIONS ELEVATIONS (CORONA MUSIC)

Over an hour of tunes, nearly all original, from this group of young local jazz players, including some second- and third-generation musicians with names like DeFade, Benack and Heid. Smooth stuff, nicely composed and expertly played, with guest spots from folks like Carolyn Perteete and Dahi Divine. Nice to see the Pittsburgh jazz standard borne by some young faces. ELEVATIONS CD RELEASE. 8 p.m. Sat., March 9. James Street Gastropub & Speakeasy, 422 Foreland St., North Side. Free. 412-904-3335

BADBOXES JSMN (SELF-RELEASED)

Seven tracks from the new project from local songwriter Harrison Wargo, who seemingly never ages, as he’s still just 22. This is a self-produced venture into electronic beats and smooth pop music — it ranges from post-Postal Service synthpop to verging-on-contemporary R&B. Wargo is a talented guy with something to say, and we’ll be hearing more from him soon.

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03/20 THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS AGES 14+ 03/21 KATE NASH 03/22 KMFDM 03/24-25 THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA & AS I LAY DYING

BADBOXES with BLUE OF COLORS. 9:30 p.m. Thu., March 7. Lava Lounge, 2204 E. Carson St., South Side. $5. 412-431-5282

SCOTT SCHENDLINGER (EARLY) CORONADO CD RELEASE (LATE) BROOKE ANNIBALE EP RELEASE (EARLY) BOULEVARD OF THE ALLIES (LATE) THE CALM BEFORE THE STORM A QUIET NIGHT OF THE BEST OF IRISH MUSIC 03/16 THE TURBOSONICS (CD RELEASE) 03/19 TYRONE WELLS

03/08 03/08 03/09 03/09 03/15

COMPLETE FAILURE THE ART GOSPEL OF AGGRAVATED ASSAULT (SEASON OF MIST)

New full-length from the local grindcore/metalcore outfit, released on the French label Season of Mist (Morbid Angel, Cannibal Corpse). Exciting and sonically challenging bursts of blast-beat aggression and intense breakdowns. The band shows a robust versatility over 10 songs that last only 22 minutes total.

TA S T E

03/24 SAN CISCO

TICKETWEB.COM/OPUSONE | FACEBOOK.COM/OPUSONEPROD | TWITTER.COM/OPUSONEPROD FOR A COMPLETE LIST OF SHOWS VISIT WWW.OPUSONEPRODUCTIONS.COM

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

AMULKE R IN@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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OPUS ONE PRESENTS

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CRITICS’ PICKS Lunasa

[FESTIVAL] + THU., MARCH 07

[IRISH] + SAT., MARCH 09

The Sunstar Music Festival comes around every other March (though the franchise also stays alive with a series of smaller shows in between). The weekend-long event, presented at multiple East Liberty venues by the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, celebrates women in music, with performances and discussions for music lovers and musicians alike. Tonight, it kicks off with a free discussion at The Alloy Studios (5530 Penn Ave.) led by Jeri Lynn Johnson, founder of the Black Pearl Chamber Orchestra; tomorrow night, at 6119 Penn A$AP Rocky Ave., Brooklyn gothpop act Light Asylum plays with local opener Vie Boheme. Saturday night, jazz is the theme at the Kelly-Strayhorn (5941 Penn Ave.), as singers including Spanky Wilson, Etta Cox and Maggie Johnson hit the stage to pay tribute to legendary women of jazz. Andy Mulkerin 6:30 p.m. Continues through Sat., March 9. Concerts $15-25. 412363-3000 or www. kelly-strayhorn.org

With the local Irish festival still going strong after 23 years, a slew of organizations dedicated to the preservation of Irish culture, and one of the only Irish-language programs in the country at the University of Pittsburgh, it’s safe to say that plenty of yinzers are proud of their Irish heritage. Still, it’s rare that an Irish music act quite so renowned and respected as Lunasa comes to town. Since coming together in 1997, the band, whose members come from counties across Ireland, has carried the flag for traditional Irish music around the world. The group plays at Carnegie Lecture Hall tonight. John Lavanga 7 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $35-39. All ages. 412361-1915 or www. calliopehouse.org

[INDIE ROCK] + FRI., MARCH 08 There have been weirder transitions, but it’s fair to say a glam-rock-inspired album from a former member of Fugazi was slightly unexpected. But Deathfix, headed up by Brendan Canty and including members of other Dischord bands like Medications, does it well. The band takes cues from the early ’70s and makes an eclectic mix of rock, power-pop and some weird stuff (there are some rapped parts on the goofy “Dali’s House”). The band hits the Mr. Roboto Project tonight on its first East Coast tour. With Allies, Adult Field Trip, Dubpixel with Robin Bell. AM 7 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $7. All ages. www.therobotoproject.org

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[HIP HOP] + WED., MARCH 13 Since he first made a big splash on the web back in January 2011, the buzz building around Harlem rapper A$AP Rocky has been relentless. A$AP proved his chops early on with his mixtape Long. Live. A$AP. and sparked a bidding war between major labels to see who would count the stacks of cash that would undoubtedly pour in when the phenom’s music debuted on the open market. The album, also entitled Long. Live. A$AP., showcased A$AP’s effortless flow over mesmerizing beats, and established him as more than just another substance-free buzz-rapper. If you’ve got any doubts, you can check him out tonight at Stage AE with Taylor Gang’s Chevy Woods. JL 7 p.m. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. $25. All ages. 412-229-5483 or www.stageae.com


TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE)

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} WILLIAM PITT UNION. Bleeding Rainbow, Instead of Sleeping and Gypsy & His Band of Ghosts. Oakland. 412-648-7814.

GARFIELD ARTWORKS. America Hearts, Weird Paul, Nox Boys. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. Micky & The Bone 6119 PENN AVE. Heliotropes, Pickers, Johnny Newmann, The Shockwave Riderz. East Liberty. Black Honey Rollers. Lawrenceville. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD 31ST STREET PUB. Backwoods 412-681-4318. CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance Payback, Inter Arma, Perish. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. Vaughn Trio. Strip District. Strip District. 412-391-8334. Deathfix, Allies, Adult Field Trip, 412-281-6593. 6119 PENN AVE. Light Asylum, Dubpixel, Robin Bell. Bloomfield. CLUB CAFE. Scott Miller, Vie Boheme, DJ Lauren G. OAKMONT TAVERN. Jenny Morgan. South Side. Part of SUNSTAR Music Lucky Me. Oakmont. 412-431-4950. Festival. East Liberty. 412412-828-4155. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Candy 363-3000. THUNDERBIRD Machine Guns, Mustache BRILLOBOX. The Red CAFE. Flannel . w Required, Social Justice Squad. ww per Western, Grand Piano. Church, Midnight a p ty ci pgh m Garfield. 412-361-2262. Split record release Special. Lawrenceville. .co HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. party. Bloomfield. 412-682-0177. Homemade Wine. Bloomfield. 412-681-4900. 412-682-0320. CLUB CAFE. Coronado, LAVA LOUNGE. Blue of Colors, Chrome Moses, Gary Lee 31ST STREET PUB. Stellar Corpses, Farraday, Badboxes. South Side. Musisko (Late). South Side. Children of October, Three Cents 412-431-5282. 412-431-4950. Short, Porno Tongue. Strip District. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Steve THE FALLOUT SHELTER. 412-391-8334. Kimock, Bernie Worrell, Wally Round Two, Latecomer, ALTAR BAR. No Control. Ingram, Andy Hess. Millvale. Breckenwood, The Fissures. Strip District. 412-263-2877. 866-468-3401. Aliquippa. 724-375-5080. BROTHERS GRIMM. KardaZ. PETER B’S. Jet W. Lee. Sarver. FRANKIE’S. Fungus. Squirrel Hill. Coraopolis. 412-788-0890. 724-353-2677. 412-422-5027. CLUB CAFE. Boulevard of the Allies, Gypsy & His Band of Ghosts, Monica Stephenson (Late). South Side. 412-431-4950. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. RPG’s. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. The Lenny Colinni Trio. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Travis Alexander, Sainthood Reps, Foreign Tongues. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HAMBONE’S. Mac Martin & The Dixie Travelers Invader, Asphixian, World’s Scariest Police Chases, Vega. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. HULA BAR. Ozo Remedy. Verona. 412-828-6919. MUGSHOTS CAFE. Bo’Hog Brothers. Crafton. 412-921-7474. THE PRAHA. The Dave Iglar Band. Tarentum. 724-224-2112. THE R BAR. Chrome Moses. Dormont. 412-445-5279. ROCKY’S ROUTE 8. Cool Change Band. Shaler. 412-487-6259. ROOSTERS ROADHOUSE. The Accelerators. Bridgeville. 412-221-1543. SCOREBOARD RESTAURANT & LOUNGE. Daniels & McClain. Valencia. 724-443-6522. SMILING MOOSE. The Banned, Baby in a Cage Off The Record, Musical Fusion, The Daily Grind, Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from Onward. South Side. 412-431-4668. a local artist. This week’s track comes from SPEAL’S TAVERN. Angry Johnny Stangry & the CRS Band. Unknown. , a local solo synth-pop project. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Adam’s Ale. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Stream or download free TJ’S HIDEAWAY. Dancing Queen. on FFW>>, our music blog at pghcitypaper.com. Evans City. 724-789-7858.

ROCK/POP THU 07

FRI 08

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 09

MP 3 MONDAY GOOD JEANS

Good Jeans

“Be Quiet”

CONTINUES ON PG. 36

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 35

HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Samantha Harlow, S.S. Web, The Blind Staggers. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Today Is The Day, Black Tusk, KEN Mode, Fight Amp. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. SHADOW LOUNGE. WRCT 88.3FM’s Annual Spring Dance Party. Feat. WRCT DJs Dave Zak, Salem, Shrubs, Alphonse, Eileen, more. East Liberty. 412-363-8277.

ROCK BOTTOM. Good Brother Earl. Waterfront. 412-462-2739.

R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & guests. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, R&B, Funk & Soul. East Liberty. 412-362-1250. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. LAVA LOUNGE. Motown Night. BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE w/ PghSoulDj. Classic Motown, SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Rare Soul, Funk. South Side. Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul 412-431-5282. Mitchell. Downtown. MEXICO CITY. DJ Juan 412-456-6666. Diego VII. Salsa & Latin BELVEDERE’S. Dj music. Downtown. Zombo Sexplosion! 412-980-7653. . w w w Lawrenceville. REDBEARDS. DJ r citypape h g p 412-687-2555. Kayoss. Mt. Washington. .com CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. 412-431-3730. Bombo Claat Friday’s Reggae. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 East Liberty. 412-362-1250. Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. Ray S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. Lugo. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. 412-481-7227. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. REDBEARDS. DJ Kayoss. RIVERS CASINO. DJs Bill Bara Mt. Washington. 412-431-3730. & Digital Dave. North Side. REMEDY. Chocolate Boombox. 412-231-7777. w/ Newtronn. Lawrenceville. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage 412-781-6771. Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. Electro, post punk, industrial, new South Side. 412-431-2825. wave, alternative dance. South RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Side. 412-431-4668. Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

MON 11

FRI 08

DJS

SAT 09

SUN 10

ALTAR BAR. The Summer Set, We Are The In Crowd. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

TUE 12 ALTAR BAR. The Saw Doctors. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CLUB CAFE. The Tossers, Continental. South Side. 412-431-4950. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Anwar Sadat, South Seas Sneak, Rose & Sara, Werewyatt & El Hollin. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HEINZ HALL. Jackie Evancho w/ Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Songs from the Silver Screen. Downtown. 412-392-4900. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Secondhand Serenade, Alex Goot, Seth Cooper, Austen Leathers. Millvale. 866-468-3401.

WED 13

THU 07 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555.

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 10

BELVEDERE’S. Humanaut Presents “Out of Order”. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. BRILLOBOX. Title Town Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild

TUE 12

BELVEDERE’S. DJ T$. Lawrenceville. 724-312-4098.

WED 13 AVA BAR & LOUNGE. DJ Outtareach. East Liberty. 412-363-8277.

BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. DJ Gina Mungo. Lawrenceville. 412-904-2915. SAVOY RESTAURANT. Latin Savoy Night. Strip District. 412-281-0660. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

BLUES

ANDYS. Tania Grubbs. Downtown. 412-773-8884. FE GALLERY. Anqwenique Wingfield. THIRD STREAM: The Groove Aesthetic. Also feat. dance, poetry, more. Lawrenceville. 240-277-1895. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Boilermaker Jazz Band. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Downtown. 412-392-2217.

by Vanessa German. East Liberty. 412-363-3000. LITTLE E’S. Lilly Abreu. Downtown. 412-392-2217. THE SPACE UPSTAIRS. Second Saturdays. Jazz-happening series feat. live music, multimedia experimentations, more. Hosted by The Pillow Project. Point Breeze. 412-225-9269. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Boilermaker Jazz Band. Greensburg. 724-850-7245.

SAT 09

SAT 09

SUN 10

FRANK’S PUB & GRILL. Shot O’ Soul. Bethel Park. 412-833-4606. MOONDOG’S. Savoy Brown. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. NIED’S HOTEL. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. REMBRANDT’S ROADHOUSE. Ruff House. Bentleyville. 724-239-4775.

WED 13 CAFE NOTTE. Billy Heid. Emsworth. 412-761-2233.

JAZZ THU 07 ANDYS. Kathy Connor. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Jimmy Z & Friends. Carnegie. 412-429-7272.

Become an auctioneer in Pittsburgh through Clarion University. Th only auctioneering The ti i program iin western t P Pennsylvania l i approved by the Pennsylvania State Board of Auctioneer Examiners and the only one in the Commonwealth to award university credit and an associate degree.

Education that works. Clarion University is an affirmative action equal opportunity employer.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.06/03.13.2013

FRI 08

ANDYS. Maureen Budway. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377. FE GALLERY. Anqwenique Wingfield. THIRD STREAM: The Groove Aesthetic. Also feat. dance, poetry, more. Lawrenceville. 240-277-1895. HEINZ HALL. Diana Krall. Downtown. 412-392-4900. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Boilermaker Jazz Band. 8pm lesson, 9pm- 12am music & dancing. North Side. 412-904-3335. KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER. Spanky Wilson, Etta Cox, Kenia, Tania Grubbs, Maggie Johnson. A Tribute to First Ladies of Jazz, part of the SUNSTAR Music Festival. Also feat. spoken word

EDGEWOOD COUNTRY CLUB. Boilermaker Jazz Band. Penn Hills. 412-823-7300. ELWOOD’S PUB. Jeff Pogas. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH. Jazz at Emmanuel. North Side. 412-231-0454. UP MODERN KITCHEN. Dave Roth. Jazzed-up brunch. Shadyside. 412-688-8220.

MON 11 KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER. Spelman College Jazz Ensemble. East Liberty. 412-363-3000. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Michael Musillami Quartet. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

TUE 12 ANDYS. John Bagnato. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series feat. Paul Thompson. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

Enroll now for March. • 20-credit program that prepares you to take the Pennsylvania State Auctioneer Licensure Exam • Option to continue on to earn an associate degree

Dr. William Hallock, Chair Department of Applied Technology 814-676-6591, ext. 1211 whallock@clarion.edu www.clarion.edu/appliedtech-auctioneering


EARLY WARNINGS

Reservations required. Shadyside. 412-381-5105.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JENNIFER CHURCH}

REGGAE

Swans

THU 07 HARD ROCK CAFE. Bang Tango. Station Square. 412-481-7625.

COUNTRY THU 07 ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. Cheswick. 724-265-1181.

WED 13 ARSENAL BOWLING LANES. Mo Nelson Band. Lawrenceville. 412-683-5992.

CLASSICAL {MON., JUNE 10}

FRI 08

Local Natives

THE PITTSBURGH CAMERATA. The Musical Conquest of the New World. Mt. Lebanon United Methodist Church, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-7131. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Works by Mozart & Bartok feat. Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, conductor & Shai Wosner, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

Stage AE, 400 North Shore Drive, North Side {FRI., JUNE 14}

Swans Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side {Sun., June 30}

David Byrne and St. Vincent

SAT 09

PITTSBURGH PUBLIC MARKET. Jack McLaughlin. Strip District. 412-281-4505.

BUTLER COUNTY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Feat. movie theme songs. Butler Intermediate High School, Butler. 724-283-1402. PITTSBURGH CAMERATA. The Musical Conquest of the New World. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Highland Park. 412-661-1245.

SUN 10

SUN 10

Palace Theater, 21 W. Otterman St., Greensburg

WED 13 ANDYS. Jessica Lee. Downtown. 412-773-8884. SEWICKLEY HOTEL. Daval/ Stater Guitar Duo. Sewickley. 412-427-9979.

ACOUSTIC THU 07 BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR & GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. CAFE NOTTE. Acoustic Cafe w/ Bucky. Emsworth. 412-761-2233. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Mike & Frank of Lava Game. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. West Deer Bluegrass Review. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. The Steel Wheels. Shadyside. 412-361-0873.

FRI 08 ELWOOD’S PUB. Martin The Troubadour. Cheswick. 724-265-1181.

SAT 09 CLUB CAFE. Brooke Annibale, Judith Avers (early). Brooke Annibale EP Release Show. South Side. 412-431-4950. FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH. The Stray Birds, Broken Fences. Shadyside. 412-621-8008. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525.

N E W S

CARNEGIE LIBRARY, OAKLAND. Elliott Sussman. Oakland. 412-622-3151. CLUB CAFE. Cheryl Wheeler, Kenny White. South Side. 412-431-4950. PITTSBURGH PUBLIC MARKET. Broked, Stranded & Ugly. Strip District. 412-281-4505.

PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Works by Mozart & Bartok feat. Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, conductor & Shai Wosner, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. SOPHIE GRAF, HARPIST. Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-999-9009.

WED 13

WED 13

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. MOONDOG’S. Acoustic Open Stage. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PARK HOUSE. Dodgy Mountain Boys & the Park House Jammers. North Side. 412-596-2743. PENN HILLS COFFEEHOUSE. Songwriter Showcase. Penn Hills. 412-798-2127.

VIENNA BOYS’ CHOIR. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000.

WORLD

SAT 09

CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL. Lunasa. Oakland.

HAMBONE’S. Boon w/ Deborah Heaton Brown & Joanna Lowe. Round robin music & spoken word performance. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

FRESH AND LOCAL

TREATS • EATS • DRINKS

TUE 12

SUN 10 CENTRAL CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL. Mary Courtney & Morning Star. Oakland. 1-888-718-4253.

TUE 12

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Elaine Paige. Downtown. 412-325-6769.

LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED FAIR TRADE • LOCAL PRODUCTS • FREE WIFI COFFEE ROASTED LOCAL EVERY WEEK

WED 13 LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER. River City Brass Band. Celtic Connections concert. Midland. 724-643-9004.

MANSIONS ON FIFTH. Dan Possumato & Vince Burns. Traditional Irish folk music.

TA S T E

FRI 08

LEMONT. Jason Miller & Steve Jackson. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100.

SAT 09

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PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

What to do March 6 - 12 WEDNESDAY 6 60

special guests Bernie Worrell & Wally Ingram. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

Familylinks 'Just Jazz' Benefit Concert AUGUST WILSON CENTER Downtown. 412-258-2700. Tickets: familylinks.org or 412-942-0492. 5:30p.m.

FRIDAY 8 80 Joel McHale

CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL Munhall. 412-3685225. With special guest CJ Toledano. Tickets: librarymusichall.com. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 7 70 Bang Tango

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. With special guests Klaymore & more. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

OFF THE WALL 2013: Seinendan Theater Company - Robot/ Android - Human Theater

SUNSTAR Music Festival: Celebrating Independent Women in Music

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM North Side. 412-237-8300. Tickets: warhol.org. Through March 9.

KELLY STRAYHORN THEATER Downtown. 412-363-3000. Tickets: kelly-strayhorn.org. Through March 9.

Steve Kimock

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With

IN PITTSBURGH

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

JOEL Mc McHALE FRIDAY, MARCH 8 CARNEGIE LIBRARY MUSIC HALL

LINCOLN PARK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER Midland. Tickets: lppac.org or 724-643-9004. Through March 10.

Coronado

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 10:30p.m.

SATURDAY 9 90 Quantum Theatre’s Q-Ball Benefit Gala

BAKERY SQUARE. 412-3621713. Tickets: showclix.com/ event/QBall2013. For more info visit quantumtheatre.com. 7p.m.

Lord of the Dance

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: pittsburghsymphony.org. 2p.m. & 8p.m.

Breath & Imagination The Story of Roland Hayes CITY THEATRE South Side. 412-431-CITY. Tickets: citytheatrecompany.org. Through March 31.

Pre-11 Day 2013: A 311-Day Celebration featuring No Control ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 21

show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8:30p.m.

Boulevard of the Allies

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-4314950. With special guests Gypsy and His Band of Ghosts & more. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb. com/opusone. 10:15p.m.

MONDAY 11

The Summer Set / We Are The In Crowd

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guests Go Radio & For The Foxes. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

TUESDAY 12

SUNDAY 10

The Tossers

Priscilla Queen of the Desert

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-4800. Tickets: trustarts.org. 1p.m. & 6:30p.m.

CLUB CAFE South Side. 412-431-4950. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/ opusone. 8p.m.

The Saw Doctors

Today is The Day

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Black Tusk, KEN Mode & more. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb. com/opusone. 8p.m.

Cheryl Wheeler CLUB CAFE South Side. 412431-4950. With special guests Kenny White. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. With special guests Honeyriders. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Secondhand Serenade

MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests Alex Goot, Veronica Ballestrini & more. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 7:30p.m.

ADVENTURE DESIGNS™

Take a stroll in Schenley Park with two new Spring styles from Jambu! Ocean

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com

Orion

Facebook.com/GordonShoes

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.06/03.13.2013


FREE WHEELIN’ {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

FANS OF THE SERIES WILL BE EAGER TO SEE HOW THE GANG, NOW 56, IS GETTING ON

Ross Nugent isn’t especially a car guy, but the two shorts he’s screening at Film Kitchen betray a certain fascination. “Hopper Repair” lovingly memorializes the rusting hulks in a VW auto graveyard near Nugent’s hometown of Sharon, Pa. And the nine-minute “Tear It Up, Son!” documents Yankee Lake Truck Night, which draws up to 10,000 people to watch monster-wheeled pickups put through their muddy paces in a drained eastern Ohio lake.

THE

EXAMINED

Truck Night: Ross Nugent’s “Tear It Up, Son!”

“It was this controlled chaos. It blew my mind,” says Nugent, a mainstay of the experimental-film scene just back from graduate studies in Wisconsin. “Tear It Up” combines crisp black-and-white cinematography — shot on a vintage handwound Bolex — with overheard audio. (“I just yanked some dude’s bumper clean off his truck! Heh-heh!”) Also screening are two shorts by veteran filmmaker Bob Buncher, including “Pennsylvania NW,” a dramatic dialogue for two top local actors, John Shepard and Robert Haley. And Scott Whiteman’s four Film Kitchen shorts include: two memorably odd music videos; the darkly comic “Sleeping Pills”; and “Left Behind Like Son,” a wicked mashup of two disparate films from different phases of Kirk Cameron’s career. DRISCOLL@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

8 p.m. Tue., March 12. Melwood Screening Room, 477 Melwood Ave., N. Oakland. $5. 412-681-9500

DEAD MAN DOWN. In this thriller from Niels Arden Oplev, the right-hand man of a mob boss falls for one of the gangster’s victims.

Colin Farrell and

Noomi Rapace star. Starts Fri., March 8.

LIFE

{BY AL HOFF}

This boy’s life: Peter, one of the Up Series subjects, at age 14 (left) and 56

I

N 1964, 14 British children, age 7, were filmed for a television show called 7 Up. Jumping off from the maxim “give me the child until he is 7 and I will show you the man,” the show interviewed the youngsters — who were intentionally chosen from varied social, geographic and economic backgrounds — about their lives and plans for the future. Were their lives already pre-determined by their circumstances? Subsequently, director Michael Apted (who had been a researcher on 7 Up) returned every seven years to re-interview the kids-turned-adults, following them through the personal (jobs, marriages), while history unfolded around them. The Up Series, now in its eighth update in 56 Up, has itself evolved into a compelling ongoing project, variously a documentary, cultural anthropology and a more thoughtful (but no less entertaining) form of what we now know as reality TV. 7 Up concluded by intoning: “This has been a glimpse of Britain’s future.” Now much of that future has been recorded.

The series provides too small a sample to draw any conclusions from — there were working-class kids who prospered, private-school kids who floundered, and others who adhered more closely to what was expected of them. But as an anecdotal document of how 14 people grew up and adapted to five decades of change, it’s fascinating. (Unforeseen in 1964: Britain’s multicultural society and the changing role of women.)

56 UP DIRECTED BY: Michael Apted Starts Fri., March 8. Harris

CP APPROVED The current check-in finds the 56-yearold subjects dealing with typical mid-life issues, such as aging bodies, empty nests and grandchildren. But there are new external concerns, such as the impact of the recent economic downturn and the austerity measures that are shredding Britain’s social safety net. (Nearly all the

parents, regardless of their economic status, feel that life will be more difficult for their children.) To enjoy 56 Up, one needn’t have seen the previous films, as Apted includes ample background material. Obviously, those who have followed the whole series will be eager to see how the gang is getting on, and how they’ve weathered the changing times (as we all have). What’s especially interesting about this episode is how reflective the subjects have become — about their participation in the project, the show’s original premise and whether there’s been any larger value to the series. Several participants complain that the series has inaccurately depicted them, even accusing Apted of cherry-picking footage to keep his thesis viable. But Nick, the farmer’s lad turned professor, concedes to a workable compromise: “The idea of looking at people over time and how they evolve — that was a really nifty idea. … It’s not an absolute picture of me, but it is a picture of somebody — and that’s the value in it.” A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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THE ABCS OF DEATH. In this new horror anthology, 26 directors from around the globe were randomly assigned a letter, and given $5,000 and free rein to make a short film about death that also illustrated their letter. As expected, the films are a mixed bag, ranging from familiar horror tropes to more experimental interpretations of the genre. There’s live action, animation and some trippy mash-ups. Two directors make self-referential films about the A-to-Z project, and a number of the films add sex or nudity for extra thrills. (More surprising was how many films featured toilets.) Some are brazenly in poor taste — an opening title card suggests animal-lovers and pregnant women not watch — but you likely already knew that. The films run in alphabetical order, with the titles and director credit running at the end of each short (“A is for…”). This gives viewers a bit of fun trying to guess from the material what each letter will stand for: Some are obvious (“D is for Dogfight”), but you’ll never guess “H.” The gimmick wears a bit thin after Q-P-R or so, but even “Z” gets its due. For my money, only a couple of the shorts were thematically and/or visually interesting, but if you’re a fan of horror-shock films, this is a value-pack of 26. In English, and various languages, with subtitles. 7 and 9:30 p.m. Fri., March 8; and 7 p.m. Sun., March 10. Hollywood (Al Hoff) EMPEROR. Chalk up Peter Webber’s historical drama as another film that might have been informative and even provocative, but winds up being a lackluster, unsatisfying affair. The story is set in 1945 Japan immediately after the surrender; Gen. MacArthur (Tommy Lee Jones) is on the ground with a small team, tasked with transitioning Japan from a combative enemy to a peaceful and stable nation.

Emperor One big question on the table: How complicit was Emperor Hirohito in the warmongering, and should he be tried as a war criminal? Or is the continuing cooperation of the deeply influential spiritual leader of Japan necessary to rebuild a ravaged, fragile nation? Tasked with answering this query — in a historically inaccurate 10 days (!) — is Gen. Bonner Fellers (Matthew Fox), who has some familiarity with Japanese culture, and once had a Japanese girlfriend. There’s some meaty stuff here — how

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.06/03.13.2013

21 and Over to reconcile after a devastating war, especially when the two sides have alien and frequently misunderstood cultures? Who has the right to be “emperor” of post-war Japan — the man who claims divine right, or the occupier who calls himself “supreme commander”? But Emperor is undercut by several flaws. Webber weaves the investigation into Hirohito with flashbacks to Fellers’ romance, which has all the emotional resonance of a TV movie (the pair picnic in bamboo forests). There’s a clunky script that far too often tells us information, rather than showing it. Emperor also tries to ratchet up the tension, when the outcome is a matter of historical record. (Even if you slept through history class, you can easily guess it based on your Sony gadgets.) And finally, Matthew Fox: He just doesn’t have the acting chops to bring to life this lesser-known history, and instead seems to double-down on the mopey, heart-broken melodrama. In English, and some Japanese, with subtitles. Starts Fri., March 8. Manor (AH) OZ: THE GREAT AND POWERFUL. In this prequel to The Wizard of Oz tale, learn how a struggling magician winds up in the Land of Oz, and what he learns from the three witches he meets. James Franco, Mila Kunis, Michelle Williams and Rachel Weisz star in Sam Raimi’s adventure, adapted from the L. Frank Baum book. In 3-D, in select theaters. Starts Fri., March 8. 21 AND OVER. If you thought The Hangover was too high-class, this might be the film you’ve been waiting for. Jon Lucas and Scott Moore’s raucous comedy borrows a similar concept. Two buddies take a third out boozing in honor of his 21st birthday, whereby everything gets screwed up; the film opens with the two dudes walking naked and beaten across a college campus, and then we flashback to see how


The ABCs of Death they got there. The journey — to which you are invited — is one of binge-drinking, girl-ogling and comic, if extreme, violence (buffalo attacks, being thrown out of windows, an inadvertent circumcision). The jokes rely heavily on the word “fuck” being repeated, and a rather outdated palette of racial stereotypes. In all, it’s a wearisome 90 minutes. If you pine for such asinine, brotastic adventures, you might as well just go out and have them yourself. (AH)

the villain in a room full of mirrors. Midnight, Sat., March 9. Manor (AH) THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH. An American couple vacationing in Morocco inadvertently get mixed up in an assassination plot. Jimmy Stewart and Doris Day star in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1956 thriller, a Technicolor remake of Hitchcock’s 1934 film. The film continues a month-long, Sunday-night series featuring Hitchcock’s leading ladies. 8 p.m. Sun., March 10. Regent Square

REPERTORY

26 6 DIRECTORS DI EC DIR DIRECT ECTORS E ECT C ORS CT ORS S | 26 2 WAYS WAY A S TO TO DIE DIE IE

ABC AB A BC Cs s OF

NO ONE UNDER 17 ADMITTED

DORMONT Hollywood Theatre (412) 344-1245 M AG N E T R E L E A S I N G . C O M / T H E A B C S O F D E AT H

THE TRAIL. Local writer, filmmaker and regular CP contributor Robert Isenberg screens his selection of his work, including the 43-minute “The Trail,” about his six-day bicycle journey from Pittsburgh to Washington, D.C., along the Great Allegheny passage. Shorter films cover subjects such as urban bouldering, roadway deterioration and climbing all the stairs at the Cathedral of Learning. Isenberg will lead a Q&A after the films. 7:30 p.m. Wed., March 6. Hollywood. $5

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

THE WIZARD OF OZ. If your viewings of Victor Fleming’s 1939 musical film have been via TV only, you owe it to yourself (and any young ’uns) to see this beloved family classic on the big screen. Join Dorothy (Judy Garland) and her little dog, too, on their unforgettable Technicolor journey to the Land of Oz — a wondrous place that, ultimately, isn’t quite as wonderful as Kansas. 7:30 p.m. Wed., March 6. AMC Loews. $5 CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF. Richard Brooks’ 1958 adaptation of Tennessee William’s booze-, sex- and regret-soaked melodrama stars Paul Newman and a sultry Elizabeth Taylor as the titular, restless cat. Screens as this month’s Cine-Brunch. 11 a.m. Sat., March. 9. (Brunch at 10 a.m.) Oaks. $6 (film only); $12 (film and brunch). ENTER THE DRAGON. Robert Clouse’s 1973 Englishlanguage kung-fu flick made a household name of its star, Bruce Lee, who would die unexpectedly at age 33 just a month before the film’s premiere. The story is a Bond rip-off — Lee infiltrates a martialarts competition held on the island fortress of a criminal — but the plot is secondary to the topnotch fight sequences, which has Lee dispatching a slew of comers with various techniques. The sharp-eyed fan may catch future martial-arts action stars Jackie Chan and Chuck Norris among the bit players. And nobody should miss the film’s tour de force climax, in which Lee goes foot-to-claw with

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Cat on a Hot Tin Roof LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS. How do you deal with a singing, man-eating plant? Frank Oz directs this 1986 adaptation of the 1982 Off-Broadway musical, itself adapted from a 1960 film. The film stars Rick Moranis and a slew of comic actors, including Steve Martin, John Candy and Bill Murray. 7:30 p.m. Wed., March 13. AMC Loews. $5

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www. warhol.org

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[ART REVIEW]

CHEVALIER DRAWS FROM THE TRADITION OF ABSTRACT ART WITHOUT EXACTLY PERPETUATING IT

TROMPE L’OEIL Stare long enough at “Somewhere in Between,” a site-specific wall installation by Lenore D. Thomas at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, and you might think your eyes are playing tricks. While the images are based on how we perceive multidimensional space, they are actually changing very slowly. What initially suggests a stagnant pattern is really a projection based on a mathematical concept. In basic geometry there is a flat plane square. But put six of them together on a flat piece of paper and they appear as a three-dimensional cube. Thomas expands on this concept by presenting a pattern of five-cubes, or penteracts, that slowly blur and morph into six-cubes (hexeracts), seven-cubes (hepteracts) and eight-cubes (octeracts). The use of animation is new for Thomas, but it makes perfect sense. The wall installation, based on her two-dimensional work, is both painting and video. On the lower portion of the wall is a landscape of large flat abstract planes in striking colors. Almost cartoony, they appear like hills or mountains, while the sky above shifts subtly through several dimensions. Thomas is interested in pattern and abstraction and how we perceive them. But she is also interested in observation. The work in this exhibition is inspired by her drives through the Western Pennsylvania landscape. She explains in an email: “I break down the elements of the landscape into geometric forms and create colors from intuition and a desire to create a sense of depth.” In her work, space is explored through both flatness and dimension. The pairing adds complexity. Alongside the installation are three earlier prints from a series called “I’m an hour ahead of being more awesome than you.” For these, Thomas plays off the perception of Pittsburgh as a dirty city, using screenprint and smoke to combine flatness and pattern. Most intriguingly, Thomas manages to make something look both simple and complex. Her adroit use of color and pattern make her images at once winsome and edgy. Creating her flattened landscapes, she actually uses multiple plate etchings and screenprints. In her artist’s statement, she says that printmaking’s flexibility allows her to “build an image with a dozen or more layers in one piece.” While recognizably landscapes, the images are studies of perception and abstraction. Ultimately, your eyes really are playing tricks on you. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

SOMEWHERE IN BETWEEN: LENORE D. THOMAS continues through April 7. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. 412-361-0873 or www.pittsburgharts.org

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From Lenore D. Thomas’ “Somewhere in Between”

{BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

[ART REVIEW]

PIXEL POWER {BY ROBERT RACZKA}

M

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOEY KENNEDY}

Neither nostalgically retro nor naively futuristic: a view of Miguel Chevalier’s installation “The Origin of the World”

IGUEL CHEVALIER is a major technological artist and recognized pioneer of digital art. Chevalier has created dozens of projects variously incorporating video projections, virtual reality, holographic imagery and other forms, as his technical skills and his artistic reach are both broad. The 53-year-old artist was born in Mexico City but for more than 25 years has lived in Paris, producing exhibitions and installations for galleries, museums and public spaces around the world. Chevalier’s works of recent years are often interactive and/or self-generative within the parameters set by computer programs developed by the artist. He previously exhibited at Wood Street Galleries in 2006 — projections of a landscape in “RGB Land” and flowers growing in “Ultra-Nature,” if that rings a bell. In his new exhibit at Wood Street, Chevalier draws from the tradition of abstract art without exactly perpetuating it, revital-

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.06/03.13.2013

izing that imagery in the process of developing contemporary forms of digital art. There is an implication that shapes on canvas were more compelling, say, half a century ago, but I think Chevalier’s “sampling” of abstract art is indeed an homage with a twist, namely the recognition that audiences today respond to a more active engagement with art.

MIGUEL CHEVALIER: POWER PIXELS 2103 continues through April 7. Wood Street Galleries, 601 Wood St., Downtown. 412-471-5605 or www.woodstreetgalleries.org

As with much art at Wood Street Galleries, Chevalier’s new projects aren’t static. They respond to the audience’s movements, and we learn how to interact with them by seeing how our movements affect the artwork. The imagery in “Pixel

Waves” (2013) has the utopian feel of information unencumbered by physical presence: what H.A.L. might have dreamt in 2001: A Space Odyssey. The projection fills the wall with a pattern of mostly brightly colored, simple shapes, some clearly inspired by the golden age of abstraction. (The work was first envisioned as a tribute to painter Auguste Hebin, and incorporates his motifs.) Meanwhile, other patterns suggest computer graphics or video games. The patterns change regularly, and each cycles through some progression of colors and shapes along with an enlivening wave-like motion. “Pixel Waves” is accompanied by a techno soundtrack by Jacobo Baboni Schilingi, and the sustained and swelling tonalities and synthesized rhythms cue an association with cyberspace. As you approach the wall of projected imagery, motion-detectors pick up your movements, and the nearby visual elements are disrupted or altered. The


CHEVALIER’S “SAMPLING” OF ABSTRACT ART IS AN HOMAGE WITH A TWIST.

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M C KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER

[ART REVIEW]

ALIEN LANDS {BY COLLEEN O’REILLY}

Diane Meyer’s “Mauer Park, Berlin” (2012) {IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST}

more people are present and moving, the more the work comes alive. That’s welcome, because the visuals are fairly simple and in order to hold our interest, the piece arguably requires the disruptions set in play by the audience’s interaction. The other major work in this exhibit, “The Origin of the World” (2013), combines biomorphic elements and geometric patterns along with another electronica soundtrack by Schilingi. “The Origin of the World” undergoes more of a continuous progression than “Power Pixels,” and the interactivity is subtler. The patterns, which are already always in motion — picture an animation of cell division or abstracted rippling water — respond to one’s presence less dramatically. The imagery is vaguely mid-century modern, but it feels neither nostalgically retro nor naively futuristic. Though it’s projected imagery, it feels more like a space that we enter into, perhaps because it wraps around two inside corners. It’s a visually stylized environment in which we are invited to immerse ourselves, a diverting experience that’s more perceptual than intellectual. The mood’s somewhat different in the non-interactive, monitor-bound “Meta-Cities” (2013), in which we relentlessly zoom through a space filled with featureless stacked cubes and cylinders along with armatures of blue light suggesting boundaries and coming-soon construction. It’s an idealized vision of cities, holding possibilities as infinite as the mathematically generated layers of a fractal. It’s entrancing, but I’m just not sure where people fit in. Chevalier has been awarded a number of architecturally-based commissions — his installations are adaptable to wildly different sites. His success with such commissions makes sense because his projections fill big walls indoors and out, animate the space and activate the audience. I mildly regret that the two major pieces in this exhibit are projected onto essentially flat walls: Chevalier’s projections benefit from the fragmentation of spaces interrupted by columns, doorways, passages and corners. Those are places where the projections are complicated by the architecture, much as the patterns benefit from being disturbed by interactive human presence. If anything would make Downtown’s First Night Pittsburgh festival even better, turning Chevalier loose in and around Katz Plaza could do it.

PRESENTS...

Diane Meyer and Ross Mantle, winners of the Fellowship 13 International Photography Competition, present two solo exhibitions of thoughtful, complex images at Silver Eye Center for Photography. In Time Spent That Might Otherwise Be Forgotten, Santa Monica, Calif.-based Meyer photographed places that carry the weight of memory, then embroidered over sections of each of the 21 images, matching the color to the section of the photograph underneath. From a distance, the cross-stitched squares resemble digital, as opposed to manual interventions, and pull the image into an ambiguous space between blurriness and clarity, personal memory and crisp technology. The cross-stitching intervenes where the Berlin Wall used to be; embroidered squares hop across an image from the artist’s childhood. Through the contrast of textures, we are held between the space in the photograph and the materiality of its surface. The abstraction of the embroidered sections works alongside distorted reflections in water, for example, or things outside the depth of field. The small objects, intricately embroidered, feel extraordinarily intimate. Subtle changes in color and careful placement of the sewn portions make the images intensely tangible. Yet there is a sense of distance: People rarely appear, and when they do, their faces are obscured by embroidered pixilation, the details of their bodies reduced to squares of color. Mantle’s California, Pennsylvania is comprised of photographs taken either in California, Pa., or in the state of California. The 51 images are imbued with a profound strangeness, a sense that something worldaltering has just happened, or is about to. Pittsburgh-based Mantle uses photography to isolate aspects of the everyday and bring them forward in their incongruity: a house that presses against a huge metal column, a swing set dwarfed by a highway overpass. People appear to be waiting, inquisitive, at times disappointed but also expectant, alienated from the built environment. Light takes on an eerie, otherworldly quality. In a set of tiny, haunting images, kids play basketball while the San Francisco Fire Department tries to extinguish a burning building behind them. These two series — chosen by judge Sam Barzilay, of Brooklyn, N.Y.’s United Photo Industries — together feel like a complicated, powerful sort of photo album. We expect photography to help us remember, experience or resolve. But these artists give us something different: a provocative and indeterminate picture of our relation to our world. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

FELLOWSHIP 13 continues through March 23. Silver Eye Center for Photography, 1015 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-1810 or www.silvereyecenter.org

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LEND ME A TENOR A COMEDY-FARCE WRITTEN BY KEN LUDWIG DIRECTED BY - CORY McCAFFERY SIGLER

MARCH 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17, 22, 23, 24, 2013 Friday & Saturday performances at 8:00pm. Sunday matinees at 2:00pm. TICKETS ARE $15.00, $7.00 FOR STUDENTS - GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE.

1614 COURSIN STREET • MCKEESPORT • (412) 673-1100 FOR RESERVATIONS

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THE WIZARD of OZ the classic film with orchestra MARCH

14-17 FOLLOW THE

YELLOW BRICK ROAD TO HEINZ HALL

FOR TICKETS, CALL 412.392.4900 OR VISIT PITTSBURGHSYMPHONY.ORG GROUPS OF 10+ CALL 412.392.4819

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Starring Jubilant Sykes as Roland Hayes

This moving, new musical features the soul of spirituals and the grace of classical music to portray one man’s ambition to be an artist.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF REBECCA ANTAL}

Julia Warner (foreground), Katie Oxman and Andrew Swackhamer in The Great Gatsby, at Prime Stage

[PLAY REVIEWS]

From the creator of Through the Night

A GOOD GATSBY {BY TED HOOVER}

BREATH & IMAGINATION MARCH 9–31, 2013

WORLD PREMIERE CO-PRODUCED WITH HARTFORD STAGE

BY DANIEL BEATY DIRECTED BY DARKO TRESNJAK

BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

412.431.CITY [2489] CityTheatreCompany.org 44

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.06/03.13.2013

MEDIA SPONSOR

I’D LIKE TO extend to Prime Stage Theatre the greatest praise possible for its production of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, in an adaptation by Simon Levy: I left the theater wanting to read the book. Which, I’m ashamed to say, I never have. So as a Gatsby-virgin, I found most of it compelling, even mysterious, and an astounding exercise of language. That F. Scott sure was a terrific writer! (The Fitzgerald estate is welcome to use that as a pull quote if it would like.)

THE GREAT GATSBY continues through Sun., March 10. Prime Stage Theatre at the New Hazlett Theatre, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $10-20. 724-773-0700 or www.primestage.com

It’s all about a Midwestern naïf, Nick Carraway, who falls in with a very bad Long Island Jazz Age bunch. Love’s young dream dies, as do a few other things, and back to the Plains states Nick goes.

I’m sure Gatsby fans will find that description reductive, but it highlights the one major problem of this adaptation: Levy, obviously, can’t put the whole novel onstage, so by necessity he moves from plot point to plot point. I haven’t read the book but I can’t believe something regarded as The Great American Novel could be the soapy if entertaining melodrama that Levy has adapted. It’s not Levy’s fault: Any stage adaptation will suffer the same fate — and, in fact, Levy does manage some gorgeous moments. But there’s got to be more to Gatsby. And this production makes me want to find out what I’m missing. Levy’s crafted a swift version uncluttered by too much stage narration. And thankfully Richard Keitel is on hand as director to move the production along with as much dispatch as Levy. (Although the scene changes could have been plotted more elegantly.) Keitel’s focus is clearly on guiding his actors to create fully realized characters, and they’ve certainly done that. Andrew Swackhamer is a haunted Carraway, destined for ineffable loss. Sean Patrick Sears is just off-kilter enough to make Gatsby seductive and threatening, and Julia Warner


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TRICK PONY {BY ROBERT ISENBERG} IN BRIEF, there are three reasons to see

Looking for the Pony: Theo Allyn, Karen Baum and Daina Michelle Griffith. They are all local actresses. They are all preternaturally skilled. They are all prolific, vibrant and emotive. Off the Wall Theater has not only gathered three terrific local performers on the same stage, but also given them roles worthy of their talents. Attend, if only for them. A fourth reason is Cameron Knight, the only non-female and non-redhead in the cast, who is nevertheless a magnificent character actor. As for the play itself, Pony is a peculiar ride. Playwright Andrea Lepcio writes about two sisters, one of whom endures some very belligerent cancer. Lauren and Oisie are also best friends, and each is a

{PHOTO COURTESY OF OFF THE WALL PRODUCTIONS}

From left: Cameron Knight, Daina Michelle Griffith, Karen Baum and Theo Allyn on Off the Wall’s Looking for the Pony

wonderful, well-adjusted person, which makes Lauren’s grim prognosis so much sadder. She smiles through her disease,

LOOKING FOR THE PONY continues through March 16. Off the Wall Theater, 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $5-35. 888-718-4253 or www.insideoffthewall.com

and Oisie helps her obsessively. Their sisterhood is legal, not genetic, but their bond is incandescent. Cancer haunts us all, and the sisters’

story is hardly unique. So Lepcio uses unconventional writing to drive her script: The dialogue is quick and choppy, filled with patter and jabs and meaningful asides. It’s as if Lepcio shredded a cancer brochure and a Gilmore Girls teleplay and Scotch-taped the trimmings together. In the first half, the pace is breathlessly fast; then Lepcio inserts bizarre bits of humor, like a kung-fu battle between an attorney and a health-insurance agent. Lepcio turns surgeons and assistants into caricatures, too incompetent and egotistical to do much good. In her world, only Lauren and Oisie are real people; everyone else is a tumor, malignant or benign, and you have a 50-50 chance of guessing which wins. Whether Lepcio’s choices are brave or misguided, her intentions are pure, and the writing flushes with anger and sorrow. We fall in love with Lauren and Oisie from the get-go, per design. Griffith and Baum trade dialogue with telepathic precision, and Allyn and Knight brilliantly create every other character, building a dysfunctional universe around them. Director Robyne Parrish must have loved this project, given the vigor of her script and cast. For a story about an incurable plague, this production overflows with life.

[STAGE]

IN MEMORIAM: RONI OSTFIELD {BY TED HOOVER}

Roni Ostfield

and Ryan Kearney make for a frightfully corrupting couple as Daisy and Tom. Katie Oxman’s Jordan is a steel-eyed good-time girl gone wrong and I make a special mention of Alexis Cash for her moving turn as the tragic Myrtle.

Pittsburgh’s theater community suffered a devastating loss last week with the death of Roni Ostfield. A one-woman local theatrical institution, Ostfield, 71, was founder and artistic director of Pittsburgh Playback Theatre — a company pioneering the use of drama therapy. Ostfield also served for many years as director of City Theatre’s Outreach Program, and worked as a teacher, mentor and director. I had the pleasure of working with Roni on many occasions and, like everyone, was bowled over by her limitless joy and passion; my own sometimes prickly remove never stood a chance against Roni’s enveloping spirit and determination to celebrate every moment of living. Condolences to her husband, Frank Cymerman, her sons, Marc and Alan, and all the family members, friends and fellow artists Roni touched throughout her remarkable life. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

What Are Museums For? The Guerrilla Girls Wednesday, March 20, 7–8 p.m. Carnegie Lecture Hall $15 ($12 members, $10 university students) Limited seating; Tickets required and non-refundable; Call 412.622.3288. The anonymous feminist collaborative the Guerrilla Girls (the “conscience of the art world”) will stage a multimedia performance in full jungle drag. Famous for their willingness to challenge cultural norms with sometimes outrageous humor, the artists will narrate their history of creating posters, books, and actions that expose discrimination in art, film, politics, and more. As part of the museum's series What Are Museums For?, director Lynn Zelevansky will join the Guerrilla Girls onstage after the performance for a dynamic discussion on the evolving roles of women in the art world.

Empowering Women exhibition in Carnegie Museum of Natural History open 5–9 p.m. on Wednesday, March 20.

Sponsored by School of Art, Carnegie Mellon University, Larrimor’s, and The Women and Girls Foundation of Southwest Pennsylvania.

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tues–sat: 10–5 | thurs: 10–8 | sun: noon–5 shop the museum stores for creative gifts cmoa.org | 412.622.3131 one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

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FOR THE WEEK OF

03.0703.14.13

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161.

Art by Tom Scioli

MARCH 09

Tom Scioli

{WORDS} “Spencer Dew writes like a quiet maniac who sees the violence under the façade of everyday things, and the beauty under the violence,” writes Karen Lillis. Also, she notes of his new dark-comic novel, Here Is How It Happens (Ampersand Books), Dew “finds redemption in the purity of longing and the shit coffee of an Amish country diner.” Dew, who teaches in Louisiana and Chicago, visits Awesome Books tonight for a reading. Joining him are Pittsburgh-based poet Michael Begnal and other writers, including Lillis, herself a novelist and blogger. Bill O’Driscoll 6:30 p.m. 929 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. www. awesomebookspittsburgh.com

here: “fashionable attire.” BO 8 p.m. 1916 Smallman St., Strip District. $10-15. www.RAWartists.org

{DANCE} Two works by pioneering choreographers and one by a modern master make up Unspoken, Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre’s latest show at the August Wilson Center. On the

+ THU., MARCH 08 {ARTS} The nationally active arts organization known as RAW debuted here last month, organizing a sold-out showcase for up-and-coming locals in everything from fashion to live music, visual art and film. Tonight’s follow-up, at Cavo, is called Generation. The 26 featured artists include 10 visual artists, four photographers and live music by Universal Beat Union and Stranded Aliens. There’s also a fashion show. And here’s a request you don’t always see ’round

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{STAGE} Heard about “robot-human theater”? No, it’s not the stage adaptation of Terminator. Rather, it’s the latest boundarydefying effort by Tokyo’s Seinendan Theater Company, whose director, Oriza Hirata, has collaborated with Japan’s Intelligent Robotics Laboratory to fuse theater arts and science. Robot / Android -

{PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID CONLEY}

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program: George Balanchine’s “Serenade” — his first ballet choreographed in the U.S., set to Tchaikovsky; pioneering Balanchine contemporary Antony Tudor’s “Jardin Aux Lilas (Lilac Garden)”; and Mark Morris’ 1988 work “Drink to Me Only With Thine Eyes,” originally created for American Ballet Theatre. Unspoken has seven performances over two weekends starting tonight. BO 8 p.m. Performances through March 17. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $25.75-$68.75. 412-456-6666 or www.pbt.org

MARCH 09

Straightening Combs


sp otlight

While Thurgood Marshall was the first African-American Supreme Court Justice, by the time of his appointment in 1967, his legacy already loomed large. As chief counsel for the NAACP, he won victories including Brown vs. Board of Education, the Supreme Court case overturning segregation in public education. “It’s almost like he lived two lifetimes in one lifetime,” says Montae Russell, who’s playing Marshall in a new production of George Stevens Jr.’s one-man show, Thurgood, at Pittsburgh Public Theater. While Marshall is a huge role, Pittsburgh native Russell has already made his mark on stage: He originated the role of Youngblood, in August Wilson’s Jitney, while still a student at Steel Valley High. Though most folks likely know Russell as paramedic Dwight Zadro on TV’s ER, he’s also done Wilson on Broadway and many regional stages, including the Public’s. Stevens, an author and documentary filmmaker, debuted Thurgood in 2006, and it later earned a Broadway run (and HBO special) starring Laurence Fishburne. The play is framed as a speech given by a retired Marshall, recounting his career. The New York Times called Thurgood “surprisingly absorbing, at times even stirring.” Russell says he’s most intrigued by Marshall’s sense of humor in the show: “It comes out of nowhere in a serious moment.” Bill O’Driscoll 8 p.m. Performances continue through April 7. 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $15.75-60. 412-316-1600 or www.ppt.org

Human Theater features two short plays: “Sayonara,” in which “an incredibly humanlike android … consoles the human actor dealing with a fatal illness,” and “I, Worker,” starring two robots and two human actors in a piece questioning the meaning and nature of work. The show’s six-city tour hits The Andy Warhol Museum’s Off the Wall series for performances tonight and tomorrow. BO 8 p.m. Also 8 p.m. Sat., March 9. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $20-25. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

+ SAT., MARCH 09 {FLORA} At the end of a long, cold winter, Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens opens its Spring Flower Show. Based on Frances Hodgson Burnett’s beloved children’s classic The Secret Garden, this year’s exhibit draws guests into Martha Sowerby’s Cottage Garden, Archibald Craven’s Topiary Court, Ben Weatherstaff’s Kitchen Garden, the Secret Garden Alcove and many other corners of the conservatory filled with colorful spring flowers. The show opens today. Jeff Ihaza 9:30 a.m.5 p.m. Exhibit continues through April 7. 1 Schenley Drive, Oakland. $11-15. 412-622-6914 or www. phipps.conservatory.org

{COMICS} Today, Pittsburgh-based graphic novelist Tom Scioli, known for his artistic style akin to comics legend Jack Kirby, conducts an in-depth seminar on graphic-novel illustration Downtown, at the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust Art Education

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dent performers from the Falk and Waldorf schools and their created instruments. BO 7 p.m. 315 S. Bellefield Ave., Oakland. $8-15. www.ionsound.org

Center. Scioli’s resume includes Freedom Force, The Myth of 8-opus and perhaps his best known work, Gødland. The seminar will be a hands-on experience in which guests will learn the art of illustrating graphic novels and be able to create some works of their own. JI 11 a.m. 807 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $40. 412456-6666 or www.trustarts. culturaldistrict.org

{STAGE}

{STAGE} Roland Hayes was born in 1897, in Georgia. Yet this son of former slaves went on to sing on the great classical-music stages of Europe and America. In Breath & Imagination, Hayes’ story is told by playwright Daniel Beaty, whose one-man show Through the Night was a hit last year for City Theatre.

MARCH 08

Robot / Android Human Theater

pianist Tom Frey plays The Accompanist and other roles. Darko Tresnjak directs. Tonight is the first public preview performance; opening night is

MARCH 09 Aaronel deRoy Gruber: Art(ist) in Motion

Art by Aaronel deRoy Gruber {COLLECTION: AARONEL & IRVING GRUBER}

on flute, clarinet, violin, cello and piano. The robots here are kinetic fabric sculptures by Garth Zeglin, and the work is titled Separate Self. Tonight’s show at Bellefield Hall Auditorium also features stu-

it was after she moved into sculpture, in the early 1960s, that her experimentalism flourished. The locally based artist would become best known for her forays into welded steel, formed aluminum and colorful Plexiglas — works that were often illuminated, and even motorized. Gruber died in 2011; tonight, the Westmoreland Museum of American Art opens Aaronel deRoy Gruber: Art(ist) in Motion, a show highlighting her sculpture but also surveying her painting, video and photography. BO Opening reception: 6:30-8 p.m. Exhibit continues through June 2. 221 N. Main St., Greensburg. Free. 724-837-1500 or wmuseumaa.org

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{MUSIC} Breath & Imagination, a world premiere co-produced with Hartford Stage, stars Jubilant Sykes, whose résumé as a vocalist — the Met, Deutsche Oper Berlin, Carnegie Hall — would do Hayes himself proud. Kecia Lewis plays Hayes’ mother, Angel Mo, and

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{ART} Aaronel deRoy Gruber began her art career as a painter, but

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Contemporary music ensemble IonSound Project continues its season titled CreatION Sound:Music and Art for Humans and Robots. The latest installment, Android Ballet, weds original robot choreography to the world premiere of a commissioned score by local composer Phil Thompson, as performed by the group

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Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co. launches its 10th season with Kim El’s Straightening Combs. In the one-woman show, directed by Chrystal Bates, El incorporates spokenword poetry and songs into short vignettes in which she embodies six different personas to portray an AfricanAmerican female coming of age. Playwrights calls Straightening Combs “a story of the repercussions of low self-esteem and overcoming depression in urban America.” Artistic director Mark Clayton Southers says the show has deepened his understanding of black women’s journey. Tonight’s opening-night performance is sold out. BO 8 p.m. Performances continue through March 31. 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $15-25.

MARCH 12

Dwayne Dolphin

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Bassist Dwayne Dolphin has worked with Pittsburgh jazz greats like Roger Humphries, Pete Henderson and Carl Arter. His vast experience has brought his work to everything from the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre’s production of Indigo in Motion to his position as a Duquesne University adjunct professor of jazz. Tonight, Dolphin performs at the Backstage Bar at Theater Square as part of BNY Mellon and Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s Jazz Live series. The Downtown event is free. JI 5 p.m. 655 Penn Ave. Downtown. Free. 412-456-6666 or trustarts. culturaldistrict.org

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

FRI, MAR 8 • 9PM ROCK

BAND NIGHT

FLANNEL CHURCH

Every Thursday!

MIDNIGHT SPECIAL FEAT.

MARCH 14 THE VAN ALLEN BELT, MODERN LIFE, BURRA

MARCH 21 DEVILS CUT, MYSTIC COWBOYZ, STONE COLD KILLER

SAT, MAR 9 • 9PM FOLK ROCK/FUNK/REGGAE

ADAM'S ALE (MEMBERS OF HOOKAH & WATERBAND)

MON, MAR 11 • 9:30PM

OPEN STAGE WITH CRAIG

KING

TUES, MAR 12 • 9PM JAZZ

SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES FEAT. PAUL THOMPSON OPEN FOR LUNCH

$1.75 PBR Drafts Everyday 9-11

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282

Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 41 2.682.0177

www.thunderbirdcafe.net

THEATER THE 39 STEPS. A spy thriller/ comedy based on Alfred Hitchcock’s 1935 classic. Fri, Sat. Thru March 16. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-591-8727. ALICE’S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND. March 8-10. Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center, Midland. 724-643-9004. ANYBODY OUT THERE? A comedy by John Patrick. Presented by The Heritage Players. Fri-Sun. Thru March 10. Seton Center, Brookline. 412-254-4633. BREATH & IMAGINATION. The story of Roland Hayes, the 1st African-American classical vocalist to be heard around the world. Tue-Sun. Thru March 31. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. THE FANTASTICKS. Two neighboring fathers trick their children into falling in love by pretending to feud. March 7-9. California University, California. 724-938-5943.

GRANDE ROMANZA: MUSICAL SCENES FROM BROADWAY & OPERETTA. Fully choreographed & costumed musical scenes. Presented by Stefano & Nina Tanchietti. Fri., March 8, 8 p.m. Washington & Jefferson College, Washington. 724-223-6546. THE GREAT GATSBY. Presented by Prime Stage Theatre. Fri-Sun. Thru March 10. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 724-773-0700. H.M.S. PINAFORE. A Captain’s daughter falls in love w/ a lowly sailor. Presented by The Pittsburgh Savoyards. Thu-Sun. Thru March 17. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-734-8476. IT’S MY PARTY & I’LL DIE IF I WANT TO. Interactive murder mystery dinner theater. Sat., March 9, 6 p.m. Gaetano’s Restaurant, Dormont. 412-343-6640. LEND ME A TENOR. Opera comedy by Ken Ludwig. Fri-Sun. Thru March 24. McKeesport Little Theater,

{BY ERIC LIDJI}

h! Bur gh! h B iin tthe Spe cial ty Iris h Men u! Gre en Coo rs Ligh t Dra fts All Day !

atee lebbrrrat Comee Celeb b’ ! iebb’s tthh Sie wiiith Dayy w i k’s’ Da ric Patric St. PPat

McKeesport. 412-673-1100. outback. Thru March 10. Benedum Center, Downtown. LOOKING FOR THE PONY. 412-456-6666. Eloisa is ready to leave a SAYONARA & I, WORKER. lifeless career to pursue a Two short plays involving childhood dream when her robot/human interaction. sister Lauren is diagnosed Presented by Seinendan Theater with cancer. Lauren’s perfect Company. March 8-9. Andy life collides w/ Eloisa’s 2nd Warhol Museum, North Side. chance as the sisters join 412-237-8300. forces to cure all that ails SISTER’S EASTER them. Thu-Sat. Thru CATECHISM: WILL March 16. Off the Wall MY BUNNY GO Theater, Carnegie. TO HEAVEN. The 724-873-3576. latest in the Late THE MARVELOUS www. per Nite Catechism pa WONDERETTES. pghcitym .co series. Presented Follow four wiseby Westmoreland cracking high school girls Cultural Trust March 7-10. from prom night to their Greensburg Garden and 10 year reunion, singing 50s Civic Center, Greensburg. & 60s pop favorites along the 724-836-8000. way. Sat., March 9, 7:30 p.m. STRAIGHTENING COMBS. Slippery Rock University, Slippery Kim El’s 1-woman show Rock. 724-738-2018. about the repercussions of PRISCILLA QUEEN OF THE low self-esteem & overcoming DESERT: THE MUSICAL. The depression in urban story of 3 of friends who hop America. March 9-31. aboard a battered old bus Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, searching for love & friendship Downtown. in the middle of the Australian TALK ABOUT THE PASSION, SUSTENANCE. Two 1-act plays centered around serial killers. Written by Graham Farrow & James Roday. Presented by 12 Peers Theater. Fri-Sun. Thru March 17. ModernFormations Gallery, Garfield. 412-362-0274. THURGOOD. The life story of Thurgood Marshall, first African-American Supreme Court Justice. Tue-Sun. Thru April 7. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. A TUNA CHRISTMAS. A sequel to the comedy Greater Tuna. Fri-Sun. Thru March 24. New Castle Playhouse, New Castle. 724-654-3437. YOU SAY TOMATO, I SAY SHUT UP! A 21st century love story where “Happily Ever After” meets “It’s Complicated” Wed-Sun. Thru May 5. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-325-6769.

FULL LIST ONLINE

PUBLICNOTICES P UB L I C NOT IC E S @PG H C IT YPAPE R . C O M

BLUE OF COLORS

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE)

PLUS

DUANE TRUCKS

MARCH 7

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

COMEDY THU 07

LIVE IRISH MUSIC Sat 3/16 • Callan (Celtic) Sun 3/17 • Cue Ball

Featuring

Doors open at 11am

3382 BABCOCK BLVD B

PITTSBURGH

412-364-8511 SIEBSPUB.COM Family Owned & Operated • Celebrating 10 Years of Service

COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ DEREK MINTO. 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. TJ MILLER. 7 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-431-4950.

THU 07 - SUN 10 COREY HOLCOMB. March 7-10 The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

FRI 08 BILL CRAWFORD, PLAYER ONE. Also feat. music by Uke & Tuba. CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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From “The Howard Stern Show,” Beer League and “The Nick and Artie Show” - Your Favorite Too Fat To Fish Comedian is Back!

“Sleepy Winston” by Jonelle Summerfield, from Interiors at Gallery at 43rd Street

ARTIE LANGE

COMES TO PITTSBURGH TO ROCK THE BYHAM THEATER

SATURDAY, APRIL 13 • 8PM BYHAM THEATER Tickets On Sale Now Tickets may be purchased online at TrustArts.org, or by calling/visiting The Box Office at Theater Square 412-456-6666

VISUALART NEW THIS WEEK CAVO. Generation. Local artist showcase feat. Ashley J. Hickey, Brad Bianchi, Johnross, Murdzak, Theodore Bolha, more. Opens March 7, 8 p.m. Presented by RAW:natural born artists. Steubenville. 412-339-0917. JAMES GALLERY. unwrapped. Shibori-dyed quilts by Jan Myers-Newbury. Opening reception: March 8, 6-9 p.m. West End. 412-922-9800. MT. LEBANON RECREATION CENTER. Photo Section 2013 Salon Open House. See award winning photos, meet the photographers. 1-day only, March 10, 1-4 p.m. Mt. Lebanon. 412-561-4363. SCHOOLHOUSE ART CENTER. The Lion & the Lamb. Oil paintings, pastels, photographs & sculptures by local artists. Opening reception March 9, 1-4 p.m. Bethel Park. 412-835-9898. SHAW GALLERIES. Paintings & Prints. Work by D.S. Kinsel. Closing reception: March 9,

5-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-281-4884. STOKE’S GRILL. A Female Perspective. Work by Kim Freithaler, June Kielty, Nadya Lapets & Vickie Schilling. Opening reception: March 8, 8-10 p.m. Ross. 412-369-5380. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. An Art(ist) in Motion. Work by Aaronel deRoy Gruber. Opening reception: March 9, 6:30-8 p.m. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WILDCARD. everyday balloons. Work by Chris Bencivenga & Becki Hollen. Opening reception: March 8, 6-9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-224-2651.

ONGOING 707 PENN GALLERY. Indivisibler. Work by John Burt Sanders. Downtown. 412-325-7017. 709 PENN GALLERY. Feminine Aesthetics. Women of Visions, Inc. group show feat. Denise “Mike” Johnson, Mary Martin, Vanessa German, JoAnne Bates, Christine McCray Bethea, Richena Brockinson,

more. Artist Talk: Downtown. 412-471-6070. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. BARCO LAW LIBRARY. Dream. Paintings by Sue Vincent. Oakland. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. All Local Artists. Muli media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOULEVARD GALLERY. Petals & Pearls. Photography & watercolors by Anne Michele Lyons & Kathleen McShea. Verona. 412-828-1031. BOXHEART GALLERY. Platonic Folds & How to Make Sense of a Canyon. Printmaking & mixed media works on paper by Meghan Olson. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Yours Truly: Privately Collected Photographs. 80 vintage prints

talk (and bitch and moan and laugh until your cheeks hurt) radio* *on your computer!

LYNN CULLEN LIVE TALK RADIO without all the static

ONLINE MONDAY-FRIDAY 10-11am only on www.pghcitypaper.com WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

Pittsburgh City Paper editor Chris Potter, every Wednesday and former Andy Warhol Museum director Tom Sokolowski, every Thursday

CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 48

8 & 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. DOC DIXON, MATT WOHLFARTH, DAVID KAYE. Funny Fundraiser. 7:30 p.m. Norwin High School, North Huntingdon. 724-861-3005 x 3202. FRIDAY NIGHT STAND-UP. Fri, 9 p.m. Thru March 29 Toros Performance Lounge, Friendship. 412-657-4245. PITTSBURGH COMEDY SHOWCASE W/ MIKE WYSOCKI. Fri, 9 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995. SCOTT SCHENDLINGER, TIM ROSS, SHANNON NORMAN, DENNIS ROONEY. Comedy Spectacular. 7 p.m. Club Cafe, South Side. 412-327-8400.

FRI 08 - SAT 09 JAY BLACK. 9 p.m. and Sat., March 9, 8 p.m. Latitude 40, North Fayette. 412-693-5555.

SAT 09 THE AMISH MONKEYS. Improv sketch comedy. 8 p.m. Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201. JOE BRONZI, MATT WOHLFARTH, DAVID KAYE. Comedy For a Cause. Benefits Mainstay Life Services. 7 p.m. Cefalo’s Banquet Center, Carnegie. 412-344-3640. LARRY REEB, KIRK BOGOS, TOM MUSIAL. 5:30 p.m. Rostraver Ice Garden, Belle Vernon. 724-379-7100. SCIT SOCIAL IMPROV JAM. For new & experienced improvisers. Sat, 6 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-322-1000. THE WRITERS’ ROOM IMPROV SHOW. 10 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. WUNDERSTUDIES: IMPROVISED MUSICALS. 8 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608.

MON 11 TOTALLY FREE MONDAYS. Mon, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, Shadyside. 412-322-1000.

TUE 12 OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

WED 13 JOKEE OAKEE. Comedy open stage hosted by Tonnochi:B. Wed Younger’s, North Side. 412-452-3267. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502. WOLFIE’S COMIC WARS. Stand-up & improv challenges. Every other Wed. Thru March 13 The Improv, Waterfront. 310-909-6446.

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by some of the most celebrated photographers of the 20th century. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Revelation. Work by Artur Vasilevich. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. EASTSIDE GALLERY. Hats Off. Work by Sally Allen, Pat Kelly, Bernie Pintar, Sickles, more. East Liberty. 412-465-0140. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Revealing Place: Photographs from Missouri, Pennsylvania & Texas. Feat. work of 36 students from 3 universities, in 3 different states. Oakland. 412-681-5449. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. A Kind of Alchemy: Medieval Persian Ceramics. A look at the diversity of ceramics made in ancient Persia, now present-day Iraq, Iran, & Afghanistan. Feat. 10th-century splashware, buffware, slip-painted ware, lusterware & 14th-century fritware, more. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALERIE WERNER, THE MANSIONS ON FIFTH. The Classic Collection: European & American Classical & Academic Styles. Early 19th & 20th century paintings. Oakland. 412-716-1390. GALLERIE CHIZ. Abstraction = M S x 2. Sculptures & paintings by Marjorie Shipe & Mary Culbertson Stark. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. All the Years Combined. Original lithographs & posters by Jerry Garcia. Shadyside. 412-363-5050.

GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Interiors. Oil paintings by Jonelle Summerfield. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GAY & LESBIAN COMMUNITY CENTER. Fractures & Israel. Photography by Torey Bocast. Downtown. 412-422-0114. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. Topographies. Work by Barbara Sorensen. North Side. 412-322-1773. MATTRESS FACTORY. Feminist and.. New work by Julia Cahill, Betsy Damon, Parastou Forouhar, Loraine Leeson, Ayanah Moor, & Carrie Mae Weems. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MENDELSON GALLERY. Gallery Artists. Featuring Ben Matthews & David Lewis. Shadyside. 412-361-8664. MODERNFORMATIONS GALLERY. Heaven Didn’t Want Them. New Works by Christian Breitkreutz & Mike Egan. Garfield. 412-362-0274. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. Uncommon Grounds. Group show highlighting the fluidity & transformative quality of

Feat. timeline highlighting important exhibitions & events, a display of 20 objects from the HERITAGE MUSEUM. collection selected by current Military artifacts and exhibits or past curatorial staff, more. on the Allegheny Valley’s Oakland. 412-622-3131. industrial heritage. Tarentum. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF 724-224-7666. NATURAL HISTORY. Free ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. admission to Carnegie Museums Regarding Warhol: Sixty of Art & Natural History from Artists, Fifty Years. Juxtaposing 4 - 8 p.m. every Thur. in March. prime examples of Warhol’s Empowering Women: paintings, sculpture, & Artisan Cooperatives films with those by other that Transform artists who reinterpret, Communities. respond, or react to Folk art objects . his work. North Side. w ww per illustrating the a p ty ci 412-237-8300. h pg power of women .com BOST BUILDING. working together Collectors. Preserved to provide for their materials reflecting the families, educate their industrial heritage of children, promote equality, & Southwestern PA. Homestead. give back to their communities. 412-464-4020. BugWorks. Feat. beautiful CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. photography of insects, amazing 20/20: Celebrating Two Decades specimens, & live bugs! of the Heinz Architectural Center. Ongoing: Earth Revealed,

EXHIBITS ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.06/03.13.2013

FULL LIST ONLINE

glass. Feat. Jon Goldberg, Jan Kransberger, Mark Leputa, Leonard Marty,& Matthew Szösz. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. MORRIS LEVY GALLERY. Salon des Femmes de la Yinz. Art exhibit in recognition of Women’s History Month. Presented by LUPEC. Lawrenceville. 724-331-9692. OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. Faces & Places: Photographs of Old Economy. Never before seen photography from the late 19th & early 20th centuries. Ambridge. 724-266-4500. PICTURESQUE PHOTOGRAPHY & GIFTS. Photography by Brenda Knoll. Lawrenceville. 412-688-0240. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Above Dusk. Paintings by Kara Ruth Snyder. Homographies. Installation by Lizzy De Vita. Inter-subjectivity. Work by Eli Blasko, Eric D. Charlton & Ian F. Thomas. NON-WORK. Work by David Montano. Public Lives. Watercolors by William McAllister. Slo Poke. Paintings & drawings by Jonathan Chamberlain. Somewhere In Between. Installation by Lenore D. Thomas. This May Not Take That Long. Audio/video installation by David Bernabo & Emily Walley. Transience. Work by Stephen Chalmers. Untitled 1. Work by Jeremy Boyle & Mark Franchino. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Consciousness. Flameworked glass by Eunsuh Choi. Friendship. 412-365-2145. SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. Projects by Diane Meyer & Ross Mantle. Work by Fellowship 13 photography competition winners. South Side. 412-431-5777.

Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II ironmaking technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. Ligonier. 724-238-4983. DEPRECIATION LANDS MUSEUM. Small living history museum celebrating the settlement and history of the Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. 412-486-0563. FALLINGWATER. Tour the

THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Bridge 12. Work by Melissa Cameron, Betty Vera, & Kevin Snipes. Strip District. 412-261-7003 x 12. SOUTHERN ALLEGHENIES MUSEUM OF ART. Red, White & Blue in Black and White: The American Scene in Prints, Drawings & Photographs. 35-some works on paper from the museum’s collection, from photographs to lithographs. Ligonier. 724-238-6015. SPACE. Mean Girls. Work by Jenn Gooch, Sonja Sweterlitsch, Randie Snow, Vanessa German, more. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Student/ Instructor Exhibition. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. THE TOONSEUM. Drawn to Peace: The Art of Atila Ozer. The Art of Akira. Production art from Katsuhiro Otomo’s film. Downtown. 412-232-0199. TRUNDLE MANOR. Sara K. Diesel. Illustrations. Swissvale. 412-916-5544. WEST PENN HOSPITAL. Welcome to the Gardens. Fine acrylic paintings by Maura Taylor. The Gallery of Art, Millvale Ave. Upper Lobby. Email maurataylor3@gmail.com for more information. Bloomfield. 412-578-5000. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. The Art of Ruth Levine. A pop-up gallery of Levine’s work. Born of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Power Pixels 2013. New selfgenerative video installations, includes the world premiere of Miguel Chevalier’s latest work, Digital-Archi (Meta Cities). Downtown. 412-471-5605.

famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany stained-glass windows. Downtown. 412-471-3436. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARMONY MUSEUM. Quilt & Coverlet Show. Heritage quilts & coverlets from museum & private collections displayed. Harmony. 724-452-7341. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well

as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures and more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, demos and more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides and exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area and Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. Spring Flower Show. Feat. bold blooms & sweet scents based on Frances Hodgson Burnett’s children’s classic, The Secret Garden.14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants and floral displays from around the world. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos and artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry and community artifacts from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. 1968: The Year that Rocked America. Nearly a dozen interactive video presentations & more than 100 evocative artifacts that explore how the year 1968 helped shape our modern world. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, and exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504.


EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

Q BALL. Quantum Theatre’s gala fundraiser. 7 p.m. Bakery Square, Unknown. 412-362-1713. SALSITA! Tapas, live music, salsa tasting competition, more. Benefits La Escuelita Arcoiris. 8:30 p.m. Pittsburgh Opera, Strip District. 412-421-4787. TROUBLE W/ A CAPITAL T. Music Man selections performed by the Pittsburgh School for Choral Arts, auctions, carnival food, more. Benefits the Oakland Girls Choir. 5 p.m. St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, Oakland. 412-267-7707. YACS 1ST ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION. Drink specials, 50/50 raffle, Chinese auction, more. Benefits the Cancer Caring Center. 6-9 p.m. Mario’s South Side Saloon, South Side. 412-622-1212.

EVENT: Fun-A-Day Exhibition, Mr. Roboto Project, Garfield CRITIC: Emily Horstman, 20, a baker from Oakland WHEN: Fri.,

March 1 We’re at the Mr. Roboto Project Fun-A-Day exhibition opening and it is wonderful. The show features a bunch of projects by artists who were tasked with making a sort of craft each day of last month. I think a lot of the projects are awesome; the embroidered-celebrity-a-day is a hit amongst the crowd. Also I think the bridge-a-day is nice because it represents Pittsburgh very nicely. There was also a really awesome Mad Lib-a-day that I’m having a good time reading in silly voices tonight. The event was great; it was nice to see so many people come out and support local art.

SUN 10

BY JEFF I HAZA

ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice and the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 421-681-0905. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling and coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. Scottdale. 724-887-7910.

SPECIAL SUN 10 KEAN QUEST TALENT SEARCH. Voice competition in six rounds benefiting St. Barnabas Free Care Fund. Sun., March 17 and Fri., April 5 Kean Theatre, Gibsonia. 724-443-0800 x 5310.

DANCE FRI 08 - SUN 10 UNSPOKEN. Presented by Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, feat. work of choreographers George Balanchine, Antony Tudor & Mark Morris. Thu-Sun. Thru March 17 August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

SAT 09 LORD OF THE DANCE. Irish dance performance created by Michael Flatley. 2 & 8 p.m. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

FUNDRAISERS THU 07 GIRL RISING FILM SCREENING.

Benefits 10x10. 6 p.m. Waterworks Cinemas, Blawnox. 412-784-1416.

FRI 08 CHAIR-ITY AUCTION & COCKTAIL PARTY. Feat. auction of children’s & adult furniture hand-painted by local artists. Benefits the Heritage Community Initiatives 4 Kids Early Learning Center. 6 p.m. Renaissance Pittsburgh Hotel, Downtown. 412-351-0535. HISTORY UNCORKED: PEACE, LOVE, & ROCK ‘N’ ROLL. Live entertainment, full access to exhibits, more. 7-11 p.m. Senator John Heinz History Center, Strip District. 412-454-6000.

SAT 09 JCC’S BIG NIGHT: TIME OF OUR LIVES. Raffle, silent auction, more. 7:30 p.m. Jewish Community Center, Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8011 x 232. LIGHTS! CAMERA! MURDER! Interactive murder mystery w/ prizes for best costume & actor. Benefits Relay for Life of Mt. Lebanon. 6 p.m. Hollywood Theater, Dormont. 412-563-0368. A NIGHT OF BEAUTY & FASHION. Fashion show, auction, hors d’ourves, more. Benefits American Cancer Society. 7:30-10:30 p.m. Above All Salon, Wexford. 724-935-5288. OUT OF HAND! Hands-on activities, silent auction, art demos, more. 7:30-10:30 p.m. The Society for Contemporary Craft, Strip District. 412-261-7003 x 12.

BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Read & code letters, pick books, pack ‘em or database ‘em! Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 412-361-3022. BOY SCOUT TROOP 905 49TH ANNUAL SPAGHETTI DINNER. 1 p.m. St. Margaret Mary Church Hall, Coraopolis. 724-457-7423. CENTER FOR HOPE/CHARTER DAY. Free admission w/ donation of canned or boxed food item. Benefits the Center for Hope. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Old Economy Village, Ambridge. 724-266-4500 x 114. EMPTY BOWLS DINNER. Soup dinner benefiting Just Harvest & the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. 2-6 p.m. Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-431-8960.

LATHET NIGOD Fd.-OSat. 1 am + We Tues. 12 am Sun.-

Beers! t f a r D 36 s for een 8 Big Sc&r Pro Games College

LARGE GROUPS?

24th & East Carson St.

“In The South Side” 412.390.1111

www.doublewidegrill.com

WED 13 BRAVERY & BEAUTY CHARITY FASHION SHOW. Benefits Crisis Center North. 6:30 p.m. Altar Bar, Strip District. 412-600-6171.

POLITICS THU 07 GREEN PARTY MEETING. First Thu of every month, 7 p.m. Citizen Power, Squirrel Hill. 412-231-1581.

LITERARY THU 07

2013 An ual

Outdoor Living Expo

ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Third and First Thu of every month The Big Idea Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323.

Live demonstrations ns and exhib exhibits bits of the latest do-it-yourself projects – Install a retaining or garden wall Design a patio or walkway Build an outdoor kitchen or fire pit Install a wood-fired pizza oven, patio columns and outdoor benches

Saturday, March M 16, 2013 8:00am-8:00pm Shrine Center IIn the heated pavilion

1 1877 Shriners Way C Cheswick, PA 15024

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

Pizza & Beer Night tuesdays $15 large pizza & pitcher domestic beer FREE POOL all night

Wind Up wednesdays

$2 Miller Lite Drafts til 12am FREE POOL all night ½ off Select Appetizers 9-11pm

Thirsty thursdays

$7 Yuengling Pitchers til 12am Karaoke 9:30-1:30am

Eat, Drink & Dance

fridays & saturdays

S.I.N sundays

$2 Coors Light Drafts til 12am $5 Long Island Special

Cattivo Events (lower level) 03.09

Hanging Garden Goth/Industrial Night

Now Booking Events, Parties & more contact cattivo44@comcast.net 146 44th Street Lawrenceville PA 15201 412.687.2157 www.cattivo.biz Check our website & Facebook page for more events

THE RAHND TABLE READING. The first public reading of manuscripts-in-progress. 8 p.m. Most-Wanted Fine Art Gallery, Garfield. 412-328-4737. SPENCER DEW. Book launch for the author of Here Is How It Happens. Also feat. readings by Michael S. Begnal & Karen Lillis. 6 p.m. Awesome Books, Downtown. 412-471-1899.

of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131. MOVE WITH ART. Pull levers to move a 10-foot wooden man, create images on a giant Kaleidoscope, feed rubber balls to a life-size wooden cow & much more. Thru May 12 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

month National Aviary, North Side. 412-323-7235. SPRING LITTLE SPROUTS: I EAT PLANTS! Learn about roots, stems, leaves & flowers. Ages 2-3 w/ adult. Mon, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Thru March 25 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925.

FRI 08

FRI 08 - SAT 09 DISNEY’S ALADDIN JR. March 8-9 Saltworks Theater Company, Oakland. 412-621-6150.

TUE 12

CONVERSATION SALON. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed of every month, 1 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. DORIT BRAUER & LAINY CARSLAW. Mad Fridays Reading Series Schedule. Delanie’s Coffee, South Side. 412-927-4030. LET’S READ ENGLISH. Book club for non-native English speakers. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. OAKLAND OPEN MIC. Poetry, music & political speeches welcome. Second and Fourth Fri of every month, 7 p.m. 610-731-1804. RICK BRUENING: ACOUSTIC IRISH STORYTELLING. 7 p.m. Biddle’s Escape, Regent Square. 412-999-9009. WRITERS’ OPEN MIC NIGHT. All genres of written/spoken word welcome. Second Fri of every month, 7-9 p.m. Reads Ink Bookshop, Vandergrift. 724-567-7236.

SAT 09 PITTSBURGH WRITERS PROJECT - ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS. Second Sat of every month, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Green Tree Public Library, Green Tree. 412-921-9292.

SUN 10 WAYNE WISE. Signing his book, This Creature Fair 12-3 p.m. Phantom of the Attic, Oakland.

WED 13

3 NIGHT!S ONLY NEXT WEEK: XXX Superstar & 2011 Penthouse Pet of the Year

Nikki Benz OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Mon-Sat: Noon-2am Sunday: 3pm-2am

MARCH 14-16

135 9th Street 412-281-7703 www.blushexotic.com

DOWNTOWN PITTSBURGH 52

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.06/03.13.2013

CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. CHRISTOPHER KENNEDY LAWFORD. Author of Recover to Live: Conversations with 100 of the World’s Top Treatment Experts. Barnes & Noble, Waterfront. 412-462-5743.

KIDSTUFF THU 07 - WED 13 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. CHARLIE & KIWI’S EVOLUTIONARY ADVENTURE. Join Charlie as he travels back to the Age of Dinosaurs to discover how evolution works. Feat. story theater & discovery area. Presented by Commonwealth Connections Academy. Tue-Sun. Thru May 12 Carnegie Museum

SAT 09

TUESDAYS WITH TESS. Tue, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

WED 13

CELEBRATE! NATURAL ANNIE THE MUSICAL. BEAUTY. Learn to create your March 13-16 Kiski Area High own chemical-free beauty School, Leechburg. 724-845-8181 products, make healthy snacks, x 5140. use recycled materials & natural dyes to create striking tie-dye. Ages 4-9. 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925. THE RACHEL CARSON TRAIL EAST LIBERTY COMMUNITY QUEST. Hike the 34-mile trail ENGAGEMENT ORCHESTRA. in 4 sections, w/ a bonus hike All levels of orchestra to the still-developing instruments are invited. Harmony Trail. Presented Parents are invited by Venture Outdoors. to join & play w/ Sat. Thru March 30 their children. Sat, 412-255-0564. . w w w 3-4:30 p.m. Thru STEP INTO typaper ci h g p March 23 East Liberty SNOWSHOES. .com Presbyterian Church, East Snowshoeing/skiing Liberty. 412-441-3800 x 11. every Sat. w/ at least 4” of KIDS DROP-IN CARTOONING snow on the ground. Call Friday WORKSHOPS. 11 a.m. to confirm. Sat. Thru March 30 The ToonSeum, Downtown. Jennings Environmental Center, 412-232-0199. Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011. SATURDAY CRAFTERNOONS: SHADOW PUPPET THEATER W/ JANE ULRICH & THE LITERARY BAGPIPES & BREWS WALK. ARTS BOOM. 1-4 p.m. Assemble, 4-mile hike to Snyder Cemetery, Garfield. 773-425-1531. followed by food & music at THANK YOU MR. North Country Brewery. Ages 21+. LONGFELLOW. Reading & book Presented by Venture Outdoors. signing w/ Sydelle Pearl. 2 p.m. 12 p.m. Moraine State Park, Awesome Books, Downtown. Butler. 412-255-0564. 412-471-1899.

OUTSIDE SAT 09

FULL LIST ONLINE

SUN 10

SAT 09 - SUN 10 RAPUNZEL. Sat, Sun. Thru March 17 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-5201.

SUN 10 AUTISM-FRIENDLY EASTER BUNNY VISIT. 6:30-8 p.m. Ross Park Mall, Ross. 412-577-5140. COMPUTER PROGRAMMING. 2-4 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. KEAN QUEST TALENT SEARCH YOUTH PRELIMINARY 4. Voice competition benefiting St. Barnabas Free Care Fund. 1 p.m. Kean Theatre, Gibsonia. 724-443-0800 x 5310. MEDITATION FOR KIDS. Ages 8-13. 2-3:30 p.m. Schoolhouse Yoga, Squirrel Hill. 412-401-4444.

MON 11 BROWN BAG LUNCH BUNCH. A lunchtime story for kids ages 3-6. Mon, 12:30 p.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. LITTLE PEEPERS: MUNCHKINS MONDAYS. Story telling and bird programs. Second Mon of every

TUE 12

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

WED 13 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 07 $10 RABIES CLINIC. Also feat. flea treatments & microchipping. Every other Thu, 1-3 p.m. Thru March 21 Animal Friends, Ohio Township. 412-847-7029. AARP TAX HELP. Free tax preparation and assistance to low & middle income taxpayers. Thu. Thru April 11 Baldwin Borough Public Library, Baldwin. 412-885-2255. ANTIQUES APPRAISAL DAY. 4-8 p.m. Westmoreland County Historical Society, Greensburg. 724-532-1935 x 210. CITY DHARMA. Soto Zen Meditation. jisen@deepspringzen. org Thu, 6:30-8:15 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill.

GLOBALPITTSBURGH FIRST THURSDAYS. International community networking event. 5:30-8:30 p.m. AVA Bar & Lounge, East Liberty. 412-392-4513. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS LUNCHTIME SERIES. Bring a brown bag lunch & join a discussion on gun control issues. 12:30 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. MAKE YOUR OWN PAINT. Learn how watercolor paints are made from raw ingredients, discuss the different types & try out the process hands-on. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. TELL THE WORLD HOW TO TREAT YOU! A conversation about women in the arts w/ Jeri Lynn Johnson. Part of SUNSTAR Music Festival. 6:30 p.m. The Alloy Studios, Friendship. 412-363-3000. TROPICAL FOREST YOGA FESTIVAL. Thru March 7 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-622-6914. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Group acupuncture & guided meditation for stress-relief. Thu DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

THU 07 - SUN 10 THE 32ND ANNUAL DUQUESNE LIGHT PITTSBURGH HOME & GARDEN SHOW. Thru March 10 David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. 412-565-6000.

FRI 08 DRUM & CHANT WORKSHOP W/ JIM DONOVAN. 7 p.m. Bottlebrush Gallery & Shop, Harmony. 724-452-0539. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY CALL FOR ACTION. 7 p.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-315-7423. THE LIFE & CONSTITUTIONS OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. w/ Dr. Cleon Cornes. Fri, 10 a.m. and Fri., April 5, 10 a.m. Thru March 22 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912.

FRI 08 - SAT 09 3 BLIND MICE DOLLHOUSE & MINIATURES SHOW & SALE. 3blindmiceshow.com March 8-9 Comfort Inn, Penn Hills. 412-244-1600.


[VISUAL ART]

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHTS

FLOWER. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Vessel Studio Glass, South Side. 412-779-2471. OTTERS: FROM NORTH DAKOTA TO TANZANIA - IT ALL STARTED IN PA. Presentation by Tom Serfass. 2 p.m. Jennings Environmental Center, Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011. PET PHOTOS W/ THE EASTER BUNNY. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Animal Friends, Ohio Township. 412-847-7000. WOMEN’S RIGHTS MOVEMENT IN THE MCKEESPORT AREA. w/ Barbara Hafer. 2 p.m. McKeesport Regional History & Heritage Center, McKeesport. 412-678-1832.

VIDEO DJ’S

10:30PM -2AM

Pens Games g n ri u d TS IN P T H $3 MILLER LIG RDAY NIGHT TU A S T H FRIDAY NIG Clique Vodka

MON 11

As any certified Deadhead knows, Jerry Garcia studied at the San Francisco Art Institute, under the countercultural artist Wally Hedrick, before life took him in another direction. The iconic rocker continued to dabble in painting and drawing throughout his life, and Gallery 4’s exhibit All the Years Combined features several of Garcia’s lithographs and artist proofs. A selection of vintage concert posters by Stanley Mouse and others is also on view. Through Sat., March 30. 206 S. Highland Ave., Shadyside. Call 412-363-5050 or visit www.thegallery4.us.

FRI 08 - SUN 10 FOX CHAPEL KIDS CONSIGNMENT SALE. Thu, Fri, Sun. Thru March 10 Adat Shalom Synagogue, Cheswick.

SAT 09 ANDROID BALLET. Showcasing Separate Self, a new collaborative work by Garth Zeglin & Philip Thompson comprising Zeglin’s robotic/kinetic fabric sculpture & Thompson’s original composition. 7 p.m. Bellefield Hall, Oakland. 412-624-4266. BONSAI: COTONEASTER. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. CLASSIC SNACKS BOOK RELEASE & COOKING DEMONSTRATION. w/ food writer Casey Barber. 7 p.m. Awesome Books, Downtown. 412-471-1899. GANNON ALUMNI DAY. Presented by the Pittsburgh Chapter of the Gannon University Alumni. 10 a.m. National Aviary, North Side. 412-904-1099. ILLUSTRATING GRAPHIC NOVELS W/ TOM SCIOLI. Learn the art of illustrating graphic novels w/ the comic book writer & artist Tom Scioli, widely known for the sci-fi opera epic Gødland. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Trust Arts Education Center, Downtown. INDIAN CLASSICAL DANCE CLASS. Sat. Thru April 20 Mookshi Wellness Center, Regent Square. 412-407-7829. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S

DAY CELEBRATION. Gifts, snacks, hand massages, more. 11 a.m.1 p.m. Ten Thousand Villages, Squirrel Hill. 412-421-2160. KNIT THE BRIDGE PROJECT. Demonstration by Fiberarts Guild of Pittsburgh. Part of the Empowering Women exhibit. 1-4 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131. KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. Korean grammar & basic conversation. Sat, 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. KOREAN II. For those who already have a basic understanding of Korean & are interested in increasing proficiency. Sat Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. OUTRAGEOUS BINGO. Feat. drag performances, more. Benefits Gay & Lesbian Community Center of Pittsburgh & Shepherd Wellness Community. Sat., April 13 and Sat., May 4 Rodef Shalom Congregation, Oakland. 412-621-6566. SATURDAY NIGHT SALSA CRAZE. Free lessons, followed by dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, Downtown. 412-708-8844. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SECOND SATURDAY AT THE SPINNING PLATE. Art exhibits w/ various musical, literary & artistic

performances. Second Sat of every month Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. 412-441-0194. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP. Friendly, informal. At the Starbucks inside Target. Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target East Liberty. 412-362-6108. ST. DAVID’S DAY PUB CRAWL. 6:15 p.m. St. James Place Tavern, South Side. 412-215-9161. STEEL CITY ROLLER DERBY SEASON OPENER. 6 p.m. Romp & Roll Skating Rink, Glenshaw. 412-486-4117. SWING CITY. Learn & practice swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569.

SAT 09 - SUN 10 HARMONY MUSEUM QUILT & COVERLET SHOW. Heritage quilts and coverlets from museum & private collections displayed, artisans & museum quilters demonstrate craft with many works available for sale. March 9-10 Harmony Museum, Harmony. 888-821-4822.

SUN 10 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. Weekly letter writing event. Sun, 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. 412-683-3727. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. Second and Third Sun of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MAKE YOUR OWN GLASS

ARRANGING W/ THE SEASONS. Learn about locally available flowers & create an arrangement from what is in season. 7-9 p.m. and Mon., April 8, 7-9 p.m. Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925. BOUNDARIES & SELF CARE. A support group for women 30+. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Anchorpoint Counseling Ministry, North Park. THE DEN. Second and Fourth Mon of every month Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. MORNING SPANISH LITERATURE & CONVERSATION. Mon, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

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TUE 12 ENDOWMENTS: WHY HAVE THEM & CONSIDERATIONS IN INVESTING THEM. Presented by Fragasso Financial Advisors. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Koppers Building Conference Center, Downtown. 412-680-2149. FOUNDATIONS OF INVESTING. w/ Brendan Gallagher of Edward Jones. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. SENIOR HOUSING CHOICES. w/ Rick Hunsicker. 1 p.m. Longwood at Oakmont, Verona. 412-826-5891. THE YWCA IN PITTSBURGH SINCE 1869. Speaker: Magdeline E. Jensen, CEO of the YMCA of Greater Pittsburgh. 7:30 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-417-3707.

WED 13

Try it Free!

BASIC HORTICULTURE. Learn about soils, plant nutrition, & environmental factors that affect plant growth/development. Wed, 7-9 p.m. Thru March 27 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925.

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BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP. For Widows/Widowers over 50. Second and Fourth Wed of every month, 1-2:30 p.m. St. Sebastian Church, Ross. 412-366-1300. ENGLISH CONVERSATION (ESL). Wed, 10 a.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. KITCHEN LITHOGRAPHY. Feat. Max Pokrzywa. AiP Gallery Speaker Series. 5 p.m. Art Institute of Pittsburgh, Downtown. 412-263-6600. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. NUTRITIONAL EDUCATION SERIES. Learn how to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Wed, 6 p.m. Thru March 13 Angora Gardens, White Oak. 412-675-8556. PGH PHOTO FAIR SPEAKER SERIES. Feat. Fred & Laura Ruth Bidwell. 6:30 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. SHADYSIDE HAPPY HOUR & BUSINESS NETWORKING EVENT. 6 p.m. Steel Cactus, Shadyside. 412-980-2720. SUSTAINING CREATIVITY FROM PRINT TO WALL. w/ Charlee Brodsky. 7-9 p.m. Silver Eye Center for Photography, South Side. 412-431-1810. URBAN BALLROOM DANCE. 3rd floor. Wed, 6:30-8 p.m. Hosanna House, Wilkinsburg. 412-242-4345. USE ALL THE CRAYONS! THE COLORFUL GUIDE TO SIMPLE HUMAN HAPPINESS. Discussion w/ author Chris Rodell. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

“Discover Me!” Call Robert for further details. 412-904-2954. LATSHAW PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for Viva Las Vegas. March 31 & April 14. Female dancers only. Call for more information: 724-853-4050. MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. Ongoing auditions for actors ages 18+ for murder mystery shows performed in the Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056.

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

CASA ALLEGHENY COUNTY

Court Appointed Special Advocates of Allegheny County works to ensure that child victims of abuse and neglect receive the attention and care that the court system is often unequipped to give. CASA volunteers partner with case workers to gather information about assigned cases, creating the basis for CASA recommendations. For more information on how to become an advocate, call 412-594-3606 or visit www.pgh-casa.org.

PITTSBURGH NEW WORKS FESTIVAL. Auditions for Pittsburgh New Works Cabaret. March 16-17. All performing artists, all ages. 3-min. audition time, acts must be original & not previously produced publicly. http://www.pittsburghnewworks. org/auditions Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-944-2639. THE TALENT GROUP. Open casting for models and actors 1st Monday of every month. 11:45 AM, 5:45 PM. 412-471-8011.

SUBMISSIONS 14TH WARD INDEPENDENT

DEMOCRATIC CLUB. Seeking submissions for the Progressive Visions Video Contest. For more information, visit http:// www.pgh14widc.org/. 2013 WESTMORELAND ART NATIONALS. Enter 4 images of artwork for national juried art show. Call or see entry ARENA’S PERFORMING form for more information. ARTS CENTRE. Auditions http://www.artsandheritage.com for the Summer Dance Intensive 724-834-7474. program. March 9. Dancers ages ART IN ACTION. Seeking artists 12+. http://www.arenaspacpro. for a one-day interactive art com/index.php/en/summershow. June 2. For more dance-intensive.html information & Moon. 412-264-9925. application: http:// THE COMPANY www.artinaction-hf. OF PITTSBURGH. com/ Stone Pavilion, Auditions for 2013 www. per Washington. season. March 24. a p ty pghci m 724-413-4648. Prepare One 32 bar cut .co BOYD COMMUNITY of trad. musical theater CENTER. Seeking locally & if asked, have a second made, high-quality work for the 32 bar cut of Contemporary 2013 GardenFest & Artist Market. Musical Theater & a monologue. Submissions in mediums such as Bring head shot & resume. Equity ceramics, glass, jewelry, wood, and Non-Equity welcome. Email: leather, paper, photography & auditionscopgh@gmail.com more, as well as handmade soaps for a time slot. Appointment & other small items are welcome. recommended. James Centre, cschade@boydcommunitycenter. West End. 412 937-1414. org 412-828-8566. DISCOVER ME! Looking for GALLERY FLYNN. Seeking work actresses between 18-30 years by film & visual artists to display old for the movie production

AUDITIONS

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.06/03.13.2013

in new gallery. McKees Rocks. 412-969-2990. IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Seeking submissions for Automata, an upcoming art show. Deadline for application: April 1. For more information, email katydement@ gmail.com. JOHNSTOWN FILM FESTIVAL. Seeking original short films of 30 min. or less. For complete

rules & entry form, visit www.johnstownfilmfest.org. NEW SLANG LITERARY MAGAZINE FOR WOMEN AND GIRLS IN PITTSBURGH. Literary magazine supported by The Women and Girls Foundation. Taking submissions of creative writing, visual art, photographs, and essays from women and girls of all ages. www.new-slang.org PITTSBURGH NEW WORKS FESTIVAL. Now accepting 1-act plays that have never before been produced. 12 plays will be selected to be performed as mainstage productions for the festival’s 23rd season. For more information visit www. pittsburghnewworks.org/ play-submission or email info@ pittsburghnewworks.org. 412-944-2639. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Seeking 2 or 3dimensional art celebrating a person or group of people living or dead, a place, thing or idea in a present-day context for Small Shrines exhibition. http://www. sweetwaterartcenter.org/callfor-artists-2/ 412-741-4405. VERONA’S CREATIVE MARKETPLACE. Seeking artists, food & product vendors for marketplace running May-Sept. Call for more info. Verona Borough Building, Verona. 412-721-0943. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Seeking individual artists & artist groups for month-long exhibitions in a new transitional gallery measuring. Artists will be responsible for all aspects of their exhibition. Send images & a brief introduction to the work to: bljones@wmuseumaa.org w/ a cc: to jotoole@wmuseumaa.org & jmcgarry@wmuseumaa.org. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.


{BY DAN SAVAGE}

My girlfriend and I read your column, and I have you to thank for being comfortable enough with my kinks to tell her about my interest in BDSM. She has indulged all my kinky fantasies and discovered some of her own. Our latest adventure has her locking up my dick in a CB-6000 male chastity device. The play/sex has been super-fun so far, but we want to be aware of any health and safety concerns. We’re most concerned about whether restricting erections with a chastity device can cause nerve damage, erectile dysfunctiom or other issues. Should I be concerned about having my erections constricted while being teased or wearing it overnight? We plan on taking off the device for sexual play, which we do about five times a week, so there would be plenty of opportunities for my guy to stretch out. Is there any issue with having the device on long-term while soft, in regards to the cock ring that serves as the back end of the device? If it is fitted properly, are there any negative effects to having this on for a day? A week? A month? I find it odd that manufacturers don’t provide more information about this. From what I’ve read online, there seem to be a lot of guys who stay locked way more long-term than I’m planning. LOCK ON COCK KAUSING ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION?

— are safer and impossible to remove without the key. So let’s say you invest in an expensive chastity device that doesn’t rely on potentially tissue-compressing rings. What does Dr. King say? “With no compression from the cock ring, it might be safe for somewhat longer use,” he answered. “Overnight use may still be problematic. Nocturnal/spontaneous erections are hypothesized to encourage blood flow and stretching of the vascular and erectile tissue to keep it healthy and prevent atrophy. Like any other tendon, ligament or muscle — use it or lose it. I can’t see how preventing spontaneous nocturnal erections can be healthy. But I can’t prove any long-term damage.” Of course, if we only listened to doctors, no one would ever eat sugar, smoke cigarettes or let his girlfriend lock up his cock in “The Grinder.” So I got a second and a third opinion. The second opinion is mine. The manufacturers of male chastity devices don’t provide information about risks because they’re not required to. Sex toys are sold as “novelty items,” not medical devices, and the FDA doesn’t regulate them. But so long as your CB-6000 isn’t cutting off circulation, pinching nerves or rubbing you raw, and so long as you’re not wearing it for extended periods (I wouldn’t wear one overnight), you’ll be fine. There are thousands of CB-6000s in circulation — it’s the most popular male chastity device on the market — and if they were injuring men or rendering them impotent, we’d be hearing from the lawyers. Dr. King consulted a doctor whose specialty is “urology trauma,” and his colleague hadn’t heard of any issues related to chastity devices. “Perhaps that speaks to the relative safety of them,” said Dr. King. “If they were messing up lots of penises, surely we urologists would be the first to know.” The third opinion is from a kinky blogger. Metal served for six years on the board of Gay Male S/M Activist — an organization that promotes safe, sane and consensual BDSM — and runs the popular BDSM site metalbondnyc.com. He’s also a keyholder to several men locked in long-term chastity devices. “I’m not a medical doctor,” Metal said, “so I can’t speak with authority on potential long-term physical effects. But I can tell you that many, many men use chastity to enhance their sex lives.” None of the men Metal has locked up — some for months at a time — have had trouble getting hard once their devices were removed. “When guys are first locked up, they often complain of waking up in the middle of the night with painful erections,” said Metal. “But that usually passes in a week or so. What I would suggest to this couple is to experiment. Lock him up for a day or two initially, then a few days, and then maybe work up to a week or more. Rules are good. Maybe he gets unlocked only when he’s chained to the bed. Then after he comes — if he’s allowed to come — his dick gets locked back up before he’s unchained.” Metal urges you to be cautious, but not to fear chastity play: “The possibilities, and the longterm sexual rewards, can be endless.”

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IF WE ONLY LISTENED TO DOCTORS, NO ONE WOULD EVER EAT SUGAR, SMOKE OR LET HIS GIRLFRIEND LOCK UP HIS COCK IN “THE GRINDER.”

Whether you’re talking about food, politics or locking a dude’s cock in a male chastity device, LOCKED, you’ll find more anonymous liars online pretending to be experts than actual experts. Male chastity play is a real kink, not some bullshit made up by a high-school kid to gross people out, e.g., “Dirty Sanchez,” “Donkey Punch,” “Michelle Malkin.” But the number of men who enjoy this kind of play is relatively small, and the number blogging about it is smaller. So it’s best not to take health-and-safety advice from anonymous chastity players online. So how about some health-and-safety advice from a board-certified urologist? “I’ve never had a patient ask me about using, or admit to using, a male chastity device,” said Stephen H. King, MD, a urologist in Washington State. “And I cannot find a single reference in the medical/ urological literature.” What would Dr. King advise a patient about wearing a male chastity device? “As a urologist, my primary concern is long-term health and preservation of erectile function, so I tend to err on the cautious side,” said Dr. King. “I’d certainly caution against long-term or continuous use of such a device, anything more than four to six hours, if it places any significant compression on the tissue.” Some guys who wear male chastity devices for extended periods invest in custom-fitted devices, which are less likely to put “significant compression on the tissue” than a semiadjustable, one-size-fits-all CB-6000. The device you’ve got is fine for newbies and short-term play, but the expensive chastity devices they sell at steelwerksextreme.com — devices with names like “The Torture Puzzle” and “The Grinder”

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

03.06-03.13

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “Telling someone your goal makes it less likely to happen,” says musician and businessman Derek Sivers. Numerous studies demonstrate that when you talk about your great new idea before you actually do it, your brain chemistry does an unexpected thing. It gives you the feeling that you have already accomplished the great new idea — thereby sapping your willpower to make the effort necessary to accomplish it! The moral of the story: Don’t brag about what you’re going to do someday. Don’t entertain people at parties with your fabulous plans. Shut up and get to work. This is especially important advice for you right now.

ARIES (March 21-April 19):

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):

Maybe you’re not literally in exile. You haven’t been forced to abandon your home and you haven’t been driven from your power spot against your will. But you may nevertheless be feeling banished or displaced. It could be due to one of the conditions that storyteller Michael Meade names: “We may experience exile as a lack of recognition, a period of transition, an identity crisis, a place of stuckness, or else having a gift and no place to give it.” Do any of those describe your current predicament, Aries? The good news, Meade says, is that exile can shock you awake to the truth about where you belong. It can rouse your irrepressible motivation to get back to your rightful place.

In the course of formulating his theory of evolution, Charles Darwin read many books. He developed a rather ruthless approach to getting what he needed out of them. If there was a particular part of a book that he didn’t find useful, he simply tore it out, cast it aside, and kept the rest. I recommend this as a general strategy for you in the coming week, Leo. In every situation you’re in, figure out what’s most valuable to you and home in on that. For now, forget the irrelevant and extraneous stuff.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Do you have a recurring nightmare that has plagued you? If so, I suspect it will recur again soon. Only this time, Taurus, you will beat it. You will trick or escape or defeat the monster that’s chasing you. Or else you will outrun the molten lava or disperse the tornado or fly up off the ground until the earth stops shaking. Congratulations on this epic shift, Taurus. Forever after you will have more power over the scary thing that has had so much power over you.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The following request for advice appeared on Reddit.com: “My identical twin is stuck in an alternate dimension and she can only communicate with me by appearing as my own reflection in mirrors and windows. How can I tell her I don’t like what she’s done to her hair?” This question is a variant of a type of dilemma that many of you Geminis are experiencing right now, so I’ll respond to it here. I’m happy to say that you will soon get an unprecedented chance to commune directly with your alter egos. Your evil twin will be more available than usual to engage in meaningful dialogue. So will your doppelganger, your shadow, your mirror self and your stuntperson.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Usually I advise Cancerians to draw up precise borders and maintain clear boundaries. As a Crab myself, I know how important it is for our well-being that we neither leak our life force all over everything nor allow others to leak their life force all over us. We thrive on making definitive choices and strong commitments. We get into trouble when we’re wishy-washy about what we want. OK. Having said all that fatherly stuff, I now want to grant you a partial and temporary license to get a little wild and fuzzy. Don’t overdo it, of course, but explore the smart fun you can have by breaking some of your own rules and transgressing some of the usual limits.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Here’s a passage from Charles Dickens’ novel Great Expectations: “It was one of those March days when the sun shines hot and the wind blows cold: when it is summer in the light, and winter in the shade.” Judging from the astrological omens, Virgo, I suspect your life may be like that in the coming days. The emotional tone could be sharply mixed, with high contrasts between vivid sensations. The nature of your opportunities may seem warm and bright one moment, cool and dark the next. If you regard this as interesting rather than difficult, it won’t be a problem, but rather an adventure.

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): There’s a writer I know whose work is brilliant. Her ideas are fascinating. She’s a champion of political issues I hold dear. She’s well-read and smarter than me. Yet her speech is careless and sloppy. She rambles and interrupts herself. She says “uh,” “you know” and “I mean” so frequently that I find it hard to listen, even when she’s saying things I admire. I considered telling her about this, but decided against it. She’s an acquaintance, not a friend. Instead, I resolved to clean up my own speech — to

“I worked as a hair stylist in Chicago’s Gold Coast for 20 years with some of the most gorgeous woman and men in the world,” writes sculptor Rich Thomson. “Once I asked a photographer who shot for the big magazines how he picked out the very best models from among all these great-looking people. His response: ‘Flaws. Our flaws are what make us interesting, special and exotic. They define us.’“ My challenge to you, Libra, is to meditate on how your supposed imperfections and oddities are essential to your unique beauty. It’s a perfect moment to celebrate — and make good use of — your idiosyncrasies.

make sure I don’t do anything close to what she does. This is a strategy I suggest for you, Capricorn: Identify interesting people who are not fully living up to their potential, and change yourself in the exact ways you wish they would change.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The German word Verschlimmbesserung refers to an attempted improvement that actually makes things worse. Be on guard against this, Aquarius. I fear that as you tinker, you may try too hard. I’m worried you’ll be led astray by neurotic perfectionism. To make sure that your enhancements and enrichments will indeed be successful, keep these guidelines in mind: 1. Think about how to make things work better, not how to make things look better. 2. Be humble and relaxed. Don’t worry about saving face and don’t overwork yourself. 3. Forget about short-term fixes; serve long-range goals. Describe how you plan to shake off some of your tame and overly civilized behavior. Testify at Freewillastrology.com

Get Your YOGA On!

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):

Schoolhouse Yoga new year. new you.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The genius of Leonardo da Vinci was in part fueled by his buoyant curiosity. In his work as an artist, musician, inventor, engineer and writer, he drew inspiration from pretty much everything. He’s your role model for the coming week, Scorpio. Just assume that you will find useful cues and clues wherever you go. Act as if the world is full of teachers who have revelations and guidance specifically meant for you. Here’s some advice from da Vinci himself: “It should not be hard for you to stop sometimes and look into the stains of walls, or ashes of a fire, or clouds, or mud or like places, in which, if you consider them well, you may find really marvelous ideas.”

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Ready for a reality check? It’s time to assess how well you know the fundamental facts about where you are located. So let me ask you: Do you know

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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which direction north is? Where does the water you drink come from? What phase of the moon is it today? What was the indigenous culture that once lived where you live now? Where is the power plant that generates the electricity you use? Can you name any constellations that are currently in the night sky? What species of trees do you see every day? Use these questions as a starting point as you deepen your connection with your specific neighborhood on planet Earth. Get yourself grounded!

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Monday, March 11 DoubleTree by Hilton Downtown Pittsburgh Friday, March 15 Embassy Suites Airport Coraopolis, PA Stop By Between 10AM-3PM

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ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE WANTED! Steel City Media is seeking F/T A.E. FOR WRRK and WLTJ radio. 2 yrs min. sales experience, possess excellent verbal skills & a self-starter. Requires own vehicle and auto insurance. Submit resume or email: Steel City Media, Attn: Chris Kohan, 650 Smithfield Street, Suite # 2200. PGH., PA 15222 or c.kohan@steelcitymedia.com No phone calls please. EOE.

Bring plenty of resumes & we’ll see you at the fair!

BUY and SELL your HOME all in the Same Place! Advertise here in the “LIVE” section of the City Paper

STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES

CLINICAL STUDIES

NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

The numbers don’t lie! How many people actually READ the classifieds? Check it out! CP 252,391 Trib Classifieds 65,075 PG Classifieds 60,463 City Paper has more eyes on the prize than other publications in the market! Advertise TODAY!

Blood Pressure and

The Brain Research study with one MRI and two interview sessions seeks healthy adults ages 35-60. Cannot have low blood pressure, hypertension, heart disease, or diabetes. $150 compensation. Will be invited to repeat study in 2 years with additional compensation. Contact Kim Novak 412-246-6200 novakkj@upmc.edu

CLINICAL STUDIES

GOUT? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

DIABETES AND ON METFORMIN? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

VAGINAL ASTHMA? DRYNESS? Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

412-650-6155

IBS?

MENSTRUAL CRAMPS?

Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

CALL TODAY!

412-650-6155

412.363.1900 CTRS

Are you interested in a long-term method of birth control? YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE IF YOU: • Are a non-pregnant woman between 16 and 35 years old • Are in need of contraception • Have regular periods • Are willing to come to Magee-Womens Hospital to complete up to 14 or more visits over a five year period The Center for Family Planning Research is conducting a research study of an investigational contraceptive intrauterine device (IUD). Participants will receive study-related exams and study-related birth control at no cost. To see if you qualify, please call the Center for Family Planning Research at 412-641-5496 or visit our website at www.birthcontrolstudies.org.Participants will be reimbursed up to $1030 over five years.

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 58

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.06/03.13.2013


Want to make a difference? Healthy Volunteers Needed for Hormonal Vaginal Ring Research Study You may be eligible to participate if you are: 18-39 years old In general good health Have regular periods Not pregnant or breastfeeding • Are willing to abstain from sexual activity, OR are sexually active and willing to use condoms, OR you are sterilized OR with one partner who has a vasectomy • Are willing to come to MageeWomens Hospital for up to 54 visits over 8 months • • • •

Participants will be compensated up to $2,930 for their time and travel For more information please contact:

The Center for Family Planning at

412-641-5496

or visit: www.birthcontrolstudies.org

Our board-certified physicians have been conducting clinical trials to advance primary care practice and the health of patients since 2003. We are currently enrolling for clinical trials in the following areas: • • • • • • •

Asthma COPD Migraine Diabetes Cardiovascular High cholesterol IBS with diarrhea

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Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

Immediate openings. Now accepting Highmark and self-paying clients.

412.246.8965, ext. 9

JADE Wellness Center

SUBOXONE

Includes Med Management & Therapy

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

SELF-ESTEEM WORKSHOPS 412-400-7159 selfesteemworkshops.com ;;;;;;;;;;;;

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

massage BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

Mingkun Massage DEEP TISSUE MASSAGE • $40 per 60 min massage • 2hr free valet parking at the Concourse with the purchase of a 60 or 90 min massage

WELLNESS CENTER

Chinese Tuina Massage Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104 3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

PH. 412.389.8637 minkunmassage.com

CHINESE MASSAGE

Chinese So Relax Massage South Side

Professional Massage Therapists

$10 Off Massage Before Noon! Water table and hot oil massages, body scrubs, and 10 different types of massages! Best Chinese Massage Open 7 days a week 9:30am til 2am 2508 E. Carson St. 412-677-6080 412-918-1281 

Walk in or Call

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

MIND & BODY Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

STAR Superior Chinese Massage Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

China Massage $50/HR Free Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 Call for more information

724-519-7896

Xie LiHong’s

125 W. Station Square Dr. Station Sq. Freight Shops

a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

• NOW Treating Pregnant Women

Sneakers not meant to be in the box. New Balance Pittsburgh. Oakland & Waterfront. www.lifestyleshoe. com.

MIND & BODY

Therapy

MIND & BODY

• VIVITROL -

LOCATIONS IN: Oakland, PA Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA West View, PA Butler, PA

;;;;;;;;;;;;

• SUBOXONE

• Group and Individualized Therapy

MIND & BODY



We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug Addiction

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

COUNSELING



• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

412-308-5540 412-548-3710 3348 Babcock Blvd. Pittsburgh

Aming’s Massage Therapy TWO LOCATIONS 1190 Washington Pike, Bridgeville (across from Eat n’ Park)

412-319-7530 4972 Library Road, Bethel Park

(in Hillcrest Shopping Center)

412-595-8077

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms. Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

Zhangs Wellness Center

412-401-4110 $40/hr DOWNTOWN 322 Fourth Ave. (1st Floor)

Health and Wellness Directory

Phoenix Spa New Young Professional Free Table Shower w/60 min. Open 10-10 Daily 4309 Butler Street (Lawrenceville)



Addiction & Recovery Health Services

WELLNESS

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

412-621-3300

412.434.6700

www.ThereToHelp.org

We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health - And Many Others 60

WE have been there WE know your pain Don’t Wait Any Longer! MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.06/03.13.2013

Suboxone Services Pittsburgh- 412-281-1521 Beaver- 724-448-9116


SERVICES

GRAND OPENING!

TIGER SPA

Judy’s Oriental Massage

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town!

COUNSELING

Appointments & Walk-ins are both welcome 10am to 10pm

FULL BODY MASSAGE

420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

$40/hr Now with Vichy Shower 4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

Accepting All Major Cards

MUSICIANS LEGAL SERVICE REHEARSAL VEHICLES ADOPTION ANNOUNCEMENTS ENTERTAINERS STUDIO SPACE Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds! Need a new employee? Call today to speak with one of our Classified advertising representatives. We get results!

REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069 Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

Specializing in Treatment of Depression and Anxiety Now Accepting New Clients with BC/BS and UPMC Insurance 412.848.1117 george@ssmha.net www.ssmha.net

CLASSES AIRLINE CAREERS – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-4923059 (AAN CAN) NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses! ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-4819472 www.CenturaOnline.com(AAN CAN)

ADOPTION PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 Void in Illinois/New Mexico

Xin Sui Bodyworks Grand Opening

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN) Call 412.316.3342 to advertise in City Paper. Become a friend of Gordon Shoes on Facebook for your chance to win great prizes and merchandise! Facebook.com/GordonShoes

PHONE SERVICES Keep it Real hot talk, local singles FREE TRIAL 412-2356296 Vibe Line Get your local number: 1.800.811.1633 18+ www.vibeline. com Give In to your wildest fantasies! TRY FOR FREE CODE 2339 Red Hots dateline 412894-0205 More local Numbers: 1-800-7006666 18+ www.redhotdateline. com

DANCE INSTRUCTOR

ADOPT Adoring Couple, Exec & stay home mom, puppies, Love & Laughter awaits your baby. Expenses Paid Bob & Maria

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

1-800-989-6766

ADOPT Adopting your newborn giving secure life and forever love is my greatest wish. EXP PD. MARIA 866-429-0222

HAULING

D & S HAULING Reliable Low Rates Call NOW

412-877-0730 N E W S

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PITTSBURGH STEEL CITY STEPPERS Join the style that’s Sweeping the NATION!!! CHICAGO-STYLE STEPPIN’ DANCE LESSONS Wednesdays 7 -8:30 PM Wilkins School Community Center CONTACT: steelcitysteppers@hotmail.com “ friend” us on Facebook and Meetup.com

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LIVE

EAST FOR RENT

ROOMMATES

MOVING SERVICES

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

ABC SELF STORAGE5x10 $45, 10x10 $65, 10x15 $95. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

Looking to fill an open position? Advertise in City Paper’s “WORK” section and reach over 250,000 people who read CP classifieds!

MONTOUR SCHOOL DISTRICT $ 149,900 Kennedy Twp. Beautiful-Brick, 3 BR, 1.5 BA Ranch with formal dinning room.Updated Kitchen, Bath and 150 amp Electric. Semi-Finished Basement. one car int/grg. Lovely, level backyard with a new patio. Must see.

Call George E Lucas 412-771-8400 #1 Choice Real Estate

Lawrenceville- Quality! EVERYTHING NEW! reduced 2BR, $1,050. 2 stry, 2-3BR, 2BA, $1,450. MJ Kelly Rlty 412-736-0906 Advertise Here Today! Advertise your GOODS in City Paper and reach over 300,000 readers per month. Now that’s SERVICE!

REAL ESTATE SERVICES AMERICA’S BEST BUY! 20 acres-only $99/ month! $0 down, no credit checks, MONEY BACK GUARANTEE. Owner financing. West Texas beautiful Mountain Views! Free color brochure. 1-800-755-8953 www. sunsetranches.com (AAN CAN)

Ink Well {BY BEN TAUSIG}

Advertise Here Today!

HOUSE FOR SALE HOUSE FOR SALE

New Price $ 360,000 - Mexican War Street Totally Renovated3-story, brick, 3 BR, 2 BA home. Original details, mantels, with 5 fireplaces. Beautiful woodwork & copper downspouts. Extra lot included. Call George E Lucas to see.

Cheaper than Rent $ 47,900 - Stowe Twp. Well Maintained - 2 BR, Frame Cape Cod set on a large level, fenced-in lot. Features a gas furnace with central air. Ready to move in. Call George E Lucas Today

WLTJ FM – Pittsburgh, Q92.9 is looking for our next Program Director. Family owned station in a Top 25 market. Applicants must have minimum three years management/programming experience, be able to work well with others, motivate an air staff, schedule music, write liners and promos, understand use of social media and the station web site. If you think you meet these requirements, please send us your resume. qpdjob@q929fm.com or Gregg Frischling 650 Smithfield Street Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, Pa 15222 62

KITCHY JOKES

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 03.06/03.13.2013

ACROSS 1. Broadcasts, as seeds 5. Big initials in conspiracy theories 8. Federico Fellini’s birthplace 14. Rhyme scheme at the beginning of “Can’t Knock the Hustle” 15. Mighty long time 16. Encourages with chicken taunts, say 17. Chef’s note-to-self after dispensing soup with a measuring cup? 19. Left by someone 20. Economic bloc headquartered in Indonesia 21. One-named singer with “Die Young” 23. Shifty 24. Holy lecture 26. Braxton of Billboard 28. Platonic utensil that clashes with the other utensils? 34. Relieve oneself 36. How insistent sentences might be typed 37. It falls in winter 38. “Apocalypto” person 40. Coworkers of RNs 41. ___ voce (quietly) 42. Sizes above meds. 43. With everything, say 45. Lady octopus 46. Dishware emblazoned with the Ten Commandments? 49. “Master and Margarita” locale

50. Portmanteau in pitching 53. Inflationary meas. 56. Disease named after a Congolese river 59. How sun-dried tomatoes might be packed 60. Naked Lady 62. Cookware gorgeously adorned? 64. Major event in golf or tennis 65. Poohpoohing word 66. Move, to a Realtor 67. Where one might hear a mazurka 68. Placeholder in a bracket 69. “Think of it ___ investment”

DOWN 1. Viking stories 2. Really moving the needle, in a way 3. It’s read for flow 4. Hanging in a deli 5. A Clampett 6. Ordinary people 7. Bender one might go on before getting engaged? 8. Cinnamon candy 9. Cold-blooded, scaly vegetarian 10. “2001: A Space Odyssey” studio 11. Businesses that sprang up in the ‘90s 12. Liam’s brother in Oasis 13. “Last Crusade” protagonist, casually

18. Having nothing to breathe 22. Rises to the challenge 25. Three-time allstar reliever Robb 27. “In that event ...” 29. U.S. transit system that spans two states and a district 30. In a crazy way 31. About to fall 32. Uncritical learning style 33. Name that would be super easy to clue if this puzzle were in Korean 34. Hold from the top, as a basketball 35. Big name in golf carts 39. Bible study 101 guy

41. Preserve hermetically, as flavor 43. Break up 44. Sizes above 42-Across 47. Lame, with an accompanying hand gesture 48. Reindeer’s biome 51. John Cale’s instrument 52. 57-Down advocate John 53. PC key near “home” 54. Just meh 55. “The Voice” alternative, briefly 57. Queer initialism 58. Like Steve Jobs, partly 61. One may be hoppy 63. “Puzzle solved” {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


PARTY FAVORS

The delicate art of seeking the Democratic committee endorsement {BY CHRIS POTTER} BEING AN ELECTED official — whether judge, school-board member

or mayor of the city — is all about making tough calls: “Do I raise taxes or cut services?” “How harsh a sentence should I impose?” “Which school should I close?” But when you’re running for office, the hardest question of all may be this: If you don’t get the party endorsement, will you drop out of the race? As someone who’s spent some time at Democratic ward gatherings — feel free to envy my glamorous career path — I hear this question a lot in the months before a spring primary. Candidates face it while visiting with neighborhood chapters of the Democratic committee, seeking the endorsement of party elders. At least in theory, the candidate who gets the nod of party officials has an inside track on winning the primary itself. The “will you drop out” query is asked more often than questions about, say, a candidate’s budgetary priorities, or the proper application of the hearsay rule. But it tends to come up mostly “in the old-school political wards,” says Jim Burn, who chairs the state Democratic Party. In more “progressive” parts of town, it barely arises: Many Democrats regard it as a loyalty oath from some earlier era, a lizard-brain reflex left over from the days when precinct captains sported prehensile tails.

The easy, and oft-used, answer is to say you’re so focused on winning the endorsement that you haven’t even considered the alternative. But the best answers imply that if you have to buck the endorsement, it’s because of a higher obligation. This year, I’ve heard one candidate cite the need for more women in the judiciary. Another explained that his family members were out in the dead of winter, gathering signatures to put him on the ballot — and “they would kill me if I didn’t file the petitions.” Perhaps the best answer is the one given by a mayoral candidate, City Controller Michael Lamb. “A mayor’s race requires you to reach out and build support,” Lamb told the Stanton Heights gathering. And building support “means letting people know you are interested in the long haul.” As it turns out, Lamb needn’t have bothered: With Mayor Luke Ravenstahl’s withdrawal from the race, and City Councilor Bill Peduto’s decision not to seek the endorsement at all, Lamb is the only mayoral candidate who can be endorsed. Still, says Burn, “You should coin that answer and sell it.” The truth is that the party’s endorsement matters less than it used to. This year, several high-profile candidates — including mayoral contender Bill Peduto and City Councilor Natalia Rudiak — aren’t even seeking it. Almost every election cycle,

MISS MANNERS WOULD NEVER HAVE MADE IT AS A COMMITTEEWOMAN. After all, the answer you’re supposed to give is, “Of course I will back out! I am but dust beneath your feet, O Wise Ones!” But only two kinds of candidates actually say this: the very strong, who have no chance of losing the endorsement, or the very weak — who can’t possibly win without it. Take, for example, Mark Tranquilli, the assistant DA who prosecuted cop-killer Richard Poplawski and is one of 15 Democrats running for four judicial spots this year. When Tranquilli told a Stanton Heights committee gathering that he would withdraw without the endorsement, there were cheers. But the response didn’t quite drown out the rival judicial candidate sitting behind me, who hissed, “He can say that because he’s the frontrunner.” For candidates in the middle of the pack, meanwhile, there’s no easy answer. It costs money just to seek the endorsement: A mayoral candidate pays $7,000 to be considered; a judicial candidate $3,500. Pledging to withdraw from the race is the political equivalent of paying a four-digit sum to wear a “kick me” sign. But how, exactly, do you ask for the committee’s support, while reserving the right to blow off its decision? It’s a question of etiquette, and Miss Manners would never have made it as a committeewoman.

some unendorsed candidate prevails. The party elders themselves often blow off their own recommendations, continuing to support unendorsed candidates even though doing so violates party rules. These aren’t the days of Davey Lawrence and the Democratic machine. Which may be why the question always makes me wistful. Whatever other issues may be in play, local elections are contests between Old Pittsburgh and New. Asking a candidate to fall on his sword may not be especially democratic. But traditions — the claims that the past makes on the present, so that history is not forgotten — rarely are. Even if those traditions aren’t worth honoring, exactly, they can still be indulged. “It’s a way for the party to ask, ‘What’s the value of our endorsement to you?’” says City Councilor Patrick Dowd. Dowd has sought the endorsement in every election he’s run in, without success. He tells party leaders he’ll continue without their backing because “I think we as Democrats do best when we have a full, open debate before the voters.” And yet, he stresses, “It would give me great honor to be endorsed by my party next time.” Which sounds like somebody who intends to ask. C POT T ER@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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March 6, 2013