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your community newspaper

total emc distribution 474,000

New/Used Uprights/Grands Tuning Repairs Refinishing Appraisals • Trades

R0011752024

Madeleine Meilleur Ottawa-Vanier 237 ch. Montreal Road (613) 744-4484

R0011680500

Working for you

quincypianos.com thursDay, January 3, 2013

www.EMCOrleans.ca

613-830-5484

1439 Youville Dr. Orleans

Player Inside trains NEWs with national team United Way is on target for this year’s fundraising campaign. – Page 2

sports

International hockey teams head to Ottawa for the Bell Capital Cup. – Page 3

news

The year that was: check out the second part of the year in review. – Page 4

Brier Dodge

brier.dodge@metroland.com

EMC sports - It’s a long drive 15-year-old Adrienne Li is used to, shuttling from her Glebe home to Toronto for soccer training sessions. She’s well familiar with the trip, travelling every weekend from October to April to train with the provincial team. But the team and coaching awaiting her on Dec. 14 was a new crowd, as Adrienne participated in her first national team training camp. The Louis Riel high school student took part in the National Identification Camp for under 15 from Dec. 14 to 20. “I was really excited to find out I was among some of the top players in Canada,” Adrienne said. The youngest the national team program begins to train players is at the U15 level, so it’s an invitation Adrienne has been hoping would come for several years. She was one of 24 players at the training camp in preparation for the CONCACAF U17 women’s championship in 2014, which is a qualifier for the world championships. “It was a lot of fun, it was a bit exhausting,” she said. “It was really cool getting to know all the different girls from across Canada.” Adrienne plays for the Capital United Soccer Club while in Ottawa, as well as the provincial team and at Louis Riel. She was part of the 2012 Team Ontario who won the national championship last summer in Halifax. She’s a part of the sport study program at Louis Riel, See ATHLETE, page 2

Brier Dodge/Metroland

Zac Johnstone is a Colonel By Secondary School Grade 12 student who will participate in the upcoming Forum for Young Canadians. Johnstone is also a volunteer with the anti-bullying organization Jer’s Vision and co-president of the school’s SAFE club. .

Colonel By student ready to sit with former and future leaders Brier Dodge

brier.dodge@metroland.com

EMC news - A Grade 12 student at Colonel By Secondary School is hoping to pick up skills at a national conference that can help him further his anti-bullying and acceptance messages. Zac Johnstone, a volunteer with Jer’s Vision and co-president of the school’s SAFE (Students Advocating for Equality), will attend the Forum for Young Canadians in late February. The Forum brings together groups of 100 students from across Canada at a time, to meet with federal politicians, participate in sessions, and network with one another. There will be three different sessions, and the Chapel Hill resident will participate in the Feb. 24 to March 1 conference. “It’s a set for if you’re interested in politics,” he said. “I think it’s going to give me tools to have more impact in the community.” He was told about the conference by his mother’s friend, and was endorsed by his school and supported by Coun. Tim Tier-

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ney in his application. His volunteer job, Jer’s Vision, is with the national organization that promotes diversity in youth, including eliminating bullying and homophobia. The school’s SAFE club runs similar initiatives, hosting a Day of Purple, an anti-bullying assembly and a talk addressing suicide in Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgendered and Queer (LGBTQ) youth. Anti-bullying and anti-homophobia events are important to Zac because he came out last year. He’s been able to tell incoming Grade 9 students, and older Colonel By students, through anti-bullying presentations. Giving the students an actual physical representation of a gay student is positive, he said, and helps with one of his goals: to eliminate homophobic language. “We’re a very good school overall, but you always need to work towards the bigger issues,” he said. “There are still a lot of people that are hiding (being LGBTQ youth).” While preventing homophobia and homophobic language is important to Zac, it isn’t all he stands for. He has goals of eventually being a poli-

tician, and hopes the forum will help give him better knowledge of how to achieve his goals. POLITICAL AMBTIONS

Participating in a mock House of Commons session and networking with politicians will help him gain the knowledge of what he could expect if he furthers his career. “It’s very different having a technical knowledge, versus a personal one,” he said. “It’s a network for a future political career.” If Zac doesn’t go into politics, he wants to consider a career in a field such as his work with Jer’s Vision. He hopes to attend Carleton University next year to study politics and human rights. He’ll get to return to the next two sessions of the forum, not as a participant, but on behalf of Jer’s Vision, to present to the attendees on the work the organization does. To follow Zac through his volunteer work at Jer’s Vision and with other opportunities for youth, look for him on Twitter as @ZacJohnstone.

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United Way campaign nearing goal Campaign extended to end of March Steph Willems

steph.willems@metroland.com

Submitted

Adrienne Li, a Louis Riel student, hopes to eventually get a scholarship to play soccer in the United States.

Athlete hopes for scholarship Continued from page 1

which gives her additional training hours. The Grade 10 student said she would eventually like to get a scholarship to play university soccer in the United States. The national team program will bring in different groups of players in the lead up to the

2014 qualifier tournament to evaluate a variety of players and how they play together before finalizing the team roster. “I think I did fairly well,” she said. “I definitely have some things to improve on.” Adrienne was able to take the weekend before Christmas off for a break, but was

FEB

18 DEC

31

planning to quickly be back to training in the hopes of being named to the national team in the future. “It would honestly be an honour (to make the team),” she said. “Just to pay everyone back for all the coaches that have helped me, and my family that has sacrificed a lot for me to play.”

MATHIEU FLEURY Coun. Mathieu Fleury, a campaign co-chairman, of the new Gift of Change system. “You give them a chance to make a difference in someone’s life.” Fleury, who shares his duties with Angie Poirier of Majic 100 and CTV Morning Live, was thrilled to able to

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EMC news - Even in these lean times it seems the gift of giving hasn’t lost its lustre. Ottawa’s annual United Way Campaign passed the $24 million mark last week on its way towards a $30 million fundraising goal. The number is significant, considering that for the past two years monies raised have fallen just shy of the campaign goal. Help meet that goal, the United Way has extended the campaign period to the end of March, the first time in its history it has gone beyond the traditional 10-week period. As well this year, an online store was launched where people can donate in someone’s name as a gift, while the service sends them a personalized message. “This is a great idea for those people you know who have everything,” said Rideau-Vanier

take on the responsibility associated with the high-profile campaign. He’s pleased with the progress so far. “To hear how far we have come, it is amazing,” said Fleury. “$24 million is a lot of money … but the need is much greater, even greater than the goal we have set.” In Ottawa, over 155 programs receive financial assistance from the United Way and those programs help the most vulnerable people in our society. Aimed at building a healthy community, funds from the campaign support services aimed at isolated seniors, the disabled, homeless persons, vulnerable youth and those suffering from mental health issues and addictions. This year’s campaign launched on Sept. 27 with the help of 14,000 volunteers in business and government workplaces throughout Ottawa.

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Bell Capital Cup sees 380 teams compete WELL REPRESENTED

Jessica Cunha

jessica.cunha@metroland.com

The Ottawa-area was well represented, with a number of teams competing for the top spot, including the Kanata Blazers, Nepean Raiders, Ottawa Sting, Ottawa Valley Silver Seven and Gloucester Rangers. “As always, the highlight of the festival (was) the 1,000-plus hours of tournament games and the lasting memories they create for all participants,” said Lawryk. Kanata native and former Sens forward Todd White again served as honourary chair at this year’s event. The Bell Capital Cup’s

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More than 6,500 players were set to hit the ice on hockey rinks across the city for the 14th edition of the Bell Capital Cup. ers and families who continue to take part in the Bell Capital Cup and build on what is a splendid foundation for this annual holiday tournament,”

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EMC sports - More than 6,500 players were set to hit the ice on hockey rinks in Ottawa for the 14th edition of the Bell Capital Cup. The competition ran from Dec. 28 to Jan. 1 with the opening ceremonies, Bell Capital Cup Fanfest and Esso Friendly Games held on Dec. 27 at the Bell Sensplex in Kanata. “This National Capital Region hockey extravaganza continues to showcase great minor hockey action, skills competitions and the Scotiabank/Canadian Tire all-star games,” said Scott Lawryk, general manager of the Bell Capital Cup, in a press release. The city played host to 380 teams from 19 divisions for the annual atom and peewee hockey tournament. This year, teams from Canada, China, Finland, Germany and the United States vied to hoist the Allen J. MacDonald Memorial Trophy. The Orléans EMC went to press before the championship games were held. “On behalf of the board of directors and our many volunteers, I would like to take this opportunity to thank all of the minor hockey associations and administrators, play-

19 divisions, including two girls teams, played more than 800 games on 31 ice surfaces across the city, from Stittsville to Navan. Each division’s championship game was played at Scotiabank Place. The board of directors of the Ottawa International Hockey Festival was expecting 20,000 visitors to the area and about 12,000 hotel rooms to be rented for the event. The five-day tournament has raised more than $2.4 million in support of minor hockey and local charities since it began in 1999. Last year, $150,000 was raised through the Bell Capital Cup.

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year in review

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A look back at July to December in Orléans The second of a two-parts review of the news from 2013

the development for his business. “We love it, we’re absolutely for it,” he said.

JULY

Lawyers did advise on draft contracts for Ottawa’s Presto smart card transit payment system, the city’s top lawyer said. But Rick O’Connor can’t say whether lawyers from his office signed off on final version of the documents because they weren’t initialed or “stamped.” The Presto file has been plagued by controversy, first with the announcement on June 20 that its implementation would have to be delayed for seven months until next February. A recent revelation that the final smart card contracts hadn’t received a lawyer’s stamp led Mayor Jim Watson to move a motion asking legal staff to ensure such measures must be taken for all future contracts. Members of the Common Thread Quilt Guild, based out of Orleans, do what they can to offer a moment of comfort in a tough time. They’ve donated quilts to the Ottawa Mission, Children’s Aid, CHEO oncology, and recently, CHEO via the Kidney Foundation. Members completed 12 quilts for the Kidney Foundation this winter, six of which were given out to children who undergo dialysis at CHEO. The extra six will be given to future CHEO dialysis patients. Sometimes patients undergoing dialysis can get very chilled, said Judy Taylor of the Kidney Foundation. “When I asked this quilting group, there was absolutely no hesitation,” she said. “The kids range between two years old and 16, and they were very much excited.” Victoria Van der Linden, who was in charge of the guild’s community projects committee, said that a mem-

File

The Gagnon-Mosco family poses with their family pets and guide dog puppy. The family raise guide dog puppies for the Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind before the dogs go through more inte Gagnon-Mosco nsive training. ber of the group spoke with Taylor and recommended making the donations. Cody Ceci hasn’t had to leave behind his friends, family, or mom’s home-cooked meals to play major junior hockey with the Ottawa 67’s. And he won’t need to in order to play professional hockey either, after the Orleans’ native was drafted 15th by the Ottawa Senators in the 2012 NHL draft. Ceci and his family watched as teams were called to the stage to announce their first round drafts in Pittsburgh and as the Ottawa Senators pick got closer and closer, the anticipation grew. And at the end, he said the experience wasn’t what he expected – it was even better. “It was definitely pretty special,” Ceci said. “On that day I had no idea where I was going to go and the best

possible scenario was to come home and play in my home town, so everything just worked out.” Ceci grew up in Orleans, attending St. Francis of Assisi and St. Clare schools, and St. Peter High School for grades 7 and 8, before leaving to attend school in Peterborough, Ont. In the OHL draft, he learned he’d be coming home to play for the 67’s, and returned to St. Peter for grades 11 and 12. It’s a relief for his parents to keep him close to home after seeing him leave as a high school student to play for the Peterborough Minor Petes following a career with the Eastern Ontario Wild. An open house for the proposed Cardinal Creek Village drew Cumberland residents to Capital City Church on June 27. While some residents came to voice concerns over traffic demands

and storm water overloads, the general feeling was curiosity about the new development. The Tamarack Homes development could be home to 13,000 new Cumberland residents in village-style housing. The 4,800 homes are accompanied by a commercial area in the concept plan. The development is planned east of the current Cardinal Creek development and Trim Road, and would run from Highway 174 past Old Montreal Road. It would extend almost as far as Ted Kelly Lane north of Old Montreal Road, and to Frank Kenny Road south of Old Montreal Road. The lands were tied up in Ontario Municipal Board rulings, but have been recently included in the urban boundary as part of an official plan amendment. Jean Laporte, who owns Laporte Flowers and Nursery, has a large parcel of land located in the middle of

When the NHL Players’ Association released their list of the top 42 bantam-aged players in Canada to be mentored at the Allstate All-Canadians Mentorship Camp, there was only one Ottawa area player chosen to attend. “You see the commercials on TV,” said Brett McKenzie. “When they called and asked my mom if I wanted to go, obviously it’s a yes.” McKenzie is representing the major bantam AAA Eastern Ontario Wild at the training camp, where he will play alongside top prospects in his age group. The 6-foot-1 centre from Vars started on skates when he was 18 months old, and has been playing ever since, moving through the Cumberland houseleague, the Cumberland Barons, Cumberland Grads, and then the Wild. The five day camp includes an intersquad game that will be broadcast on TSN. The Allstate All-Canadians Mentorship Cup will be a chance for scouts to preview the talent that come up in next year’s OHL draft. Don’t take Carling Avenue off the table for a light-rail line, city councillors told their staff advisers on June 27. Following public opposition to a report that narrowed potential rightrail routes down to four options – three of which include parts of the Byron-Richmond corridor – councillors directed staff to keep looking at all 15 options that were originally examined. A May 30 city staff report indicated that the four options for a primary western LRT line were the “top corridors” and that one of them would eventually be chosen as the line to be built. But deputy city manager Nancy Schepers told council on June 27 that “nothing is being taken off the table.” See GARAGE, page 5

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YEAR IN REVIEW

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Garage from the past greets museum visitors Continued from page 4

“The 15 options all remain on the table,” she said, adding, “We will spend more time on some options that appear to be more viable than others.” That drew jeers from a group of residents in the audience who were holding signs reading No LRT on ByronRichmond. David Truemner starts the engine of a 1943 Massey-Harris tractor and the sound of whirling machinery fills Watson’s Garage. “That’s music to my ears,” he said. The tractor is part of Watson’s Garage at the Cumberland Village Heritage Museum, and Truemner’s current project. It took him a year to find the generator and get the proper parts to make the latest fix, but that’s half the fun for the recently retired volunteer. He started at the museum as an interpreter for the garage six years ago, but quickly got involved doing even more when he was asked to help with a vintage car, a 1929 model. “What really changed by interest was when they asked me to fix the Durant,” he said. The car now runs, another successful repair for Watson’s Garage, which is thought to have started in 1926 in Cumberland. “Oh, that was a big day for me,” he said of the first time the car ran. “I let the clutch go and just went.” Truemner has spent a considerable amount of time tracking the history of Watson’s Garage, its owner, John Watson and his family.

Since June 1, there have been 74 reported thefts from vehicles, and 15 reported break and enters in Fallingbrook alone, said Staff Sgt. Stephanie Burns. Most of the break and enters involved open or unlocked garage doors. Police said there are daily calls to report thefts from vehicles in Orleans, commonly from vehicles that have been left unlocked. Unlocked vehicles, and those with GPS devices displayed on the dashboard, make for an easy target. Parked in front of the house, garage door openers also make it easy for thieves to gain access to the home. The garage door openers have also been stolen from Orleans’ park-and-rides from unlocked cars. Paperwork including address then allows thieves to enter the home through the garage. It’s hard for Oluwasegun Makinde to sum up the moment when he found out that he’d achieved a dream: he’s an

Olympian. “Excitement, relief, extreme joy, the realization of dreams coming true, just the feeling that a lot of hard work had paid off,” he said. “Everything mixed into one indescribable emotion.” Makinde, who went to Fallingbrook Community Elementary School and Colonel By Secondary School before surprising some and staying close to home to attend the University of Ottawa, was named to Canada’s 4x100-metre men’s relay team. At the Olympic trials in Calgary, years of training with the Ottawa Lions came together as he ran a personal best in the 200-metre sprint - 20.71 seconds – to give him the silver medal. “I absolutely love competing in front of huge crowds, the feeling is exhilarating,” he said. “I’m a little disappointed that I didn’t win, but like my coach says – my time will come.” See PARALYMPIANS, page 6

FILE

Josh Cassidy, a wheelchair racer who trains with the Ottawa Lions, spent the summer training and competing for the Paralympic Games. Cassidy also set a world record for the wheelchair marathon in 2012, competing in Boston.

Courtnay Pilypaitis achieved the goal she’s focused on for the past three years of her life. Everything came together on Canada Day, as a 71-63 score carried the women’s national basketball team to not only a victory over Japan, and an Olympic berth. “It was pure excitement from the moment the buzzer went,” said Pilypaitis, a St. Peter Secondary School graduate. “Being able to accomplish a lifelong goal with such great teammates was an unbelievable feeling.” She not only played, but lead her team at the competition in Turkey. She was named Canada’s tournament MVP and led scoring with 21 points against Japan. “I’d say this is the ultimate Canada Day. To come back after Friday’s loss is nothing less than spectacular,” Canada Basketball president Wayne Parrish said in a press release. “Their resilience has been remarkable. It was inspiring to see the way Courtnay developed this past week.” Pilypaitis has played the last two seasons professionally in Lithuania, and previously for the Gloucester Wolverines and University of Vermont. There has been a recent spike in vehicle and garage thefts through the Orleans area. Orléans EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

5


YEAR IN REVIEW

Your Community Newspaper

Paralympians head to London to compete At 11 years old a track coach noticed her, and she started running competitively. Three years later, Robinson, who has cerebral palsy, was competing in the Paralympics. The right side of her body is affected by the disease, which means her muscles are weaker and atrophied. “I walk with a slight limp,� Robinson said. “But I’ve been told on numerous occasions that it disappears when I run.�

Continued from page 5

And even more important than the silver medal is the fact that the 20-year-old is now London-bound for the Olympic Games. He’ll be joined by Ottawa Lions coach, former Olympic sprinter Glenroy Gilbert, who is the coach for the national 4x100-metre relay, and Lions teammate Seyi Smith, who will run alongside him in the relay. Three Ottawa Lions wheelchair athletes will be heading to the London Paralympics this summer. Josh Cassidy, who recently set a world record Boston Marathon time, Rachael Burrows and Curtis Thom have all been selected for the Paralympic team. Even though none of the three are full-time permanent Ottawa residents, the strength of the club has drawn them here, or back, to represent the city. Cassidy and Burrows are coached by Amanda Fader. “It’s more excitement right now, the nerves will come later,� Fader said. She said that unlike the Olympic selection criteria, Paralympic athletes competing at the trials in Calgary didn’t get an automatic confirmation of their place on the team upon finishing their races.

Delays to the finishing touches on the Cyrville bridge have occurred because the company contracted to build the bridge went bankrupt, said Beacon Hill-Cyrville Coun. Tim Tierney. Concreate USL, a Bolton, Ont.-based contractor, made headlines in late March after it went into receivership – despite being contracted by the city to build the Strandherd-Armstrong bridge. Tierney said just the cosmetic final touches are still needed for the Cyrville bridge, which should be finished by the end of August.

With gun incidents on track to reach double the number of shootings Ottawa had last year, Cumberland Coun. Stephen Blais wants the city to create a plan to tackle gun and gang crime. There have been 27 gun-related incidents in Ottawa so far this year, compared to 23 cases in all of 2011.

AUGUST

Some living in Ottawa had a hard time swallowing the city’s line that more riders would have access to the new LRT line by shifting a stop to the Rideau Centre and removing the station’s Elgin Street entrance. The news came out this spring and set off a storm of criticism from people who said the move would cut off easy access for people in the east end of Centretown near city hall. But would you believe it’s a good thing if Jason White told you so? White’s name isn’t a household one, but the city is hoping

Youths!

FILE

Michael Knutson, left, acts out a scene on stage at the Shenkman Arts Centre alongside fellow OrlÊans Young Players Theatre School counsellors and former students JÊrÊmie Cyr-Cooke and Keri Poupore. he is only the first of many citizen experts who can crunch city data and analyze decisions made around the council horseshoe. Ottawa residents shouldn’t go into a panic that their taxes are going to go up, even though

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house prices are on the rise in Ottawa. That was the message from the city’s deputy treasurer following news that Ottawa has seen a 24 per cent increase in assessed home value over the last four years, according to the Municipal Property Assessment Corporation. That’s about the same annual increase the city has seen since 1980, according to MPAC. But “boutique� neighbourhoods like the Glebe, Westboro and other areas close to downtown are seeing increases above the 24 per cent average. Karen Goetzinger’s first installation show has set up inside the Trinity Art Gallery at the Shenkman Arts Centre. Using a variety of materials,

including Italian pima cotton organdy, silk organza, acrylic paints and fond metal, the show A State of Transparency represents memories. Runner Leah Robinson is an interesting contradiction on the Paralympic team. She’s the baby of the team at 18, but the Kitchener, Ont. native is also a Paralympic veteran, having competed in the 2008 Beijing Olympics at only 14. Not surprising, seeing the Heron Gate woman started running at the age of four-yearsold. “I started long distance with my dad,� she said. “I started running one kilometre road races and by the time I was eight, I worked my way up to five kilometres.�

All Devon Nicholson ever wanted to do was wrestle. “He’s somebody who loves something so much, he’s willing to sacrifice everything for it,â€? said Max Moskal, who produced a documentary about Nicholson. “And it ruined his life.â€? Moskal, a St. Peter Secondary School and Algonquin College graduate, understands what it’s like to be passionate about something – for him, it’s filmmaking. When he saw Nicholson wrestling at an event in Quebec years ago, he recognized him. Moskal realized Nicholson worked at the OrlĂŠans gym he attended, he soon started filming him, eventually also working alongside him as a co-worker at the gym. See MEDICAL, page 7

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Medical centre becomes popular with residents Continued from page 6

“It was really evident he was different,” Moskal said, of the Cairine Wilson Secondary School graduate and high school wresting champion, who had wrestled on the national stage, but dreamed of a career as a professional. Brian Coburn Boulevard is now open through to Mer Bleue Road in Orléans. The official opening of the road, which provides an alternative route to Innes Road from Trim Road, was on July 30. “This will provide a real alternative and allow residents to avoid the heavy congestion along Innes Road,” said Coun. Stephen Blais in a release. It’s not done yet though – the city has approved funds that will see the road eventually connect with Navan Road. Business is booming at Findlay Creek Medical Centre. More than 7,500 patients have registered with family doctors at the privately-owned clinic since it opened last February.

Since then, the clinic has expanded its services, adding an audiologist and a psychologist to its staff, with plans to hire an obstetrician-gynecologist in the fall. The clinic is still accepting new patients, with the capacity to bring in up to 20,000 patients, depending on doctors’ preferences. Everyone who has applied for a family doctor at Findlay Creek has been able to register with one of the doctors. “We’re still sending out waves of acceptance letters,” said assistant director Alejandro Almendrades. He said the clinic is getting calls from all over the city – and even outside the city limits – with requests for family doctors. Ottawa-Orléans MPP Phil McNeely was at the Montfort Hospital on Aug. 8 to announce additional nursing hours in Ottawa. Ottawa will receive up to 26,807 nursing hours in 2012-13 dedicated to patients arriving by ambulance. Allocating more nursing hours to patients arriving in the emergency room via ambulance prevents a backlog of ambulances and paramedics. The nurses will be working with

patients who do not have life-threatening conditions. Fifteen years of hard work by volunteers with the Friends of Petrie Island have changed one section of the beach into a multi-use area. “The work’s been done on Wednesday mornings for the past 15 years,” said Friends of Petrie Island chairman Al Tweddle “Obviously it became more used by the public.” On Aug. 8, the volunteers received a recognition plaque from Coun. Bob Monette. Monette is allocating $20,000 from his cash-in-lieu-ofparkland fund to the group for signage around the island. Tweddle estimates that the group has donated about $20,000 worth of labour from a core group of 12 volunteers. They have a stewardship plan and work to protect the natural features of the island. The group has made a nature centre, which is used for weekly youth programs and houses information about animals that can be found on Petrie Island, as well as the centre’s popular turtle, Myrtle. The centre was converted from an abandoned cottage just west of the main beach. The island since gained

marked walking trails which include informative signs, picnic benches, and a children’s play area. The Friends of Petrie Island also host school groups and summer camps who visit for a tour of the island. Because no dogs are allowed on Petrie Island, it’s allowed other species to flourish. Petrie Island is home to turtles, beavers, plus a wide variety of vegetation. St. Joseph Boulevard was the hot topic for Couns. Stephen Blais and Bob Monette at the Orléans Chamber of Commerce’s town hall portion of their Aug. 9 networking breakfast. St. Joseph Boulevard will be widened in certain area from two to four lanes over the next several years as part of the Trim Road expansion; a roundabout will be built where the two intersect. Several chamber members said the area isn’t walkable enough, and it needs to be more attractive. “The (Business Improvement Area) is working with the city to improve the streetscape,” said Monette. Future plans include plaques along the street about the first francophone families in the area.

There were also comments that not enough Orléans businesses are displaying French signage, opting to use solely English. Monette said store owners are encouraged to be as bilingual as possible, but are not required to display any French signage. Brittany Moorecroft’s journey started with a series of small challenges to push herself after her University of Ottawa graduation. It grew into her deciding to climb Mount Kilimanjaro and raise $5,000 for the charity WaterCan in the process. “With no one challenging me, I chose to challenge myself,” the 22year-old said. “I’ve wanted to climb it since 2010, it just kind of happened, like fate.” Moorecroft, a Sir Wilfred Laurier Secondary School grad and Orléans resident, will spend Oct. 12 to 26 climbing, along with a delegation that includes Ben Mulroney and 20 others. WaterCan provides clean drinking water to communities in Eastern Africa. See DIEPPE, page 10

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December 1630 – 10am Children’s Pageant December – 10am Readings and Carols December 23 – 10 am Choir Service

1111 Orleans Boulevard 613-837-4321 December 24 - Christmas Eve Check us out at: www.orleansunitedchurch.com 5 & 7 pm Family Services

St. Clement Church/Paroisse St. Clément at l’église Ste-Anne Welcomes you to the traditional Latin Mass Sunday Masses: 8:30 a.m. Low Mass 10:30 a.m. High Mass (with Gregorian chant) 6:30 p.m. Low Mass For Christmas Mass times please see www.st.-clementottawa.ca 528 Old St. Patrick St. Ottawa ON K1N 5L5 (613) 565.9656

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613-590-0677 stmarys@rogers.com stmarysblackburn.ca

5 & 7 pm Family Services 9 & 11 pm Candlelight Communion

R0011814463-1220

St. Mary the Virgin Anglican Church R0011824482.0103

9 & 11 pm Candlelight Communion December 30 – 10am Readings and Carols

613-236-0617 Worship 10:30 am www.glebestjames.ca glebestjames.church@bellnet.ca R0011292984

Sundays @ 10am

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St. Margaret’s Anglican Church

Reverend Canon John Wilker-Blakley

Sunday Worship

2144 East Acres Road (Montreal @174)

613-745-4664 pgbiblechurch.ca

QUEENSWOOD UNITED CHURCH

Trinity (8785 Russell Rd., Bearbrook) St. Mary’s (3480 Trim Rd., Navan) Navan Community Sunday School St. Andrew’s (1900 Devine Rd., Vars)

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Info: 613-216-2200 or www.bvnanglican.ca

ST. HELEN’S ANGLICAN CHURCH

Sunday Worship 8, 9:15, 11 1234 Prestone Dr, Orleans (1 block west of 10th Line, 1 block south of St. Joseph) 613-824-2010 www.sthelens.ca

GRACE PRESBYTERIAN ChuRCh

Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m. Sunday School/Nursery During Worship

360 Kennedy Lane E., Orleans

613-837-6784 www.queenswoodunited.org

St. Mark’s Anglican Church Sunday Eucharist 10:00 a.m. Sunday School

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2476 Old Montreal Rd., Cumberland Tel: 613-859-4738

1220 old Tenth Line Rd orleans, oN K1E3W7 Phone: 613-824-9260 www.graceorleans.ca pastordan@graceorleans.ca

R0011292981

THIS IS MY

INvITES You To WoRShIP SuNDAYS AT 10:45Am

Minister: Rev. Ed Gratton

Come and celebrate God’s love with us.

8:30 a.m. 10:00 a.m. 9:45am 11:30 a.m.

THIS IS MY

pentecostal church R0011293005

A Church in the Heart of Vanier 206 Montreal Rd. Sunday Communion at 9:00 am in English Also at 11:00 am (in English and Inuktitut) 613-746-8815 www.stmargaretsvanier.ca

Anglican Parish of Bearbrook, Navan & Vars

1111 Orleans Boulevard 613-837-4321 Check us out at: www.orleansunitedchurch.com

Dominion-Chalmers United Church

pentecostal church

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Pine Grove Bible Church

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Ministers: Rev. Dr. Christine Johnson Stephanie Langill - Youth and Children Rev. George Clifford - Pastoral Care Lyon Street South and First Robert Palmai - Music �

9:0010:30 am am Sunday SchoolWorship (all ages) - Morning 9:00 am Sunday School (all ages) 10:00 am Morning Worship KidzChurch (ages 4-11) - Young Adults Service 10:007:00 ampm Morning Worship KidzChurchAdult (ages 4-11) 7:00 pm Young Service Nursery careduring available during Nursery care available Sunday School 7:00Morning pm Young Adult Service and for infants – 3yrs. – 3yrs. MorningWorship Worship for infants Nursery care available during Sunday School and Morning Worship for infants – 3yrs.

Sunday Services Worship Service10:30am Sundays Prayer Circle Tuesday at 11:30 Rev.10:30 Jamesa.m. Murray

Programs for children, youth and young adults. Homegroups, Adult Bible studies, Ladies Prayer & Share. See website for details.

355 Cooper Street at O’Connor 613-235-5143 www.dc-church.org

613-837-3555 1825 St. Josephwww.cpcorleans.ca Blvd, Orleans

265549/0605 R0011293022

pmyouth (Sat)and - Spanish Service Programs for 6:00 children, young adults. Homegroups, Adult Bible studies, Ladies Prayer & Share. See website for details. 3:00 pm (Sun) - Spanish Sunday School

1825 St. Joseph Blvd, Orleans 613-837-3555

www.cpcorleans.ca

For all your Church Advertising needs Call Sharon 613-688-1483 Orléans EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

7


opinion

Your Community Newspaper

EDITORIAL

Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow

D

ecember 2012 ended with a bang not a whimper. That is if you don’t count the moans and whines from various residents after they were hit with two big snowstorms and 50-plus centimetres of snow. Ottawa residents haven’t seen weather like this for years and it’s understandable that it will take some of us a little time to adjust. First and foremost, the inclement weather has been

accompanied by a rise in the cases of colds, the flu and other illnesses. But that is mostly a product of people huddling together inside and sharing their germs. The first part of any intelligent person’s survival guide for the Great Canadian Winter must begin with an old adage you probably heard from your mother: wash your hands. Wash them frequently. And if you’re sick, stay

home and recover. Many workaholics will show up at the office even while fending off a bad bout of the bubonic plaque. While their work ethic is commendable, it only serves to spread the sickness to coworkers. Stay home, rest up and return to work recharged and healthy. But the cold weather and heaps of white stuff aren’t all doom and gloom. Winter is a season of play

for ski and skating enthusiasts. Owners of ski hills in Quebec and Ontario are bubbling with jubilation over the recent snowfall. Skiing on real snow, you see, is a whole new experience compared to gliding down the artificial stuff. As for Canada’s national sport, volunteers across the country are out in force clearing the ice pads and outdoor rinks to make way for the legion of children hungering

for a game of scrimmage hockey. The average 10-year-old boy or girl’s eye’s light up when they see the thermometer dip below zero and hear that the roads are choked with snow. Of course that can only mean one thing. A school snow day and a morning spent chasing a piece of vulcanized rubber with their buddies on the local rink. January also sees the arrival of the Bell Capital Cup, bringing together hundreds of teams, both from Ontario and Quebec and other countries and thousands of atom and

peewee-age hockey players. This year, the cup features the Capital City Condors, a team with players with intellectual and physical disabilities. For these children, the winter and the opportunity to play hockey is a thing of joy. An emotion that can’t help translate to the hearts of volunteers who run the team and onlookers who watch them play. For those who hate the winter, let your Grinch hearts defrost a little and take notice of the opportunities that present themselves. Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow.

COLUMN

Planning the great Canadian event CHARLES GORDON Funny Town

T

he thing about anticipating a great event is that the event is always great in anticipation. It’s only when it becomes a real event that it risks being disappointing. So bring on the 150th anniversary celebrations, Canada’s next big birthday, scheduled for 2017, unless government cutbacks cause it to be postponed. Already, the government is said to be putting out feelers to Canadians, asking them for ideas on how the event can be properly marked. According to reports, cross-country consultations are beginning this month. The aim is to make the 150th as memorable as the 100th was. Those who were there remember it as a pretty good one, but it might be different this time. It’s pretty difficult to imagine this government or any future one laying out the kind of dough that was spent in 1967. Expo 67 was only the biggest of many large expenditures. Don’t forget the hundreds of centennial projects that were built across the country. If not for the centennial there would be empty spaces where a lot of the arenas and concert halls are in Canadian cities. Not to say that our present-day governments, at all levels, are stingy, but is there another word that describes them better? Furthermore, our taxpayers are far less adventurous in spirit than they were in 1967. It’s with these facts in mind that we have to consider the contribution we will make to the cross-country consultations. In order to gain government acceptance, proposals to celebrate

the 150th have to be, let’s say, modest in scale. Better still, they have to include provisions for corporations to pay for them. So where does that leave us, here in the capital? Under different circumstances we might think of the 150th as the perfect occasion for the unveiling of the long-discussed portrait gallery, which was once to be located across from Parliament Hill. But we won’t get that now. Maybe, instead, a PowerPoint presentation sponsored by a bank. There are some possibilities in the idea of re-enactment. This year there were re-enactments of key battles in the War of 1812. Maybe some of that could be done in 2017, re-enactments of key moments in the national capital’s history, with due consideration of budgetary realities. Actors, as long as they are not paid too much, could portray Charlotte Whitton battling with city councillors, Thomas D’Arcy McGee breathing his last, Pierre Elliott Trudeau walking in the snow. Developers could take time off from their busy schedule putting up new condos to restage the destruction of LeBreton Flats. Staging the reconstruction of LeBreton Flats might not be possible at the moment. Celebrations of this sort should also look forward. Peering into the future is always interesting. In 1967 it may have been imagined that the Ottawa of 2013 would have public transit flying through the air, hologram movies projected into the night sky and an enlightened government capable of anticipating the needs of the people. None of this has come true, but the exercise is still worth the effort. So let’s think about Ottawa 2117 as presented this year at Expo 17. Public transit flying through air, except in a tunnel. Hologram movies available to elite cable subscribers. One more building on the LeBreton Flats. Still no portrait gallery, but they’re thinking of using the last building in the city that isn’t a condo. In other 2117 developments, the 19-digit telephone number comes into effect, additional parking is on Mars and another bridge to the Quebec side is under active study.

Editorial Policy The Orléans EMC welcomes letters to the editor. Senders must include their full name, complete address and a contact phone number. Addresses and phone numbers will not be published. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and content, both in print and online at www.yourottawaregion.com. To submit a letter to the editor, please email to theresa.fritz@metroland.com , fax to 613-224-2265 or mail to The Orléans EMC, 80 Colonnade Rd. N., Unit 4, Ottawa ON, K2E 7L2.

orlÉans ExpandEd MarkEt CovEragE

57 Auriga Drive, Suite 103 Ottawa, ON, K2E 8B2 613-723-5970 Vice President & Regional Publisher: Mike Mount Group Publisher: Duncan Weir Regional General Manager: Peter O’Leary Regional Managing Editor: Ryland Coyne Publisher: Mike Tracy / mtracy@perfprint.ca

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8 Orléans EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

Published weekly by:

disTriBUTion inQUiries David Maillet 613-221-6252 adMinisTraTion: Crystal Foster 613-723-5970 adverTising sales: Sales Manager: Carly McGhie 613-688-1479 cmcghie@perfprint.ca display adverTising: Gisele Godin - Kanata - 688-1653

Web Poll This Week’s poll question

What was your initial response to all the snow we’ve had recently?

Previous poll summary

Do you make New Year’s resolutions?

A) I bundled up the kids and spent

A) Definitely. I love making these life-changing commitments to personal improvement.

11%

B) I took the day off and got some chores done inside.

22%

C) I resigned myself to hours of shovelling and dreaming about summertime.

B) Sort of. I always make a resolution, but I’m really bad at following through. C) Never. If you want to make a better life for yourself, just do it.

33%

D) I grumbled about the weather all day, mostly on Twitter.

D) I meant to, but I thought the world was going to end last week and never got around to it.

33%

the day playing outside.

To vote in our web polls, visit us at www.yourottawaregion.com/community/cityofottawa

Dave Pennett - Ottawa West - 688-1484 Dave Badham - Orleans - 688-1652 Cindy Manor - Ottawa South - 688-1478 Geoff Hamilton - Ottawa East - 688-1488 Valerie Rochon - Barrhaven - 688-1669 Jill Martin - Nepean - 688-1665 Mike Stoodley - Stittsville - 688-1675 Stephanie Jamieson - Renfrew - 432-3655 Dave Gallagher - Renfrew - 432-3655 Leslie Osborne - Arnprior / WC - 623-6571 Emily Warren - Ottawa West - 688-1659 Classified adverTising sales: Sharon Russell - 613-688-1483 Kevin Cameron - 613-688-1672 Adrienne Barr - 613-623-6571

ediTorial: Interim Managing Editor: Theresa Fritz 613-221-6261 Theresa.fritz@metroland.com neWs ediTor Nevil Hunt nevil.hunt@metroland.com 613-221-6235 reporTer/phoTographer: Brier Dodge brier.dodge@metroland.com 613-221-6235 poliTiCal reporTer: Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com 613-221-6162

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Your Community Newspaper


opinion

Your Community Newspaper

M

y middle child exerts a lot of confidence. He’s a solid reader. He’s good with numbers. He can kick a ball onto the roof of the school – all areas in which a six-yearold wants to excel. Unfortunately, his confidence in the tasks he does well often causes him to be falsely confident in other areas of his life. And this is where a six-year-old becomes a ticking time bomb. He’s not as cautious as he should be when skiing or tobogganing down the ice hill at Green’s Creek. This is why a helmet is recommended. It turns out most of us are like my six-year-old. While confidence in our areas of expertise is generally regarded as a good thing, we have a tendency to allow our confidence to overflow into areas where it is unfounded – not so good. This is particularly true when we experience success. If I win a writing award, for example, and I happen to have an appointment with my financial advisor the same day, it’s likely I’ll select more risky investments than normal. This is based on the false belief that my success in an area where I’ve trained and

BRYNNA LESLIE Capital Muse practiced must naturally spill over into areas where I have no expertise. It’s like that scene in the movie Bridget Jones’s Diary, where, following a great first day as a television producer, Bridget has a “sneaking suspicion” she’s also a master chef. That she ends up making blue soup, orange pudding and green gunge for her birthday dinner demonstrates the folly of her thinking. But while overconfidence can be problematic, we can also take advantage of this tendency to experience new things and to keep our resolutions going beyond Jan. 31. January is a month when people are inherently optimistic. There’s something about the new year that has each of us pushing the reset button, ready for a fresh start. It’s the reason we use January as an excuse to resolve to go to the gym, quit smoking or save more

money. We all become a little nutty in January. Unfortunately, February is another type of month altogether. The confidence we felt as the calendar turned over to 2013 starts to dwindle, as we realize we’ve gained, rather than lost, weight, or that we’ve started drinking red wine in lieu of smoking. But perhaps we could use our tendency for overconfidence to carry us through. Try riding this high – on a good day, rather than reaching for a glass of wine to celebrate, head for the gym. If you experience some sort of success at work in February, try mastering a new recipe that evening in the kitchen. If you win a hockey game, try a new sport that very week. You may fail, but at least you had the confidence – or false confidence -- to try. As I say to my six-year-old, however, it’s best wear a helmet, just in case.

More Ontarians encouraged to get screened for cancer Initiative calls on 100,000 additional people to be checked EMC news - Cancer Care Ontario has launched Time to Screen, a call to action for at least 100,000 additional residents to screen for breast, cervical and colorectal cancer over the next six months. Time to Screen also encourages Ontarians to have open conversations with their family and friends about getting screened, as cancer screening will help save countless lives by enabling earlier diagnosis and treatment. Included in the initiative are creative e-cards about cancer screening for Ontarians to share with their loved ones. Residents are also encouraged to talk to their healthcare provider about being screened or visit the Time to Screen tool to find out the right time to be screened. Screens encouraged

Time to Screen specifically encourages: • Average-risk men and women, 50 to 74 years of age, to screen for colorectal cancer every two years using the fecal occult blood test. • Average risk women 50 to 74 years of age to screen for breast cancer every two years with mammography. • Women 21 to 70 years to screen for cervical cancer every three years with a Pap test. Women 30 to 69 years of age who have been identified as being at high risk for breast cancer should have a screening mammogram and MRI every year. “There is strong evidence that screening for colorectal, breast and cervical cancers can reduce mortality,” said Dr. Linda Rabeneck of Cancer Care Ontario. SEES WHAT YOU CAN’T

Cancer screening sees what you can’t and is proven to save lives by detecting precancerous changes or cancer at an early stage.

Cervical cancer is almost entirely preventable with regular Pap tests, appropriate and timely follow-up and HPV immunization. When caught early, there is a 90 per cent chance that people with colorectal cancer will be cured. death decrease

And between 1990 and 2008, breast cancer death rates for Ontario women decreased by 37 per cent, which may be the result of better treatments and increased screening with mammography and a recent decline in breast cancer incidence. Recently, cervical cancer screening guidelines were updated outlining the right age for women to screen and the time interval between tests. In Ontario, cervical cancer screening is now recommended starting at age 21 and every three years until age 70 for all women who are or ever have been sexually active. Screening is not recommended for women under the age of 21.

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Resolve to tap into your unfounded confidence

Orléans EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

9


year in review

Your Community Newspaper

Dieppe anniversary marked at memorial the former mayor, who now lives in Kanata Lakes.

Continued from page 7

Founded in 1987, the Canadian charity has worked in a number of communities to fight pverty. Moorecroft will visit a rural community in Kiteto District, in Masai during the trip, to meet students and teachers who benefit from WaterCan’s projects. A crowd gathered at the war memorial in downtown Ottawa on Aug. 19 to remember the 70th anniversary of the Dieppe Raid. Veterans and military officials alike gathered for the 45-minute ceremony, which included speeches from Ottawa-Orléans MP Royal Galipeau and Walt Natynczyk, chief of defence staff. “Today, if the Canadian Forces are respected, it’s because of our veterans, and their service to Canada, because of their extraordinary example, because of their high standards, because they trained us so well,” said Natynczyk. “We march in their footsteps, we sail in their wake, and we fly on their wings.” Special guest Jacques Cing-Mars was also recognized. The 92-year old Dieppe veteran, now in a wheelchair, was the guest of honour, and received a large round of applause as he placed a wreath. September

A bridge over Green’s Creek has been renamed after former Gloucester mayor Harry Allen.

This summer, 256 youth were able to find summer jobs through the Youth Services Bureau of Ottawa’s summer jobs program. The youth services bureau (YSB) ran three days of workshops for the youth, who came from lower-income Ottawa neighbourhoods, to teach resume and interview skills before they applied for jobs with businesses that are members of the program. Shahrazad Hassan, 16, was one of the students placed. From east Ottawa, she was happy to get a job working in retail at Old Navy in Gloucester. “It was amazing, I really liked the experience,” she said. “They prepare you (and) teach you about workplace safety. They helped find a workplace that you would enjoy.” It was the first job for all the youth placed, and the first time they received their own paycheques.

file

Garneau Student council and Grade 7 and 8 student representatives plant a tree in the front of Garneau high school during a celebration for National Tree Day. Allen was joined by his family, friends and former political figures from his time in Gloucester city hall on Aug. 24 for the unveiling of the commemorative plaque and sign. After moving to Beacon Hill and joining the community association,

he became a Gloucester councillor and later mayor. “Those roots start in the parks, they start in the rinks,” said Innes Coun. Rainer Bloess. “Have you held a hose at 2 a.m. in -30 degree weather? He has.”

The bridge is located on St. Joseph Boulevard at the Green’s Creek crossing, close to Blackburn. Allen worked on having the bridge expanded as a part of the St. Joseph Boulevard expansion, so it is a fitting spot to name in honour of

The peak of rush hour came to a halt on Sept. 4 at 5 p.m. when a car fell into a sinkhole on highway 174. Mayor Jim Watson announced the city found a supplier for 18 sections of sewer pipe needed to fix the damage caused by the sinkhole two days later, on Sept. 6. The city had difficulty finding a supplier for the 3.6-metre diameter pipe. See PADDLERS, page 13

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OrlĂŠans EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

11


FOOD

Your Community Newspaper

Duck is a lean, flavourful everyday meat choice EMC lifestyle - Duck isn’t just for special occasions nor is it difficult to prepare, so look for Ontario raised duck in you grocery store and give this great recipe a try. Duck is readily available at butchers and some grocery stores; it is a lean and flavourful meat choice. Quick and easy to cook, it makes weeknight meals or special dinners simple to get on the table. Preparation Time: 10 minutes, one hour marinating time Cooking Time: 20 minutes Servings: two Ingredients

• 125 ml (1/2 cup) sodium reduced chicken broth • 45 ml (3 tbsp) rice wine, mirin or white wine • 45 ml (3 tbsp) sodium reduced soy sauce • 30 ml (2 tbsp) seasoned rice vinegar

• 15 ml (1 tbsp) minced ginger • 2 fresh cloves garlic, minced • 1 fresh duck breast • 30 ml (2 tbsp) canola oil • 750 ml (3 cups) chopped bok choy, rapini or swiss chard • 500 ml (2 cups) chopped Nappa cabbage • 114 g (4 oz) shitake mushrooms, stemmed and sliced • 1 fresh sweet red pepper, thinly sliced Preparation

In shallow dish, whisk together broth, mirin, 30 ml (2 tbsp) of the soy sauce, vinegar and half each of the ginger and garlic. Pour 75 ml (1/3 cup) of the marinade into shallow bowl and reserve remaining marinade. Score duck breast skin crosswise, then lengthwise to form a cross-hatch. Place duck breast in shallow bowl and turn to coat. Cover and refrigerate for at least one hour or up to four

hours. In oven-proof skillet, heat half of the oil over high heat and sear duck breast skin side down until golden brown and crisp. Turn duck breast over and place skillet in 220 C (425 F) oven for about five minutes or until thermometer reaches 155 F (68 C). Set aside. Meanwhile, in large nonstick skillet, heat remaining oil over medium high heat and saute the bok choy, cabbage, mushrooms, pepper and remaining ginger and garlic for two minutes. Add reserved marinade and cook, stirring occasionally for about five minutes or until tender crisp. Whisk together cornstarch and 15 ml (1 tbsp) soy sauce and stir into vegetables. Cook, stirring for one minute or until sauce is thickened. Divide among two plates. Thinly slice duck breast and place over top vegetable mixture to serve. Submitted

Cuts for cancer Diann Lalande, Sylvie Lalande Simard and Linda Eagen, president and CEO of the Ottawa Regional Cancer Foundation at the the annual Cancer Foundation Telethon. Cuts for Cancer at Lalande’s studio raised $10,000 in 2012, achieving an overall goal of $60,000 raised to date. The event has been running for 10 years.

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e r

year in review

Your Community Newspaper

Paddlers head from Ottawa to Washington, D.C. Continued from page 10

“I completely understand the aggravation that people are experiencing as everyday life is disrupted by this failure of infrastructure,” Watson said at a press conference. “We fully understand the need to get this fixed as quickly as humanly possible.” The section of pipe under the eastbound lanes of highway 174 was slated for a $1.5-million renewal and crews were on site for the first time cleaning the pipe hours before the sinkhole formed. Alain Gonthier, the city’s manager of asset management said there is no indication the crew’s work contributed to the pipe’s collapse. The storm sewer pipe under the westbound lanes is newer, dating to about 1975, and is not at risk of a similar collapse, Gonthier said. The pipe that failed was 50 years old. The sinkhole is located on the eastbound Jeanne d’Arc off-ramp off the highway. One car went into the sinkhole, with the only a portion of the rear bumper left above ground. The sole occupant of the car, a 48year-old man, was able to exit the car on his own, and was able to exit the sinkhole with help from bystanders. Cairine Wilson Secondary School is named after the first female Canadian senator. But due to a mix-up before backto-school, the sign at the front of the school instead paid tribute to 1990s Wilson Phillips singer Carnie Wilson.

A group of Ottawa-area paddlers are making the trek of a lifetime, paddling in a canoe from Ottawa’s Victoria Island to the capital of the U.S.A., Washington, D.C. as a part of the Capital to Capitol by Canoe trip. Covering about 50 kilometres a day, the group will paddle on rivers, lakes, canals, harbours and bays, They’ll cover the St. Lawrence Seaway, Lake Champlain, the Hudson River and Chesapeake Bay, and anticipate arriving in Washington in six weeks. It’s a diverse and varied group that ranges from Westboro canoe adventurer Max Finkelstein and his 13-year-old son Isaac, to American paddlers meeting with the crew along the way. Some of the paddlers have been friends for years, while others are just getting to know each other now as teammates. Their reasons for taking the trip are as diverse as the crew, but they primarily focus on respect for water as a resource and the protection of the waterways and history surrounding

them. “What brought us together is, despite our backgrounds, we all recognize water as the most valuable

resource,” said paddler Nicholas Tilgner, who has worked as a guide on the Yukon River.

See TERRY, page 16

connections H S I L

Watch for your

Connections brochure

Winter - Spring 2013

outlining the Ottawa Catholic School Board’s continuing education program with this week’s EMC Community Newspaper*

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file

Beacon Hill resident Norm Radford, pictured during his first night of camping at Petrie Island, was set to paddle from Ottawa to Washington, D.C. as a part of the Capital to Capitol project.

Eric Czapnik was a determined man, shifting career paths at age 48 to achieve his goal of becoming a police officer. So having a street named Eric Czapnik Way is fitting, said his son, Lukasz Galazk. “I know my father’s watching right now and probably has the biggest smile on his face, because he always liked things to go his way,” Galazk said. “And now he can – he got Czapnik’s Way.” The street adjacent to the Orléans community police station off St. Joseph Boulevard, running between the station and the Quality Inn, was officially renamed Eric Czapnik Way on Sept. 13.

www.winterconnections.com

G N E

nment

In an effort to help drought-stricken farmers, city council has extended property tax deadlines until next spring. The extension applies to farmers who participate in the city’s Farm Grant Program and allows farmers to pay their taxes by April 25, 2013 instead of December 6, 2012. The interim property tax due date has also been extended to April 25, 2013. Farm Grant Program participants will also get a grant to cover any penalties and fees they would have been hit with starting at the original tax due date. Mayor Jim Watson told city council that he was very pleased the city has found a way to assist farmers who are facing “extraordinary circumstances.”

The school isn’t being renamed after the pop singer and it was just a humorous misstep, said trustee John Shea. Shea spent several years lobbying to have the previous sign updated; it was installed in 1975. When the new sign went up on Aug. 31, it only took a day for the emails and calls to start coming in. “What can you think but just laugh?” Shea said. “It was hilarious; it was obviously an honest mistake.”

*in designated areas.

Mark D. Mullan Chairperson

Mark D. Mullan Chairperson

Julian Hanlon Director of Education

Julian Hanlon Director of Education R0011836130/0103

Orléans EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

13


opinion

Your Community Newspaper

Gathering ice blocks always sent chills MARY COOK F and flat-bottom sleigh along with the tools he needed for cutting out the ice. I was filled with both dread and admiration. I lived in fear that Father would slip into one of the holes from which he had taken a block of ice and be lost forever. At the same time, I marveled at how this single day would provide us with ice for the rest of the winter and, if we were lucky, until this same exercise was repeated the next year. If I was with him, I figured I could look after him and make sure he was safe. What I could do, I had no idea. But just being with him, I knew would keep him safe. I was bundled up like a mummy and Father wore a second pair of bib overalls over his winter clothes. His big cowhide mitts covered two pairs of wool mitts, a fur hat with the ear lugs down was tied securely under his chin, his pipe, as always

hung loosely from his mouth and we were ready for the trip across the back field, down the other side of the west hill to the Bonnechere. The ice on the river cracked and snapped under the sleigh. I fervently prayed the horses, sleigh and Father and I wouldn’t end up on the bottom of the river. We came to the very centre of the Bonnechere and the long process began. Father, using the auger, burrowed four holes, forming a square into the ice. Then, with the needle-nosed saw, he cut a swath from one hole to the other three. This was when I was filled with dread, because I knew what was coming. Once the square was freed, the block instantly flew from the water, sometimes rising above the very ice we stood on, splashing great gushes of water all around. Most of it landed right on Father. Now the block was ready to be hauled out and put on

14 Orléans EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

the sleigh. This step was repeated until the sleigh was covered with blocks and they were piled three deep. Here, I took on a new fear. What if the sleigh was so weighed down that the horses, the sleigh, the cut blocks of ice, and myself went to the bottom of the Bonnechere? By the time the last block was heaved onto the top row of ice, Father’s overalls were

Bonnechere. Father’s work, however, was far from over. Once back at the ice house, he had to unload the blocks one at a time, each probably weighing 45 kilograms, and place them in rows inside. Father could hardly walk upright with the weight of his frozen overalls, but he was not ready to change into dryer clothes yet. The horses had to be put in the barn, fed and bedded.

As soon as we were on firm ground, I said my silent prayer of thanks that we had been saved from a freezing death in the bottom of the Bonnechere. Father’s work, however, was far from over. Once back at the ice house, he had to unload the blocks one at a time, each probably weighing 45 kilograms, and place them in rows inside. slick with frozen water. It was all he could do to climb onto the front of the sleigh and head the horses back to the ice house. As soon as we were on firm ground, I said my silent prayer of thanks that we had been saved from a freezing death in the bottom of the

Only then did he head for the house and the warmth of the kitchen. Mother had to strip him of the frozen outer layer and the overalls were draped over the wood-box to melt and dry. The brothers would be pressed into service on Sat-

urday, as they headed to the sawmill to bring back load after load of sawdust and cover the blocks in the ice house. The sawdust was free, the owner of the mill glad to be rid of it. So for another winter, and hopefully well over the summer, we would have ice for the ice box in the kitchen of that old log house. We considered ourselves very privileged indeed to have the big oak Barnett bought by grandfather who couldn’t understand how anyone could survive without an ice box. After that day on the Bonnechere, and after his supper, Father, completely spent of every ounce of energy, would go to his usual spot in the kitchen. He would settle into the rocking chair in front of the Findlay Oval, lift his stockinged feet onto a cushion on the oven door and promptly fall asleep. The Ottawa Farm Journal or the Family Herald and Weekly Star would have gradually slipped from his gnarled hands. I would watch his gentle breathing and I would be filled with such caring. Again I would say my prayers of grateful thanks that Father had survived another day of bringing in the ice from the Bonnechere.

R0011835378_0103

Mary Cook’s Memories

0103.R0011837197

or reasons which escape me today, I was always home from school on the day Father went to the Bonnechere to bring ice in for the ice house. I think now, it was because Mother knew how very anxious I was when Father went to the river and in my childish mind I was sure I could save him from any disaster if I too was on the Bonnechere. Father had been watching the river for weeks and then one day he went down with the auger and burrowed a hole to see how thick the ice was in the very centre of the river, where the water was the deepest. It was ready. It was time to bring in the blocks of ice for the ice house. Through necessity, the ice house was always built on the north side of the barn. This protected it from the sun. It was a small, black building, not much bigger than the smoke house, with no windows, only a narrow door just wide enough to allow one body inside with the big iron ice-tongs. Now the day had arrived when Father would go to the river with the team of horses


R0011840417

Your Community Newspaper

OrlĂŠans EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

15


year in review

Save Energy and Money in 2013

Your Community Newspaper

Terry Fox runners hit the road

Make a new year’s resolution to use electricity wisely and save on your energy bills. Here are some simple yet helpful tips to conserve energy.

Continued from page 13 Czapnik, who worked from the Orléans station, was fatally stabbed while on duty outside the Civic hospital in the early morning of Dec. 29, 2009. Some Terry Fox Run participants did a short walk, others five kilometres, and some finished with 10 kilometres under their belt during the Sept. 16 run in Orléans. But for several participants, like Nelson Waddell and Chris Goneau, there is no finish line in the near future when it comes to their involvement. For Goneau, who is the chairperson of the Orléans run, it’s a special day to remember his daughter, Valérie, who passed away from bone cancer two years ago. A Beatrice Desloges graduate, she was in her second year of school at the University of Ottawa when she died.

Get rid of that old, energy-guzzling fridge and save up to $125 a year in electricity costs. If your fridge is 20 years or older, you may qualify for free removal and disposal. For details, visit www.hydroottawa.com/fridge.

If your furnace or air conditioner is getting old, get up to $650 in incentives when you replace eligible central heating and cooling systems with an energy-efficient model. Check out www.hydroottawa.com/rebate for details.

Cumberland’s Sonshine Auto Parts was recognized for donating about 12,000 cars over the years to the Ottawa fire department on Sept. 17. The cars – as well as space at the large property in Cumberland – have been donated to the firefighters so they can practise their extrication skills. Extrication involves safely removing the parts of a car following an accident or crash, to treat and remove any passengers. Because there are so many models of vehicles on the road with different compositions, body types and internal systems, firefighters need to fine tune their skills on a variety of cars.

Reduce your heating costs by up to 10 percent when you set your programmable thermostat to 20°C (68°F) when you are at home, and 18°C (64°F) when sleeping or away.

“The cost in terms of both dollars and quality of life was very real,” Watson said. The money will be needed to repair and upgrade Ottawa’s $30 billion in roads, water, transit, recreation and cultural infrastructure. None of the infrastructure is unsafe right now, but transportation infrastructure, such as roads, has the highest percentage in really poor shape, with 25 per cent of the city’s $11.2 billion in transportation infrastructure rated in poor to very poor condition. Transit infrastructure is in the best shape, with $1.4 billion of assets rated 79 per cent in good to very good condition.

The city’s first-ever indepth report on its infrastructure reveals that Ottawa needs to boost repair spending from $80 million to $165 million a year by 2022. Just days after spending $4.9 million to repair a sinkhole on highway 174 caused by a collapsed culvert, the report revealed the city isn’t spending enough to stay on top of repairing its roads, underground pipes and bridges. The report was particularly important in the context of a recent significant failure of a key piece of city infrastructure: the highway 174 sinkhole.

The peaksaver PLUS program offers participants with central air conditioning a free professionally-installed programmable thermostat. Visit www.peaksaverplus.net for details. Create a “charging centre” using a power bar with a timer to charge electronics such as cell phones and MP3 players at night. Set the timer to turn off during the day.

October

Shenkman Arts Centre artists, organizations and resident partners have received over $65,000 in ARTicipate grants for the 2012-13 year. The grants, which totalled $66,405 between 13 groups, are in their third year.

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File

Anna Korutowska is greeted by police Chief Charles Bordeleau upon arrival at the Orléans community police station on Sept. 13. A street next to the station was renamed for her late husband, Eric Czapnik. The money comes from the ARTicipate Endowment Fund, which is run by the AOE Arts Council. “The recipients are all talented artists and arts organizations who are passionate about their projects,”AOE Arts Council president said Heather Jamieson in a press release. “The funding is a direct way to foster artistic innovation and spark creativity by encouraging groups and artists to make the most of the (Shenkman’s) professional spaces.” Cristiane Doherty, communications staff for the council, said groups have to meet specific criteria to be eligible for the grants. A jury then evaluates the applications and decides how much grant money to give to each group. Chapel Hill resident Rick Mofina turned a real-life panic into his next crime novel. Mofina recalls losing his family while on vacation at the Halifax waterfront. “I looked all over and I couldn’t find them for about 20 minutes,” he said. “But I thought, ‘What if I didn’t find them?’ That’s when the seed was planted. What if it was a family in New York City, Times Square.” In the 14th book by the former crime journalist, a mechanic named Jeff Griffin takes his wife and son to New York City. “Battling his anguish and police suspicions, Jeff fights to rescue Sarah and Cole. He knows now that the love he and Sarah have is worth saving,” said Mofina’s summary of the plot. “But he could lose the chance to tell her amid growing fears that they have

become entangled in an unfolding plot that could have global consequences.” The book was released on Sept. 25, and is available in most bookstores, as well as an e-version. Barbara Ann Scott King died on Sept. 30 at the age of 84, but her memory won’t fade from the city where she grew up. Canada’s sweetheart was a Sandy Hill native who trained at the Minto Skating Club and twirled on Dow’s Lake during Ottawa winters, and later achieved unmatched success. She is the only person to ever hold the European, North American, Canadian and World championship titles and the Olympic gold simultaneously. In the first Olympics after the Second World War in 1948, the then-teenager won the gold medal and quickly solidified her name as a Canadian sporting icon. She trained at Minto Skating Club, representing the same club as many Ottawa championship skaters. Don Jackson skated with several of the same coaches as Scott King, and went on to become a world champion and Olympic bronze medalist before coaching and taking the executive director role at Minto. A small, yellow airplane ended up in the Ottawa River near Cumberland on Oct. 2. The plane was near flying Barnett Park, next to Quiggley Hill Road in Cumberland when it crashed into the water at around 4 p.m. See HAIR, page 17


year in review

Your Community Newspaper

Hairstylist clips the competition to win award Thanks to an alert fisherman – an off-duty Ottawa police civilian staff member – the 69-year-old male pilot was quickly pulled from the water. The fisherman witnessed the plane crash and immediately steered his boat towards the scene, said Ottawa paramedics. He pulled the pilot, the only occupant of the plane, onto his boat and brought him to shore, where paramedics were able to treat him for injuries.

vincial premier who called Ottawa home. “That was historic for our community to have a premier,” said Ottawa West-Nepean MPP Bob Chiarelli, a close colleague of McGuinty’s. McGuinty asked party president Yasir Naqvi, MPP for Ottawa Centre, to convene a leadership convention at the earliest opportunity. McGuinty said he will remain leader and premier until a new Liberal leader is found and he will remain as the MPP for Ottawa South until the next election – a role he has held for 22 years.

There will never come a time when there is nothing left for hairstylist Isabelle Filion to learn. She’s been styling hair for 25 years, worked for hair companies, taught hairdressing, been a judge in hairstyling competitions and in 1998, was Saskatchewan’s national Contessa Hairdresser of the Year. The Contessa Awards recognize the top stylist in each province, as well as the best stylists nationally in several categories. This year, Filion is a semifinalist in the running for the award for Multicultural Hairstylist of the Year. It’s the seventh time she’s been up for an award, but the first time for multicultural hair. The category, which requires stylists to submit three styles of different textures of hair, is a new one for Filion. “Each year I would like to pick one category and focus on that category,” she said. “When you’re push-

Getting people on bicycles is about convincing them it’s not just something they do – it’s something that’s impossible for them to resist doing. That was the message delivered by keynote speaker Ralph Buehler during the annual general meeting of local bicycle advocacy group, Citizens for Safe Cycling. More than 100 people gathered at Tom Brown Arena in Hintonburg to hear Buehler’s advice, culled from his research as an assistant professor of urban affairs and planning at Virginia Tech University and as the coauthor of an upcoming book called City Cycling. Cycling is on an upward trend in cities all around the world, Buehler said, but a comprehensive approach is needed to keep it that way. Building bicycle lanes alone is not enough, Buehler said. If a city really wants to make strides, it needs to look at things like bike parking, bike-shar-

Continued from page 16

file

Left, Mackenzie Durocher and right, Michael Thompson, present Justin Trudeau with a plaque thanking him for speaking at St. Clare Catholic School on Nov. 1. ing yourself, you’re becoming better at your craft.” It would be easy to drive past the farmers’ fields in Navan and not realize there is a vineyard and winery nestled off Milton Road. But take a quick drive down Perrault Road and the Domaine Perrault Winery can be found right in Navan. The family has been farming in Ottawa’s east-end since 1850, and the current operations have been at the 200 hectare location for 48 years. The Perrault family also owns a dairy farm on site and grows corn and soybeans, but there is a vineyard and

winery on the property. They grow over 20 types of grapes, which go into different types of wine. They also bring in grapes from the Niagara region to create hybrid blends. The use of hybrid wines creates a struggle with the provincial regulator, VQA Ontario, which won’t designate the wine as 100 per cent Ontario grapes. In a surprise move after nine years as premier of Ontario, on Oct. 15 Ottawa South MPP Dalton McGuinty announced he is stepping down as premier. The 57-year-old was the first pro-

ing programs, marketing and events, and broader things like driver education and creating zoning rules that favour compact, mixed-use communities. “Public policies are crucial to making cycling more attractive and to make cycling safer,” Buehler said. Queenswood Heights is one of the oldest communities in Orléans, and residents are making sure that fact doesn’t go unnoticed. The community association had taken on fewer projects in recent years, but with a new executive elected on Oct. 3, president Philippe Andrecheck is looking forward to the year ahead. He’s especially keen to return to a book about the history of Queenswood Heights, being written by Helen Tweddle. Lori Nash, who passed away earlier this year and was known to many as “the queen of Queenswood Heights,” had also been working on the project with Tweddle. The Ottawa police guns and gangs section executed a search warrant in Orléans on Oct. 18. Around 9 p.m., they entered a property in the 6000 block of Notre Dame Street, which runs parallel to St. Joseph Boulevard. Police seized two firearms, a 16gauge sawed-off shotgun and a 12gauge sawed-off shotgun. See BENGALS, page 18

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17


year in review

You’re never too old to play!

Your Community Newspaper

Do you regret not learning to play a musical instrument, being the superstar in a sport or tripping the light fantastic on the dance floor? Live those childhood dreams now. Get an introduction to tap, piano, creative writing and lots more! Remember dodgeball? Play it again in the Adult Gym class. Check out the thousands of courses available in the Fall-Winter Recreation eGuide. There are sports, classes and activities offered for all ages! Active living is easier than you think and City Wide Sports can help you move from bystander to player! Whether you want to learn a new sport or brush up on your skills, our trained leaders offer skill development programs as well as drop-ins and leagues. Whether it’s playing tennis indoors, brushing up on your skating skills, or putting in a basketball team, it’s all happening in safe, nurturing, and fun environments. Girls n’ Women and Sports (GWS) is a special unit of Parks, Recreation, and Culture Services mandated to provide fun, safe, nurturing sport and physical activity opportunities for girls and women in female-only programs. Sisters, mothers and daughters, and friends playing together is what it is all about. Find activities under the Sports section for each age group.

file

An Orléans Bengal player shakes Gov. Gen. David Johnston as the Grey Cup arrives at Rideau Hall on Oct. 21.

In the Fitness and Wellness section of the eGuide, soon-to-be and new moms can find opportunities for keeping active over the winter. Pre and Post Natal classes include indoor cycling, Mambo mamas and boot camps. You can also find Diaper Fit and Pre Natal aquafitness classes in many of our pools. Make friends as you socialize and exchange tips about being a new parent!

Bengals meet the Grey Cup

Play together in Family classes If you are looking for a class in which mothers, daughters, fathers and sons can participate together, the ‘Family’ section has: • Dance (hip hop, bellydancing) • Arts (pottery, handbuilding) • Sports (badminton, basketball) • Martial Arts

Continued from page 17

Winter Classes start soon! Browse online at ottawa.ca/recreation to discover affordable programs to get you out this winter. Visit your favourite facility where knowledgeable and friendly staff will help you discover your next adventure. You can also call 3-1-1 for more details.

They also seized ammunition for the guns and about 4.5 kilograms of marijuana. Two men – a youth and a 25-year-old – were arrested and charged with several offences, including unlicensed possession of a prohibited or restricted weapon, possession of a firearm obtained by crime and possession for trafficking.

R0011838770-0103

It wasn’t the average pregame routine for the Orléans Bengals bantam football team as they, along with the club’s mosquito division team, greeted the Grey Cup at Rideau Hall on Oct. 21. The Grey Cup is in Ottawa as a part of a cross-Canada tour. Dax Johnston, a CFL employee who was filling in for the day as the keeper of the Cup and was decked out in a suit and crisp white gloves, carried the cup up the walkway to CFL alumni, Gov. Gen. David

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Johnston, CFL commissioner Mark Cohon and a swarm of Bengals players. They moved into Rideau Hall as photos of Lord Grey and Lord Stanley – the Grey Cup and Stanley Cup’s namesakes – hung on the walls beside the cup. November

An abandoned school on the old Rockcliffe Armed Forces base went up in flames on Nov. 12. Ottawa firefighters received a call shortly after 3 a.m. that there were flames coming from a building at the former base. Firefighters found the building engulfed in flames. They worked all through the night and the next morning to keep the flames under control. Firefighters pumped water from Montreal Road to the site to fight the fire. The cost of damage to the school has not yet been announced. A development proj-

ect is slotted for the land in coming years. The arson unit was set to investigate the fire because of the large estimated loss. The minute last year’s Parade of Lights was over, groups started thinking about how to design show-stopping floats for this year’s Nov. 24 parade. “They have a look at all the other groups and sit there mesmerized by each other more than anything,” said Bob Rainboth, chairman for Santa’s Parade of Lights. “It creates a rivalry.” Last year’s groups will be out to beat the 2011 grand champion, the Navan Lions Club. Awards were also given out to best band, elementary school, high school and Christmas spirit, among others. Rainboth, a firefighter in Orléans, organizes the parade with the Ottawa Professional Firefighters Association. See VANDALISM, page 22

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insurmountable.

Kids with physical disabilities are just like other kids. Except, they face all kinds of daily challenges like being able to get around. But, you can improve the quality of their lives by giving to Easter Seals Ontario. You’ll be providing financial assistance for essential equipment such as wheelchairs, walkers and ramps as well as vital communication devices. You’ll even help send a kid to a fully accessible Easter Seals camp designed for kids just like them. Help kids with physical disabilities rise above life’s many challenges. Give today!

20

Orléans EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

easterseals.org


news

Your Community Newspaper

CAA offers tips for safe winter driving EMC news - Driving during the winter months can be challenging, but it doesn’t have to be. CAA is reminding drivers to check the forecast before heading out, dress for the weather and leave early to get to their destination safely. “Remember to remove all the snow and ice from your vehicle so you can see and others can see you,” said Silvana Aceto of CAA. “Be sure to slow down in the snow, leave extra space between

Keep the following in your trunk: • Shovel. • Windshield washer fluid.

Keep the following inside your vehicle: • Ice scraper and snow brush. • Blankets. • Flashlight and batteries. • First aid kit. • Smart phone and charger.

spring. For contest details, visit www.BiblioOttawaLibrary. ca/AwesomeAuthors or contact InfoService at 613-580-2950 or InfoService@BiblioOttawaLibrary.ca. This contest is sponsored by the Friends of the Ottawa Public Library Association, which publish pot-pourri, an anthology of the winning poems and stories. Visit www.OttawaPublicLibraryFriends.ca to order it.

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EMC news - The Ottawa Public Library’s 18th annual Awesome Authors youth writing contest is underway. This contest, for aspiring young poets and short story authors, is open to writers between the ages of nine and 17. They are invited to submit poems and short stories in English and/or French. The deadline is Feb. 11. Participants can win prizes which will be presented in the

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• Booster cables. • Extra clothing and footwear. • Bottled water. • Granola or energy bars.

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CALL SHARON AT 613-688-1483 or email srussell@thenewsemc.ca Fax: 613-723-1862 CALL KEVIN at 613-688-1472 or kevin.cameron@metroland.com Read us online at www.emconline.ca

Orléans EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

21


year in review

Your Community Newspaper

Vandalism at legion fixed before Nov. 11 Now in its 15th year, the three-kilometre parade through Orléans attracts huge crowds, making it a family tradition for many. Families come from all over the city and surrounding towns to see the giant parade, Rainboth said.

to Mont Blanc, Mont SaintSauveur, Mont Ste-Marie and Mont Tremblant, leave at 6 a.m. from the Ray Friel Recreation Complex and return at 6 p.m. “They show up at the bus with eyes half open,” said club president Ed Geier. The evening trips load at 2:30 p.m. and return at 10 p.m.

Every winter in Orléans, parents have a chance to give their teenagers the answer the kids want when they ask mom or dad to take them snowboarding, yet again. There are no ski hills in the Ottawa area accessible by public transit, so getting chauffeured to and from the slopes is often the only option for teens. The Orléans Teen Ski Club has been providing a solution for more than 30 years, busing teens to hills in the Laurentian mountains and Outaouais region. Parent volunteers organize the trips, limited to teens aged 13 to 17 years old. The teens and parent volunteers travel to nearby ski hills like Camp Fortune and the more distant Mont Tremblant. The eight-week season runs through January and February, alternating local evening night skiing trips with longer day trips. The day trips, which go

No one had to look at the memorial at the Orléans branch of the Royal Canadian Legion on Remembrance Day and worry about an outstanding bill. The memorial, called the Remembrance of Grieving Comrades, was vandalized this summer and fixed thanks in part to donations and fundraisers. The Thursday before Remembrance Day, OttawaOrléans MP Royal Galipeau was at the legion to announce a contribution of up to $1,050 to finish paying for the repairs to the monument. The repairs cost the legion $2,100, a surprise expense that they didn’t expect to have to pay this year. The federal funds came from the Ministry of Veteran Affairs, which has a cenotaph/monument restoration program. It includes a soon-to-be-introduced initiative called Cutting Red Tape, which can fasttrack applications, such as the

called at 3:30 p.m. to take him to hospital, where he is listed in serious condition.

file

The Brothers Dubé play for crowds on a train-based stage during a 2011 show on the CP Rail’s Holiday Train. The three brothers were invited back for double the shows to play on the 2012 holiday tour. one from Orléans,. “(It) is to fast-track applications for funding to assist in repairing of damage made to cenotaphs and monuments from shameful acts of vandalism,” said Veterans Affairs Minister Steven Blaney in a

Thanks

attended. “Since it’s not going through a community, it’s not a big concern,” said Beacon HillCyrville Coun. Tim Tierney. The proposed route runs along Innes Road from St. Laurent Boulevard to Blair Road. The alternative proposed route runs along Cyrville Road, from St. Laurent Boulevard and then from Innes to Blair. The pipe will be an upgrade to the existing pipeline. The part of the line being replaced is sandwiched between two larger pipes. A man was taken to the hospital on Nov. 15 after a 225-kilogram piece of equipment fell on him. The accident, which occurred at 1485 St. Laurent Blvd., saw a metal girder fall on the 48-year-old man. Three workers were carrying scaffolding when it dropped, falling onto the shoulders of the injured man. The injured man is a temporary worker for the Labour Group, and he had been working on the site for three days. Police and paramedics were

If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. That’s the message that seniors at a Rotary Club fraud prevention presentation heard at the Orléans branch of the Ottawa Public Library on Nov. 14. See FUTURE, page 23

105.3 KISS FM 1310 News CHEZ 106 Y101 Cache Consulting National Arts Centre Orchestra Players’ Association • FanFair Concert Sonja Adcock • 52@52

225 Donald St., Unit 134, Ottawa, ON K1K 1N1 Phone 613-746-5143 | Fax 613-741-1647 | www.snowsuitfund.com 22 Orléans EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

The Orléans’ Montana’s Cookhouse on Innes Road had an early morning kitchen fire on Nov. 11. Ottawa firefighters responded to calls around 5:45 a.m. and had the fire under control shortly after at 6 a.m. They had to force entry into the building, which had smoke visible on two sides. No one was inside the building at the time of the fire. The fire started in the kitchen’s deep fryer, which suffered damage. There was also moderate smoke damage in the kitchen, and light smoke damage in the dining room. Damages were estimated at $40,000. Enbridge Gas held a consultation at the end of October for a proposed pipeline replacement project. The open house, held at Pope John Paul II Catholic School on Oct. 25 was poorly-

Warmest

The Snowsuit Fund and the thousands of children it serves thank the following organizations for their major contributions to the Fund in the 2012/2013 campaign.

press release. Galipeau, who presented the funds on behalf of Blaney, said he was personally offended by the vandalism.

It was a love of horses that first had Elizabeth Sellers putting words on paper. But the main character quickly took over and Sellers decided to turn Katy’s story into a short series of novels. In her novels, a teenage girl named Katy is bullied – and wakes up one day having turned into a horse. “The premise is a young girl who is lonely and bullied,” Sellers said. “And she gets turned into a horse and she meets up with a gang of her friends. They don’t realize who she is; they sort out all sorts of adventures.” The first book in the series is called If Horses Were Wishes, and the second installment, Trouble Rides a Fast Horse, the second book, comes out Nov. 22. Sellers said as she started to write the book, Katy took over with her own bullying story to tell. “I think that Katy’s message is that you’re not alone and there are people out there who can help you,” Sellers said. She first wrote the original novel five years ago, but it took several years to be released. Currently a court reporter, she lived in the United Kingdom for years after graduation, working with horses, then running her own business. She always loved writing – but had little time for it between work and raising children. “I never found time to write until a few years back, and then I thought, I’m going to sit down, and do it,” she said. “My only intention was to finish writing a book. But I figured I might as well go for it, and find a publisher.”

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Continued from page 18


year in review

Your Community Newspaper

Future home values questioned by MPP The man was charged with robbery, aggravated assault, assault with a weapon, possession of a weapon and breach of undertaking.

Continued from page 22

The ABCs of Fraud presentation, which is endorsed by Ottawa police, has been going to different library branches this fall to educate seniors. West Ottawa Rotary Club members Bob Harrison and Linas Pilypaitis spoke to a group of seniors at the Orléans branch. Seniors are more vulnerable to fraud due of several factors, and are often seen as more susceptible, Harrison said. “When I grew up, I was trusting someone with a handshake,” he said. “The doors in my house were never locked.” These days, scams are a dime a dozen and it’s important that people – especially those more vulnerable to scams – take steps to protect themselves. New guidelines meant to standardize garbage and recycling bin requirements for multi-residential buildings left councillors with a slew of questions at a recent planning committee meeting. The design guidelines are aimed at preventing problems before they happen, said Melanie Knight, a planning staffer who worked on the guidelines. The document says property owners are responsible for constructing “proper and safe waste handling systems” for their buildings, and that the facilities must include room for garbage bins as well as recycling for blue-, black- and green-bin materi-

Students at Sir Wilfrid Laurier Secondary School kept with tradition this year, running their annual toy mountain drive to collect Christmas toys for area childen.

Ottawa-Orléans MPP Phil McNeely said that Orléans homeowners can expect to see home values drop 10 to 15 per cent if more jobs don’t come to the east end at a Nov. 22 community association meeting. “I think it’s going to hurt us,” he said “Our communities are not going to survive unless they do something different. If you’re going to lose $50,000 on your home, you should get excited about it.” McNeely said the recent incentives announced by city council to bring jobs to Orléans is a step in the right direction, but it won’t be enough. “They’ve given us a bone with the tax rebate, and that will give us some jobs. But that will be a small number compared to the number moving out,” he said. “These are low-paying jobs that will come to Orléans.” He said that downtown jobs are Orléans jobs because they are a short enough commute to keep families living in the community.

another type of recycling bin. The guidelines aim to fix that. “Residents must have convenient access to facilitate their participation in the recycling and organics programs,” the document states.

Technical glitches aren’t the only issue plaguing OC Transpo’s Presto card system. With so many changes and new procedures resulting from bugs in the system, operators are having trouble keeping up.

file

als. Currently, there are no guidelines and the city doesn’t offer organics recycling for all multi-residential buildings. While a handful of apartments are part of a pilot project for green bin collection, many buildings don’t have the capacity to include

December

Pet Adoptions

An 18-year-old man was arrested after another 18-year-old was stabbed on Nov. 26 at the Convent Glen Plaza. The man was robbed and stabbed shortly after midnight. He was taken to hospital with several stab wounds, but non-life threatening injuries.

See INQUEST, page 24

PET OF THE WEEK

Britany

LOLO

ID#A150010

ID#A151616 Lolo is a 7 month old, white female Dutch rabbit. She was surrendered to our shelter by her owner on November 28, but is now available for adoption. This sweet natured girl would make a perfect pet for a family with children! Rabbits are intelligent and social animals that make affectionate and rewarding family pets as long as their needs are met. Plenty of human attention, daily exercise and play, nutritious food and hay are all important elements of proper rabbit care. Given the appropriate care, rabbits can live up to ten years, so the decision to adopt a rabbit must not be taken lightly.

Britany is a one year-old black and white spayed female domestic shorthair cat who loves to greet everyone she meets! She was brought to our shelter as a stray on October 15 but is now available for adoption. This lovely lady is full of cuddles and purrs and would make a great addition to your family! Britany is currently at one of our Pet Adoption Locations (PAL). If you are interested in adopting Britany, make sure to swing by Petsmart in Orleans!

For more information about these or other animals available for adoption, please call the adoption Centre at 613-725-3166 ext. 258 or visit www. ottawahumane.ca.

So now you have a dog! • • • • • • • • •

Housetrained and lets you know when he needs to go outside Begins to walk on a leash without pulling Sits quietly Sits and stays with limited distractions for a short period of time Greets people calmly and does not jump Chew her toys — not furniture, fingers or shoes React calmly to different people, children, sounds and other dogs Types of training at this stage: crate training, house training, puppy class Games to try at this stage: hide and seek, ball chase and retrieve Puppies need quiet time. Too much stimulation teaches them that being hyper and nervous is acceptable. 5 months to 1 year • Consistently walks on a leash without pulling • Walks on leash unless you can call him back under all circumstances • Sits quietly under most distraction • Sits and stays under most distraction • Types of training at this stage: continue previous stage training and add manners and obedience — basic and advanced • New games to try at this stage: recall games in the house and yard 1 year and over • Dogs become mature adults between two and three years of age • Between one year and maturity, your dog should be able to walk on a leash and sit and stay quietly under any distraction

R0011833487t

Please note: The Ottawa Humane Society has many other companion animals available for adoption. Featured animals are adopted quickly! To learn more about adopting an animal from the Ottawa Humane Society please contact us: Website: www.ottawahumane.ca Email: Adoptions@ottawahumane.ca Telephone: (613) 725-3166 x258

Walter Hi! My name is Walter. I’m a Boston Terrier, and I’m seven years old. I love to go for walkies, and car rides! When I get a bone, or a new favourite toy, I run around the house crying with excitement. I try to to talk, but it comes out as a lot of silly noises. I only bark when I think there’s danger, or a squirrel is in my yard. I’m great at clearing a room. It’s not my fault, all Boston’s are known for this gift. I cannot howl. My lips get in the way and it comes out as a garble. My Mum thinks this is funny and is trying to get me on video. I like the feel of carpet, so I usually crawl along dragging my belly, or wiggle around on my back. People laugh, but I don’t mind. I like to dance for my supper, or I can do a lot of tricks for a yummy treat. If you ever meet me, I will always greet you with lot’s of kisses! Do you think your pet is cute enough to be “THE PET OF THE WEEK”? Submit a picture and short biography of your pet to find out! Simply email to: cfoster@thenewsemc.ca attention “Pet of the Week”

1227

Owning a dog can be a very rewarding experience and how you train your dog has a big impact on whether your relationship will be one of companionship or frustration. A big mistake people often make when they first bring their dog home is to give him too much freedom. You may think you’re being nice, but in fact, you may be doing more harm than good. Adopting a training program from the beginning is a fun way to get to know your dog and sets the stage for a successful relationship. What is training? Training is a form of communication between a dog and his owner. Since dogs cannot speak, it is up to the owner to learn how to communicate with the dog. All owners can benefit from training classes, even if they have previously owned a dog or trained many in the past; remember that every dog is different. What is your role in training? If you don’t train your dog, he will train himself — and not necessarily in a good way! Your dog will learn from you. By taking an active role in teaching your dog, you will be able to train the dog the way you want. Knowing your dog Similar to children, dogs understand different things at different stages of their development. Below you will find a brief description of the kinds of things you can expect from your dog as she grows. Please note that these are only guidelines. Some dogs progress or mature slower than others. Be prepared to see behaviour change over time. 0–4 months

Time to make a grooming appointment

12-5303 Canotek Rd.(613) 745-5808 WWW.TLC4DOGS.COM Orléans EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

23


Local events and happenings over the coming weeks — free to non-profit organizations Fax: 613-224-3330, E-mail: orleans@metroland.com

Jan. 5

Cumberland Curling Club to host free curling clinic for first-time curlers Have you ever wanted to try curling but have never had an opportunity? Well, now’s your chance from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Participants will be given a brief Curling 101 crash-course on the basics of the game, including rules, etiquette, and strategy. They will then head out onto the ice and have an opportunity to throw some rocks and take part in a match. Space is limited so interested persons must register by sending an email to cccurling.membership@gmail.com or calling George Mota at 613-8342740.

Jan. 5

Give your e-waste an afterlife and help Habitat NCR Help Habitat for Humanity NCR give families a hand up, not a hand out by dropping off your e-waste at our ReStores at 7 Enterprise Ave. or 2370 Walkley Rd. E-waste is also accepted year-round

at both stores. For more information, call 613-612-5443, send an email to myrna@habitatncr.com or go to www.habitatncr.com. All e-waste collected by Habitat NCR is recycled in Ontario by Sims Recycling Solutions through the Ontario Electronic Stewardship Program. Every purchase made at the ReStores and the electronic waste product collected from the OES program supports Habitat NCR as it helps local families achieve the dream of homeownership.

Mondays

The Ottawa Pub Dart League plays from October to April at various venues in the city. If you are interested in joining or venue sponsorship, please visit www.theopdl.ca. Discover the unique thrill of singing four-part harmony with a group of fun-loving women who enjoy making music together. Regular rehearsals on Monday nights from 7 to 9:30 p.m. at Or-

léans United Church, 1111 Orléans Blvd. For information call Muriel Gidley at 613-590-0260 or visit www. bytownbeat.com.

Fridays

Tai Chi at Roy Hobbs Community Centre, 109 Larch Cres. on Tuesdays, except first Tuesday of each month, for beginner/intermediate levels 10:45 a.m. to noon. Fridays for intermediate/advanced levels 10:45 a.m. to noon. Drop in or contact Lorne at 613-8246864 for details.

Five-pin bowling league encourages senior citizens over the age of 50 to participate in an activity that provides regular moderate exercise. There is no registration fee. The league is a fun, non-competitive league; experience is not required. Bowling takes place each Friday afternoon between 1 and 3 p.m. at Walkley Bowling Centre, 2092 Walkley Rd. Participants are placed on mixed four-person teams. To register, please call Roy or Jean Hoban at 613-7316526.

Wednesdays

Ongoing

Tuesdays and Fridays

632 Phoenix Royal Air Cadet Squadron meets every Wednesday evening 6:15 to 9:30 p.m. at St. Joseph school, 6664 Carriere St. Open to youth age 12 to 18. No registration fee to join, however fundraising is required. Visit www.632aircadets.com for more information.

Are you between 13 and 17 years old? Come and join the Orleans Teen Ski Club this winter for some great skiing and snowboarding. The Orleans Teen Skiing Club is a community based non-profit ski club run by volunteers for the benefit of our members. Check us out at www.otsc. ca for membership benefits and outings. Please contact Ed Geier at 613-604-0894 or

Jim Yip at 613-830-6402 for more details. Ottawa Newcomers’ Club invites women new to Ottawa to join activities and meet some new friends. Please check the website at www.ottawanewcomersclub. ca. For more information call 613-860-0548 or ottawanew comers@hotmail.ca. The Gloucester South Seniors’ Chess Club, 4550 Bank St., meets every Monday and Thursday at 7 p.m. Immediate openings. Please contact Robert MacDougal, 613-821-1930 for more information. Girl Guides of Canada offers programs locally for girls from five to 17 years of age. Meetings, camps, leadership and skills are all part of the opportunities provided. Visit www.girlguides.ca. The Active Living Club invites active seniors and adults 50-plus to join us in the outdoor activities of hiking, cycling, canoeing, cross-

country skiing and snowshoeing. All outings start at 10 a.m., at different locations in Ottawa-Gatineau, and range from one-and-a-half to three hours. Call City Wide Sports at 613-580-2854 and press 1 for administration or email cws-psm@ottawa.ca. There is a Mom and Me Playgroup meeting at East Gate Alliance Church. It takes place the second and fourth Wednesdays of the month from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. More information can be found at www.eastgate alliance.ca or by contacting debbie@eastgatealliance.ca or 613-744-0682. Shout Sister Choir is looking for new members. Practices for the Ottawa centre group are Tuesday evenings from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at St. Barnabas Church, 394 Kent St., Ottawa west practices take place on Thursday evenings from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Woodroffe United Church, 207 Woodroffe Ave. More information is online at www. shoutsisterchoir.ca.

year in review

Inquest finds toddler’s death ‘preventable’ Continued from page 23

An overhaul of the drivers’ Presto display screens is set to hit buses at the beginning of January – only a couple of weeks before 10,000 more people are set to get Presto cards – meaning OC Transpo is getting ready to train all of its operators how to use Presto all over again. The cost of the retraining hasn’t been finalized, city spokeswoman Jocelyne Turner wrote in an email, but the tab will be picked up by Metrolinx, the provincially funded agency in charge of Presto. An Orléans grocery store is closer to getting a construction subsidy. The $459,416-grant was given a thumbs up during a Dec. 4 meeting of the city’s finance and economic development committee. The subsidy was approved with no discussion and one vote of dissent from Kanata South Coun. Allan Hubley. Hubley has said he doesn’t support the city’s new tax holiday and grant plans that provide advantages to attract businesses to certain areas of the city over other neighbourhoods. If approved by full city council the “development incentive grant” would go to the Farm Boy store’s landlord, the Place d’Orléans mall. In one heartbeat, Orléans teenagers Abdoulaye Samaké and YannAlexandre Fillion realized their lives were about to change.

Following the address to the jury, Audette said he felt satisfied that he and wife Melanie had been given ample input into the proposed recommendations. He said there should be an emphasis on non-pool water play for children in daycares, such as sprinklers and splash pads.

They both received the news they’d been waiting for: they made the Montreal Impact’s professional soccer academy and would be moving across the provincial border in the new year. “Every day I would go, wait, nothing would come,” said Samaké of the call from the team. When the deadline came, he thought he didn’t make it – until his parents took him out for dinner and told him the news. Two OC Transpo buses had windows damaged on the evening of Dec. 6 while driving in Orléans. Const. Marc Soucy of the Ottawa police said the first incident happened around 8 p.m. near Charlemange Boulevard. Two windows were shot out of the bus as it drove. About an hour and a half later at about 9:30 p.m., a second bus at Jeanne d’Arc Boulevard and Mockingbird Drive had a window damaged. Police said the incidents involved pellet guns, and that no one was injured in either incident. Jérémie Audette’s death could have been prevented. Following a coroner’s inquest, a five-person jury made 16 recommendations to prevent future accidents. Jérémie drowned in 2010 in a pool at an unlicensed daycare facility in Orléans. On Dec. 4, Vivian Lee Stewart, Crown counsel, gave the jury a long

24 Orléans EMC - Thursday, January 3, 2013

file

The Grey Mayors, a group of former area mayors that served prior to amalgamation, along with Beacon Hill-Cyrville Coun. Tim Tierney, perform a variety of Christmas carols at the Beacon Heights Retirement Residence on Dec. 13. list of recommendations to consider, put together with input from the Audette family. The Crown suggested a review of the Day Nurseries Act, which governs many aspects of daycares and home-based childcare to include rules surrounding registration and water play. It also gave suggestions for municipalities regarding pool enclosures, and for realtors to provide information on pool safety. The jury was then given time to deliberate, after hearing from a

number of witnesses from the day of Jérémie’s death and experts from a variety of fields. “It wasn’t easy to relive Jérémie’s tragedy,” said his father, Alain Audette, in a Dec. 4 address to the jury. “Jérémie’s life was taken too soon, which is why the Audette family will stay involved (in promoting safety). We hope that Jérémie’s inquest will serve as a valuable life lesson to the public on daycare and water safety.” He said the family hoped “achievable and realistic recommendations would be implemented.”

The city’s second Sensplex arena is officially coming to Beacon Hill. On Dec. 4, the city’s finance committee endorsed a deal with Ottawa Community Ice Partners to replace the aging Potvin Arena in Shefford Park with a new Sensplex, similar to the one the company operates in Kanata. Coun. Tim Tierney, who expressed his desire for a Senplex-like facility when the city issued its request in April, said he couldn’t be happier. “I’m very happy it’s the Sens organization. It’s great news,” Tierney said. “Obviously they have a great track record in the west end of the city.” “Obviously they have name recognition and they have done this before. They know how to operate a facility,” Tierney said. The existing Potvin Arena is a single-pad facility that was built in 1975 and renovated in 1995 and 2007. The arena is situated in the 11-hectare Shefford Park, which includes four soccer fields, three mini fields, three football fields, a beach volleyball area and parking lots.


ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23

TAURUS - Apr 21/May 21

SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21

SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22

PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20

Aries, there are some things that need to be accomplished this week despite the your reservations. Find a way to make the best of the situation. Taurus, enjoy an active week ahead that includes a very busy social schedule. Instead of trying to swim against the tide, let it take you along. Take care of things on your own this week, Gemini. Others around you will be just as busy, so put your head down and get started on the many tasks at hand. Sarcasm is not the right approach this week, Cancer. Focus on being amiable to all of the people you interact with the next few days and reap the rewards. Secrets have a funny way of catching up with you, Leo. Although it can be hard to be honest, upcoming situations will work out much more easily if you are. You have no reason to question your confidence this week, Virgo. Give yourself a pep talk to make it through a sticky situation, and things will turn out alright.

33. Before 34. Fixed in one’s purpose 39. Madames 40. Frosts 41. City drains 42. Baseball playoff 43. Cruise 47. Steeple 50. Precipitation 51. Cas____: winter melons 52. A unit of two 53. Viewed 54. Taxis 55. 4840 square yards 56. London radio station 58. Perform work regularly 60. Longest geological time

Last week’s answers

You are coasting on a high of good fortune, Libra. Don’t worry, it isn’t going to slow down anytime soon. Enjoy all of the opportunities that come your way. It takes more than just good ideas to find success, Scorpio. There is also a lot of follow-through and legwork that goes into every scenario. Start working through the particulars. You won’t be able to rest until you solve a problem that has been bugging you, Sagittarius. But the solution won’t immediately present itself. Sometimes it takes more time and money than it’s worth to follow through with something that originally seemed like a good idea. Don’t think of it as giving up but redirecting. It may take a little more time to work through the long todo list, but that will make the satisfaction of getting the job done that much more worth it, Aquarius. Words can be interpreted in many different ways, Pisces. Choose what you say wisely so you don’t give anyone the wrong impression.

51

eS C n a CH I N! W o T

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