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613-736-9573 613-736-9573

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www.lesjewellery.ca

1795 Kilborn Ave. 1795 Kilborn Ave. Ottawa, K1H6N1 6N1 Ottawa, ON ON K1H

LE’S Jewellery

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2012

www.YourOttawaRegion.com

2446 Bank St. Next to Wendy’s at Bank & Hunt Club

613-733-3888

Inside Council NEWS

Veteran speaks to Steve MacLean P.S. students for Remembrance Day ceremony. – Page 3

NEWS

Crime Prevention Ottawa honours community members with safety awards on Nov. 5. – Page 11

NEWS

Sens Foundation looks at building more ‘rinks of dreams’ in Ottawa. – Page 45

debates ward tax holiday Orléans may get incentives to attract businesses Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - Business groups see a new tax-holiday plan as a way to boost job creation in Orléans and on Carling Avenue, but some councillors worry the strategy could put other areas of the city at a disadvantage. As part of a broad update to the cityʼs economic development strategy presented to the finance committee on Nov. 6, the cityʼs director of economic development and innovation, Saad Bashir, revealed a plan to provide tax incentives for businesses to come to areas that need economic stimulus or redevelopment. While these “community improvement plans” were pitched as a new citywide policy, some councillors were troubled that city staff had already chosen Orléans and part of Carling Avenue to benefit from the program before outlining the selection criteria or details about the way the program would work. Kanata South Coun. Allan Hubley dissented on the report because he felt the plan to defer taxes for business that set up in Orléans would disadvantage other areas of the city, including his ward. “When I meet with businesses, how can I convince them to come to Kanata if we are paying them not to?” he asked. Hubley wanted to defer the report until Bashir could give more details about the eligibility criteria, but the committee voted against a delay. See TAX, page 5

EDDIE RWEMA/METROLAND

Robert Bateman admires works of art by students at Robert Bateman Public School on Nov. 6.

Bateman visits school namesake Get kids to tune out video games and tune into nature: artist Eddie Rwema Eddie.rwema@metroland.com

EMC news - Hallways at Robert Bateman Public School were turned into an art gallery, as staff and students prepared for a visit by the man the building is named after. The 82-year-old renowned Canadian artist and conservationist was at the school on

Nov. 6 to discuss the importance of conservation and the simple pleasure of experiencing the outdoors. “My aim here is to get kids to fall in love with nature,” said Bateman. Born in Toronto in 1930, Bateman, who lives on Salt Spring Island, B.C., recently established the Bateman Foundation, a national, not-for-prof-

it charity dedicated to education and public service. The foundation will support educational programs delivered by groups such as the Canadian Wildlife Foundation, Scouts Canada and Parks Canada. Addressing grade 4 to 6 students, Bateman told the kids itʼs important for their parents to take them out to enjoy nature instead of letting them spend most of their time indoors playing video games. “The average North American kid spends seven hours a day, seven days a week, look-

ing at a screen and no time playing around outside,” he said. “Parents have to go out and play with nature with their kids. They have to show by example. You canʼt show by telling; you have to show by doing.” He said he was overwhelmed by the artwork produced by the students at the school. “I enjoyed seeing the artwork upstairs. Keep doing art but also keep going out in nature,” he said. See GET, page 2

Here comes Santa Claus!! 1910 St. Laurent Blvd. (corner of St. Laurent & Smyth)

Santa Photos: Saturday November 17th from 10am to 4pm Santa Photos are $5.00 Photos are taken by volunteers from Children at Risk. All money raised will be used to support programs and activities for Autistic Children & their families in the Ottawa area.

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Santa and Mrs. Claus arrive for a visit on Saturday, November 17th, 2012 Join us from 10am to 2pm for crafts, Face Painting, Magic, Balloon Art and Story time with Mrs. Claus (all activities are free) Each child will receive a special treat from Santa


NEWS

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‘Get out and enjoy nature’: artist Continued from page 1

EDDIE RWEMA/METROLAND

Artist Robert Bateman admires some of the art produced by students. The artist said he hopes the children not only paint nature, but experience it.

Some of the drawings included owls, which Bateman said he hopes kids get a chance to see in real life, not just images. His main message to kids was “get out and enjoy nature and try to avoid junk food.” “We are building fat bodies with little minds,” he said. While he is not opposed to digital technology, Bateman said there is a need to find a balance between nature and video games. “You can use these handheld devices to go out in the field and go birding.” “Nature is wonderful; nature is magic, and it is just so good for the soul and body to

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be out in nature,” he said. Studentsʼ questions ranged from what is his favourite type of art to his favourite animal. “I am humbled and honoured to have this privilege to talk to the boys and girls at Robert Bateman Public School,” he said, adding that he strongly believes that being outside is good for everybody, from toddlers to seniors. “It is good for the mind, body and spirit.” Visual arts teacher Monique Doucette said her students stand to learn from Batemanʼs presentation. “We are showing him that we are trying to carry on his name at our school and develop the arts within the school population,” said Doucette.

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Bateman and teacher Monique Doucette, a visual arts teacher at Robert Bateman Public School, poses for a photograph with the famous naturalist.


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WIN EDDIE RWEMA/METROLAND

Second World War veteran Cliff Chadderton speaks to Steve MacLean Public School students on Nov. 9. Chadderton lost his right leg below the knee in 1944 while in command of a company of the Royal Winnipeg Rifles, battling for the Scheldt Estuary in Belgium and Holland.

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Second World War veteran speaks to Steve MacLean students

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EMC news - A sombre mood gripped students at Steve MacLean Public School as they gathered to remember the brave men and women of the Canadian Forces who have made the ultimate sacriďŹ ce to help others. The schoolĘźs gymnasium was packed to capacity as students and staff eagerly waited to hear from Second World War veteran and chief executive ofďŹ cer of the War Amps, Cliff Chadderton. Introducing Chadderton to the crowd, Steve MacLean vice principal Richard Latour described him as a great Canadian famously known for heading the War Amps, an organization helping to improve the quality of life for all amputees. His wartime experiences enabled him to produce the Never Again documentary series that honours CanadaĘźs military heritage and at the same time shows the lasting devastation and impact that war can have both on people and the environment. Chadderton said Never Again should serve as a reminder for the soldiers who come after him that they should never have to go through what their forefathers did. The 93-year-old veteran lost his right leg below the knee in 1944 while in command of a company of the Royal Winnipeg RiďŹ&#x201A;es, battling for the Scheldt Estuary in Belgium and Holland during the Second World War. Steve MacLean Public School students spent the entire week studying why itĘźs important to remember. They produced artwork, stories and poetry about the

SUITE OF FIVE NEW WHIRLPOOL ENERGY EFFICIENT APPLIANCES

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eddie.rwema@metroland.com

struggles of war and they have welcomed members of the military community into their school to provide ďŹ rst-hand accounts about the need for peace. Also on hand at the Remembrance Day ceremony held on Nov. 9 was Master Cpl. Wendy Eaton. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you remember them, think about the choices you make today and how they can make a difference in the lives of others,â&#x20AC;? said Eaton. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Let us remember the hundreds and thousands of men and women who have served this country in times of conďŹ&#x201A;ict. Let us remember those who have lost their lives in World War I and II, Korea and on peacekeeping missions.â&#x20AC;? Eaton, who currently works at the National Defence headquarters, emphasized the need to make the world a better place and a place where â&#x20AC;&#x153;we donĘźt have to worry about being hurt; a place where we can live in peace with those who we love and a place where we can have the opportunity to be anything we desire,â&#x20AC;? she said. Eaton encouraged the youngsters to be courageous in all they do. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anyone can be courageous if you do the right thing for the right reasons despite the harm that may come to you,â&#x20AC;? she said. Students performed musical pieces, read poetry and participated in two minutes of silence as a sign of respect for Canadian peacekeepers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe that we can all make a difference one day and one action at a time. It is our choice; it our responsibility. Together letĘźs all reďŹ&#x201A;ect; lets all remember,â&#x20AC;? said Denise Poirier, school principal.

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Eddie Rwema

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0HULYDOH5G2WWDZD21.*- Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012


NEWS

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Tax break will spur growth in depressed areas: Wilkinson Continued from page 1

His colleague, Kanata North Coun. Marianne Wilkinson, disagreed. “Deferring it helps stagnate economic development in our city,” she said. “Itʼs extremely important now.” Mayor Jim Watson had a short speech prepared to speak in favour of the plan. He said the idea is “a good experiment” to try, and something the city has never done before. While it would be nice to give incentives for the whole city, itʼs not practical to have community improvement plans everywhere, Watson said. “We have to focus on areas that need help,” he said. Gloucester-Southgate Coun. Diane Deans also expressed concerns about the plan. Still, she voted in support of the report. “This is a slippery slope,” she said. “I donʼt like where this is going…maybe the market should be the driver.” Deans said the criteria used to choose the areas that get a community improvement plan “will be its success or failure” and supporting the program without seeing those criteria made her uncomfortable. Kitchissippi ward resident Kevin OʼDonnell ran down to city hall during the meeting to speak because he was so opposed to the “tax holiday.” “The city should be focused on ensuring all businesses have a chance to prosper…but whether they prosper or fail is up to the market,” he said, adding itʼs not appropriate for the city to “be in the business of picking winners.” The city should invest in things that really attract busi-

ALLAN HUBLEY

RAINER BLOESS

nesses to invest here, such as a good transit system and infrastructure, OʼDonnell said. Gloucester-South Nepean Coun. Steve Desroches made the same point. “If weʼre giving away money for taxes, are we going to have enough to provide the stuff that really incents businesses to come here, like transit?” he asked. Innes Coun. Rainer Bloess said the city isnʼt “shovelling cash at anyone” and added that it is difficult to justify investing in transit and infrastructure if there is no business development happening in an area. Itʼs a chicken-andegg problem, he said. Community improvement plans are permitted by the provincial government and have been used in Hamilton, Kitchener, London, Niagara Falls and Windsor. There are two types proposed for Ottawa: plans that foster urban revitalization through grants for businesses that repair or rehabilitate existing employment areas, and employment-related plans that help create jobs in areas where residential growth has outstripped job creation. That is the case in Orléans, where the ratio of jobs to households is 0.5 – far lower than the citywide target of 1.3 local jobs per household. Itʼs unclear why Orléans has lagged behind, said Jamie

Kwong McDonald, executive director of the Orléans Chamber of Commerce. She said the east-end community has a lot to offer, including an educated, bilingual workforce. “Very few people actually stay in Orléans and work there,” she said. “There is a lot of excitement (about the proposed plan) in the business community in Orléans...There are some that have been stalled and this initiative is very exciting for them.” The two proposed locations would be part of a fiveyear pilot project, but Bashir said he would likely be ready to expand the program to different areas after observing how it works in Orléans and on Carling for six months. “Once the programs are up and running…with eligibility criteria, if we feel comfortable with it, I would see no reason not to expand it further,” Bashir said. Information on the Carling plan – including the boundaries of the area – is sparse. It will be an urban revitalization plan, and more information is “forthcoming,” according to a city report. Bay ward Coun. Mark Taylor has been working towards an economic development plan for the area by meeting with local businesses for the past several months.

I chose solar

JESSICA CUNHA/METROLAND

Clay creations Anne Derks of Chapman Mills and Linda Thompson of Mooney’s Bay take a look at pottery items made by Chandler Swain at the ninth annual 260 Fingers event at the Glebe Community Centre on Nov. 10.

Are you Creative? Do you want to design a Christmas card for all of Ottawa to see? Councillor Steve Desroches, Gloucester-South Nepean is holding his

Annual Christmas Card Contest and invites all elementary school students in Ward 22 to participate!

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Draw, Paint or Sketch a design depicting the holiday season on 8 1/2” x 11” paper. The winning design will be selected to be on the front of Steve’s Annual Christmas Card.

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Mail your entry to: Deputy Mayor Steve Desroches 110 Laurier Ave. West Ottawa, Ontario, K1P 1J1 Or email a high-resolution copy to: Steve.Desroches@Ottawa.ca Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

5


NEWS

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Emergency wait room times down across province: Ontario gov’t

Diane Deans

Eddie Rwema

Councillor/Conseillère Quartier Gloucester-Southgate Ward

eddie.rwema@metroland.com

Gloucester-Southgate Ward Snow Tour 2013 I will be taking part in my annual ‘preparing for winter’ snow tour on November 26th, 2012. City Staff will join me as I tour the ward to view areas which I know could be the cause of snow maintenance issues during the winter months. If you have an area in mind that has an ongoing snow clearing problem please contact me at diane. deans@ottawa.ca or 613-580-2480 and I will add the location to the tour. “AccessAbility Day” 2012 This year the City of Ottawa will be hosting “AccessAbility Day” on November 29th with the theme, “Building People Places by Designing Accessible Spaces”. Residents are invited to come and celebrate the day and learn more about accessible design. The event will take place from 9:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. in Jean Pigott Place, Ottawa City Hall, located at 110 Laurier Avenue West. Admission to the event is free and individuals are required to register by November 21st. For full schedule details and registration guidelines please visit ottawa.ca or phone 3-1-1.

EMC news - Emergency room wait times at Ottawaarea hospitals have gone down over the past four years. Wait times across the province have been reduced on average by 1.2 hours, and 86 per cent of patients are receiving treatment within target time frames, according to a press release from the Ontario government. In Ottawa, between 70 and 94 per cent of patients are assessed and treated within the target wait time. In 2009, Ontario set emergency room length-of-stay targets of four hours for patients with minor conditions and eight hours for patients with complex conditions. At CHEO, time spent in the emergency department has decreased by 27.6 per cent over the last four years, the release said. About 94 per cent of people received treatment within the target period. Yasir Naqvi, MPP for Ottawa Centre, said CHEOʼs emergency room is making good progress in improving performance so they

can treat patients better and faster. “I am proud of what our government is doing to help them (CHEO) keep achieving their goals,” said Naqvi. Other hospitals in Ottawa have also seen a significant decrease in wait times. At the Monfort Hospital, time spent in the emergency room has decreased by 52.6 per cent, 19 per cent at the Ottawa Hospitalʼs General campus and 7.4 per cent at the Queensway-Carleton Hospital. On Nov. 16, Naqvi announced the province will provide area hospitals with $6.5 million to improve emergency room performance, the province will provide area hospitals with $6.5 million to improve emergency room performance, adding that the government was building on its emergency room success to support hospitals facing the biggest challenges. According to Deb Matthews, minister of Health and Long-Term Care, Ontarians requiring medical attention are now being seen faster and spending less time in emergency rooms. “This is part of our com-

FILE PHOTO

Ottawa Centre MPP Yasir Naqvi announced that the province will be providing $6.5 million to improve emergency room performance. mitment in the Action Plan for Health Care to ensure people receive the right

care, in the right place, at the right time,” Matthews said in a press release.

Winter Parking Ban I want to remind everyone that the City of Ottawa’s winter parking ban runs from November 15th to April 1st. There is no parking allowed on city streets between 1:00 a.m. and 7:00 a.m. when 7cm or more of snow is forecast by Environment Canada (this includes forecasts for a range of snow such as 5 – 10 cm). These regulations ensure that the City’s snow-clearing crews are able to keep Ottawa’s roads safe and clear for pedestrians, cyclists, public transit, and motorists.

Walter Used To Eat Frozen Dinners Alone

For more information on these restrictions and to sign up for winter parking e-alerts please visit www.ottawa.ca or phone 3-1-1. City launches graffiti prevention pilot program

Green Bin Tip: Paper coffee cups and waxed paper coffee cups go in your green bin, not in your black box or blue box. They can be used to hold cooking grease before you put it in your green bin.

Follow me on Twitter @dianedeans 110 Laurier Avenue West Ottawa, ON K1P 1J1 Phone: Fax:

6

E-mail: diane.deans@ottawa.ca www.dianedeans.ca

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

At Chartwell, the chef changes the menu daily, so Walter not only gets to choose from a variety of balanced meals, but he enjoys them with a side dish of laughter and conversation. For more information call Bridlewood Retirement Residence at 613-521-1977 or visit www.chartwellreit.ca

R0011736001.1115

(613) 580-2480 (613) 580-2520

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R0011736068-1115

The City of Ottawa Graffiti Management Program has determined that traffic signal control boxes are a top target for graffiti vandalism and the City of Ottawa has launched a pilot program to deter graffiti tagging on these assets. A total of 23 boxes along Bank Street have been chosen for the pilot and will be wrapped with a decorative, graffiti resistant vinyl film. If the project is successful, staff will explore the possibility of extending the installation to traffic control boxes across the city.


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Hunt Club man recognized for 30 years of service to community Eddie Rwema eddie.rwema@metroland.com

SUBMITTED PHOTO

From left, John Sankey, president of Hunt Club Community Association; Alan Asselstine and David McGuinty, Ottawa South MP honour Asselstine for his 30 years of service as a volunteer at the Hunt Club Community Association. dren.” With the increase of people in the neighbourhood and surrounding communities, Assel-

stine said traffic congestion on Hunt Club Road continues to be the number one issue. “We have a serious issue

with respect to Hunt Club Road,” he said. David McGuinty, Ottawa South MP, thanked Assel-

stine and the board for their continued hard work and dedication to the Hunt Club community.

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EMC news - Thirty years ago, Alan Asselstine stepped up to volunteer with the Hunt Club Community Association to help with organizing children activities. He hasnʼt looked back since. On Nov. 5, the association recognized him for his volunteer service to the community as director and treasurer as well as his contributions to the naturalization of Sawmill Creek and the soon-to-be completed pedestrian bridge linking the Hunt Club community to the east side of the Airport Parkway. “He is just pure gold for our community. He is one of those people who give reliable advice and you can count on them,” said John Sankey, president of the Hunt Club Community Association. The association presented Asselstine with a certificate and granted him lifetime membership in the association. “He is steady, trustworthy, and always willing to take on the unglamorous but important tasks that make our community a better place to live. I have greatly respected his advice over the years, and I hope I can call him now and then when weʼve a difficult decision to make in the future,” said Sankey.

After 30 years, Asselstine said he hopes he can continue contributing to the association but wants new people to take over from where he has left off. Seventy-year-old Asselstine said it is the love of his community and the desire to make his community a better place to live that kept him going for all those years. “I felt it is important to contribute to the community you call home,” said Asselstine. “We like the community. It is our home and I hope everybody can contribute to make our community a better place.” While on the association board, Asselstine dealt with different issues that mattered to the community. “When we first moved in the area, Hunt Club Road didnʼt go anywhere; this neighbourhood was quiet and at the edge of the city; but now the road has expanded, and you feel more like you are in the city,” he said. In the early 1980s, recreation issues were on everybodyʼs mind; but things have changed now, he said. “With fewer children, recreation issues have changed to more servicing seniors,” said Asselstine. “Houses around have matured and children have moved on. There are now more old people than chil-

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Food, folks, crafts and fun Chef Peter Evanchuck, right, and Helene Lacelle get ready for One & Only, a free community arts and crafts festival at the Sandy Hill Community Centre on Sunday, Nov. 18 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The event, now in its sixth year, will feature 60 artists and crafters and is supported by Action Sandy Hill. Evanchuck, along with assistants Dallas Fletcher, Francois Bregha and Mark Lacelle, will also prepare a free all-you-caneat buffet featuring dishes such as perogies, roast chicken couscous, Thai noodles, burritos, tacos, German pickle potato salad and more. Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

7


OPINION

Your Community Newspaper

EDITORIAL

Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tax holiday amounts to a bribe

C

ouncil is selling a plan to offer businesses a â&#x20AC;&#x153;tax holidayâ&#x20AC;? to locate in OrlĂŠans and along part of Carling Avenue as a way to stimulate economically depressed areas in the city. LetĘźs call it what it really is: a bribe. Businesses who cash in on this offer will split an estimated $20 million in property tax refunds over ďŹ ve years. Innes Coun. Rainer Bloess

says the city isnĘźt â&#x20AC;&#x153;shovelling cash at anyone,â&#x20AC;? adding that itĘźs difďŹ cult to justify transit and infrastructure investment in an area with no business development growth. ItĘźs a chicken-and-egg problem, he said. The councillor has chosen the correct metaphor, but drawn the wrong conclusion. If council wants to encourage business development in the city, it should provide good transit and infrastructure, build communities that

allow residents to live, work and play without a commute. That doesnĘźt mean forfeiting $20 million in potential tax revenue. ThatĘźs property tax money which should help the city pay for services and infrastructure in the area. CouncilĘźs $20-million plan offers a temporary tax deferral, but no other tangible and permanent inducements that businesses value. If the city wants to encourage economic development in

the east end, it should consider fast-tracking construction of light rail to OrlĂŠans. The pilot program put before council last week was light on details. There was no accompanying eligibility criteria â&#x20AC;&#x201C; just the names OrlĂŠans and Carling Avenue. The project was snuck in front of the cityĘźs ďŹ nance committee, buried in a mound of other reports. Using BloessĘź chickenand-egg analogy, which

should come ďŹ rst? A decision to forfeit $20 million in property taxes or a sound plan based on study and sober discussion? To be fair, council has done a lot to encourage economic development in Ottawa this term. It transformed OCRI into Invest Ottawa and created a plan to encourage entrepreneurship. But over the past two weeks it has come up with two ill-conceived and unfair

economic development plans. Last week, council agreed to offer special treatment to larger businesses that set up shop in Ottawa â&#x20AC;&#x201C; basically putting small businesses at a comparative disadvantage. CouncilĘźs tax holiday has the same effect, pitting ward against ward. A plan that bribes businesses to locate in a particular ward is unfair, unwise and ill-conceived. Coun. Diane Deans called the plan the start of a slippery slope, suggesting economic development should be market driven. Taxpayers would likely agree.

COLUMN

War against progress continues CHARLES GORDON Funny Town

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he pace of change is exhausting. TheyĘźre changing the passport, changing the $20 bill, closing the ServiceOntario machines and starting Christmas music later at Shoppers Drug Mart. So much to learn, so little time. LetĘźs start with the last one. An unanticipated wave of common sense swept over the business community, resulting in a decision by a major retail chain to hold off on the Christmas music until at least after Remembrance Day. You might not even have noticed that it was missing in the days after Halloween. But maybe you did. Maybe you were walking through the drugstore with an odd little feeling that something was just a bit off. Then you realized, right there in the razor blades aisle, that the song playing was Raindrops Are Falling on My Head, not Jingle Bell Rock. Somehow you resisted the urge to complain. When you learned the reason why, you might even have applauded. Christmas music, particularly the cheery commercial kind, can wait until after we have had time to think about the costs and sacriďŹ ces of war. Who knows, maybe the idea will catch on, more businesses will adopt this practice next year and we can be spared Frosty the Snow Man until there is actual frost. Meanwhile, there are gains and losses in the war against technology. Example: fancy new passports coming which will be full of iconic Canadian images and

iconic Canadian politicians, not all of them Conservative. The passports will also have the inevitable chip in them, electronic rather than edible. The chip will have an antenna, which isnĘźt as alarming as it sounds. You can still put it in your pocket, but you can also wave it at a scanner which will then know everything about you. Apparently the scanner wonĘźt know more about you than a person could, from reading whatĘźs printed on the passport, but in our society we now like our machines to know as much as possible. People less so. ThatĘźs why the Ontario government put machines in most of the shopping centres, allowing you to do such things as renew your car registration without having to be in contact with a human being. Those machines were actually quite efďŹ cient and enabled you to skip long lineups. For some reason there werenĘźt long line-ups at the machines. The lack of a lineup might have been due to more people doing their government business online. Still, it is worth keeping in mind that when you deal with a human being rather than a machine you might be helping human beings stay employed. Speaking of which â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and apologies for the lame transition â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Queen Elizabeth is more fully employed on the new $20 bill than she was on the old one. The bill, issued last week, has her image on it three times, compared to the old billĘźs one. ThereĘźs the big portrait on the front of the bill and smaller images peering out from those metallic strips front and back. On the new $50, which was issued in March, the three images are of Mackenzie King, so this one is deďŹ nitely an improvement. Six Queens will get you a new passport, which you can wave at a scanner and it will know everything about you. Is life great or what?

Editorial Policy

Web Poll THIS WEEKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S POLL QUESTION

What does observing Remembrance Day mean to you?

A) Offer businesses a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;tax holidayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

to set up shop in job-poor wards such as OrlĂŠans.

A) Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a time to pay tribute to those who have given their lives for our country.

78%

B) Invest in transit and infrastructure to attract businesses.

B) Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a day to remember family members who fought for Canada.

0%

C) Offer citywide incentives â&#x20AC;&#x201D; council shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t favour individual wards.

C) Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a chance to honour our service men and women.

11%

D) Do nothing. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up to the market to determine economic activitiy.

D) Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a moment to reflect on the conflicts that still plague our planet.

11%

The Ottawa South EMC welcomes letters to the editor. Senders must include their full name, complete address and a contact phone number. Addresses and phone numbers will not be published. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and content, both in print and online at www.yourottawaregion.com. To submit a letter to the editor, please email to theresa.fritz@metroland.com , fax to 613-224-2265 or mail to Ottawa South EMC, 80 Colonnade Rd. N., Unit 4, Ottawa, ON, K2E 7L2.

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

PREVIOUS POLL SUMMARY

How should the city encourage growth in job-depressed areas?

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Second World War training pays tribute to veterans ‘We wanted to do something to tie into Remembrance Day:’ participant

““I think this is a time of year when people have more thought to what people went through,” he said. “Itʼs our tribute to those who went

through the war.” Anderson said training had to be “quick and effective” in order for the troops to grasp and retain the lessons.

“The techniques are designed for the beginner,” he said. “Itʼs got to be simple; itʼs got to be fast.” Anderson first became interested in the combat techniques after reading about a Second World War spy school in Oshawa, Ont. “It sounded like something that interested me,” he said. So he went about learning and absorbing as much information as he could, from history books and veterans of the war. “I only know this much,” he said, holding his thumb and pointer finger close together, “of what they (the veterans) know.” Julie Ethier said itʼs important these techniques are taught to the younger generations or else they will be lost. “It reminds me that World War II, that era, how little time ... they had to be trained for the situation,” she said. “Itʼs part of history thatʼs getting harder and harder to hang on to.” As the veterans of the Second World War pass away, so too does their knowledge. “If I donʼt show this, itʼs gone,” said Anderson, whose class also collected items for the Ottawa Food Bank. “These things disappear ... a part of our history disappears with it.”

way? I donʼt know. Part of the problem is that numbers like that 163 per cent are relatively meaningless to most of us. And we are not wired to think about the future value of money. A more simple fix is to think about money this way: What comes in each month must be greater than what

goes out. Chances are if youʼre in debt, you didnʼt read past the first sentence of this column. But if youʼve made it this far, Iʼd like to offer up the first step to ending the cycle of debt: Keep your receipts ... for everything. Stuff them in a shoebox in your front closet and have a look at the

end of the month. Itʼs the only way to find out what youʼre really spending and the first step to becoming debt-free. Of course, if psychological theory is anything to go by, youʼll probably take one look, burn the box and go Christmas shopping at the mall with your credit card.

Jessica Cunha jessica.cunha@metroland.com

JESSICA CUNHA/METROLAND

Instructor Cris Anderson, an Ottawa South resident, demonstrates techniques used in hand-to-hand training during the Second World War on class participant Mike Reilly, of Rockland. Anderson taught the moves during a class held at the Overbrook Community Centre on Nov. 10. landed on the weekend. “We wanted to do something to tie into Remembrance Day,” said Collins. “It puts everything in perspective.”

Anderson, an Ottawa South resident, taught a variety of self-defence strategies, including close-armed and close-quarter combat.

Breaking the debt cycle BRYNNA LESLIE Capital Muse

I

f youʼre in debt, youʼll probably read this headline, turn the page and go Christmas shopping at the mall with your credit card. Itʼs human instinct to ignore things that make us uncomfortable. Moreover, our imperfect psychology often leads us to do precisely the opposite of what we should. Itʼs the reason those disturbing Health Canada ads on cigarette packs make addicts smoke more. Itʼs the reason we fail to read the calorie count on the pack of a two-bite brownie before taking 10 bites and itʼs why we turn the channel off when we see those infomercials about children starving in Africa and head to the local Chinese food buffet instead. But we are a nation in debt. And chances are, even if youʼve managed to read this far, you are carrying some sort of debt. So please, read on. In mid-October, the average debt-to-income ratio of Canadian households hit an all-time high of 163 per cent. That means for every dollar we earn in a year, we owe

an average of $1.63. To put it simply, if your household income is $100,000 and you carry a mortgage of $163,000, or if your household income is $50,000 and you owe $81,500 on your credit card and loans, you fit the debt profile of the average Canadian. As a result of this news, finance ministers across the country went all nanny-state on us: “Whatʼs wrong with you people? Get your fiscal houses in order.” Indeed, every few weeks or so, federal Finance Minister Jim Flaherty finds it prudent to stand behind a podium to at some posh event and collectively slap the wrists of Canadians for being so careless with their funds. But heʼs hardly leading by example. Despite inheriting a massive surplus from his Liberal predecessors, Flahertyʼs government racked up the biggest deficit in Canadian history in a move to – guess what? -- boost consumer spending in the wake of the recession. In other words, governments tell us to spend one week and then reprimand us for doing so the next, all the while com-

mitting the sin of overspending themselves. Of course, governments like to couch their overspending in terms like “investing for the future.” The problem is the future never comes, so they just leave mammoth debt balances for the next generation without any accountability whatsoever. As a result -- for governments and the citizens they govern -- money has taken on a rather mythical quality. We live in a time where the value of money has become meaningless for most people. With credit readily available, most mid-thirties professionals I know carry student loans in the tens of thousands of dollars, along with mortgages and lines of credit balances. And frankly, they donʼt give a damn as they hand over their gold cards to “pay” for that delectably over-priced glass of red wine at after-work drinks. Because they have lost any sense of reality as it pertains to the value of a dollar. Never mind the fact that half of Canadians would likely find themselves in a food bank line should they miss a single paycheque. Just as thereʼs always another squeeze of toothpaste in the bottom of the tube, it seems thereʼs always more money available in the credit line -- or what I like to call, the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. Has it always been this

OTTAWA SENATORS WOMENS WORLD HOCKEY 3 X 85 R0011738218 SLS=4917

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EMC news – Ottawa residents visited the Overbrook Community Centre on Saturday, Nov. 10, to learn selfdefence tactics taught during the Second World War and watch original top-secret training footage used during the war. Most recruits received only eight to 12 hours of hand-tohand combat training in classes of up to 600 people during the Second World War before moving on to their next lesson in basic training. “Thatʼs not a lot of time,” said Cris Anderson, an expert instructor in Second World War self-defence techniques. Anderson, who partnered with John Collins Jiu-Jitsu, said they wanted to tie in with Remembrance Day since it

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

9


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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Community crime prevention crusaders honoured Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - Volunteers from across the city sent a message of collective responsibility for neighbourhood safety during Crime Prevention OttawaĘźs annual awards on Nov. 5. Eight groups and individuals were honoured for their contributions to making Ottawa a safer place during the Community Safety Awards. The real-life stories of people who received awards illustrate the importance of crime prevention, said Chantal Bernier, CPO board member and president of the International Crime Prevention Centre. Stories like that of Embellissement Vanier BeautiďŹ cation, winner of the Volunteer Program Award, capture the attention of audiences around the world when she speaks, Bernier said. A recent audience was â&#x20AC;&#x153;truly marvellingâ&#x20AC;? at the reduction in crime in Vanier, Bernier said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That example shows how Ottawa has the potential, the stature, to be a model for the world.â&#x20AC;? That kind of mobilization of citizens is key to safety and crime reduction, Bernier said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Crime prevention is not the best solution; it is the only solution,â&#x20AC;? she told the crowd gathered at city hall. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A truly safe community is one that has a targeted effort towards crime prevention.â&#x20AC;? Awards handed out during the ceremony included: â&#x20AC;˘Youth Leadership Award: Peiman Soltani For the past ďŹ ve years, 24-year-old Peiman Soltani has worked with at-risk youth. Through his citywide Ottawa Community Centre Basketball League for Youth and the West End Motivators, Soltani said he tries to â&#x20AC;&#x153;be an older brotherâ&#x20AC;? to the youth he works with, like his mentors were for him. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To see this change, it really motivates me more to get involved with the younger generation,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;˘ City Employee Award:

Abdulkadar Mohamed Dualeh Abdulkadar Mohamed Dualeh left his home of wartorn Somalia to come to Canada alone at age 13 and immediately began volunteering at the Canterbury community police centre in an effort to become a police ofďŹ cer like his father. Both on- and off-duty, Dualeh has prevented two women from taking their lives and saved a barefoot toddler who was freezing in the snow. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When someone needs assistance, I will do anything possible to help them,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;˘ Ginsberg, Gingras and Associates Business Award: Canadian Tire Jumpstart charities Canadian TireĘźs Jumpstart charities have helped children to access recreation and sport programs in Ottawa since 2005. During that time, Jumpstart has helped 40,000 children attend March break and summer recreation programs. The free program helps prevent kids from â&#x20AC;&#x153;falling into the wrong routines,â&#x20AC;? said Canadian Tire dealer David McClenahan, who accepted the award. â&#x20AC;˘ Volunteer Award: Roberta Della-Picca Pinecrest-Queensway resident Roberta Della-PiccaĘźs sons were approached to sell crack cocaine minutes after the family moved into their Pinecrest-Queensway area home. A decade later, Della-PiccaĘźs contributions to community safety initiatives â&#x20AC;&#x201C; as well as anti-racism, anti-bullying and anti-violence against women programs and aboriginal advocacy â&#x20AC;&#x201C; were honoured. Through United Neighbours, Della-Picca and fellow volunteers have achieved a 27 per cent drop in crime between 2006 and 2011 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the largest drop in Ottawa and higher than the citywide average of 15 per cent. â&#x20AC;˘ Community Program Award: MAP (Mentorship, Aftercare and Presence) Reintegration MAP Reintegration works to help convicts return as productive members of their com-

PHOTOS BY LAURA MUELLER/METROLAND

During the Community Safety Awards on Nov. 5, Centretown community police officer Const. Khoa Hoang, centre, accepts the Enforcement Professional Award from police board chairman Eli El-Chantiry, left, and police Chief Charles Bordeleau, right, during the Community Safety Awards.

LAURA MUELLER/METROLAND

During the Community Safety Awards at city hall on Nov. 5, family members join city bylaw officer Abdulkadar Mohamed Dualeh, second from right, as he receives the City Employee Award from his boss, deputy city manager of operations Steve Kanellakos, right. munities. The small staff works with 50 volunteer coaches to provide coaching and counselling to help released convicts ďŹ nd jobs, secure housing and avoid falling back into criminal activities. â&#x20AC;˘ Enforcement Professional Award: Const. Khoa Hoang Centretown community police ofďŹ cer Const. Khoa Hoang was nominated three separate times for his work volunteering at 25 local organizations and mentoring youth. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I owe a lot to this community and I try not to forget that,â&#x20AC;? Hoang said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being a community police ofďŹ cer puts you in direct responsibility (for) the community thatĘźs given so much to you.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;˘ Volunteer Program Award: Embellissement Vanier Beautification The efforts of the Vanier beautiďŹ cation group have created a prettier, cleaner community that is safer because people feel comfortable enjoying its parks and public spaces, said co-chairwoman Marguerite Beaulieu. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This initiative really began with coming together in a common goal â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to take back our community,â&#x20AC;? Beaulieu said. â&#x20AC;˘ Leadership Award: Paul Welsh Paul Welsh has been the executive director of Rideauwood Addiction and Family Services for 25 years. He said it is his personal wish to help as many people suffering from addictions â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and their family members â&#x20AC;&#x201C; as possible. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It affects many people directly or indirectly,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Families come to us and say, ĘťThank God, someone understands.Ęźâ&#x20AC;?







 









   

                          

         

           

               

  

   

  

 





 

    

    

   

 

   



  

       

        

       

     

     

      

     



  

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Mark

NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Fisher Biking right

School Trustee Zone 7

Centretown resident Christopher Marin gets outfitted with a new light and bell from Shane Noris of Hintonburg’s bike sharing group Right Bike. Right Bike, the Citizens for Safe Cycling, Ottawa police and Safer Roads Ottawa’s blitz on Nov. 6 at the Corktown Footbridge in Centretown helped raise awareness and encourage Ottawa cyclists to use proper lights while cycling in the early evening and at night.

www.markfisher.org

Labour Relations I wanted to bring you up to date on the labour relations situation at the school district. As you know, the collective agreements with all of our bargaining units expired on August 31, 2012. The Ottawa Carleton District School Board has been negotiating with our unions locally in hopes of having a new agreement in place by the legislated deadline of December 31, 2012. We continue to work hard in this regard.

MICHELLE NASH/METROLAND

However, it is important to note that while the legislated deadline for negotiating new agreements is December 31, six of our nine bargaining units will be in a legal strike position effective November 12. If an agreement is not reached by November 12, either provincially or locally, there is the possibility of service withdrawal. Although this can take many forms, it would be prudent for parents to start thinking about their child care arrangements in the event that we find ourselves in a situation where schools must close during periods of labour disruption. The Board is committed to keeping you informed as we move forward. School principals will be sending letters home. However, as situations may change rapidly, the most up to date information will be posted to the district website @ www.ocdsb.ca. The Board will also provide updates on any major changes to operations through the media. I thought it was important for the community to be aware of this information. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions at mark.fisher@ocdsb.ca.

Donate Your Used Books Today! Sawmill Creek Elementary School is looking for donations of gently used books for all ages to sell in their 1st Used Book Sale in March 2013. Search your shelves for picture books, early readers, chapter books, fiction, non-fiction and adult books. Books can be dropped off at the school in the main office during school hours (3400 D’Aoust Avenue, Ottawa, K1T 1R5) or you may email sawmillcreekusedbooksale@gmail.com to make arrangements. The earlier we receive donations, the more time our volunteers have to make this a successful event! Proceeds raised will go to help fund new playground equipment for our school.

R0011708528-1115

Ottawa Carleton District School Board 133 Greenbank Road Ottawa, Ontario, K2H 6L3 T. 613-808-7922 • F: 613-596-8789 acebook.com/resultsforyou

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

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(at Alta Vista, one block north of Walkley Rd.)


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Champlain LHIN CEO Chantale LeClerc announces new funding for community-level health services in Ottawa on Nov. 7. The cash will address the increased need for home support services.

LHIN puts cash into local health providers Steph Willems steph.willems@metroland.com

EMC news - Health care in the Ottawa area is about to get an $11.1 million boost aimed at community-level services. The money is meant to address the increased need for home support services due to the aging population and the many health issues that come with it. As well, attention will be paid to those with mental health and addiction issues. The announcement by the Champlain Local Health Integration Network, which is funded through the Ontario Ministry of Health and Longterm Care, was made at the offices of VHA Health and Home Support – one of the many local providers that will see a financial boost. Calling it “wonderful news,” Champlain LHIN chief executive Chantale LeClerc said: “Todayʼs announcement is about transforming health care as we know it.” The $11.1 million in funding will carry over annually and is expected to reduce pressure on hospitals in terms of wait times and available beds. The Ontario government

estimates the number of residents over age 65 will double within 20 years. LeClerc said the funding will allow 3,000 more people to be served by communitylevel health services in the Ottawa region and an enable providers to offer an additional 65,000 hours of health service. “As a former home-visiting nurse, Iʼve had the privilege of witnessing how valuable these services are to people,” said LeClerc. “It makes the difference between going to the hospital and being able to stay in your own home.” Ottawa-Orleans MPP Phil McNeely, parliamentary assistant to Health Minister Deb Matthews, mentioned the “pressing need to find and support new ways of delivering health care,” citing the need to make the tax dollars of Ontario residents go further in this regard. This view was echoed by Ottawa-Centre MPP Yasir Naqvi, who was on hand for the announcement. The largest portion of the funding, $7.15 million, will go towards the Champlain Community Care Access Centre,

which helps seniors transition from a hospital to their home through a variety of supports.

It makes the difference between going to the hospital and being able to stay in your own home. CHANTALE LECLERC, CHAMPLAIN LHIN

The remaining funds will be divided amongst a long list of seniorsʼ service providers, disability support providers, addiction treatment centres and mental health centres and programs stretching from Hawkesbury to Barryʼs Bay. Valerie Bishop, executive director of VHA Health and Home Support, spoke of the fear felt not just by the elderly faced with health issues, but by their middle-aged children. “When suddenly you canʼt perform (the basics of domestic living) and have a whole number of obstacles to overcome, your independence is threatened,” said Bishop. “As a daughter of aging parents,

their health and happiness is a constant concern.” To illustrate the impact such services can have on a real family, Gweneth Gowenlock of Mechanicsville spoke of her difficulties in caring for her husband following his diagnosis of dementia five years ago. “I didnʼt know where to turn at first,” she said, detailing how she was eventually connected with a host of services that allow both her and her husband to live a better life. A personal support worker aids them in their home life, while a support program allows her husband to have two stimulating day trips each week. The time allows Gowenlock to recharge her batteries and accomplish domestic duties. “Weʼve been really fortunate to have support; without it I donʼt know what kind of a pickle weʼd be in,” she said. “For us it really means he can stay at home longer…and in the meantime he is happy to be at home and we are happy to have him at home. “With help and support we can carry on and have a reasonable quality of life.”

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Be aware and prepared if you’re heading into the forest This fall, people planning to go hiking, jogging, hunting, riding or bird-watching in a forest should take steps to stay safe. Public lands in Ontario are used for a variety of activities. Everyone in the forest needs to be aware others may be nearby, and stay visible. Hunting is allowed on most Crown land, on some private properties with the permission of the property owner and in some municipal/county forests. Anyone using the forest

should check with the municipality for specific information. HIKERS AND BIRDWATCHERS

• If you take a pet with you, ensure the animal is wearing a brightly coloured blanket or Tshirt. HORSEBACK RIDERS

• Be aware of hunting seasons in the area where you are hiking. • Wear a hunter orange vest or jacket and hat, and be especially careful at dawn or dusk, when colours such as red and green appear brown. • Avoid wearing white, especially mittens or hats. They can resemble a deerʼs tail through trees.

• Try to avoid known hunting areas, especially at dawn or dusk. • Wear a hunter orange vest or jacket, and a brightly coloured helmet cover. • Use a brightly coloured rump sheet for your horse. HUNTERS

• Be aware that you may be sharing the forest with other hunters, as well as hikers, riders and birdwatchers. • Anyone, including archery hunters, hunting during gun season for deer and moose, must wear solid hunter orange clothing and a hunter orange head cover. • Consult the 2012-13 Hunting Regulations Summary for exceptions. Hunters must never shoot unless they are absolutely sure of their target and what is beyond it.

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R0011621416

Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Residents participate in a public consultation hosted by Roche-Genivar to discuss options for the interprovincial bridge in June 2012.

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Coun. Fleury pushing for a truck plan Saying council wants trucks off King Edward Avenue is not enough, says the councillor for Rideau-Vanier Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

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EMC news â&#x20AC;&#x201C; RideauVanier Coun. Mathieu Fleury is unsatisďŹ ed with responses he is getting from staff about what the city can do to remove truck trafďŹ c from downtown streets if a new interprovincial bridge is built. Before January, the National Capital Commission is expected to announce its preferred option for a new bridge connecting Ottawa to Gatineau. Residents from each of the proposed corridors â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Kettle Island, Lower Duck Island and Gatineau Airport/McLaurin Bay â&#x20AC;&#x201C; have expressed concerns about the impact a bridge would have on their community. Heavy truck trafďŹ c is at the top of that list. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once that interprovincial crossing goes in, we expect all the interprovincial trucks to be moved off,â&#x20AC;? Fleury said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;ItĘźs clear. ItĘźs not just this council now; itĘźs been previously stated as well.â&#x20AC;? What remains unclear is what the city is planning to do to ensure that happens, Fleury said. ItĘźs important to him for that issue to be cleared up now, before itĘźs too late, and so far he has had no luck getting a clear answer to his questions about

truck routes. After an unsatisfactory response to a question he submitted to transportation committee at the beginning of October, Fleury is still hammering away at the question. He submitted another inquiry on Nov. 7 asking what the city can do to ensure all heavy truck trafďŹ c is removed from Chaudière Bridge and the King Edward Avenue, Rideau Street, Waller Street, Nicholas Street truck corridor and onto the potential new bridge. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donĘźt care where itĘźs going to be. To me, itĘźs about providing a solution. ItĘźs not taking the issues from the Macdonald-Cartier Bridge onto Chaudière Bridge. The new route should be deďŹ ned and it should remove the ability for interprovincial truck routes to use King Edward, Champlain and Chaudière (bridges).â&#x20AC;? Those results arenĘźt a given without conďŹ rming the cityĘźs instructions for what it wants to see happen with truck routes. Fleury expressed frustration in having to re-ask the same question. â&#x20AC;&#x153;ItĘźs weird. So many people have spent so many resources and time and attendance at public meetings to discuss it, and it just hasnĘźt appeared to capture any changes,â&#x20AC;? Fleury

said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;IĘźm hopeful with this IĘźm awaking at least the cityĘźs piece (of) it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;LetĘźs get that component clamped (down),â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we just let it slide, we donĘźt get it ďŹ xed.â&#x20AC;? As the study drags on, Fleury said he thinks itĘźs important to keep pushing on certain issues. For him, that issue is truck trafďŹ c downtown. â&#x20AC;&#x153;ItĘźs a fundamental question and it seems to be lost under six, seven other priorities. So I want to make sure thatĘźs at the forefront of the report that comes out.â&#x20AC;? Fleury isnĘźt the only one asking that question. On April 4, Innes Coun. Rainer Bloess took a swing at it by asking several pointed questions about truck studies ordered by council. Part of the response was a memo from the National Capital Commission that stated: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The degree to which the alternatives divert truck trafďŹ c will be an integral consideration in the evaluation processâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? when considering a new bridge location. That still doesnĘźt answer the question of how the city would put policies into place to remove the trucks, and thatĘźs what Fleury wants answers for. With files from Michelle Nash.


R0011739237

Your Community Newspaper

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Hundreds attend Remembrance Day ceremony in Vanier Jessica Cunha jessica.cunha@metroland.com

EMC news - Hundreds of people gathered at the Eastview City Cenotaph on Sunday, Nov. 11, to pay tribute on Remembrance Day. The crowds lined the street, watching as the members in the parade march in step to the beat of the drums

before lining up in front of the cenotaph. The parade, organized by the Royal Canadian Legion Eastview branch, included active and retired military personnel, members of the police force and cadets. A number of wreaths were laid at the cenotaph from various groups, schools, organizations and individuals.

PHOTOS BY JESSICA CUNHA/METROLAND

Hundreds of people gathered to watch a parade march in beat of the drums before lining up in front of the cenotaph.

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Minwaashin Lodge gets major funding Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC news - Minwaashin Lodge received a major boost in funding from a local consulting firm. The funds will help more women who use its programming get the skills and confidence they need to succeed in the workforce. Minwaashin accepted a grant of US$100,000 from Accenture, a management and consulting firm on Nov. 8. The money is expected to help fund three programs at the lodge, all of which are for aboriginal women who have been affected by violence. The company will also provide volunteer resources and programming for aboriginal women. “We are tremendously fortunate to have partners helping us improve supports for aboriginal women in our community,” said Irene Compton, program manager at Minwaashin. “Our clients appreciate the commitment by Accenture employees to offer their time, resources and skills to help them succeed.” Minwaashin provides support to First Nations, Inuit and Métis women who are survivors of violence and the residential school system. Prior to the funding from Accenture, the lodge did run

programming geared towards finding employment, healing circles, counselling and selfesteem and confidence activities. This funding will give the organization the opportunity to upgrade its employment program. TARGETING COMMUNITIES

The grant is part of United Way Ottawaʼs targeted community investment fund program. The United Way worked in consultation with the Ottawa Aboriginal Coalition, an alliance of aboriginal organizations, which identified the Minwaashin Lodge as the agency for the grant. The United Wayʼs community campaign co-chairs, Rideau-Vanier Coun. Mathieu Fleury and Angie Poirier attended the event. “This is a great example of how United Way works with organizations to achieve their business and corporate social responsibility objectives to address a specific need in our community,” Fleury said. “We create partnerships, mobilize support and combine efforts with partners like Minwaashin and Accenture to help make change happen in Ottawa.” The United Way will act as liaison between Minwaashin

and Accenture, reporting the results of the partnership as well as oversee the funding investment on behalf of Accenture. Minwaashin client Kateri Miles heard about the lodgeʼs programs through a friend, and was eager to learn employment skills. She signed up for the employment readiness program. “I never thought I would be where I am today, it is a total gift,” Miles said. Since attending the program, Miles has decided to go back to school to become a social worker. “Itʼs great news,” Miles said. “For me, this is a very positive time. The fact that the lodge will be improving what it already has, making more programs available here, it is so positive.” In the past Accenture has participated in the United Wayʼs employee giving campaign. This new contribution will allow the companyʼs employees the opportunity to work and share their skills with Minwaashinʼs clients. “This is an important opportunity for our people at Accenture, and by sharing their skills, they will instantly see the impact they are having on the lives of people in Ottawa.” said Mark Lambert, Accenture managing director.

MICHELLE NASH/METROLAND

Irene Compton thanks Accenture for a US$100,000 donation to Minwaashin Lodge, a non-profit organization for aboriginal women who experienced violence. The money will be used to increase employment services efforts at the lodge.

R0011707992-1101

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

21


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Brookfield High School held a pancake breakfast on Nov. 2 to raise money for Operation Veterans. Operation Veterans is a non-profit organization founded by Dr. Paul Kavanagh from Laval, Que., in association with the Canadian War Museum. Its purpose is to raise funds across Canada in order to provide veterans a meal in the Mess, the War Museumʼs cafeteria. The meal is a tangible way of thanking veterans for the sacrifices they made in the past, as well as for the day to day support they show the museum, often providing hours of volunteer service in the museum itself. Additionally, the organization helps fund the development of online modules about diplomacy and peace-keeping that are used by teachers of Canadian history as a way to encourage young people to become familiar with Canadaʼs military history and the essential role played by our veterans. The pancake breakfast was organized by Brookfieldʼs Studentsʼ Council with the able assistance of the schoolʼs office administrator, Cathy Babcock.

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Brookfield raises money for Operation Veterans With the breakfast, students were able to raise more that $1,500 to contribute to Operation Veterans. A cheque was presented to Claude Drouin, a representative from the War Museum. Last yearʼs donation to the same cause came to $1,300. Parents, as well as the community at large, were invited to participate and the support given by the business community was overwhelming. Dennyʼs South Keys restaurant contributed the pancake mix that was responsible for the delicious pancakes that were appreciated by all. Other businesses made it possible to have exciting door prizes. For the price of $5, students and guests received pancakes, fruit and a choice of juice or coffee. They were also automatically entered into a draw for a wide variety of items provided by the sponsoring businesses. Additionally, tickets could be bought for a raffle of the two items which generated the most interest, a gift certificate given by The Works on Bank Street South, as well as a prize donated by Bleekers. A huge thanks goes out to the studentsʼ council, Ms. Babcock and to the many parents, students and staff who participated in the breakfast.


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Forum addresses neighbourhood-wide issues michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC news- Residents in Vanier engaged with city officials and staff, neighbours and their city councillor to discuss what their community needs to become one of the most desirable places to live in the city. The very first Vanier Community Forum was held on Nov. 3 at the Richelieu Vanier Community Centre. The registered event welcomed about 60 residents, business owners and partners to discuss the needs of Vanier. Linda Cristina, of the cityʼs planning and growth management department, worked with Quartier Vanier, the Vanier Community Association and Vanier Beautification to organize the day. “This is a way residents and the city can participate in an open discussion about their neighbourhood,” Cristina said. The purpose of the forum was to connect and collaborate; something many of the residents who attended agreed was accomplished. Rideau-Vanier Coun. Mathieu Fleury also agreed. The councillor said it was an excellent opportunity for everyone who came out and participated. “It offered a place for an open discussion with the city,” Fleury said. Funding for the forum came in part from a Heritage Canada grant, which has also been instrumental for the

community to fund its first community-wide event, Cʼest Chill on Dec. 1. Fleuryʼs staff and city staff not only attended the meeting, but participated in the table discussions with residents. Those discussions, which each lasted 45 minutes, included a look at parks, recreation, safety concerns, sustainable transportation, economic development and community partnerships. After every discussion, a representative from each table presented their notes to the rest of the group. Ideas suggested for the area included a dog park, more businesses developed in Vanier, more street lights, art in the windows of businesses, and better neighbour-to-neighbour connections to build strength in the community. Overbrook Community Association president Sheila Perry came to the event to learn from Overbrookʼs closest neighbours. “We share a lot of the similarities and itʼs important to learn from one another,” Perry said. The Overbrook association has in the past extended its reach to Vanier for multiple issues, events and guidance, including a recent business improvement area meeting where Quartier Vanier executive director Suzanne Valiquet attended to speak on how the Overbrook community can build its own BIA. “Itʼs natural to keep the dialogue open between the two

MICHELLE NASH/METROLAND

Residents, from left, Kate Greer-Close and Lucie Marleau participate in an all-Vanier forum on Nov. 3. Concerns surrounding development, walkability, park revitalizations and transportation were discussed at Vanier’s first Neighbourhood Connections Office forum.

R0011731815-1108

Michelle Nash

communities,” Perry said. One of the most interesting aspects of the forum was the work of artist, Jennifer Shepherd. Shepherd, who runs a company called Living Tapestries, was hired by the city to re-create the conversations taking place into a graphic image. Throughout the meeting, Shepherd took notes and created a four-panel canvas drawing of what occurred. “Capturing the conversation through a drawing gives everyone who participated in todayʼs event validity that what they said was heard,” Cristina said. “Itʼs something concrete the residents get to take away and it shows a commitment that these are your thoughts and they are recorded.” Fleury agreed. “Itʼs a fantastic way to illustrate the discussions which were taking place,” he said. As for what will happen with all the ideas, concerns and notes made at the forum, Fleury said his office will develop some short-term priorities, including improving pedestrian transportation. Some of the broader and more general ideas - including improving the neighbourhoodʼs streetscape - will be something his office will consider for a long-term project. “Our goal is to make it (Vanier) the best community,” Fleury said. Fleury thanked residents who came out to the forum and those who have been working hard for the past few years at making Vanier a great place to live. “It is easy to work in Vanier, because the residents make it so. They are very engaging,” he said.

R0011737766/1115

More than 50 Vanier residents participate in city-led event

MICHELLE NASH/METROLAND

Artist, Jennifer Shepherd was hired by the city to re-create the conversations taking place at the Vanier forum on Nov. 3 into a graphic image. Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012


Your Community Newspaper

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Ottawa Public Health Information at 613-580-6744. The influenza vaccine is also available through physician offices and some pharmacies.

Preventing falls:

Enjoy your home as long as possible As we enter into our senior years the In the bathroom: premium we place on independent living • Install grab-bars in the shower, tub increases. Unfortunately, 40 per cent of and toilet areas. all nursing home admissions occur as • Use a bath-seat and a hand held a result of a fall, but aging in your own shower in your tub if you have trouble home is possible. Prepare your home so it standing. will be safe for you as you age. • Use a long rubber mat in your tub To keep your home safe: and place a bath mat with a rubber • Ensure floors are dry and slip-free. backing outside of the tub. Clean up water spills right away and • Use a raised toilet seat if you have avoid using wax or cleaners on the trouble getting on and off the toilet. floor. In the kitchen: • Remove clutter and other items you • Keep items you use often within can trip on such as extension cords, reach. shoes or mats. • Keep heavier items in the bottom • Consider using a cordless phone. cupboards. • Ensure there is bright lighting in and Outside your home: around your house by: • Ensure outdoor stairs and paths do not • Using a minimum of 60-watt bulbs in have holes or loose stones on them. all light fixtures. • Remove items you can trip over like • Using nightlights in bedrooms, garden tools and hoses. hallways and bathrooms. • Clear snow and ice from stairs as soon • Installing motion sensitive lights in as possible after a snowfall. the entrance outside your home. • Use lots of sand or salt on your outdoor • Minimize the risk of falling down your stairs and driveway in the winter. stairs by installing sturdy handrails Making a few small home improvements the full length of all staircases and and adjustments to daily habits can create removing loose carpeting. a safer environment, where the risk of

falling down is much lower. The short amount of time it takes to make these changes might help to lengthen the time a senior can enjoy living in their own home. For more information on how to make your home safer, call Ottawa Public Health Information at 613-580-6744, TTY: 613-580 9656 or visit ottawa.ca/ health. You can also connect with Ottawa Public Health on Twitter and Facebook. Adapted from: Smart Moves, Information about fall prevention for older adults, SMARTRISK, 2004.

R0011289681-1115

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

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TAKE THIS TEST! ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏ ❏

difficulty seeing street signs while driving blurred night vision tiredness and/or blur while reading eyestrain from computer use family history of eye disease

NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Residents give heritage a closer look Forum invites urban, rural input Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

(cataract, glaucoma, macular degeneration etc.)

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FAMILY LAW in a Box presents

Divorce Straight Talk A FREE public seminar that answers all your questions about separation and divorce Wednesday,October November 7-9pm, WestEnd End Wednesday, 24,21, 7—9 pm, East

Speakers: Julie Audet/Josée Thibault, Founders of Family Law in a Box, “What is the next step? Knowledge is Power” Sandy Holmes, Parenting Mediator, “The Children Come First” Cindy Duncan, Mortgage Broker, “Paying Off Matrimonial Debt and Protecting Your Credit Rating” Barb Gladwish, Financial Divorce Specialist, “Ensuring a Healthy Financial Future After Divorce”

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The seminar is FREE, but advance registration is required. Please register with josee@familylawinabox.com or call her at (613) 447-8221 for more information. Seminar includes handouts and lots of time for your questions.

Space is limited — REGISTER NOW!

EMC news - From heritage homes in the Byward Market to farmhouses in the south end, Heritage Ottawaʼs latest forum aims to bring all of Ottawa residents together to help promote and preserve heritage in the city. Heritage Ottawa will host the 2012 Ottawa Heritage Forum on Nov. 17 at DominionChalmers Churchʼs Woodside Hall in Centretown. This will be the second forum of its kind; the first was held in New Edinburgh in October 2011. The organization credits the groupʼs desire to hold an annual heritage event to the success of that first meeting. Heritage Ottawaʼs Nancy Oakley is one of the organizers for the event. “We realized a forum is a needed and valuable to all the communities who participate, to share ideas and discuss heritage concerns,” Oakley said. Members of New Edinburgh Community Alliance co-hosted the event in 2011 and part of the day involved taking the participants on a walking tour. Oakley confirmed this yearʼs forum will also take a break, to walk around Centretownʼs heritage district. “The walk really seemed to help people get an idea of what is going on in a heritage district and that is what we hope will happen this year too,” she said. The day will be divided into three parts: guest speakers, a look at the importance of a communityʼs role in saving heritage and table discussions. “This format allows us and the participants to have a proactive approach,” Oakley said. Heritage Ottawa will also discuss issues the group has been following, which include the fight against the National Capital Commissionʼs desire to demolish three homes in Lowertown, on Sussex Drive. The request to demolish those homes was recently turned down by the cityʼs planning committee.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Ottawa-area residents attend Heritage Ottawa’s first forum in New Edinburgh at St. Bartholomew’s Church in October 2011. “We have won the battle but the war is definitely not over,” Oakley said. The group aims to discuss the recent win at the forum, in preparation for what NCC may do next, with the homes. RURAL FOCUS

Aside from discussing urban heritage, Oakley said one of the most important roles at this yearʼs forum will take is to ignite heritage interests across the city, beyond urban boundaries. “We recognize heritage is not just old buildings in the downtown core, but it is rural villages and farms,” Oakley said. “We are encouraging rural residents to come out and participate too.” To entice all of Ottawa to

come, the group has invited a wide range of individuals, museums representatives and community associations. Representatives from Watsonʼs Mill in Manotick and from the Diefenbunker in Carp will speak on the importance of community engagement and partnerships. One of the cityʼs planners will discuss Ottawaʼs system of heritage conservation and appreciation, and community associations from the Glebe, Dalhousie, Briarcliffe, Old Ottawa South and Lowertown will present issues from their respective neighbourhoods. The table discussions will allow residents to break down topics on heritage, including possible solutions and ideas. The ultimate goal, Oakley added, will be to have the forum grow in both numbers

and interest from community associations across the city and Ottawa Valley. For heritage junkies who are unable to attend, Oakley said Heritage Ottawa will write up a full report for its website, a few weeks after Nov. 17. Following the trend of this yearʼs forum and 2011ʼs, Oakley said the group will pair up with a different community each year. The Lowertown Community Association is slated to co-host the 2013 forum. Those interested in participating in future forums, promoting heritage or becoming a Heritage Ottawa heritage keeper, can email info@heritageottawa.org. To learn more about the forum or to RSVP, drop a line to heritageforumottawa@gmail. com.

November 17 2PM November 18 2PM November 20 7PM 67’s vs. NIAGARA 67’s vs. PLYMOUTH 67’s vs. KINGSTON TEDDY BEAR TOSS Game Sponsor:

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012


Your Community Newspaper

Mark Your Calendar Join us at Revera – Landmark Court for our upcoming November event: Speaker Series: Isobel Eastman Tuesday, November 20th, 2 pm – 3 pm Enjoy an afternoon of storytelling with local author and retired school teacher Isobel Eastman. She shares her past stories and life experiences that are filled with rural characters and humorous school children. Light refreshments will be served. 11036 11.12

Tours of our residence available.

Landmark Court Seating is limited. Call Monica VanDam to RSVP at 613-218-8364.

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Your Community Newspaper

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Nov. 17–Dec. 23, 2012


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Buy, store and prepare fish properly

BUYING AND STORING

Farmed fish are of consistent quality and are available all year round. You can buy them at retail outlets, farmers markets or at the farm gate in several forms: whole dressed, fillets or smoked. To prepare for storage, soak in salted water for 30 minutes to remove the natural slippery, protective coating. Tightly wrap and refriger-

ate for two to three days. To store for up to three months, freeze tightly-wrapped fish at -18 C. PREPARING AND COOKING

Cook with mild-flavoured oils (such as butter, hydrogenated shortening, peanut or corn oil) to prevent flavour from transferring to the mild flavour of the fish. To ensure moist and tender fish, probe with a fork while cooking to see that flesh is opaque and flakes easily. Hereʼs a brief outline of the chief cooking methods: Pan-Fry: Dip fish pieces in milk, roll in flour. Lightly grease a heavy skillet and brown on both sides. Season with salt and pepper. Bake: Sprinkle with salt and pepper and brush with melted butter or vegetable oil. Bake in well-greased pan for 15 to 20 minutes at 400 F (200 C). Microwave: Season to taste fresh or thawed fish; cover with plastic wrap leaving one corner open for venting. Cook on high for five

What’s for

Dinner?

to six minutes per pound (or four to five minutes per fillet). Let stand three to four minutes before serving. Barbecue: Place seasoned fillet on grill, skin side down. Cook on one side only for about 10 minutes at medium to high heat. Poach: In flat pan, barely cover fish with hot Court Bouillon (see below). Cover and simmer, not boil, for four to six minutes. (Court Bouillon: Combine one litre of water, three tablespoons of lemon juice or one tablespoon of cider vinegar and 1.5 teaspoons of salt. Bring to a boil and cook three minutes before poaching fish.) Broil: Cover with basting oil or Dijon sauce (see below). Broil 10 to 15 centimetres from heat source for about 10 minutes. (Dijon sauce: Mix one part Dijon mustard with three parts mayonnaise. Season with lemon pepper and fresh dill. Spread evenly over fillets for broiling, baking or barbecuing.) Foodland Ontario

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Kichesippi beer wins gold Steph Willems steph.willems@metroland.com

EMC news - An Ottawabased brewery is basking in the rich, amber glow of success after winning a gold medal at the 2012 World Beer Championships.

Kichesippi Beer Companyʼs 1855 brew took the top position in the amber ale category at the annual event, held in Chicago last month. That beer took home bronze in the World Beer Championshipsʼ golden ale category, having also won bronze at the Canadian Brew-

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ing Awards held in June. “Youʼre up against a category at the championships,” said co-owner Paul Meek. Currently, Kichesippi products can be found at 120 restaurants and bars in the greater Ottawa area and in 35 provincial liquor stores.

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EMC food - Aquaculture is centuries old and is widespread in Asia. Until the 1980s, more than 70 per cent of world supply came from China, Japan, Korea and the Philippines. Itʼs a relatively new industry to Canada. In Ontario, fish culture goes back to about 1866, but it was only in 1962 that changes to the Game and Fish Act permitted raising of commercial fish for stocking waterways and later for human consumption. Ontarioʼs initial 16 fish farms have grown to more than 200 today.

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Your Community Newspaper

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30

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012


SENIORS

Your Community Newspaper

List of chores was very long

T

here was a price to pay for being the youngest in the family. I was given, I thought, more than my share of chores, all because Mother thought they were easy jobs and ones I could handle. All because I was the smallest of the five children, but also the youngest. It was my chore to keep the wood box in the kitchen filled. It was a job I hated because never once did I carry in the wood from the summer kitchen that I didnʼt end up with splinters in my hands and often in my arms. But Mother thought it was an easy chore and one of which I was quite capable of handling. Another job that fell on my shoulders was making sure the water under the ice box accumulated in a white granite basin, was emptied. Only once I remember forgetting about it, and having it overflow all over the kitchen floor. That meant I had to get down on my hands and knees and mop the entire kitchen floor. I never forgot to check the basin for melted ice after that. Making the toast for breakfast was another job Mother thought I was quite capable of handling. Of

MARY COOK Mary Cook’s Memories course, there was no electricity on the farm back then, so a wire rack was placed over the fire in the Findlay Oval. It held four slices of bread and I couldnʼt take my eyes off it for a second or the toast would burn. The penalty for this error in judgment was my having to eat the burnt toast. The fact that my hateful brother Emerson did everything in his power to have me burn the bread, had me so nervous, I was a complete wreck by the time everyone had their toast. As soon as I got home from school, and had changed into my play clothes, I was also expected to go out to the hen house and gather the eggs. I used a wicker basket and had to be very careful to handle the eggs carefully, because many of them would be sold in Renfrew on the Saturday. Large eggs sold for 15 cents a dozen, but if they were cracked, you were lucky to get a

nickel. My sister Audrey, older than I by about 11 years, often didnʼt use the basket. Like Mother, Audrey would bunch up the bottom of her apron and carry the eggs that way. And never once do I ever remember her cracking an egg. I tried it one day with my apron, but with disastrous results. I had to go out behind the hen house and get ride of the ones I managed to break before Mother saw what I had done. It was back to the basket for me! There was a job, however, I felt very privileged to be given. After the milking was done at night, the milk was moved by stone boat, in big milk cans, into the summer kitchen. It was my job to place a square of clean cheese cloth over each can and then sink on the lids tightly. I could never figure out why we used the cheese

cloth, but it was a necessary part of the job. The next morning, before my chore with the toast began, I would take the big brown baking bowl and the little tin strainer out to the summer kitchen to one of the milk cans. Using the strainer, I would skim off the cream that would settle over the night to the top, and put it into the bowl, so that everyone would have a helping of rich cream for their porridge. I liked this job because Mother and I had a ritual that never varied all the time we lived on the farm in Renfrew County. I would bring the bowl of cream into the kitchen and say to Mother, as I did every morning, “A miracle happened overnight, Mother. Last night that milk was white, and this morning it is the colour of gold. Itʼs a miracle Mother.” And I would wait for the answer that never varied. “Itʼs not a miracle Mary… thatʼs just good old fashioned Renfrew County magic.” We would both laugh, never tiring of the ritual that went on day after day, every morning of my life as the youngest in the family, on that farm in Northcote.

Operation Veteran launches fourth year Canadian War Museum

On Nov. 11, Operation Veteran will launch its fourth year of operations. Over the past four years, support for the program has grown tremendously to now include schools from all 10 provinces and three territories, a partnership with EF Educational Tours and plans for educational resources that will help relay the history of the First World War, both online and in the classroom. Operation Veteran was founded by Dr. Paul Kavanagh, in association with the Canadian War Museum, after his moving encounter in April 2009 with a Second World War veteran who did not have enough money to pay for soup and a coffee at the Museum cafeteria. “There was a long line-up and people were becoming impatient,” Kavanagh explained. “He was in tears. I had to do something. So I paid for his meal.” Soon afterwards, Kavanagh founded Operation Veteran to ensure that on Nov. 11, no veteran would lack the funds

for a meal at the museum. To date, more than 3,500 complimentary meals have been served to veterans visiting the Canadian War Museum. Resources include sophisticated, curriculum-based, online modules with virtual access to the museumʼs important collection of artifacts, images and archives as well as hands-on educational kits containing authentic materials of the type worn, used and created by Canadians who experienced firsthand the realities of the First World War. In the coming year, Operation Veteran will continue to enlist more schools, and provide the funding for educational resources to help students better appreciate the contributions and sacrifices of a generation of Canadians at a formative time in our history. For more information about the program, visit www.warmuseum.ca/ov. The Canadian War Museum is Canadaʼs national museum of military history. Its mission is to promote public understanding of Canadaʼs military history..

Catch up on the latest

Community News with your local EMC.

IF YOU WORK IN ONTARIO, THIS IS YOUR FIGHT. On September 11, 2012, the Ontario Liberal government passed Bill 115, the Putting Students First Act, 2012.

Bill 115 is undemocratic, unconstitutional, and unprecedented. sIt takes away the democratic rights of teachers and education professionals to bargain collectively. sIt places the government beyond the reach of the Ontario Human Rights Code, the Ontario Labour Relations Act, and even the courts. sIt takes local decision-making away from school boards and puts it in the hands of the provincial government. That’s why we’re standing against Bill 115. It sets a dangerous precedent for all Ontarians. In fact, the government has already threatened other public sector workers with similar legislation. As teachers, we teach your children to stand up for their principles. Today, we ask you to do the same.

What can you do to help? Join us in standing up for democratic rights. Let your MPP know that Bill 115 must be repealed.

StopBill115.ca

This message brought to you by the Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario R0011745302-1115

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

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THURSDAY NOVEMBER 15, 2012

Dogs of all sizes and breeds from around the province compete in the Dock Dogs big air event.

A doggone good time

JESSICA CUNHA PHOTOS/METROLAND

Jennifer Theriault, of Maxville, Ont., shows how well Chuck, a Catahoula up for adoption through the Catahoula Rescue Ontario group, pays attention. The rescue group set up shop at the Ottawa Pet Expo held at the Ernst & Young Centre on Nov. 10.

Under My Wing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Pug Rescue offers tips about adopting a pug at the Ottawa Pet Expo, held at the Ernst & Young Centre on Nov. 10. From left, Maia Stonebridge, of Bayshore, with pug Bijou; Shelley Hutchinson, of Kanata, with pug Milo; and Brandon Zweerman, of South Keys, with pug Oscar.

Cathy Leeson, of Kemptville, takes in the exhibits at the Ottawa Pet Expo, held at the Ernst & Young Centre on Nov. 10, with basset hound brothers Baxter and Milo.

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NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

River Ward City Councillor Conseillère, quartier Rivière

River Ward Recipe Round Up: Christmas Cookies â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Holiday Goodies It is always wonderful to share great recipes, especially during the holidays. I am excited to present the first River Ward Recipe Round Up: Christmas Cookies â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Holiday Goodies.

Please send me your favourite Christmas cookie or holiday goodie recipe by 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, December 4, 2012. On Friday, December 7, 2012, I will announce two random winning recipes at my Annual Christmas Lights Tour for River Ward Seniors. The two winners will receive a special prize and will be recognized on my website and in an upcoming column. We will bake the two winning recipes at a seniorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event in December.

MICHELLE NASH/METROLAND

The artists at Centre 507â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Studio Art program are getting ready for their first art exhibition, Artistic Expressions Studio Art Exhibition thanks to a grant from the Centretown United Church. From left, Glebe artist and centre volunteer Lisa Thomas, Centre 507 artists Jul Liboiron, Nirmolak Saggu and Centre 507 and church board member Linda Pollock.

More details to come....

Art exhibit showcases Centre 507 talent

Changes to Curbside Residual Waste Several important changes in solid waste collection began the week of October 29, 2012. Residual household waste is collected every two weeks and the green bin is collected every week. Blue and black box collection will continue on alternate weeks.

Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC entertainment - An upcoming art exhibition at Centretown United Church offers an example of whatĘźs possible when someone is given a little help. Centre 507 will hold its ďŹ rst art exhibit on Nov. 21 to 24 in the churchĘźs sanctuary, 507 Bank St. The show, Artistic Expressions Studio Art Exhi-

You can confirm your collection schedule by checking your Waste Collection Calendar online at Ottawa.ca. You can also sign up to receive personalized reminders about your collection schedule via e-mail, phone or Twitter by visiting ottawa.ca or by calling 3-11 (613-580-2400). You can also visit my website at MariaMcRae.ca, which has a detailed map identifying your new collection day.

bition, will showcase Centre 507 artistsĘź work. The show is a direct result of a joint project from Centre 507 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; drop-in centre for people living with poverty, addictions and mental illness â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and Centretown United Church. Centre 507 and church board member, Linda Pollock describes the Studio as a place where the artists have a safe, equipped studio space. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There has been a lot of in-

Upcoming River Ward Flu Clinics Wednesday, December 5 - 3:30 to 8:30 p.m. St. Pius X Catholic High School (1481 Fisher Avenue) Wednesday, December 12 - 3:30 to 8:30 p.m. Jim Durrell Recreation Centre (1265 Walkley Road) For more information please visit ottawa.ca/flu , watch for daily updates on Twitter (@ottawahealth) and Facebook, or call Ottawa Public Health Information at 613-580-6744 (TTY:613-580-9656).

At Kumon, we give your kids the power of knowing. Whether your child needs extra help with math and reading or wants new academic challenges, our specialized learning program provides children of any age or ability with the confidence to achieve more all on their own.

Your Strong Voice at City Hall As always, I appreciate hearing from you and encourage you to keep in touch with me as it allows me to serve you better. It is an honour and a privilege being your strong voice at City Hall.

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Tel./TĂŠl.: 613-580-2486 Maria.McRae@ottawa.ca MariaMcRae.ca @CouncillorMcRae 34

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

Academic Enrichment Pre-K â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 12th Grade 800.ABC.MATH www.kumon.ca

R0011719266-1108

terest from the Centre 507 clients,â&#x20AC;? Pollock said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is great to watch them all get ready for this show.â&#x20AC;? The program received a one-time grant from the Watkins Fund for Innovative Ministries, through the United Church Foundation to organize the exhibit. All the Centre 507 artists have made submissions which will be on display. Frequent Centre 507 patron, Jul Liboiron said she has been working around the clock on her pen and ink pieces. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is taking a lot out of me, I am constantly trying to get the work done,â&#x20AC;? Liboiron said. Some of LiboironĘźs art pieces will also be available to purchase as gift cards. Liboiron has leaned on the two professional Ottawa artists, Glebe painter, sculptor and teacher Lisa Thomas, and Ginger McCoy, painter, ceramic artist, who volunteer at the studio twice a month to offer workshops and mentor the artist-members. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have fun with all of the artists, and they give back to me as much as I give to them,â&#x20AC;? Thomas said. The church is converting its sanctuary room into a gallery for the event, after the show, the space will be available for the program on a regular basis. Thomas said this new space is desperately needed. The current space the artists use for the program and to get ready for the exhibit is the churchĘźs preschool room. Thomas and McCoy must set up and tear down each time the group uses the shared space. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It will be great to have a more permanent space, where everyone can just

drop in and get started,â&#x20AC;? Thomas said. Pollock said the churchĘźs goal is to make the room a community space, available for whatever the community needs. Regardless of the amount of space available, most of the artists say they come because the program is enjoyable. Barrhaven resident, Nirmolak Saggu said he makes the trek to the centre for the two hours every other month because it allows him to opportunity to express his creative side. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I am at home, maybe I could get more time to spend on my art, but here, I get to focus and learn new things,â&#x20AC;? Saggu said. SagguĘźs strength is pencil sketching. He said he was afraid of using colour until he attended some of the workshops on colour at the centre. Now everything he creates is full of colour. The artists who attend the program vary. Some are shy, others are living with mental illnesses, homelessness, or some simply come to the centre because of its multiple activities. All of them however credit the studio art program as a way to both express themselves and grow as individuals. The exhibit will welcome different guests each evening throughout the event, including speaker Ed Broadbent on Nov. 21 at 7 p.m., pianist William Blais on Nov. 22 at 7 p.m. and the Shout Sisters Choir on Nov. 23. After each guest appearance, the audience is invited to view the artwork. The show is open from 7 to 9 p.m. from Nov. 21 to 24.


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

Public weighs in on Bronson art proposals Steph Willems steph.willems@metroland.com

EMC news - Judging by the turnout at an open house at the Bronson Centre on Nov. 8, interest in public art in Ottawa is growing. A number of artists answered the cityʼs call last summer for submissions for the public art component of the Bronson Avenue Renewal project, a $30-million road reconstruction project expected to wrap up in 2014. Those proposals were on display at the open house, with the public encouraged to provide feedback for the selection process. Two sites have been chosen for art installations: the entrance to the Bronson Centre and the southern fenceline at the lawn bowling club by the intersection with Gladstone Avenue. The proposals were split between those vying for either project, though two of the seven artists were submitting for both. “The chainlink fence around the lawn bowling club will be replaced with an art fence,” said Melissa Black, project co-ordinator of the cityʼs public art program. “It could be the whole fence or just a part of it.”

STEPH WILLEMS/METROLAND

Artist Andrew O’Malley shows off his submission for the Bronson Avenue Renewal public art competition, one of seven shortlisted artists displaying their ideas at a Bronson Centre open house on Nov. 8. Both sites were chosen for their busy pedestrian traffic, high visibility and current state of appearance. Most

would agree that the current look of both sites isnʼt likely to get hearts pounding. One of the artists vying for

the Bronson Centre site was Andrew OʼMalley, whose scale model gave a taste of what heʼd like to see adorning

the entranceway. Glowing, translucent figures depicting a cross-section of the population – and the clientele of the

centre itself – would alternate in colour, synching up once an hour. “There would also be seasonal colour palates,” said OʼMalley, who has been shortlisted before in a public art competition. Detlef Gotzens, who has 45 years of professional artistic experience under his belt, brought his love for glass to his proposal for the fence. He envisions a aluminum fence – two metres tall and 20 metres long – topped with pieces of thick, coloured glass. The wispy aluminum component is meant to look like grass moving in the wind. “The idea was to create something dynamic; a cheery accent that you wouldnʼt expect as part of a fence,” said Gotzens, adding, “Glass is a very unique material. There are so many things you can do with glass.” The cityʼs art selection committee was to review public feedback following the open house and return a verdict by Nov. 14. The two proposals chosen will be based on several criteria, including creativity, ability to address the site characteristics, production methods, durability and maintainability.

Committee puts street safety changes on hold till spring laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - City councillors want to put a proposed reduction in the speed limit on Bronson Avenue on hold – at least for now. Following the Oct. 18 death of Carleton University student Krista Johnson, who was killed as she cycled northbound in the southbound cycling lane on Bronson, Capital Coun. David Chernushenko called for something to be done to address longstanding safety concerns on the street. The wide section of Bronson Avenue south of the Rideau Canal has become a speedway, Chernushenko said, proposing the speed limit be dropped to 50 kilometres per hour, down from the current limits of 60 and 70 km/h. But councillors on the cityʼs transportation committee werenʼt convinced that a speed-limit change in isolation would make any difference and instead decided to put off a decision until February or March, when the committee expects to receive a comprehensive report about safety conditions on that stretch of Bronson Avenue. The review is already in the works and GloucesterSouthgate Coun. Diane Deans said the report will help city staff and the committee fix the problems “in a comprehensive way.” Piecemeal changes can have the unintended consequence of making the road

less safe, Deans said. Rideau-Rockcliffe Coun. Peter Clark said lowering the speed limit alone “is not the answer” because without enforcement, there is nothing prompting drivers to slow down to the speed listed on the sign. While the committee awaits the full report, the city will boost speed-limit enforcement on Bronson Avenue, where vehicles travel an average speed of 84 km/h despite the 60 and 70 km/h limits, said Phil Landry, manager of traffic management and operational support. Enforcement measures would include adding an electronic board that displays driversʼ speeds over periods of one or two weeks. Chernushenko said he never meant his suggestion to reduce the speed limit to be an isolated solution, but heʼs OK with the temporary compromise of adding more enforcement. “We have a street where speeding is common, red light running is common,” Chernushenko said. “(Bronson Avenue) would be an efficient place to cycle and walk, but people are choosing not to use them and thatʼs mostly a factor of speed.” Itʼs easy to see the call for change as a “knee-jerk reaction” to the recent death, Chernushenko said, but the issue is actually a longstanding one. Bronson Avenue has seen more than 600 collisions and a handful of deaths over the past decade, Chernushenko said.

Some councillors were not in favour of reducing the speed limit. Orléans Coun. Bob Monette said he would rather see alternatives discussed, rather than reducing the speed limit. “I do have a feeling that there are ways we can make it a safer environment for cyclists and pedestrians, and reducing the (speed) is not always the solution,” he said. Speeding really is the main issue on Bronson, said trans-

portation committee chairwoman Coun. Marianne Wilkinson, but she blamed the issue on a street that changes from a narrower four-lane road lined with homes to a wide, straight, six-lane speedway. Beacon Hill-Cyrville Coun. Tim Tierney expressed concern the cityʼs departments donʼt seem to work well together when it comes to planning for cycling improvements when road projects are already planned.

“Weʼre spending a hell of a lot of money on Ottawa on the Move,” Tierney said, referring to a $340-million program to fix city roads over the next couple of years. “Weʼre ripping up the road but not looking at opportunities for cycling.” Oglivie Road is a prime example of a location that could have used more though towards cyclists before it was rebuilt, he said. Local community asso-

ciations and Carleton student groups have already sent letters in support of making changes to increase safety on Bronson, Chernushenko said. The next step in the public consultation will be a survey of local residents as part of a city staff review. That will happen over the next couple of weeks and a working group of local residents, staff and Chernushenko will consider those results and look at making recommendations.

ANDREW REYNOLDS ANDREW REYNOLDS 4 X 65 R0011723796 SLS=4930

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Laura Mueller

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

35


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36

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012


NEWS

Your Community Newspaper

City signs on to new slots contract Revenue-sharing agreement doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t include money from table games Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

One question that OĘźConnor couldnĘźt answer was how the funding formula would apply to the possible addition of table games at the cityĘźs only current gambling facility.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;If the Rideau Carleton Raceway is the proposed casino location, does this impact on our ability to gain revenue from the addition of gaming tables in addition to slot rev-

R0011740513

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FILE PHOTO

The city has set up a new slots revenue sharing agreement with the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation.

Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x160;6Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;i

Real God. Real People. Real Church.

Join us Sundays at 10:30 7275 Parkway Rd. Greely, ON 613-821-1056

Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;`i>Ă&#x2022;ÂŤ>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;°V>Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;ÂŁĂ&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;ÂŁxĂ&#x2C6;

www.parkwayroad.com

The West Ottawa Church of Christ

Service Time: Sundays at 10:30 AM

meets every Sunday at The Old Forge Community Resource Centre 2730 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, ON K2B 7J1

Location: St. Thomas More Catholic School, 1620 Blohm Drive

Sunday Services: Bible Study at 10:00 AM - Worship Service at 11:00 AM A warm welcome awaits you For Information Call 613-224-8507

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Invites you to our worship service with Rev. Dean Noakes Sundays at 11am 414 Pleasant Park Road 613 733-4886 pleasantparkbaptist.org

Worship services Sundays at 10:30 a.m.

ËĄË&#x;ˤÂľÇ&#x2039;ssĹ&#x2DC;EĹ&#x2DC;Ĩ Ç&#x160;Ÿ_Ę°šǟǟÉ  ɠɠɠʳɠŸŸ_É&#x161;ÄśsʳŸĹ&#x2DC;ĘłO ʚ˼ˠˢʺ˧˥˨Ë&#x161;˥ˢ˼˥ NĂ&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Äś_OÇ&#x2039;sĆźÇ&#x2039;ŸÉ&#x161;Ă&#x17E;_s_ĘłƝĜsÇŁsOĜĜŸÇ&#x2039;É&#x161;Ă&#x17E;ÇŁĂ&#x17E;ÇźČ&#x2013;ÇŁŸĹ&#x2DC;Ë&#x161;ÄśĂ&#x17E;Ĺ&#x2DC;sĘł

Gloucester South Seniors Centre 4550 Bank Street (at Leitrim Rd.) (613) 277-8621 Come for an encouraging Word! R0011292837

DČ&#x2013;Ă&#x17E;Äś_Ă&#x17E;Ĺ&#x2DC;ÂśĹ&#x2DC;Č&#x2013;ÇźĂ&#x152;sĹ&#x2DC;ÇźĂ&#x17E;OĘ°Ç&#x2039;sĜǟĂ&#x17E;ŸĹ&#x2DC;Ĝʰ_Ă&#x17E;É&#x161;sÇ&#x2039;ÇŁsOĂ&#x152;Č&#x2013;Ç&#x2039;OĂ&#x152;Ęł

Celebrating 14 years in this area!

613.247.8676

(Do not mail the school please)

Pleasant Park Baptist

Watch & Pray Ministry ǢČ&#x2013;Ĺ&#x2DC;_É´ǢsÇ&#x2039;É&#x161;Ă&#x17E;OsÇŁ Çź ˨ŸÇ&#x2039;Ë Ë Ĺ?

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We are a small church in the city of Ottawa with a big heart for God and for people. newhopeottawa.co

The Redeemed Christian Church of God

Heavenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gate Chapel

WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Worship 10:30 Sundays

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Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;iÂ&#x201C;ÂŤÂ?>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;7Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;ÂŤĂ&#x160;ÂŁÂŁ\ÂŁx

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Rideau Park United Church

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EMC news - The city stands to gain more than an extra million dollars from a new slots revenue sharing agreement with the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation. While city staff said the new money-sharing formula is simply an extension of the existing agreement the city has with OLG, at least one councillor approached it cautiously. In the context of an ongoing debate over a location for a possible new casino in Ottawa, Konxdale-Merivale Coun. Keith Egli asked if approving the agreement would â&#x20AC;&#x153;box us inâ&#x20AC;? for a new casino that could be located in Ottawa. The answer from the cityĘźs

top lawyer, Rick OĘźConnor, was no, and that satisďŹ ed the ďŹ nance and economic development committee on Nov. 6. The committee unanimously approved the agreement.

enue?â&#x20AC;? Egli asked. While OĘźConnor said he didnĘźt know the answer yet, but would be asking OLG about that, representatives from OLG have already conďŹ rmed to media that the revenue-sharing agreement only applies to slots and money made from gaming tables would not be shared. Over the

past ďŹ ve years, the city has received between $4.3 and $4.4 million annually from 1,250 slot machines at the Rideau Carleton Raceway. The new agreement would add $1.3 million more a year to the cityĘźs coffers if slot revenue remains the same.The agreement means the city gets 5.25 per cent of ďŹ rst $65 million of net slot revenue, three per cent on next $135 million, 2.5 per cent of the next $300 million and half a per cent of the remainder of net slot revenue.

Minister - Rev. William Ball Organist - Alan Thomas Nusery & Sunday School, Loop audio, Wheelchair access

470 Roosevelt Ave. Westboro www.mywestminster.ca

Email: admin@mywestminister.ca

613-722-1144

Heb. 13:8 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and today, and forever

R0011588510

The Canadian Forces Chaplain Services Military Chapel Sunday Services

St Aidanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anglican Church Holy Eucharist 8:00 am & 10:30 am 10:30 am - Play Area for Under 5 934 Hamlet Road (near St Laurent & Smyth) 613 733 0102 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; staidans@bellnet.ca

St. Richardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anglican Church

 sWWW3AINT#ATHERINE-ETCALFECA

November 18th: Lapse into lying G%%&&,(,))'

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at lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ĂŠglise Ste-Anne Welcomes you to the traditional Latin Mass Sunday Masses: 8:30 a.m. Low Mass 10:30 a.m. High Mass (with Gregorian chant) 6:30 p.m. Low Mass For the Mass times please see www.st.-clementottawa.ca 528 Old St. Patrick St. Ottawa ON K1N 5L5 (613) 565.9656

Sunday Worship - 10:00 a.m. Nursery and Sunday School

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St. Clement Church/Paroisse St. ClĂŠment

Sunday Services: 8am and 10am Thursday Eucharist: 10am Nearly New Shop/Book Nook Open Thursday, Fridays 1pm - 3:30pm and ďŹ rst Saturday of each month: 10am - Noon 8 Withrow Avenue 613-224-7178

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss our Annual Christmas Bazaar

Riverside United Church 3191 Riverside Dr (at Walkley)

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Sunday Worship at 11:00am Refreshments / fellowship following service www.magma.ca/~ruc (613)733-7735

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NOT YOUR AVERAGE ANGLICANS

Come Join Us: (Located corner of Breadner Blvd. and Deniverville Pvt.)

Service protestant avec lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ĂŠcole du dimanche 09:30 Messe Catholique romaine avec la liturgie pour enfants 11:15 Venez-vous joindre Ă  nous (SituĂŠe au coin du boul. Breadner et Pvt. Deniverville)

R0011622275

ANGLICAN PARISH OF GREELY, METCALFE, VERNON Welcomes its new incumbent,

Nov 17th 9am - 2pm

The Reverend Kerri Brennan

www.saintrichards.ca

She comes to us following her curacy which she served at Trinity Church in Cornwall We Invite you to join us for worship on Sundays and to meet Reverend Kerri. All Saintsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Church in Greely (11:15 a.m.), Holy Trinity in Metcalfe (10 a.m.) and Saint Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in Vernon (8:45 a.m.) For more information, please visit the parishâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at: www.parishofmgv.org.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Worship the Lord in the Beauty of his holiness...â&#x20AC;?

St. Michael and All Angels Anglican Church 2112 Bel-Air Drive (613) 224 0526 Join us for regular services Beginning September 9 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sundays at 8:00 & 10:00 a.m. Church school and youth group Rector: Rev. Dr. Linda Privitera â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Everyone welcome â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Come as you are â&#x20AC;&#x201C; www.stmichaelandallangels.ca

Protestant Worship with Sunday School 09:30 Roman Catholic Mass with Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Liturgy 11:15

Les Services de lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;aumĂ´nerie des Forces canadiennes Services du dimanche de la chapelle militaire

All are welcome to come hear the good news in a spiritually uplifting mix of traditional and forward looking Christian worship led by the Reverend Richard Vroom with Sunday morning services at 8:30 and 10. Two blocks north of Carlingwood Shopping Centre on Lockhart Avenue at Prince Charles Road.

1115.R0011740499

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faith@magma.ca www.magma.ca/~faith

in Metcalfe on 8th Line - only 17 mins from HWY 417 265549/0605 R0011293022

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St Catherine of Siena Catholic Church

10 Chesterton Drive, Ottawa (Meadowlands and Chesterton) Tel: 613-225-6648 parkwoodchurch.ca

Minister: James T. Hurd Everyone Welcome

613.224.1971

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Only south Ottawa Mass convenient for those who travel, work weekends and sleep in!

429 Parkdale at Gladstone Ministers Rev. Dr. Anthony Bailey Barbara Faught - Pastoral Care Melodee Lovering - Youth and Children Worship Service - 10:30 am 613-728-8656 Sunday School for all ages pdale@trytel.com www.parkdaleunitedchurch.ca Nursery Available

43 Meadowlands Dr. W. Ottawa

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Sunday 7 pm Mass Now Available!

Sunday Services Worship Service10:30am Sundays Prayer Circle Tuesday at 11:30 Rev.10:30 Jamesa.m. Murray 355 Cooper Street at Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor 613-235-5143 www.dc-church.org

Come & worship with us Sundays at 10:00am Fellowship & Sunday School after the service

ALL WELCOME Sundays at 10:30 a.m. The Salvation Army Community Church Meeting at St. Andrew School 201 Crestway Dr. 613-440-7555 Barrhaven www.sawoodroffe.org

Dominion-Chalmers United Church

Parkdale United Church G%%&&(&'*'-

Tel: (613) 276-5481; (613) 440-5481 1893 Baseline Rd., Ottawa (2nd Floor) Sunday Service 10.30am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12.30pm Bible study / Night Vigil: Friday 10.00pm â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1.00am Website: heavensgateottawa.org E-mail: heavensgatechapel@yahoo.ca

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Councillor confirms sale of Beechwood property Minto wants to build mixed retail, residential on fire site michelle.nash@metroland.com

EMC news - The Minto Group conďŹ rmed last week the company will purchase the commercial property on Beechwood Avenue decimated by a ďŹ re in March 2011. MintoĘźs purchase and development plans for the property have long been the subject of rumour in the community, but owing to the length of time itĘźs taken for the current owner to settle an insurance claim, Minto remained silent. Last week, Rideau-Rockcliffe Coun. Peter Clark conďŹ rmed the insurance questions have been resolved and the site is set to be sold to Minto. The company will

seek building approvals as soon after the sale is complete. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are going to go as fast as the system will let them,â&#x20AC;? Clark said. Minto approached Clark with a proposal â&#x20AC;&#x153;a while ago,â&#x20AC;? but it couldnĘźt be made public until now because of the insurance claims, he said. Minto spokesperson Gwen Cox subsequently conďŹ rmed the company is currently working on plans for the site. Clark said the new owners will hold a community consultation, something the company is not required to do, once plans are ďŹ nalized. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It doesnĘźt have to go to a public meeting, but it will,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It would go to a public

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meeting to inform them (the community) what is going to happen,â&#x20AC;? Clark said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is interest in getting something done.â&#x20AC;? Cox said no public consultation has been scheduled yet. The ďŹ re, which ultimately destroyed ďŹ ve businesses, started in the basement of the Home Hardware on the morning of March 16, 2011. Since then the site has remained empty and boarded up. At a Beechwood Village Alliance meeting held on Oct. 29, many of the residents enquired about what would become of the site. Residents expressed their desire to have the Home Hardware back at the alliance meeting, and Clark con-

FILE

A March 2011 fire that started in the basement of the Home Hardware on Beechwood Avenue resulted in the entire building being torn down. ďŹ rmed the land would remain zoned for main street-style commercial developments at street level with condos or rental units on top. Clark said he believes the maximum height will be eight storeys. The councillor wouldnĘźt comment on whether he likes or supports the proposal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;ItĘźs not a ďŹ nal proposal yet,â&#x20AC;? he said.

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39


NEWS

QUEEN TOURING AND UNIVERSAL MUSIC GROUP PRESENT

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 20 NATIONAL ARTS CENTRE TICKETS ON SALE TOMORROW AT 10AM!

MICHELLE NASH/METROLAND

TICKETS ALSO AVAILABLE AT THE NAC BOX OFFICE, ROGERS.COM/WBO OR TEXT ‘TICKETS’ TO 4849.

Ryan Desgranges gets help from community members to help take down Ottawa 67’s defenceman Michael Cajkovsky in a demonstration about bullying at Robert E. Wilson Public School on Nov. 7. Desgranges and his classmates became leaders, in a new Ottawa police pilot project to stop bullying in schools.

ALL DATES, ACTS AND TICKET PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. TICKET PRICES SUBJECT TO APPLICABLE FEES.

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Thursday, November 22 6-8pm Bonfire in the Tay Basin Fireworks Lighting of the Community Trees

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7-10pm Meet & Greet Fashion Show Chocolate, Cheese & Wine Live Music, Merchant Displays

Saturday, November 24

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40

Morning Run Yoga Class Glamour Boudoir Photos Candlelight Walk

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

Six schools participate in police pilot project EMC news - A new pilot project launching at six Ottawa elementary schools aims to stop bullying in its tracks. Students gathered in Robert E. Wilson Public Schoolʼs gymnasium on Nov. 7 to participate in a new antibullying program where grade-4-to-6 students learned how to become leaders for their fellow kindergarten to Grade 3 schoolmates. Robert E. Wilson is the first of the six schools to launch the program. Its school resource officer, Amanda Payette, has been trained to teach the students how to stop being bullied or becoming a bully. “It teaches the older kids to be role models and gives them an important role in their school and really I think that is all kids want, to give them a sense of importance in their school and community,” Payette said. The new anti-bullying pilot program has two components. The grade-4-to-6 program is called LEADS, which stands for “look,” “explore,” “act,” “did it work” and “seek help.” This program teaches these grades to act as leaders for their younger schoolmates. The second portion of the program is WITS, which stands for “walk away,” “ignore,” “talk it out,” and “seek

help.” The program is aimed at teaching children from kindergarten to Grade 3 to use their wits when dealing with a bully. Payette officially gave the younger students their WITS badges as well as taught the older students the importance of helping the younger students. “Today they are just learning about it. Over the course of the program I think they will become more and more involved in it,” Payette said. The five other schools participating are Bayshore Public School, Chapman Mills Public School, Osgoode Public School, Pinecrest Public School and Riverview Alternative School. Each month teachers and the students from both the WITS program and the LEADS program read from an anti-bullying book and follow the lesson plans provided by the program. Payette said she approached all of the 18 schools she works in to participate in the WITS program. Robert E. Wilson, which was identified by the school board as high-needs, couldnʼt afford the programʼs books and other materials so they were donated by the school board. Payette said she hopes this program will make a difference. “It canʼt just always be about coming in after the fact,

there needs to be intervention,” Payette said. “We would like them to grow up with this. We are giving them the tools to ask for help.” The assembly welcomed support from community members, including Ottawa 67ʼs hockey players Richard Mraz, Keegan Wilson and Mike Cajkovsky, Ottawa firefighters, and police officers. “I think this program is great. It puts the children on the right track,” Wilson said. The WITS program is not new. It began in Victoria, B.C. in 1993 at Lampson Street Elementary School to provide violence prevention program for children and youth. Shortly after the WITS program was created, the founders began working on the older youth program LEADS. In 1997 a charity called Rock Solid Foundation was launched to help fund the WITS and LEADS programs. Today the program is in more than 150 schools across Canada and the United States. Payette received her program training through an online tool found on the WITS website at www.witsprogram.ca. Any teacher, parent or community member can take the online training course. Payette said she hopes the pilot project becomes a permanent one and the number of schools participating in Ottawa grows.


NEWS

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STEPH WILLEMS/METROLAND

Planting the seed of remembrance Israeli Ambassador Miriam Ziv, left, and Swedish Ambassador Teppo Tauriainen take part in a traditional tree-planting ceremony at Raoul Wallenberg Park on Nov. 9, part of a commemoration of the 100th anniversary of Wallenbergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birth. Wallenberg, a Swedish diplomat, saved thousands of Jews from death during the Holocaust by setting up safe houses in his home country and issuing protective passports. The tree in his namesake park is a donation by the Shoah (Holocaust) Committee of the Jewish Federation of Ottawa.

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Mom is a spayed female, brown and white tabby Domestic Short Hair cat, she is about one year and 3 months old. She was brought to the shelter as a stray on August 29 and is currently available for adoption. Mom needs a home that will allow her to be independent all the while giving her some cuddling time! She tends to be vocal, and would love a home in which she can have endless conversations with you, or another cat!

Is your catâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scratching habit leaving you scratching your head? and make her less likely to use the post. Special products for training your cat are available at pet supply stores. If you are considering declawing your cat, consider this: declawing a cat doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t remove just the claws â&#x20AC;&#x201D; it amputates the end digit from the paw, similar in scope to cutting off a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ nger at the last joint. This procedure can cause substantial discomfort and complications after the operation. Declawed cats may become reclusive, irritable, aggressive and unpredictable, and may have a tendency to bite as they cannot scratch to give warning. While other, newer methods exist for declawing (for example, laser surgery), the end result is still undesirable for your cat as it prevents her from engaging in normal cat behaviour. The OHS does not support declawing. It should be considered as a ďŹ nal option after you have exhausted other alternatives to eliminate destructive behaviour. However, if you feel that you must either declaw your cat or give her up, the OHS would rather see your cat stay in her home. If you decide that it is absolutely necessary to have your cat declawed, only have the front paws done, so that the cat can still scratch an itch, climb and defend herself. If this is your decision, consult your veterinarian ďŹ rst and discuss having the surgery done at the same time your cat is spayed or neutered. Other tips If you catch your cat in the act, try making a loud noise (for example, use a whistle, shake a soda can ďŹ lled with pebbles or pennies, or slap a wall or a table) or use a water-ďŹ lled squirt bottle. Conversely, when your cat claws the scratching post instead of your couch, make sure you give your cat extra praise and affection. One reason cats scratch is to remove the dead outer layer of their claws. Regularly trimming your catâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nails can help reduce scratching. You should clip off the sharp tips of your catâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s claws on his front feet every two weeks or so. More companion animal information is available at www.ottawahumane.ca.

Hi, my name is Charlie, I am a 18 months old Golden Retriever. I was adopted by my family at the age of 5 months. Since then I have been enjoying going to the dog park and taking all kind of classes. I proved to be a very smart dog!! I Love to play with my two brothers, Azlan and Jaga are two Highland Lynx kittens. Our little pack of three love to play, cuddle and by time â&#x20AC;&#x153;get in troubleâ&#x20AC;? together!!! 9dndji]^c`ndjgeZi^hXjiZZcdj\]idWZĂ&#x2020;I=:E:ID;I=:L::@Ă&#x2021;4HjWb^iVe^XijgZVcYh]dgi W^d\gVe]nd[ndjgeZiidĂ&#x2019;cYdjiH^beanZbV^aid/X[dhiZg5i]ZcZlhZbX#XVViiZci^dcĂ&#x2020;EZid[i]ZLZZ`Ă&#x2021;

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Please note: The Ottawa Humane Society has many other companion animals available for adoption. Featured animals are adopted quickly! To learn more about adopting an animal from the Ottawa Humane Society please contact us: Website: lll#diiVlV]jbVcZ#XV Email: 6Ydei^dch5diiVlV]jbVcZ#XV Telephone:+&(,'*"(&++m'*-

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Scratching is normal cat behaviour, not a comment on your upholstery. Cats scratch in order to: remove the dead outer layer of their claws; rub their scent onto things to mark their territory; stretch; work off energy; and even to seek your attention when they want something. There are lots of ways to keep your feline friend from ruining the furniture. You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t eliminate scratching behaviours: itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a normal behaviour for your cat; it becomes a problem only when the object being scratched is an item of value to you. The goal is to redirect the scratching to an acceptable object, such as a scratching post. Provide objects for scratching that are appealing and convenient from your catâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s point of view. Observe the physical features of the objects your cat is scratching. Note their location, texture, shape and height. Substitute a similar object(s) for your cat to scratch (for example, rope-wrapped posts, corrugated cardboard, or even a log). Place an acceptable object (for example, scratching post) near an inappropriate object (for example, upholstered chair). Make sure the objects are stable and wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fall over when she uses them. You can make these objects more attractive to your cat by spraying them with catnip periodically and hanging a toy from the post. If you cat is refusing to use a scratching post and prefers your rug, try covering a piece of plywood with carpet and spraying it with some catnip. Cover the inappropriate object(s) with something your cat wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like, such as double-sided sticky tape, aluminium foil, sheets of sandpaper, or a plastic carpet runner with the pointy side up. Only remove the â&#x20AC;&#x153;unappealingâ&#x20AC;? coverings (for example, double-sided sticky tape, aluminium foil, sheets of sandpaper) from the inappropriate object(s) when your cat is consistently using the appropriate objects. This will entice your cat to investigate the more appealing scratching post. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take your cat over to the scratching post and position her paws on the post to show her what sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s supposed to do. This will likely have the opposite effect

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ŠThe Best Buy Seal is a registered trademark of Consumers Digest Communications, LLC, used under license. +Based on WardsAuto.com 2012 Upper Small segment, excluding Hybrid and Diesel powertrains. Standard 10 airbags, ABS, traction control and StabiliTrakÂŽ. ÂŽBluetooth is a registered trademark of Bluetooth SIG Inc. â&#x20AC; â&#x20AC; 2012 Sonic Sedan LTZ, MSRP with freight, PDI & levies $22,134. 2012 Chevrolet Equinox LTZ, MSRP with freight, PDI & levies $35,729. 2012 Orlando LTZ, MSRP with freight, PDI & levies $30,134. Dealers are free to set individual prices. â&#x2C6;&#x17E;Offers available until September 30, 2012; participating lenders are subject to change. 0% purchase financing offered on approved credit by TD Auto Finance Services, ScotiabankÂŽ or Ally Credit for 84 months on new or demonstrator 2012 Chevrolet Malibu, Orlando (excluding LS and 1LT models), Equinox (excluding LS models), Cruze (excluding LS 1SA models) and Sonic (excluding LS models) and 2012 GMC Terrain (excluding SLE1 models); 72 months on 2012 Chevrolet Avalanche and Silverado Light Duty Trucks and 2012 GMC Sierra Light Duty Trucks; 60 months on 2012 Chevrolet Traverse, 2013 Malibu, 2012 Buick Enclave and 2012 GMC Acadia; 48 months on 2013 Chevrolet Spark. Rates from other lenders will vary. Down payment, trade and/or security deposit may be required. Monthly payment and cost of borrowing will vary depending on amount borrowed and down payment/trade. Example: $16,995 at 0% APR, the monthly payment is $202.32 for 84 months. Cost of borrowing is $0, total obligation is $16,995. Offer is unconditionally interest-free. ΊOffer(s) valid in Canada until September 30, 2012. 0% lease APR available for up to 48 months on a new or demonstrator 2012 Chevrolet Sonic (excluding LS models) or Cruze (excluding LS 1SA models), O.A.C by GM Financial. Applies only to qualified retail customers in Canada. Annual kilometre limit of 24,000 km, $0.16 per excess kilometre. Example Cruze LT 1SA : $20,350 at 0% APR, monthly payment is $262.00 for 48 months. Total obligation is $12,617. Option to purchase at lease end is $7,733, plus applicable taxes. Down payment or trade and/or security deposit may be required. Monthly payments may vary depending on down payment/trade. â&#x2122;Śâ&#x2122;Śâ&#x2122;ŚOffer only valid from September 1, 2012 to September 30, 2012 (the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Program Periodâ&#x20AC;?) to retail customers resident in Canada who own or are currently leasing (during the Program Period) a Chevrolet Silverado or GMC Sierra (1500-3500), Chevrolet Avalanche/Colorado/S10; GMC Canyon/Sonoma; or Isuzu Light Duty Series, or any competitive pickup truck with a pickup bed. Qualifying customers will receive a $1,000 credit towards the purchase, lease or factory order of an eligible new 2012 or 2013 Chevrolet Silverado, Avalanche or GMC Sierra or 2012 Chevrolet Colorado or GMC Canyon which must be delivered and/or factory ordered (factory order applies to 2013 MY only) during the Program Period. Only one (1) credit may be applied per eligible vehicle sale. Offer is transferable to a family member living within the same household (proof of address required). This offer may not be redeemed for cash and may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives available on GM vehicles. The $1,000 credit includes HST/GST/QST/PST as applicable by province. As part of the transaction, dealer will request current vehicle registration and/or insurance to prove ownership. GMCL reserves the right to amend or terminate this offer, in whole or in part, at any time without prior notice. Void where prohibited by law. Additional conditions and limitations apply. See your GM dealer for details.

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City buys in to community ‘rinks of dreams’ program Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

EMC news - A “rink of dreams” in Jules Morin Park is set to become a reality. The plan for a new, National Hockey League-sized outdoor rink in the Lowertown park has been in the works since early 2011, when the Ottawa Senators Foundation announced its intention to help build the community rinks. Now, the city has committed to the program by putting $200,000 in management costs towards helping the foundation develop a number of the rinks around the city. In addition to Lowertown, the foundation is already looking at other areas like Bayshore, Overbrook/McArthur, Ledbury Park (Herongate/ Ridgemont), Centretown, Navan and Cumberland. Work on Jules Morin Park is already underway and is expected to

continue into the new year. The upgrades will include an asphalt base with paint markings, rink boards, end-zone fencing and nets. In the summer, the court lines painted on the asphalt could be used for other sports such as basketball, lacrosse and ball hockey. The foundation expects it will cost $250,000 to build each rink. That would mean a total of $2 million in new park infrastructure, so the cityʼs contribution of $200,000 represents 10 per cent of that commitment. Contributing that money is part of the foundationʼs goal of promoting physical activity, recreation and social development in local communities, according to a city report. “Those kids in those neighbourhoods, they really donʼt have a lot of additional funding within their families to get out and participate in sport and reaction opportunities,”

Danielle Robinson, president of the foundation, said last year. “The idea around this is to provide a facility and the resources to make it much more accessible.” The city hopes to partner with other local organizations, such as Canadian Tireʼs I Love to Play Hockey and I Love to Skate initiatives, to offer programs, lessons and special events such as tournaments and carnivals at the new rinks. Special events involving the Ottawa Senators are also planned, including visits from the players, skating and hockey events, clinics and practices. The community rinks are the second part of the foundationʼs Rink of Dreams project, which began with a $2-million refrigerated rink at city hall. The city contributed $250,000 towards building that rink. The community rinks will not be refrigerated.

FILE PHOTO

City councillors, representatives from the Sens Foundation and dignitaries gathered to officially open the Rink of Dreams at city hall on Jan. 26. The Sens Foundation is now building on the initiative by constructing neighbourhood ‘rinks of dreams.’

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012


COMMUNITY

Your Community Newspaper

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Bracedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; to hit stage in Barrhaven school Play hoping to raise awareness about scoliosis Jennifer McIntosh jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com

EMC news - Audiences in Barrhaven can brace themselves for a special performance: a one-woman play about a young girl faced with scoliosis. The play, entitled Braced, is the story of Rebecca Steele who plays a dozen characters to portray her experiences as an adolescent with the disease that causes an abnormal curvature of the spine. Thanks to the Curvy Girls chapter in Ottawa, the play will hit the stage at LongďŹ elds-Davidson Heights Secondary School on Nov. 30. The Ottawa Chapter of the Curvy Girls was founded in part by Merivale High School

student Danielle Denisko. The group meets once a month to discuss everything from what itĘźs like to wear a hard, plastic brace to medical appointments, surgery and peer pressure. Andrea Lebel, a physiotherapist who went into the ďŹ eld because she dealt with scoliosis as a teen, said the idea for the group came after she met a mother in Barcelona. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Her daughter was part of the Long Island Curvy Girls and she talked so much about the beneďŹ ts, I realized it would be good if the girls could get support from each other,â&#x20AC;? Lebel said. Because of the success of the Curvy Girls group for teens, there will now be a support group for adults. The play Braced will be shown to LDHSS students and is open to the general public at St. Theresa Hall on Somerset Street West on Dec. 2 at 4 p.m. The public showing is

meant to help raise awareness about the disease that Lebel says is as common as asthma. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donĘźt have scoliosis screening here in Canada,â&#x20AC;? she said, adding that means the diagnosis often comes too late for corrective measures like a brace. When that happens, surgery is often the only option. Lebel said the group has already started work on a fundraiser in June and a fashion show for the spring, but the play will provide the public with information about signs and treatment. At the Dec. 2 show there will be pamphlets for the public to learn about some of the signs associated with scoliosis. There is no charge for the tickets, but people are encouraged to bring a donation which will help purchase equipment at CHEO. Lebel said schools interested in having a performance should contact her at curvy girlsottawa@gmail.com.

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Braced, the story of New York teen Rebecca Steeleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trials with scoliosis, will hit the stage at Longfields-Davidson Heights Secondary School on Nov. 30.

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NEWS

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Drug workshop focuses on prevention for parents Emma Jackson emma.jackson@metroland.com

EMC news - A Manotick church took a stance against drugs on Nov. 3 when it hosted a parent workshop aimed at preventing teens and pre-teens from becoming users. The youth group at St. James Anglican Church on Bridge Street hosted the all-day workshop for about 30 parents, teachers and youth workers. Police officers leading the workshop showed participants different types of illicit drugs and how to tell if a person is high. Displays of common hallucinogens, uppers and downers were laid out – which one high school volunteer said looked completely unappetizing – and stacks of pamphlets about marijuana and other common drugs were available. A mother from Barrhaven, who only wished to be identified as Jane, said she has two teenagers at home and wants to be prepared to talk to them about drug issues. “I feel like information is power, so I wanted to get as much information as I

could,” she said. Another parent said that much has changed since she went to high school – the drugs and habits are different – and she wanted information on prevention and identification. The workshop was geared to parents of students in grades 5 to 9, in an effort to prevent, instead of repair drug problems. Indeed, one of the workshopʼs goals was to “know more than the kids” when it comes to available drugs and the dangers they present. “The more tools we have, the more tools we give (youth) to deal with these issues,” said Donna Rourke, who organized the event as the churchʼs FAITH youth group co-ordinator. The workshop comes in the middle of a blossoming narcotic drug problem in the small community, which left one teenager dead of an overdose in the summer. An estimated 30 teens in the village are hooked on fentanyl, a prescription narcotic that comes in the form of patches, according to community police officer Const. Arun Daniels. Police suspect that the users are behind a rash of

break and enters in the community, because they need cash to buy their next high. Rourke said the workshop was planned before the fentanyl problem exploded at the end of the summer. The idea was first considered during Manotickʼs annual Dickinson Days in June, when the youth group volunteered with the community police officer. They discussed the idea of bringing the RCMP-created workshop Kids and Drugs to the community and it was organized for the fall. St. James Rev. Ross Hammond said the church is constantly looking for new ways to do Godʼs work in the community, and this was a perfect fit. “Our community is largely made up of families,” he said. “So we thought, ʻWhat can we do to support the community?ʼ” Rourke said she hopes to host the same workshop again in the spring, “to reach further into the community” and access scout and guide leaders, teachers and other role models who regularly work with youth. The church also plans to host other youth-focused workshops on topics like bullying and mental health.

EMMA JACKSON/METROLAND

Parents and youth workers participate in an RCMP-created workshop called Kids and Drugs at St. James Anglican Church in Manotick on Saturday, Nov. 3.

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012


NEWS

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Valour Road medals united at Canadian War Museum First World War Victoria Crosses awarded to three Winnipeg soldiers Steph Willems steph.willems@metroland.com

EMC news - Nearly a century after they were awarded, three Victoria Cross medals – the highest award for courage in the British Commonwealth – have made their way to the Canadian War Museum. The medals were awarded to three young Canadian soldiers – Sgt.-Maj. Frederick William Hall, Lt. Robert Shankland and Cpl. Lionel B. Clarke – for their bravery during some of the fiercest fighting of the First World War. What makes these medals unique among the 71 VCʼs awarded during that war was that all three men lived on the same block of the same street in Winnipeg. Subject of a CBC Heritage Minute, the brave actions of the men – two of whom did not survive the war – led their community to pressure Winnipeg city council to rename Pine Street to what is now Valour Road. The medals and a synopsis of each manʼs actions are now contained within the museumʼs Royal Canadian Legion Hall of Honour. “We decided to put the display in this section because weʼre focusing not just on the men and the medals, but also on how Winnipeg commemorated their valour,” said Mélanie Morin-Pelletier, First

World War assistant-historian at the museum. “Itʼs a study of a city honouring its citizens.” By the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, Winnipeg had recently undergone a population boom, and many young labourers were quick to enlist for military service.

It’s a study of a city honouring its citizens. MÉLANIE MORIN-PELLETIE

Hall, born in Ireland, was working as a shipping clerk before enlisting at the onset of the war. He was killed by rifle fire at the Second Battle of Ypres in 1915 as he left his trench to rescue a wounded comrade. Clarke, a railroad surveyor when the war broke out, singlehandedly defended a section of captured trench at the Somme front from a counterattack by 20 enemy soldiers, and was wounded in the process. He was killed by shellfire a month later, in October 1916. Shankland was a cashier at a creamery before the war. He was commanding a company of men during the Battle of Passchendaele in October 1917 when heavy fire caused a neighbouring battalion to

SUBMITTED

Eric Clarke, left, and Doug Cargo, great-nephews of Cpl. Lionel B. Clarke and Sgt. Maj. Frederick William Hall, admire the new display of Victoria Cross medals belonging to First World War soldiers from Winnipeg’s Valour Road at the Canadian War Museum. Clarke, Hall, and Lt. Robert Shankland all lived on the same block of that street before enlisting for military service. withdraw, leaving him and his men dangerously exposed. In order to summon reinforcements, Shankland made the dangerous journey back to Allied lines to report the situation before returning to his men to await reinforcements. Shankland survived the war and even re-enlisted as a non-combatant officer during

the Second World War. While the death toll on all sides during the First World War was staggering, the residents of the working-class Winnipeg neighbourhood didnʼt want the service of their neighbours to be forgotten. In 1925, the city of Winnipeg erected a plaque declaring the street would hence-

forth be named Valour Road in memory of the three. With the 100th anniversary of the outbreak of the First World War less than two years away, the new display ends a three-year initiative by the museum to gather the Valour Road Victoria Cross medals in one place. “Our collections people worked closely with the do-

nors, making sure they were comfortable with the idea of donating the medals,” said Avra Gibbs-Lamey, media relations officer for the museum. “The medals themselves will be lent to a Manitoba museum for the centenary in 2014, but their home is now the (Canadian) War Museum.”

Lions Club helps grieving mothers remember lost children jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com

EMC news – The Barrhaven Lions Club is helping grieving families remember their children thanks to a memory box program in affiliation with CHEO. The memory boxes provide keepsakes for parents

who have lost infants through stillbirth or very early in their life. The boxes, manufactured locally allow the parents to place keepsakes to help them remember their child. In two years the Lions Club has donated 76 boxes to CHEO. Lion Doreen Lebano said

she was especially supportive of any programs at CHEO following the treatment of her youngest grandson when he was just four weeks old. “When we were approached we thought it was a wonderful opportunity to help families through a very difficult time,” she said. Each box is specially hand-

crafted for the family. Lebano said it gives dignity to the death of a child and helps parents, siblings and relatives to grieve and to heal. “It represents something tangible for loved ones to treasure and to share with others,” she said. Now the Lions Club is

looking to the community for help. They will host a family bowling fun day at the Merivale Bowling Centre on Merivale Road south of Hunt Club Road. The fun day is set for Nov. 25 starting at 1 p.m. Entry is $25 and includes shoes and snacks.

All proceeds will then be donated to CHEO for the creation of more memory boxes. Lebano said people who would like to attend and not bowl can pay a discounted entry fee of $10. To reserve teams, contact Doreen Lebano at 613-8250384.

PROTECT YOURSELF AND OTHERS FROM THE FLU t (FUZPVSøVTIPU t 8BTIZPVSIBOETGSFRVFOUMZPSVTFBIBOETBOJUJ[FS t $PVHIPSTOFF[FJOUPZPVSBSN OPUZPVSIBOE t 4UBZIPNFJGZPVSFTJDL

To learn more visit fightflu.ca R0011736748

Jennifer McIntosh

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

49


FIREWOOD

Seasoned maple and oak, free delivery, Member of BBB. Volume Discounts! 613-830-1488

ARTS/CRAFT/FLEA MRKT Walter Baker Christmas Craft Show November 17th and December 8th 10am - 4pm. Free Admission. 100 Malvern Drive. Over 50 local Crafterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and Artisans. www.goldenopp.ca

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY AVON Join Today! No Quotas, No Credit Card, For free Gift* enter referral name Lorie Simpson 1-800-454-4490 lorie.simpson@interavon.ca www.facebook.com/avontastic

BUSINESS SERVICES HAVE YOU BEEN DENIED Canada Pension Plan Disability Benefits? The disability Claims Advocacy Clinic can help. Contact Allison Schmidt at: 1-877-793-3222 www.dcac.ca House Cleaning Service Sparkle & Shine

Professional,dependable, customer-oriented. Bi/Weekly. Tailored to your needs. For a free consultation/estimate. 613-295-3663 MELVINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

INTERIOR PAINTING Professional Work. Reasonable Rates. Honest . Clean. Free Estimates. R e f e r e n c e s . 613-831-2569 Home 613-355-7938 Cell. NO JOB TO SMALL! $$$NEED MONEY$$$ Do you have a pension plan form an ex-employer? (LIRA) or (lock in RRSP) Call NOW! 1-416-357-9585

Grade 9 EQAO Study If you are a student or the parent of a student who has received their official Grade 9 EQAO score, please consider participating in a short interview about the meaning of that score. Contact the researcher at 613-292-3728 for information. Participants will receive a $20 gift card to Chapters.

FOR RENT

KANATA Available Immediately

Importer/Distributer of flooring in search for a sales representative or a sales agent for the Ottawa region, experience in the field an asset. Send resume via e-mail at ontads@gmail.com include reference number: OE1211

WORK WANTED

Attention: Do you have 5-15 hours/week? Turn it into $5000/month on your computer. Online training, flexible hours. www.debsminioffice.com Looking for persons willing to speak to small groups, 1 on 1 presentations. A car and internet necessary. Diana (866)306-5858. Senior Accountant A growing technology company requires a professional accountant to take on responsibility for day-today accounting and financial statement preparation. Regular duties will be supplemented with special projects. The ideal candidate will hold an accounting designation and have 3 years+ experience with the full accounting cycle and financial statement preparation.Experience using AccPac is an asset. Location: Ottawa West. Please send resume and cover letter to:

REMOVE YOUR CRIMINAL RECORD 100,000+ have used our service since 1989. BBB A+ rating. US Waiver allows you to travel to the US, or apply for a Record Suspension (Pardon) - professional & affordable Call 1-8-NOW PARDON (1-866-972-7366) www.removeyourrecord.com

COMING EVENTS

PETS

Attn: Hunters MacMillan Taxidermy Wants You!! In addition to head mounts, we do full and partial mounts, European mounts, even rugs. Have a unique idea for your mount - Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s talk. Contact MacMillan Taxidermy 613-432-2286 All work guaranteed

DOG SITTING Experienced retired breeder providing lots of TLC. My home. Smaller dogs only. References available. $17-$20 daily Marg 613-721-1530

Small, winterized, 3 bedroom cottage, on large waterfront lot. Propane heated. Between Burritts Rapids and Merrickville. $975/month plus utilities. Call 613-826-3142.

FOR SALE Apples, cider and apple products. Smyths Apple Orchard, 613-652-2477. Updates, specials and coupons at www.smythsapples.com. Open daily til April 1st.

*HOT TUB (SPA) Covers-Best Price. Best quality. All shapes and colours. Call 1-866-652-6837. www.thecoverguy.com/newspaper

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

LIVESTOCK Rideau Arcott Rams for sale. Ready for fall breeding. Contact 613-812-2438.

MORTGAGES $$MONEY$$ Consolidate Debts Mortgages to 90% No income, Bad credit OK! Better Option Mortgage #10969 1-800-282-1169 www.mortgageontario.com

VEHICLES

$1050 $950

TRILCOSTW1231

0301.332055



Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

FOR RENT

$1150

Health Programs, Social Programs, Business Programs, Technology Programs

50

7i`Â&#x2021;-Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2122;>Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;{ÂŤÂ&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;613-284-2000Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;iiĂ&#x152;yi>Â&#x201C;>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x152;JÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Â&#x201C;>Â&#x2C6;Â?°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

$1350

Offering diplomas in:

75 Albert Street, Suite 101 | Ottawa, ON K1P 5E7

GARAGE SALE

5 MILES SOUTH OF SMITHS FALLS CORNER OF HWY 15 & BAY ROAD

CANCEL YOUR TIMESHARE. No RISK program. STOP Mortgage and Maintenance payments today. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Free Consultation. Call us NOW. We can help! 1-888-356-5248

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

GARAGE SALE

 Â? i > Ă&#x160;  > Ă&#x20AC; Â&#x17D; i Ă&#x152; One of the Largest in the Ottawa Valley!

REAL ESTATE SERVICES

CAREER OPPORTUNITY



613-224-7178 / www.saintrichards.ca

German Shepherd Pups black or sable DDR workline AKC parents vet check health guarantee $450. (613)802-2757 strongbond@msn.com

GREAT WINTER CAR 2003 Pontiac Grand Prix SE 4 door, 195,000kms. 6 cylinder 3.1, full load. Lady Highway Driven. Has GT look. $2100.00 or OBO as is. Kevin 613-485-6680



 

November 17, 9 a.m. - 2 p.m.

"*

FOR RENT

MORTGAGES 1ST & 2ND /L.O.C. Private Funds Available Credit Problems? I have solutions. Please contact Jack Ronson 1-855-847-7337 Metro City Mortgages, Belleville. Licence#M08004515 Broker#10202

Better futures begin here.

9 Rossland Ave. (corner of Merivale & Rossland)

0 sq ft LARGE SELECTION OF and Outdoor Huge 10,0o0wroom! QUALITY FURNITURE Building! Indoor Sh

PERSONAL

HUNTING SUPPLIES

3 Bedrooms, 2.5 Bathrooms, 5 appliances and more, located in established area, on site management office, 323 Steeplechase Dr. (just off Stonehaven Dr) Kanata, K2M 2N6, call 613-592-0548

ARTS/CRAFT/FLEA MRKT

UĂ&#x160; /+1 -Ă&#x160; UĂ&#x160; " /  -Ă&#x160; UĂ&#x160;/""-Ă&#x160; UĂ&#x160;-*",/-Ă&#x160; ", Ă&#x160; UĂ&#x160;** -Ă&#x160; UĂ&#x160;/  Ă&#x160;7, Ă&#x160; UĂ&#x160;1, /1, Ă&#x160; UĂ&#x160;EĂ&#x160;1 Ă&#x160;1 Ă&#x160;", t

SEASONS GREETINGS CRAFT FAIR Nov. 24/25, 10am to 4pm, Stittsville Arena. WarnerColpitts Lane. Fundraiser for Ottawa Humane Society. Contact Gord. 613-592-4376

613-831-3445 613-257-8629 www.rankinterrace.com

Send A Load to the dump, cheap. Clean up clutter, garage sale leftovers or leaf and yard waste. 613-256-4613.

Melissa Stylianou Quintet with Special Guest Megan Hamilton. Friday November 16, 7:30 pm Chalmers United Church, 212 Barrie St. Kingston Students/Seniors $10, Adults $20 www.queensu.ca/pao or 613-533-2558.

TRUE Advice! TRUE Clarity! TRUE Psychics! 1-877-342-3032 or 1-900-528-6256 or Mobile #4486 (18+) 3.19/min. www.truepsychics.ca

jobstohire12345@gmail.com

Qualitative, Professional House Cleaning. Detail oriented and thoroughness guaranteed. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll keep your home neat and tidy. Insured and bonded. Call 613-262-2243. Tatiana.

GARAGE SALE

We are looking for key people to expand our Financial Services business in this area. Experience not necessary, We will train. For an interview call 613-762-9519.

KANATA RENTAL TOWNHOMES

ARTS/CRAFT/FLEA MRKT

www.emcclassiďŹ ed.ca

St. Richardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Christmas Bazaar

3 bedroom townhouse, 1.5 baths, 2 appliances, unďŹ nished basement, one parking spot. $1038 per month plus utilities.

Disability Products. Buy and Sell stair lifts, scooters, bath lifts, patient lifts, hospital beds, etc. Call Silver Cross Ottawa (613)231-3549.

CAREER OPPORTUNITY

NOTICES

CL419629?1108

www.duquettesďŹ rewood.com

After-school Math Program at Barrhaven. Effective Way to improve child math understanding. From pre-school to grade 10. Enrollment $79.00/month. Call 613-816-7921 or visit www.cfclearning.com

HELP WANTED

CL392526

DUQUETTEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FIREWOOD

EDUCATION & TRAINING

CL365991

All clean, dry & split. 100% hardwood. Ready to burn. $120/face cord tax incl. (approx. 4â&#x20AC;&#x2122; x 8â&#x20AC;&#x2122; x 16â&#x20AC;?). Reliable, free delivery to Nepean, Kanata, Stittsville, Richmond, Manotick. 1/2 orders avail. (613)223-7974. www.shouldicefarm.

CLASSIFIED

CL389263-1108

Your Community Newspaper

PHONE:

1-888-967-3237 1-888-WORD ADS

FOR RENT

FOR RENT


Your Community Newspaper

CLASSIFIED

GARAGE SALE

GARAGE SALE

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

PHONE:

1-888-967-3237 1-888-WORD ADS

www.emcclassified.ca

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Mchaffies Flea Market HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

CL388682

We’re Still Hiring School Bus Drivers Call today!

613-688-0653

Free Training

www.firststudentcanada.com

Proudly Promoting National School Bus Safety Week

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

University of Guelph, Kemptville Campus is presently recruing 2 Temporary full me Diesel Equipment Lecturers & 2 Part Time Undergrad Equine Studies Instructors For the Winter 2013 Semester For further details go to:

www.kemptvillec.uoguelph.ca

CL418966_1115

“Your Provider, Leader and Partner in Health Care” The Perth and Smiths Falls District Hospital is a progressive two site facility serving a catchment area of 44,000 residents of Perth, Smiths Falls and surrounding area. We are a fully accredited Hospital delivering a broad range of primary and secondary services. Come and be part of a team where you are encouraged to develop both personally and professionally within a dynamic facility.

IT SYSTEMS SUPPORT SPECIALIST Working closely with the Senior Systems Analyst your role will include the interfacing of devices, system images/repairs/upgrades, backups and ongoing preventative maintenance of all corporate IT assets. Further duties include providing remote and onsite technical support to both hospital sites for a wide variety of hardware and software products including Microsoft Office and operating systems, local and wide area networks, virtual machines and standalone server configurations, SAN storage, and our integrated Meditech Health Care Information System. As the successful candidate you would also be responsible for the ongoing support and maintenance of our printer fleet and racking and initial configuration of network and server hardware. This fast-paced position provides prompt assistance, application support, issue resolution (Tier 1 and Tier 2), and end-user training to Perth and Smiths Falls District Hospital employees and other members of the IT Department. Our facilities are open 24/7 and our IT staff rotate after hours on-call responsibilities. The position also requires frequent travel between the two hospital sites. The Systems Support Specialist will participate in quality improvement, risk management and patient safety activities departmentally and organization-wide. In addition you will work in accordance with applicable provisions of the Occupational Health and Safety Act and Regulations, professional standards and guidelines, and Perth and Smiths Falls District Hospital corporate and departmental Policies and Procedures. Requirements • Two year or higher degree/diploma in Information Technology or related field • Industry standard certifications in Microsoft and other vendor technologies or relevant education and experience • Must have a valid Ontario driver’s license • Must be able to be on-call as per rotation and as required • Proficiency in verbal and written English communications Knowledge/Experience • Minimum of three years work related experience in Information Technology support • Minimum of two years experience working in a customer service oriented IT department • Thorough working knowledge of Microsoft Active Directory and Group Policy management • Experience with printer fleet management, troubleshooting, maintenance and repair – Lexmark authorization an asset • Detailed knowledge of IT systems and support, operating systems, and network and desktop systems • Experience with OS image management, hardware repair/replacement, configuration of network equipment, operating systems, servers, and various software applications • Working knowledge of VMware, Citrix, Exchange and Blackberry Enterprise Server administration an asset • Previous experience configuring and supporting a corporate wireless environment an asset • Previous hospital experience an asset Skills/Abilities • Ability to work independently and in a team in organizing, scheduling and work completion • Exceptional multi-tasking abilities, prioritization skills and able to work under pressure • Energetic with a strong customer service mindset • Excellent written and verbal communication skills with the ability to communicate effectively with all levels of staff and external agencies Interested and qualified candidates are encouraged to submit a letter of application and resume by November 30th, 2012 at 4p.m., in confidence to: D. Evans Manager, Human Resources Perth and Smiths Falls District Hospital 60 Cornelia Street West Smiths Falls, Ontario K7A 2H9 Email – devans@psfdh.on.ca Fax– (613) 283-0520 We appreciate your interest, however only candidates under consideration will be contacted.

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

CL412705_1115

150 booths Open Every Sunday All Year 8am-4pm Hwy. #31 – 2 kms north of 401

175277_0212

Eastern Ontario’s Largest Indoor Flea Market

51


Your Community Newspaper

CLASSIFIED NOTICES

NOTICES

PHONE:

1-888-967-3237 1-888-WORD ADS

www.emcclassiďŹ ed.ca

NOTICES

NOTICES

MOTHERS.... IF YOU ARE EXPECTING OR HAVE A NEW BABY Place Your Birth Announcement in your Community Newspaper (includes photo & 100 words) and recieve your Welcome Wagon FREE information and GIFTS from local businesses. ) x a t (plus Please register on line at www.havingababy.ca or call 1-866-283-7583

$28.00

Official Sponsor to Welcome Wagon Ottawa Region

Network

BABY PROGRAM

ADVERTISE ACROSS ONTARIO OR ACROSS THE COUNTRY! For more information contact your local newspaper.

DRIVERS WANTED

SKILLED HELP

FINANCIAL SERVICES

STEEL BUILDINGS

LAIDLAW CARRIERS VAN DIVISION require experienced AZ licensed drivers to run the U.S. Premium mileage rate. Home weekly. New equipment. Also hiring Owner Operators. 1-800263-8267

ANNOUNCEMENTS THEREâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ONE IN EVERY CROWD. Recognize a six to 17 year old with the prestigious 2012 Ontario J u n i o r C i t i z e n o f t h e Ye a r Awards nomination by Nov. 30. www.ocna.org/juniorcitizen or call 905-639-8720 ext. 239.

WANTED WANTED: OLD TUBE AUDIO EQUIPMENT. 40 years or older. Amplifiers, Stereo, Recording and Theatre Sound Equipment. Hammond organs. Any condition, no floor model consoles. Call Toll-Free 1-800-947-0393 / 519853-2157.

PERSONALS ARE YOU SINGLE? Not sure how to find a partner? MISTY RIVER INTRODUCTIONS can make it easy. CALL (613)257-3531, www.mistyriverintros.com. With clients of every age & walk of life. WEIGHT NO LONGER! Herbal Magic will help you Lose up to 20 lbs by New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eve - Proven Results! Call NOW 1-800-854-5176. DATING SERVICE. Long-term/shortterm relationships, free to try! 1-877297-9883. Talk with single ladies. Call #7878 or 1-888-534-6984. Talk now! 1-866-311-9640 or #5015. Meet local single ladies. 1-877-804-5381. (18+) TRUE ADVICE! True clarity! True Psychics! 1-877-342-3036 or 1-900-5286258 or mobile #4486. (18+) $3.19/ minute; www.truepsychics.ca.

CAREER TRAINING LEARN FROM HOME. EARN FROM HOME. Medical Transcriptionists are in demand. Lots of jobs! Enrol today for less than $95 a month. 1-800-466-1535 www.canscribe.com, admissions@canscribe.com

SHOP MANAGER IMMEDIATE FULL TIME        knowledge an asset.       Experience.      " Contact for details: Eileena Haynes 306-634-8388 E-mail: Eileena.Haynes@doallind.com Fax - 306-634-8389 FLUID POWER MECHANIC Immediate Full Time Position/s available for our Hydraulic Division. Able to: %  '  technical drawings. Assemble, dismantle, repair & reassemble drilling rig hydraulics.      '*   drilling rig components. <        equipment. =>  KX[K\<%]" ^_   specialist, or millwright. Relocation Assistance available! E-mail: Eileena.Haynes@doallind.com or fax 306-634-8389 Attn: Eileena

AUTOMOTIVE Ve h i c l e b u y e r s a r e O N LY protected by OMVIC and Ontario consumer protection laws when they buy from registered dealers. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no protection if you buy privately and you risk becoming victim of a curbsider. To v e r i f y d e a l e r r e g i s t r a t i o n or seek help with a complaint: www.omvic.on.ca or 1-800-943-6002.

GET CASH FAST! For your Jewelry, Diamonds, Luxury Watches, Designer Bags, Apple Electronics. SELL them or GET a LOAN at: www.PAWNUP.com or CALL 1-888-435-7870 Online Pawn Shop, without leaving home! FINANCIAL WORRIES? Consolidate into one monthly payment including credit cards, taxes, collection agencies, garnishments. Stop harassing phone calls. 1-877-9770304. 24 hours Services bilingues. info@debtszero.ca MoneyProvider.com. $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-7761660.

ADVERTISING LOOKING FOR NEW BUSINESS and added revenue? Promote your company in Community Newspapers across Ontario right here in these Network Classified Ads or in business card-sized ads in hundreds of well-read newspapers. Let us show you how. Ask about our referral program. Ontario Community Newspapers Association. Contact Carol at 905639-5718 or Toll-Free 1-800-387-7982 ext. 229. www.networkclassified.org

HELP WANTED LOOKING FOR SALES REPRESENTATIVES - Canadian Taxpayers Federation is expanding our Sales Division in your area. For more information visit: www.taxpayer.com CALL 1-800-667-7933 Ext 111 or email: national.manager@taxpayer.com.

REALLY BIG BUILDING SALE... "THIS IS A CLEARANCE SALE YOU DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T WANT TO MISS!" 20X20 $3985. 25X24 $4595. 30X36 $6859. 35X48 $11,200. 40X52 $13,100. 47X76 $18,265. One End wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422 www.pioneersteel.ca STEEL BUILDINGS/METAL BUILDINGS 60% OFF! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call 1-800-457-2206

FOR SALE #1 HIGH SPEED INTERNET $28.95 / Month. Absolutely no ports are blocked. Unlimited Downloading. Up to 5Mps Download and 800Kbps U p l o a d . O R D E R T O D AY AT www.acanac.ca or CALL TOLL-FREE: 1-866-281-3538. SAWMILLS from only $3997 - MAKE M O N E Y & S AV E M O N E Y w i t h your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT 1-800-566-6899 Ext:400OT.

EMPLOYMENT OPPS. PART-TIME JOBS - Make your own schedule, sell chocolate bars to make $$$, decide where and when you sell, start and stop when you want. Tel: 1-800-383-3589. www.chocolatdeluxe.com

VACATION/TRAVEL HAWAII ON THE MAINLAND, healthy low-cost living can be yours. Modern Arenal Maleku Condominiums, 24/7 secured Community, Costa Rica â&#x20AC;&#x153;friendliest country on earthâ&#x20AC;?! 1-780952-0709; www.CanTico.ca.

Connect with Ontarians â&#x20AC;&#x201C; extend your business reach! www.networkclassified.org 52

312327

Redeem this coupon at the Kanata Kourier-Standard OfďŹ ce Attention: ClassiďŹ ed Department 80 Colonnade Rd N. Nepean, ON K2E7L2 Ph:(613) 224-3330 Fax: (613) 224-2265

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

BUSINESS OPPS. SILVER CROSS franchisees operate a business that sells & installs accessibility & mobility equipment for residential applications. Franchisees required for: Etobicoke, North Yo r k , P e t e r b o r o u g h , B e l l e v i l l e , Kingston, Cornwall, Sudbury, Sault Ste. Marie, Thunder Bay, North Bay, Owen Sound, Parry Sound, Gravenhurst, Pembroke, Brockville, Smith Falls. For franchise information CALL 1-800-572-9310, Email: smurray@silvercross.com or visit: www.silvercrossfranchise.com. GET FREE VENDING MACHINES. Can Earn $100,000.00 + Per Year. Guaranteed Over 100% Return On Investment. Guaranteed Location Placement. Financing Available. Full Details CALL NOW 1-866-668-6629 Website WWW.TCVEND.COM

MORTGAGES RESIDENTIAL/COMMERCIAL, 1st & 2nd, Renovation/Construction Mortgages. Secured Lines of Credit. Equity Loans, Debt Consolidation, Poor credit & bankruptcies OK. No income verification plans. Need to refinance/consolidate? Borrow $30k@$166.66/month (OAC). Servicing Eastern & Northern Ontario. CALL Jim Potter, Homeguard Funding Ltd. TOLL-FREE 1-866-403-6639, Email: info@qualitymortgagequotes.ca, www.qualitymortgagequotes.ca (LIC #10409). $$$ 1st, 2nd, 3rd MORTGAGES Debt Consolidation, Refinancing, R e n o v a t i o n s , Ta x A r r e a r s , n o CMHC fees. $50K you pay $208.33/ month (OAC). No income, bad credit, power of sale stopped!! BETTER OPTION MORTGAGES, CALL TODAY Toll-Free 1-800-282-1169, www.mortgageontario.com (LIC# 10969). AS SEEN ON TV - 1st, 2nd, Home Equity Loans, Bad Credit, SelfEmployed, Bankrupt, Foreclosure, Power of Sale or need to ReFinance? Let us fight for you because â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in your corner!â&#x20AC;? CALL The Refinancing Specialists NOW Toll-Free 1-877-733-4424 (24 Hours) or click www.MMAmortgages.com (Lic#12126).


R0011736949

Your Community Newspaper

Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

53


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CLUES DOWN 1. Display stands 2. Forearm bones 3. British thermal unit 4. Drunkard 5. Corpuscle count (abbr.) 6. Pitcher Hershiser 7. Rod-shaped bacterium 8. Egg 9. Dancing With the Stars host 10. British Air Force 11. Opposite of beginning 12. Zanzibar Copal 13. Running contests 24. Arms factory 25. Sodium 26. Current Margulies show 28. Ancient Egyptian sun god 29. Former Hess Corp. name 32. Scrap of cloth 33. Highest card

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CLUES ACROSS 1. Massages 5. Automaton 10. The side that goes last 14. Lowest female voice 15. Roar of acclaim 16. Tennis’ Kournikova 17. Canute (alt. sp.) 18. Blind gut 19. Insures bank’s depositors 20. Cathode (abbr.) 21. Appendage 22. Of I 23. The reciprocal of cosine 27. Rubs away 30. Bravo! 31. Crash into 32. Radioactivity units 35. Dynasty’s “J.R.” 38. Components specified individually 42. Facial skin disease 43. The Peach State

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Local events and happenings over the coming weeks â&#x20AC;&#x201D; free to non-profit organizations Fax: 613-224-3330, E-mail: Ottawasouth@metroland.com

Nov. 15 The Riverside South Community Association hosts its annual general meeting at the Riverview Community Centre on Spratt Road. There will be a community open house at 6:30 p.m. and the AGM starts at 7:30 p.m. This is a great opportunity for residents to learn about what is happening in their community and the work of the RSCA through presentations by our elected leaders. For additional information, visit riversidesouth.org. The money smarts and tax planning session is back at the Ottawa Public Library, Greenboro branch, located at 363 Lorry Greenberg Dr., from 7 to 8.30 p.m. This session will deal with effective tax planning with an in depth look at the credits and deductions available during your working years, as well as in retirement. We will also discuss various tax deferral plans and how best to use them. For more information call 613-580-2957

Nov. 18 Welcome to the fifth annual Christmas craft and gift show being held at the RA Centre. There will be over 40 exhibits featuring local artists, artisans and craftspeople presenting a wonderful array of handmade items and gifts. Help support local artisans and small businesses and enjoy the one-stop shopping event for both family and

friends. Come on out and find that one special gift you couldnĘźt find anywhere else from 10 a.m to 4 p.m.

Nov. 21 Join us for tips to protect seniors against identity theft, internet fraud, investment scams, bogus charities and illegal telemarketing. Presented by the Rotary Club of West Ottawa and endorsed by Ottawa Police Services. The session takes place from 2 to 3 p.m. at the Ottawa Public Library, Elmvale Acres branch. For more information call 613738-0619. Harmony Club for seniors invited seniors for cards or conversation from 10:30 a.m. until noon, when a delicious lunch will be served at $6. From 1 to 2 p.m., there will be a presentation by Rev. Steve Clifton on the visit that he and his family took to Ireland last spring. The church is wheelchair accessible and parking is free. All seniors in the area are invited to visit any of the monthly meetings. New members are welcome. Annual membership fee is $5. For more information or to register call 613 733-3156.

Nov. 24 Please join us for a fundraising dinner for the Restoration of Historic Lowertown Ste- Anne Church at

Villa Marconi, 1026 Baseline Rd. Cocktails 6 p.m; dinner 7 p.m. Fine food, musical entertainment and silent auction. Tickets $95 (includes tax-deductible receipt for $50). Everyone is welcome. A special invitation to former Ste- Anne parishioners. Contact Barry McMahon at barry.mcmahon@sympatico.ca.

Nov. 30: The Christmas Hamper Project of Ottawa is appealing to the community for donations of toilet paper, diapers, powdered milk and soup. Because some holiday wish lists are more basic than others, the Christmas Hamper Project of Ottawa is now signing up donors. Adopt a hamper for someone who will be alone during the holidays, or for a family. Contribute as an individual, a family, a department or workplace. For more information see www. christmashamperproject.com. Adoption deadline is Nov. 30. You are invited to an old fashion roast beef dinner with all of the trimmings at Rideau Park United Church, 2203 Alta Vista Dr., starting at 5 p.m., with a second sitting at 6:30 p.m. After the roast beef, enjoy apple crisp for dessert. Tickets are $15 for adults and $8 for children under 12. For tickets, please call 613-7333156 ext 229., or come to the church office. For more

information, visit www. rideaupark.ca

Email us with your community event! OttawaSouth@metroland.com

Ongoing Volunteers are needed to maintain the ice surface at the two community rinks in Findlay Creek this winter. There will be a rink at ButterďŹ&#x201A;y Park, similar to years past, and a permanent boarded rink at the new Diamond Jubilee Park. If there are no volunteers to help out, there are unfortunately no rinks for the community to use. For more information, email greenspace@ďŹ ndlaycreek.ca.

Mondays Looking to learn conversational Spanish? Improve your Spanish speaking skills with Los Amigos Toastmasters. The group meets at TunneyĘźs Pasture on Mondays from 4:55 to 6:30 p.m. For more information, contact Carole at 613-761-6537 or visit www. amigos-tm.ca.

Tuesdays The Hogs Back 50+ Club meets every Tuesday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the front room of the Boys and Girls Club, 1463 Prince of Wales Dr. at Meadowlands and Hogs Back. Bring a bag lunch or come for cards, crafts, friendly chatter and camaraderie. Drop in and check it out. For more information call Shirley at 613-225-8089.

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Afraid talking to a group? Improve your public speaking and leadership skills. Join us at an open house meeting of the Riverside Toastmasters from 6:50 to 9 p.m., at 1480 Heron Rd. For more information call 613-737-3267 or visit riversidetoastmasters.ca.

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Nov. 12

St. Timothyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Prebyterian Church, 2400 Alt Alta Vi Vista t D Drive i

invites you to participate in our

Candy Cane Bazaar on Saturday, November 17 at 10:30 am We offer you: baking; deli; books; crafts and a silent auction. A delicious lunch will be served starting at 11:30. Luncheon cost is $12.00 and the tickets can be purchased at the door. The church is handicap accessible. p pu

Community Concert And Carol Sing

La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries invites you to visit the Minto Dream Home and view the spectacular array of La-Z-Boy furniture on display. Enter for a chance to win a $1000 gift certiďŹ cate from La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries.

No purchase necessary but we encourage you to buy your Dream of A Lifetime Lottery ticket today to help the kids at CHEO. For lottery info visit www.dreamofalifetime.ca

to win at the Minto Dream Home located at 110 Grey Willow Drive or at the BA L L OT Enter following La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries locations: NEPEAN 545 West Hunt Club Rd.

GLOUCESTER Corner of Innes & Cyrville KINGSTON 770 Gardiners Rd. RioCan Centre Name:

Sunday, November 25 at 2:00 pm

Address:

Sing your favorite Christmas Carols and enjoy special music presented by soloists, choirs, instrumentalists, and a bell choir. Refreshments following. Free will offering to support Heron Emergency Food Centre. For information call (613) 733-0131.

Email:

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Phone: Draw to take place on Monday November 19, 2012

FURNITURE GALLERIESÂŽ

    Purchase a Midnight Enchantment gift set for $175 or a Moonlit Serenade gift set for $125.* *Before taxes. Good while supplies last. See our store for details.

LEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JEWELLERY

2446 Bank St. (at Hunt Club Rd.) Ottawa, ON K1V1A4  

 

 Sterling silver charms from $30

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012

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Ottawa South EMC - Thursday, November 15, 2012


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