Page 1

the

Falcon’s Eye

Pfeiffer University http://media.pfeiffer.edu/falconseye/April13.pdf

April 2013

o b a S

e g a t

By Rodd Baxley

The Phoenix has been sabotaged. Pfeiffer’s literary magazine was hacked online recently, and everything associated with the magazine was deleted. The website, the email account, the submissions of work, everything was gone. “When everything happened at first my emotions went crazy. I felt everything from panic, to stress, and then I was sad because I couldn’t believe someone would do this to us,” Editor-In-Chief of The Phoenix, Kayla Lookabill, said. The Phoenix offers students, staff, faculty, and community members the opportunity to submit original works of poetry, art, fiction or essays every year.

The Phoenix staff reviews each piece and publishes the magazine. “It’s very hurtful to see the destruction of someone else’s creative process,” Sylvia Hoffmire, Assistant Professor of English and Advisor to The Phoenix staff, said. “This is a criminal offense and it should not be taken lightly.” Fortunately, Pfeiffer’s IT department was able to retrieve submissions through the archives. Right now The Phoenix is working on relaunching itself. “We are using this time for rebuilding who and what we are. We want to really put The Phoenix out there for everyone to see and know about,” Lookabill said. “The staff is working hard and

moving forward. We have run into a large bump in the road, but we’ll be fine,” Hoffmire said. “I don’t understand why, but this gives us a great opportunity to take The Phoenix and change it to become the best it can be,” Jamie Alcala, Visual Arts Editor, said. “Though this may be a small setback, we are not letting it change our goals of showcasing the talents of our community at the end of the semester.” That goes hand-in-hand with the mission of The Phoenix, as seen on Facebook. “Every day is a new day. Every day we rise from the ashes.” Anyone with any information on this crime should contact the Honor Board. You can reach the board via Dr. Jim Gulledge at ext. 3366.


2 April

Exclusive: By Kimberly Goodell

Tuition Hike for 2013-2014

“I am already paying $32,000 dollars to go here! Why do I have to pay more next year?” freshman Lauren Witcher said. “As our fixed costs increase, such as oil to heat each dormitory, so must the price of tuition to attend Pfeiffer,” VP of Finance/ CFO Robin Leslie explained. Leslie confirms tuition will rise for 2013-2014, but the increase will not be outrageous. “The current price of tuition amounts to $22,500 dollars a year. The price of tuition will only increase five to six percent next year,” Leslie said. That amounts to between $1,125$1,350. “I think Pfeiffer is the one of the most expensive schools to attend. Even though it is a private institution, the price to go here is too high. I am pretty sure it does not cost that much at other schools,”

freshman Kaitlyn Yow said. “[Actually], Pfeiffer ranks 27th out of 35 [for] tuition costs at [accredited North Carolina private] universities. The number one price of tuition is Duke University with a total of over $41,000 a year,” Leslie explained. “I understand why the price of tuition would increase, especially with the current standing of the economy. But when people like myself are struggling to pay a couple hundred a month, another thousand [or so] next year will be more than my family can afford. What will I do then?” said one sophomore who wished to remain anonymous. There are ways to help ease the financial burden of tuition. The Administration has been sending out e-mails with possible opportunities for scholarships for the next academic school year. People also have the chance to receive more money

Shot Suspensions By Jane Meyer Why were so many Pfeiffer students kicked out of class on Friday, February 15? The school requires everyone to have up-todate immunization records, and this was the last date to have them turned in. Those who did not have complete records were asked to leave class. Jennifer Carrick is the nurse at Pfeiffer University. She received her B.S. in Nursing from UNC Chapel Hill, and her M.S. in Nursing from UNC Charlotte. “There is a suspension day every semester, and if students do not provide required documentation by that time, they will be withdrawn from their classes. They are suspended and not allowed to attend campus activities or their classes,” Carrick said. The Pfeiffer University website

states that “you will not be able to register for classes until the completed form is received, reviewed, and processed which can take up to two weeks.” If so, why was it left to professors to suddenly kick students out of their classrooms in the middle of the semester? Junior Corey Cleghorn was one of the students on the list to be suspended. “I hate shots, so I had one of those moments of distress. Also, finding my medical records was pretty hard,” Cleghorn said. To voice your opinion about the recent school suspensions, log onto our Facebook page.

when they reapply for financial aid through FASFA. If anyone has any questions or concerns, please stop by the Administration building and ask to speak with Robin Leslie or Shivon Lee.

photo by Philip Howard


news

Goodbye to Peer Chaplains? By Apache Shuping

Do you ever just need someone to talk to? Here at Pfeiffer students have people to talk to who can really relate to them. They are called Peer Chaplains. “The Peer Chaplain program was instituted over twelve years ago,” Pastor Dana McKim said. According to www.Pfeiffer.edu, the purpose of peer chaplains is “to provide a friendly and welcoming environment for students that helps build community.” But the program is being temporarily shut down and redesigned and re-staffed, according to McKim. Why make this decision now and not at the end of the semester? “Waiting until the end of this semester to make this decision would have been problematic. Several of our remaining Peer Chaplains had interests in other leadership opportunities such as our Sports Chaplain program, Residence Life positions, Peer Mentors and Tutors. If we had waited to make this decision and announce this in April, the deadlines for those opportunities would have come and gone and these students would have not had the opportunity to pursue these interests,” McKim explained. “If we made the decision when we did but held the Peer Chaplains to their contractual obligations then they would be working for a program that was being placed on hiatus and it is difficult, even under the best of circumstances, to put your heart and soul into a program that you know is coming to an end. By doing this now and in this way, these students who have been faithfully executing their duties were given the opportunity to pursue other interests.” Freshman Brandy Queen was interested in becoming a peer chaplain because she thought it would help her major and give her experiences for the youth ministry field. “I was upset but knew there had to be some reason as to why the program was shut down. The program will be greatly missed if it never returns,” Queen said. “The program did a lot of positive

things around campus,” sophomore Megan Lyerly said. John Borza just started his position as a peer chaplain this semester. “Ever since I started in the church at Pfeiffer, I wanted to make a change in the student population of Pfeiffer and I believed being a peer chaplain would help me achieve that goal,” Borza said. “The Peer Chaplains were not fired, I have heard that terminology used to describe what was done and that is unfortunate and demeaning to the students that were dedicated to this program,” McKim said. “Just because we are not technically

Peer Chaplains, we are still available for students. I wasn’t a Peer Chaplain for the title, but because I care about others. Students can still come talk to me and I know other former Chaplains feel the same,” Diamond Pate, who has been a peer chaplain for two years, said. “We have had several conversations with our former Peer Chaplains and will be developing a new program that will be unveiled within the next year,” McKim added.

Photo by Jamie Alcala

The Blue Room where Peer Chaplains often meet.

3


4 April Giving Credit Where Credit’s Due By Kelly Hoey

It should come as no shock that nursing is one of the top majors in today’s collegiate scene. It is consistently mentioned by educational organizations such as the Princeton Review in their segments on 10 best college majors due to job security, lucrative pay, and the aging of the baby boomer generation. Here at Pfeiffer University the Nursing department is diligently working on building Pfeiffer’s reputation as an exceptional place to earn a Bachelors of Science in Nursing (BSN). The Nursing program was granted authorization in May 2009 by the North Carolina Board of Nursing and was introduced to students the following fall. The major requires two years of pre-requisite classes, so students could not officially apply to be a nursing major until the Spring 2011 term. Dr. Dianne Daniels, Department Chair and Associate Professor of Nursing, has been working along with other staff members to get the department accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE). Gaining accreditation is a long tedious process but major progress has been made recently. The CCNE was on campus in February for an on-site evaluation, which is a huge step toward becoming accredited. “The Department of Nursing had our national accreditation site visit this [past month]. We will not know the outcome until after the Commission meets in October. I feel very positive about the visit and trust we will receive good news in October,” Daniels said. The accreditation works in a retroactive way, so if the program is awarded accreditation next fall the nursing program’s first class of graduating seniors this May will still be recognized as completing their BSN at an accredited institution. Pfeiffer students realize the numerous opportunities a BSN has to offer and are taking advantage of having such a

great program with a very dedicated staff. “I switched from being an art major to nursing so I could accomplish my dream of becoming an art therapist. Being able to obtain my BSN at Pfeiffer allows me to work

with a helpful staff that has a very personal approach to education and doesn’t operate as an educational factory like larger schools do,” Pfeiffer Nursing student Erin West said.


news

Free Taxes By Crystal Curlee

Are you looking for a way to do your taxes for free and without the hassle? The Accounting Society, a group of Pfeiffer students, is volunteering in the Vita Program to offer to do your taxes for free. This is the second year they are conducting this program. All volunteers are IRS certified. They cover anything from basic tax preparation to international student filing. The site coordinator is Pfeiffer Professor Dr. Patrick Malloy. “We make appointments seven days a week,” accounting student Candice Roberts said. “It’s a great program at absolutely no charge to clients. [It’s] a great tool for our learning and teaching skills for the Accounting and Fraud program members… It is a needed and valuable contribution to our community and student body. We will be looking forward to doing it year after year and hope to come to be known around the area and campus for our reliable service and above all our quality and interest in serving those around us!” “The individuals that did my taxes were very professional and helpful, I really enjoyed it,” client Gregory Maynor said. Anyone can make an appointment by contacting The Accounting Society at accounting.society@fsmail.pfeiffer.edu. You can also call Candice Roberts at 980-5816757.

Pfeiffer Accounting Society

5


6 April Bluegrass at Pfeiffer By Zach Thompson On Friday, February 22nd, The Pfeiffer Chapel rang loud and proud with the sound of Bluegrass. For the 10 o’clock hour, students and faculty alike got to be up close and personal with Bob Carlin, banjoist extraordinaire. Carlin is the best known clawhammer style banjoist performing today. Carlin has taken his love for the banjo and toured throughout the United States, Canada, Europe, Australia, and Japan. Not only does Carlin love playing the banjo, but he is also a traditional music researcher. Carlin gave a short history of the traditional five string instrument which was seen in his performance. “I think that it’s great to have such a talented musician at Pfeiffer, playing such an unheard of instrument. When I heard about this event, I knew that I had to be there,” senior Zack Jones said. Carlin is a three-time winner of the Frets Magazine readers poll, and has four Rounder albums along with several instruction manuals and videos for the banjo. Carlin is not only highly known for his incredible musical talent, but also for his amazing skill as a music industry producer. “It’s not my style of music, but I really enjoyed it,” sophomore Ryan Goldsmith said. As his performance ended, Carlin, along with music professor Steve Harrill and two students, took their folk instruments over to Stokes Student Center and had an impromptu Bluegrass jam session that provided entertainment for all around. “They sounded really good. It was very interesting,” freshman Apache Shuping said.


news

Pfeiffer Does Pfashion By Shea McDonnell “It was actually a lot more entertaining then I thought it would be. I loved all the speedos, those were my favorite,” senior Shannon Bonnel said of the recent fashion show held in the theatre. The purpose of the fashion show was to give examples of appropriate and inappropriate clothing that could be worn by college students. The catch was that all the models were actual Pfeiffer students wearing their own clothing. The show started with models wearing appropriate and inappropriate sports wear. Inappropriate clothing ranged from anything from cut off tee shirts, to other schools’ clothing, to speedos. The show then went on to cover how you should dress for a business casual event, a semi-formal or formal event, and culminated with all the models wearing appropriate and inappropriate club wear. Most students enjoyed how all those assigned to wear things considered to be a fashion “no-no” made their strut down the runway humorous. “I just thought it was really funny everyone did such a good job. It’s just cool that it was all students and they made it funny to watch,” freshman Delaney Miller said. Even with all the humor, it’s hard to say if students will actually heed the advice that the show was trying to give, and stop wearing their pajamas to class and cut-offs to practice. “I didn’t even want to come initially, but my friends were in it, so I did. It was actually entertaining, but I am still going to wear what I want,” sophomore Justine Serje said.

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8 April A Journey to Retain Students By Zach Dyer In the world of academia, numerical values are assigned to nearly every aspect of an educational facility. From student to faculty ratios, acceptance rates, to the all important percentage of students receiving financial aid; these ratings are pervasive and are designed to allow us to compare schools, relatively speaking. A quick journey onto any college ranking site and you will find that Pfeiffer, like most small, private universities, has a fairly low freshman retention rate; that is the percentage of students returning after their first year. But, as Professor Deborah Burris explains, these numbers are kind of arbitrary and do not do justice to what Pfeiffer, or any college for that matter, aims to do, namely, encourage students to persist in their education, either at Pfeiffer, or, if necessary, elsewhere. “We want students to persist in their education, to help them discover what they want to do,” Burris stated. The Pfeiffer Journey class exists to not only retain students, but help them find their own identities. “[This] course is one that everyone takes, in which they find their voice, discover what is important to them and what they need to do to best prepare them for that,” Burris said. She adds that Journey also helps them “formulate their values and really establish a level of connectedness.” “The quicker you establish a sense of belonging and make students feel as if they are part of a community, the faster retention rates increase,” said Dr. Gerald Neal, a Pfeiffer professor and Journey mentor. The second semesters of the Journey program involve a “very thoughtful career assessment, in which both student and advisor arrive at a major,” Burris said. “While belongingness is important for retention, clarity is also motivating and definitely important.” Clarity involves deciding on a major field or career goal that in turn gives a

student purpose. That purpose helps them persist toward graduation. According to Burris, Pfeiffer’s “new coaching model, that really takes the time to sit down with everyone,” is paying off. This year the fall to spring retention rate for new students was an outstanding 92%, a value that Pfeiffer has previously only dreamed of.


news Increased Minimum Wage? By Natalie Miller In February President Barack Obama announced, in his State of the Union address, a plan to raise the minimum wage from $7.25 per hour to $9.00 per hour by 2015. This plan has gotten mixed reviews. Many believe an increase would help people get out of poverty, while others are worried it will have a negative effect and lead to higher unemployment and inflation. Students we interviewed who work minimum wage jobs are happy about this potential raise. “I think it’s a good thing. Minimum wage doesn’t go up very often, but prices do a lot,” said one student worker who wished to remain anonymous. But one freshman we talked to, who

is an accounting major, opposes the raise. “It would be terrible to raise minimum wage. If they raise minimum wage all it will do is cause inflation and higher unemployment,” said the student, who also wished to remain anonymous. How do you feel about a possible minimum wage increase? Visit our Facebook page to join the conversation.

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10 April Out of the Box By Amanda McClure Walking forward, standing facing the door in an elevator, sitting at a table to eat, or talking in an “inside voice” are all considered social norms. Society has classified what is “normal” and what isn’t. Some people challenge these norms and receive different responses in return. I did an experiment where I violated a social norm by getting in a person’s personal space, or “bubble”. Walking into Stokes there are plenty of seats, whether on couch or library, and I would sit right next to somebody that I did not know. I did the same in the library. Odd and confused looks were given, and some turned away. When doing experiments you have to take into account all of the variables that could have influenced the situation. “It depends on whether it’s crowded or completely empty, a person’s personality, and also gender,” Psychology Professor and Chair of the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences Dr. Donald Poe stated. One strong reaction I received was from someone who simply packed up their belongings after a couple of minutes and left. “Most find it uncomfortable,” Dr. Poe commented. “Leaving is the most drastic reaction.” Most people are confused when someone violates a social norm. When people get in this “bubble” we feel like they have violated our space. In my experiment it was rare for people to actually respond and say something. Many just took action. “I would probably just leave or tell them to please leave because they are violating my own personal space and are being distracting,” freshman Miguel Cervantes commented. “I was weirded out. Wasn’t really sure how to respond,” junior Todd Facemyer stated. If you break a social norm society will look at you differently and treat you differently. There is a lot of research out there about social norms and experiments

that violate them. For more information about children recognizing broken social norms follow the link below. http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.

php/news/releases/toddlers-object-whenpeople-break-the-rules.html


news

Love Asian Style By Tongtong Xue As we all know, Valentine’s Day is for lovers all around the world. In Asia, countries have their own ways to celebrate this day of romance. On Valentine’s Day in Japan, men will not send any gifts to women, and women only send chocolate to their boyfriends. And on the White Valentine’s Day (March 14th), men will send chocolate back to their girlfriends. Japanese young lovers regard chocolate as the sweet symbolization of eternal love. In India, lovers always get together to have a sweet lunch, then visit the landmark Taj Mahal. The Taj Mahal is a magnificent palace built by a King in ancient India. He built this palace for his queen who died very young. Many people were deeply moved by this King’s passion, so Indian lovers always go to the Taj Mahal to witness their faithful love. In Korea, there are 12 Valentine’s days in one year. Western Valentine’s Day (February 14th), White Valentine’s Day (March 14th) and Ring Valentine’s Day (July 14th) are the most famous three lovers days. On Western Valentine’s Day, lovers usually send chocolate to each other. White Valentine’s Day is just like its name. It celebrates the most pure love between lovers. On this day, young couples always go to a park and have a sweet picnic. On Ring Valentine’s Day, lovers usually send rings to each other. In China, besides sending gifts to lovers, people always put out sky-lanterns at night. Young lovers write some sweet wish on paper and put it into the lanterns. When night falls, they light the candle at the bottom of the lanterns and let lantern fly to the sky with their sincere hope. So Americans may think they have covered the market on Valentine’s Day, but our friends halfway around the world love celebrating romance just as much.

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12 April

April 5 PROJECT LINUS DROP-IN SERVICE Time 9:30 am-4 pm Location Stokes Student Center, Lounge

APRIL April 7 COMPUTER SOCIETY CLUB:

SUNDAY OF SERVICE-FAITHFUL

SO YOU WANNA BE A HACKER?

Time 1:30-5:30 pm

Time 1:00-3:00 pm

Faithful Friends Animal Sanctuary, Charlotte, N.C.

Location Jane Freeman 200 or join via Adobe Connect at https:// champlaincollege.adobeconnect.com

April 6

April 13

COFFEE HOUSE

GUITAR RECITAL

Time 8:00pm-10:00 pm

Time 7:00 pm

Location Theater, 3rd floor Administration building

Location Chapel

(This is the last coffee house of the year!!!)

April 14

Come out and Support Brent Lawrence as he plays guitar for his Senior Recital.

FRIENDS ANIMAL SANCTUARY Location

COMPUTER SOCIETY CLUB: SO YOU WANNA BE A HACKER? Time 1:00-3:00 pm Location

Jane Freeman 200 or join via Adobe Connect at https://champlaincollege.adobeconnect.com

April 15-30 8TH ANNUAL JURIED STUDENT ART EXHIBITION

Location

Falling Rivers Art Gallery (next to Starnes Jewelers) 119 West Main St., Albemarle, NC


calendar

CALENDAR April 16

April 19

BARITONE RECITAL Time 4:30 pm- 5:00 pm Location Chapel

CHOIR CONCERT

8TH ANNUAL JURIED STUDENT ART EXHIBITION RECEPTION Time 6:00 pm-7:30 pm Location Falling Rivers Art Gallery (next to Starnes Jewelers) 119 West Main St., Albemarle, NC

(Area 1 .5 cultural credit offered)

Time 7:00 pm- 8:30 pm Location Chapel

April 23

April 28 SPENCE ROBERTSON, PIANO SENIOR RECITAL Time 7:00 pm-8:00 pm Location Chapel

April 29

HISTORY CLUB GUEST SPEAKER

FLIGHT OF THE FALCON RACE

Time 3:00 pm- 4:00 pm

Time 4:00 pm-11:00 pm

Location Community Room, Stokes Student Center

Location Clock Tower

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14 April

CASINO NIGHT

By Ryan Goldsmith The highly anticipated annual Casino Night will take place March 23rd from 9 to 11 pm in the Stokes Student Lounge. The event is put on by The Campus Activities Board every year and is one of Pfeiffer’s most popular events. Students come to play black jack, roulette, and many other casino games. The money you win can be used as credit for the Falcon Store. “The casino night is by far the best thing that Pfeiffer puts on. It’s the only way I can afford anything from the Falcon Store,” sophomore Adam Kotwas said. Students are expected to dress formal, much like you would in Las Vegas. If you’re of legal drinking age you can bring

your alcohol, but drinks and snacks will be served for everyone. “CAB has already started getting ready for Casino night. Everyone shows up to win money. It’s the most popular event we

hold,” CAB President Chandler Ligas said. Dealers will be faculty and staff. So come by and win some money off your favorite professor.

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sports

Falcon Swimmers Break School Records By Katherine Deeck

The 2012-2013 Falcon swim team not only crushed their competition, but also broke 16 school records at the Bluegrass Mountain Conference swim meet in midFebruary. The women finished 7th and the men finished 9th overall in the conference. Freshman swimmer Kate Galichenko was one of the many who broke records and received medals at the meet, both in individual and group competition, totaling six broken records and three medals. “It was good [to have broken so many records as a freshman], but it is a lot of responsibility because everyone looks to you,” Galichenko said. “I will just try to do better next year and break more records.” During this meet, Galichenko received the title of NCAA “B” Cut time in her individual 200 Butterfly, meaning that in each of these events she swam under a set time. She also received 3rd place for her time in the 200 Butterfly.

Hannah Finkernagel also brought the Lady Falcons two medals and broke multiple records. Freshman Nick Insley led the men with five broken records, including the 200 Freestyle Relay and the 100 Backstroke. “Breaking these records gives me more motivation to come back and be faster,” Insley said. “I don’t really feel pressure, I just feel motivation. I have to keep stepping up my game.” Along with Galichenko, Finkernagel, and Insley, 11 other swimmers were part of teams or individually broke records and received medals. It was very much a team effort. “There were a lot of big swims from everybody,” Insley said. “It’s not that one person had a good meet, everybody had a great meet.” “Our team did very well overall,” Galichenko said. “Everybody was really

cheerful and helped each other to focus and be confident.” Overall, the Falcon swim team had a successful season. The women beat nearby rival Catawba College for the first time in 12 years. “The team as a whole performed great,” assistant coach Katie Huff said. “I couldn’t be more proud of the times every swimmer posted after a hard and long season of training.”

Matt Burns

Kate Galichenko

Mary Rudolph

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16 April

Matt Michaeli: “I’m Just Me”

By Kimberly Goodell Originally born in Drapper, Utah, freshman Matt Michaeli strongly believes lacrosse has made him the man he is today. “Ever since I was a young kid I loved to play lacrosse. Me and my buddies grew up playing in my neighborhood, and ever since then I fell in love with the sport. I have been playing for 11 years,” Michaeli explains. But lacrosse is not Michaeli’s only passion. He enjoys watching war movies, laughing, and the band Skrillex. “I’m a good time,” Michaeli says. Known around campus as “Utah”, Michaeli attended Pfeiffer to carry on with his love of lacrosse. Even though he is a business major, Michaeli enjoys letting loose by being himself, and making others laugh. The only thing that upsets Michaeli

is failure. “It is [awful] when I have such a passion for a sport, especially lacrosse, and I do not receive a lot of playing time. While it pushes me to do better when I get to play, I feel like I’m failing when I stand on the side lines,” Michaeli says. With Michaeli’s positive and laidback attitude, he still wishes the best for his teammates, and always remembers that his purpose is far greater than his challenges. “Whenever I become angry or upset at things, which rarely happens, I just push it to the back of my mind. I do not want to let the little things affect me. I can easily get over them,” Michaeli adds. Since lacrosse is a huge part of

picture by Jamie Alcala

Michaeli’s life, he will forever carry with him the discipline, sportsmanship, and team building experiences lacrosse has given him. “[Michaeli] is very determined. He is a driven person, who is team oriented and willing to put other people before himself,” friend and teammate Kevin Kerrick said. “Do the best with what God gave you, and use it to your fullest advantage,” Michaeli says. “The one thing that I do best is to be myself. I’m just me.”


sports

Pfeiffer Men’s Lacrosse Team scores a win on March 9th over Dominican (CA), bringing their season record to 6-1

Lady Falcons remain undefeated through the first half of the season

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18 April

SPORTS CALENDAR

MEN’S LACROSSE

WOMEN’S LACROSSE

BASEBALL

APRIL

APRIL

APRIL

2ND - MOUNT OLIVE @ MT. OLIVE - 4 P.M.

4TH - LEES-MCRAE @ BANNER ELK, NC - 4 P.M.

2ND - NEWBERRY @ MISENHEIMER - 3:30 P.M.

6TH - SETON HILL @ GREENSBURG, PA - 1 P.M.

6TH- LIMESTONE @ GAFFNEY, SC - 12 P.M.

13TH - LIMESTONE @ MISENHEIMER - 3 P.M.

13TH- QUEENS @ MISENHEIMER- 12 P.M.

13TH/14TH - KING @ MISENHEIMER- 12 /1 PM

19TH- CONFERENCE SEMI’S - TBA

17TH- LENOIR-RHYNE @ MISENHEIMER - 4 P.M.

21ST- CONFERENCE FINALS- TBA 26TH- ROLLINS @ MISENHEIMER - 4 P.M.

2OTH- CONFERANCE SEMI’S- TBA 21ST- CONFERANCE FINALS- TBA

MEN’S GOLF

19TH/20TH- MOUNT OLIVE @ MISENHEIMER - 3/ 12 P.M 23RD - UNC: PEMBROKE @ MISENHEIMER 4 P.M. 25TH-28TH CONFERENCE TOURNAMENT TBA

WOMEN’S GOLF

SOFTBALL

APRIL

APRIL

APRIL

8TH- 9TH MOUNT OLIVE INVITATIONAL @ GOLDSBORO, NC - 9 A.M

8TH- 9TH AGNES MCAMIS @ GREENVILLE, TN - 9 A.M

7TH - LEES-MCRAE @ BANNER ELK, NC- 2 P.M 11TH- LIMESTONE @ GAFFNEY, SC - 2 P.M. 13TH - BELMONT ABBEY @ BELMONT - 1P.M 14TH - MOUNT OLIVE @ MISENHEIMER 2 P.M 19TH- 21ST CONFERANCE TOURNAMENT @ TBA

MEN’S TENNIS APRIL

WOMEN’S TENNIS APRIL

MEN’S VOLLEYBALL APRIL

8TH- KING @ MISENHEIMER - 2 P.M.

3RD- CONVERSE @ MISENHEIMER -3 P.M.

3RD - ERSKINE @ DUE WEST, SC - 7 P.M.

15TH - QUEENS @ MISENHEIMER - 3 P.M.

8TH- KING @ MISENHEIMER - 2 P.M.

19TH- 21ST CONFERENCE TOURNAMENT - TBA

15TH - QUEENS @ MISENHEIMER - 3 P.M.

6TH - CONFERENCE TOURNAMENT QUARTER FINALS- TBA

19TH-21ST CONFERENCE TOURNAMENT -TBA

10TH - CONFERENCE TOURNAMENT SEMI FINALS - TBA 13TH - CONFERENCE TOURNAMENT FINALS - TBA


features

RECEIVE 15% OFF W/ PFEIFFER STUDENT ID

19


Staff List

Courtesy Sports Information

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF: RODD BAXLEY LAYOUT EDITORS: JAMIE ALCALA, CARESSA SAMUEL ADVISOR: CHARISSE LEVINE NEWS EDITORS: SHEA MCDONNELL, KIMMY GOODELL SPORTS EDITOR: KIMMY GOODELL ADVERTISING EDITOR: ANGELA HUNT PHOTOGRAPHERS: SHAWN SMITH, PHILIP HOWARD

The Pfeiffer Women’s Basketball Team caps off a stellar season and scores a spot in the NCAA National Tournament STAFF:

RYAN GOLDSMITH KELLY HOEY ZACHARY THOMPSON CRYSTAL CURLEE KATHERINE DEECK ZACHARY DYER AMANDA MCCLURE MARIANA’ MELVIN JANE MEYER NATALIE MILLER APACHE SHUPING TONGTONG XUE

The Falcon's Eye-April 2013  

Pfeiffer University's student newspaper