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DEBATE PREP: WILL “PREPPERS” INHERIT THE EARTH? IS THERE A BETTER WAY TO HANDLE CLIMATE CHANGE? 14


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013


EVENTS 1.25 – 8pm OFF THE WALL 2013: TAMMY FAYE STARLITE: CHELSEA MÄDCHEN Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

1.26 – 8pm SOUND SERIES: BONNIE “PRINCE” BILLY, WITH SPECIAL GUEST, TITLE TK Carnegie Lecture Hall (Oakland) Co-presented with Carnegie Museum of Art, in conjunction with the exhibition Cory Arcangel: Masters Tickets $18/$15 Members

1.31 – 8:30pm JOHN WATERS: INTIMATE GALLERY TALK REGARDING WARHOL: SIXTY ARTISTS, FIFTY YEARS Tickets $150 (30 person capacity)

2.1 – 8pm JOHN WATERS: THIS FILTHY WORLD Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland) Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

Shana Moulton and Nick Hallett: Whispering Pines 10

2.22

Friday, February 8, 2013 / Warhol theater / 8pm / co-presented with Carnegie Mellon University, School of Art Whispering Pines 10 is a one-act opera by artist Shana Moulton in collaboration with composer Nick Hallett, and featuring vocalist Daisy Press. Directed by Elyse Singer, it features a live performance by Moulton as her alter ego Cynthia, a hypochondriac agoraphobe prone to colorful hallucinations and absurd fantasies. While Cynthia seeks health and total happiness within her virtual environment—an interactive video set that utilizes real-time multimedia techniques its creators call “live animation”—she usually settles for fad cures and new-age kitsch, creating situations in turn comic, contemplative, and surreal.

(7 performances) $123/$98 Members & students

seating is limited for most performances, so advance purchase is strongly suggested

single tickets

performances may contain adult subject matter and strong language

3.8

For tickets call 412.237.8300 or visit warhol.org.

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3.9 – 8pm

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

Funding for the Off the Wall series was provided by the Quentin and Evelyn T. Cunningham Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation. The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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2.23 – 8pm

OFF THE WALL 2013: SEINENDAN THEATER COMPANY – ROBOT/ANDROID - HUMAN THEATER Co-presented with Japan-America Society of Pennsylvania Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

Whispering Pines 10 was developed through the Harvestworks Artist In Residence Program with additional support from the Experimental Television Center, The Kitchen, New Museum of Contemporary Art, and Rhizome.

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OFF THE WALL 2013: DAVID CALE: HARRY CLARKE Tickets $25/$20 Members & students

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013


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ROCK & BOWL! at the world-famous {EDITORIAL}

01.16/01.23.2013

Editor CHRIS POTTER News Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor ANDY MULKERIN Associate Editor AL HOFF Listings Editor MARGARET WELSH Assistant Listings Editor JESSICA BOGDAN Staff Writers AMYJO BROWN, LAUREN DALEY Staff Photographer HEATHER MULL Intern JEFF IHAZA

VOLUME 23 + ISSUE 03

[MAIN FEATURE]

Guide 2013. 18 Winter Scores of tips for chilling out all winter long.

[NEWS]

06

“They tried this on the South Side, and it was put down by the people.” — Lawrenceville business owner Stephen Sobina on attempts to form a special tax district in the neighborhood

[VIEWS]

14

“I’d like to live in an America where you rely on your neighbors, your garden and your knowledge.” — Mark Dixon of Transition Pittsburgh on the difference between transitioners and preppers

[TASTE]

an elemental approach to 24 “Ittheoffers delightful street food of Thailand in which nothing is over $9.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review Noodlehead

[MUSIC]

29

“Sometimes you have to behave and turn it off. But your choices and your musicality is still gonna come through.” — Drummer David Throckmorton, on knowing when to tone it down a bit

[SCREEN]

undermines the film’s pretend 39 only message about curtailing bad guys.”

“The casual violence by the good guys

— Al Hoff, reviewing Gangster Squad

{COVER ILLUSTRATION BY strawberryluna}

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers MICHAEL ARTMAN, SHEILA LETSON, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

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Marketing Director DEANNA KRYMOWSKI Marketing and Promotions Coordinator LINDSEY GUARD Advertising and Promotions Coordinator ASHLEY WALTER Radio Promotions Director VICKI CAPOCCIONI-WOLFE Radio Promotions Assistants ANDREW BILINSKY, NOAH FLEMING

{ADMINISTRATION} Business Manager BEVERLY GRUNDLER Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Technical Director PAUL CARROLL Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

{PUBLISHER} STEEL CITY MEDIA

[ARTS]

these projects healthy or are they 41 “Are proof of misguided medical rhetoric?” — Nadine Wasserman, reviewing art exhibit Imperfect Health: The Medicalization of Architecture

[LAST PAGE]

grapple with Big Ideas every day 63 “They — freedom and consequence, redemption and truth.” — Creative-writing instructor Sarah Shotland on conducting writing workshops with prisoners

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} NEWS OF THE WEIRD BY CHUCK SHEPHERD 16 EVENTS LISTINGS 44 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 53 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 55 CROSSWORD PUZZLE BY BEN TAUSIG 60 NEWS

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GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2013 by Steel City Media. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Steel City Media. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Steel City Media and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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“IT’S GOTTEN TO A POINT WHERE THERE IS REAL VALUE IN THIS NEIGHBORHOOD.”

INCOMING Letter to the Editor It is sad that City Paper seeks to score cheap points against Gov. Tom Corbett by placing humiliating, demeaning sketches of him on the cover, the latest such entry from the Jan. 9 edition, in which a topless, fat-bellied, face-painted Corbett is portrayed as an all-out Penn State University football fanatic and a fool. I agree with the newspaper’s editorial point that Corbett’s lawsuit against the NCAA is wrongheaded, but the issue is overshadowed, given the vitriol and contempt that you display for the state’s leader. I suppose that the stark switch in leadership of the state from Governor Edward “Spendell” to a bona fide fiscal conservative has ruffled feathers at the newspaper, which now seeks to strike back at Mr. Corbett by attempting to tear him down, even if that must be accomplished by hitting below the belt. I do not know how this constitutes what a reasonable and prudent person would consider to be journalism. Obviously journalism is not the goal. Settling scores is. — Oren M. Spiegler, Upper St. Clair

RE: Unsportsmanlike Conduct: Corbett suit proves just how out-of-bounds sports culture has become (Jan. 9) You give the holier-than-thou NCAA far too much good-guy credit, and by doing so, cede it way too much power. It levies punishments unfairly and acts only in its own interest. It should have remained silent, but it bowed to media outrage and hand-wringing about the nebulous “culture” of college football. It’s about time someone took on that organization. I hope the state wins. — Web comment from “EJM”

“Apparently the only ‘older Pennsylvanian’ Governor Corbett wants the PA Lottery to benefit is Tom Corbett.” — State Rep. Jesse White on the governor’s plan to privatize the state lottery

MAKING A BID

Lawrenceville businesses weighing pros and cons of tax district {BY AMYJO BROWN}

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N 1992, when his family began reno-

vating the iconic former Pennsylvania National Bank building at the corner of Penn Avenue and Butler Street in Lawrenceville, Chip Desmone remembers picking up trash in the parking lot every day. “Very unsavory trash — booze bottles, needles, condoms. It was ugly stuff,” he says. By the early 1990s, buildings that had housed, or catered to, the city’s oncethriving steel industry were boarded up. Lots were overgrown. Cars were often broken into. Desmone remembers the day the owner of the bar across the street was shot. “It was a ghost town in many ways,” he says. That, of course, has changed. Artists and developers drawn to the area’s stock of large, cheap, historic properties have helped to craft a vibrant neighborhood. According to the Lawrenceville Corporation, a community-redevelopment group, more than 230 buildings have been renovated, and since 2010, more than 36 new businesses have opened throughout the community. “It’s really become the most sought-after neighborhood in Pittsburgh right now,” says Joe Kelly, the owner of Kelly Custom Furniture and Cabinetry and another early developer, like Desmone, who remembers when the streets were barren. They hope to keep the momentum going. Both are supporters of an effort to create a Lawrenceville “business improvement district,” a designation that allows the neighborhood to raise money from property owners to enhance services ordinarily

{PHOTO BY RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

Lawrenceville property owner Chip Desmone, whose family renovated the National Bank, says paying a bit more in taxes to improve the neighborhood is a good investment.

provided by local government, such as street cleaning and light-pole maintenance. Urban planners often tout improvement districts as a way to encourage revitalization, and districts can take different forms. Business-improvement districts tax only commercial properties, while neighborhood-improvement districts tax homeowners in the area as well. But the districts have been controversial — in part because property owners are

assumed to favor the proposition unless they speak out against it. Pittsburgh today has only two such districts, in Oakland and Downtown, which tax businesses only. Other attempts at creating districts have failed in places like Mount Washington, the Strip District and, most recently, the South Side. “This is a difficult process,” says Josette Fitzgibbons, the city-wide Main Street coordinator for the Urban Redevelopment CONTINUES ON PG. 08

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MAKING A BID, CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

Authority. “It requires communities to be extremely well organized, to have a level of consensus.” IN LAWRENCEVILLE, the process is well underway. Matthew Galluzo, the Lawrenceville Corporation’s executive director, says his group has spent two years working on the plan. The group envisions charging $10 per foot of commercial property fronting on Butler Street and Penn Avenue. Roughly speaking, the district encompasses Butler Street between 34th and 57th streets, and portions of Penn around Doughboy Square, as well as a stretch of Penn between 40th Street and the Allegheny Cemetery. In all, the tax would affect 350 property owners — all commercial or industrial properties — and raise roughly $174,400. The average property owner owns about 20 feet of frontage and will pay about $200 a year for the services, Galluzo says. “It is as bare-bones in its approach as you can get,” Galluzzo says, adding that the $10 fee is low. He also says that using street frontage offers an advantage compared to Oakland’s and Downtown’s approach of charging all businesses in their districts by assessed value. Since the improvement district focuses on streetlevel improvements, he says, charging on the basis of street footage provides an “even playing field.” In addition to street cleaning and sidewalk maintenance, the money would help pay for removing graffiti and snow, as well as seasonal displays like flower baskets in summer and holiday lights in winter. (Decisions about how to spend the money will be made by an advisory group of taxed property owners.) Supporters say such amenities will draw more business into the neighborhood and increase property values. Brian Mendelssohn, principal of the Botero Development firm, says one advantage of the proposal is that it gives

{IMAGE COURTESY OF LAWRENCEVILLE CORPORATION}

The shaded blocks along Butler Street and Penn Avenue represent properties that would be included if Lawrenceville’s new Business Improvement District is approved.

the neighborhood power to chart its own course. Other neighborhoods, he says, “have a lot of outside money — corporations and big city plans telling them how to develop.” By contrast, the board that decides how tax proceeds will be invested “is made up of ourselves. We get to decide what we do.” Still, not everyone thinks the proposal is fair. For one thing, critics point out, businesses and property owners already pay to have their streets taken care of — in the form of city taxes. “It is simply wrong to ask property owners and business owners, who are already taxed through the roof, to pay more taxes to put up holiday lights and other redundant services,” says Ryan Barton, government-affairs

director for the Realtors Association of Metropolitan Pittsburgh. Among the staunchest opponents are a handful with the most to lose. Barton says his group has been speaking with nine property owners who together hold 2,000 feet of street frontage — roughly 11 percent of the total. Among them is Stephen Sobina, owner of Em-Bed-It, a manufacturer of custom corporate mementos and tombstones on the 5600 block of Butler Street — the upper end of the proposed district. With 143 feet fronting Butler, the tax would cost him about $1,400 a year, and he says he won’t get much in return. “We have no amenities in front of our property — no benches, no garbage cans, no trees planted,” he says. “Holi-

day lights, that’s nice for those down in the commercial district, but up here? It’s not reasonable.” Kelly acknowledges that the increased service levels may not help all the district’s businesses directly, particularly those like Sobina, who don’t rely on walk-in traffic. “But it will improve the value of their property,” he says. “I think this is being forced down property owners’ throats,” counters Sobina. “They tried this on the South Side, and it was put down by the people.” ORGANIZERS SAY they’ve learned lessons

from the failure of the South Side’s proposal, which flamed out in the face of resident opposition before the CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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Where transit goes, investment follows. Along with commuters, Port Authority brings employers and developers looking for a city with viable public transit to Pittsburgh. In fact, half of Downtown's recent development has been connected to a subway station. And it's not just Downtown. The East Busway has brought over $800 million in economic development to the areas around bus stations. Public transit raises property values, helps revitalize neighborhoods, and spurs retail activity. The bottom line: every taxpayer dollar invested in public transit returns as much as $6 in economic returns.

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MAKING A BID, CONTINUED FROM PG. 08

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formal process even started. “It reinforced our decision to not include residential properties,” in the improvement district, says Galluzzo. “We really wanted to make this focused on the business community and the interests of a healthy commercial district.” That may, indeed, give the idea more of a fighting chance. Once proposed, improvement districts fail only if owners of 40 percent or more of the affected properties actively object by registering their disapproval with the city clerk’s office. Otherwise, the owners are assumed to support the proposal. That means such districts can potentially be created by a determined minority with the time and motivation to invest in the process. “A non-answer is a yes. That’s wrong,” says John Bauer, owner of Mobile Radio Service, which has been on Butler Street since 1970. Levying the tax only on those businesses with street frontage is unfair, he says. “I just think they’ve really stacked the deck.” Shouldn’t property owners have to opt in to a tax, rather than opting out? “It’s an interesting and unusual question,” says Pittsburgh City Councilor Patrick Dowd, who represents the area. The rules governing improvement districts were set by the state Legislature in 1990. About 42 such districts have since been created across the state. “I think it’s about forcing participa-

tion,” Dowd says of the process. That level of participation is about to become clear. Some 1,300 letters were sent out last fall to property and business owners within the proposed boundaries; the second of two public hearings was held on Jan. 14. Property owners now have until Feb. 28 to “vote” by sending a letter of objection to the City Clerk. At least 140 property owners will have to speak in opposition for the proposal to be halted. Otherwise, it can go to the city council for a vote. Dowd says he favors the improvement district in concept, but that he will support the results of the votes. “It’s your decision,” he told about two dozen people who attended Jan. 14’s public hearing. At that forum, those speaking in support of the district out numbered opponents by 12-6. Efforts to change that dynamic are underway, with the Realtors Association promising to rally opposition. But for Desmone, whose company owns about 1,000 feet of frontage combined within the proposed district’s boundaries, the $10 per foot charge is worth it, he says. “It’s gotten to a point where there is real value in this neighborhood,” he says. “It’s really incumbent on everyone to make sure that that keeps going, and the best way to ensure that it keeps going is to pull together our resources.” A B ROW N @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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IT’S BACK State voter ID is alive and well for May primaries, at least for now {BY LAUREN DALEY}

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OPPONENTS OF Pennsylvania’s voter-identification law won a battle when a state judge temporarily suspended it on Oct. 2. But with the block extending only to last year’s general election, the war is far from over. As of now, the law — which requires voters to present photo identification at the polls — is active and on the books. And while a full trial to decide the law’s constitutionality will probably be held sometime this summer, that leaves the requirement in effect for the May 21 municipal primaries. But the plaintiffs in a lawsuit challenging the measure say they intend to try to block it again this spring, and to eventually wipe it from the books completely. “We will file a motion to block” the law from taking effect this spring, says Vic Walczak, the legal director for the state American Civil Liberties Union. “We don’t believe this law should be allowed to interfere with any election, because people will be disenfranchised.” Even by conservative estimates, Walczak says, 100,000 Pennsylvanians could

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{PHOTO BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

Volunteers dropping residents off at PennDOT’s Downtown driver’s-license center last fall — part of a campaign to secure photo IDs for voters.

face barriers in obtaining proper identification to vote. After Gov. Tom Corbett signed the law in March, the ACLU, the Advancement Project, the Public Interest Law Center of Philadelphia and the Washington, D.C., law firm of Arnold and Porter sued the state, arguing the law could disenfranchise hundreds of thousands of voters who couldn’t get proper ID. On Oct. 2, Commonwealth Court Judge Robert E. Simpson Jr. granted a temporary injunction, suspending the requirement for the 2012 presidential election. As of press time, attorneys opposing the requirements hadn’t filed for an injunction to halt the law. Walczak says they are waiting to hear a timetable from Simpson on how the case should proceed. The state says it intends to fight to uphold the law. “We think everyone should get an ID, and we think everything in the law will be in effect and is on solid legal ground,” says Ron Ruman, press secretary for the Pennsylvania Department of State. Ruman notes that PennDOT has been offering free voting-only IDs since September. “[R]eally, anyone should be able to get an ID without waiting,” he says. The newer IDs ease some of the law’s original requirements, but barriers remain, Walczak says. For one thing, “You’re still required to get to the [PennDOT facility]” — a challenge for some voters in rural areas, or who have difficulty traveling. Last year, 175 organizations formed the non-partisan PA Voter ID Coalition to educate the public on what they needed at the polls. However, because of the ongoing le-

gal fight, activists were never sure what to tell voters about ID requirements. Now as another election season heats up, they are facing similar challenges. “One of the confusing points last year was that this uncertainty was still hanging out there five weeks before the election,” says Ellen Kaplan, vice president and policy director at the Committee of Seventy, a Philadelphia-based good-government group that created and led the Coalition. “That’s certainly contributing to a lot of confusion now.” What’s more, Kaplan notes, last year’s education efforts capitalized on the draw of a presidential campaign to energize voters and outreach groups alike. Municipal primaries typically lack that kind of star power, which could be a barrier to outreach efforts. “It’s easier to get people to contribute when it’s a presidential election,” she says. “Resources to do [an outreach] campaign will be a lot smaller this time.” In Pittsburgh, voters will decide, among other things, the fields for mayor and city council. In Philadelphia, “the top of the ticket is city controller and district attorney,” Kaplan says. “I’d like to say that people get excited about that but frankly, they don’t.” Local activist Celeste Taylor, who oversaw the Voter ID Coalition’s efforts in Pittsburgh, says the groups are meeting this month to shape their efforts for the primary. “The work around the voter-ID issue gave us energy to work with people who have been woken up,” says Taylor. “People were seeing this as an affront to democracy.”

“WE WILL FILE A MOTION TO BLOCK IT.”

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013


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Two different takes on surviving an uncertain future {BY BILL O’DRISCOLL} IT’S EASY enough to mock preppers. These are the apparently numerous folks who, as depicted on National Geographic Channel’s series Doomsday Preppers, stockpile food and weapons and craft elaborate plans to “bug outâ€? — head for the hills — in case of emergencies like natural disaster, powergrid failure or even complete societal collapse. Preppers can seem like paranoid gun nuts who are actually kind of eager for things to go wrong. By contrast, consider the international Transition Town movement, which encourages communities to plan how they’ll thrive in a world destabilized by climate change and dwindling supplies of oil. Transition, born in England, is about building consensus among neighbors to realize a vision of a relocalized, environmentally sustainable world without fossil fuels; it’s about responding to perceived scarcity by building a society we’d actually prefer to live in. Prepping, meanwhile, largely involves individual households or small groups overcoming disasters — while expecting everyone else to be unprepared, perhaps even hostile. Citing overseas precedents, preppers hark to Argentina’s disastrous 2001 debt crisis. Transitioners hopefully recall how, after the Soviet Union collapsed, Cubans learned how to feed themselves with urban agriculture. As a lifestyle focus, Transitioning versus prepping can seem the difference between living a dream and surviving a nightmare. All that might explain why most preppers are enthusiastically armed, while Transition materials scarcely mention weaponry. Some Transitioners fear that, whether it’s derided or admired, prepping will become society’s default model for coping. If prepping triumphs, “We will rely more on beans, bunkers and bullets,â€? says Mark Dixon. “I’d like to live in an America where you rely on your neighbors, your garden and your knowledge.â€? Nonetheless, local preppers and Transitioners say the distance between them is overstated. Dixon, a ďŹ lmmaker and environmentalist, co-founded Transition Pittsburgh, but notes that both groups emphasize practical skills like gardening, and favor localized problem-solving. Both cite society’s ignorance of its utter dependence on cheap fossil fuels. In Pittsburgh, meetup.com lists 430 Transitioners and 157 preppers. “If you can link those two movements, you can

have a very powerful populist movement,â€? Dixon says. Josh Wander also sees overlaps. Wander, 42, once served in the Israeli military; he now runs the website www.jewish prepper.com and hosts the PCTV show The Prepper Report. He’s a doctoral student at Pitt (in public policy and administration) who lives in Squirrel Hill with his wife, six children, “food for monthsâ€? and guns. Last year, Wander was featured on Doomsday Preppers. “As preppers, we’re not happy with that show,â€? he notes. “It makes us look a little loony and wacko.â€? Meanwhile, Wander’s Prepper Report has explored such Transition-friendly, selfsufďŹ cient activities as urban gardening, beekeeping and backyard chicken-raising. And Wander says that preppers like him, far from loners, are quite civic-minded. “We are creating a community through education of disaster preparedness,â€? says Wander, who last year ran for Pittsburgh City Council. “That’s an essential element of disaster preparedness, getting everybody on board.â€? Yet big differences remain between Transitioners and preppers. Climate change, central to Transition planning, does not concern most preppers, who seem more worried about personal sustainability than the environmental kind. They’re happy to keep burning oil. The biggest divide, however, might be over simply deďŹ ning “community.â€? Transitioners view decision-making as consensusbuilding, and resources as for sharing, as with community solar arrays. For preppers, the best community is one where everybody takes care of himself. “If there is some sort of catastrophic disaster that affects us, if I’m the only one on the block that has the goods, they’re going to be coming to me for it,â€? says Wander. Then there’s the bug-out. If things get really bad, as Wander put it on Doomsday Preppers, “You have to get out of this urban death-trap.â€? And contrasting with consensus-minded Transitioners, preppers hew to op sec — operational security. “We’re a little more secretive because no one wants their stuff stolen,â€? says Dave Roberts, another local prepper. Perhaps preppers (who tend to be conservatives and libertarians) and Transitioners (typically lefties) simply express two distinct views of human nature. Dixon, for one, believes going solo only gets you so far. “What happens when you run out of ammo? The answer is, you better have worked on your Transition Town.â€? D RI S C OL L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013


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NEWS OF THE WEIRD {BY CHUCK SHEPHERD}

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The usual 20,000 or so visitors every year to Belgium’s Verbeke Foundation art park have the option (365 of them, anyway) to spend the night inside the feature attraction: a 20-foot-long, 6-foot-high polyester replica of a human colon created by Dutch designer Joep Van Lieshout. At one end, of course, another body part is replicated (and gives the installation its formal name, the Hotel CasAnus). The facility, though “cramped,” according to one prominent review, features heating, shower and a double bed, and rents for the equivalent of about $150 a night. The 30-acre art park is regarded as one of Europe’s “edgiest” art destinations.

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Giuseppe Tedesco took the witness stand in Newton, N.J., in December and swore that all six shots that hit his girlfriend, Alyssa Ruggieri (one of them fatal), were “self-defense” “accidents.” After she discovered his .25-caliber handgun in sofa cushions, he said he reached for it and in the struggle was shot in the hand, but he still managed to grip the gun tightly, and the pair tumbled down some stairs. During the struggle, “both” hands shot Ruggieri twice. Despite their injuries, they both maintained their vise-like grips on the gun, he said, and “they” shot Ruggieri twice more. The final shot, he said, came with Ruggieri holding the gun pointblank at his face, and when he pushed it away, “they” fired another shot that hit Ruggieri in the temple.

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The issues director of the fundamentalist American Family Association told his radio audience in November that God’s feelings will be hurt if America stops using fossil fuels for energy. “God has buried those treasures there because he loves to see us find them,” said Bryan Fischer, who described Americans’ campaigns against fossil fuels as similar to the time when Fischer, at age 6, told a birthday-present donor that he didn’t like his gift. “And it just crushed that person.”

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Retrials and appeals are sometimes granted if a convicted criminal demonstrates that he received “ineffective assistance of counsel.” Among the reasons that the lawyer for convicted Joliet, Ill., quadruple-murderer Christopher Vaughn offered in his November motion was the ineptness of other lawyers (but not himself). Specifically, he argued, the lawyers for the convicted wife-killing police officer Drew Peterson put on such a disgusting case that they gave all defense lawyers a bad name. (The website LoweringTheBar.net pointed out that Vaughn lawyer George Lenard himself violated a lawyers’ “kitchen sink” standard by overlisting 51 separate reasons why his client deserved a new trial.)

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Mauricio Fierro gained instant fame in December in Sao Paulo, Brazil, as the reported victim of a car theft (captured on surveillance video) when he dashed into a pharmacy. He went to a police station to file a report, but encountered the pharmacy owner making his own report — that Fierro was actually robbing him at the moment the car was taken. More surveillance video revealed that while Fierro was standing outside the pharmacy, wondering where his car was, a man ran by

and stole the stolen cash. Fierro then immoderately complained to the police even more about Sao Paulo’s crime rate and lack of security. Afterward, Fierro admitted to a local news website that in fact he had stolen the very car that he was reporting stolen.

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Former undercover cop Mark Kennedy filed for damages in October against the London Metropolitan police, claiming post-traumatic stress syndrome based on the department’s “negligence” in allowing him to have such a robust sex life on the job that he fell in love with a woman whose organization he had infiltrated. Kennedy’s wife has filed for divorce and is also suing the department, and 10 other women (including three of Kennedy’s former lovers) have also filed claims.

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Sarah Childs won a restraining order in Denham Springs, La., in December, forbidding the town from shutting down her “Christmas” lights decoration. The large outdoor display (in a neighborhood with traditional Christmas displays) was the image of two hands with middle fingers extended.

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In a 3-2 decision, the Board of Adjustment in the Seattle suburb of Clyde Hill ruled that a homeowner must chop down two large, elegant trees on his property because they obstruct a neighbor’s scenic view of Seattle’s skyline. The board’s majority reasoned that the complaining neighbor (who happens to be former baseball all-star John Olerud) would otherwise suffer a $255,000 devaluation of his $4 million estate. (Olerud was ordered to pay for the tree removal and to plant the neighbor two smaller trees in place of the majestic ones).

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People With Issues: (1) New York’s highest court ruled in November that subway “grinders” (men who masturbate by rubbing up against women on trains) cannot be charged with felonies as long as they don’t use force to restrain their victims (but only commit misdemeanors that usually result in no jail time). (2) Police in Phuket, Thailand, announced that their all-points search for a public masturbator who harassed a restaurant’s staff had produced no suspects — although a spokesman said they did find “a few people [nearby] who were masturbating in their vehicles, but none of them were the man we are looking for.”

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The week before Christmas, a Nottingham, England, officer wrote parking tickets to drivers of two ambulances that were taking too long to board wheelchair-using schoolchildren who had just sung carols for an hour downtown to raise money for the homeless shelter Emmanuel House. (Following an outpouring of complaints, the Nottingham City Council revoked the tickets.)

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Ironies: (1) A 20-year-old man’s life ended when he was shot to death in an altercation in San Bernardino, Calif., on Friday, Dec. 21, while attending a Mayan-inspired “End of the World” party. (2) The next night, in Fort Worth, Texas, a 47-year-old drummer collapsed of a seizure and died onstage. He had played with several bands, including Rigor Mortis.

S E N D YO U R W E IRD N E W S TO WE IR DNE WS@E A RT HL I N K . N E T O R WWW. NE WS O F T HE WE I R D. C OM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013


RED CARPET C H A R I T Y PREVIEW GALA THURSDAY FEBRUARY 14 6PM–11PM

PITTSBURGH INTERNATIONAL AUTO SHOW

DAVID LAWRENCE CONVENTION CENTER Join Mario and Nathalie Lemieux for an evening of dining and dancing at the RED CARPET CHARITY PREVIEW GALA! Benefitting The Mario Lemieux Foundation For tickets go to www.TheRedCARpetGala.org

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FEBRUARY 15–18 DAVID LAWRENCE CONVENTION CENTER Friday & Saturday 10am – 10pm Sunday & Monday 10am – 6pm

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The Piano Hawk

PIANO TUNING & REPAIR Emily Hawkins 412-407-4266 NEWS

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A selection of local happenings that should provide entertainment, edification and exercise this season {BY CP STAFF}

Illustration by strawberryluna

Despite recent alarming reports that 2012 was the warmest year in our nation’s history, it’s still winter out there, folks! On the following pages, we’ve compiled a selection of local happenings through March that should provide entertainment, edification and exercise. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013


12 13

PETER YARROW OPENING: MUSTARD’S RETREAT

SATURDAY, JANUARY 19 7:30 PM / CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL, OAKLAND $40 ADVANCE / $44 AT DOOR / $20 STUDENT (w/ID) 412-361-1915 / www.calliopehouse.org

{PHOTO COURTESY OF VENTURE OUTDOORS}

L A N DE S BE RG DE S IGN

Snowshoeing with Venture Outdoors

OUTDOOR Make 2013 the year you hit the annual Ligonier Ice Festival and watch artisans turn giant blocks of ice into sculpture. It’s a sure-fire way to feel better about the frozen water we have to deal with this time of year. Jan. 26 and 27. Diamond area, Ligonier. www.ligonier.com

Cold weather doesn’t mean you have to stay inside, and the folks at Venture Outdoors have dozens of activities lined up to prove it. From all-season hikes (some with food and booze included) and strolls to more timely pursuits like snowshoeing and winter bird-watching, there’s bound to be a good reason for you to get outside. See www.ventureoutdoors.org for complete list and for reservations.

(www.ppgplace.com); and both North Park and South Park have skating facilities open through mid-March (www.alleghenycounty. us). In the city, Schenley Park Rink offers family nights, discounts with college ID, and a couples-only skate on Valentine’s Day (www.citiparks.net).

KIDS If a dog ate a bowl of alphabet soup, could it talk? And what would it say? Find out in Martha Speaks, a new family musical adapted from Susan Meddaugh’s books and the PBS TV series. The hour-long play is presented by Pittsburgh International Children’s Theater. Feb. 10-17. Byham Theater, Downtown, and several area schools. 412-456-6666 or www.pgharts.org

Two of Pittsburgh’s favorite youngsters are turning 1 — and you’re invited to the party. Stop by the National Aviary to celebrate Happy

Ice skating is fun — and good exercise. Downtown’s Rink at PPG Place is open until March 10

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WINTER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 19

First Birthday Penguins, ns, with celebrants Tribby and Kaden. Games, penguins on parade, “Happy Birthday” singing, ging, and cake and ice cream. Feb. eb. 23 and 24. North Side. 412-32312-3237235 or www.aviary.org rg

Those Disney characters ers are never more lovable than han when they’re skittering ng around on skates. Catch tch the latest show, Disney ey on Ice: Treasure Trove, and nd watch your faves from m Lion King, Peter Pan, Snow White and more lace up at the Consol Energy Center. nter. Feb. 27-March 3. www. w. consolenergycenter.com om

Pennsylvania, San Francisco visits Pennsylv Angeles. Jan. 25and Los A 16. South Side. 412-431March 16 1810 or www.silvereye.org

Hey kids, look who’s back: the Easter Bunny! And before the big day, he’s making time to hold some scheduled brunches and lunches at the Pittsburgh Zoo. Be sure to ask about his diet — he gives that candy away because he knows it’s better to eat carrots. March 23, 24 and 30. Highland Park. 412-365-2532 or www.pittsburghzoo.org

Art by Ross Mantle, at Silver Eye Center {IMAGE COURTESY OF THE ARTIST}

ART AND EXHIBITS If you need that festival feel in mid-winter, revisit the approximate scene of First Night for the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s next quarterly Gallery Crawl. A couple dozen galleries and performance spaces will be open, with art shows, music, food and more. Jan. 25. Downtown. 412-456-6666 or www.pgharts.org

Silver Eye Center rolls out Fellowship 13, the latest iteration of its annual international photography competition. This year’s honorees are Diane Meyer — whose portfolio Time Spent That Might Otherwise Be Forgotten employs cross-stitched embroidery — and Pittsburgh’s own Ross Mantle, whose series California, Pennsylvania

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better to keep warm How bette than with fflame-worked glass? That’s the e medium chosen by Korean-born artist Eunsuh Korea n Choi for her new C exhibit at Pittsburgh e Glass Center. G Consciousness opens C during Penn Avenue’s d Feb. Fe b 1 Unblurred event. Friendship. 412-365Frie e 2145 5 or www.pittsburgh glasscenter.org gla glassc c

Happy First Birthday Penguins at the National Aviary

On Feb. 1, Pittsburgh Center for the Artss sseeks sensory overload opening 10 new visual-art by openin shows. Among them: David Bernabo and Emily Walley’s This May Not Take Long; Jeremy Boyle and Mark Franchino’s Untitled; and work by Bill McAllister, Lenore D. Thomas and Lizzy De Vita. Shadyside. 412-361-0873 or www.pittsburgharts.org

Seeing Earth in its entirety from Apollo 8. Black Power at the Olympics. Nixon defeats Humphrey. The assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Kennedy. The national launch of Mr. Roger’s Neighborhood. All these landmark events and more happened in 1968, and are contextualized in a new traveling exhibit 1968: The Year That Rocked America at the Heinz History Center. Starts Feb. 2. Strip District. 412-454-6000 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org

The Carnegie Museum eum of Art’s Heinz Architecturall Center has spent 20 years explaining laining why architecture matters, rs, and now it’s taking a look back.. The anniversary exhibit 20/20: Celebrating brating Two Decades of the Heinz inz Architectural Center, includes 20 0 objects from the collection selected by current or past curatorial staff. Includes cludes Cake-itecture, an opening-night contest for architectural cakes. Starts Feb. 9. Oakland. 412-622-3212 or www.cmoa.org

These days, we too o often think of Iraq, q, Iran and Afghanistan stan as places of strife, but the region hass a rich cultural history. ry. The new exhibit, A Kind of Alchemy: Medieval Persian Ceramics, offers beautifully crafted d bowls, bottles and d other vessels, in a variety y of

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013

“Triatica Go Within,” by Aaronel deRoy Gruber, at Westmoreland Museum of American Art

aesthetic styles that marks ancient Persia’s fortuitous location between Asia and Europe. Opens Feb. 23. Frick Art & Historical Center, Point Breeze. 412-371-0600 or www.thefrickpittsburgh.org

actual encounters between Nico and journalists. Starlite sings, too: “Femme Fatale,” Bowie’s “Heroes” and more. Jan. 25. North Side. 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org

Gallerie Chiz warms up March with a new show featuring two veteran local artists. Mary Culbertson Stark shows new paintings, while Marjorie Shipe offers new sculptural work; the show opens with a March 1 reception. Through March 30. Shadyside. 412-441-6005 or www.galleriechiz.com

If 21st-century capitalism seems uniquely problematic, meet John Gabriel Borkman. Towering dramatist Henrik Ibsen’s penultimate play depicts a disgraced 19thcentury businessman along with his wife and his former mistress (who are sisters). Quantum Theatre stages the rarely produced work, directed by Martin Giles. Jan. 31Feb. 24. Hart Building, East Liberty. 888718-4253 or www.quantumtheatre.com

The sculptural work of mult multimedia Pittsburgh artist Aaronel de deRoy Gruber, 2011, is the focus who died in 2011 deRoy Gruber: of Aaronel deRo Motion, a new exhibit Art(ist) in Motio Westmoreland opening at the W American Art. In Museum of Ameri sculptures, some of creating her sculptu motorized, Gruber used which were motorize welded steel, formed materials such as welde Plexiglass. Opens aluminum and Plexigla 724-837-1500 or March 9. Greensburg. 7 www.wmuseumaa.org

A Kind of Alchemy: Medieval Persian Ceramics at Frick Art & Historical Center Pictured: 13th-century fritware bottle, Central Iran

STAGE STA She’s alre already done Tammy Faye Bakker and Ta Tammy Wynette. Now performance artist Tammy Faye Starlite Starlit tackles Warhol superstar supers and Velvet Underground Under chanteuse Nico. Onechante woman show Chelsea Mädchen, Mädche en part of The Warhol Museum’s Off Andy Warh a series, the Wall series ies, is based on

Tammy Faye Starlite at The Andy Warhol Museum

In 1001 Arabian Nights, Scheherazade told stories to keep alive. With Soap Opera, Attack Theatre has only to keep your attention — and odds are good the veteran dance troupe will manage that with this “passionate mash-up of dance and opera” inspired by Scheherazade. Feb. 1-10. Strip District. 412-281-3305 or www.attacktheatre.com


Kyle Abraham/ Abraham.In.Motion at Byham Theater {PHOTO COURTESY OF IAN DOUGLAS}

Yes, they can-can. The Royal Winnipeg Ballet’s new Moulin Rouge — a story of “love, ambition and heartbreak” with French music and high kicks — broke records at home and is packing houses on the road. Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre tackles the challenge at the Benedum Center. Feb. 14-17. Downtown. 412-456-6666 or www.pbt.org

remains among the world’s most popular operas. A new Pittsburgh Opera staging of Madama Butterfly stars Italian soprano Maria Luigia Borsi and American tenor Bryan Hymel. March 16-24. Benedum, Downtown. 412-281-0912 or www.pittsburghopera.org

American Idiot at Heinz Hall

{PHOTO COURTESY OF TURNER ROUSE JR.}

One of Pittsburgh’s own takes a coveted stage. The Pittsburgh Dance Council, which hosts the world’s top troupes, presents the premiere of Kyle Abraham/ Abraham.In.Motion’s Pavement. Local native Abraham, whose electric movement and riveting choreography have made him a rising star nationally, says this work explores “the state of Black America.” Feb. 16. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666 or www.pgharts.org

Who’d have thought of turning Green Day’s pop-punk album American Idiot into a Broadway musical? But the 2009 show was a critical and commercial hit. PNC Broadway Across America brings Billie Joe Armstrong’s power-chord vision of post-9/11 teen dreams to Heinz Hall. Feb. 19-24. Downtown. 412-456-6666 or www.pgharts.org

MUSIC M U

Born in 1887 in Georgia, orgia, to former slaves, vocalist Roland Hayes yes went on to conquer the world’s classical stages. ges. Hayes is brought to life in Breath and Imagination, gination, a world premiere at City Theatre. The e show is written by and stars Daniel Beaty, whose one-man show Through the Night was a hit for City last season. March 931. South Side. 412-431-2489 or www.city theatrecompany.org g

No matter who’s telling elling her story, things never go too o well for poor old ol od Madame Butterfly. Still, Puccini’s take take

It’s a winte winter companion Lawrenceville’s for Lawren summertime Rock All Night summertim Tour: The SnowBall at features local bands Cattivo fea genres, but it all of many ge happens under one roof. See O OutsideInside, The Th Harlan Twins, Carney Stomp C and many more. Sat., Jan. 19. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157

For Cincinnati’s Heartless Bastards, the B comparisons to com

Daniel Beaty at City Theatre {PHOTO COURTESY OF NATHAN YUNGERBERG}

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WINTER GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

Last time good-time rapper Hoodie Allen came through town, he sold out Altar Bar; this time, he does two nights there. The onetime Google employee might rarely be accused of being hard, but his stuff’s undeniably catchy. March 5-6. Altar Bar, Strip District. 412-206-9719

Dark Star Orchestra at Carnegie Music Hall of Homestead

Ohio neighbors The Black Keys come hard and heavy, but this band has a bit more country twang to complement its blues-rock intensity. Wed., Jan. 23. Mr. Small’s Theatre, Millvale. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

In the late ’90s and early ’00s, Hot Water Music was synonymous with the Gainesville scene that sprung up around No Idea Records. Last year, Chuck Ragan and Co. released their first new LP since 2004. Tonight they play with La Dispute and The Menzingers. Jan. 30. Altar Bar, Strip District. 412-206-9719 or www.thealtarbar.com

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January 18-20, 2013 at the Pittsburgh Mills Just got engaged? Let us help you find your dress, table decor, ideas, and vendors all in one location. All wedding items, including brand new & gently-worn, high-end designer dresses anywhere from 30% to 90% off. FRI. JAN 18 - 5 pm to 9 pm $10/bride + guest, $10/add. guest SAT. JAN 19 - 10 am to 7 pm - free admission SUN. JAN 20 - 12 pm to 5 pm free admission & red-tagged items 50% off

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Hoodie Allen at Altar Bar

Caspian has been hitting the epic postrock beat since the mid-’00s, when epic post-rock was the next big thing. The band’s latest, Waking Season, is a weird, beautiful ride that mixes in electronics. March 22. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-431-4668 or www.smiling-moose.com

LITERARY Winter is a great time to catch up on reading, but why not get out and talk about it? The Carnegie Library offers loads of book discussion groups, for mulling over everything from graphic novels and poetry to mysteries and short stories. See the website for schedules and locations. Ongoing. www.clpgh.org

The Weber Brothers are the kind of band that we’re lucky to still be able to see in a small room locally. The roots-y Canadian group doubles as Ronnie Hawkins’ backing band, but brings its own tunes tonight. Feb. 1. Howlers, Bloomfield. 412682-0320 or www.howlerscoyotecafe.com

Why are we here? Nationally known Pittsburgh-based science author Chip Walter returns with a new book posing an evolutionary answer to why Homo sapiens survived when species like Neanderthals didn’t. Walters visits the Waterfront Barnes & Noble to launch Last Ape Standing, his follow-up to Thumbs, Toes and Tears. Jan. 31. West Homestead. 412-462-5743

It’s been months in the making, but finally, we get to hear the first full-length from local slowcore types Arlo Aldo. Bandleader David Manchester relocated here from Baltimore a couple years ago, converting his old outfit Kadman. Feb. 2. Brillobox, Bloomfield. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

The Pittsburgh Contemporary Writers Series hosts a free reading by nonfiction writer Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts, whose latest was 2011’s critically noted Harlem Is Nowhere: A Journey to the Mecca of Black America. Rhodes-Pitts will be honored as this year’s William Block Senior

There are few figures in punk history quite like H.R.; the Bad Brains frontman mixed hardcore punk with rasta practices in the early years of punk, and has since mixed his Bad Brains work with a considerable solo career. Feb. 10. Thunderbird Café, Lawrenceville. 412682-0177 or www.thunderbirdcafe.net

Think of it as part Deadhead dream, part theater: Since 1997, Dark Star Orchestra has

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013

Few local albums released this season will be as extreme as the two unleashed tonight: Grisly Amputation and Lycosa throw a bash to celebrate their respective brands of death metal and grindcore. Feb. 16. Dead Horse Cantina and Music Hall, McKees Rocks. 412-973-3295

Literate indie types everywhere were elated last year to hear about Bad Books, the new group that comprises Kevin Devine and Manchester Orchestra’s Andy Hull. The supergroup makes a stop in Pittsburgh on its first major tour. Feb. 17. Mr. Small’s Theatre, Millvale. 412821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com

Book discussio n groups at the Carnegie Library

This

performed as the premier Grateful Dead tribute act, most often recreating entire classic Dead sets song for song. Maybe it’ll be a nice early gift for your psychedelic Valentine! Feb. 12. Carnegie Music Hall of Homestead, Munhall. 412-368-5225 or www.carnegieconcerts.com

Leave it to They Might Be Giants to write a song about Mr. Small’s Theatre. For kicks, check out the video (featuring John Hodgman) on YouTube, then see the band at Small’s itself tonight. March 20. Mr. Small’s Theatre, Millvale. 412-821-4447 or www.mrsmalls.com


Research Study of

Borderline Personality Disorder The University of Pittsburgh and UPMC are seeking men and women ages 18 to 45 to take part in a research study of borderline personality disorder. To participate, you must have symptoms of the disorder, which may include: troubled personal relationships, chronic feelings of emptiness or boredom, KPMÄJ\S[`JVU[YVSSPUNHUNLYVYMY\Z[YH[PVUTVVKZ^PUNZZLSMKLZ[Y\J[P]LVY PTW\SZP]LILOH]PVYZVYOPZ[VY`VMZLSMPUÅPJ[LKWHPUVYPUQ\Y`

Heartless Bastards at Mr. Small’s Theatre

Participants are interviewed about their moods, behaviors, and personality [YHP[ZHUK^PSSILJVTWLUZH[LK\W[V \WVUJVTWSL[PVUVM[OLPU[LY]PL^Z

{PHOTO COURTESY OF NATHAN PRESLEY}

:VTLWHY[PJPWHU[ZTH`HSZV\UKLYNVHUM490ZJHU;OLYLPZUVJVZ[MVY[OPZ WYVJLK\YL7HY[PJPWHU[ZHYLJVTWLUZH[LK \WVUJVTWSL[PVUVM[OLM490 Writer. Feb. 26. Oakland. 412-624-6508 or www.pghwriterseries.wordpress.com

Feb. 15-18. David L. Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. www.pittautoshow.com

While it’s not quite spring, maybe it’s time for Paris. Monday Night Lectures hosts Paula McLain, the poet and author of The Paris Wife, a novel set in the Jazz Age about Hemingway’s first spouse. March 18. Oakland. 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

It’s nine acres of stuff for your home, from toilets and light bulbs to lawn furniture and solar panels — and it’s conveniently located under one very big roof. The David L. Lawrence Convention Center is your one-stop for indoor-outdoor products and ideas, at the Pittsburgh Home and Garden Show. March 110. Downtown. www.pghhome.com

For more information, call 412-246-5367.

5171 517 171 BUTLER 171 BUTL BUTL UTLER U UT TL LER ER STR S STREET TREET T EET EE

Since 1985, the Guerrilla Girls have used The Carnegie Mellon International Film Festival posters, zines, films, street actions and a book is a great way to check out some foreign films, (Confessions of the Guerrilla Girls) to further their fight against sexism in the art world. The as well as hear from visiting directors, attend post-screening anonymous, masked discussions and even group will hit the nibble on ethnic treats. Carnegie Lecture This year’s fest, Faces Hall for the provocaof Media, will offer tively titled talk-slashfilms that reflect the performance “What impact of rapidly Are Museums For?” changing media and which recounts the its related technology artists’ methods. on individuals and March 20. Oakland. The Weber Brothers at Howlers cultures. March 21 412-622-3288 or through April 13. www.cmoa.org Various locations. www.cmu.edu/faces

OTHER

These monster trucks have better names than rappers — Grave Digger, Monster Mutt, Eradicator, Backdraft, Razin’ Kane, Ice Cream Man and Zombie — and they’ll be earning their monikers at Monster Jam. With huge tires, crazy horsepower, flames and squashed cars, it’s a “Date With Destruction,” for sure. Feb. 15-17. Consol Energy Center, Uptown. www.consolenergycenter.com

It’s an exciting time for car-shoppers, as more manufacturers focus on leaner, greener machines that still have plenty of fun features (heated seats, computer inputs) that would have been unthinkable a couple of decades ago. See what’s new at this year’s Pittsburgh International Auto Show.

The seventh annual Farm to Table conference offers your chance to: meet local farmers and purveyors; sample food items; attend lectures and workshops; and network with other folks interested in local and sustainable food economies. March 22 and 23. David L. Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. www.farmtotablepa.com

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Constipation? Abdominal Bloating?

You may qualify for this clinical research study if you experience any of the following symptoms:

• To learn more call: Clinical Trials Research Services, LLC

412-363-1900 www.ctrsllc.com

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Researchers are evaluating the safety and effectiveness of an investigational drug for constipation with abdominal bloating.

• Plan now for savings at the Summer Solstice. On June 21, the Carnegie Science Center lets you set your own admission fee — as low as you like — provided you also “pay” with a preserved snowball. (Saved snowballs will be reunited with the river using a launching tool.) So, hope for more snow, and make a couple of snowballs to store in the freezer. www.carnegiesciencecenter.org

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Fewer than 3 bowel movements per week Lumpy or hard stool, straining, or a sensation of incomplete evacuation during bowel movements Abdominal bloating due to chronic constipation

If you qualify, study-related care will be provided at no cost. Insurance is not needed. Participation includes up to 7 visits to the study center.

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NOODLEHEAD OFFERS AN ELEMENTAL APPROACH TO THE DELIGHTFUL STREET FOOD OF THAILAND

NEW DOG {BY ANDY MULKERIN} Sight-seers in Lawrenceville may have noticed that a new — well, sort of — Butler Street hot-dog spot quietly opened during the first week of January. But although the location is new, the name and reputation aren’t. Franktuary has been a Downtown lunch fixture for the better part of a decade. But the little hot-dog shop in the back of Trinity Cathedral has its limitations, explains co-owner Tim Tobitsch. The location prevents the shop from being open evenings and weekends; the shop can’t have a fryer without doing major renovations; and serving beer in a church, while not strictly illegal, seems tacky at best. So Tobitsch and co-owner Megan Lindsey decided to expand, keeping their Downtown location (and their well-received hot-dog truck) while opening a bigger location on Butler. “The Downtown store seats 30, and is open about 25 hours a week,” says Tobitsch. “In Lawrenceville, we seat 90, and when we get to the hours we plan to be open, we’ll be open about 100 hours.” That’s potentially a twelve-fold expansion. Much of the menu is the same, with additions like fries — and poutine, as made popular by the Franktuary truck — plus a full bar, replete with specialty cocktails. The cocktail list was developed by Lindsey, consultant Marie Perriello and bartender Roger Harvey. Franktuary hopes to be open for Sunday brunch next month, but for now, Sundays are a day of rest for the new staff. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

3810 Butler St., Lawrenceville. Open Mon.-Wed. 11 a.m.-midnight; Thu.-Sat. 11 a.m.-2 a.m.

the

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Mark rk you your calendar for Feb. 1. That’s the day that tickets for the 9th annual

South Side Soup Contest go on sale. (Tickets will be sold through www.showclix.com.) This event sells out every year, so get your spoon in early. The contest, in which South Side chefs make and serve a variety of soups, is Sat., Feb. 16. Keep up at www.facebook.com/ SouthSideSoupContest.

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PERFECTLY TINY THAI

{PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL}

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

N

EARLY A decade ago, the opening of Typhoon on Shadyside’s South Highland restaurant row seemed to signal a sea change in local Asian dining. It elevated Thai food from “ethnic” category to stylish cuisine, served with refinement in an artistic, upscale setting. In Typhoon’s wake, other restaurants now provide a similarly splurge-worthy experience of Thai dining, while a new, far more humble but still delectable, trend has taken hold in the once-elegant space Typhoon occupied: noodles. To say that Noodlehead isn’t elegant is not to suggest that it isn’t fashionable. But the recycled wood-plank walls, oldfashioned filament light bulbs, picnicstyle utensil caddies and eclectic seating (from industrial stools to plastic-fantastic mod chairs) evoke a feeling more than a specific place or culinary tradition: simplicity, authenticity, rusticity, noodles. Such rough-hewn chic does not necessarily come cheap, but by taking cash only, not accepting reservations, being BYOB and not even having a phone,

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013

Sukothai soup

Noodlehead is able to offer an elemental approach to the delightful street food of Thailand in which nothing is over $9. Noodlehead’s tightly curated menu is another part of this equation. It has four short sections: a pair of noodle soups at $6 apiece; five no-substitution noodle dishes for $9; three more with your choice of shrimp, chicken or tofu, also for

NOODLEHEAD 242 S. Highland Ave., Shadyside. No phone. www.noodleheadpgh.com HOURS: Daily noon-10 P.M. PRICES: $6-9 (cash only) LIQUOR: BYOB

CP APPROVED $9; and five finger-food “snacks,” each at about $6. You can try the entire menu for $104 — and, with the help of some holiday guests, we nearly did. As their title suggests, the snacks are small plates, and good for sharing. Thai fried chicken came as a mound of moist, sliced cutlet, coated in a light, ultra-crisp

crust that was delightful on its own and better with a generous dollop of sweet garlic-chili sauce. Pork belly steamed buns were actually less labor-intensive rounds of fluffy dough folded over several chunks of succulent pork belly in a smoky-sweet, barbecue-esque sauce, while paper-thin slices of house-pickled Asian cucumber added brine and tang. An order of pig wings inevitably led to jokes about when pigs will fly. But these morsels of pork shank were worth the groaners. Butchered to resemble drumsticks, they were spicy and intensely flavored; unlike chicken wings, pork has more than enough robust flavor of its own even beneath minced herbs, spices and chilies. Perhaps disadvantaged by following the pig wings, garlic nam pla chicken wings were plump and crisp, but not especially flavorful. After all these delights, it was noodle time. The 10 noodle preparations on offer included fully six different types of noodles, a testament to Noodlehead’s commitment to its craft. Thin rice noodles


were tender in both Sukothai and Love Boat soups; the former punched up the flavor quotient with sliced pork loin, slivered green beans, peanuts and hardboiled egg in a spicy lime broth, while the latter relied on the rich savor of simmered beef and pork cracklings. Linguini-like semolina noodles, the most similar to Western pasta, were tightly coiled with a green curry sauce which clung to them and to succulent bits of chopped arctic clam. Chiang mai curry was a creamy, warm, coconut-milk broth served over egg noodles with chicken, pickled mustard greens, shallots and a nest-like lattice of crispy matchstick noodles on top.

On the RoCKs

{BY HAL B. KLEIN}

AMERICAN SPIRIT Pittsburgh bars offer expanding bourbon choices

Classic pad Thai achieved that elusive, yet essential, perfect balance of salty fish sauce, sweet tamarind paste and tangy lime juice, with crushed peanuts adding earthy crunch to a bed of rice noodles entwined with just-sautéed bean sprouts. The pad Thai was one of the few dishes that wasn’t at least a little bit spicy to start; to most, diners can increase the heat using a 1-5 scale on which 1 is “a li’l spicier,” 4 is “Thai hot” and 5 is “crazy hot.” No one in our party was brave enough to go that far, but we found levels 2 and 3 to be comfortably within the “not so hot you can’t taste it” range; next visit, that’s probably where we’ll dwell. Noodlehead succeeds deliciously in extending Pittsburgh’s range of Thai options both downward in price and outward in quality. Its exploration of the versatile noodle is refreshingly focused, excitingly varied and wonderfully affordable.

There’s no mistaking America’s most popular native spirit: Bourbon is caramel, vanilla and spice. And, thanks to a few Pittsburgh bartenders, finding the bourbon that suits your taste has never been easier. According to an Act of Congress — really — “straight bourbon” must be produced in the United States, start with a base of at least 51 percent corn, and be aged for at least two years in charred, new oak barrels. Nearly all bourbon is produced in Bourbon County, Ky., but it need not originate in Bourbon to be bourbon: Jack Daniels, technically a Tennessee whiskey, is for all practical purposes the same spirit. Bourbon gets its rich, vanilla flavor from the barrels. “It’s unbelievable how important the wood is to the process,” says 1947 Tavern bartender Wes Shonk, who attended an invitation-only whiskey camp — yes, bartenders go to whiskey camp — in Kentucky last summer. Shonk adds that where the barrel is placed in a distiller’s warehouse matters more than everything else; barrels located in the best spots will often be bottled as “single barrel” and fetch a single barre premium price. prem There are essentially three thre flavor profiles to bourbon. Most b bourbons fall into the bou category of traditional cat and sweet high-corn, but you can also find high-rye (spicy and assertive — Basil Hayden is a popular example) and wheaters like Maker’s Mark, which are soft with w caramel and vanilla flavors. Shonk says that he enjoys guiding patrons through his Shadyside restaurant’s selection of more than 50 bourbons. What’s more, he says, “We have a huge East End liquor store around the corner. So if you like what you drink, you can go get a bottle for home. Make us the testing ground.” 1947 even offers 1-ounce pours for curious consumers. Acacia bartender Brian Gastaldi adds that bourbon is democratic in spirit — just like America itself. “There’s no wrong way to enjoy a bourbon,” Gastaldi says. And because his bar has more than 100 selections, it won’t be hard to find a right way.

INFO@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

{PHOTO BY TERRY CLARK}

Counter seating at Noodlehead

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THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

BAR & RISTORANTE

Experience the Flavors of France!

Lets Do Brunch with a

Waffle Bar and

WINTER MENU New Wines and Beers

$5 Bloody Marys

WWW.BRIDGETEN.COM

OPEN FOR HOCKEY NIGHTS IN PITTSBURGH WITH LABATT’S BLUE! 20 South 10th St.

Southside

412.586.5033

4428 LIBERTY AVE BLOOMFIELD 412-683-1448 delsrest.com Little

ANGKO STR TRIIP HE S TH P N T IIN

AUTHENTIC THAI CUISINE

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

BELLA FR FRUTTETO. R 2602 Brandt Sch h School Road, Wexford. 724-940-7 77 724-940-7777. Adjacent orchards are one off the attractions at this comfortab b clubby suburban comfortable, restaurant restaur t The Italian-inspired restaurant. menu features ffeatt the fruits of these o orch ha orchards in several applebased d dish h including apple dishes, ravioli and d apple bruschetta. Bella Fr rutttte combines an Frutteto innovat tive e but unfussy menu innovative with friendly friend d service and congen nial sseating. KE congenial BIGHA AM T BIGHAM TAVERN. 321 Bigham Bi h St. St., Mount Washington. 412-431-93 412-431-9313. This Mount Washingto Washington spot has all the pleasures of a local pub in a neighborhood best known for dress-up venues. It offers pub grub with a palate, such as burgers topped with capicola and green peppers. There is also a dizzying array of wings, including a red curry-peanut, linking a classic American bar snack to the flavors of Asian street food. JE CAFÉ NOTTE. 8070 Ohio River Blvd., Emsworth. 412761-2233. Tapas from arou around the globe are on the menu at this charmingly converted old gas station. The small-plat small-plate preparations are sophistica sophisticated, and the pr presentations are uniformly lovely. Flavors ra range from Asian-style Asian n-style crispy duc duck wings and scallops-three-w scallops-three-ways to roasted pe eppers stuffed peppers with ricott a. KE ricotta.

DINE IN / TAKE OUT

BYOB B YO OB ALL LUNCHES $

THE FRESHEST LOCAL PRODUCE FROM THE STRIP Mon 11:30-3:00

Tue-Thu Fri-Sun 11:00-9:00

1906 Penn Ave. Strip District 412-586-4107

LITTLEBANGKOK INTHESTRIP.COM 26

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013

CUCINA BELLA. 1200 Pennsylvania Ave., Bridgeville. 412-257-5150. This casual eatery offers an unassuming menu of pizzas and pasta that are prepared with a commitment to fresh ingredients and an open-minded, thoughtful approach to flavor profiles. For instance, pizzas range from traditional tomato and cheese to arugula and prosciutto to the adventurous rosemary and pistachios, ricotta, sausage, and green olives. KF

revamped Io’s (formerly Iovino’s) new simplified menu seems a near-perfect distillation of tasty, trendy and traditional. Some dishes are sophisticated classics, like pan-seared flounder with fresh tomato and asparagus. Others are everpopular workhorses like the BLT and fish tacos, or reinventions such as a Thai empanada or Pittsburgh’s own “city chicken”(skewered pork). KE MAD MEX. Multiple locations. www.madmex.com. This local chain’s several lively, funkily decorated restaurants boast an inventive selection of CalMex cuisines. Mad Mex is a good stop for vegetarians, with dishes such as chick-pea chili and eggplant burrito. It’s not genuine Mexican by a long shot, but if there were a country with this food, it’d be great to vacation there. JE

GRAN CANAL CAFFÉ. 1021 N. Canal St., Sharpsburg. 412-781-2546. The menu here is classic coastal Mediterranean. Even dishes rarely seen at other Italian restaurants — such as snails and penne stuffed with seafood — MEAT AND POTATOES. are traditional, not 649 Penn Ave., made up to satisfy Downtown. 412eclectic contemporary 325-7007. This tastes. The cannelloni restaurant combines . www per alone merits a visit to several current trends, a p ty pghci m one of Gran Canal’s including revisiting .co cozy, family-friendly staples of the American dining rooms. KE pantry, the gastro-pub and nose-to-tail cooking, all THE GRAND CONCOURSE. in the lively Downtown space. Station Square, South Side. Expect everything from marrow 412-261-1717. The high bones to burgers, flatbreads ceilings, marble columns and and chicken pot pie, as well as stained-glass windows of this pots of rhubarb jam and handformer railway terminal are crafted cocktails. LE impressive, but the sophisticated yet uncomplicated shrimp, crab PAPAYA. 210 McHolme Drive, and other seafood dishes hold Robinson. 412-494-3366. their own against the spectacular Papaya offers a fairly typical setting. Sundays feature a Thai menu — from pad Thai popular brunch, allowing you to to panang curry — augmented sample even more of the topby sushi and a few generic shelf cuisine. LE Chinese dishes. The selection may have erred more on the IO. 300A Beverly Road, Mount side of reliability than excitement, Lebanon. 412-440-0414. The but the presentations show

FULL LIST ONLINE

7-$9

11:30-9:00

Meat and Potatoes {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} while occasionally invoking the short-order tradition, as with the hash of potatoes, peppers and onions. KF

Papaya {PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} Papa CAFFE DAVIO. 2516 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-1119. By day, a tiny store-front diner, serving omelets and pancakes, and by evening, an authentic and delightful Italian restaurant. The menu — both prix fixe and a la carte — focuses on the authentic flavors of Sicily, such as pasta Norma and veal alla Palermitana,


offMenu

that the kitchen is making an impression. KE POOR RICHARD’S WEXFORD ALEHOUSE. 10501 Perry Highway, Wexford. 724-935-9870. This bar and restaurant delivers top-notch pub grub, plus a wellcurated beer menu. Among the offerings: the Buffalo, N.Y. classic sandwich, roast beef on weck, a Germanic roll with caraway seeds; and mac-and-cheese, made with Buffalo hot sauce. Well-prepared burgers, wings, fish and chips, and sandwiches round out the menu. KE

{BY AMYJO BROWN}

GRABBING A BYTE Pittsburgh restaurants serve as testing ground for tech startups WARE SYKES, the new CEO of NoWait, a startup company

PORK-N’ NAT. 8032 Rowan Road, Cranberry. 724-776- 7675. This family-run BBQ joint does two things right: There’s a lot of smoke flavor in their meat, and the kitchen takes its rub seriously. The ribs, for instance, are studded with cracked pepper and intensely flavored with spices — spicy and crusty without, perfectly moist and tender within. Add in: four sauces, plus traditional sides such as mac-and-cheese or baked beans. JF STONEPEPPER’S GRILL. 1614 Washington Road, Upper St. Clair. 412-854-4264. Though seemingly calculated to be just another chain, StonePepper’s relies on good proportions and expert preparations to give some distinction to familiar fare like pizza, burgers and salads. Don’t miss the signature dessert: cinnamon-bun pizza. KE

Ware Sykes, CEO of NoWait {PHOTO COURTESY OF NOWAIT}

TIN FRONT CAFÉ. 216 E. Eighth Ave., Homestead. 412-461-4615. Though the menu is brief, inventive vegetarian meals push past the familiar at this charming Homestead café. The emphasis is on fresh, local and unexpected, such as asparagus slaw or beet risotto. In season, there’s a charming rear patio. JE TOAST! KITCHEN & WINE BAR. 5102 Baum Blvd., Bloomfield. 412-224-2579. In this intimate restaurant, the emphasis is on local, seasonal ingredients simply yet inventively prepared. Menu items change frequently and feature combinations both straightforward (shrimp and grits) and unexpected (add habañero cheddar and brownsugar butter to that). Or try the chef’s tasting, a unique fourcourse dinner just for you. LE VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. 424 S. Main St., West End. 412-458-0417. This warm, welcoming, and satisfying Italian restaurant is a reason to brave the West End Circle. The menu offers variety within a few narrowly constrained categories: antipasti, pizza and pasta, with the pasta section organized around seven noodle shapes, from capelli to rigatoni, each paired with three or four distinct sauces. KE

helping to change the way restaurants handle wait lists, spent a night last week at the Waterwork’s Burgatory, greeting customers from the hosting station. Sykes, 36, was hired Jan. 2 to help run the Pittsburgh-born technology business, which offers restaurants a tool for texting diners when their table is ready; it’s designed to replace the flashing lights and vibrations of the industry’s pagers. The business was started two years ago and launched out of AlphaLab, a startup accelerator located on the South Side. It is one of several local companies updating the way Pittsburgh restaurants interact with their customers. Sykes, a New Yorker, has never worked in the restaurant industry before. But he — like many of those trying to bring new technologies into the business — is eager to learn how he can help restaurants reach tech-savvy customers. “I’m trying to get a crash course in restaurants,” says Sykes, who will also be taking turns bussing tables as part of his orientation. The restaurant industry can be a tough market to change, says Jim Ambrose, director of business development for LoyalTree, another Pittsburgh-born technology company launched out of AlphaLab. It offers restaurants a mobile rewards program tied to their point-of-sale systems, allowing customers to scan their receipts to recoup rewards rather than carry a separate card in their wallet. LoyalTree launched early last year at the Crazy Mocha coffee chain, and is being used in about 100 city restaurants. NoWait is operating in nearly 50 city establishments. Ambrose, who has held “every job in the restaurant industry other than owning a restaurant,” was brought on board in part because of his experience, which has helped the product’s focus on minimizing disruption to established workflows, he says. “When you ask any given restaurant to change what they’ve known to be successful, it’s very difficult,” he says. But entrepreneurs at both companies say Pittsburgh is a great testing ground. Both companies have used their experiences here to expand into other markets. “We often say that if we can get it to work in the heartland …” says Robb Myer, NoWait’s co-founder. “That’s enabled us to scale very quickly.” ABRO WN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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Harris Grill Presents

hoggapalooza

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us

2nd place Best Chinese in Pittsburgh

Friday

February Everything’s

Featuring cuisine in the style of

Peking, Hunan, Szechuan and Mandarin

100 VEGETARIAN

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Outside!

China Palace Shadyside

Freeze a little, save a lot!

Outdoor Ice Bar with Jack Frost featuring $3 take-itto-the-head ice luge shots, funny hats, and Woodchuck Cider. A woodchuck is like a groundhog, right? Viewer discretion is advised, as are warm woolen mittens. The furry fun starts around 7:00 -- don’t be late now. 21+

DISHES!

Delivery Hours

11:30 - 2 pm and 5-10pm

5747 Ellsworth Avenue, Shadyside

5440 Walnut Street, Shadyside 412-687-RICE www.chinapalacepittsburgh.com

412.362.5273

Very few groundhogs, ifHarrisGrill.com any, were harmed in the prodiction of this event.

Don’t Hibernate… Celebrate the Season

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013

Happy Valentine’s Day From Spaghetti Warehouse

2 Can dine for $34.99* Choice of Appetizer, 2 Dinner Entrees, Soup or Salad and Dessert Call for details 412-261-2511

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LOCAL

“IT’S LIKE — MACHINES IMITATING GUYS, AND NOW YOU’RE IMITATING THE MACHINES.”

BEAT

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

CHARTING A PATH

OUT OF THE

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DAVID THROCKMORTON 40TH BIRTHDAY SHOW

ATLAS CD RELEASE with THE YELLERS, THE COLOR FLEET. 9:30 p.m. Fri., Jan. 18. Brillobox, 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $8. 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net +

skilled drummer. David Throckmorton’s name wouldn’t be the first that comes to a civilian’s mind when Pittsburgh music comes up, but musicians who have been around for a while know it quite well. Though, when they refer to him, they usually just call him “Throck.” “I love Throck!” says Bill Deasy, the onetime Gathering Field frontman who now performs solo, with Throckmorton in his backing band. “He’s kind of a little more like a force of nature than any other drummer in Pittsburgh. I love all the drummers I’ve worked with, but he’s sort of on a different level.”

{BY ANDY MULKERIN}

AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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HERE’S A quiet fame in being a

Full speed ahead: Atlas (from left: Jon Miller, Eric Emerson, Mike Slobodian, Graeme Louden)

They were dark days for Atlas, those months after former drummer Nick McCall left to move out west. The remaining members practiced to a drum machine; they tried out drummers from Craigslist, many of whom showed up wearing drum gloves. “Yeah, thinking back, that was a really depressing time,” says keyboardist and guitarist Jon Miller. “After we found Graeme, it was like, ‘Wow, this is fun again! We can write and play shows!’” “Graeme” is drummer Graeme Louden, a Scottish-born musician who was moved by his employer to Pittsburgh from a previous post in West Virginia. He’s the newest member of Atlas, which has always revolved around Miller and guitarist Mike Slobodian. Also on board: bassist Eric Emerson, who’s done stints in other bands around town, including his current band, The Velcro Shoes, in which Slobodian also plays. Atlas’s latest, an EP called Shapes, has been a long time coming, at least for a five-song disc. But it’s not for lack of effort. Miller, who works with other bands as an engineer, took his time tweaking the mixes the band got after tracking at J Bird Studios. “I always wonder how some bands record so quickly,” Miller says. “But I guess I spend a lot of time on that stuff, fixing stuff that maybe other people won’t even notice.” Shapes has the hallmarks of some of the British alt-rock the band members admit to taking cues from, like Muse, in addition to the dancey post-punk vibe of bands like Interpol. Emerson writes the lyrics, taking an approach that eschews specificity. “It can be hard to write in a way that points to a central focus, but doesn’t come right out and say it,” says Emerson. “But when you do that, it’s something that everyone understands, even if they don’t know why.” Armed with ambition and a full band again, Atlas releases Shapes with a show at Brillobox this weekend; it probably won’t be long before we hear the band is back in the studio again, though. “My ambition,” says Slobodian, “is to write a perfect album — something that at least one person in the world will think is a perfect album”

M A I N F E AT U R E

FEATURING BILL DEASY, GOOD BROTHER EARL, THOTH TRIO, DAVID THROCKMORTON TRIO 10 p.m. Sat., Jan. 26. Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com On fire: David Throckmorton prepares to celebrate the big 4-0.

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“He never ceases to amaze me,” says Paul Thompson, a local jazz bassist who’s been playing with Throckmorton since the ’90s. “I can’t wait to see people who have never heard him, when they see him play for the first time.” DAVID THROCKMORTON was born in Wash-

ington, Pa.; his father, Bob, was a jazz drummer for much of his life, playing regularly at the Holiday House in Monroeville, and touring for a time with lounge-style vocalist Buddy Greco. His brother, Rob, played drums too, taking his talents to the Army before being deployed as a soldier during the first Gulf War. Throckmorton went to college “for a minute,” he says, before dropping out. “It wasn’t for me. I knew I wanted to be drumming, so with that, it didn’t make sense.” He spent some time back in Washington, then in Pittsburgh, gigging and playing with bands like Sleeping Giants. In 1997, he got his first big break with the help of Paul Thompson, a Duquesne student who knew him from playing around town. Thompson was referred through a connection in Youngstown to the touring band for jazz trumpeter Maynard Ferguson. He took the opportunity — and found that the drummer for the band wasn’t exactly ideal. “He wasn’t working out,” recalls Thompson. “Nobody else in the band really

got along with him. And he was my roommate. So at the end of that tour, I told the tour manager, ‘I know this drummer back in Pittsburgh.’ I said, ‘Throck is the greatest drummer you will ever hear!’” Throckmorton was picked up for the band and did two years on tour — about nine months out of the year. It was an eye-opener. “I’d been out of town a little with bands before that, but I hadn’t been west of Indiana or something like that,” Throckmorton says. “The first gig with Maynard was in Vegas — that was my first plane ride. Suddenly it was like, big shot from Washington, Pa.” After two years with Ferguson’s band, Throckmorton returned to Pittsburgh, setting up with bands here, marrying and becoming a father to two boys. (He’s currently going through a divorce.) In the late ’90s, his main vehicle was the mostly-improv fusion band Electric Eel Service; in the 2000s, he focused on Beam, an improv live-band hip-hop hybrid with two bassists (including Paul Thompson), an MC and a DJ. His work with Beam is spastic, like the breakbeat stuff often created using sequencers in dance music. It shows that the jazz drummer is no purist. “I like programmed drums,” Throckmorton says. “I grew up listening to Run DMC and everything after, and I like that culture.

The City’s Hottest Live Music Scene!

JAN 22 8PM

CONTINUES ON PG. 32

A QUICK GUIDE TO DAVID THROCKMORTON’S BANDS

Tears of a C lown r te Save it for La Mirror in the Bathr oom

David Throckmorton plays drums somewhere almost every night of the week, often as part of the rhythm section for a vocalist at venues like Andys at the Fairmont, or as part of jams like Space Exchange at Thunderbird Café, or at the recently shuttered Interval jazz night at Shadow Lounge. But some of his projects have lasted longer, and been more serious than others. Here’s a quick guide.

Maynard Ferguson Band: Ferguson was a well-known jazz trumpeter

Visit jergels.com/calendar for a complete list of shows & to buy tickets! UP

noted for his high-note playing; Throckmorton went on his first major tours with Ferguson’s band in 1997-98.

Thu 1.17 GIN BLOSSOMS // 8 pm

Electric Eel Service: After Throckmorton returned to Pittsburgh, he started playing in this jazz-fusion band with guitarist Rick Mals and bassist Steve Landay.

Fri 1.18 GATHERING FIELD // 9 pm

Beam: Throckmorton’s hip-hop interests came through in Beam, the group he led along with bassists Paul Thompson and Steve Landay, MC Akil Esoon and DJ Supa C.

Tue 1.22 THE ENGLISH BEAT // 8 pm

Sleeping Giants: Throckmorton played drums — and about 300 cymbals — in the jammy ’90s alt-rock band whose crowning achievement was playing its most popular song, “Holes in My Pockets,” on Late Night with Conan O’Brien in 1997.

Thu 1.24 WHO’S BAD, the Ultimate Michael Jackson Tribute Band // 8 pm

Bill Deasy: Throckmorton has played drums for the former Gathering Field frontman

Thu 2.7 BRETT KEISEL – SHEAR DA BEARD // 6 pm

since 2003.

Good Brother Earl: Throckmorton regularly plays with the long-time local alt-country-flavored rock band.

Sat 2.23 JERGEL’S 1-YEAR ANNIVERSARY PARTY featuring THE CLARKS // 9 pm

OPEK/Thoth Trio/Flexure: All three of these bands are jazz ensembles of different sizes that Throckmorton plays in with saxophonist Ben Opie and bassist Paul Thompson. They range from Sun Ra-style psychedelic jazz to acoustic trio jazz to electric jazz in the style of early-’70s Miles Davis. NEWS

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OPUS ONE PRESENTS

If it’s done creatively, I really like it. Guys like DJ Premier and Pete Rock and DJ Shadow and J Dilla — these guys are as influential to me, as drummers, as some drummers are. It’s like — machines imitating guys, and now you’re imitating the machines.”

NEW RELEASES {BY ANDY MULKERIN}

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with Bill Deasy. Deasy remembers talking to Throckmorton on the phone about a gig coming up days later at a fair in Greensburg; by the time of the gig, Throckmorton was ready to go. Playing backup to a singersongwriter is different from a lot of what Throckmorton is used to in jazz bands with drum solos and polyrhythms. “With someone like Deasy, who strums an acoustic guitar and sings, it’s not difficult music,” Throckmorton says. “But it’s a challenge to try to put your mark on it without being like, ‘Hey, look at me.’ They’re his songs.” Throckmorton plays with other pop and rock acts, too: He’s played with Good Brother Earl since the mid-’00s, and backs up singer-songwriter Maddie Georgi at times. “He’s a very musical drummer. He’s the kind of musician who makes everyone around him, including me, better,” says Deasy. “He can be very blunt, but I’ve grown to appreciate that, because he’s also always the one who wants to run a song again, to make sure everyone’s got it. He’s kind of become a bandleader; he keeps everything together.” That’s a role Throckmorton clearly relishes. “If you can hook up with good players,” he says, “I think the best thing is to try to find a way for them to feel like they’re part of it, and they’re expressive within it, and you’re going to get the best results that way. I’ve heard a million great band leaders that I like talk about that. And I want that freedom when I play with someone else, too.”

mr. smalls

club cafe

02/26 MARDUK & MOONSPELL 02/28 HANNIBAL BURESS 03/07 STEVE KIMOCK 03/10 TODAY IS THE DAY 03/11 FINCH - PLAYING 'WHAT IT IS TO BURN' 03/19 TODD SNIDER 03/20 THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS 03/21 KATE NASH 03/27 BADFISH: A TRIBUTE TO SUBLIME

01/25 MIKE MEDVED BAND 01/25 OVERDOST, PLUTOCRAT NOOSE & MORE 01/26 DAVID THROCKMORTON'S 40TH BDAY CELEBRATION FT. BILL DEASY & MORE

01/31 ELLIS PAUL 02/01 ARTISTREE 02/01 DAVON MAGWOOD & MORE 02/02 TIFT MERRITT 02/07 FRONTIER RUCKUS 02/10 CARRIE RODRIGUEZ

OPUSONEPRODUCTIONS.COM | TICKETWEB.COM/OPUSONE | 866-468-3401

ON SAT., Jan. 26, Throckmorton celebrates his 40th birthday with a show featuring many of his bands, at Club Café. “As I get older,” he says, “I have less desire to be the hot drummer than when I was a kid. But that never goes away … it’s more like, I want to sound interesting playing this. And if it’s a hired-gun gig, you have to please the person who hired you. Sometimes you have to behave and turn it off. But your choices and your musicality is still gonna come through, and generally, people like that. “I like to hear that in drummers’ playing: that they’re going for it,” he adds. “It’s hard to describe, because it might not even be risky. I’m not afraid I’m gonna mess up the song or overplay, but … I dunno. Safe is boring.” AMU L K E R IN@PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013

CAIT CUNEO VIOLET (SELF-RELEASED)

This EP is the former Black Coffee frontwoman’s solo debut. Cuneo croons neo-soul for fans of Norah Jones and the like; the songwriting here is above average and the performance is topnotch. My biggest qualm is that these tracks largely hit the same groove; a debut EP is a good place to showcase one’s versatility. But it’s a great start and foretells a bright future. CAIT CUNEO CD RELEASE. 9 p.m. Fri., Jan. 18. Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $10-12. 412-381-6811 or www.rextheater.com

WHITE LIKE FIRE LIES (Self-released) Good songwriting and fun vibes permeate this four-song EP from the local guitar-rock band. The vocals come from Elvis Costello, and the hooks come from the good side of ’90s pop-rock (think Superdrag) and 2000s dance-punk. Nice stuff from a promising young band that’s worth checking out.

WHITE LIKE FIRE. 9 p.m. Thu., Jan. 17. Howlers Coyote Café, 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $5. 412-682-0320 or www.howlerscoyotecafe.com

MARIAGE BLANC UNDERCURRENTS (SELF-RELEASED)

A five-song EP crafted in the two years since the local band’s previous fulllength. (It’s lost a couple players in that time, but the main songwriters remain the same.) The subtlety of the advanced production techniques make this one a rewarding listen, though the songs themselves skew a bit long and same-y at times. Well played and pretty, with plenty of “Oh, cool!” moments. AMULKERIN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


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CRITICS’ PICKS

Erin McKeown

If you’ve heard Stephane Wrembel before, it may have been in a context where you didn’t recognize him: The French guitarist composed the theme to Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris. Before that, though, he was already accomplished in jazz-guitar circles, known for combining classical training with the Gypsy techniques he picked up from French Gypsy musicians. Tonight, he plays Thunderbird Café. Andy Mulkerin 8 p.m. 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $20. 412-682-0177 or www.thunderbirdcafe.net

he’s also played with Phil Elverum and David Dondero, and taught school, but the project that brings him to Garfield Artworks tonight is his solo work. Anderson’s lyrics-conscious songwriting is in line with the aforementioned outsider-folk heroes; tonight, his weapon of

Jason Anderson {PHOTO COURTESY OF J.M. LUNEAU}

[JAZZ] + THU., JAN. 17

[FOLK] + SAT., JAN. 19 If you were to name a handful of living legends of folk music, Peter Yarrow would no doubt be one; as a member of Peter, Paul and Mary, and a founder of the Newport Folk Festival, Yarrow was one of the luminaries of the ’60s folk revival. Poet, musician and activist, Yarrow is both a friendly face and a great American. Tonight, he plays Carnegie Lecture Hall in Oakland as part of the Calliope series. Mustard’s Retreat opens. AM 7:30 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $40-44. All ages. 412-361-1915 or www.calliopehouse.org

[INDIE-POP] + SAT., JAN. 19 She’s here so often, we might as well give her dual citizenship: Brooklyn’s Jenny Owen Youngs returns tonight for a show at Brillobox. To be fair, her past two gigs here — opening for Tim Barry and then for Frank Turner — were solo, acoustic deals, and last year’s An Unwavering Band of Light exhibits just how she’s grown as a pop songwriter, benefiting from a great backing band. Tonight, she headlines; Paul Luc opens. AM 9:30 p.m. 4104 Penn Ave., Pete Bloomfield. $12. Yarrow 412-621-4900 or www.brillobox.net

[INDIE-FOLK] + MON., JAN. 21

Jason Anderson got his start on K Records as the frontman of the late’90s band Wolf Colonel;

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choice will be an electric piano. Kid Durango (acoustic) and Max Somerville open. AM 8 p.m. 4931 Penn Ave., Garfield. $5. 412-361-2262 or www.garfieldartworks.com

[INDIE-POP] + WED., JAN. 23

Erin McKeown’s latest, Manifestra, includes plenty of guests — the most unexpected of whom might be MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow, who doesn’t sing, but did co-write one of the tunes. McKeown has always been one to keep politics, and deep thinking, in her music. (In fact, she spent last year studying activism and music at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society.) Tonight, she plays Club Café, with Jenn Grant. AM 8 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $12. 412431-4950 or www. clubcafelive.com


WE KNOW GUITARS NEW N EW AND AND USED! US U SED!

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM

GUITARS - UKES - AMPS - LESSONS - REPAIRS

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X194 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION} CD release show. Bloomfield. Gone Motometer. South Side. 412-621-4900. 412-431-4668. CLUB CAFE. The Wandering THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Rocks, Mark Dignam (Early) Ekoostic Hookah. Lawrenceville. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD Love Letters, Will Simmons 412-682-0177. CHOPHOUSE BAR. Terrance & the Gum Band, Junk Vaughn Trio. Strip District. Fingers (Late). South Side. 412-281-6593. 412-431-4950. 31ST STREET PUB. The CLUB CAFE. Freakwater, GOOD TIME BAR. Three Coney Island Side Show, Pairdown. South Side. Car Garage. Millvale. The Cheats, The 412-431-4950. 412-821-9968. Bessmers. Strip District. HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. GOOSKI’S. Trollkicker, 412-391-8334. White Like Fire, Butterbirds, Nomad Queen, ALTAR BAR. www. per Silent Lions, Brittany Hautz, Liebestod, Dislexya. Fist Fight In pa pghcitym Ryan Williams. Bloomfield. Polish Hill. The Parking Lot, .co 412-682-0320. 412-681-1658. AfterTheFall. Strip District. LAVA LOUNGE. Deborah HAMBONE’S. 412-263-2877. Heaton Brown, Coronado, Steve Hawk & Steve BAVINGTON ROAD HOUSE. The MeToos. South Side. Thompson. Lawrenceville. Montford. Burgettstown. 412-431-5282. 412-681-4318. 724-899-2448. SMILING MOOSE. Jar’d Loose, MOONDOG’S. Norman Nardini. BRILLOBOX. Jenny Owen SuperVoid, Slaves BC. South Side. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. Youngs, Paul Luc. Bloomfield. 412-431-4668. OBEY HOUSE. Gone South. 412-621-4900. Crafton. 412-922-3883. CLUB CAFE. Rhett Miller, SHADOW LOUNGE. Tom Black Prairie. South Side. ANDYS. Maureen Budway. Kurlander & PaleBlueSound, 412-431-4950. Downtown. 412-773-8884. Necessary Experience. East EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. BRILLOBOX. Atlas, The Liberty. 412-363-8277. The Dirty Charms, Chink Yellers, The Color Fleet. Atlas SMILING MOOSE. Four Nights the Rock God. South Side. 412-431-4090. THE FALLOUT SHELTER. Paradox Please, The Tilt Room. Aliquippa. 724-375-5080. FRANKIE’S. theCAUSE. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-5027. FRANK’S PUB & GRILL. 5 Mile Radius. Bethel Park. 412-833-4606. KEAN THEATRE. Neil Diamond Tribute. w/ Chris Denem. Gibsonia. 724-444-5326. MUGSHOTS CAFE. Bo’hog Brothers. Crafton. 412-921-7474. OAKMONT TAVERN. Three Car Garage. Oakmont. 412-828-4155. THE PRAHA. The Dave Iglar Band. Tarentum. 724-224-2112. ROCK ROOM. The Bestevers, Sistered. Polish Hill. 412-683-4418. RODNEY’S LOUNGE. The GRID. Irwin. 724-864-3222. SMILING MOOSE. Tuesday’s Too Late, They Promised Escape (early) There There, Otis & The Elemental (late). South Side. 412-431-4668. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Cello Fury. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. TJ’S HIDEAWAY. Walk of Shame. Evans City. 724-789-7858. THE VALLEY HOTEL. Kings Ransom. Jefferson Hills. 412-233-9800. Each week, we bring you a new MP3 from a local WATERWORKS artist. This week’s offering comes from Incyte; GREENSBURG. Lucky Me. Greenfield. 724-216-5408. stream and/or download his song THE WOODEN NICKEL. from our music blog, Guy Matone. Monroeville. 412-372-9750. FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com.

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ROCK/POP THU 17

SAT 19

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SATURDAYS 10PM-2AM

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“Days Like These”

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412-381-9600

CONTINUES ON PG. 36

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SUN 20 HOWLERS COYOTE CAFE. Weird Paul Rock Band 99 Cent Variety Show. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. SHADOW LOUNGE. Murals. East Liberty. 412-363-8277.

MON 21 BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Slim Forsythe’s Gospel Band, Paul Labrise, Carol Blaze, Duane Jones, Phat Man Dee, Ben Shannon, Still Not Sober, more. Martin Luther King Day Benefit for the Duncan & Porter Homeless Shelters. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. GARFIELD ARTWORKS. Jason Anderson, Kid Durango Acoustic, Max Somerville. Garfield. 412-361-2262. HEINZ HALL. Morrissey, Kristeen Young. Downtown. 412-392-4900.

CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE. Salsa Friday. Downtown. 412-325-6769. ECLIPSE LOUNGE. House Music w/ Hana. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330.

SAT 19

1139 PENN AVE. Hot Mass. Late Night Dancing. Disco, House, Techno. 21+ BYOB. 2am-8am Sunday morning. Downtown. BRILLOBOX. Title Town Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & guests. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Saturday Night Meltdown. Top 40, Hip Hop, Club, CLUB CAFE. The R&B, Funk & Soul. East Toasters, Mrs. Liberty. 412-362-1250. Skannotto, The . www per DIESEL. DJ CK. South a Pressure. South Side. p ty pghci m Side. 412-431-8800. .co 412-431-4950. ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Do MR. SMALLS THEATER. Sum’n Saturday Reggae The Almost, All Get Out, w/ Dan Dabber. Lawrenceville. Makeshift Prodigy, Model Class 412-251-0097. Citizens. Millvale. 866-468-3401. THE NEW AMSTERDAM. SHADOW LOUNGE. Night Moves. Tracksploitation. Lawrenceville. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. 412-904-2915. SMILING MOOSE. The REMEDY. Push It! DJ Huck Finn, Rocketboys, Dinner & A Suit. DJ Kelly Fasterchild. Lawrenceville. South Side. 412-431-4668. 412-781-6771. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. ALTAR BAR. Reel Big Fish. S BAR. Pete Butta. South Side. Strip District. 412-263-2877. 412-481-7227. ARSENAL BOWLING LANES.

TUE 22

FULL LIST ONLINE

WED 23

Thunder Power. Lawrenceville. 412-683-5993. CLUB CAFE. Erin McKeown, Jenn Grant. South Side. 412-431-4950. MCDAIN’S. The Gil Snyder Combo. Monroeville. 412-373-3335. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Heartless Bastards, Dead Confederate. Millvale. 866-468-3401. ROCK BOTTOM. Good Brother Earl. Waterfront. 412-462-2739. SHADOW LOUNGE. M.R. Smith. East Liberty. 412-363-8277.

SUN 20

DJS

WED 23

THU 17 BELVEDERE’S. Neon w/ DJ hatesyou. 80s Night. Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555. CLUB TABOO. DJ Matt & Gangsta Shak. Homewood. 412-969-0260. ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Throwdown Thursdays w/ Tracksploitation. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097. INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. Transmission: Classic Alternative Dance Party. South Side. 412-381-3497.

FRI 18 BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATRE SQUARE. Salsa Fridays. DJ Jeff Shirey, DJ Carlton, DJ Paul Mitchell. Downtown. 412-456-6666.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013

RIVERS CASINO. DJs Bill Bara & Digital Dave. North Side. 412-231-7777. SMILING MOOSE. The Upstage Nation. DJ EzLou & N8theSk8. Electro, post punk, industrial, new wave, alternative dance. South Side. 412-431-4668.

Frankie Beverly, EL DeBarge. Oakland. 412-621-4253.

SAT 19 SHADOW LOUNGE. Landon Thomas, Yung Rellz, Treeo, Pirate Gang, KMF Boyz, Sixx Mill, more. Live from the Cockpit Showcase. Ages 21+ after 9 p.m. East Liberty. 412-363-8277.

BLUES THU 17 THE R BAR. Jimmy Adler Band. Dormont. 412-445-5279.

FRI 18 EXCUSES BAR & GRILL. Don Hollowood’s Cobra Kings. South Side. 412-431-4090. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. The Blues Orphans. North Side. 412-904-3335. JUNE BUG’S. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. Sutersville. 724-872-4757. LARGE HOTEL. Jimmy Adler Band. Clairton. 724-384-9950.

SAT 19 CAFE NOTTE. Ron & The Rumpshakers. Emsworth. 412-761-2233. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. The Cobra Kings, Gary Belloma & The Blue Bombers. Robinson. 412-489-5631. INN-TERMISSION LOUNGE. The Rhythm Aces. South Side. LITTLE T’S. Ruff House. Unknown. 724-899-5004. MOONDOG’S. Miss Freddye. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. RICH’S PARKSIDE DEN. Bobby Hawkins Back Alley Blues. McKeesport. 412-896-1966. SUNNY JIM’S TAVERN. The Blue Bombers, Patrick Scanga. Kilbuck. 412-761-6700.

WED 23 CAFE NOTTE. Billy Heid. Emsworth. 412-761-2233.

JAZZ

TUE 22

THU 17

ECLIPSE LOUNGE. Groove Tuesdays. Djs provided by 720 Music. Lawrenceville. 412-251-0097.

ANDYS. Maura Minteer. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CJ’S. Rodger Humphries & The RH Factor. Strip District. 412-642-2377. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Friends. Entrepreneurial Thursdays. Downtown. 412-392-2217. PAPA J’S RISTORANTE. Jimmy Z & Friends. Carnegie. 412-429-7272. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Stephane Wrembel. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

AVA BAR & LOUNGE. DJ Outtareach. East Liberty. 412-363-8277. BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. Fuzz! Drum & bass weekly. Bloomfield. 412-682-8611. SAVOY RESTAURANT. Latin Savoy Night. Strip District. 412-281-0660. SPOON. Spoon Fed. Hump day chill. House music. aDesusParty. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

HIP HOP/R&B THU 17 ALTAR BAR. Chris Webby. Strip District. 412-263-2877.

FRI 18 SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. MAZE Feat.

FRI 18 MANCHESTER CRAFTSMEN’S GUILD. John Pizzarelli. North Side. 412-322-1773.

SAT 19 ANDYS. Kenia. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Moorehouse Jazz. Strip District. 412-281-6593. CJ’S. The Tony Campbell Saturday Jazz Jam Session. Strip District. 412-642-2377.


EARLY WARNINGS

Singer Songwriter Night. North Fayette. 412-788-2333.

WED 23

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JOSH ANDERSON}

Caitlin Rose

ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. MOONDOG’S. Acoustic Open Stage. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. PARK HOUSE. Dodgy Mountain Boys & the Park House Jammers. North Side. 412-596-2743.

THUR, JAN 17• 8PM AN EVENING OF GYPSY JAZZ

STEPHANE WREMBEL FRI, JAN 18 • 9PM JAM BAND VETERANS

EKOOSTIC HOOKAH

WORLD SUN 20

SAT, JAN 19• 9PM CELLO ROCK WITH PITTSBURGH'S OWN

BYHAM THEATER. Kalpa Cambi. The Sound of Dalmatia. Klapa Cambi. Downtown. 724-462-1517.

CELLO FURY

REGGAE

MON, JAN 21 • 9:30PM

Caitlin Rose

FRI 18

WITH CRAIG KING

Club Café, 56 S. 12th St., South Side

JUMPER’S JUNCTION. The Flow Band. Washington. 724 206 0080.

{FRI., APRIL 12}

CLASSICAL

Iceage

FRI 18

{SAT., APRIL 06}

6119, 6119 Penn Ave., East Liberty {TUE., APRIL 30}

The Black Keys with The Flaming Lips Consol Energy Center, 1001 Fifth Ave., Uptown

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Dane Vannatter. North Side. 412-904-3335. LITTLE E’S. Jessica Lee & Mark Strickland. CD Release. Downtown. 412-392-2217. SUPPER CLUB RESTAURANT. Frank Cunimondo & Patricia Skala. Greensburg. 724-850-7245. TAMBELLINI BRIDGEVILLE RESTAURANT. RML Jazz. Bridgeville. 412-370-9621.

SUN 20 ELWOOD’S PUB. Jeff Pogas. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Kenia. North Side. 412-904-3335.

TUE 22 ANDYS. John Bagnato. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Space Exchange Series w/ Book Exchange: plays Monk. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

WED 23 ANDYS. Juan & Erika Vasquez. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE BLIND PIG SALOON. Erin Burkett & Virgil Walters. Jazz Jam. New Kensington. 724-337-7008. DANTE’S RESTAURANT & LOUNGE. Jerry & Lou Lucarelli. Brentwood. 412-884-4600.

ACOUSTIC

GRILL. Mark Pipas. Wexford. 724-934-1177. BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Songwriters In Harmony. Songwriters Workshop. Harmony. 724-452-0539. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Tom Terling. Robinson. 412-489-5631. ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. MULLIGAN’S SPORTS BAR & GRILLE. Acoustic Night. West Mifflin. 412-461-8000.

FRI 18 ELWOOD’S PUB. The Unknown String Band. Cheswick. 724-265-1181. PARK HOUSE. Andre Costello. North Side. 412-224-2273. PENN BREWERY. Ryan Melquist. North Side. 412-237-9400.

SAT 19 CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL. Peter Yarrow. Oakland. 412-361-1915. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Christopher Mark Jones. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. MARS BREW HOUSE. Carl Schubert. Mars. 724-625-2555. OLIVE OR TWIST. The Vagrants. Downtown. 412-255-0525. PENN BREWERY. John Galt Theory. North Side. 412-237-9400. THE COMMONPLACE COFFEEHOUSE & ROASTERY. Jack McLaughlin. Indiana. 724-465-6529.

THU 17

TUE 22

BILLY’S ROADHOUSE BAR &

BOCKTOWN BEER & GRILL.

NEWS

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M A I N F E AT U R E

OPEN STAGE TUE, JAN 22 • 9PM JAZZ SPACE EXCHANGE SERIES WITH

BOOK EXCHANGE

THE NORDIC SOUND: SWEDEN. Berwald, Sjögren, Stenhammar, Petersen-Berger. Chatham University, Shadyside. 412-365-1100. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Concert Italia feat. Gianandrea Noseda, conductor & Benjamin Hochman, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

PLAYS MONK OPEN FOR LUNCH

Kitchen hours: M-Th: 11am-12am Fri & Sat: 11am-1am Sun: 11am-11pm

4023 BU TLER ST LAWREN CEVILLE 412.682.017

SAT 19 NATHAN PACHECO. WQED Multimedia, Oakland. PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Concert Italia feat. Gianandrea Noseda, conductor & Benjamin Hochman, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

SUN 20 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Concert Italia feat. Gianandrea Noseda, conductor & Benjamin Hochman, piano. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900.

WED 23 WESTMORELAND YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA’S PHILHARMONIC. Seton Hill University, Greensburg. 724-834-2200.

OTHER MUSIC SAT 19 LEMONT. Dave Crisci. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. SIXTH MOUNT ZION CHURCH. Pittsburgh Gospel Choir, Vanessa German, Ellen Gozion, Carolyn Perteete. Let Freedom Sing concert. East Liberty. 412-512-0589.

BAND NIGHT Every Thursday!

JANUARY 17

CORONADO JANUARY 24

THE DRESSED FRETS JANUARY 31

ROUND BLACK GHOSTS

MON 21 FRANKLIN REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL. Pittsburgh Gospel Choir, Vanessa German, Ellen Gozion, Carolyn Perteete. Let Freedom Sing concert. Murrysville. 412-512-0589.

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www.thunderbirdcafe.net

The Tender Land by Aaron Copland Gregory Lehane, Director; Gil Rose, Music Director

January 24–26 at 8pm; January 27 at 2pm Chosky Theatre

Carnegie Mellon Chamber Orchestra Ronald Zollman, Music Director

Carnegie Mellon Wind Ensemble George Vosburgh & Thomas Thompson, Co-Directors Stephen Story, Associate Director

Everyday 9-11

2204 E. CARSON ST. (412) 431-5282 SCREEN

2012–13 CONCERT SERIES

Sunday, February 3 at 2pm Carnegie Music Hall

$1.75 PBR Drafts

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CARNEGIE MELLON SCHOOL OF MUSIC

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Sunday, February 10 at 7:30pm Carnegie Music Hall

tickets: music.cmu.edu ARTS

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What to do January 16 - 22 WEDNESDAY 16

Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 8p.m.

KRESGE THEATRE Oakland. Free. For more info visit music. cmu.edu. 6p.m.

FRIDAY 18

Wind Ensemble Competition

Hollis Brown CLUB CAFE South Side. 412431-4950. With special guests Walker and the Rebellion & The Brushfire. Over 21 show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 17 Chris Webby

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412263-2877. With special guest Zio, Vinnie Vocals & more. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly. com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

Gin Blossoms JERGELS RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. Tickets: jergels.com. 8p.m.

Stephane Wrembel THUNDERBIRD CAFE

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

IN PITTSBURGH special guests The Show & Puzzle Pieces. Over 18 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

MONDAY 21

Ekoostik Hookah THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

Morrissey

HEINZ HALL Downtown. 412-392-4900. Tickets: culturaldistrict.org. 8p.m.

Cait Cuneo Band

TUESDAY 22

REX THEATER South Side. 412-381-6811. All ages show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

SATURDAY 19 Fist Fight in the Parking Lot / Afterthefall

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Seminar CITY THEATRE South Side. 412-431-CITY. Tickets: citytheatrecompany.org. Through Feb.10.

Night Moves

SHADOW LOUNGE East Liberty. 412-363-8277. With special guests Coastal Remedy & I am a Sea Creature. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

FIST FIGHT IN THE PARKING LOT SATURDAY, JANUARY 19 ALTAR BAR

Bon Journey

The Amazing Kreskin

JERGELS RHYTHM GRILLE Warrendale. 724-799-8333. $7 cover. For more info visit jergels.com. 9p.m.

PALACE THEATRE Greensburg. 724-836-8000. Tickets: thepalacetheatre.org. 8p.m.

Cello Fury Tony Orlando RIVERS CASINO North Side. Tickets: riverscasino.com or 412-231-7777. 7p.m. & 10p.m.

THUNDERBIRD CAFE Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177. Over 21 show. Tickets: greyareaprod.com. 9p.m.

SUNDAY 20 Dan Harmon

NEW HAZLETT THEATRE North Side. 412-320-4610. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Murals SHADOW LOUNGE East Liberty. 412-363-8277. With

The Almost MR. SMALLS THEATRE Millvale. 412-821-4447. With special guests All Get Out, Makeshift Prodigy & more. All ages show. Tickets: 866-468-3401 or ticketweb.com/opusone. 8p.m.

“SLIDE OUT OF WINTER” KICK THE BOOT SAVINGS UP TO $200 . . . . . . . . . . . . SAVE $25 + AN $201 TO $250 . . . . . . . . . . SAVE $50 ADDITIONAL $251 AND UP . . . . . . . . . . . SAVE $75 10% OFF! *While supplies last. No other discounts apply. Offer good on both Mens & Womens styles!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013

at the Waterfront 108 WEST BRIDGE ST. 412-464-1007

www.gordonshoes.com Facebook.com/GordonShoes


NOTEWORTHY {BY AL HOFF}

A CAREEN THROUGH CAR CHASES, EXPLOSIONS AND AN ASSORTMENT OF VICIOUS ASSAULTS

Early on, Yaron Zilberman’s low-key drama A Late Quartet sets up an extended metaphor about Beethoven’s Opus 131. Cellist Peter (Christopher Walken) explains to his class that the unusual length of the quartet — seven movements played without pause — means that instruments will go out of tune, and musicians must adjust on the fly to remain in harmony.

Playing for time: Christopher Walken

CP APPROVED

Peter’s own quartet has been together for 25 successful years, comprised of first violin David (Mark Ivanir), second violin Robert (Philip Seymour Hoffman) and violist Juliette (Catherine Keener), who is married to Robert. When Peter informs his colleagues that he retiring from the quartet, relationships quickly become dissonant. Also caught up in the tangle is Alexandra (Imogene Poots), Robert and Juliette’s daughter, who is being coached by David. This part of the film is a bit soapy, as the quartet members have ill-advised romantic assignations, spar over musical roles and styles, and unleash longsimmering resentments. But the drama is salvaged by good performances, and the successful framing device which demands these professional musicians seek resolution. It’s great to see Walken turn in a sensitive, low-key portrayal, but after decades of watching him play deranged characters, you may need a moment to adjust. When the film opened with a grim-faced Walken clutching a cello, I was sure he was going to kill someone with it. Starts Fri., Jan. 18. Harris AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

In Je-woon Ki Kim’s

The Las Last Stand d, AArnold Schwarzenegger stars Schwarzeneg as a sheriff whose small wh town on the Mexican M border is the last las defense against an escaped drug esca kingpin. If the t poster is to be believed, very large guns gu will be a significant factor f in this drama. Starts Fri., Jan. 18. NEWS

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COP FLOP {BY AL HOFF}

The gang’s all here: Giovanni Ribisi, Josh Brolin, Ryan Gosling, Anthony Mackie, Michael Peña and Robert Patrick

R

UBEN FLEISCHER’S Gangster Squad got an unwanted burst of publicity after last summer’s Colorado megaplex shooting, when its trailer depicted some of the film’s characters shooting up a movie-theater audience. So the release date was pushed back, the scene cut and the film slightly re-tooled. But have no fear, fans of glorified violence: There’s plenty left! Why, just in the first five minutes, we see: a man torn in half while chained between two cars (then eaten by coyotes); a hand severed by an elevator; an attempted rape; a woman slammed into a Murphy bed; and a brutal fist fight. A voice-over tells us that, in 1949, “Los Angeles belongs to Mickey Cohen.” The East Coast gangster is making a play for the West Coast vice rackets and it’s up to the Los Angeles police to stop him. So grizzled Chief Parker (Nick Nolte) puts together an off-the-books team tasked with destroying Cohen’s burgeoning

M A I N F E AT U R E

empire. Never mind procedure or legal doo-dads, he counsels — “It’s not a crime wave, it’s an enemy occupation.” The story is based in reality in that: There is a city called Los Angeles in California; Cohen and Parker existed; and the L.A.P.D. does have a checkered past when it comes to by-any-meansnecessary law enforcement.

GANGSTER SQUAD DIRECTED BY: Ruben Fleischer STARRING: Josh Brolin, Ryan Gosling, Sean Penn

Other than that, this story is comicbook material, including its squad line-up of one-note archetypes: Square Jaw (Josh Brolin), Playboy (Ryan Gosling), Streetwise Black Guy (Anthony Mackie), Rookie (Michael Peña), Tech Nerd (Giovanni Ribisi) and Cowboy (Robert Patrick). A hammy Sean Penn swaggers around as

Cohen, and Emma Stone unconvincingly slinks as his two-timing moll. Don’t expect the story and mood of similarly themed L.A. Confidential or The Untouchables, despite all those cool Fedoras; this is a B-grade actioner prettied up with A-list stars. Not much plot or detective work — just guys driving around, snapping out big guns and “lighting it up” — while upbeat jazzy music plays. We’re asked instead to be captivated by a careen through car chases, car wrecks, car explosions and an assortment of vicious assaults. Of course, the squad has the imprimatur of “right.” (I’m kneecapping you for your own good and for the good of the city, buddy!) But this casual violence by the good guys only undermines the film’s pretend message about curtailing bad guys. When queried about the ethics of it all, squad leader Square Jaw shrugs: “This is the only way we can beat ’em.” Solving problems unilaterally with bullets: Feel free to discuss. A HOF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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a light-hearted comedy! Frank Capra directs this 1944 film starring Cary Grant. 11 a.m. Sun., Jan. 20, and 2 p.m. Thu., Jan. 24. Hollywood

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

NEW BROKEN CITY. Mark Wahlberg, Russell Crowe and Catherine Zeta-Jones star in this political thriller about a New York City mayor and the ex-cop he hires to follow his wife. Allen Hughes directs. Starts Fri., Jan. 18. MAMA. Andrés Muschietti directs this horror thriller about a couple who take on the care of two young nieces, previously left alone in the woods for five years. Or were they? Jessica Chastain and Nikolaj Coster-Waldau star. Starts Fri., Jan. 18.

REPERTORY THE HEART OF JENIN. After his child was killed by Israelis, a Palestinian father donates the boy’s organs to six Israeli children. This documentary from Lior Geller and Marcus Vetter follows the father as he visits the six children whose lives were saved by the transplants. The 2008 film is presented by Silk Screen, and will be followed by a discussion. In English, and Arabic, with subtitles. 7 p.m. Thu., Jan. 17. Gregg Theater, Sewickley Academy, 315 Academy Ave., Sewickley. Free. www.silkscreenfestival.org

CP

REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE. Nicholas Ray’s landmark 1955 film gave the previously marginalized exploitation topic of juvenile delinquency top-notch big-screen production values and a talented young cast. A suburban kid from a nice if emotionally distant home — James Dean, linked forever with his bad-boy

Mama red jacket — finds a new family with two other disillusioned teen-age souls (Natalie Wood and Sal Mineo) over a tumultuous 24 hours. 7 p.m. Thu., Jan. 17. Melwood (Al Hoff) VARIATIONS ON VISION: EXERCISES IN CONDITIONING PERCEPTION. This hour-long program of experimental film and video promises to “baffle cognition and unrest comfortable notions of reality.” See for yourself: Among the material screening is Pierre Hebert’s “Around Perception,” and the first section of Stan Brakhage’s “Scenes From Under Childhood,” on 16 mm. 7 p.m. Sat., Jan. 19. (doors at 6 p.m.). 6119 Penn Ave., East Liberty. Free. www.facebook.com/6110penn

particularly the willful torching of its many abandoned buildings. (There are as many as 30 structure fires a day.) Tony Putnam and Brenda Sanchez’s new documentary follows the crew of Detroit’s Engine Company 50, located in the city’s blighted east side, as the firemen fight to keep the city safe and intact. The filmmakers will lead a Q&A after the Friday-night screening. 7 p.m. Fri., Jan. 18, and 7 p.m. Sat., Jan. 19. Hollywood

REVEAL THE PATH. A bicycle documentary from the same team that brought you last year’s Ride the Divide. In this film, Mike Dion’s cameras follow worldclass bikers as they pedal through some of the world’s most visually stunning — and physically challenging — locales. Filmed on four continents, the riders traverse mountains (Nepal), valleys (Scotland), beaches (Alaska) and deserts (Morocco). The screening is a benefit for BikePGH. 7 p.m. Thu., Jan. 24. SouthSide Works. $10 in advance at www.imathlete.com/events/ revealthepath; $15 at door

BURN: ONE YEAR ON THE FRONT LINES OF THE BATTLE TO SAVE DETROIT. Part of Detroit’s post-industrial infamy is its reputation for arson,

Burn: One Year on the Front Lines Alfred Hitchcock’s classic 1960 film CP PSYCHO. is a thriller and treatise on troubled motherson relationships. Embezzler-on-the-run Janet Leigh picks the wrong motel to catch some rest at, though the proprietor seems friendly enough … Psycho remains a textbook of masterful editing, and Bernard Hermann’s score is as creepy as ever. 10 p.m. Fri., Jan. 18, and 10 p.m. Sat., Jan. 19. Oaks (AH)

   

  

Tune in, log on, hear the music that matters to you. wyep.org

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THE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE. Alternately creepy, prescient and funny, 1962’s Manchurian Candidate is as fascinating a study of Cold War paranoia as it is a political thriller. Laurence Harvey returns from Korea as one of several American POWs who appear to have been brainwashed by Soviet and Chinese Communist agents. He finds his mother, Angela Lansbury, in full flag-waving battle-dress, stagemanaging the political career of his boozy, inept stepfather, James Gregory. Meanwhile, his former superior, played by Frank Sinatra, is plagued with nightmares in which a passionless Harvey commits murder at a ladies’ garden association. The film is often cited as somehow anticipating the assassination of President Kennedy (especially in its allegiance to a shadowy domestic conspiracy). While that event truly couldn’t have been foreseen, director John Frankenheimer is savvy about the increasing role of media and spectacle in politics. There are fabricated war heroes, patriotism relayed through music and costumes, and Gregory’s hilarious performance as the Sen. Joe McCarthy stand-in, shaking his fist in Holy American rage only when the television cameras are turned on. Indeed, the plot’s mastermind hopes to use “a nation of televised viewers … to sweep us into the White House.” The film continues a month-long, Sunday-night series of films that were mind-blowing when released. 8 p.m. Sun., Jan. 20. Regent Square (AH)

CP

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013

SUSHI GIRL. Kern Paxton directs this crime thriller about an uneasy reunion of thieves. One has just been released from prison, after spending six years keeping his mouth shut. But at the celebratory dinner — sushi served on the body of a naked woman at an isolated restaurant — tensions run high. Who’s hiding what, and why? 7:30 p.m. Thu., Jan. 24; 9 p.m. Fri., Jan. 25; and 7 p.m. Sun., Jan. 27. Hollywood

OPEN SCREENING. All students, alumni and current Pittsburgh Filmmakers/Pittsburgh Center for the Arts members are invited to screen their short films and videos. One work (up to 15 minutes) per person in the following formats: DVD, Blu-ray, Quicktime file, Mini DV, Super 8 and 16 mm. (Email zavala@ pghfilmmakers.org if submitting Super 8 and 16 mm, or with other queries.) The films will be screened in order received, with the last work beginning at 11 p.m. Reception with food and beverage also included. 8:30 p.m. Sat., Jan. 19. Melwood. $4 (waived if submitting a film).

Arsenic and Old Lace

ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST. Jack Nicholson stars in Milos Forman’s 1975 adaptation of Ken Kesey’s novel. A rebellious man thinks he can cheat the criminal-justice system by pleading insanity and serving time at a mental institution. But things — including an insurrection against the asylum’s dictatorial Nurse Ratched (Louise Fletcher) — don’t go as well as he hoped. The film continues a Saturday-night series of Oscar classics. Midnight, Sat., Jan. 19. Manor

MANOS: THE HANDS OF FATE. The shlocky 1966 horror film from Harold P. Warren about a devilworshipping cult gets the RiffTrax treatment, a.k.a. professional funny guys Michael J. Nelson, Kevin Murphy and Bill Corbett providing live commentary. You can enjoy it all through the magic of digital broadcast. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Jan. 24. Cinemark Robinson, Cinemark Pittsburgh Mills and Pittsburgh North 11. www.fathomevents.com

ARSENIC AND OLD LACE. After dropping by the home of his elderly aunts to inform them of his new marriage, a man discovers that they’ve been killing people and stashing them in the basement. And it’s

ANDY WARHOL FILMS. Selections from Warhol’s Factory Diaries series (1971-75) and other shorts screen. Ongoing. Free with museum admission. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. www.warhol.org


[BOOK]

AS THE CURATORS SEE IT, WE THINK OF OUR LIVES IN MEDICAL TERMS

“MY LIFE”

One of Jim Messina’s illustrations of youthful 1930s hi-jinks {IMAGE COURTESY OF CHUCK MESSINA}

Jim Messina was 50 when a back injury he sustained as a Marine at Guadalcanal forced his retirement from J&L Steel’s Aliquippa Works. But his next avocation is what sets him apart from most who grew up during the Great Depression, fought in World War II and worked in area mills: Messina took up drawing and later wrote his autobiography. And the late Messina’s charming illustrations and guilelessly affecting prose have been assembled by his son Chuck Messina into an oversized, 221-page paperback titled Grit Smoke and Steam (from local genealogy specialists Closson Press). The book — the first volume in a planned series of five — starts with Messina’s earliest days in West Aliquippa, where he was born in 1922 and grew up between a funeral home and the Slovak Hall. It ends just before the war, with his decision to enlist in the Marines. Most of what’s in between sketches a Depression-constrained but surprisingly idyllic small-town childhood (where Jim’s boyhood accomplices included future composer Henry Mancini). Kids shot dice in the alley, skated at the Monaca Roller Rink, fished for coins in sidewalk grates with a bamboo pole and a wad of gum. They even went skiing, on bent steel rods. A later section, complete with Messina’s own photos, details his and local friends’ adventures when, in 1939, they took their first train ride and headed West to build roads in New Mexico for the Civilian Conservation Corps. Most of the drawings — whether in pencil, charcoal and ink, watercolors, oil and tempera — are rendered in simple, even childlike terms. (Some streetscapes are more draftsmanlike.) Messina was selftaught; he meant his words and drawings — originally titled “My Life” — simply as a keepsake for family. “He picked himself up and he found another interest in drawing,” says Chuck Messina. “It’s just an amazing gift he left me.” “He was really talented for never taking an art course,” adds Messina. “He always referred to the drawings as cartoons. We come to find out, it’s American folk art.” Messina, who’d encouraged his dad’s efforts, had himself studied art but spent most of his working life as a flight attendant. Jim Messina died in 2008. His son, 57, now lives in Philadelphia and is gathering material for volume two, covering his father’s Guadalcanal experience. The book has sold about 180 copies, says Messina. It’s available for $29.95 at www.clossonpress.com, on Amazon and at Café Kolache, in Beaver.

[ART REVIEW]

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

BUILDING HEALTH {BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

P

{COLLECTION CCA © HENRY DREYFUSS ASSOCIATES}

“Handicapped and Elderly, diagram 3b,” from Humanscale 1/2/3: A Portfolio of Information, by Henry Dreyfuss Associates, designers, and Niels Diffrient, Alvin R. Tilley and Joan C. Bardagjy, authors. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press, 1974.

UBLIC-INTEREST design is a nascent

but growing field. It is based on the idea that everybody — rich, poor, healthy or sick — deserves thoughtful and high-quality architecture and design. In a recent opinion piece in the New York Times, John Cary and Courtney E. Martin argued that design can greatly “improve and enrich” people’s lives by dignifying their experiences. Citing such projects as the Butaro Hospital in Rwanda and The Star Apartments in Los Angeles, they explain that human-centered products and places focus on the needs of the community. Practitioners envision a participatory, sustainable and responsible approach that translates to a better world. Idealistic? Yes. But our increasingly mechanized, urbanized and globalized population means that architecture and design need to respond to our changing technological, social and environmental

landscapes. According to curators Giovanna Borasi and Mirko Zardini, architecture and design are not always “capable of providing positive solutions for the environment or the ‘sick’ body.” Every solution has attendant consequences, some of them good, some of them bad. Their exhibition Imperfect Health: The Medicalization of Architec-

IMPERFECT HEALTH: THE MEDICALIZATION OF ARCHITECTURE continues through Feb. 24. Miller Gallery, Carnegie Mellon University campus, Oakland. 412-268-3618 or www.cmu.edu/millergallery

ture, currently at the Miller Gallery, posits that we live in anxious times brought on by our fears about pollution, disease, aging and our food supply. Their assertion is that most projects fo-

cus on cure rather than on care, and that architecture and design rely on “medical rhetoric” that provides imperfect solutions. As they see it, we think of our lives in medical terms. And while architects and designers seek solutions “based on the optimistic premise that design has the capacity to deliver individual and collective wellbeing,” they should also be thinking selfcritically about the limitations of their field. The curators explain that the exhibition aims to reveal the contradictions and complexities inherent in our health-obsessed society. Granted we are inundated with information about diets, exercise, pills and cures, and yes, we could do with a healthy dose of skepticism about modern medicine. But where would we be without it? The exhibition includes a wide variety of objects and materials — many of which come from the Canadian Centre for Architecture’s permanent collection. Organized

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BUILDING HEALTH, CONTINUED FROM PG. 41

into sections such as Disease, Ageing and Obesity, the exhibition meanders from news clippings to photographs, drawings, videos, architectural models, art works and even dust samples. It’s not entirely coherent and is designed to be purposefully contradictory. In one section, photographs of Frederick Law Olmsted’s parks, Cesare Leonardi’s drawings of trees, and designs and images of vertical gardens are all displayed in proximity to a table full of books on allergies, a plan for a low-allergy garden, and non-allergic building materials. Are these projects healthy or are they proof of misguided medical rhetoric? While Olmsted and Calvert Vaux may have based their designs on outdated 19th-century beliefs about disease, there is little doubt that their projects remain important oases for countless urbanites in cities like New York and Montreal. It is interesting that there are very few images of actual medical facilities in the exhibition. There are a handful of examples of hospice, elder care, Alzheimer’s and cancer-care centers, but no hospitals or clinics. And there are only a few items that actually refer directly to disease, including: an artifact from a sanatorium that shows a picture of the sea; photographs of people sleeping in salt mines as a cure for

respiratory ailments; drawings by Gordon Matta-Clark titled “Immune vs. Cancer cells”; and paper sculptures by Andy Byers called “Cow,” “Chicken” and “Pig,” that represent domestic animals that are actually vectors of human diseases. There are, however, a quirky array of objects and materials relating to topics such as epidemics and quarantine; garbage and recycling; age segregation or integration; personal, social and work spaces; elevators; stairs; environmental illness; air pollution; filtration; industrialization; and land reclamation. There is even a model of the rotund fictional character Captain B. McCrea from Pixar’s animated futuristic movie Wall-E. And there are Rabbit chairs designed by SANAA that deliver an evocative message about obesity. If the abundance of materials on display seems too overwhelming and inconclusive, head over to the photographs of industrial landscapes by Bernd and Hilla Becker. There you’ll see familiar images of Pittsburgh and Youngstown. These will remind you of what we already know all too well around here: Industry brought prosperity, but it also brought pollution and health problems. These images capture perfectly the contradictions, consequences, and imperfections of human invention. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

Happy hour has never been so... creative! Stop by the museum for drinks and some creative "outside the box" activities in our stunning Hall of Sculpture, with dozens of amazing design objects just steps away! Great Objects Inspire Great Thinking This Thursday, January 17, 5:30--9 p.m. $10; includes museum admission and one drink ticket Which showstoppers of world's fairs past really knock your socks off? Discover the groundbreaking and innovative objects on view in Inventing the Modern World: Decorative Arts from the World's Fairs, 1851–1939. Vote for your favorite, Culture Club is sponsored by come up with new uses for known materials, and craft your own imaginative showstopper alongside members of Pittsburgh’s “made by hand” network!

tues–sat: 10–5 | thurs: 10–8 | sun: noon–5 guided tours daily | members visit free cmoa.org | 412.622.3131 one of the four carnegie museums of pittsburgh

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Karla Hackenmiller’s “Liminal Assemblage”

[ART REVIEW]

PRINTS IMPRESS {BY NADINE WASSERMAN} “REMBRANDT’S Skyscraper,” by Michael

Loderstedt, occupies one corner of Printwork 2012 at Artists Image Resource. While it is the only sculptural piece in the exhibition, it is not alone in its innovative use of the print medium. As a study in medium, scale, color and form, it pays tribute to an iconic printmaker and at the same time functions as a meditation on contemporary printmaking. According to the artist, it is “comic, ethereal and ascendant,” words that could describe a number of pieces in this show.

PRINTWORK 2012 continues through Jan. 31. Artists Image Resource, 518 Foreland St., North Side. 412-321-8664 or www.artistsimageresource.org

Juried by Nicholas Chambers, the new Milton Fine Curator of Art at The Andy Warhol Museum, Printwork 2012 presents printmaking as a diverse discipline. Printmakers today are rediscovering traditional forms as well as taking advantage of new technologies. Printwork 2012 includes a diversity of styles and content. The mix of artists offers some interesting associations. For instance, Loderstedt and Sean P. Morrissey both use screenprint to explore aspects of architecture. And both reduce architecture to minimal detail — floors and facades. But in order to emphasize re-

petitive pattern, Loderstedt is interested in the way cities focus on grand architecture as spectacle, while Morrissey is interested in the way individuals pursue a “dream home.” Repetition is a tool used by several artists in the exhibition. In Karla Hackenmiller’s “Liminal Assemblage,” simple repetitive marks accumulate into a complex and dense image. Louise Kohrman also uses a simple mark — here a small circle — to create a repetitive pattern. Rather than fill the page, however, her images in works titled “The Presence of Absence” resemble delicate and minimal webs that cling to the top edge of the paper. Subtlety of repetition is the goal in works by Mandy Fitzgerald. Her “Bubbles and Dirt” and “Clouded Memory” are studies in how little information is necessary to express an idea. On the flip side are the numerous artists who seek complexity by using layers, collage and the mixing of media. Tom Christison’s “Breeding Ball” and “On Holiday” are painterly images that are a jumble of narrative and abstract parts. Like Christison, Lenore Thomas uses multiple layers to build her deceptively simple images. Rhea Nowak, like Thomas, uses Photoshop and manipulates, crops and scans the images in her composition. And Jim Rugg converts his many drawings into handassembled notebooks. Other works of note are Lisa Bulawsky’s charmingly eccentric memorial prints, Michael Hegedus’s video-game characters and Katie Kaplan’s printed fabric. Overall, the exhibition presents an engaging snashot of printmaking today.

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From the creator of wasn’t there, therre was no discu discussion NBC’s new TV drama, pable of continuiing in a meaningfuleani “SMASH” saying this right. No. I am, act actually. I has a sound. It rin ngs like a bell. bel It doe that there’s no sub bject or story or or idea BUY YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

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FOR THE WEEK OF

01.1701.24.13

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. Saturday and Sunday only, at 1 p.m. daily, watch scenes from visiting Enchantment Theatre Company’s production of The Velveteen Rabbit. (The full show’s on stage at The Hillman Center for Performing Arts on Saturday night.) And Monday, look for Martin Luther King Jr. Day programming, including storytelling by actor Greg Kenney. BO Museum hours: 10 a.m.5 p.m. 1 Children’s Way, North Side. $12-13 (children under 2 free). 412-322-5058 or pittsburghkids.org

{PHOTO COURTESY OF GAGE SKIDMORE}

{WORDS}

+ THU., JAN. 17 {EXHIBIT}

Certain nights, Carnegie Science Center offers to watch the kids while the parents have a night out. Tonight, though, it’s all about the parents — or any other adult. The Center’s 21+Sports is a no-kids night for visitors to enjoy such Highmark SportsWorks attractions as the 25-foot rock wall, the bungee-harnessed trampoline and the rollercoaster simulator. You can also roam the Center’s four floors and exhibits like SeaScape. Plus there’s live music and a cash bar. Very adult. Bill O’Driscoll 6-10 p.m. One Allegheny Ave., North Side. $10-15. 412-237-3400 or www. carnegiesciencecenter.org

JAN. 20 Dan Harmon and help from a Makeshop instructor). Starting Saturday, and every weekend through January, build a “glow tree” — a sculpture of twigs and copper wire that sparkles purple and green thanks to a vacuum chamber. This

+ SAT., JAN. 19 {ART}

+ FRI., JAN. 18 {EXHIBIT} Busy weekend at the Children’s Museum. Today through Monday, visit the Makeshop to create your own DIY clock (with an $8 kit

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013

Novelist Sarah Dessen has published 10 young adult novels, two of which were adapted into the 2003 teen drama How to Deal. Her latest novel, What Happened to Goodbye, hits stores in paperback later this year. As part of the 12th season of Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures and Carnegie Library’s series Black, White & Read All Over, Dessen speaks tonight at the Carnegie Library Lecture Hall. The event also features an audience Q&A, live music, book-signing and snacks. Jeff Ihaza 7 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave, Oakland. $15 (or two for $25 online). 412-622-8866 or www.pittsburghlectures.org

JAN. 19 Rebecca Harris in Seminar

“Creativity is sort of insanity,” opines Tim Fabian in a press release. “My work then is my insane need to play coupled with a socially appropriate outlet.” Now photographer Fabian has invited some playmates to join in his first curatorial venture, Play. It’s a group show at Millvale’s Panza Gallery highlighting artists and photographers whose work exhibits evidence of play. The exhibit spotlights such local names as Sue Abramson, David Grim, George Kollar, Mark Panza and William Wade. The opening reception is tonight. BO 6 p.m. Show continues through Feb. 16. 115 Sedgwick St., Millvale. Free. 412-821-0959 or www.panzagallery.com


Martin Luther King Jr. photographed by Marion S. Trikosko, 1964

MainEvent

At free events marking Martin Luther King Jr. Day, live King’s legacy by doing everything from questioning war to building community and celebrating the arts. During Sat., Jan. 19’s Martin Luther King Jr. Public Forum, discuss “The Cost of the War and the African-American Community” with a distinguished panel led by talk-show host Chris Moore; the Black Voices for Peace program takes place at 3 p.m. at Carnegie Library’s East Liberty Branch (bvfppgh@hotmail.com). Also on Jan. 19, hear the first of two Let Freedom Sing! concerts featuring The Pittsburgh Gospel Choir, city and suburban high school and church choirs, spoken-word artist Vanessa German and more (412512-0589). The programs begin at 7 p.m. Sat., Jan. 19 (Sixth Mount Zion Baptist Church, East Liberty) and 7 p.m. Mon., Jan. 21 (Franklin Regional High School, Murrysville). On King Day itself (Jan. 21), spend the afternoon at East Liberty Celebrates Dr. Martin Luther King, at the Kelly-Strayhorn Theater; the noon-4 p.m. program features live music and dance by the August Wilson Dance Ensemble and other groups, plus hands-on arts stuff and more (412-363-3000). Afterward, right around the corner, the Union Project holds its annual King Day festivities at East Liberty’s Eastminster Presbyterian Church. From 4-7 p.m., enjoy a community meal and an evening of fellowship, including storytelling for families (www.unionproject.org). Bill O’Driscoll

{STAGE} Paying for abuse? That might seem the dynamic in Seminar. The 2011 Broadway comedy concerns four aspiring young writers who’ve purchased spots in an Upper West Side writing seminar with a famous author named Leonard, only to hear him label their work “a soul-sucking waste of words,” among other blandishments. But there’s more to this critically favored play by

favorite Rebecca Harris. Tonight begins a week of preview performances; opening night is Jan. 25. BO 5:30 p.m. Continues through Feb. 10. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-55. 412-431-2489 or www.citytheatrecompany.org

Cereal Aisle — and with story titles like “Putting the Bi into Bicentennial” — Matthews’ wields a droll, left-of-center sensibility. A fixture on the local arts scene, he’s known for his publicly posted personalad flyers seeking romance. Tonight’s launch for his selfpublished book will be filmed by Julie Sokolow for her documentary Aspie Seeks Love, about Matthews’ late-in-life Asperger’s syndrome diagnosis. Also: readings by Matthews and award-winning Chicagobased writer Erika Mikkalo. BO 7 p.m. Awesome Books, 929 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. www.awesomebooks pittsburgh.com

{WORDS} “Having no interest in mainstream masculine activities such as sports, sports-watching, finance or alcoholism, I’ve had

JAN. 24 Reveal the Path

+ SUN., JAN. 20 {STAGE}

dating to the 1800s, derived Harmontown, the fictional from liturgical styles but still universe led by Dan Harmon, part of the country’s contemis a magical place. Harmon porary culture. (Some klapa writes for NBC’s Community; tunes celebrate, for instance, he and fellow comedian and wine.) The nine-man group’s co-host Jeff Davis blend the Sound of Dalmatia tour hits mundane and the hilarious just five U.S. cities — all in this often-confessional weekly podcast. The show’s growing numJAN. 19Matthews ber of devoted fans David — Harmonites — has led the pair to share their universe with the masses via the touring Harmontown Live Podcast Show that makes its way to the New Hazlett Theater tonight. JI 7 p.m. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $20. 412320-4610 or www. newhazletttheater.org

JAN. 19 Play

Theresa Rebeck, best known for creating the NBC drama Smash. (Her plays include Bad Dates and Mauritius.) In City Theatre’s production, Leonard is played by Daniel Gerroll, an acclaimed British actor who had a big role in the film Chariots of Fire. The production, directed by Tracy Brigden, also features longtime City

NEWS

to distinguish myself through other means,” writes David Matthews. “I have a postcard collection, a menagerie of anthropomorphic coconuts, and a compulsion to channel my sarcastic tendencies in a socially-acceptable way by writing.” As in the introduction to his debut story collection, Meltdown in the

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in the company of Pittsburgh’s own Jerry Grcevich Tamburitza Orchestra. The show’s at the Byham Theater tonight. BO 7:30 p.m. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $31.25-45.25. 412456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

+ TUE., JAN. 22 + THU., JAN. 24

{MUSIC} Renowned Croatian vocal group Klapa Cambi visits with a rare offering. The group’s klapa music is a form of a cappella singing

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John McIntire. No word on whether hot chocolate will be served. BO 7 p.m. fort construction; 8:23 p.m. show. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. Cost: one or more blankets. 412-621-4900

ARTS

{COMEDY}

{SCREEN}

For those who don’t find the upstairs at Brillobox quite intimate enough, may we recommend The Great American Blanket Fort/ Blanket Drive Comedy Show? Comedian Gab Bonesso combines her desire to help homeless folks with her love of blanket forts. Donate a blanket for this structure, which will shelter the audience as it watches performers like Bonesso, Josh Verbanets, Chrissy Costa and

The makers of bicyclingadventure documentary Ride the Divide return with Reveal the Path. The new one spans the globe, as top mountainbikers including Ride the Divide star Matthew Lee take 36 days to navigate terrain from Alaskan coastal beaches to Nepal’s mountains and the Moroccan high desert, connecting with local residents along the way. The film’s director, Mike Dion, co-stars. The one-night Pittsburgh-premiere screening, at SouthSide Works Cinemas, benefits advocacy group BikePGH. BO 7 p.m. South Side. $10-15. www.southsideworks.com

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VISUAL TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://HAPPENINGS.PGHCITYPAPER.COM 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X161 (PHONE) {ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

THEATER FLIGHT FROM HIMSELF. One-man show by Mark C. Thompson about a man who looks back on his life & discovers a way to escape his fear. Fri, Sat and Sun., Jan. 20. Thru Jan. 26. Off the Wall Theater, Carnegie. 412-489-5840. GRAND NIGHT FOR SINGING. Musical tribute to Rodgers & Hammerstein. Wed-Sun. Thru Jan. 20. Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown. 412-456-6666. ITALIAN AMERICAN RECONCILIATION. A comic folktale by John Patrick Shanley. Jan. 18-20 and Jan. 22-26. Butler Little Theatre, Butler. 724-287-6781. LES MISERABLES. Tue-Sun. Thru Jan. 27. Benedum Center, Downtown. 412-456-4800. RED MASQUERS CABARET. Peter Mills Playhouse, Rockwell Hall. Sat., Jan. 19, 8 p.m. Duquesne University, Uptown. 412-396-6000. SEMINAR. Four aspiring, young novelists learn that the hardest part of writing fiction is facing the facts. Tue-Sun. Thru

Feb. 10. City Theatre, South Side. 412-431-2489. SINATRA-STYLE CABARET SHOW & WINE DINNER. Fri., Jan. 18, 6:30 p.m. The Wooden Nickel, Monroeville. 412-372-9750.

FRI 18 - SUN 20 TOM ARNOLD. Jan. 18-20 The Improv, Waterfront. 412-462-5233.

SAT 19

BILL BENDEN, LIONEL HAMILTON, JOSH COPEN. Knoch Wrestling Boosters Funny Fundraiser. 7 p.m. COMEDY OPEN MIC W/ Winfield Township VFC, Butler. DEREK MINTO. Thu. Thru Jan. 17 724-448-9222. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. DAVID KAYE, 412-681-4318. DAVID MICHAEL, PITTSBURGH IMPROV LISA DAPPRICH. JAM. Thu. Thru Highland Competition Feb. 28 Cabaret Cheerleaders Funny www. per at Theater Square, Fundraiser. 6 p.m. pa pghcitym Downtown. .co Patterson Hall, Natrona 412-325-6769. Heights. 412-398-6658. MARK RICCADONNA, VINNIE NARDIELLO, DAN COMEDY HYPNOSIS SHOW. JENNICHES. Slapsticks! Comedy Feat. Jason Christopher. Club. 7 p.m. The Rose Bar and 8 p.m. Rocky’s Route 8, Shaler. Grille, White Oak. 412-751-6960. 412-487-6259. MIDSEASON REPLACEMENT: COMIC WARS: THE BOY & AN IMPROVISED SITCOM. THE BEAR VS. INCIDENTAL 7 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, FOREPLAY. Stand-up & improv North Side. 412-322-1000. challenges. 8 p.m. Mullen’s Bar & SCIT SOCIAL IMPROV JAM. For Grill, North Side. 310-909-6446. new & experienced improvisers. PITTSBURGH COMEDY Sat, 6:30 p.m. Steel City Improv SHOWCASE W/ MIKE WYSOCKI. Theater, North Side. 412-322-1000. Fri, 9 p.m. Corner Cafe, South Side. 412-488-2995.

COMEDY THU 17

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 18

SUN 20

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC

DAN HARMON. 7 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 412-320-4610.

MON 21 TOTALLY FREE MONDAYS. Mon, 8 p.m. Steel City Improv Theater, North Side. 412-322-1000.

CRITIC: Maureen Ciarolla, a human-resources director from Monroeville

TUE 22 OPEN MIC STAND UP COMEDY NITE. Hosted by Derek Minto & John Pridmore. Tue, 9:30 p.m. Smiling Moose, South Side. 412-612-4030.

EVENT: Comic

Wars competition

at Mullen’s Bar and Grill, North Side WHEN: Fri.,

WED 23

Jan. 11

The comedy was very entertaining; it was quite different from a lot of events and very spontaneous. I haven’t seen live comedy in such a long time [that] I was surprised by some of the language at some points. Like the bit [one contestant] did about masturbation was a bit shocking — not that I’m offended by any stretch of the imagination, but I was just kind of surprised [by] how uncensored everything was. I enjoyed myself a lot and I think I’d be back to see something like this again in the future. I’d be more prepared for some of the topics next time. BY JEFF I HAZA

JOKEE OAKEE. Comedy open stage hosted by Tonnochi:B. Wed Younger’s, North Side. 412-452-3267. STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC. Wed, 8 p.m. The BeerHive, Strip District. 412-904-4502.

EXHIBITS AUGUST WILSON CENTER FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE. The Nazi Olympics: Berlin 1936. An exhibit exploring 1936 Olympic Games including use of propaganda, the boycott debate, history of the torch run, & the historic performance of Jesse Owens. Curated by the United States Holocaust CONTINUES ON PG. 48

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Work by Craig Freeman, from Cartoon Nihilism at 707 Penn Gallery

NEW THIS WEEK

ONGOING

707 PENN GALLERY. Cartoon Nihilism. New Works by Craig Freeman. Opening reception: Jan. 18, 6-9 p.m. Downtown. 412-456-2962. 709 PENN GALLERY. The Painting as Object. New work by Fabrizio Gerbino. Opening reception: Jan. 18, 6-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-471-6070. BARCO LAW LIBRARY. Dream. Paintings by Sue Vincent. Opening reception Jan. 18. Oakland. FE GALLERY. Words for Poems. Installation by Laurie Trok. Opening reception: Jan. 19, 6-9 p.m. Lawrenceville. 412-254-4038. FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. Revealing Place: Photographs from Missouri, Pennsylvania & Texas. Feat. work of 36 students from 3 universities, in 3 different states. Opening reception: Jan. 18, 6-9 p.m. Oakland. 412-681-5449. PANZA GALLERY. Play. Work by Sue Abramson, Ruth Drescher, David Grim, Tom Gigliotti, Mark Panza, Michael Sahaida, more. Opening reception: Jan. 19, 6-9 p.m. Millvale. 412-821-0959. SHAW GALLERIES. Pittsburgh After Dark. Photography by Jimmy Taaffe. Closing reception: Jan. 19, 5-8 p.m. Downtown. 412-281-4884. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Architecture Transformed. Printmaking & fiber art by Barbara Westman. Closing reception: Feb. 23, 7-9 p.m. Here & Now. National printmaking exhibition. Juried by Barbara Westman. Closing reception: Feb. 23, 7-9 p.m. Sewickley. 412-741-4405.

ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Jeremy Kost: Friends w/ Benefits. Photography. I Just Want to Watch: Warhol’s Film, Video and Television. Long-term exhibition of Warhol’s film & video work. Permanent collection. Artwork and artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side. 412-237-8300. ARTISTS IMAGE RESOURCE. Printwork 2012. National juried print exhibition feat. over 20 artists. North Side. 412-321-8664. BLUE OLIVE GALLERIES. All Local Artists. Muli media, pottery, woods & jewelry. Frazier. 724-275-7001. BOXHEART GALLERY. The 12th Annual Art Inter/ National. Invitational group show exploring space and how the immediate environment affects the artistic process. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. White Cube, Green Maze: New Art Landscapes. 6 innovative institutions dedicated to the experience of culture & nature. Cory Arcangel: Masters. Repurposed readymade digital technology. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CATHOLIC CHARITIES BUILDING. Park Journeys: Yellowstone. Work by Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild students. Downtown. 412-456-6999. CHATHAM UNIVERSITY. Culture in Context. African Art from the Olkes Collection. Shadyside. 412-365-1232. FEIN ART GALLERY. 5th Annual Holiday Show. Affordable art for the holidays. Curated by Kathleen Zimbicki. North Side. 412-321-6816.

FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. GALLERIE CHIZ. Architectural Perspectives: Places & Planes. Work by Guglielmo Botter & Ben Saks. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. Genexodus. Handmade paper cuttings by Theodore Bolha. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GAY & LESBIAN COMMUNITY CENTER. Royal Portrait Show. Drag portraits. Downtown. 412-422-0114. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. LA PRIMA ESPRESSO. Paintings/Prints of Italy. Prints of Vince Ornato’s oil paintings of Italy. Strip District. 412-281-1922. LAKEVUE ATHLETIC CLUB. Pop-Up Gallery. Work by a variety of artists. Valencia. 724-316-9326. LAWRENCE HALL GALLERY. Landscape Expressions. Work by Lynn Fero. Downtown. 412-392-8008. MATTRESS FACTORY. Feminist and.. New work by Julia Cahill, Betsy Damon, Parastou Forouhar, Loraine Leeson, Ayanah Moor, & Carrie Mae Weems. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MILLER GALLERY AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY. Imperfect Health: The Medicalization of Architecture. Feat. photographs, sculpture, architectural models & CONTINUES ON PG. 48


GALLERY CRAWL

fourth floor, cont.

Eclectic Laboratory Chamber Orchestra (E.L.C.O.) > Music from Beck’s only-available-assheet-music album, Song Reader. Performances at 6:15, 7:15 and 8:15pm.

Pittsburgh Print Group > Examining the end of time.

2. SPACE 812 Liberty Avenue

6. Harris Theater

Romper Room > Jen Cooney, Jae Ruberto, Jacob Ciocci,

809 Liberty Avenue

Matt Barton, Thad Kellstadt, Jim Lingo and Ladyboy. Guestcurated by Ladyboy. Music by DJ Dave Zak. Human Touch Project > The newest body of sculptural work by artist Phoenix Savage.

Harris Theater Short Films > Selections from the

3. Cell Phone Disco Tito & Exchange Way A surface that visualizes the electromagnetic field of an active mobile phone. Several thousand lights illuminate when you make or receive a phone call near the installation.

4. Shaw Galleries 805 Liberty Avenue

2nd Annual Bad Art Sale! > Bad art, picture frames, mats, art books, gently used art supplies!

5. Trust Arts Education Center 805-807 Liberty Avenue Peirce Studio (lower level)

CONSOL Energy Hot Spot > Re-energize with this Pittsburgh-based producer of coal and natural gas. Continuum Dance Company > Excerpts of THE MOVEMENT, created by Sarah Parker. Performances at 6, 7 and 8pm.

2012 Three Rivers Film Festival competitive shorts program.

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FREE BIKE PARKING where designated. All locations universally accessible unless noted.

11. Toonseum

19. 709 Penn Gallery

947 Liberty Avenue

709 Penn Avenue

StarKist Charlie’s Hall of Legends > Original

Fabrizio Gerbino > Paintings, drawings and installations inspired by our post-industrial landscape.

pieces from the ToonSeum permanent collection, featuring some of the world’s most iconic cartoon characters.

12. August Wilson Center for African American Culture 980 Liberty Avenue

20. 707 Penn Gallery 707 Penn Avenue

Craig Freeman: Cartoon Nihilism > Nihilism, depression and suicide through the cartoon world.

Glamazonia by Mario Epanya > Images of Black women celebrate the beauty and diversity of the Diaspora.

21. Symbiotic Collusion

The Nazi Olympics: Berlin 1936 > Exploring the

131 Seventh Street Appalachians in Charge of Visual Culture by Derek Reese.

courage and triumph of athletes who boycotted, participated in or were barred from the Games. Pittsburgh: Reclaim, Renew, Remix > Imagery, film and oral history narratives dedicated to honoring and preserving Black culture in Southwestern Pennsylvania. 971 Liberty Avenue, 2nd Floor Gallery [not universally accessible] Art by Keith Schmiedline and live music by Dylan Reynolds.

7. 811 Liberty Avenue

14. Urban Pathways Gallery

Arcade Comedy > The brand new Arcade Comedy

914 Penn Avenue

Theater in the Cultural District, featuring Pittsburgh’s best sketch, improvisational and alternative comedy year-round. Time to Play! arcadecomedytheater.com

The Heart is Lonely... > Student artwork based on the works of Jacob Lawrence; Poetry Slam at 6 and 7:30pm; plus the Sounds of Steel steel pan band.

8. Catholic Charities Susan Zubik Welcome Center

15. CAPA 111 Ninth Street

212 Ninth Street

Future Memories, Future Myths > Works by CAPA

Creative Reuse > During the fall of 2012, students

Visual Arts students and curated by Rafael Abreu-Canedo.

at Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild took part in a unique after-school art course, creating art from materials supplied by the Pittsburgh Center for Creative Reuse.

16. Future Tenant

9. Awesome Books

created from reclaimed and urban wood.

929 Liberty Avenue An independent bookstore offering new and used books.

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linocuts inspired by classic films.

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Carnegie Library > Button-making! We supply the

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10. 937 Liberty Avenue

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new, self-generative video installations, including the world premiere of Digital-Archi (Meta Cities).

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Power Pixels 2013: Miguel Chevalier > Two

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lead sponsor:

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Presented by THE PITTSBURGH CULTURAL TRUST Department of Education and Community Engagement. All information and locations are subject to change.

Visit TrustArts.org or call 412-456-6666 for more info.

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Friday, Jan. 25, 2013 5:30–9pm

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in the Cultural District

21. Night Market 3 131 Seventh Street Bringing together some of Pittsburgh’s most creative independent vendors, artists and desserts to an indoor market.

22. Katz Plaza Seventh Street & Penn Avenue Steel Town Fire: Intricate moves on poi, snakes, swords and other burning props. 6:30, 7:30 and 8:30pm.

23. Backstage Bar 655 Penn Avenue

Symphony of Colours > Work by Kim Freithaler, June Kielty, Nadya Lapets and Vickie Schilling. Live Music by Jason Kendall Duo.

24. Arthur Murray Dance Studio 136 Sixth Street (above Melange Bistro) [not universally accessible]

Free Dance Lessons and Demos > Swing at 7:30pm. Bachata at 8pm. Salsa at 8:30pm.

819 Penn Avenue

Best of Arbor Aid with Tree Pittsburgh > Works

25. Boutique 208 208 Sixth Street A retail boutique featuring locally-handmade wares.

17. Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council

26. Robot Repairs

810 Penn Avenue, Suite 200

Six x Ate: Sound, Time, Space > Local artists from

by Fran Gialamas that reflect the past steel industry.

210 Sixth Street Is your robot experiencing technical difficulties? Consider visiting this place for a potential fix.

an ongoing dinner and lecture series of the same name.

18. Bend Yoga

27. Dream Cream Parlor

808 Penn Avenue, 2nd Floor

539 Liberty Avenue Designated ice cream flavor sales are contributed to causes in exchange for community service of the recipient.

Art on the Walls: Steel-Life II > Photo assemblages

Pittsburgh Playwrights Theater Lobby (third floor) Twinning Photography > Trying to twin one hundred Africans with their African American lookalikes.

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 46

Memorial Museum. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. Preserved materials reflecting the industrial heritage of Southwestern PA. Homestead. 412-464-4020. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Inventing the Modern World: Decorative Arts at the World’s Fairs, 1851–1939. Furniture, metalwork, glass, ceramics, textiles, & jewelry produced by Herman Miller, Tiffany, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Empowering Women: Artisan Cooperatives that Transform Communities. Folk art objects illustrating the power of women working together to provide for their families, educate their children, promote equality, & give back to their communities. BugWorks. Feat. beautiful photography of insects, amazing specimens, & live bugs! Life: A Journey Through Time & Population Impact thru Jan., Winging It: Experimental Gallery About Birds thru March, Lord of the Crane Flies thru April. Ongoing: Earth Revealed, Dinosaurs In Their Time, more. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome (planetarium), Miniature Railroad and Village, USS Requin submarine, and more. North Side. 412-237-3400. CARRIE FURNACE. Built in 1907, Carrie Furnaces 6 & 7 are extremely rare examples of pre World War II ironmaking technology. Rankin. 412-464-4020 x.21. COMPASS INN. Demos and tours with costumed guides featuring this restored stagecoach stop. Ligonier. 724-238-4983. CONNEY M. KIMBO GALLERY. University of Pittsburgh Jazz Exhibit: Memorabilia & Awards from the International Hall of Fame. Oakland. 412-648-7446. FALLINGWATER. Tour the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Ohiopyle. 724-329-8501. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, with classes, car & carriage museum. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion and stable complex, and enjoy hikes and outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Chalk Hill. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade and ivory statues from China and Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123.

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VISUAL ART

CONTINUED FROM PG. 46 NATIONAL AVIARY. Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. With classes, lectures, Garfield. 412-328-4737. drawings, that together demos and more. North Side. THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. examine the relationships 412-323-7235. Kodachrome Works. Work by between design & health. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 26 Sam Ditch. Bloomfield. Oakland. 412-268-4754. rooms helping to tell the story OLD ECONOMY VILLAGE. MODERNFORMATIONS of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. Faces & Places: Photographs GALLERY. Healthy Artists University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. of Old Economy. Never before Movie Poster Exhibition. 20 412-624-6000. seen photography from the local artists compete to design OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. late 19th & early 20th centuries. a poster representing the This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion Ambridge. 724-266-4500. Healthy Artists documentary site features log house, blacksmith PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. The series. Garfield. 412-362-0274. shop & gardens. South Park. History of Photography. Plus MONROEVILLE PUBLIC 412-835-1554. preservation and education LIBRARY. Watercolors PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY exhibits. Shantytown - The by Phiris. Work by Phiris MUSEUM. Trolley rides and Ed Salamony Photographs. Katherine Sickels. Monroeville. exhibits. Includes displays, walking Experience the Depression 412-372-0500. tours, gift shop, picnic area and in Pittsburgh’s shantytown MORGAN CONTEMPORARY Trolley Theatre. Washington. through this historic GLASS GALLERY. Cheers, 724-228-9256. photographic documentary. Salute, L’chaim To The Next 50! PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & North Side. 412-231-7881. Group show feat. Ellen Abbott BOTANICAL GARDEN. Orchid PICTURESQUE & Marc Leva, Alex Bernstein, & Tropical Bonsai Show. 4 indoor Judi Charlson, more. Shadyside. PHOTOGRAPHY & GIFTS. rooms & 3 outdoor gardens Photography by Brenda Knoll. 412-441-5200. feature exotic plants and floral Lawrenceville. 412-688-0240. MOST-WANTED FINE ART displays from around the world. PITTSBURGH CENTER GALLERY. Get Drawn. Work Oakland. 412-622-6914. FOR THE ARTS. Small Step by Sylvia K. & Sarina Meester. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Steelers & Penguin games. Park. 412-665-3639. Downtown. 412-232-0199. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence GLOBAL CHALLENGES & for Life. Photos and artifacts LOCAL IMPACTS: FOREIGN of her life & work. Springdale. POLICY CHALLENGES. Panel 724-274-5459. EAST LIBERTY CELEBRATES discussion & Q&A about foreign RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL MLK, JR. Live performances, policy challenges that the HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits family friendly activities, incoming Obama administration on the Homestead Mill. Steel more. 12-4 p.m. Kellywill face in the next 4 years. industry and community artifacts Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 6-8 p.m. Union Project, from 1881-1986. Homestead. 412-363-3000. Highland Park. 412-471-7852. 412-464-4020. MLK JR. DAY IN THE PARK. PITTSBURGH GOO-GOO SENATOR JOHN HEINZ Feat. ice skating, snowshoeing, HISTORY CENTER. From GATHERING. Join fellow & various educational activities/ Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s local progressives to meet new art projects tied to the legacy of Pittsburgh’s role in the antiallies & help w/ a small MLK Martin Luther King, Jr. Presented slavery movement. Ongoing: “Day-On” project. 5:30-8 p.m. by Venture Outdoors. 1-4 p.m. Western PA Sports Museum, AVA Bar & Lounge, East Liberty. Schenley Park Skating Rink, Clash of Empires, and exhibits 412-363-8277. Oakland. 412-255-0564. on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates BOOKS IN THE AFTERNOON. ART SALE & RAFFLE. Benefits Pittsburgh industrialists, The Art of Fielding by Chad the Rukmini Foundation. local history. Sewickley. Harbach. 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Jan. 18-19 Assemble, 412-741-4487. Oakland. 412-622-3151. Garfield. SOLDIERS & SAILORS ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK MEMORIAL HALL. CLUB. For advanced ESL students. . www per Military museum Presented in cooperation w/ AN EVENING OF a p ty ci pgh m dedicated to honoring the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy ARTS FOR AUTISM. .co military service Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Feat. spoken word members since the Lebanon Public Library, artist Gwen Ritchie, Civil War through artifacts & Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. magician T.J. Hill, & short film personal mementos. Oakland. GRANDSLAM CHAMPIONSHIP screening. Benefits the Joey 412-621-4253. I: FISH OUT OF WATER. Stories Travolta Scholarship Fund. 7 p.m. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. by Derek Minto, Brittany Story, Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Features 5,000 relics of Stacy Keene, Michael Chester, Liberty. 412-848-9355. Catholic saints. North Side. more. Hosted by Alan Olifson & 412-323-9504. presented by The Moth. 7:30 p.m. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN New Hazlett Theater, North Side. BOOK ‘EM BOOKS TO CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo 646-205-2722. PRISONERS WORK PARTY. Vanka Murals. Mid-20th HOMUNCULUS: A READING Read & code letters, pick books, century murals depicting war, FOR THE LAB. Prose & poetry pack ‘em or database ‘em! social justice and the immigrant by Carolina Ebeid, Joy Katz, Sundays 4-7 p.m. or by appt. experience in America. Millvale. Elizabeth Hoover, & Eric Lidji. Thomas Merton Center, Garfield. 421-681-0905. 7 p.m. Assemble, Garfield. 412-361-3022. THE TOONSEUM. Pittsburgh FURBULOUS. Fur coat sale. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY Scores! The Pro Scoreboard Helps benefit the Junior League HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Art of Kensington Falls of Pittsburgh. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Young writers & recent graduates Animation. Animations feat. Wear After Shop, Bloomfield. looking for additional feedback on the Jumbotron at Pirates, 412-687-2600. on their work. Thu The Big Idea

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013

HOLIDAY

POLITICS

Bookstore & Cafe, Bloomfield. 412-687-4323.

TUE 22

FRI 18

MON 21

FUNDRAISERS LITERARY FRI 18 - SAT 19

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAT 19

SUN 20

Giant Leap. Group show feat. members of the Keystone West artist collective. White Show: Subtlety in the Age of Spectacle. Group show feat. Jaq Belcher, David Burke, Ellen Carey, Mark Franchino, Jane Haskell, Marietta Hoferer, more. Romancing the Tone. Group show feat. Lenka Clayton, Corey Escoto, Rachel E Foster, David Leggett, Rebecca Mir & Sayward Schoonmaker. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. American Idols. Exhibition by John Moran feat. glass busts of all 43 U.S. presidents. Friendship. 412-365-2145. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Bridge 12. Work by Melissa Cameron, Betty Vera, & Kevin Snipes. Strip District. 412-261-7003 x 12. SOUTHERN ALLEGHENIES

THU 17

FOLKTALES FROM AROUND THE WORLD. 7 p.m. Aspinwall Municipal Building, Aspinwall. 412-781-0213. JILL KHOURY & BERNADETTE ULSAMER. Mad Fridays Reading Series. Delanie’s Coffee, South Side. 412-927-4030. MYSTERY BOOK DISCUSSION GROUP. Belshazzar’s Daughter by Barbara Nadel. 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

SAT 19 DAVID V. MATTHEWS, ERIKA MIKKALO. Reading & release of Matthews’ short story collection, Meltdown in the Center Aisle. 7 p.m. Awesome Books, Downtown. 412-951-6133. LITANALYSIS: READING FICTION W/ FREUD. Discuss contemporary fiction w/ insight from professional psychoanalysts from the Pittsburgh Psychoanalytic Center. Third Sat of every month, 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PENNWRITERS SPRINGDALE WRITERS GROUP. Third Sat of every month Springdale Free Public Library, Springdale. 724-274-9729.

SUN 20 SCOTT SILSBE. Sunday Poetry & Reading Series. 2 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

MON 21 OUT OF THE GUTTER: GRAPHIC NOVEL DISCUSSION GROUP. Third Mon of every month, 6:30 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

MUSEUM OF ART. Red, White & Blue in Black and White: The American Scene in Prints, Drawings & Photographs. 35-some works on paper from the museum’s collection, from photographs to lithographs. Ligonier. 724-238-6015. SPACE. Romper Room. Work by Jae Roberto, Jacob Ciocci, Jim Lingo, Jen Cooney, Matt Barton & Thad Kellstadt. Curated by Ladyboy. Downtown. 412-325-7723. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop. Open studio. Lawrenceville. 412-621-0663. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Your Art Needs You. 177 faded or damaged works which visitors can adopt, funding restoration. OBorn of Fire: The Valley Work. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.

WED 23 CARNEGIE KNITS & READS. Informal knitting session. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3116. CONVERSATION SALON. Second Fri of every month, 2 p.m. and Fourth Wed of every month, 1 p.m. Northland Public Library, McCandless. 412-366-8100. PITTSBURGH POETRY EXCHANGE. Discussing The Water Books by Judith Vollmer. 7:30 p.m. Coffee Tree Roasters, Shadyside. 412-481-7663.

KIDSTUFF THU 17 - WED 23 BACKYARD EXHIBIT. Musical swing set, sandbox, solar-powered instruments, more. Ongoing Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. CHARLIE & KIWI’S EVOLUTIONARY ADVENTURE. Join Charlie as he travels back to the Age of Dinosaurs to discover how evolution works. Feat. story theater & discovery area. Presented by Commonwealth Connections Academy. Tue-Sun. Thru May 12 Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Oakland. 412-622-3131. MISSING LINKS (THE RAINBOW JUMPY). Bounce, jump, roll, run & walk through a 30-foot inflatable “jumpy” art piece created by Felipe Dulzaides. On loan from The New Children’s Museum, San Diego CA. Thru Feb. 3 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

FRI 18 - SUN 20 LITTLE MERMAID JR. FriSun. Thru Jan. 20 McKeesport


[STAGE] Little Theater, McKeesport. 412-673-1100.

FRI 18 - MON 21 DIY CLOCKS. Make your own unique clock in the MAKESHOP. Jan. 18-21, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SAT 19 EAST LIBERTY COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT ORCHESTRA. All levels of orchestra instruments are invited. Parents are invited to join & play w/ their children. Sat, 3-4:30 p.m. Thru March 23 East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800 x 11.

SAT 19 - SUN 20 GLOW TREES. Build a tree sculpture from twigs & conductive copper wire & mesh, then watch as it is energized in a vacuum chamber, creating glowing, sparkling lights. Jan. 19-20 and Jan. 26-29 Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. TARZAN & JANE. Sat, Sun. Thru Feb. 3 Gemini Theater, Point Breeze. 412-243-6464. THE VELVETEEN RABBIT. Highlighted scenes from full length production & meet & greet w/ the actors. Jan. 19-20, 1 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

Though he gained prominence as a mentalist in the ’70s with his own TV show — and as a regular guest of Johnny Carson on The Tonight Show —

The Amazing Kreskin remains a showman and cult celebrity. He recently released his predictions for 2013; apparently, this year will be good for family bonding and bad for lawyers. Saturday, Kreskin brings his near-psychic powers of observation to the Palace Theater. 8 p.m. Sat., Jan 19. 21 W. Otterman St., Greensburg. $22-30. Children under 10 not admitted. Call 724-836-8000 or visit www.ThePalaceTheatre.org.

MON 21 BROWN BAG LUNCH BUNCH. A lunchtime story for kids ages 3-6. Mon, 12:30 p.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838. GET YOUR GAME ON TEENS! Play videogames, board games, cards & more with other teens. Third Mon of every month, 3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Downtown. 412-281-7141. I HAD A DREAM: A CONVERSATION W/ A FRIEND. One man show w/ Greg Kenny. Part of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration Day. 2 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. KING FOR A DAY. People of all ages can read aloud portions of Dr. King’s speeches. Part of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration Day. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. WINTER LITTLE SPROUTS: MY FIRST GARDEN. Sing songs, read stories & pot plants to take home. Ages 2-3 w/ an adult. Mon, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Thru Jan. 28 Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Garden, Oakland. 412-441-4442 x 3925.

WED 23

OUTSIDE

WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

FRI 18 WISE WALK. 1-mile walk around Oakland. Fri, 10:30 a.m. Thru Jan. 25 Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151.

OTHER STUFF THU 17

SAT 19

CITY DHARMA. Soto Zen Meditation. jisen@deepspringzen. org Thu, 6:30-8:15 p.m. Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. CULTURE CLUB. Salon-style conversation & happy hour. Third Thu of every month, 5:30-9 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, Oakland. 412-622-3131. A GARDEN PRIMER. Beginners vegetable gardening workshop. Presented by Grow Pittsburgh. Thu, 7-9 p.m. Thru Jan. 24 East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-362-4769 x 102. INTERNATIONAL HAPPY HOUR: WINTER EDITION. Presented by Global Solutions Pittsburgh. 6-8 p.m. Bar Marco, Strip District. 412-471-7852. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/

3RD ANNUAL WINTERFEST. Ice skating, snowshoeing, ice sculpture & dog sledding demos, chili cook-off, more. 11 a.m.5 p.m. Moraine State Park, Butler. 724-368-9185. PRAIRIE IMPROVEMENT DAY. Help manage the unique prairie ecosystem. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Jennings Environmental Center, Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011. STEP INTO SNOWSHOES. Snowshoeing/skiing every Sat. w/ at least 4” of snow on the ground. Call Friday to confirm. Sat. Thru March 30 Jennings Environmental Center, Slippery Rock. 724-794-6011.

TUE 22

TUE 22

TUESDAYS WITH TESS. Tue, 10 a.m. Penguin Bookshop, Sewickley. 412-741-3838.

SURVIVAL BASICS. Tue, 3-4:30 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. 412-477-4677.

CONTINUES ON PG. 50

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$15 large pizza & pitcher domestic beer FREE POOL all night

Wind Up wednesdays

$2 Miller Lite Drafts til 12am FREE POOL all night ½ off Select Appetizers 9-11pm

Thirsty thursdays

$7 Yuengling Pitchers til 12am $4 Absolut Vodka 10-12pm

Eat, Drink & Dance fridays & saturdays S.I.N sundays

$2 Bud Light Drafts til 12am

01.18 01.19

Sex, Drag & Rock n Roll Snowball DJ Zombo (2 levels) 146 44th Street Lawrenceville PA 15201 412.687.2157 www.cattivo.biz Check our website & Facebook page for more events

[VISUAL ART] international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. RENAISSANCE DANCE GUILD. Learn a variety of dances from the 15-17th centuries. Porter Hall, Room A18A. Thu, 8 p.m. Carnegie Mellon University, Oakland. 412-567-7512. WEEKLY WELLNESS CIRCLE. Group acupuncture & guided meditation for stress-relief. Thu DeMasi Wellness, Aspinwall. 412-927-4768. WEST COAST SWING. Swing dance lessons for all levels. Thu, 7 p.m. Pittsburgh Dance Center, Bloomfield. 412-681-0111.

like-minded individuals. Third Fri of every month, 7 p.m. The Loft, Regent Square. 412-871-5387. LUBE IDOL. American Idol-style singing contest. Fri, 10 p.m. Thru Jan. 18 Quaker Steak & Lube, Cranberry. 724-778-9464. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. LEADERSHIP & DIVERSITY AWARDS. 5:30 p.m. August Wilson Center for African American Culture, Downtown. 412-258-2700. PUBLIC ART WALKING TOUR. Begins at Carnegie Mellon University, Fine Arts Building Lobby. 12 p.m. 412-391-2060 x 237.

THU 17 - SAT 19

FRI 18 - SAT 19

BE THE BEST YOU ARE SOFTBALL CLINIC. Lead by Jessica Mendoza. Email bethebest@optimum.net for information. Jan. 17-19 Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bethel Park. 412-833-5300.

THU 17 - SUN 20 PITTSBURGH RESTAURANT WEEK. Highlighting diverse dining options to the greater Pittsburgh region. Visit http:// pittsburghrestaurantweek.com/ for more information. Thru Jan. 20 412-586-4727.

FRI 18 DRINKING SKEPTICALLY. Informal discussion group for skeptics, critical-thinkers &

FRIDAY NIGHTS

VIDEO DJ’S 10:30PM -2AM

FRIDAY NIGHT $3 Miller Lite 16oz Drafts

$3 Pinnacle Vodka

$5 MARTINIS

LATHET NIGOD FO + t. 1 am Wed.-TSaues. 12 am Sun.-

Beers! t f a r D 36 s for een 8 Big Sc&r Pro Games College

LARGE GROUPS?

24th & East Carson St.

1060 060 SSettlers Ridge Center Drive - Robinson Township CadillacRanchGroup.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013

“In The South Side” 412.390.1111

www.doublewidegrill.com

PRANA. Multimedia event feat. live music, dance, fabric installation & video as visualization for the 7 chakras of the body. Presented by Poof Social Change Through Art. Jan. 18-19, 8 p.m. The Space Upstairs, Point Breeze.

SAT 19

Art by Barbara Westman

Pizza & Beer Night tuesdays

BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 49

THE AMAZING KRESKIN. World famous mentalist. 8 p.m. Palace Theatre, Greensburg. 724-836-8000. THE COST OF THE WARS ON THE AFRICAN AMERICAN In Hear & Now, a new exhibit at Sweetwater Center COMMUNITY. Public forum feat. Chris Moore, Rev. Thomas Smith, for the Arts, local and national printmakers wrestle Dr. James Stewart, & Father David with understanding and existing in the present Taylor. 3 p.m. Carnegie Library, moment — not always an easy task, despite the surplus East Liberty. 412-363-8232. of pithy quotations on the subject. The show is juried AN EVENING W/ JIM SHOOTER. by fiber artist and printmaker Barbara Westman, Interview & Q&A w/ the comic writer. VIP reception at 6 p.m. whose solo exhibit Architecture Transformed will also 7:30 p.m. The ToonSeum, be on view. Opening reception: 7-9 p.m. Fri., Jan. 18. Downtown. 412-232-0199. 200 Broad St., Sewickley. Call 412-741-4405 or visit KOREAN FOR BEGINNERS. www.sweetwaterartcenter.org. Korean grammar & basic conversation. Sat, 1 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. swing dancing skills. Sat, 8 p.m. of The People’s University. KOREAN II. For those Wightman School, Squirrel Hill. who already have a basic 3 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-759-1569. understanding of Korean & 412-622-3151. TAKE A SHOT AT CHANGING are interested in increasing THE WORLD LAUNCH. Film proficiency. Sat Carnegie Library, contest launch for middle Oakland. 412-622-3151. AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL & high school students. Also ROBERT BURNS SUPPER. HUMAN RIGHTS CAFE. feat. screening of The People Dinner honoring the Scottish Weekly letter writing event. Sun, Speak. 2 p.m. Senator John poet. Feat. performances by 4-6 p.m. Panera Bread, Oakland. Heinz History Center, Strip District. 412-683-3727. the Macdonald Pipe Band 412-622-1325. of Pittsburgh & Celtic Spirit ANTIQUE & CLASSIC BICYCLE VARIATIONS ON VISION: Highland Dancers. 5 p.m. SWAP MEET. 8 a.m.-12 p.m. EXERCISES IN Holy Cross Greek Orthodox Days Inn, Butler. 724-287-6761. CONDITIONING Church, Mt. Lebanon. ARABIC FOR BEGINNERS. PERCPETION. Feat. 412-835-3997. Second and Third Sun of every the fi rst section of SATURDAY NIGHT month Carnegie Library, Oakland. Stan Brakhage’s SALSA CRAZE. Free 412-622-3151. ww. r w e “Scenes from Under lessons, followed by p ghcitypa INDOOR TRIATHLON. p m Childhood,” shown dancing. Sat, 10 p.m. .co 11:30 a.m. Jewish Community on 16mm film. 6 p.m. La Cucina Flegrea, 6119 Penn Ave, East Liberty. Center, Squirrel Hill. Downtown. 412-708-8844. 412-521-8010. 301-520-5635. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. PFLAG GREENSBURG. Support, VECHERINKA BALKAN Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing education & advocacy for DANCE PARTY. Live music, follows. No partner needed. the LGBTQ community, family & dance lessons, more. Third Sat Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. friends. Third Sun of every month, of every month, 7:30 p.m. Thru Grace Episcopal Church, 2 p.m. Trinity United Church of June 15 Bulgarian-Macedonian Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. Christ, Greensburg. 412-518-1515. National Education and Cultural SPANISH CONVERSATION Center, West Homestead. GROUP. Friendly, informal. 412-461-6188. At the Starbucks inside Target. PRESIDENTIAL INAUGURATION YOU CAN BE A DOG Sat, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Target LIVE SCREENING. 11 a.m.WHISPERER. Dog training & East Liberty. 412-362-6108. 12:30 p.m. Children’s Museum communication workshop. Part SWING CITY. Learn & practice

SUN 20

FULL LIST ONLINE

MON 21

CONTINUES ON PG. 52


January’s Featured Mixologist:

talk (and bitch and moan and laugh until your cheeks hurt) radio*

Congratulates January’s Featured Mixologist

*on your computer!

LYNN CULLEN LIVE

BILL PAWLIKOWSKI

5801 VIDEO LOUNGE & CAFÉ For Shadyside resident Bill Pawlikowski, bartending was the natural progression of things after being in the food-service industry for fifteen years. He has now worked at 5801 Video Lounge & Café for three years honing his bartending skills. Pawlikowski started waiting on tables at age fifteen for a small mom and pop restaurant on Route 31. He has since worked himself up to management and bartending in the food-service industry. His favorite kind of customer is a regular who he can predict their rou-

TALK RADIO without all the static

ONLINE MONDAY-FRIDAY 10-11am only on www.pghcitypaper.com

tine. He says the trick to bartending is, “multi-tasking and thinking ahead”. When asked what the best part about working at 5801 Video Lounge & Café, he replied “I work with my best friends. We really are one big family here”. When not working with these friends, he can be found on his couch with his 10 month old English Bull Dog, Sealee. What’s the best way to get a drink quickly from Pawlikowski? He says, “Patience and eye contact. Flagging a bartender down only makes the wait longer”.

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

Pittsburgh City Paper editor Chris Potter, every Wednesday and former Andy Warhol Museum director Tom Sokolowski, every Thursday

BILL’S FEATURED RECIPE:

The ABSOLUT Blushing Geisha 2 oz. ABSOLUT CherryKran Vodka Splash of Sours Splash of Sprite Splash of Grenadine In a mixing glass, combine all ingredients. Shake and pour into glass. Garnish with orange slice and a cherry.

5801 ELLSWORTH AVENUE SHADYSIDE www.5801videolounge.com 412-661-5600

[ENJOY WITH ABSOLUT RESPONSIBILITY®.] ABSOLUT® VODKA. PRODUCT OF SWEDEN. 40% ALC./VOL. DISTILLED FROM GRAIN. ©2012 IMPORTED BY ABSOLUT SPIRITS CO., NEW YORK, NY.

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 50

make a real connection Call Livelinks. The hottest place to meet the coolest people.

of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. SPELLING BEE WITH DAVE AND KUMAR. Mon Lava Lounge, South Side. 412-431-5282.

TUE 22 GARDENING FOR FOUR SEASONS OF INTEREST. Class focusing on landscaping for a different season, along w/ ideas for hardscape. Tue, 7-9 p.m. Thru Jan. 29 Phipps Garden Center, Shadyside. 412-441-4442 x 3925.

WED 23

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COMPETITIVE SCRABBLE. Seeking new players, no experience necessary. Wednesdays, Squirrel Hill. 412-422-7878. LET’S SPEAK ENGLISH! Practice conversational English. Wed, 5 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3151. PFLAG WASHINGTON. Support, education & advocacy for the LGBTQ community, family & friends. Fourth Wed of every month First Presbyterian Church, Downtown. 412-471-3436. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners.

All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550. WEST COAST SWING WEDNESDAYS. Swing dance lessons. Wed, 9 p.m. The Library, South Side. 916-287-1373.

AUDITIONS ATL-NYC PRODUCTIONS. Auditions for new TV show, I Want To Be Discovered. Log onto www.iwant2bdiscoveredonline. com & post video of group or individual talent. 3 minutes max.

of an upbeat Broadway song. Call for appointment. Grand Theatre, Elizabeth. 412-384-0504. NEW HORIZON THEATER, INC. Auditions for Black Pearl Sings! Black female in late 20s to early 40s & white female in early 20s to late 30s. Call 412-431-0773 & leave your contact information. PRIME STAGE THEATRE. Auditions for The Great Gatsby. Jan. 19-20. College & adult actors/ vocalists for all roles, 1-2 min. monologue appropriate for the

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

FROGWATCH USA

Through the program FrogWatch USA, volunteers can learn about local wetlands and help in amphibian conservation by reporting the calls of frogs and toads. On Sat., Jan. 26, from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium staff will be at Jennings Environmental Education Center to lead a workshop on monitoring local species. Registration required; email frogwatch@ pittsburghzoo.org.

time of the play & acappella THE BOBCAT PLAYERS. 1920’s tune of your choice. Auditions for their 2013 season. The Oakland School, Oakland. Jan 12, 17, & 19. Plays include 412-965-0563. “Bus Stop,” “Old Love,” “There PSO’S ORCHESTRA Goes the Bride,” “Broadway TRAINING PROGRAM Bound,” & “Love Loss and What FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN I Wore.” For information & MUSICIANS. Applicants must scheduling appointments, call be African American musicians for visit www.bobcatplayers.com. age 18-30 at the start date 412-953-0237. of the fellowship, & must CARNEGIE PERFORMING play a standard orchestral ARTS CENTER. Auditions for instrument. More info at Snow White ballet. Jan. 19. www.pittsburghsymphony.org/ Ages 5+, call for time slot & OTPAAM. Application deadline: more information. Auditions Jan. 18. for Cinderella. Feb. 9. RWS & ASSOCIATES Ages 5+, call for time slot ENTERTAINMENT, INC. & more information. Carnegie. Auditions for paid roles in 412-279-8887. productions that will KEAN THEATRE. Kean take place across Quest Talent Search North America. Vocal Competition Feb. 3. Male/ is accepting female singers, registrations. All ages. dancers, actors http://www.kean www. per pa & musicians. theatre.com/ Gibsonia. pghcitym o .c Auditions@RWSand 724-443-0800 x 5310. Associates.com LATSHAW Thru Feb. 3. Point Park PRODUCTIONS. Auditions University, Downtown. for fall & Christmas traveling 212-391-1795. orchestra shows. Ongoing. THE TALENT GROUP. Open Male/female singers & dancers. casting for models and 412-728-2193. actors 1st Monday of every MCCAFFERY MYSTERIES. month. 11:45 AM, 5:45 PM. Ongoing auditions for 412-471-8011. actors ages 18+ for murder mystery shows performed in the Pittsburgh area. 412-833-5056. ALLOY PITTSBURGH MCKEESPORT LITTLE ARTIST IN RESIDENCE THEATER. Accepting resumes PROGRAM. Seeking regional & inquiries for anyone Pittsburgh artists to submit interested in directing a main project proposals to develop stage or fundraiser show. temporary site-based Deadline is Feb. 28. Send artworks. Submit 10 images resumes to timmylovesursala@ of previous work; current CV, yahoo.com McKeesport. artist statement & bio; URLs 412-673-1100. for any video material in MON RIVER ARTS. Auditions PDF packet to alloypittsburgh@ for Godspell. Jan. 19-20. gmail.com Carrie Furnace, Men/women age 16+, 32 bars Rankin.

FULL LIST E N O LIN

$2 WELL DRINKS 10PM - MIDNIGHT

2-4-1 LAP DANCES

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013

SUBMISSIONS

DIGITAL FILM COMPETITION. Competition for middle and high school students on the impact of STEM (science, technology, engineering & math) in their lives. Presented in partnership with Pittsburgh Filmmakers. Visit www.scitechfestival.org/film for information. GALLERY FLYNN. Seeking work by film & visual artists to display in new gallery. McKees Rocks. 412-969-2990. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. JOHNSTOWN FILM FESTIVAL. Seeking original short films of 30 min. or less. For complete rules & entry form, visit www. johnstownfilmfest.org. Thru May 1. NEW SLANG LITERARY MAGAZINE FOR WOMEN AND GIRLS IN PITTSBURGH. Literary magazine supported by The Women and Girls Foundation. Taking submissions of creative writing, visual art, photographs, and essays from women and girls of all ages. www.new-slang.org THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@ hotmail.com SIGNIFICANT & SUBLIME: THE CRITICAL ROLE OF ART TEACHERS IN PUBLIC EDUCATION. Seeking paintings, drawings, photography, sculpture, prints, & mixed media by current public school art teachers. Submit 3-5 JPEG images, artist statement & questions to: significantandsublime@ gmail.com Panza Gallery, Millvale. 412-821-0959. VERONA’S CREATIVE MARKETPLACE. Seeking artists, food & product vendors for marketplace running May-September. Call for more information. Verona Borough Building, Verona. 412-721-0943. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Seeking individual artists & artist groups for month-long exhibitions in a new transitional gallery measuring. Artists will be responsible for all aspects of their exhibition. Send images & a brief introduction to the work to: bljones@wmuseumaa.org w/ a cc: to jotoole@wmuseumaa.org & jmcgarry@wmuseumaa.org. Greensburg. 724-837-1500.


{BY DAN SAVAGE}

My name is Nancy, and I’m 19. My boyfriend’s name is Carl, we have been together for almost a year — our anniversary is Feb. 14! I want to do something sexy for us on our anniversary. I plan on being with Carl for years to come, and I don’t want the sex to become monotonous. For a while, I’ve wanted to go to a sex store to purchase a few things to spice things up. I found a supportive, nonjudgmental friend who wants a few kinky things for her and her boyfriend. There’s just one problem: I have no idea what to buy! Neither does my friend! I was hoping you had a few essentials that my friend and I should know about or consider purchasing. Both my friend and I are college students, so we’re on a budget. I’m hoping to stay under $100! I just want to keep our relationship going strong and keep things interesting between us sexually. NEEDS A NAUGHTY CONNECTION, YO!

One man’s scorching-hot sex toy is another man’s boring old roll of duct tape, NANCY. By which I mean to say … Turn-ons are subjective. Not all women are to all men’s tastes, not all men are to all women’s, and not all sex acts appeal equally to all. Likewise, sex toys that I might buy for my partner — sex toys I might be inclined to mention when asked to recommend one or two — might not appeal to your boyfriend. I’ll go further than that: The sex toys that turn my husband on would either terrify or stump your boyfriend. Instead of shopping with your friend, you might want to go shopping with your boyfriend. But if you want to surprise your boyfriend — and that’s legit, and lots of people surprise their partners with sex toys on Valentine’s Day — I asked a few sex-toy merchants I like and trust for recommendations. Jennifer Pritchett from Smitten Kitten in Minneapolis, Minn. (smittenkittenonline. com): “The variety of sexy gadgets and orgasmpromising gizmos can be overwhelming even for an experienced shopper. Don’t fret! Smart sex-toy shoppers use a process of elimination. First, commit to a budget that you are comfortable with. Second, ask yourself what you want to do with it. Penetration or no? Vibration or no? Unsure? Then go with the most versatile toy possible. Try out the vibrating dildo by Pleasure Works called the Right Spot. This affordable toy is great for g-spot or prostate stimulation, comes with a removable vibrator, and can be sterilized easily! The Right Spot will keep up with your changing sexual tastes for years to come!” Claire Cavanah from Babeland in Seattle and New York City (babeland.com): “Nancy sounds like a great girlfriend — she’s taking responsibility for maintaining the hotness in her relationship. Bravo! She asked for the essentials, and that means vibrators and lube. We offer a kit called the Babeland Vibrator

Starter Kit for $45. It consists of three vibrators: the Orchid G, which is great for — you guessed it— g-spot stimulation; the Silver Bullet, a standard vibe that has served as a gateway toy for many thousands of sextoy lovers; and a Sonic Ring vibe, a stretchy cock ring that holds a vibrator on top of the penis or dildo for clit stimulation during penetration and gives the penis a good buzz, too. These rate as good starter toys because they’re easy to use, they’re unobtrusive and friendly looking, and they deliver a lot of power. She should take home a hardy lubricant like BabeLube or Sliquid as well. Happy anniversary!” Evy Cowan from Shebop in Portland, Ore. (sheboptheshop.com): “I could give some suggestions on a starter kit, but I think it’s much more fun to explore and decide for yourself what would work for you and your partner. Don’t be scared to pick things up and turn things on (that’s if the shop provides floor models like we do). It’s really important to be able to feel the material and what levels and types of vibrations different toys produce. Don’t be afraid to ask the staff questions — that’s what we’re here for. If the sex shop in your town is not very helpful when it comes to questions, then do some research before you go shopping. On our blog, we have a great guides section that gives advice, from choosing your first vibrator to detailed instructions on how to use a cock ring. Last but not least, make sure the toys you are buying are body safe — there are lots of toys out there that you do not want to be putting in your body. Check out the ‘Safe Sex Toy Shopping Guide’ at Badvibes.org to get the basics.” Tynan Fox from Twin Cities Leather in Minneapolis, Minn. (facebook.com/Twin CitiesLeather): “As Dan alluded to, don’t forget to think outside the box. Our advice: Don’t let the gas masks and floggers and cock locks (oh, my!) scare you away from leather/ fetish shops or gear. It’s OK to start small and simple. Consider buying two blindfolds — one for each of you — and go at it while you’re both wearing them. The feeling of having sex with all your other senses heightened may just ignite a new kinky spark in your love life, and that would definitely fight off routine, monotonous sex. Who knows? Maybe one day, rather than thinking outside the box, you’ll be keeping your boyfriend’s cock locked inside one! But start small. You want to work your way up to the Fucksaw.”

Cri ckuent ge Lo

Pittsburgh’s Best and Oakland’s Only Strip Club on the corner of Baum and Morewood

Monday: $2 Coors Light 9-11pm Tuesday: All Domestic Bottles $3 Until Midnight Wednesday: $2 Miller Lite All Night Thursday: $3 Well Drinks 9-11pm Friday: Ladies Night, No Cover For Ladies Saturday: Ladies Night, No Cover for Ladies, $2 Domestic Bottles until 9pm, $4 Jager Bombs All Night

Looking for Independent Dancers ATM on Site VIP Area for Private Dances

www.cricketdancers.com

Savage Love

280 Morewood Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15213 412-683-9000

REMEMBER: DURING A ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE, ALL RELATIONSHIPS ARE REBOUND RELATIONSHIPS.

How long should a person wait to “get back out there” when his wife has been eaten by a zombie? Asking for a friend. SHERIFF RICK GRIMES (VIA TWITTER @RICKGRIMESATL)

Not too long — life is short, particularly during a zombie apocalypse, and your friend shouldn’t waste what little time he has left. And remember: During a zombie apocalypse, all relationships are rebound relationships. So your friend should get out there.

SEND IN YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT THESTRANGER.COM/SAVAGE

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FOR THE WEEK OF

Free Will Astrology

01.16-01.23

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): A San Francisco writer named Maneesh Sethi decided he was wasting too much time on the Internet. His productivity was suffering. So he hired a woman to sit next to him as he worked and yell at him or slap his face every time his attention wandered off in the direction of Facebook or a funny video. It worked. He got a lot more done. While I would like to see you try some inventive approaches to pumping up your own efficiency, Capricorn, I don’t necessarily endorse Sethi’s rather gimmicky technique. Start brainstorming about some interesting yet practical new ways to enhance your self-discipline, please.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Ronnyjohnson618” is a guy who posts his opinions on a wide variety of YouTube videos. Many times, he claims to be an expert in the field he’s commenting on. Responding to a live music performance, he says he’s a conductor for an orchestra. Offering his opinion about a mimosa plant, he asserts that he is a botanist. Beneath other YouTube videos, he declares he is a meteorologist, chemist, psychologist, soldier and geometry teacher. I love this guy’s blithe swagger; I’m entertained by the brazen fun he’s having. As you express yourself in the coming week, I recommend that you borrow some of his over-the-top audacity. Create a mythic persona. Imagine your life as an epic story. Play the part of a hero.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The earliest performance artist on record was the ancient Greek philosopher Diogenes of Sinope. In one of his notorious stunts, he wandered around Athens with a lit lantern during the daytime, claiming to be looking for an authentic human being. I recommend that you undertake a similar search in the coming days, Pisces. You don’t have to be as theatrical about it. In fact, it might be better to be quite discreet. But I think it’s important for you to locate and interact with people who are living their lives to the fullest — devoted to their brightest dreams, committed to their highest values and sworn to express their highest integrity.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “If you would hit the mark, you must aim a little above it,” wrote 19th-century poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. “Every arrow that flies feels the attraction of the earth.” This is good counsel for you to keep in mind during the coming weeks, Aries. I suspect you will have a good, clear shot at a target you’ve been trying to get close to for a long time. Make sure you adjust your trajectory to account for the attraction of the earth.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): If you learn a novel idea or a crucial new lesson while you are tipsy or outright blitzed, you will probably forget it when you sober up. And it will remain forgotten as long as you abstain. But there’s a good chance you will recall the van-

ished information the next time you get loopy. I’m telling you this, Taurus, because even if you haven’t been inebriated lately, you have definitely been in an altered and expanded state of consciousness. I’m afraid that when you come back down to earth in a few days, you might lose some of the luminous insights you’ve been adding to your repertoire. Is there anything you can do to ensure you will retain these treasures? It would be a shame to lose track of them until the next time your mind gets thoroughly blown open.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Studying the movements of the planets is my main way of discerning the hidden currents of fate. I sometimes supplement my investigations by reading Tarot cards and the Chinese “Book of Changes,” also known as the I Ching. To arrive at your horoscope this week, I used all of the above as well as the following forms of prognostication: catoptromancy, which is divination by gazing into a mirror underwater; cyclomancy, or divination by watching a wheel that’s turning; geloscopy, divination by listening to random laughter; and margaritomancy, divination by observing bouncing pearls. Here’s what I found, Gemini: You now have the power to discern previously unfathomable patterns in a puzzling mystery you’ve been monitoring. You also have the ability to correctly surmise the covert agendas of allies and adversaries alike. Maybe best of all, you can discover certain secrets you’ve been concealing from yourself.

abone. They say it means “a curse that becomes a blessing.” Here’s an example of the phenomenon at work in their lives: While driving home from work together, they experienced car trouble and had to pull over to the shoulder of the road, where they called a tow truck. Later they discovered that this annoying delay prevented them from getting caught in the middle of an accident just up ahead. Extrapolating from the current astrological omens, I’m guessing that you will experience at least one vomfiabone in the coming week, Leo.

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“To be reborn is a constantly recurring human need,” said drama critic Henry Hewes. I agree. We all need to periodically reinvent ourselves — to allow the old ways to die so that we can resurrect ourselves in unforeseen new forms. According to my analysis, Cancerian, your next scheduled rebirth is drawing near. For best results, don’t cling to the past; don’t imitate what has always worked before. Instead, have faith that surrendering to the future will bring you the exact transformation you need.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): My readers Paul and Sophie wrote to let me know they have patched together three Latin words to invent a term for a new concept: vomfi-

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NOW HIRING Part Time Counselors for Afternoon/Evening Hours jobs@freedomtreatment.com

I bet that in the next five months you will be obliged to carry more responsibility than you have in the past. You will find it hard to get away with being lazy or careless. I suspect that during this time you will also have the privilege of wielding more influence. The effect you have on people will be more pronounced and enduring. In short, Virgo, your workload will be greater than usual — and so will your rewards. To the degree that you serve the greater good, you will be a major player. As for next few weeks, you should concentrate on the work and service and responsibility part of this equation.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Do you know what a “binky” is? It’s what a rabbit does when it gets so crazily happy that it exuberantly leaps up into the air, stretching and twisting its body as it flicks and flops its feet. I’m not sure if lexicographers would allow us to apply this term to humans. But assuming they might, I’m going to predict that you’ll soon be having some binky-inducing experiences. You’re entering the Joy and Pleasure Season, Libra — a time when abundant levels of fun and well-being might be quite normal.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You know that area on your back that you can’t quite reach if you want to scratch it? It’s called your acnestis. I propose that we make it your featured metaphor of the week. Why? Because I suspect you will have to deal with a couple of itchy situations that are just beyond your ability to relieve. Yes, this may be frustrating in the short run. But it will ultimately make you even more resourceful than you already are. By this time next week, you will have figured out alternative solutions that you haven’t even imagined yet.

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412-221-1091 FREEDOMTREATMENT.COM

m ur & ers 7p Ho fts tiz 5 py ra e p D pp Ha Off e A c $2 Pri 2 1/

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

M A I N F E AT U R E

APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

“We need new friends,” said essayist Logan Pearsall Smith. “Some of us are cannibals who have eaten their old friends up; others must have ever-renewed audiences before whom to re-enact an ideal version of their lives.” Smith could have been talking about you Sagittarians in early 2013. According to my interpretation of the astrological omens, you need some fresh alliances. Their influence will activate certain potentials that you haven’t been able to access or fully express with the help of your current circle.

MUSIC

DELIGHT

Imagine that thanks to scientific breakthroughs, healthy habits, and good luck, you’re still alive in 2090. What’s your life like? Testify at Free willastrology.com.

Pittsburgh’s only Peanut Butter Burger!

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412.316.3342 EXT. 189

SERVICES 56 + WORK 56 + STUDIES 59 + LIVE 60 + WELLESS 61

SERVICES ANNOUNCEMENTS CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

DANCE INSTRUCTOR Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342

Place your Classified advertisment in City Paper. Call 412.316.3342 REACH 5 MILLION hip, forward-thinking consumers across the U.S. When you advertise in alternative newspapers, you become part of the local scene and gain access to an audience you won’t reach anywhere else. http:// altweeklies.com/ads Wellness is a state that combines health & happiness. Make City Paper readers happy by advertising your health services in our “Wellness” section.

CLASSES ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472 www.CenturaOnline. com(AAN CAN) Advertise Here Today!

PITTSBURGH STEEL CITY STEPPERS CHICAGO-STYLE STEPPIN’ DANCE LESSONS Wednesdays 7 -8:30 PM Wilkins School Community Center CONTACT: steelcitysteppers@ hotmail.com “friend” us on Facebook and Meetup.com

AIRLINE CAREERS – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-4923059 (AAN CAN)

HAULING

D & S HAULING Reliable Low Rates Call NOW

412-877-0730

REHEARSAL Rehearsal Space starting @ $150/mo Many sizes available, no sec deposit, play @ the original and largest practice facility, 24/7 access, 412-403-6069 Our readers look for an overall feeling of well being on a daily basis and they are looking for businesses like yours! Advertise in City Papers “Wellness” section.

ADOPTION ADOPT Adoring young professionals will LOVE and CHERISH 1st baby. Expenses Paid 1-800-997-1720 Morgan & John

Adopt. Adoring woman looking to adopt a baby. Unconditional love & security forever promised. Exp.Pd. Elisa 1-855-586-8848

WORK HELP WANTED $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easyworkgreatpay.com (AAN CAN)

Your ad could be here

Advertise Here Today!

State Police Approval Letter Required 724-728-8029 3645 Brodhead Rd Monaca, PA 15061

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437

PAY FOR ONE DAY!

Feb. 23, 24, 28; Mar. 1, 2 Apr 20, 21, 25, 26, 27 Renewal Classes: Feb. 28 and Apr. 25 Brodhead Rd Location

www.lethalweapons.state.pa.us

WANTED! 36 PEOPLE

GREAT

Act 235 Courses

Mar. 16, 17, 21, 22, 23 Renewal Classes: Mar. 21 Doubletree by Hilton Greentree

HELP WANTED!!! MAKE $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailingusa.com (AAN CAN)

www.healthnutrition pittsburgh.com

ARMOR SECURITY TRAINING INSTITUTE

412.316.3342

Registration Necessary TWO WEEKS Prior to the First Day of Class

Drivers WANTED Pittsburgh City Paper needs friendly drivers to work (early morning hours) to distribute the paper in the Downtown Pittsburgh area. Interested candidates must have a clean DMV history and current proof of insurance. Regular lifting of up to 50 lbs is required. Heavy, bulk retail delivery to CP sites weekly.

Must have a full-size truck/van. CONTACT >> 412.316.3342 x173 JIM for an application

DISCLAIMER: ALTHOUGH MOST ADVERTISING IN PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER ARE LEGITIMATE BUSINESSES, PRIOR TO INVESTING MONEY OR USING A SERVICE LOCATED WITHIN ANY SECTION OF THE CLASSIFIEDS WE SUGGEST THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE: ASK FOR REFERENCES & BUSINESS LICENSE NUMBER, OR CALL/WRITE: THE BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU AT 412-456-2700 / 300 SIXTH AVE., STE 100-UL / PITTSBURGH, PA 15222. REMEMBER: IF IT SOUNDS TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE, IT USUALLY IS! 56

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013


Are You A People Person? Making a difference for over 30 years, Public Interest Communications has been the voice behind the nation’s most successful non-profit organizations. But—it can only happen one connection at a time. If you are articulate, motivated, and care about the world, call (412) 622-7370 or head to: pubintcom.com/careers.html www.facebook.com/ picpgh

www.paguard.com

www.goodwillswpa.org/ job-postings

In Oakland/ Shadyside, on busline. Near universities. Plenty of free parking.

www.panerabread.jobs

www.sunrise-careers.com www.sunriseseniorliving. com

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NOW HIRING All Levels of Management

Opportunities available in All Cafes in Pittsburgh ›Room for advancement ›Great Salary and Benefits › ›Bonus Program ›

JOIN OUR TEAM www.panerabread.jobs

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013


STUDIES Want to make a difference? Healthy Volunteers Needed for Hormonal Vaginal Ring Research Study You may be eligible to participate if you are: • • • •

18-39 years old In general good health Have regular periods Not pregnant or breastfeeding • Are willing to abstain from sexual activity, OR are sexually active and willing to use condoms, OR you are sterilized OR with one partner who has a vasectomy • Are willing to come to MageeWomens Hospital for up to 54 visits over 8 months

Participants will be compensated up to $2,930 fo their time and travel For more information please contact:

The Center for Family Planning at

412-641-5496

or visit: www.birthcontrolstudies.org

Are you interested in a long-term method of birth control? YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE IF YOU: • Are a non-pregnant woman between 16 and 45 years old • Are in need of contraception • Have regular periods • Are willing to come to Magee-Womens Hospital to complete up to 14 or more visits over a five year period The Center for Family Planning Research is conducting a research study of an investigational contraceptive intrauterine device (IUD). Participants will receive study-related exams and study-related birth control at no cost. To see if you qualify, please call the Center for Family Planning Research at 412-641-5496 or visit our website at www.birthcontrolstudies.org.Participants will be reimbursed up to $1030 over five years.

ROLL THE DICE

ays ve alw er. ’ u o y s ine s s t y Pap t he bu e r ti s e in C i t r a t S v 2 d & ad 34 3 s. w a n te 6 u 1 s re lt 3

412-

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LIVE REAL ESTATE SERVICES 20 ACRES FREE. Buy 40Get 60 acres. $0-Down, $198/month. Money back gaurentee. NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful views. Roads/ surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.SunsetRanches. com (AAN CAN) Advertise Here Today!

EAST FOR RENT

ROOMMATES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

SOUTH FOR RENT

Beautiful 1st-flr apt in a 3-family hse on Bartlett St in Sq Hill avl immediately. $925/mo + gas + electric. Incl. w/ d dishwasher. This will be a sublease through July 2013, with option to take over lease in August. Call (412) 5438610 or email gardellawg@gmail.com.

Mount Washington 1BR apt. 1st flr 1/2 block from Grandview $650 + Utils. 412-833-3803

Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

MOVING SERVICES ABC SELF STORAGE5x10 $45, 10x10 $65, 10x15 $95. (2) locations Mckees Rocks & South Side. 412-403-6069

Ink Well {BY BEN TAUSIG}

NAMASTE! Find a healthy balance of the mind, body and spirit with one of our massage therapists, yoga, or spa businesses!

ACROSS

STUDIES CLINICAL STUDIES Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

ENDOMETRIOSIS?

CLINICAL STUDIES Find your next place to “LIVE” in City Paper!

MENSTRUAL CRAMPS? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

DIARRHEA?

ASTHMA? Call Preferred Primary Care Physicians at

Our board-certified physicians have been conducting clinical trials to advance primary care practice and the health of patients since 2003. We are currently enrolling for clinical trials in the following areas: • Asthma • COPD • Migraine • Diabetes

• Cardiovascular • High cholesterol • IBS with diarrhea

412-650-6155

CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

Your ad could be here

DIABETES? CALL TODAY!

412.363.1900 CTRS

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412-650-6155

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013

ENDINGS ALL OVER

1. Pass on 6. Blew past the Rx amount, say 10. Bitter beer flavorer 14. Parent of Mack Trucks 15. “O Rei do Futebol” 16. Noodle product? 17. Serve as course director? 18. Union currently run by James P. Hoffa 20. Coin flip to see who gets the first glass of Bordeaux? 22. Drink with plenty of 10-Across 25. Networking spot 26. Lisbeth portrayer 27. Scünci maker 29. Chick-___-A 30. Matching neckwear for a couple of goofy-looking Welsh pups? 35. British rapper Jay ___ 36. Knack for notes 37. Collars 40. Helping an old lady cross the street in the middle of a war? 45. Fast food giant 46. Knight’s logo 47. Certain discount 51. Pen-carrying presidential runner-up 53. “Sure thing” 54. Bust of the 43rd president in

an alternate universe? 57. English Civil War soldiers 58. Disembodied brain allied with Shredder 62. New York’s The ___ Is Too Damn High party 63. Mega-depressing Vietnamese-American model Tequila 64. Site of a “Return of the Jedi” battle 65. De Matteo on “Sons of Anarchy” 66. Restricted to 67. Skirt

DOWN 1. Big letters in prescriptions 2. Degenerate 3. Flamenco exclamation 4. Sans opposite 5. Related to the word of god, in a way 6. Made a call 7. Company whose logo features a homonym of its own name 8. Pizzazz 9. Loss of points 10. Reach from home? 11. Ancient art space 12. Intrinsically 13. Unlikely to take shit 19. Brand in the freezer, sometimes 21. NYC area,

informally 22. Congressional productions 23. Rob of “Parks and Recreation” 24. 1947 computing patent subject 28. A.D. part 29. Like some parental tones 31. Five hundred sheets, often 32. Gun, in ‘90s rap lyrics 33. Mr. Ferrari 34. Famed Harlem ballroom 38. General area? 39. “You’re scaring the fish, dude!” 41. Carvey’s partner, in the ‘90s

42. It’s rolled in Mexico 43. Chain unit 44. Used meth 47. Popular low-rider model, briefly 48. One who’s got the hook-up 49. Layer with holes 50. Crush competitor 51. Fixate (on) 52. Lana Del Rey’s “___ Can You See” 55. Major Germanic god 56. Bond’s first film 59. Run numbers? 60. Alcoholic egg drink 61. Test with an “experimental section,” briefly {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


WELLNESS COUNSELING

MIND & BODY Xie LiHong’s

massage

WELLNESS CENTER

BAD BACK OR NECK PAIN?

412-400-7159

Chinese Tuina Massage

selfesteemworkshops.com

Walk-Ins Welcome 412-561-1104

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3225 W. Liberty Ave. • Dormont

MIND & BODY

CHINESE MASSAGE

Mingkun Massage

412-308-5540 412-548-3710

DEEP TISSUE MASSAGE

3348 Babcock Blvd. Pittsburgh

• $40 per 60 min massage • 2hr free valet parking at the Concourse with the purchase of a 60 or 90 min massage

Zhangs Wellness Center

412-401-4110 $40/hr

125 W. Station Square Dr. Station Sq. Freight Shops

DOWNTOWN 322 Fourth Ave.

PH. 412.389.8637

(1st Floor)

minkunmassage.com 



Chinese So Relax Massage

Phoenix Spa

Caring Help for Opiate Addiction

• Experienced, caring therapy and medical staff. • Private, professional setting. • Downtown office near public transportation and parking. • Medication by prescription coverage or self-pay.

412.246.8965, ext. 9

JADE

www.pittsburghbodyworks.com

China Massage $50/HR Free Table Shower 1788 Golden Mile Hwy Monroeville, PA 15146 Call for more information

724-519-7896

Open 10-10 Daily

Free Table Shower w/60min Open 10-10 Daily

1310 E. Carson St. 412-488-3951

Therapeutic Massage Therapy Relief is just a call away. Our licensed professional staff can assist with Fibromyalgia, Circulation, Low Back Pain, Muscle Spasms.

Wellness Center

Premiere Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Treatment

Shadyside Location

412-441-1185

412-677-6080 412-918-1281

We treat: ~ Opiate Addiction ~ Heroin Addiction ~ And Other Drug Addiction

• SUBOXONE • VIVITROL -

a new once a month injection for alcohol and opiate dependency

Includes Med Management & Therapy

• Group and Individualized Therapy

LOCATIONS IN:

• NOW Treating Pregnant Women

Oakland, PA Downtown Pgh, PA Bridgeville, PA West View, PA Butler, PA

NO WAIT LIST Accepts all major insurances and medical assistance





IMMEDIATE OPENINGS

412-316-3342

Walk in or Call

SUBOXONE

Family Owned and Operated Treating: Alcohol, Opiates, Heroin and More

Call Today to Advertise Your Business in Pittsburgh City Paper!

Water table and hot oil massages, body scrubs, and 10 different types of massages! Best Chinese Massage Open 7 days a week 9:30am til 2am 2508 E. Carson St.

Addiction & Recovery Health Services

Immediate openings. Now accepting Highmark and self-paying clients.

Sports, Swedish, Shiatsu. $50/Hour Northside Location Near Heinz Field Call Rick: 412-512-6716

STAR

412-621-3300

SUBOXONE TREATMENT

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE FOR MEN

Superior Chinese Massage

(Lawrenceville)

$10 Off Massage Before Noon!

 Trigger point  Deep tissue  Swedish  Reflexology BLOOMFIELD  412.683.2328

New Young Professional

South Side

Get the most for your money in CP Classifieds. We get great results. Call 412.316.3342

Therapy

Free Table Shower w/60 min. 4309 Butler Street

Professional Massage Therapists

MIND & BODY

Find your next place to “WORK” in City Paper!

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SELF-ESTEEM WORKSHOPS

MIND & BODY

412.434.6700

Suboxone Services Pittsburgh- 412-281-1521 Beaver- 724-448-9116 NEWS

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WE have been there WE know your pain Don’t Wait Any Longer! MONROEVILLE, PA

412-380-0100 www.myjadewellness.com +

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www.ThereToHelp.org

We Accept: - UPMC for You - United Health - And Many Others EVENTS

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Xin Sui Bodyworks

TIGER SPA

Grand Opening

GRAND OPENING!!! Best of the Best in Town! 420 W. Market St., Warren, OH 44481 76 West, 11 North, 82 West to Market St. 6 lights and make a left. 1/4 mile on the left hand side.

$49.99/ hour Free Vichy Shower with 1HR or more body work (Body shower and Body Scrub) Essential Oil used at no extra charge

Open 9am-12 midnight 7 days a week! Licensed Professionals Dry Sauna, Table Shower, Deep Tissue, Swedish

2539 Monroeville Blvd Ste 200 Monroeville, Pa 15146 Next to Twin Fountain Plaza 412-335-6111

330-373-0303 Credit Cards Accepted

GRAND OPENING!

Judy’s Oriental Massage Appointments & Walk-ins are both welcome 10am to 10pm

FULL BODY MASSAGE $40/hr

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

Work yourself into a lather. Rinse. Repeat.

Now with Vichy Shower 4125 William Penn Hwy, Murrysville, PA 15668 Across the street from Howard Hanna’s

724-519-2950 Accepting All Major Cards

412.316.3342

Get Your YOGA On! Schoolhouse Yoga new year. new you.

get strong strLS GLstrLFt get Áe[LEOe sTuLrreO KLOO Oose weLgKt sKaGysLGe ÀnG SeaFe nortK KLOOs

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 01.16/01.23.2013


SERVING SENTENCES IT’S 8:30 ON a Friday morning, in a 12-by-12-foot cinder-block room in the basement of the Allegheny County Jail. And Theo is here to testify. Sarah Shotland has just asked him and the other 14 men here if they have anything they want to share. Theo (not his real name) certainly does. He’s a drug dealer, Theo says, and he’s angry about it. Angry because when he leaves County, he’s still going to be a drug dealer. Angry because he wants to provide for his family and doesn’t know any other way to do it. Angry because he misses his kids — and because he’s afraid that they’ll do the same things he did, and end up here too. The other men, all dressed in red scrubs and sitting in a circle, murmur assent. “That’s so real,” one says. The others nod. Shotland seizes the moment: “Who else is a dad?” All 14 hands go up. “Why not write a letter to your kids?” she prompts. Assiduously, and painstakingly, the men write for 15 minutes.

erything he’s lost to it. What he misses most, he says, is his neighborhood — Bloomfield, its bakeries and churches. His is a tale of loss on top of loss. Although all his crimes have been petty, he’s a lifer of sorts, because he keeps rotating back in. Around the room, Shotland’s students run the gamut, a rainbow coalition of colors and ages ranging from 18 to 65. While some of their writing is pretty good — the program has produced a brace of national prison-writing award-winners — much is little more than doggerel or therapy. Which is just fine with Shotland. “It’s about self-healing,” she says, “or channeling their anger. That’s great. Because this is one way to express themselves.” All these hard cases — people who’ve spent their lives concealing, hiding, covering up — are now opening up, freely discussing emotions, hurts and hopes. Emboldened by the letters home, Shotland’s next exercise is a sonnet, of all things. The participants hunker down, then emerge. It ain’t Shakespeare, or Spenser, or Milton. It’s down-and-outers writing about drugs, about the detritus of their lives. But clearly they’re trying

ALL THESE HARD CASES — PEOPLE WHO’VE SPENT THEIR LIVES CONCEALING, HIDING, COVERING UP — ARE NOW OPENING UP, FREELY DISCUSSING EMOTIONS, HURTS AND HOPES. As coordinator of Words Without Walls, a writing program created by Chatham University’s MFA in Creative Writing Program, Shotland leads these gender-segregated seminars, and also supervises the graduate students who serve as teachers. She knows the drill well, having begun when she was a graduate student. “That’s perfect,” she remembers thinking when she learned of the program: “A captive audience.” They’re a captive audience, all right. County is a decidedly mixed bag, housing everyone from petty offenders to arch-criminals. Many are here waiting — for local, state or federal systems to process their cases. They’re waiting for transfers, waiting for trials. Tax cheats and torturers, drug pushers and price-fixers, all are chucked in together, at least for a bit. Some for a bigger bit. Inmates with no history of violence can take the semester-long Words Without Walls course, as often as they desire. (One woman signed up a record eight times.) The program is entirely voluntary: Given the transient nature of the population, some don’t last the semester. When the 15 minutes are up, an older man, doing time for retail theft, reads his letter. It’s a harrowing tale of addiction, and ev-

to take the next step. “I tell my students that even if they’ve never written a word, they have richer material than most people,” Shotland says. “They grapple with Big Ideas every day — freedom and consequence, redemption and truth. I ask them to mine their lives for experiences to bring to the page.” And it works. “I get a lot of memory,” she says, “and a lot of poetry. Some of it is very good. Some of it sets the bar very high. “Plus,” she adds, “they’re so attentive. They love sharing their work with each other.” That’s the pull, she thinks: that touch of self, of sharing, of humanity in a closed, rigid environment. In the only home that some of them have ever known. It’s been three hours. A guard — big, burly, Central Casting — comes in the room. “We gotta go,” he commands, and the men all stand. They thank her as they file out. Shotland watches their red backs and sighs. “It’s the most important thing I do,” she says. “It makes me think more deeply about how we’re all connected. And how these people got to be human beings for a while.” INF O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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January 16, 2013  

Pittsburgh City Paper - Volume 23 - Issue 3

January 16, 2013  

Pittsburgh City Paper - Volume 23 - Issue 3