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NEWS S PENTICTON WESTERN

Craft show features holiday magic

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Penticton Indian Band school earns international recognition

ISSUE 89

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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2011

entertainment Penticton artist joins select enter list for Art in the Park

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sports t Hosting the Continental Cup will put Penticton in big spotlight

HOCKEY DORM NETS APPROVAL Simone Blais

Western News Staff

Mark Brett/Western News

WORLD OF ENTERTAINMENT — Sheila Mohamed performs one of her dances during the Axe Capoeira show at the Cleland Theatre Sunday as part of the ongoing Children’s Showcase series. Capoeira is a Brazilian art form that includes martial arts and music. The next Children’s Showcase event is Jan. 15 when Buzz Brass comes to the Cleland.

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Score one for developers of the hockey school dormitory proposal. Penticton council approved second and third readings of the rezoning and supported the development permit application to build a seven-storey building featuring a dorm to service the Okanagan Hockey School and other commercial entities, despite an hour-long public hearing that saw residents air concerns about the transaction. Robert Wasalasko said pile-driving construction at the South Okanagan Events Centre site caused concrete pads to break on his property — and that was on the other side of Alberni Street, let alone across his back lane. “I don’t know if the property development is going to cause any more issues with my house,” he said. Nick Bevanda, a principal with CEI Architecture, said the proponent wanted to clarify a few issues about the project. The dormitory would provide short- and long-term housing accommodations to approximately 150 students of the hockey academy and approximately 50 adults including family members and staff. “We are sympathetic to the neighbours,” he said, noting construction will not include pile driving. They sited the project as close to Eckhardt as possible to buffer neighbours, Bevanda said, and allowed for additional access to the sides of the lot in the lane running behind the lots from to Comox Street to Alberni to mitigate traf¿c. The Ministry of Transportation disallows access from Eckhardt due to the highway designation, he added. “The exit to your building is right in my building. Everything is going to be in my alley. I’m not opposed to this thing, but a sevenstorey building?” Jill Enslow, a Creston Avenue resident, said during the public hearing. “Three or four I could probably live with, but this way

I’ll have no sun, no privacy, no mountain view in my backyard.” Enslow also asked for the architect’s contact information in case construction impacts the structural integrity of her home. “We all have cracks in our walls after the events centre,” she said. John Race said he was more concerned about the sale price of the lots from 903 to 969 Eckhardt Ave. West. He lives only a few doors down from the proposed dorm, and his most recent B.C. Assessment notice came in at $283,000 for the land alone — when the city sold the nine parcels for $925,000, or just over $100,000 each. “My concern is the value of my property is going to go down as a result. That’s my land as long as you don’t want it,” he said. “Will my property hold value if you’re giving it away down the street?” Mayor Dan Ashton tried to assure Race there are no redevelopment plans for remaining lots. “The city has no plans for further acquisitions,” he said, adding that if the private owners of the four Echhardt lots want to redevelop, it would go through the regular channels. “We don’t have any plans for that whatsoever.” City development services director Anthony Haddad explained the values as having been reduced partially because the homes on site were demolished and then the parcels were trimmed by 20 per cent to allow additional highway space. One parcel to the east is unsalable because it was carved up signi¿cantly by the right-hand turn allowance on Alberni. Once a 15 to 20 per cent drop in market value is factored in, Haddad said, “you can see the considerable drop in value.” As they debated the development permit application, Coun. Andrew Jakubeit spoke in favour of the project as an economic generator for Penticton. He estimated the $15 million project could mean $30 million in economic activity.

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Penticton Western News Wednesday, November 9, 2011

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New school brings boost to enrolment Steve Kidd Western News Staff

Though the students at Outma Sqilx’w Cultural School may not realize it, they and their school building are getting recognition across the country. They’re probably more interested in things like getting their homework done, playing on the new playground equipment or working in the school’s cultural centre. Or maybe just enjoying the spectacular panoramic view from the school, situated high on a bluff overlooking the valley. “The children probably feel like they are on top of the world. And they deserve to be,” said Penticton Indian Band Chief Jonathan Kruger. At the same time as the kids are busy with their work and play, they are also seeing high enrolment levels at a time when schools in other areas of the country are reporting high rates of absenteeism among First Nations students. Michele Woitzik, the school administrator, said they are also seeing solid community involvement from family members and others. “That’s where we’ve seen a big increase in attendance,” she said. “There is a great sense of belonging.” Kruger said it is probably a combination of factors that contribute to their success, including the worldclass building the school is now housed in. Even before its doors were open, the Outma Sqilx’w school was earning acclaim, like making the top 20 shortlist for best designed schools in the world at the 2010 World Architecture News competition. And

Kristi Patton/Western News

CHIEF JONATHAN KRUGER has a lunchtime chat with Sisuse Wilson who is in Junior Kindergarten at Outma Sqilx’w Cultural School on the Penticton Indian Reserve.

earlier this month, word came that the school had been given a Best of Canada award by Canadian Interiors magazine and will be featured in their November 2011 issue. It’s a beautiful building and a great atmosphere to be in, according to Kruger. “I’m sure that our children are pretty stoked to go to school and are proud to be in a good place,” he said. “You’ve got a beautiful huge gymnasium that they can play in; the playground equipment is state of the

art; and there is the cultural room that promotes pride.” Peter Hildebrand of Iredale Group Architecture wanted to ensure the school was contemporary and reÀective of the Penticton Indian Band’s culture. “The design brief required that the building grow from the landscape and so the colour palette and soft curvaceous forms mimic the textures of the nearby rolling hillsides,” he said. “The design culminates in a dramatic atrium, dedicated to teaching the

Okanagan People’s language history and art.” Kruger describes the atrium, the cultural heart of the school, as resembling a futuristic version of the traditional pit house. It is a focus for cultural elements of the classes. “I believe that our cultural program and our curriculum was always outstanding. But it is de¿nitely enhanced, I am sure, because of the cultural room,” said Kruger. “They are drying sage in there and Indian tea. They are really working with the

tools they have in there.” Up until last year, the Outma Sqilx’w school was housed in a series of portables, as the band worked on the dream of creating a real home for their school. After 20 years of work, that dream was realized this September, when the ¿rst classes of students entered the new building. The goal of the design was to create a contemporary space that captivated students using current technologies as well as creating curiosity and pride in their culture. Outma incorporates many technologies for both learning and sustainability, including smart boards in the classrooms, video conferencing, WiFi, a low-energy geothermal system for heating and cooling and ample natural lighting to run the school without arti¿cial means during the day. “We wanted our community to have the best school for our children. It happened to be the best designed school in Canada, in the top 20 in the world,” said Kruger. “That’s really something to be very proud of. And especially being honoured a few days ago for our power-sense and energy ef¿ciency.” Education and promoting cultural values has been a priority for both chief and council in the past as well as today, but Kruger said that the real drive comes from the community. Though the band’s plans for economic development are proceeding, Kruger said that change is coming on a large scale, involving the whole community and balancing development with social and cultural values. “We are de¿nitely following the community’s direction and very proud to be part of that,” Kruger said.

Ashton believes city has turned the corner Simone Blais Western News Staff

It hasn’t been an easy three years for Dan Ashton, but the incumbent mayor says it’s been necessary. In seeking a second term at the head of the council table, Ashton reÀects a great deal on the past. Between cutting 31 positions at City Hall, the referendum on Penticton’s bid for the correctional facility and the South Okanagan Events Centre operating de¿cit, he’s overseen his fair share of hot-button topics. Although the layoffs were “the hardest thing I’ve ever done,” the businessman says he doesn’t back down from his ¿scal conservative agenda. “I think the light at the end of the tunnel is not a train coming anymore. We are turning a corner,” he said, adding that the net effect is a focus on customer service at City

Hall. “If someone doesn’t like the way I part my hair in business, they have the choice to go elsewhere. But in the city, they don’t have a choice. We’re a sole-source provider. We had to change. Unfortunately that change involved a consolidation.” There’s one statistic that looms over his bid to remain at City Hall: Penticton has not re-elected a mayor in 18 years. Jake Kimberley was successful in seeking a second term in 1993, but all re-election campaigns since have failed. “I have to stand on what we’ve done,” Ashton said, adding he isn’t one to brag about accomplishments. “It will be up to the electorate. Is it a hurdle? It’s a stigma attached to it, but I’m more than prepared to put myself forward again. Myself and council, with everything that we had to work with and the time we had to work with, I think we’ve done a good job. “Some may disagree with how we did it, but I don’t think they would disagree that

something had to be done.” He holds up the pool project as a highlight of the past term and example of his leadership style that gets all players on board to get a project ¿nished on time and within a water-tight budget. “You’ve got to bring consensus into it. That’s the only way,” he said. “It’s through the working relationships that many of us have with senior levels of government that we were able to obtain those grants.” Ashton also sees too much red tape at City Hall for his liking. He recounts a visit to Kelowna with staff earlier this year, when he went to the front counter of the business licence division to ask a hypothetical question: If he were a retailer looking to relocate to downtown Kelowna in a space for C3 zoning that allows retail and requires no changes, how long would it take to obtain a business licence?

See ASHTON - Page 4

Mark Brett/Western News

PENTICTON MAYOR Dan Ashton answers a question during an interview with members of the Penticton Western News editorial board.

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Penticton Western News Wednesday, November 9, 2011

Contest encourages vote Simone Blais

Western News Staff

Doesn’t matter if it’s for the sense of civic duty or the chance to win a new Àat-screen. Either way, the Best Damn Sports Bar just wants you to vote. The Penticton establishment has teamed up with a host of businesses in town to encourage young residents to exercise their democratic rights with a contest called Rock the Vote 2011. All those who cast a ballot on Nov. 19 and bring proof to the bar by 8 p.m. are entered into a draw for prizes. Max Picton, Best Damn’s general manager, said there had been discussion around the bar from some older generations about needing to get younger people out to vote. “A big part of why the youth aren’t voting today is they don’t understand the process. It seems complicated,” he said. “The very ¿rst time you do it, you don’t understand it. Our goal is to make it as simple as possible, so they understand it’s not a complicated process.” He said that they began bandying about possible ideas of how to get young people out, and decided they would help them take care of everything: a shuttle would take voters to the polls and staff would explain the process of voting to all. “The point of the shuttle is so we can say, ‘All you have to do is show up with your ID and we’ll take care of the rest. We’ll show you how to vote,’” Picton said. “We’ll take you down there and make it really easy for you to get involved.” And it could pay off dividends. Best Damn wanted to sweeten the pot for young voters by offering good prizes: a 42-inch high-definition television, IPhone or gift certi¿cates for Freeride Boardshop and the Mule Nightclub. “We wanted a couple of prizes that spoke to the youth, that might actually be enough incentive for them to go and vote. It’s just a reward for becoming involved, more

Mark Brett/Western News

GENERAL MANAGER Max Picton of the Best Damn Sports Bar shows off prizes similar to the ones that can be won as part of the contest encouraging young people to participate in the Nov. 19 civic election.

or less,” he said, adding the partner businesses were happy to jump on board. “As soon as I phoned them and told them about the event, they said, ‘Yes, 100 per cent. We want to push our customers to do the same thing.’ It’s really a few of the businesses in the community working to make this happen.” Those looking to take part should bring two pieces of ID, including one with their address on it like a driver’s licence. Failing that, bring the ID and piece of mail indicating address. The shuttle will run from noon to 8 p.m. Entrants don’t have to take the shuttle down to the polling station at the Penticton Trade and Convention Centre, but they are required to show some proof of their attendance — snapping a picture with a digital camera or cellphone will suf¿ce. Once that’s completed, Picton said entrants can return to the bar at 260 Martin St. and enter the draw, which will be held shortly after the UFC ¿ght that night, at approximately 10 p.m. Picton understands it’s not a per-

fect system, in that someone could just take a photo by the polling station and try to dupe staff. But a big part of it is the awareness factor. “If someone really wanted to mess around, take a picture and not vote themselves, they could. But the goal is to get everybody thinking about it and get them down there,” he said. So far, the business is getting a good reaction to the contest — including a host of mayoral and council candidates, who have thrown their support behind the project. “It’s fantastic. Everybody just thinks it’s an amazing event,” he said. “The candidates themselves think it’s a great idea because they understand that we need to get the youth involved in the political process in town. “I’ve had so many individuals come up to me and say, Thank you for doing this.’ I was quite impressed. It was a better response than I even had hoped for.” For information about the contest, check out Best Damn’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ bdsb.penticton.

ASHTON - City must respond quickly “We were there at 10 o’clock in the morning. She said you can pick it up in late this afternoon, tomorrow morning at the latest,” he recalled, adding that the same process in Penticton takes three weeks. “We’ve reduced it substantially, and we’re going to continue to reduce it, but it was an eye-opener.” City Hall has to respond quickly, he said, to opportunities that come up to expand the city’s economic base and create jobs, through tax breaks under programs like the expanded economic investment zone bylaw. “Tourism isn’t going to be the panacea for the future of Penticton. It’s going to be a portion of it, but you have to take a look at the improvements that will allow people to be here,” he said. But he sees long-term leases of city land around Marina Park Way as a way to potentially generate economic growth and jobs. He cites Coeur d’Alene, Idaho as an example of how a community can create the parameters of development by giving their expectations on amenities and attractions, and then allowing the private sector to come in and make those dreams come to life.

“It’s time to revamp the whole area,” he said. “Is there an opportunity to work together on the marina lands? Absolutely.” Some have made hay about Ashton’s role on the B.C. Liberals riding association board, suggesting he has intentions to seek the party nomination to represent Penticton after longtime MLA Bill Barisoff retires in 2013. “I think the citizens should expect the mayor to be committed to the job full time,” Ashton said, adding he works 60 hours a week between the City of Penticton and the Regional District of Okanagan Similkameen. “An opportunity may present itself in the future. The City of Penticton has and will continue to have my full dedication.” In the meantime, he said he will focus on establishing the city’s solid ¿nancial footing by fostering jobcreation projects and reducing the de¿cit. “Nobody’s got a magic wand,” he said. “Experience is going to count in the future. You can’t rest on your laurels right now.”


Penticton Western News Wednesday, November 9, 2011

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Penticton Western News Wednesday, November 9, 2011

opinion

Published Wednesdays and Fridays in Penticton at: 2250 Camrose St., Penticton B.C. V2A 8R1 Phone: (250) 492-3636 • Fax: (250) 492-9843 • E-mail: editor@pentictonwesternnews.com

EDITORIAL

Parents still able to access information

T

he public schools employer wants the B.C. Labour Relations Board to order teachers to write fall report cards, despite their job action, and ¿ne them as much as 15 per cent if they refuse. The B.C. Public School Employers’ Association considers reports cards essential, as does the education minister. The Education Ministry previously advised schools that report cards must be issued as usual, even if they contain little information, because three written reports are required by law. If teachers refuse to prepare them, school administrators will have to do so, although that could prove dif¿cult if teachers are also refusing to communicate with them or attend staff meetings as part of their “teach only” action. So they could contain nothing more than attendance records. The teachers’ contract expired in June. Their union, the BCTF, has suggested there won’t be progress in contract talks until the government lifts its net-zero mandate, allowing a pay increase that would bring B.C. salaries inline with those in Alberta and Ontario. Once again, students and parents are caught in the middle, with report cards being used as a bargaining chip. The employer claims that ¿rst reports in November provide early indications of how a student is doing and identi¿es those in need of extra help. And parents, as well as students, want to know what is going on — con¿rmation at least. But report cards are just pieces of paper. The information recorded on them is no doubt important, even vital to those hoping to pursue post-secondary education. And teachers are still recording that information and will readily provide it to parents and students electronically, even over the phone. All you have to do is ask.

NEWS PENTICTON WESTERN

2250 Camrose Street, Penticton, B.C. V2A 8R1 Tel: (250) 492-3636 Fax: (250) 492-9843 Publisher: Mark Walker Editor: Dan Ebenal Sales Manager: Larry Mercier Creative Director: Kirk Myltoft

The Penticton Western News is a member in good standing of the Canadian Community Newspapers Association and the British Columbia & Yukon Community Newspapers Association. The Penticton Western News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888687-2213 or go to <www. bcpresscouncil.org>. This publication reserves the right to refuse any material — advertising or editorial — submitted for publication and maintains the sole right to exercise discretion in these matters. Submissions by columnists and guest writers do not necessarily reflect the opinion of this newspaper. All material contained herein is copyright.

‘Occupy’ is just another squat A full three weeks after the Occupy Wall Street protest camp sprang up in New York City, a few stragglers announced they were almost ready to “Occupy Maple Ridge” and “Occupy Revelstoke.” Perhaps other pathetic protests are still being dreamed up around B.C. But most have already packed up, and in places such as Prince George, these anti-capitalist rallies never led to an illegal squat. Let’s be clear about our squats, the ones in Canada and particularly B.C. They are explicitly anti-capitalist and statist in their message, which is presumably why they were funded by government unions. Despite the free food, power and porta-potties, these squats quickly became ¿lthy and dangerous as the chronic street drug population replaced the spoiled young drummers and hula-hoopers who camped out to curse corporations on their iPhones. And yes, squats are still illegal here, following a unanimous October decision of the B.C. Court of Appeal against David Arthur Johnston. This pretend-homeless guy’s antics are at the root of the lat-

Tom Fletcher

B.C. Views est squatter outbreak. Victoria and its courts caved in to Johnston and allowed camping on public property at night. But he demanded 24-hour squatting rights, because some supposedly homeless people are supposedly insomniacs too. Turns out there were plenty of shelter beds on which to snooze away the day or night, and his vague claim of a constitutional right to camp on public property was summarily dismissed. I had a brief exchange with an Occupy Vancouver “organizer,” one Min Reyes, as she tried to rouse the reluctant radicals of Maple Ridge. Reyes de¿nes herself in her Twitter pro¿le as “Flirting with Anarchism while

making love to Socialism,” which sums up B.C.’s occupy movement as well as anything. “My personal approach to the analysis of society relies on Marx’s historical materialism,” Reyes writes on her blog. After majoring in Marxism at SFU, she moved on to BCIT’s journalism program, but dropped out after a couple of weeks because her studies “compromised my personal values.” Turns out BCIT is all about “skills” to get a “job.” Bummer. A glimpse of these “values” was on display when a reporter from CKNW radio tried to cover a heroin overdose at Occupy Vancouver. She was shouted down and accused of shaping the news to bene¿t “Coke and McDonalds.” At Occupy Victoria, which I visited a few times before it descended into another needle park, signs warned against “chem trails,” smart meters and corporations. Campers were urged to “nationalize ¿nance, energy and food” industries. Five-year plan for tractor production, anyone? Nationalizing banks is also at the top of Occupy Vancouver’s long, pretentious list of demands.

Why is this stale leftist ideology so pervasive? Here’s a hint. The union representing these kids’ teachers is demanding higher corporate taxes to pay for their typically self-serving, ¿nancially illiterate contract demands. Here in Victoria, as in Vancouver, the huge growth in shelter, food, clothing and transition housing service doesn’t impress the hardcore system users. Victoria’s mayor built his reputation with years of street outreach work, but he’s still targeted for the ugliest treatment, including vandalism at his family home. Victoria council even kowtowed by voting to “support” the squat next to City Hall, where Johnston used to camp. Then they cut off the power and water, which had been commandeered rather than set up by city staff at taxpayers’ expense, as was the case in Vancouver. In B.C.’s most “progressive” cities, we’re getting used to encountering public areas fouled by vomit, feces and used needles. Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews. com. tfletcher@blackpress.ca

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Transit system making progress I get frustrated when I read misinformation about Penticton Transit in letters to the editor. As a regular transit user, I know that there is room for improvement in Pentictonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transit service. But then, could we not also say this about many aspects of our community and our personal lives? As long as we live in a car-oriented culture, public transit will never be the best mode of travel. Of course, it has to be cost-effective, along with the political will to make it so. As long as corporations and banks continue to be bailed out with our tax dollars, and wars are funded with public tax dollars and taxation is not based on a fair system, I believe that we will continue to see a pittance spent on public transit. Nonetheless, as a user of Pentictonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transit, I am able to get around without undue hardship. With my trusty Ridersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Guide, and very helpful bus drivers, I am thankful for what we have. While it did take me approximately 6-8 months to â&#x20AC;&#x153;learnâ&#x20AC;? the system, to know how to get from point A, to B and possibly C, then back to A, it has all been doable. The latest letter stated that we have no weekend or night service. A quick peak at the Ridersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Guide will show that writer that neither is true.

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history

October was Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s History Month in Canada. Proclaimed in 1992 by the government of Canada, Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s History Month provides an opportunity for Canadians to learn about the important contributions of women and girls to our society â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and to the quality of our lives today. This year the Penticton Museum donated exhibit space in the main lobby between the library and museum for Penticton & Area Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Centre. Over the course of the month PAWC displayed two main exhibits: how far women have come in education, and history about womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s events organized by PAWC. All these displays give tribute to women role models who inspire us. Women have had a major role in all aspects of our history. For example, during the First World War, more than 2,800 women served with the Canadian Army Medical Corps. Did you know in 1929 â&#x20AC;&#x153;women as personsâ&#x20AC;? was a hotly contended issue, giving rise to the Persons Case, headed up by the Famous Five. Although the results of the case only recognized women as â&#x20AC;&#x153;persons qualiÂżedâ&#x20AC;? for appointment to the Senate, the media at the time declared â&#x20AC;&#x153;Women are Persons!â&#x20AC;? Today we have 67 women in the House of Commons. Did you know that it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t until the 1960s that you

All the buses (numbers 1 to 5) run Monday to Saturday, during the daytime. We also have a night bus service (Monday to Saturday), that, while thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s room for improvement, does provide service. Pentictonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sunday service needs to improve, as well as providing statutory holidays service (which is none, except during tourist time in July and August), but the best way to improve any service, is to use the service. Remember, that while Penticton buses look as though they are running empty, they are not empty. Penticton has a busy transit system, with lots of walkers, scooters, wheelchairs, strollers and shopping carts, with passengers getting on and off all the time. Please, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t judge an empty bus as being empty all the time. Did you see the bus when it was busy a few blocks back? My most wonderful learning experience in using the transit has been to slow down my life, talking to people and making new friends on the buses or while waiting for a bus. Thanks Penticton for a public transit system, and thanks to Berry & Smith Trucking for managing the system, and thanks to the bus drivers for a punctual, courteous, caring and safe service.

could study womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history in university. Penticton & Area Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Centre would like everyone to celebrate the history of women in their families and community by saying thank you to all the grandmothers, mothers, sisters and aunties that have helped create the opportunities for all of us. Angelika Eneas, event facilitator Penticton and Area Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Centre

Driving home the message

The Parent Advisory Council from Parkway Elementary School would like to take this opportunity to send a big thank you out to the Penticton RCMP and the speed reader volunteers in our city. For the past month and a half, we have had the privilege of having police and speed reader presence in front of our school during peak student activity times (going and coming from school). Although this has not completely eradicated the problem that we have with drivers going above the posted 30km/h speed limit, we have seen a signiÂżcant decrease in the number of automobile drivers disobeying the law. Our school is committed to Âżnding a solution so that our children can pass safely from sidewalks to the school, and having these outstanding individuals in our vicinity in the interim has made us all breathe a little easier in hopes that no further incidents

Brigid Kemp Penticton

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will befall our school. We hope that the police and speed readers will continue to make ours and all of the other schools in the district a priority during peak student activity times. Once again, thank you all for your presence this past while at our school.

Sherry-Lynn Picheniuk Parkway Elementary School PAC

We want to hear from you The Penticton Western News welcomes letters to the editor for publication. We suggest a maximum length of 400 words and reserve the right to edit letters for length, brevity, clarity, legality, abusive language, accuracy and good taste. All published letters remain the property of the PentictonWesternNews,which is the sole judge of suitability for publication. Letters must include the writerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s address and daytime phone number, which will not be published. Letters should be signed with the writerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s full name and be sent by e-mail to letters@ pentictonwesternnews. com; mailed to the Penticton Western News, 2250 Camrose St., Penticton, B.C., V2A 8R1; or faxed to 250-492-9843.

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letters

Speeding through school zones has become the norm There was a time when most drivers took personal responsibility to drive safely, with due care and attention, obeying the rules of the road and using common sense. We

used to call it driving defensively. This means the best offence is defence. Now many drivers apparently believe that defensive driving is offensive (pun intended) as speed-

ing is the norm from my observations. The inÀiction that the most Àagrant speeders demonstrate is either retinal detachment or attention de¿cit disorder.

They either cannot see speed signs or they ignore them. I suspect the latter; how can one not see three highway signs in a row advising one to decrease speed?

THE SOUTH OKANAGAN SIMILKAMEEN MEDICAL FOUNDATION Raises funds for the medical facilities throughout the region, including the Penticton Regional Hospital, Moog & Friends Hospice House, Trinity Centre, Summerland Health Centre and Extended Care, Princeton General Hospital and Ridgewood Lodge, South Similkameen Health Centre and Orchard Haven in Keremeos, South Okanagan General Hospital and Sunnybank Centre in Oliver.

The worst areas of violation are school zones. In Summerland I regularly observe more than 90 per cent of drivers speeding in excess of 30 km/h. This includes municipal vehicles, logging trucks, gravel trucks, freight trucks and an assortment of cars and pickups. I won’t even mention the excitement in trying to cross the street in a crosswalk. The rule used to be that one had to stop before the pedestrian left the curb and wait until they reached the other side; now cars roll up to the crosswalk as one is in the crosswalk, causing a spike in endorphins

and an elevated level of anxiety. The big picture, however, happens on our highways. The current government has a novel approach to make-work programs. It encourages media, MLAs and local folk to promote the identi¿cation of “killer highways”, such as the one north of Summerland, at Yellow Lake and currently in Lake Country. I should throw in the Sea to Sky highway at the coast for a fair balance. Then the government solution is to straighten out the ‘most wanted’ killer highways at unjusti¿able cost

Letter off target

Chair person Peggy Guest along with the executive members for the Peach City Tees Up for Cancer have been fundraising for three years to reach their goal of $100,000 for the purchase of a CT Scanner at PRH. To date they have raised more than $92,000.

Although I may agree with some of the content of Wendy Tapping’s letter, she de¿nitely needs some clari¿cation of some facts regarding coyotes and deer. First of all, a heart-shot deer de¿nitely does not die within milliseconds — the ¿rst deer I heart-shot ran over 100 yards and sprayed blood out both sides. The heart was pulverized but the deer thought it was still alive, a wellplaced head shot is hard to beat. Now secondly these yearling deer are not “babies”, this is not Disneyland. These yearlings are well on their way to looking after themselves and it is incomprehensible to even think a conservation of¿cer would shoot them. Now on to coyotes eating toddlers, cats don’t matter as they won’t stay at home and eat too many songbirds anyway. Your toddler has a much greater chance of being hit on the Parkway then being eaten by a coyote. There are two recorded cases in North America of a human being killed by a coyote, I’ll take those odds any day. As for mentioning PETA, I am personally proud to be a card carrying member of the organization know as People Eating Tasty Animals. Remember it’s hunters who are the true conservationists and we have an army ready to help move these deer once government decides that’s the “right” thing to do. Ernie Marven Cawston

Live with nature

David Kampe donated a piece of land valued at $1.5 million to the South Okanagan Similkameen Medical Foundation which can only be used for hospital/medical services in the future. Hospital Administrator, Lorraine Unruh, Chair, Jane Drapeau and Vice Chair, Ken Jaggard give Mr. Kampe a special plaque of thanks to recognize his profound generosity.

We would like to thank all the individuals, service organizations and business groups for their dedication and thoughtfulness by making donations to the South Okanagan Similkameen Medical Foundation. South Okanagan Similkameen Medical Foundation 550 Carmi Avenue, Penticton, B.C. V2A 3G6 Phone: 250-492-9027 • Toll Free: 1-866-771-0994 www.sosmedicalfoundation.com

In regards to the deer population, it reminds me of the overpopulation of rabbits that happened in Kelowna a few years ago. I’ve also noticed an overpopulation of election signs everywhere. It’s OK to put out a few signs to get voters’ attention, but why more than ¿ve in a row for the same person? People are putting signs on hillsides on clay banks, which is wrecking our scenery as now there are holes there that weren’t there before. Also vandals are periodically pulling these signs out of the ground and throwing them anywhere. I hope they do it different in the future. I certainly do not want any shooting within the city limits in regards to the deer. Might as well go back in time like the “Old Wild West”. It seems like the majority of people

to the environment and we taxpayers. I was sure that the highway through Rogers pass right to the Alberta foothills was next, but a speeding truck that dumped its load in Vaseux Lake on Oct. 28 has caught the attention of media and public of¿cials as the next “killer highway” that must be straightened out so save the speeders from themselves. I have never known a highway to be a ‘killer’; speed, yes. What’s wrong with this picture? Laurie Rockwell Summerland

that complain about the deer have money for plants, so why not go purchase a tall fence around your property. That way no trespassers can go onto your property. Or you can move to a big city where their are other trespassers, maybe not the furry-kind. Let’s learn to live with nature. Laura Pede Penticton

Grateful for mother’s care

On Oct. 23, our mother of 86 years, Irene Thorsteinson, became ill very quickly and required immediate medical attention. From the time I called 9-1-1 until after her death, Mom as well as our entire family received complete compassionate, gentle, loving care from Interior Health Services. The paramedics, the nurses, doctors and technicians in the Emergency Department as well as the nurses and all staff on Med South, not only gave excellent professional care but went above and beyond to ensure that not only Mom’s total needs were met but that we, as her family, were wrapped in compassion, understanding and care. The staff’s inclusion and welcoming of Mom’s minister, Carol Joy Stokes, as well as after-death care by EverdenRust was a great comfort to us. All staff who worked Oct. 23 and 24 know we are thanking each and every one of you. This community is very fortunate to have Interior Health and Penticton Regional Hospital caring for us. We are forever grateful. Thank you. The family of Irene Thorsteinson (Gordon and Jo-Ann Herle, Wayne and Lois Axford and families)

Reason to give thanks

I want to thank everyone who made my Thanksgiving possible, especially the lady who donated $20 and didn’t even know me, and Edmo for the use of his house. We fed 15 people successfully. Nancy Wright Penticton

What’s the rush?

I agree completely with Ted Wiltse’s letter of Nov. 2 regarding the rushed sale, almost give away, of the eight, or is it nine lots. As of Nov. 1 there is already large equipment working on the property. Why such a rush? Pat Stevens Penticton


Penticton Western News Wednesday, November 9, 2011

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Lawyers plan job action Kristi Patton Western News Staff

Some Penticton trial lawyers have taken an early stance on a provincewide movement beginning in January targeting a lack of legal aid funding. “There will be an escalating series of duty counsel withdrawals starting in January. Some lawyers in Penticton are doing job action ahead of that,” said Bentley Doyle, communications director for the Trial Lawyers Association of B.C. Starting in January, a provincewide campaign is set to begin with lawyers not providing any adult criminal duty counsel services for the ¿rst week of the month. This will escalate, adding an extra week each month, until April when they will not provide services for all 30 days. Doyle said a meeting was held by the Trial Lawyers Association of British Columbia in September where lawyers got together and decided on the action. “What we want is the B.C. government to restore legal aid funding to where it was in the early ‘90s. There was far more services covered for citizens in need today. In many family law cases they don’t have coverage, in many criminal cases they don’t have legal aid coverage,” said Doyle. “In

the early ‘90s the B.C. government brought in a provincial sales tax on legal fees. That money was supposed to go to fund legal aid and it was not put in there, it was never put in there. That is upwards of $100 million a year that is collected that does not go to fund legal aid and it should.” Doyle calls duty counsel “lawyers on the front lines.” These are lawyers called in to represent lowincome people that may have been arrested overnight or are held in custody and don’t have representation. Duty counsel provides immediate legal assistance. Doyle said while provincial court judges have received pay increases and Crown counsel salaries rose, the tariff for duty counsel has not increased since 1991. He argues given inÀation by 2005, it is an equivalent to $63, and that is a 21 per cent pay decrease. “Basically the ministry operates with the budget they have and say there is no more money for this issue. Roughly the ministry is funding it to a tune of $60 million a year. To get it back to restored levels that it should have never left you would need about $100 million a year,” said Doyle. Veteran lawyer Leonard Doust led the Public Commission on Legal Aid released in March. The result of his report, Foundations

for Change, suggests federal and provincial funding cuts have left the system unable to meet basic needs, and it’s the working poor and marginalized people who suffer most. Doust said legal aid should be an essential service, and laid out recommendations including making more people eligible and giving legal aid workers better pay and support. Doyle said when the escalating action days begin it is going to slow down the whole judicial system, one that is already bogged down because of lack of court time and a shortage of judges. In Penticton, counsel from another area in the province swooped in on their days of action and worked the legal aid cases. “By and large we are hearing there is support across the province from lawyers. I’m no a lawyer, I am a communications director, but if they were my colleagues I would have some bad feelings about them. I can’t look at them lawyer to lawyer and say what are you doing? But I ¿nd it very frustrating and I think a lot of lawyers are going to be very upset if that happens,” said Doyle. Lawyers have been asked to pin a blue ribbon on their lapels on Nov. 30 and walk out during their noon hour break to draw attention to their cause.

Steve Kidd/Western News

FILLING A NEED — Rashaud Hudson, of the Penticton chapter of Junior Chamber International, repacks food into the collection boxes in front of Wal-Mart. The JCI filled about 30 of the boxes, each hand-decorated by local students for the weekend food drive.

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Penticton Western News Wednesday, November 9, 2011

Fake gun leads to school lockdown Kristi Patton Western News Staff

RCMP called for a lockdown at Penticton Secondary School on Friday after a resident saw a student walking around with what they thought was a riÀe. “There was a situation where some students were producing a ¿lm outside. They were instructed to stay inside and somebody from the public saw one of the students holding a gun, not realizing it was a

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fake gun,” said principal Bill Bidlake. Police called for a lockdown at the school and shut down the area for about 15 minutes until the of¿cers made contact with the students and found the riÀe to be an air soft gun. Bidlake said RCMP of¿cers spent time doing assemblies with the students afterwards to remind them of the dangers involved in bringing weapons to school or having them in public when they can be per-

When you are walking around with what appears to be a weapon you can bet someone is going to phone and we are going to act as if it is real, especially around a school. — Sgt. Rick Dellebuur

ceived to look authentic. “It was a mistake and unfortunately the police were involved because at the time we didn’t know how serious it was,” said

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Bidlake. Sgt. Rick Dellebuur said the air soft gun was con¿scated by RCMP and that it was “a very good replica of an automatic riÀe,” adding it looked like an AK-47. “This is what happens, much like the dynamite incident last week. If we get a call of a gun we treat it very real until we can prove otherwise. When you are walking around with what appears to be a weapon you can bet someone is going to phone and we are going to act as if it is real, especially around a school,” said Dellebuur. Last November two similar complaints of suspected guns involving

youth prompted RCMP to issue a warning about air soft or pellet guns. One incident involved a Pen High student carrying a pellet gun while walking to school. The stock had been cut off and the barrel plugged at the end. In the other incident a member of the public called RCMP after they saw youths in an empty lot around Vancouver Avenue wearing camouÀage carrying what they believed to be riÀes. The weapons turned out to be pellet guns that were altered to look like an authentic riÀe. “A member could have got out, drawn his gun and there could have been confusion. You would hate to think what would happen,” said Dellebuur of the incidents. It is not illegal to posses air soft or pellet guns, but RCMP said it is an issue when they are altered to make them look real. It can results in a criminal charge and also becomes an issue of safety.

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Coming soon to a downtown core near you: a seven-auditorium theatre. Penticton council unanimously approved Landmark Cinemas’ application for a development permit to build a new cinema and additional commercial uses at the Liquidation World site at Winnipeg Street and Westminster Avenue. “We’ve waited for this for a long time,” Coun. Judy Sentes said. The site was previously contaminated by contaminants from a site to the south, and Landmark has been working to clean the site up since 2008. They have since received a certi¿cate of compliance from the Ministry of Environment, which freed up the city to allow for development for the site. Anthony Haddad, director of development services, said the project is eligible for economic investment zone incentives — including a three-year tax break on the land and 100 per cent of the building permit fees — because the proposed development falls into the category of key tenants the city is seeking in the area. Coun. Mike Pearce lauded the investment zone bylaw, noting four or ¿ve municipalities in B.C. have offered similar incentives for business. The cinema project, he added, is among two under the bylaw that will create employment. “One thing I’m hearing out there is they all want jobs, so I want to do what we can to help them out,” he said. Acknowledgement around the table was given to the owners of the land for setting the site aside as the potential home for a theatre, and Mayor Dan Ashton thanked Landmark speci¿cally for bringing a project forward that was “long overdue.” “Thank you very much for believing in Penticton,” he said.


Penticton Western News Wednesday, November 9, 2011

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a&e

A&E Editor: Steve Kidd • Phone: 492-3636 ext. 216 E-mail: events@pentictonwesternnews.com

Local artist joins select group Steve Kidd

Western News Staff

If Glenn Clark was still in school, he would have had a great “what I did on my summer vacation” essay this year. The Penticton-based artist was selected to spend a week in Glacier National Park in July, one of six artists picked to be part of Art in the Park. “I never apply for anything like that, but I saw that one and I had to apply, because I have always wanted to get inside that park to paint,” said Clark. Art in the Park has been running since 2008, providing visual artists with special access to explore one of Canada’s national parks and then share the experience through art. This year, the Art in the Park program celebrated Glacier and Yoho national parks’ 125th anniversaries. Clark, who said that in 20 years he hasn’t applied for any art competition or project, has long been drawn to the area. “You drive through Revelstoke and you’re looking around at all the big mountains. I get all shaky, I had to get in there,” said Clark, who was one of six artists chosen from 57 applicants. Along with 28 paintings, Clark came out of a park with a new nickname.

Photo submitted

GLENN CLARK, clad in his gumboots, braving the elements and painting in Glacier National Park.

“In Revelstoke, I am ‘the gumboot painter,’” he said. That’s because when the weather turned bad, he just kept heading outdoors to work. “The ¿rst two days were glorious, but it was a wet July,” said Clark. Even though on day three, the rain was coming down in buckets, Clark had his most productive day. “Everyone else stayed inside the research station. I went outside tucked underneath my umbrella and cranked out seven paintings that day,” Clark said. “I was painting rain clouds quickly moving over the mountains. It was fascinating, because they would leave pockets of the hills in the background … it was an abstract between the greys and whites and the blues and greens in the

distance.” Clark’s ¿nished works will be on display at the Revelstoke Visual Arts Centre from Nov. 12 to Dec. 3 along with works by the other artists on the journey, which included photographers and watercolour artists. Clark’s work will also be on display a little closer to home. In late January, he will be doing a retrospective-style exhibition of his work at the Penticton Art Gallery. “Paul (Crawford) offered me a show,” said Clark, who plans on bringing together works from the last 20 years, including a series painted for the 2004 Memorial Cup featuring the Vees. Those works were exhibited in Kelowna for the cup celebration, but have never been seen as a group in Penticton.

Steve Kidd/Western News

SOUP FOR THE ARTS — Zdenka Kettenacker examines one of the 200 soup bowls she and friends at the Penticton Potter’s Guild created for the Penticton Art Gallery’s annual Soup Bowl Project fundraiser, which takes place on Nov. 10 at 7 p.m. The $35 ticket price ($40 for non-members) purchases one of the hand-crafted bowls and soups from some of the finest local restaurants. Along with wine, homemade breads and music, all enjoyed while surrounded by great artworks, this important fundraiser for the gallery is also a great evening out.

Authors series at En’owkin Centre Western News Staff

A reading today at the En’owkin Centre is going to feature an author whose book exempli¿es both the work of the centre and of Theytus Books. I See Me was published in 2009 by the aboriginal publishing house, Theytus Books, which makes its home at En’owkin. It was written by Margaret Manuel, who is a graduate of the National Aboriginal Professional Artist Training Program at the centre. “Being a parent of two sparked a need within me to teach my

children Nsyilxcn, our Okanagan language,” said Manuel. “As I struggled with learning and teaching the language to my children, I imagined an easier way for us to learn together. Since reading a bedtime story with my children was routine, I thought what’s easier than a children’s book.” I See Me is ¿lled with images of Manuel’s son, Qwyula?xw, as he is nurtured within the Syilx way of life. He sleeps in his baby board to hand-drumming, he plays with the rattle among other daily activities. “This encourages children in

their early years to relate actions with daily life, Syilx tradition and language,” said Manuel, adding that through children’s literature and the NAPAT program, she developed the skills to write I See Me. In 2010, the book received an Honorable Mention Award at the New York Book Festival. The event begins at 11:30 a.m., with welcome addresses at noon by En’owkin Centre director Jeannette Armstrong and Gerry William of the creative writing department. Manuel will take the podium at 12:15 p.m., followed by a book signing at 1:15 p.m.

PACIFIC AGRI-FOOD RESEARCH CENTRE GIVES

The United Way campaign team from Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre with SADI’s Michelle Stefan and United Way Chair Brad Haugli.

Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre in Summerland kicked off their United Way workplace campaign to support lasting change for vulnerable children, adults and seniors in the South Okanagan Similkameen.

Call 250-492-2842 to support United Way.


12

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Penticton Western News Wednesday, November 9, 2011

news

Memorial pays tribute to West Bench veterans Kristi Patton Western News Staff

A veteranâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s memorial envisioned by the community of West Bench in

2008 now has the funds to be able to move forward. The Regional District of Okanagan Similkameen is receiving a maximum of $24,520

through the federal government Community War Memorial Program. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This was something very dear to my heart,â&#x20AC;? said Sue Gibbons, who

was instrumental in the project and her father, Bob Jenkins, was one of the original veterans from West Bench. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The West Bench is a very suc-

WIND POWER PROJECTS OPEN HOUSE 7KH 6KLQLVK &UHHN 1RUWK DQG 6RXWK :LQG 3RZHU 3URMHFWV DUH D =HUR (PLVVLRQ (QHUJ\ Developmentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (ZED) initiative to construct and operate two separate and independent VPDOOVFDOH0HJDZDWW 0: ZLQGSRZHUSURMHFWVLQ%ULWLVK&ROXPELDŇ&#x2039;V5HJLRQDO'LVWULFW RI2NDQDJDQ6LPLONDPHHQDSSUR[LPDWHO\NPZHVWRI6XPPHUODQG%& 7KH 6KLQLVK &UHHN 1RUWK DQG 6RXWK :LQG 3RZHU 3URMHFWV 6&:33  ZLOO VXSSO\ FOHDQ renewable, greenhouse gas-free power to BC Hydro - enough to power approximately 5,000 homes per project 7KH6KLQLVK&UHHN1RUWKDQG6RXWK:LQG3RZHU3URMHFWVZLOOLQFOXGH Â&#x2021; six â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ten wind turbines per project Â&#x2021; one meteorological tower per project Â&#x2021; below-ground electrical collector system between wind turbines Â&#x2021; above-ground electrical collector system to BC Hydroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transmission system (approximately 38 km) Â&#x2021; separate access roads to the project areas and between project components Â&#x2021; other facilities as required for project studies, construction and operations :KLOHWKHSURMHFWWLPHWDEOHVKDYHQRWEHHQĂ&#x20AC;QDOL]HG SCWPP are slated to begin operation in late 2013. Construction is expected to take approximately six to eight months and will employ an estimated 30 to 40 persons. SCWPP are projected to operate for 25 years, during which an estimated 100 to 200 person-years of employment will be created for operations and maintenance.

OKANAGAN LAKE

Environmental assessment activities are nearly FRPSOHWH DQG WKH Ă&#x20AC;QDO ORFDWLRQ RI SURMHFW FRPSRQHQWVZLOOEHGHWHUPLQHGWRPLQLPL]HDQGRU avoid potential environmental effects. ZED intends WRĂ&#x20AC;OHDQDSSOLFDWLRQIRUD/LFHQVHRI2FFXSDWLRQIRU a Wind Power Generation Plant with the Ministry of )RUHVWV /DQGV DQG 1DWXUDO 5HVRXUFH 2SHUDWLRQV early in 2012 for each project.

MERRITT HWY 5

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P ROJECT O PEN H OUSE You are invited to an open house to LQWURGXFHWKH6KLQLVK&UHHN1RUWK and South Wind Power Projects and to receive your comments. 7KHRSHQKRXVHZLOOWDNHSODFH :HGQHVGD\1RYHPEHU SP²SP 2NDQDJDQ5HJLRQDO/LEUDU\ Summerland Branch 9525 Wharton St Summerland, BC This open house is part of ZEDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s public consultation program. First 1DWLRQ HQJDJHPHQW DFWLYLWLHV DUH also underway.

ZED welcomes your input. Please send any comments or questions regarding the project via ZEDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at zeroemissiondevelopments.com ZED is a BC based renewable energy company, established in late 2007 to develop wind power projects ranging from 15 to 150 MW.

SUMMERLAND

PENTICTON

cessful veteran lands act subdivision and it was important for me to pay tribute to those original veterans that settled and built their homes here on the West Bench.â&#x20AC;? The project will include the construction of a new memorial in Selby Park located in West Bench. The park is named after Eric Selby, a veteran and driving force in the establishment of the West Bench Veteransâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Land Act project. The memorial will include a bronze plaque listing the approximately 180 names of Second World War veterans who settled in the West Bench community. Okanagan Coquihalla MP Dan Albas was at the announcement on Mon-

day at Selby Park on behalf of Veterans Affairs Minister Steven Blaney. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the things I think is great is we continue to see different ways and means that our government continues to show respect for our veterans,â&#x20AC;? said Albas. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Supporting the construction of new memorials is one way our government is working to ensure the sacriÂżces of our veterans will not be forgotten.â&#x20AC;? Selby Park is currently a popular access site for mountain bikers to ride on trails on the Penticton Indian Band lands to the west and north. In 2010 the RDOS applied for and received $18,000 in federal matching grants for park upgrades. The money permitted the

RDOS to undertake several projects including a riding ring upgrade to improve drainage, erect new fencing and put in sprinklers. The RDOS is currently in the process of creating a non-proÂżt society to manage the Selby Park riding ring as an amenity for all Area F residents. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What we want to do is take the opportunity with this project to reengage the community to get some smart, talented people involved. We want to take this money that came from the federal government and our own contributions out of our parks budget and really blow it up into something we can all be proud of,â&#x20AC;? said Area F director Michael Brydon.

DORM - Discount draws dissent

permit because of the sale of city land and the economic investment zones that provides temporary tax breaks gave too much in the way of discounts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s getting this land for free. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care how they spin it, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s free,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here to talk about the zoning, not the sale,â&#x20AC;? Ashton said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Same thing,â&#x20AC;? Vassilaki responded. Vassilaki was the lone opponent to both the rezoning application from small-lot residential to mixed-used commercial second and third readings and councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s support of the development permit application subject to provisions, including the Âżnalization of the land sale. The Âżnal disposition of the lands has been postponed to Nov. 21 due to a typo error in the advertisement as part of the legal notiÂżcation requirements.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We all say we need jobs and have tourism, and this will bring more jobs and will enhance sports tourism,â&#x20AC;? said Jakubeit, adding that more time doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily mean more revenue from a land sale. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Waiting for the economy to improve means we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get that $30 million impact.â&#x20AC;? Coun. Judy Sentes said the dormitory concept is not new to the city, as Okanagan Hockey School organizers have articulated their desires to house students since the academyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inception. Ultimately the sale and development beneÂżt both the city and the school. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This property is costing us money as itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sitting there empty,â&#x20AC;? she said. Although council was debating the development, Coun. John Vassilaki said he couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t vote in favour of issuing the

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Penticton Western News Wednesday, November 9, 2011

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

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14

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Penticton Western News Wednesday, November 9, 2011

calendar WEDNESDAY November 9 OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS meets from 2 to 3 p.m. in Room 103 of the Penticton United Church, enter through north door. Call 250-493-1527 for info. HAND AND FOOT CANASTA at 1 p.m. in the Penticton Leisure Centre, 439 Winnipeg St. Lessons

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available for those who have never played before. Call June evenings at 250492-7630 for info. PENTICTON DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB holds weekly games Wednesdays at 7 p.m., Thursdays at 1 p.m. and the Under 100 Club Thursdays at 12:30 p.m. at the Penticton Library. Call Birgitta at 250-7701154 for info. SAHAJ MARG MEDITATION every Wednesday at 4:30 p.m. Call 250-492-4458 for info. 65-PLUS SINGLES COFFEE CLUB meets at 10 a.m. at the Penticton Golf and Country Club. For info call 250-492-0459 or 250-770-1018. BINGO EVERY WEDNESDAY in the Legion hall for the Ladies Auxiliary, 502 Martin St. at 1 p.m. regular bingo at 6:30 p.m. SENIORS’ RECREATION and Wellness Centre at 439 Winnipeg St. hosts euchre every Wednesday from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Call Joy at 250-770-1174 for more information. FALLS OKANAGAN SENIORS’ Activity Centre has exercise classes at 8 a.m., music and coffee hour at 9 a.m. followed by carpet bowling at 1 p.m. SOUTH MAIN DROP-IN CENTRE has beginner line dance at 9 a.m. (call 250493-2111 to confirm), coffee social at 10 a.m., intermediate/advanced line dance and cribbage at 1 p.m. ANAVETS HAS HUMP day with entertainment by Buzz Byer at 6:30 p.m. and Stu’s Kitchen open. AL-ANON FOR FRIENDS and family of alcoholics at 7:30 p.m. at United Church, 696 Main St. Call 250-490-9272 for info. TOPS B.C. 4454 has weekly meetings from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at 445 Ellis St. Ring at the back door

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492-2684 to register. No fee. PENTICTON ACADEMY OF Music has string orchestra under the direction of John Suderman from 7:15 to 8:45 p.m. at the Leir House. Open to intermediate and advanced string players ages 16 and up. New members welcome. KIWANIS CLUB HAS a lunch meeting every Wednesday at noon at 390 Brunswick St. Penticton PENTICTON MUSEUM a WILL be hosting Remembrance Day video on naval convoys during the Second World War from noon to 2:30 p.m. Presentation is in the museum auditorium (785 Main St.) and includes coffee, tea and confections. Admission is by donation. GRANDPARENTS OF PRESCHOOLERS: Grand Times at the Museum is a free program 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. each Wednesday until Dec. 14. Lunch is provided for you and your grandchildren. Call Dawn at 250493-7554 to reserve your spaces. BLOOD DONOR CLINICS will be at the South Main Drop-In Centre Nov. 9 to 11 from 1 to 5:30 p.m. To donate by appointment, call 1-888-2donate (1-888-236-6283).

THURSDAY November 10

FRANCO 50-PLUS CLUB meets from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Drop-in program for French speakers wanting to socialize in French, including activities such as games, outings, discussions, hobbies and projects. Call Lina at 250492-2549 for info. DESERT SAGE SPINNERS and Weavers Guild meets at 10 a.m. at the Oliver

Community Centre. Members create beautiful handworks. Visitors are always welcome. If you are interested in becoming a member stop by or contact Gail Erickson at rgerickson@telus.net or 250-498-4959. PEACH CITY meet TOASTMASTERS from noon to 1 p.m. at the Penticton United Church, Toastmasters improves speaking abilities and leadership skills. Call 250-486-0601 for info. TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) meets at 5:30 p.m. at 431 Winnipeg St. Call Merle at 250-7708093. SOUTH MAIN DROP-IN CENTRE has Spanish conversation and carpet bowl at 10 a.m., improver line dance at 12:30 p.m., bingo and crafters meet at 1 p.m., and table tennis at 7 p.m. Call 250-493-2111 to confirm line dance activities. TOPS B.C. 1640 meets from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. in the Bethel Church basement at 945 Main St. Phone Betty-Lou at 250-492-7623 or Liz at 250-493-7997 for more information. OKANAGAN FALLS SENIORS’ Activity Centre has computer classes at 9 a.m., bridge at 1 p.m. and cribbage at 7:30 p.m. Everyone welcome. ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION branch 40 has crib at 7 p.m. Ladies Fitness and Friends at 10 a.m. at the Legion Hall. O KANAGAN S OUTH and I MMIGRANT Community Services is offering free English classes. For more info, stop by the office at 508 Main St. or call 250-492-6299. AL-ANON FOR FRIENDS and family of alcoholics meet at 7:30 p.m. in the Summerland United Church. Call 250-490-9272.

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on the lane, the meetings are downstairs. Phone Susan at 250-496-5931 or Fran at 250-490-3927. IODE THRIFT STORE on 464 Main St. has weekly specials and is open Monday to Saturday, 1 to 4 p.m. SUMMERLAND ART CLUB meets every Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the library’s lower floor on Wharton Street. Painters of all levels welcome. Workshops available. For info call Barb at 250-494-3002. THE BASKETRY AND Fibre Art’s Guild will hold their monthly meeting at Leir House Cultural Centre at 10 a.m. Contact Janice Ashby at 250-492-4327 or Diane Swanson at 250-493-0884 for more info. FOSTER CARE INFO sessions every Wednesday at 10 a.m. at MCFD Resource Office. For info call Moe at 250-770-7524 or visit www.fosterbc.ca or www.mcf.gov.bc.ca/ foster. ELKS CLUB ON Ellis Street has a management committee meeting upstairs at 7:30 p.m. FRATERNAL ORDER OF the Eagles has a general meeting for all members every second Wednesday at the hall on 1197 Main St. OLIVERDOUBLEOQuilters have drop-in activities every Wednesday. PENTICTON QUILTERS MEET on the second and fourth Wednesday of the month at the Salvation Army hall at 9 a.m. Check their website at www.pentictonquilters. com or email ggover1@ shaw.ca. UNITED PENTICTON CHURCH has liturgical dance sessions the last Wednesday of each month from 2 to 3 p.m. Call 250-

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Penticton Western News Wednesday, November 9, 2011

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

15

calendar FRATERNAL ORDER OF Eagles has Joseph’s Famous Pizza from 4 to 7 p.m. Music trivia by Affordable Music at 7 p.m. Prizes. Members and guests welcome to hall on 1197 Main St. ANAVETS HAS KARAOKE at 7 p.m. N EW H OPE FOR Widows and Widowers has lunch connections to meet with others of similar loss, (going “dutch”) the second Thursday of the month at 11:45 a.m. Please phone Fran at 250497-7850 or Evelyn at 250-770-7865 for location and to reserve your spot. ELKS CLUB ON Ellis Street has darts and pool. Laurie Carter and Bruce Kemp will be at Hooked on Books at 7 p.m. for the launch of their collaborative photo essay on the Okanagan Valley Gifts of the Okanagan.

FRIDAY

November 11 ELKS CLUB on Ellis Street has drop-in darts and pool at 7 p.m. followed by karaoke by Anita. Fraternal

Order of Eagles celebrates Remembrance Day. Come share snacks and sociables all day. Dinner and Entertainment have been moved to Saturday night. All members and guests welcome. 1197 Main St. SENIORS’ COMPUTER CLUB meets at the Leisure Centre, 439 Winnipeg St. Members drop-in from 1 to 2:30 p.m. in the main hall. Call 250-770-7848 for more information. S ENIORS S INGLES LUNCH Club welcomes 65-plus each Friday. For location call 250-496-5980 or 250-770-8622. PDSCL has bingo at 1 p.m. in the Leisure Centre on Winnipeg Street. Call Tarra at 250-490-0200, ext. 1 for more information. SOUTH MAIN DROP-IN CENTRE has Tai Chi Chuan at 10 a.m., cardio dance at 11:10 a.m., new beginner line dance at 1 p.m. ANAVETS HAS DJ music. 890 WING OF South Okanagan Air Force Association gets together at 4 p.m. at

the clubhouse at 126 Dakota Ave. FUNTIMERS BALLROOM DANCE Club meets most Fridays upstairs at the Elks Club on Ellis Street from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. for ballroom and LatinAmerican dancing. Instruction is provided on certain Fridays. For more information contact Brian at 250-492-7036 or visit www.funtimers.bravehost.com. STARGATE PENTICTON a metaphysical IS event from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the South Main Drop-In Centre. There is no admission to morning session after 9:30 a.m. Tickets are $33 cash or cheque sales only. Call Trish at 250-276-4844. REMEMBRANCE DAY SERVICE at OK Falls School followed by parade to the Cenetaph at the Legion Building. After a flypast by the Warbirds the silence will be observed and then the laying of wreaths. After the ceremony, everyone is invited for a free lunch. Music will be played by Yvonne Waddon.

REMEMBRANCE DAY SERVICE to be held at the (439) Winnipeg Street Leisure Centre at 2 p.m. with Rev. Peter O’Flynn. There will be a war time sing along after the service with Young at Heart. Everyone welcome.

COMING EVENTS

LIVING LIFE TO the Full: 12 hours that can change your life. The Canadian Mental Health Association – South Okanagan Similkameen Branch is offering a free course. The eight-week course offers info on living life better. Classes are Wednesdays from 10 to 11:30 a.m. starting Nov. 16 to Jan. 4 at Penticton Church of the Nazarene at 523 Jermyn Ave. Registration is limited. For more information contact Leah at CMHA 250-493-8999. GRIEF SUPPORT AND Education Video Series is free and open to anyone who wishes to attend. Location is the Penticton Art Gallery Tea Room, 199 Marina Way. For Information contact Andrea Turner

at 250-492-9071, ext. 2203. The next video is on Nov. 18, then Nov. 25, Dec. 2 and Dec. 9. REBEKAH CHILI NIGHT at the Festival of Lights is on Nov. 25 from 5 to 9 p.m. There will be chili, a bun and a drink for just $5. Used book sale, crafts, baking and more at IOOF Hall on 9536 Main St. GATHER YOUR FRIENDS and family together and celebrate the holidays with a ride on the Summerland Christmas Express Train this December. Enjoy hot cocoa, sing along to Christmas carol favourites with Felix Possak and watch the children’s faces as Santa and Mrs. Claus hand out goody bags. Shop for the perfect gift for that special someone at The Trout Creek Trading Co. Trains depart Prairie Valley Station on Dec. 10 and 11 at 4 and 6 p.m., Dec. 16 at 5 and 7 p.m. and Dec. 17 and 18 at 4 and 6 p.m. Tickets: adults $22, seniors $21, teens $18 and kids (3 to 12) $14. Call 1-877-494-8424 for reservations.

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ish your customers the best of the Holiday Season or let them know of a Special Sales Event you have coming up. I can show you how to get your Christmas message out to your customers at an affordable price. Whether it’s on a Special Greeting in our Holiday Spirit Carol and Recipe Guide or a Sales Event that you have coming up in our Shop with Santa Special Edition, give me a call. I would be more than happy to show you all the special features as well as the benefits of advertising in the Penticton Western News.

Mark Brett/Western News

STUDENTS AUSTIN LUDWAR (left) and Max Curtis of Queen’s Park Elementary move to the sound of the ball during a game of goalball at the school recently. In the sport the competitors wear darkened glasses to simulate blindness.

Students gain new perspective Queen’s Park class given glimpse of life for the visually impaired MARK BRETT Western News Staff

Austin Ludwar’s Queen’s Park classmates recently had a chance to see, or not see, just how the world looks through his eyes. Donning their special

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shade glasses rendering them legally blind, the Grade 4/5 students were taught the sport of goalball, with only their senses of touch and hearing to guide them. While this was only a game according to program organizers, it was an excellent way to bring home to children how life is everyday for those with limited or no vision. “Sometimes my students don’t want people to pay attention to them because they don’t want anyone to know that they have a disability,” said Lynn Langille, Austin’s vision resource teacher. “But days like this, instead of being embarrassing for Austin, are kind of exciting because he gets to have something a little extra special but it’s still something he can participate in with his whole class. “Also, all of the other kids are blindfolded so they’re going to get a taste of what it’s like to be visually impaired or totally blind, which gives them an appreciation of what it’s like.” Suffering from congenital motor nystagmus since birth, Austin has,

with the support of his mother Sharon Preston and his special education assistants, been able to attend regular school and lead a near-normal classroom life. But according to Preston, there are still some very frustrating times for her son, one of those just happened to be earlier in the day. “This morning he had hockey practice with the school and when I arrived to pick him up at quarter after eight he wasn’t on the ice,” she recalled. “When I went into the dressing room he was really upset and I said ‘what’s up?’ and he said ‘I don’t like to play hockey because every team I’m on lose because I can’t see and play as good as the other kids.’ “So today with everybody being blindfolded it makes them all equal and this will really boost his con¿dence after being so down on himself.” And mom was right. Coming out of the school gym after a couple of shifts on the court and at least one goal to his credit Austin was all smiles.

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“It was really just fun,” he said, the grin widening. “I think everyone really enjoyed it. I think my friends would say it was fun, awesome, cool, hilarious. “I think it’s good to do this because then they (other kids) know how I feel and just have to adjust.” His good friend and hockey teammate, nineyear-old Max Curtis agreed: “It helped me realize actually how hard it can be to do things when you have seeing problems. This is important because it helps those who aren’t so good at seeing not feel so bad.” Instructing the skills training for the children at the school was Mike Lonergan of B.C. Blind Sports. In goalball there are three players on the court who roll a ball with bells imbedded in it back and forth trying to get it past the defenders into a goal. It became a Paralympic sport in 1980 and currently another Penticton sight-impaired athlete, Ashlie Andrews, is a member of Canada’s national team. “We are just thrilled to have Mike come to our school to help bridge communication and understanding between our students,” said Nicole MacIntyre, a special ed worker at Queen’s Park. “Social responsibility and empathy are an important part of learning and living.”


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CRAFTER MYRNA DECOCK of Mad Creations of Surrey looks over some of the unique creations at her kiosk at the 15th annual Santa Presents show at the Penticton Trade and Convention Centre. Several thousand people attended the popular two-day event last weekend which raised more than $5,000 for the hospital foundation.

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Christmas came early for the South Okanagan Similkameen Medical Foundation this year. Thanks to the unparalleled success of the 15th annual Santa Presents craft fair last weekend at the Penticton Trade and Convention Centre, the foundation which operates in support of Penticton Regional Hospital is now more than $5,000 richer. The money will go to the yearly Tree of Dreams campaign for cancer diagnostic equipment at the hospital. “This is our best yet we’re very pleased,” said co-organizer Marge Noble whose family ¿rst began the fair. “I told Janice Perrino of the medical foundation and she said: ‘Wow and wow.’ She was just so happy, we’re all happy that this worked out so well. “We had a lot more people this year and Saturday was exceptionally busy. It’s hard to put an exact number on it so we’re just saying several thousand people at this point.” In the decade and a half the seasonal festival has been running, more than $50,000 has been raised to help agencies such as the medical foundation and the Canadian Cancer Society. Noble admitted having a few worried moments before the show, especially because of the economic climate but those fears turned out to be unfounded. Although she admitted there was one minor hitch to the weekend. “That was there wasn’t enough parking space. I mean is that a problem?” she said. “Aren’t we lucky if that’s the only problem. “For that (success) we would just like to let the public know how much the Noble/Robson family appreciates their support so we can support the hospital.” She also heard plenty of good things from the more than 100 vendors. One regular exhibitor at the show reported an increase of 15 per cent over previous years and all three Christmas bakeries sold out of their products.


Penticton Western News Wednesday, November 9, 2011

Sports Editor: Emanuel Sequeira • Phone: 492-3636 ext. 224 E-mail: sports@pentictonwesternnews.com

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

sports

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WARREN HANSEN of the Canadian Curling Association along with Penticton Mayor Dan Ashton (right) begin sweeping Kim Kirkham’s rock after it was announced that Penticton will host the 2013 Continental Cup.

International curling event slides into Penticton Emanuel Sequeira Western News Staff

Kim Kirkham envisioned bringing a large curling tournament to Penticton, but she had no idea what was coming. Kirkham, a past-president of the Penticton Curling Club, approached the Canadian Curling Association about hosting a national event. Instead, Penticton is getting something on a larger scale — the 2013 World Financial Group Continental Cup — an international championship started in 2003. “It’s a big event,” said Kirkham, who is the host committee chair of the event scheduled for Jan. 10 to 13 at the South Okanagan Events Centre. “Cream of the crop. We’re very fortunate. We thought maybe the Scotties. We don’t think the venue here is big enough for the Brier, but it could definitely host a Scotties.” When Kirkham learned what Penticton landed, she was filled with “huge” excitement. “This is really, really big,” she said. “Six best teams from North America and six best from the world. It doesn’t get much better than that.” Warren Hansen, director of event operations and media relations for the CCA, made the announcement in the Vault at the SOEC Friday afternoon and pushed the slogan used for season of champion events, You Gotta Be There, which has been credited with increasing enthusiasm. “The Continental Cup is a relatively new event to the sport of curling,” said Hansen, who

threw second stones for Hec Gervais and won the 1974 Brier. “One that is quickly gaining a solid reputation. The Contintental Cup annually involves the 12 best teams in the world. There are five different competitions: team play, mixed doubles, singles, mixed skins and skins.” Scott Braley, chief executive officer and executive director of Curl B.C., said he’s pleased for Penticton. Kirkham mentioned to him a couple years ago about Penticton’s desire to go beyond hosting provincials to bring national events. Braley thanked and congratulated members of the host committee and the Penticton Curling Club as well as the World Curling Federation and the CCA. “Penticton has a track record of hosting successful curling events,” said Braley, noting the 2008 B.C. men’s championship and in 2010 the B.C. Scotties women’s championship. Hansen said one of the main things that helped Penticton get the Continental Cup is that the CCA hasn’t done an event in Penticton. “This great new facility, I think the Okanagan Valley is a pretty strong curling area,” he said. “We have had successful events in Kelowna and Vernon. It was time for us to do one here.” Kirkham said that curling fans will be spoiled with the calibre. “Normally you would have to go to the Lower Mainland, for instance Langley is hosting 2012,” she said. “It will be nice to see just

how many curling fans are actually in the Okanagan. I think we will get the support throughout the Okanagan north and south.” And she believes it will attract attention from those that watch at home. “In conjunction with our event partners from both the United States Curling Association and the World Curling Federation, it is certainly a great opportunity to host the Continental Cup in the beautiful City of Penticton,” said chief executive officer of the Canadian Curling Association Greg Stremlaw. “Our site visits during the event review process clearly established that both the community and South Okanagan Events Centre are world class and we look forward to sharing the highly entertaining World Financial Group Continental Cup with the fans in the host community and all of southern British Columbia.” The 2013 World Financial Group Continental Cup will celebrate its ninth edition in Penticton. It will also be the third time B.C. has hosted the cup, following Chilliwack in 2006, while Langley will stage the 2012 renewal in January. Since it began in 2002 in Regina, North America holds a 4-3 edge over Team World. There were no cups held during the 2005-06 and 2009-10 seasons. To help the Continental Cup succeed, the City of Penticton is giving a grant of $38,500 to the host committee with 50 per cent of that amount being returned to the city.

Cougars advance to provincials as Bighorns forfeit playoff game Emanuel Sequeira Western News Staff

The Penticton Cougars (2-6) are going to provincials, but not the way they wanted. Ready to face the Columbia Valley (Invermere) Bighorns (62) in Invermere on Nov. 6, Cougars coach Terence Westera was disappointed that the Bighorns were forced to forfeit.

The Bighorns had their usual set of referees, but they were not certified. “Last time we were there they pretty much had parents out of the stands (officiating),” said Westera. “It was a very one-sided game (the Bighorns won 28-7). A bunch of players got hurt. Four players suffered head injuries and one went to the hospital. It

wasn’t a very safe game. I made myself very clear that they had to have certified officials because we had to.” Before the game, Westera approached the officials and asked for their certificates. None were able to provide papers. “We have a local referee crew which is basketball referees,” Bighorns coach Bruce Marlow

told the Columbia Valley Echo. “I have been very fortunate to have these guys ref all season long. “They were all at the game when it started,” he continued. “Penticton decided that if we did not have certified football referees, they did not want to play.” For full story, go to www.pentictonwesternnews.com.

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ATHLETE OF THE WEEK Spencer Kingzett, 14, helped the Princess Margaret Mustangs Grade 9 boys volleyball team win the Central Zone championship in its first season. “There was more competition and it felt good to come home with the banner,” said Kingzett, who played the power position. “I felt I played pretty well.” During the season, Kingzett focused on his hitting ability.

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Penticton Western News Wednesday, November 9, 2011

sports

Emanuel Sequeira

@pentictonsports

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Ruff returns to SOEC as a pro Emanuel Sequeira Western News Staff

Since he was a kid Zack Ruff always dreamed of becoming a professional motocross rider. All he did was tear up terrain on his dirt bike. Last year when the Canadian Arenacross Championship came to Penticton and the South Okanagan Events Centre, an event that features the top Canadian and international riders fighting for every inch of the track, amateurs of all ages and categories were welcome to join. Ruff was one of them. Fast forward to today and Ruff just completed his first outdoor season as a pro as he competed in all the Canadian national races. Ruff finished 19th overall in MX2. “I had a few bad motos, a few DNFs (did not finish) but my best finish was sixth in Walton, Ont.,” said Ruff, who also raced in Kamloops, Nanaimo, Calgary, Morden, Man., Quebec, New Brunswick and Ontario for the final. “Travelling the country has been neat.” Ruff now wears No. 39 at nationals as he competed in the Monster Energy Outdoor Nationals for Canadian Motosport Racing Corporation. Racing in Penticton again on Remembrance Day and Saturday for the Canadian Arenacross Championship, Ruff is now considered one of the top riders for the show. However, he knows he still has work to do. “I learned I have to be more consistent for next year,” said Ruff. “I think I can be in the top 10 in almost every round. I have to

Steve Kidd/Western News

ZACK RUFF debuted in the Canadian Arenacross Championship last year on his 17th birthday, and this year the rookie is looking to have a stronger start among a large contingent of pros for this weekend’s event.

be in really good shape, put in a lot of work practising and riding.” He still remembers what last year at the SOEC was like as he said it went over really good. “I think Robin Gibbs does a really good job promoting it,” he said. “He seems to put on a good show. The crowd seems to like it. He makes it fun for the riders.” This weekend, Ruff is concentrating on getting a really good start. “Just ride my best,” said Ruff, who will have family and friends in attendance. “I think it’s just cool to race in front of your hometown. I enjoy arenacross a little more than outdoors some-

times. I tend to do better at arenacross.” While he knows there will be eyes on him, fans will also be watching for former Canadian Arenacross champ Kyle Beaton, a Vancouver resident who he said is a strong competitor in arenas. “He will definitely be up there,” said Ruff. Other top riders in town are Scott Saura, Kevin Lepp, Trevor Carlson, Kyle Keast, Jake Andretti of Washington and Josh Edwards of California. Once again, the professional riding contingent will be joined by amateur riders of all ages and categories. “Interest level from riders is greater from the first

time,” said Gibbs. “Have amazing facilities in Penticton. Good organziers. Crowd was good. We have more pro riders coming. The depth of talent, there is definitely no clear winner. It’s definitely going to be competitive.” Gibbs is expecting to have 5,000 people in the stands during the two days. “I always have a bit of butterflies as it’s a big undertaking,” said Gibbs. “I have not heard one negative comment. I think we have an event that is going to grow.” For full story, go to www. pentictonwesternnews. com. TESTING A BRUIN — Mason Chew and the Penticton Lakers kept Penticton’s Cole Buckley of the Grand Forks Border Bruins busy firing 33 shots his way on Sunday. The Lakers won the afternoon matchup 6-2 to improve their record to 10-4-0-2. They played Kelowna yesterday and host Beaver Valley on Friday at 7 p.m. Mark Brett/ Western News


Penticton Western News Wednesday, November 9, 2011

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

21

sports

Mustangs capture Central Zone Special to Western News

Princess Margaret Mustangs Grade 9 volleyball team capped off an impressive debut season by capturing the Central Zone league in Kelowna. The Mustangs proved there is more than one quality program in town compiling an impressive 31-3 record to win the league. They also went undefeated to win the playoff championships. Competing against Grade 9 and 10 junior competition, the Mustangs record was 68-15 in both tournament and league play. The squad was led by the strong setting of Colton Van Camp and Cody Poitras. Combined with impressive power hitting from Spencer Kingzett, Tyrell Buckley and Kyle Kohlhauser, the Mustangs have tremendous potential for next year as Grade 10 juniors. Kohl Linder, Brett Lavingne and

Submitted photo

CENTRAL ZONE CHAMPION Princess Margaret Mustangs are as pictured: Back row from left — Spencer Kingzett, Rylan Potter, Kohl Linder, Brett Lavigne, Keegan Hawley and Gavin Pattman. Front row — Coach John Buckley, Kyle Kohlhauser, Cody Poitras, Jay Leaman, Duncan Woods, Colton Van Camp, Tyrell Buckley.

Keegan Hawley handled the middle block and attack positions. Ryan Potter played well at right side to put up big blocks. Gavin Pattman and Duncan Woods added depth with Jay Leaman passing balls at the libero position. Mustangs coach John Buckley said this team reminds him of the past championship junior boys teams that captured five provincial

championships and finished no lower than fourth over a 10-year consecutive span at provincials. “This team had tremendous potential if they want to commit to the sport,” said Buckley. “They are all big and very athletic, with depth at all positions.” Many players have been asked to tryout for the Okanagan zone team June 2 and 3 in Kelowna

for the selection camp to go to the B.C. Sumer Games in Surrey in July. “This will be a good indicator as to whether this group is serious to be a contender next year as Grade 10s in junior,” added Buckley. By playing in the Central Zone, the Mustangs have opted out of competing for one of the two south zone valley berths.

Steve Kidd/Western News

FLAMINGO FUN — Allen Pratt, who has been curling for about 30 years — though not always while wearing a flamingo on his head — shakes hands with his opponent after an early morning match at the Penticton Curling Club’s annual fun Wreckspiel.

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Penticton Western News Wednesday, November 9, 2011

news

Candidates identify ways to create jobs for Penticton It’s good to know where the politicians stand on the issues before casting your ballot. The Western News surveyed Penticton council candidates about their views on three topics, allowing them to respond in 200 words for each answer to get a sense on their plan. The ¿rst question posed to candidates was: List three speci¿c things you would do to create jobs in Penticton for residents. Below are the candidates’ answers, appearing

in alphabetical order. BURGA BLACK — 1. To start with: we must stop our jobs from leaving Penticton! 2. We must offer some incentives to shop owners so they can remain in Penticton (rents lowered on the facilities; tax relief, etc.). 3. Where one position becomes vacant offer it to two people at half-time each — thereby hiring two people instead of one (at least until the economy improves). JEANNIE CAVALLO — 1. Empower our Economic

Development Of¿ce. This of¿ce has been without clear direction from City Hall and that needs to change. The purpose of the Economic Development Of¿ce is to sell Penticton to potential job creators. I am encouraged that a new group has been awarded the contract to manage this of¿ce. 2. Continue to push the economic investment zone bylaw. I don’t believe that many local businesses know about this bylaw or understand how it can help them. I will go door to door

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to convince local businesses to take advantage of these incentives and invest in our future. 3. Streamline how we do business at City Hall. From talking to job creators, many feel that City Hall is dif¿cult to deal with and it takes too long to get things done. We need to review how the system works and make changes to improve. This will make it easier for them to do what they do best: create jobs. POONAN CHAHAL — If I could establish three areas of jobs in Penticton with my power, I would promote entrepreneurship among the youth, as we are one community that relies on local businesses. Second, I would try to promote the idea of a new shopping complex, bringing in many new jobs, with more entertainment for all ages. Lastly, I would try to build a facility for the elders to get more involved in our community, with more interactions between them and the youth. FRANK CONCI — The new Okanagan College Centre for Excellence is a huge resource we need to capitalize on. We need to target sustainable building technology companies — geothermal, solar and electric “living” building technology. We need to let these companies know that we have this facility here and let them know we have land available for sale and will offer Àexibility in our DCCs for green technology companies. Second, we need to not forget that we also have some large-scale employers already here and we need to ensure we keep them here. The city has the bene¿t of its own electrical utility — can we use that to offer economic incentives for companies willing to re-invest in their operations? Thirdly, the SOEC and Penticton Trade and Convention Centre are assets that are currently underperforming. Currently we have an operator who gets paid regardless of if the

centre makes money or not and staff on the payroll year round even with fewer events. No business can run this way and we have to recognize that it is a business. This is why I believe it is important to have business experience, expertise and a positive attitude to make some much-needed changes. I would like to bring that to council. JASON COX — Job creation is a global problem. While the economic recovery is happening here in Canada, we still need to jump-start the job creation process here in Penticton. The labour market is far weaker than it looks. Because of the dif¿culty the unemployed are having ¿nding new jobs, many people have left the city for other opportunities, leaving holes in our community. Three speci¿c things I would do to create jobs are: 1. Adequately fund and support the Economic Development Of¿ce. The professionals in this department are our best asset for information and our best “salespeople” to attract new industries and help grow existing businesses. 2. Focus on helping existing businesses grow and expand by helping to identify new foreign and domestic markets and assisting to make connections with these markets. This is a strategy I have been personally involved with though Economic Development in recent years and it has been successful. 3. 85% of jobs are created by small business. I would make Penticton more attractive to entrepreneurs by providing speci¿c incentives, support and resources for start-up companies and small businesses that are growing. DAVID GREENWOOD — If elected to council, to help create jobs I would do what I could to hasten the building of the secondary access to the PIB land so that construction of new business on the west side of the channel could begin. I would reach out to

the tech and ¿lm industry and groups such as Accelerate Okanagan, a group focused on attracting and growing the tech industry in the Okanagan. WES HOPKIN — 1. Continue work to streamline the application and planning process for new developments and creation of a comprehensive building and development guide. I would particularly work to engage important stakeholders and local experts to be involved in the consultation process for such reforms. 2. Engage in a comprehensive review of the of¿cial community plan and work on developing a strategic long-term plan to Àesh out the vision statement that was composed earlier this year so that developers better understand the regulatory climate in Penticton and can plan their projects accordingly. I would also ¿ght to ensure that council consistently follows that plan, and deviates only in extreme circumstances. 3. Review the city’s marketing strategy to leverage the fundamental advantages of the city as a retirement community which creates demand for well-paying year round jobs to service that population in sectors like health care or ¿nance. ANDREW JAKUBEIT — To help create jobs, I would continue to push sport and adventure tourism. This is an under-achieved potential with all the amenities, two lakes, four seasons and stunning beauty we have here. While tourism isn’t a high paying industry, it does have residual bene¿ts that create signi¿cant dividends as people who get exposed to Penticton often return for another visit, or consider retiring here, starting a business or raising a family. I think we need to continue to inform developers and property owners and make them aware of our economic investment zones as an incentive to spur on new development. If we can start to get some

“Hold the Line” on taxes Strengthen and Grow our Economy Reconnect City Hall with Citizens Elect

9 Frank Conci

for City Council

of our empty lots in highpro¿le areas developed it will not only have signi¿cant economic impact but will create a sense of energy and action that will inspire others to do the same. I think economic gardening (growing a business from within and locally) has potential and we should be working to develop programs that encourage, nurture and develop local businesses to grow, expand and compete. That also starts with the community embracing the concept of buying locally. LYNN KELSEY — A. Encourage technology industry and environmentally friendly (green) industry. B. Advocate for a Living Wage policy in Penticton. C. Bring support industry for the large shipbuilding contract just received in the province. D. Foster year round tourism. RANDY KIRKOSKI — Partner with the high schools/college to hold job fairs to expose the students and residents of Penticton to new business ideas, such as home based business to commercial ventures. By partnering with the high schools and the college, this will give the students and residents the necessary skills to either start a business or to promote their talent to assist current businesses to increase production or sales of their product. Promote the city for a greater tourism destination by beautifying the city. Promote the outdoors such as the wine industry, Skaha Bluffs, Kettle Valley Trail, lakes and beaches and our natural habitat. This will then create the need for more people to service these sectors. Promote the amenities that Penticton has to offer to people who are thinking of retiring so that they have an option to make this their new home. An increase in retirees will create jobs to service this industry.

See VOTE - Page 24


Penticton Western News Wednesday, November 9, 2011

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

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further south lies the Stadtwald forest, where an ascent of the 45-metre high wooden Goethe Tower is rewarded with fabulous views across the entire city. The route back to the centre could take in one of Frankfurt’s oldest restaurants, the Gerbermühle, which is idyllically located on the banks of the Main. As a friend of the then leaseholder, banker Johan Jakob von Willemer, Goethe was a regular patron. He fell madly in love with Willemer’s foster daughter Marianne at the tavern and could often be seen there enjoying a glass or two or apfelwein. To this day, this traditional cider remains the most popular drink among the locals. The Gerbermühle was also a likely haunt of the Frankfurt doctor Heinrich Hoffmann, whose illustrated Struwwelpeter books became classics of children’s literature. In an old villa in the upmarket Westend district there is a museum devoted to Hoffman and the Struwwelpeter character, featuring drawings, rare editions, translations, parodies and much more besides. Another Frankfurt repository of illustrated stories is the Caricatura, Germany’s leading museum for re¿ned satire and comic art. These are just two of nearly 60 museums in Frankfurt,

and both the Struwwelpeter and the Caricatura are entirely unique to the city. Away from big business, architecture, culture and cider, Frankfurt has a whole other side to discover. The GrünGürtel, a belt of green land around the city, offers 80 square kilometres of natural scenery for people to stretch their legs in the fresh air. Recognized by the United Nations as a prime example of sustainable urban development, it encompasses forests, parks, meadows, farmland, rivers and lakes, and features a rich diversity of plant and animal life. The green belt’s emblem is a friendly character called the Grüngürteltier, who has so far only been spotted in Frankfurt’s leafy sur-

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Penticton Western News Wednesday, November 9, 2011

news

VOTE - Candidates address jobs

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HELENA KONANZ — A. Council must actively solicit the provincial and federal governments to bring government jobs to Penticton. We have the of¿ce space, and these are the best paying and most stable jobs that could come to our community. As a small business owner in Penticton and having worked in the corporate world with Nike, I understand the ups and downs of business. More than anything Penticton needs economic stability year round. B. Although it’s important to be ¿scally responsible in the next three years, we need to eventually expand the industrial area to make room for Penticton companies to grow, and for new, clean businesses to move in. We need to show con¿dence in our manufacturing and high-tech business. Expansion to the Cantex property would be an obvious next step. C. Council must spearhead a project to bring a high-speed ¿breoptic pipe to the South Okanagan so that high tech businesses can do business here. We have the technology already within our school board and city buildings, but we need to expand that service and share the costs with the other municipalities in our area. This is a project that has been in the works for a decade, and we need to make it happen. DAVID KORINETZ — Offer tax incentives to the right kind of businesses to expand or move to Penticton — basically, high paying jobs that are environmentally friendly. Continue to clear up the permit backlog and push to have something done with those empty lots downtown. The old waterslide lot near Skaha needs to be developed or turned into a park. Revisit the prison option and/or similar options that may arise. GARY LEAMAN — 1. Adequately fund and support the of¿ce of the economic development of¿cer. This is the front-line for business development and the ¿rst point of contact for many prospective businesses/employers. A new contractor has just been chosen by the city for this function. Care must be taken to ensure continuity with prospects and work already in progress. A return to attendance at commercial real estate conventions by the EDO may be advisable. As an aside, my career has me sourcing new retailers for Penticton, and I have personally secured dozens of new businesses to our city, while at Cherry Lane. 2. Develop a unique selling feature. This is will differentiate Penticton from competitive communities. It can be low operating/utility costs, tax incentives, technical /IT opportunities/support, good labour pool, connection to transportation, proximity

to market, inexpensive land/leases, an industrial park, proximity to supplies and materials or a combination thereof. We must ¿nd a way to stand out from the competition. 3. Target a niche market for development. The manufacturing, distribution, wholesale, retail model is undergoing dramatic change. We must identify and aggressively target operators in a growth industry for which we can successfully compete. GARRY LITKE — The use of “mega projects” is not the only method of job creation. We need to start capitalizing on what already exists. Local businesses and manufacturing companies employ many people. If these existing businesses can expand, more jobs are created. Through incentive and regulation a lot can be done to encourage growth. For example, a “wood ¿rst” policy in local building construction would assist local wood manufacturers. A smoke control bylaw would assist local wood stove manufacturing by requiring replacement of existing inef¿cient, polluting wood stoves. The impact of such actions would be signi¿cant. Promotion of the newly created economic investment zones creates jobs as development begins to ¿nd Penticton more attractive. The proposal from the Okanagan Hockey School is one example of this approach working. Initially, construction of the seven-storey building creates jobs. When completed, the facility allows OHS to grow, providing jobs for coaches, referees, sports retail, teachers and others who provide service to our hockey community. A new contract for economic development was recently awarded to a group of motivated and successful local business people. This innovative, exciting model for development is without additional cost and is focused on enhancing economic activity in Penticton. KEVIN NOONAN — City council once said they wanted to be the “City of Festivals,” now no one believes they meant it. The ¿rst thing that must be done is to actually convince businessmen and entrepreneurs that Penticton really is “open for business” by actively helping people to realize their goals. The second thing is not just talking about encouraging business in our own community and making contingency plans. We must pick our target markets we want and go to them with our message. Third item is the ongoing job of attracting four-season tourists. We need tourism to last year round. In the current world climate, we can-

not just send out print material that covers Canada in broad strokes. We must again ¿nd the distinct markets we want and directly entice them to come and sample Penticton. MIKE PEARCE — We have a golden opportunity with the new Centre of Excellence. The young people who graduate from there will need jobs. As a community we need to help the college co-ordinate the graduates with a view to starting some potential new industry in Penticton. Perhaps we can match these needs with some of the money we have here that people need to invest and everyone can make a pro¿t. Co-operation with the private sector to make working with City Hall and its rules easier. Using city lands where appropriate such as the recent sale to Normar of city lands, which helped them create jobs and the sale of city lots near the SOEC for dormitories, which enhance the Okanagan Hockey School. We need to push hard to obtain any spin-offs if the corrections facility is built in, say Oliver. Increase the number of economic incentive zones to give businesses incentive to settle here. JUDY SENTES — City council must do everything possible to nurture and grow economic development. We have created economic zones and implemented incentives but we must be more dedicated in marketing the opportunity of Penticton for business investment. Targeting speci¿c industries compatible to our locale would be my ¿rst priority and, I hope, that of our economic of¿ce. JOHN VASSILAKI — Creating jobs is always an important issue. A. Upgrade infrastructure in the downtown core such as water and sewer so that smaller projects will be able to take place. At the present time, parts of Ellis Street, Martin Street and Winnipeg Street do not have water capacity for a four-storey apartment building. South Main Street is in the same predicament with sewer. B. Partner with private enterprise to build facilities that will be self-suf¿cient, for example a day and overnight marina by the Sicamous. C. Make city land available and give incentives to new and present businesses to the industrial area. We need more opportunities in this area to attract new industry with good paying jobs. TERRY YEATMAN — Try to attract new business by lowering development costs, make it easier for them to establish new businesses in our area and I think it’s so important to shop locally and get established businesses thriving so they can afford to hire new people.

Re-Elect Mayor Dan Ashton

No o v n 19 emb th er

Call Dan at 250-809-7484 or visit www.MayorAshton.com


Western News Staff

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WISE BUYERS READ THE LEGAL COPY: Vehicle(s) may be shown with optional equipment. Dealer may sell or lease for less. Limited time offers. Offers may be cancelled at any time without notice. See your Ford Dealer for complete details or call the Ford Customer Relationship Centre at 1-800-565-3673. *Purchase a new 2011 Ranger Super Cab Sport 4X2/2011 F-150 Super Cab XLT 4X4/2011 F-250 Super Cab XLT 4X4 Western Edition/2011 F-350 Crew Cab XLT 4X4 Lariat diesel engine for $14,999/$28,999/$39,999/$57,999 after Total Manufacturer Rebate of $6,000/$8,500/$8,000/$10,000 deducted. Taxes payable on full amount of purchase price after Manufacturer Rebate has been deducted. Offers include freight and air tax of $1,450/$1,550/$1,550/$1,550 but exclude variable charges of license, fuel fill charge, insurance, registration, PPSA, administration fees, any environmental charges or fees, and all applicable taxes. All prices are based on Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price. Manufacturer Rebates can be used in conjunction with most retail consumer offers made available by Ford of Canada at either the time of factory order or delivery, but not both. Manufacturer Rebates are not combinable with any fleet consumer incentives. †Receive $6,000/$8,500/$8,000/$10,000 in Manufacturer Rebates with the purchase or lease of a new 2011 Ranger Super Cab Sport 4X2/2011 F-150 Super Cab XLT 4X4/2011 F-250 Super Cab XLT 4X4 Western Edition/2011 F-350 Crew Cab XLT 4X4 Lariat diesel engine. This offer can be used in conjunction with most retail consumer offers made available by Ford of Canada at either the time of factory order or delivery, but not both. Manufacturer Rebates are not combinable with any fleet consumer incentives. ♦Based on competitive data available at the time of testing using Ford drive-cycle tests (in accordance with the guidelines of the Society of Automotive Engineers’ Standard J1321) of comparably equipped models. Class is Full-Size Pickups over 8,500 lbs. GVWR. **Estimated fuel consumption ratings for the 2011 Ranger 4X2 4.0L V6 5-speed Manual transmission: [13.5L/100km (21MPG) City, 9.8L/100km (29MPG) Hwy]/ 2011 F-150 4X4 5.0L V8 6-speed Automatic transmission: [15L/100km (19MPG) City, 10.5L/100km (27MPG) Hwy]. Fuel consumption ratings based on Transport Canada approved test methods. Actual fuel consumption will vary based on road conditions, vehicle loading and driving habits. ‡Remember that even advanced technology cannot overcome the laws of physics. It’s always possible to lose control of a vehicle due to inappropriate driver input for the conditions. ‡‡Some mobile phones and some digital media players may not be fully compatible – check www.syncmyride.com for a listing of mobile phones, media players, and features supported. Driving while distracted can result in loss of vehicle control, accident and injury. Ford recommends that drivers use caution when using mobile phones, even with voice commands. Only use mobile phones and other devices, even with voice commands, not essential to driving when it is safe to do so. SYNC is optional on most new Ford vehicles. ††© 2011 Sirius Canada Inc. “SIRIUS”, the SIRIUS dog logo, channel names and logos are trademarks of SIRIUS XM Radio Inc. and are used under licence. ▼Program in effect from October 1, 2011 to January 3, 2012 (the “Program Period”) To qualify, customer must turn in a 2005 model year or older vehicle that is in running condition (able to start and move and without missing parts) and has been properly registered/plated or insured for the last 3 months (the “Criteria”). Eligible customers will receive [$500]/[$1,000]/[$2,500]/[$3,000] towards the purchase or lease of a new 2011/2012 Ford [Fiesta (excluding S), Focus (excluding S)]/[Fusion (excluding SE), Taurus (excluding SE), Mustang (excluding Value Leader), Escape (excluding XLT I4 Manual), Transit Connect (excluding EV), Ranger (excluding Regular Cab 4x2 XL), Edge (excluding SE), Flex (excluding SE), Explorer (excluding base)]/[F-150 (excluding Regular Cab 4x2 XL), Expedition, E-Series]/[F250-550] – all Raptor, GT500, BOSS302, and Medium Truck models excluded (each an “Eligible Vehicle”). Taxes payable before Rebate amount is deducted. To qualify: (i) customer must, at the time of the Eligible Vehicle sale, provide the Dealer with (a) sufficient proof of Criteria, and (b) signed original ownership transferring customer vehicle to the Authorized Recycler; and (ii) Eligible Vehicle must be purchased, leased, or factory ordered during the Program Period. Offer only available to residents of Canada and payable in Canadian dollars. Offer is transferable to persons domiciled with the owner of the recycled vehicle. Offer can be used in conjunction with most retail consumer offers made available by Ford at either the time of factory order or delivery, but not both. Offer not available on any vehicle receiving CPA, GPC, or Daily Rental Rebates and the Commercial Fleet Rebate Program (CFIP). Limited time offer, see dealer for details or call the Ford Customer Relationship Centre at 1-800-565-3673. ©2011 Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited. All rights reserved.

Penticton Western News Wednesday, November 9, 2011 www.pentictonwesternnews.com 25

Traffic stop leads police to cocaine discovery news

hicle by Otis, the RCMP service dog. The vehicle, a 2006 Mazda, was seized and will be sought to be forfeited as offence-related property under provisions of the Criminal Code. A 46-year-old male from Burnaby faces charges of cocaine possession for the purpose of traf¿cking.


26 www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Wednesday, November 9, 2011 Penticton Western News

Your community. Your classikeds.

250.492.0444

INFO

Classified

• CHECK YOUR AD! Notice of error must be given in time for correction before the second insertion of any advertisement. The publisher will not be responsible for omissions or for more than one incorrect insertion, or for damages or costs beyond the cost of the space actually occupied by the error. • Advertisers are reminded that Provincial legislation forbids the publication of any advertisement which discriminates against any person because of race, religion, sex, colour, nationality, ancestry or place of origin, or age, unless the condition is justified by a bona fide requirement for the work involved. • Readers: In ads where ‘male’ is referred to, please read also as ‘female’ and where ‘female’ is used, read also as ‘male’.

Word Classified Advertising Deadlines: WEDNESDAY PAPER TUESDAY 10 A.M. FRIDAY PAPER THURSDAY 10 A.M.

fax 250.492.9843 email classikeds@pentictonwesternnews.com Announcements

Travel

Employment

Employment

Employment

Personals

Travel

DATING SERVICE. Longterm/short-term relationships, free to try!!! 1-877-297-9883. Live intimate conversation, Call: #4011 or 1-888-5346984. Live adult 1on1 Call: 1866-311-9640 or #4010. Meet Local Single Ladies. 1-877804-5381. (18+).

BRING THE family! Sizzling Summer Specials at Florida’s Best Beach! New Smyrna Beach, FL. See it all at: www.nsbfla.com/bonjour or call 1-800-214-0166.

Business Opportunities

Education/Trade Schools

Education/Trade Schools

WORK AT HOME Motivated people needed for expanding online health and wellness opportunity. www.starnorth.info

GET PAID To Lose weight. $5,000 For Your Success Story. Personal Image TV Show. Call to Qualify: 416-730-5684 ext 2243. www.mertontv.ca Joanna@mertontv.ca.

Childcare Available

ACCOUNTING & Payroll Trainees needed. Large & small firms seeking certified A&P staff now. No experience? Need training? Career training & job placement available. 1-888-424-9417. AIRLINES ARE HIRINGTrain for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (877)818-0783.

OPEN EARLY 8 AM MONDAY MORNINGS TO SERVE YOU BETTER!

250-492-0444

Regular office hours: Monday to Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Announcements

Announcements

Engagements

Funeral Homes

Nunes-Pottinger Funeral Service & Crematorium

Serving our South Okanagan communities with compassion, respect, and understanding. The families of Britney Judith Zelmer (formerly of Penticton) and Ryan Kenneth King (of Victoria) are happy to announce their engagement. Wedding to take place May 20th, 2012 at Hatley Castle, Victoria.

John Nunes Daryn Pottinger

Phone 250-498-0167 (24 hrs) 34505 - 89th St. Oliver, BC www.nunes-pottinger.com

Coming Events RE-Elect Shelley CLARKE for Trustee Nov. 19

Information Funeral Homes

Credible Cremation Services Ltd.

Our #1 priority is to serve families. If finances are a concern, call us, we can help

Basic Cremation $990 +taxes (Penticton Area)

250-493-3912 24 hrs “No Hidden Costs”

559 Ellis St., Penticton

www.crediblecremation.com

Pre-Pay & Save

Education/Trade Schools

Anyone witnessing accident on Calgary Ave, Penticton, Sept. 23, approx 10:00am, between car & man on scooter, pls call ICBC 250-493-4181, Tammy, Lisa, or Frances.

Personals Alcoholics Anonymous, if your drinking is affecting you and those around you, call 250-490-9216 ATTENTION RESIDENTIAL School Survivors! If you received the CEP (Common Experience Payment), you may be eligible for further Cash Compensation. To see if you qualify, phone toll free 1-877988-1145 now. Free service! GET PAID - Grow Marijuana Legally. Educational seminar, Victoria. December 3 & 4 th. Legal/medical/cultivation MMj. Tickets - 250 870-1882 or greenlineacademy.com

Education/Trade Schools

Lost & Found lost, Oct. 7, light green and white plaid snowboarding jacket, Pen High or Naramata bus, please call (250)492-3767

Travel

Children Pam’s Family Daycare licensed, spaces 1yr & up. CCRR member. 250-492-0113 Treasured Moments Daycare, licensed, has spots avail. for 0-5 years old in Ok Falls, call Julie, 250-486-2798

Employment Business Opportunities

CANCEL YOUR TIMESHARE. NO Risk Program. STOP Mortgage & Maintenance Payments Today. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Free Consultation. Call Us Now. We Can Help! 1-888-356-5248.

EARN EXTRA INCOME. Learn to operate a Mini Office Outlet from your home. Free online training, flexible hours, great income. No selling required, www.123bossfree.com HOME BASED BUSINESS. We need serious and motivated people for expanding health & wellness industry. High speed internet and phone essential. Free online training. www.project4wellness.com Partner- Company owns 750 new cigarette & Snack Machines to place into 129 Factories Exclusively for 20 yrs $250,000 req.’d 778-754-1891

Obituaries

Obituaries

Timeshare ASK YOURSELF what is your TIMESHARE worth? We will find a buyer/renter for CA$H. NO GIMMICKS- JUST RESULTS! 1-(888)879-7165. www.BuyATimeshare.com

FLAHARTY JOHN Passed away after a valiant battle with cancer on October 31, 2011 at the age of 68 years. John will be sadly missed and lovingly remembered by his beloved, Bev, three children; JoAnn of Penticton, Kevin and Lorrie both of Dawson Creek, three grandchildren; Dalaina, Kendell and Steven, Bev’s children; Doug (Nick) and Dana (Paul) and granddaughter, Piper all of Kelowna, twin brother, Jim (Patsy) of Calahoo, Alberta and sister, Patsy (Ed) Ellul of Toronto, Ontario. A grave side service will be held at 10:00 am on Saturday, November 12, 2011 at the Penticton Lakeview Cemetery, with Padre John Briscall, officiating. Condolences may be directed through Providence Funeral Homes; providencefuneralhomes.com Providence Funeral Homes Parkview Chapel (250) 493-1774

Education/Trade Schools

Education/Trade Schools

Career Opportunities COURSES starting Jan. 3/12 Natural Health Practitioner, Wholistic Practitioner & Day Spa Practitioner, Aroma Therapist, Reflexologist & More! www.naturalhealthcollege.com

Community Newspapers

Career Opportunities

Class 1 Drivers to haul dry vans Western Canada & US. Only drivers with 2 years exp. & US border crossing capability. Dedicated tractors, paid drops, direct deposit. No phone calls Fax 250-546-0600

Obituaries

12160 - 88th Ave Sry. BC

1.888.546.2886 Visit: www.lovecars.ca

FIND EVERYTHING YOU NEED IN THE CLASSIFIEDS

Career Opportunities

Service Technician

We’re at the heart of things™

Drivers/Courier/ Trucking

Courses Starting Now!

Get certified in 13 weeks

International Truck Dealership located in beautiful Northeastern BC is seeking Journeyman Service Technicians to join our established team of professionals. Successful candidates will be self motivated and computer literate and possess strong mechanical and diagnostic skills. We offer an excellent wage and benefit package. Please submit resume to:

Email: Andy.Schurmann@gearorama.ca Fax: 250-782-8142

Obituaries

Obituaries

CRANDON John A. (Jack)

It is with deepest sadness we announce the passing ng hn of our dear husband, father and grandfather John y Crandon of Keremeos BC. John passed away suddenly on October 28th, 2011 at the age off 70. John is survived by his life companion and loving wife of 45 years, Gail. He is lovingly remembered by his son, Geof (Kimberley) off Sooke BC, granddaughter Tiana of Red Deerr nd AB, his daughter LeeAnn Rouleau (Gilles) and C. grandsons Dustin and Brady of West Kelowna BC. don John is also survived by his brother Stan Crandon ie of (Doreen) of Moose Jaw SK and Marj Gerrie owchuk Prince George, BC, his mother in law Verna Powchuk d nephews, of Kelowna BC, as well as numerous nieces and d bby hi t in laws and special friends. John is predeceased his parents h moved to hen Catherine and James Crandon. John was born in Moose Jaw, SK, and then T they Regina, SK in 1963 where he met and married the love of his life Gail. Together o Slims had 2 children and in 1978 the family moved to Penticton, BC where John owned lllwright until Landscaping. Later in his life he changed careers and worked as a millwright n just about ng his retirement in 2003. John loved to help people and enjoyed fixing anything. John loved the game of golf; his best game was 2 over par. He fishing. John also loved to spend time outdoors camping and fishing. n Dodi, his nd always loved having his sidekick and loyal friend i south to ing poodle at his side. John loved the snowbird life, heading Yuma, Arizona every winter. A Celebration of Life willl be held in the spring. In lieu of flowers donations can be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of BC and Yukon. Your messages of condolence, sharing your fond memories of John may be sent to: www.grahamfh.com. Arrangements entrusted to...

Graham Funeral Home 5920 Kootenay Street, Oliver, B.C. (250) 498-3833

Education/Trade Schools

Education/Trade Schools

Education/Trade Schools

Become a Psychiatric Nurse in your own community There is an urgent need for more Registered Psychiatric Nurses (RPN), particularly outside the urban areas of the province. And with the workforce aging – the average age of a Registered Psychiatric Nurse in BC is 47 years – the number of retirees from the profession is exceeding the number of graduates. Entry-level earnings start at $30.79/hour to $40.42/hour. Train Locally – The only program of its kind in BC, students can learn within their local communities via distance education, local and/or regional clinical placements, and some regional classroom delivery. This 23 month program is accredited by the College of Registered Psychiatric Nurses of BC (CRPNBC). Government student loans, Employment & Labour Market Services (ELMS), band funding & other financing options available to qualified applicants.

Toll Free:

1-87-STENBERG www.stenbergcollege.com


Penticton Western News Wednesday, November 9, 2011

www.pentictonwesternnews.com 27

Employment

Employment

Employment

Education/Trade Schools

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

MEDICAL OFFICE Trainees needed! Hospitals & Dr.’s need medical office & medical admin staff. No experience? Need training? Career training & job placement available. 1888-748-4126. TRAIN TO Be an Apartment/Condominium Manager at home! We have jobs across Canada. Thousands of graduates working. 31 years of success! Government certified. www.RMTI.ca or 1-800-6658339, 604-681-5456. WORK FROM Home. Find out why over 1,285 CanScribe Career College Medical Transcription graduates, aged 18-72, can’t be wrong. Free information.1-800-466-1535. www.canscribe.com. admissions@canscribe.com

Automotive Detailer Needed immediately. Experienced, responsible, hard working, results oriented, a great attitude & a clean BC drivers abstract. Opportunity for advancement for proper individual. Fax resume to 250-493-7120 or email davepascoe@bobbrowngm.com

No walk-ins please.

Alberta earthmoving company requires a Journeyman Heavy Duty Mechanic. You will work in a modern shop and also have mechanics truck for field work. The job is at Edson, Alberta. We require that you have experience on Cat crawlers and or Deere excavators. Call Lloyd at (780)723-5051. A Penticton firm has an immediate opening for a Senior Bookkeeper/Accountant. Successful applicant must be fully trained in the use of AccPak and be prepared to take over a busy office. This is a full time position with excellent benefits. Please call 250-809-6150 JOBS! JOBS! JOBS! No experience necessary, we will train. Must be 18+yrs. of age. Call 250-860-3590 or Email: info@plazio.ca

CONSTRUCTION COMPANY requires Dispatch Manager Central Interior. Must ensure smooth, efficient scheduling of material delivery & perform operational tasks for truck fleet. Candidates will be organized, proactive and work well under stress. Experience in trucking an asset. Forward resumes to paverswanted@yahoo.ca. Exp. Hooktender. Permanent work, 210 plus days a year in the East Kootenays, full benefits & overtime. A good portion of work is done with Mobile Back Spar and Grapple. Excavator experience and spotting will be required.(250)349-5415 or fax (250)349-7522 JASPER CONSTRUCTORS is hiring HR/Labour Relations Advisors for Vancouver and Kelowna to oversee staff recruitment, deployment, and workforce planning of field labour. Receive full benefits! Please apply online at www.applyfirst.ca/job27830 Planerman & Millwright required immediately for North Okanagan Forest Company. Preference will be given to those with experience in the forest industry. Fax resume to 250-838-9637. Quesnel Industrial Transportation has opening for fulltime log truck drivers. Year round work avail. Above average pay and health plan provided. 1250-992-2309.

Education/Trade Schools

Education/Trade Schools

Help Wanted

HHDI RECRUITING is hiring on behalf of Baker Hughes

EQUIPMENT OPERATORS Baker Hughes

Alberta -

based oilfield services company is currently hiring equipment operators. Class 1 or 3 license preferred, but we will train the right candidate with a Class 5. Please call 250-718-3330 or Fax: 1-888-679-0759 For more information or send your resume & current drivers abstract to: driverclass1@shaw.ca We are still hiring - Dozer & excavator operators required by a busy Alberta oilfield construction company. We require operators that are experienced and preference will be given to operators that have constructed oilfield roads and drilling locations. You will be provided with motels and restaurant meals. Competitive wages, bonus and transportation daily to and from job sites. Our work is in the vicinity of Edson, Alberta. Call 780-723-5051.

Education/Trade Schools

STUDY.WORK. S U . O

SUCCEED

TRAIN TO BE A EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATOR IN PENTICTON TODAY!

Early Childhood Educators develop daily activities for children. They lead children in activities by telling or reading stories, teaching songs, demonstrating the use of simple musical instruments, preparing craft materials & taking the children to local points of interest. Train locally for the skills necessary in this rewarding career Àeld.

JOIN US ON:

Employment

Employment

250.770.2277 www.sprottshaw.com

CALL PENTICTON:

Painting & Decorating

Help Wanted

Trades, Technical

Financial Services

POSITION Available for 4th Year. or Lic. Auto Tec., with well rounded exp. integrity for well established BCAA approved RPM Auto located in Kelowna, eight fully equipped bays, with the latest equipment. Email resume: rpmauto@shawlink.ca or Fax (250)868-3587 or Drop off to:1761 Harvey Ave PROCESSOR OPERATOR WANTED to run a Waratah dangle head 320 Cat. Work on site in our post and rail yard in beautiful Southern BC. Great working conditions, competitive wage, benefits, profit sharing, 10 hour days, 4 days a week. This is a F/T permanent position. Email or phone: g_zieske@xplornet.ca Gary at 250-295-7911 ext. 102

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com

sclubb@wjscanada.com, only candidates who receive an interview will be contacted.

Income Opportunity GET PAID Daily! Now accepting: Simple P/T & F/T Online Computer Related Work. No experience is needed. No fees or charges to participate. Start Today, www.BCWOC.com

Services

Sales

Esthetics Services

SALES Representative A Port Kells industrial engine distributor requires a full time inside/ outside sales representative. Job consists of a great variety of duties. Mechanical aptitude, good phone skills and computer knowledge are required. Reply to: resume2011@shaw.ca

**By popular demand, Wanda’s Esthetics offers this fall/winter $90 special-3hours of esthetic services. Call for your choice at 250-770-1628.

Financial Services

Trades, Technical

Reduce Debt

F/T Certified Gas Fitter required for Horizon Climate Controls, a community minded, progressive HVAC & electrical contracting company located in Williams Lake, BC. Applicant should have a strong service & installation background in residential, commercial and industrial settings. Competitive wages with benefit package. Email resume to: horizonclimatecontrols@ shawbiz.ca or fax to (250)3989099. Required immediately to join our team: one Licensed automotive technician, Ford experience would be an asset. competitive wages, benefit package with pension. Drop resume off to Colin At Lake City Ford or email to csmith@lakecityford.ca

GET AN Instant cash loan any time you need! Pawn or Sell your watch or jewelry at online pawn shop securely from home. Call Toll-Free 1-888435-7870, www.PawnUp.com. IF YOU own a home or real estate, Alpine Credits can lend you money: It’s that simple. Your credit/age/income is not an issue. 1-800-587-2161.

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

by up to

70%

• Avoid bankruptcy • 0% Interest

778-476-5946 250-860-1653 www.4pillars.ca All 4 PillarsTM ofÀces are independently owned and operated.

ARE YOU EXPERIENCING FINANCIAL DISTRESS? Relief is only a call away! Call 250-979-4357 to set up your FREE consultation in Penticton. Donna Mihalcheon CA, CIRP BDO Canada Limited, Trustee in Bankruptcy 200, 1628 Dickson Ave., Kelowna, B.C. V1Y 9X1

SALES PROFESSIONAL Sentes Chevrolet’s business is growing and we are looking for an enthusiastic and energetic individual who would like become a member of the Sales Team. If you are interested in pursuing a professional sales career in the automotive industry please forward your resume to dougsharpe@sentes.com. Our apprentice program and salary guarantee may be exactly what you are looking for.

sentes D.L. 22742

Trades, Technical

Trades, Technical

Get Trained for a Profitable, Long-Term Career...

CONSTRUCTION

COMMUNITY COLLEGE S i n c e 1 9 0 3

Services

WJS is seeking various RCW positions in Penticton, preference will be given to applicants posessing diploma in Human Services field with valid CPR, First Aid, NVCI, and a valid Class 4 DL, prefer at least 1 year experience working with developmentally challended adults, WJS will provide training for the right candidate, please fax resumes to program manager at 250493-2238 or email to:

in one of the Fastest-Growing Industries:

SproUStt-S ha w JOIN ON:

Services

Accepting applications for a 19week Construction Trades Training Program. Get hands-on experience in various trades followed by practical on-site training. Program will be offered In Penticton. For applications & additional information, call Penticton:

250-486-7330 Proudly sponsored by the Southern Interior Construction Association

SMALL BUSINESS Grants. start or grow your small business. Free to apply. Qualify for up to 100K. www.leadershipgrants.ca.

Hairstylists MEN’S HAIRCUT / STYLE Special $20 by Experienced Stylist Tues, Wed, Thurs 9:30 to 5. By Appointment Only. 250.492.3699

Legal Services CRIMINAL RECORD? Guaranteed Record Removal since 1989. Confidential, Fast, & Affordable. Our A+BBB Rating assures EMPLOYMENT & TRAVEL FREEDOM. Call for FREE INFO. BOOKLET

1-8-NOW-PARDON (1-866-972-7366) RemoveYourRecord.com

Cleaning Services Mature, honest, reliable former B&B owner looking for homes to clean, ref’s avail., (250)4975227

Countertops CALL MIKE’S ELITE Countertops- All Countertops - Granite, Caesar Stone, Sile Stone, Han Stone, Marble and all natural stone products. Hundreds of colours to choose from. We offer a special every month, call Mike to find out this month’s deal! Please call (250)575-8543, 2392 Dominion Road. REFACE Countertops. 1/2 the Cost of Replacing. Granite & Corian Designs. 470-2235.

Garden & Lawn

LIVE

Christmas Trees

Make Your Christmas Truly Unforgettable

GIARDINOS 250-493-0007 149 Upper Bench Rd. S.

Home Improvements BELCAN Painting & Renos Licensed-Insured-WCB, Painting, Tiles, Flooring, Finishing Carpentry, Kitchen & Bath Reno’s. Call Len 250-486-8800

DONE RIGHT at a reasonable price: Painting, Repairs, Reno’s. Licensed, Insured, WCB. Call Nick 250-486-2359. GREAT Canadian Builders Ltd. “Turning Houses into Homes.” Your complete renovation specialists. 25 years experience. All interior & exterior work, concrete, sheds, garages, fences, roofing, decks, drywall, framing. Restorations, additions. Licensed and insured, for your free estimate call Steve 250-490-9762, 250488-0407 Rob Hurren Carpentry, renovations big and small, kitchen and bath remodeling, doors trim work, finishing and more, professional design available, call Rob 250-809-7131

Moving & Storage FAMILY Movers. Moving? Anything, anywhere. Local and long distance trips. Packing service available, weekly trips to Vancouver, Alberta, full and partial loads. Cheapest rates in the valley. Free Estimates, 250-493-2687

Auctions

REASONABLE RATES specializing in PAINTING, home repairs and upgrades, no job too small. Truck available, call B&B Handyman Service, ask for Bruce, 250-809-4771

Rubbish Removal PENTICTON Junk Removal! Anything goes! Household waste, furniture and appliances to the dump 250-770-0827 TERRY the JUNK GUY 778931-0741 Rubbish, Cars, Yard Cleanups, Anything TerryTheJunkGuy.ca 778-931-0741

Telephone Services HOME PHONE Reconnect. Call 1-866-287-1348. Prepaid Long Distance Specials! Feature Package Specials! Referral Program! Don’t be without a home phone! Call to Connect! 1-866-287-1348

Tree Services Phipps Tree Service. Gutter blowouts, sm. repairs, book now. Bucket truck for X-mas lights. 250-488-3316

Pets & Livestock

Equestrian Very friendly 5 year American Paint gelding, experienced rider. Call (250)496-5120

Feed & Hay 1st $6.50 & 2nd $7.00 cut Alfalfa grass mix, Irrigated, 70 80lb bales, barn stored, (250)547-6816 800 lb round bales: this years grass hay $50./bale, last years grass hay $25./bale. Wheat Straw bales 3x3x8 700 lb $40/bale 250-804-6720 good quality meadow hay, tarp covered, $150 per ton, (250)499-5407 HAY FOR SALE; Grass or Grass Alfalfa mix, Round bales $70 each, approx. 800lbs. Large square bales, 3x3x8, $160/ton. Delivery avail. on larger orders. 250838-6630 *HAY-SALES-GUARANTEED Quality Grass, Alfalfa, Mixed square bales, round bales & Silage bales. Delivery avail. (250)804-6081,(250)833-6763.

Livestock Shavings Friendly service from Summerland since 1972 Les Porter 250-490-1132

Pets CKC registered Working Line Male German Shepherd puppy for sale. Both parents are personal protection trained, good prospects, great pedigree. first shots and micro chipped.Ready to go. 250-296-3316

GREAT Dane puppies, mantle & black, Ready Nov 18th, $1000, 1(250)379-2022 HAVANESE / BICHON frise puppies, come with shots, del available. (250)804-6848 I am Tobi, a lab cross, recently lost my companion so I need a middle-sized older dog (5-6yrs), for play and run in big yard and loving home, (250)493-4624 Miniature Australian Shepherd puppies, tri/merle, tails docked dewclawed, 1st shots, Ready Nov26, $750 250- 540-3111 Trinity Shepherds Malamute/ Shepherd cross, puppies, avail now, Vet checked all shots $250.ea 250-547-9763

Merchandise for Sale

Appliances White Maytag fridge, Fridgidaire fridge, $150 ea (delivered),large cap. washer & dryers, works exc.$150 (delivered & set up) Front load Bosch washer $200. 250-7700827

UNRESERVED AUCTION SALE - NOV. 10 - 6PM Estate Wood Working Tools Thickness planer, routers, chop saw, compressors, pressure washer, lathe, drill press and much more viewing - 825 Westminster Ave. W, Penticton, BC or view at okanaganauctions.com


28 www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Merchandise for Sale

Merchandise for Sale

Wednesday, November 9, 2011 Penticton Western News

Real Estate

Rentals

Rentals Apt/Condo for Rent

Apt/Condo for Rent

Homes for Rent

1 & 2 bdrm, newly reno’d suites. Secured access, util incl, near hospital, bus route and close to all amenities, n/p, n/s 250-938-7146

Summerland cozy studio unit, 6appl., wall bed, avail. to quiet, reliable, ns tenant, $760 (util incl.), (250)494-7488

$1250, 2 Bed reno’d house, 7 appl, fncd yard, shop, 2+ parking, lane axcess, N/S, pets upon approval, 250-490-5220 1bdrm, f/s, close to shopping & transit, $600,Dennis at Realty Executives, (250)493-4372 2bdrm, avail. immed, pet neg., $925+util, (250)723-6127 loreenbrown@shaw.ca 2bdrm house on large lot, nice setting, 790E Duncan Ave., non-smokers, np, long term, $975, 604-354-2442 2 BDR Penticton near IGA 5 App NS NP ref req $1100/mo call 250-490-5001 3bdrm, 2ba, f/s/dw/m/w/d, air, RV parking, fenced, $1300, Dennis at Realty Executives, (250)493-4372 3bdrm, newly reno’d., 2 1/2 bath, house w/view, bsmt, DreamEasy kitchen, close to Mission Hill Elem. $1,300/mth + utils. (250) 503-1540 626 Wade Ave. 3 bdrm, f/s, w/d. Call (250)490-1700, 250486-3791. 732 Winnipeg St. 3 bdrm+ den, 2 bath, dbl gar, fenced yard w/back lane, vacant $1300/mo. VJ 250-490-1530 House 1 level, close to school/shopping/hospital, 3bdrm, 1bath, 5appl, dbl garage, very clean Avail. Dec. 01, $1200/mo+util. 250-493-8881 Keremeos area 2bdrm mobile. Rent $550+$150 util, next to orchard. Cell 250-499-0558. Naramata, 3bdrm, 2ba, f/s/dw/w/d, dble carport, $1200, Dennis at Realty Executives, 250-493-4372 nice 2bdrm, 1bath, 6appl., near school, SOEC & DT, $975+util., avail. Dec. 1, ref req., (250)488-7247 Summerland, avail Dec 1, 2 bdrm, 2 bath rancher, c/port, big yard, close to downtown, n/p, n/s. $1000/mo + utils. 1 (250)494-0668

Appliances

Misc. for Sale

For Sale By Owner

Apt/Condo for Rent

EXTREMELY LOW PRICES on popular BRAND NAMES because of slight scratch and dent.

infrared sauna, 2 person, solid cedar, $1000, Free Spirit treadmill, gym quality, $400, sofa & love seat, emerald green pattern, new condition, $400, queen cast iron bed, incl. headboard, footboard & frame, $75, (250)404-8680, or email: cleo1958@shaw.ca Single box spring & mattress, dbl box spring & mattress, queen box spring & mattress all with frames. $150 each delivered. (250)493-2687

2bd/2bth condo a/c gas fp np 5appl. adult close to senior centre/shops bus stop smoke free new paint move-in ready. 250-545-2983, 250-545-1130 MUST SELL, REDUCED, was $599,000, then $549,000, sacrificed for $499,000 firm, 5bdrm w/inlaw suite, plus 3 acres irrigated, 2 acres for pasture, 1604 Sparton Dr., Penticton, 250-492-3330 or www.spartondrive.com Newer Condo in Coldstream, 3 bdrm, den, 3 car garage, in-ground pool, furnished. $639,900. NO HST. drive by 8761 Hofer Dr. (250)550-3039

MOVE IN

SAVE HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS. Washer/Dryer set starting at $399 Ranges starting at $299 LG TV 50” $499 we do all of our repairs

CANADIAN LIQUIDATORS #104 2100 Dartmouth Rd, Pent, 250-490-0554 1-877390-0554

Why buy retail? When you can buy BELOW WHOLESALE

Fruit & Vegetables Walnuts for sale, $1.50/lb or 15lbs for $17, (250)492-6956

Firewood/Fuel dry fir, larch, tamarack, dry pine, starts at $250/cord, 1/2 cord avail., truck loads $50, free kindling, seniors disc., free delivery to Penticton & some areas, (250)490-8325, 250-253-3524

Furniture

PENTICTON BARGAIN STORE We buy and sell quality furniture Showroom Open 10-5

778-476-5919

256 Westminster Ave. W. www.pentictonbargainstore.com

futon & mattress, black steel frame, excellent condition, $60, (250)492-3015

Heavy Duty Machinery 6 Yard Sander $1200, Christy Carriage for yarding $1000, (250) 545-4653 or 308-0977

Medical Supplies Shoprider Mobility Scooters & Powerchairs. New & Used, Stairlifts & Vertical lifts, www.okmobility.ca Kelowna: 250-764-7757, Vernon: 250542-3745, Toll free: 1-888-5423745

Misc. for Sale CAN’T GET up your stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help! No obligation consultation. Comprehensive warranty. Can be installed in less than 1 hour. Call now 1-866-981-6591. CAN’T GET Up Your Stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn Stairlifts now! Mention this ad & get 10% off your new Stairlift! Call 1-866-981-5990. Car Dolly: Rewired, wheels have been greased very recently. Works very well. Asking $799. Call 250-354-7471. Located in Nelson DO-IT-YOURSELF Steel Buildings priced to clear make an offer! Ask about free delivery, most areas! Call for quick quote and free brochure 1-800-668-5111 ext. 170. FAST RELIEF the First Night!! Restless Leg Syndrome and Leg Cramps Gone. Sleep Soundly, Safe with Medication, Proven Results. 1-800-7658660. www.allcalm.com. Golf clubs, right hand w/golf bag, $150, JVC 32” TV, $100, bathroom cabinet, never used, $60, dart board, never used, $20, (250)462-6275 Moving sale-dark wood desk, couch, two solid wood bookcases, secretary desk, treadmill, and metal dining chairs. Phone 250-493-6565 evenings and weekends

Misc. Wanted Coin Collector Buying old Coins, Silver, Gold, Olympic + Also buying bulk silver coins. Chad: 250-863-3082 (Local)

Wanted, 30 treated 6x8 railway ties, call (250)490-6669

Musical Instruments 8th year Anniversary Sale, new music items have arrived, Peavey // Marshall // Takamine // Behringer // Guitar Stands //, Strings // much much more, NO Tax with this ad, 15% Pawn Fees with this ad, rentals also available, Pawn Traders and Music Sales, 71 Nanaimo Ave. E, (250)490-3040 Guitars, amplifiers, drums, keyboards, band & string instruments, music books & access., music lessons, sales & rentals, Skaha Sound, 51 Nanaimo Ave. E, 250-492-4710

Sporting Goods AB lounge 2 sit up bench, c/w instructions, DVD & VHS, exc. cond., $60, (250)492-3015 Weber & Markin Gunsmiths Quality Firearms Buy & Sell at The Best Little Gun Shop Around, 4-1691 Powick Rd Kel 250-762-7575 Tues-Sat 10-6

Stereo / DVD / TV DENON AVR-3803 7.1 Home Theatre Receiver with 115 watts x 8 channels: $180.00 obo. DENON DVD-2900 DV D / S A C D / C D / DV D - AU DIO/CD-R Audiophile grade player (not BlueRay): $180.00 obo. PARADIGM CC-370 v.4 Center Channel, (2) ADP-370 v.4 Surrounds and a PDR-12 v.2 12” Subwoofer, all together for $500.00 obo. All in excellent condition. PENTICTON. Phone 250-488-6716 after 6:00pm.

Real Estate Acreage for Sale MUST SELL, REDUCED, was $599,000, then $549,000, sacrificed for $499,000 firm, 5bdrm w/inlaw suite, plus 3 acres irrigated, 2 acres for pasture, 1604 Sparton Dr., Penticton, 250-492-3330 or www.spartondrive.com

Sporting Goods

Houses For Sale ******* OKHomeseller.com Where smart sellers meet smart buyers! View Thompson Okanagan properties for sale.// Selling? No Commission. (250) 545-2383 or 1-877-291-7576 REDUCED $319,000 2280sq.ft bright home on lg 70x115 ft lot. 3bdrms, 2 up, 1 down, on bus route and less than 5 min walk to Penticton Plaza, schools and hospital. Gas fp, 5 Maytag appliances, daylight bsmt, high efficiency furnace, a/c, lg carport, RV prkg, fenced back yard & back alley access, storage shed, potential in-law suite, fresh paint interior & exterior, call 250-809-9014 to view 101 Duncan Ave E

Mobile Homes & Parks WHOLESALE FACTORY DIRECT. Manufactured, Modular & Park model Homes. Tremendous savings. Luxurious 1512 sq. ft home including delivery and installation only $114,950. Many other plans available. Come see our new display homes 610 Katherine # 58 in West Kelowna Estates Highway 97 to Westside Road, exit North 200 meters to Nancee Way, left 100 meters to Spland Road, right 100 meters to Katherine, left to #58 on right. The Home Boys 778-755-2505 Open House Wednesday to Sunday from 10-6 or www.hbmodular.com

Mortgages Mortgage Help! Beat bank rates for purchases and refinances, immediate debt consolidation, foreclosure relief, and equity loans. Free, fast, friendly, private consultations. Call 1-888-685-6181 www.mountaincitymortgage.ca

Other Areas ARIZONA BUILDING Lots! 50% OFF! 15, AAA+ View Lots. $0 Down! Starting $99/mo! Guaranteed Financing! Near Tucson’s Int’l Airport www.sunsiteslandrush.com Call 1-800-659-9957 Mention Code 7.

Sporting Goods

FOR SALE - ROAD BICYCLES 2011 Norco CRR - SL, M, SRAM Red complete group 53/39, Ritchey Bars and Stem, Mavic Elite wheel $3600. 2009 Norco Diabolique II TT Bike, M, Vision Bars, Carbon Seatpost, forks, DuraAce 7800 brakes, shifters, derailleurs, FSA NeoPro Crank 54/42 - $3200 (no wheels) 2005 Cervelo P3K TT Frame only - 51cm, Carbon Fork and Seatpost - $200 Contact 250-462-4441 or mwalker@blackpress.ca

INCENTIVES 241 Scott Avenue

1 bdrm, 2 bath at prestigious Meritage Loft, 1 blk from lake & park , u/g prkng, f/s, d/w, microwave, w/d. $1000/mo. Dennis @ Realty Executives. 250493-4372

Cable Included, Senior Building, No Smoking, No Pets, Secure Building, Parking, Balcony 1 + 2 Bedroom

1bdrm 2nd floor in DT Penticton, ns, np, could be office/home space, mature tenant, ref req., $650/mo. (incl. util.) Vito (604)291-1059

250-488-1800 250-488-2881

SINGLA SINGLA HOMES HOMES Penticton’s Leader

Penticton’s Leader in Quality Rentals in Quality Rentals

Townhouses 3 or 4 Street bdrm 296 & 298 Maple 2½ bath, family orientated. Townhouses 3 or 4 bdrm Rents start at $1100. Ask 2½ bath, orientated. about ourfamily incentives! New Rents from $1100. Ask Mgmt!

about our incentives!

on 3 yr lease. Commercial/whse/office spaces avail on Government St., Penticton, 1024 sq ft., 250-493-9227

2bdrm, great location, private parking, quiet, secure building, wheelchair accessible, large storage room, laminate floors, $850, heat/cable incl., cat ok with dep., ns, 250-488-7902

bdrm, 1 bath, garage &home. huge 626 Wade-Character yard, perfect for RV storage 3 bdrm, 1 bath, fenced yard

Bachelor, 1 & 2 bdrms avail. immed. & Nov. 1, newly reno’d, $550-$800, central Penticton,water incl.,call (250)4934903 to view

with shed & 4 appl.

407-1750 Atkinson St.

407-1750 Condo. TopAtkinson floor, dlxSt.adult Condo. deluxe bldg. 2top bigfloor, bdrms, 2 full adult bldg. baths, fp, 25 huge appl. bdrms, & large 2 full baths, fp, large covered deckcovered deck, 5 appl.

bdrm 2nd fl unit, laminate flooring, parking avail. great location, $750 heat/cable incl. n/s, cat ok w/deposit, avail. Immediately, 250-488-7902

SUMMERLAND HOUSE SUMMERLAND HOUSE

Furn’d or unfurn’d apt for rent in Princeton Avail. now, need exc ref’s & DD. No pets. Call 1-250-295-1006 for info, lv a message.

Rent top top or or bottom bottom or or both! both! Rent 13611Bloomfi Bloomfield. eld.Top Tophas has 13611 bdrm,2 2full fullbaths, baths,huge huge 3 3bdrm, sundeck&&carpet. carport. Bright sundeck Bright 3 3 bdrm, 1 bathlower in lower is a bdrm, 1 bath, is a must see. Utilities incl.Util. in both! must see! inc.

LARGE 1 & 2bdrm apt. for rent. +40 bldg, $750 & $850 +util, ref’s req. 250-487-1136

Awesome view, 1 bdrm Skaha Pl, top flr, insuite storage, n/p $750 incl util. 250-276-9394

SUMMERLAND 1 BDRM D/T $660.00/month includes water/sewer/shared laundry NS DD required 1/2 month Avail mid Nov Call 778516-5535 wext 105 to view

RENTALS (250) 770-1948 Property Management 101-3547 SKAHA LAKE RD. Skaha Pl. 1 Bdrm, 4th floor, f/s, a/c, secure Downtown: 1 bdrm/bach, f/s, a/c, decks, building & parking. Avail. Now .................. incl. pkg. $600.00-$645.00 incl. util & cable ................................... $68500 incl. water Burns Ave.: 2 bdrm, 1 bath, condo in quiet Pent. Ave. 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath apartment on 4 plex. F/s, w/d, d/w, a/c, balcony & pkg. No main floor. F/S, D/W, A/C, insuite storage Pets. Avail. Now. $800.00 incl. water with carport pkg. $775.00 incl. water. Bassett: 2 bdrm house w/garage & fenced Fairview: Spacious 1 bdrm condo in quiet complex. F/s, w/d, d/w, a/c, lrg deck, incl. yard. F/s, w/d, f/p. Avail. Now. Pets okay. pkg. Avail. Dec. 1. $795.00 incl. water ..................................................$1000.00

MONDAY - FRIDAY

Front Street Realty

Property Management #2 Front St., Penticton, B.C.

Commercial/ Industrial 2 MONTHS FREE RENT

2 BDRM Condo Downtown Penticton, newly reno’d, Adult Bldg. NP/NS, avail now. $775 + util; 1 yr lse. 604-939-3844

966 KingNew St. Mgmt! Cozy home, huge yard, 2 bdrm, 1 bath, plus garage. 966 King St. Cozy home, 2

FOR RENT IN NARAMATA - Suite with open loft - Private - Views Pets OK - Large Property - All Utilities - Wireless - Satellite TV Washer / Dryer - Furnished option Quiet single or couple - 1050 monthly PHONE: 250 496-5198

1bdrm Apt. in clean, quiet, ns bldg, near Cherry Lane, just painted & new carpets, ideal for retired or semi-retired, balcony, elevator & coin laundry, $650+util., np, 250-492-4265

1BED 1bath main floor Summerland LAKEVIEW home $850/month. Laundry, utilities, cable, wireless included. Small pet ok, NS. Call Julian 250-859-2047

250-490-1700 296 & 298 Maple Street

Apartment Furnished

1BDRM, across from Skaha Beach on bus route, long term rental, n/s, n/p. $650/mo+ util, 250-492-9692, avail. Dec. 1

1 bdrm immaculate character apt. Historic building, Uplands area, burgundy walls, high ceilings, oak flrs, on bus route. Seek clean, quiet, person(s), n/p, n/s. (250)492-6319

250-486-3791 250-486-3791 250-490-1215 250-490-1215 250-490-1700

Rentals

250-492-2233 ASK FOR DEBBIE

APARTMENTS

132 POWER STREET 1 bed, fr/st, includes utilities. Avail. NOW .............................................. $700 2 bed, fr/st, includes utilities. Avail. NOW .............................................. $850 284 YORKTON AVENUE ....................................................................... $925 2 bed, 2 bath, fr/st, d/w. Avail. NOW

HOUSES

GILMAN AVE., SUMMERLAND ........................................................... $850 2 bed, fr/st, d/w, w/d, low maint. yard. Avail. NOW 1840 OLIVER RANCH RD., OK FALLS .............................................. $1400 3 bed, 2½ bath, 5 appl. floor, fenced yard, garage. Avail. NOW 296 KINNEY AVE. (NEW) ................................................................... $1500 3 bed, 3 bath, 5 appl., c/a, fenced yard, dble garage. Avail. NOW CORNWALL DRIVE (RENOVATED) ................................................... $1500 2+ bed, 2 bath, 5 appl., hardwood, c/a, large yard, garage. Avail. DEC. 1

3500sqft Versatile Commercial Building. Excellent exposure in Vernon, BC $2042.+TN 1-250-550-5647 APPLE Plaza 770sq.ft, suited for food related retail business. Call Barbara 250-492-6319 COMMERCIAL BUILDING FOR LEASE

9202 Shale Ave. Summerland. 5400 sq. ft x 16 ft high main building + 480 sq. ft. office space on 1/2 acre fenced. Additional 3/4 acre available. Call Allan 250490-7451

Duplex / 4 Plex 2bdrm 2ba unit, laminate floors, central location, private parking, cat ok w/deposit, $900, 250-488-7902 3 bdrm, 1 bath, side by side duplex, 1400 sq ft, hardwood flr, fenced yard, close to Safeway on Weyburn, incl f/s, w/d hook up. Avail Nov 1. $1050/mo+utils. 250-462-7741 4 brm or 2 brm $1590 or $849 OBO. two entrances. two bath, up and down. close to Penticton high school. 250 487 0268 Summerland, upper duplex, 3bdrm, large kitchen, covered parking, shared laundry, ns, np, $950+1/2 util., Avail Dec 1 1. 250-494-9082

Apt/Condo for Rent

Rentals

Motels,Hotels LARGE 1bdrm suites & bachelor suites, avail for rental from Sept. 15 until May 2012. Fully furnished, utilities/cable incl.,, quiet location, near Mall & bus route. Call Valley Star Motel 250-492-7205 MOTEL suites and RV pads $480 up. located at Penticton and Pleasantview Motel & RV park Summerland. 250 487 0268

Apt/Condo for Rent

REALTY EXECUTIVES PENTICTON APARTMENTS: $550

Downtown, 1 bdrm bsmt suite, recently updated, f,s, coin op laundry, extra storage. Avail. Dec. 1 ( H542-3) $600 Between Malls, 1 bdrm bsmt suite, f,s, w.d, laminate floors. Avail. Dec. 1 (OT444) $650 Near library, 1 & 2 bdrm apartments, children welcome, f, /$800 s, a/c, balcony, elevator, covered parking. Cat ok. Avail. Now and Dec. 1(EFR) $660 Dwntwn, 1 bdrm top floor apt, fridge, stove, free cable & laundry. Avail. NOW (ITA) $750 Top floor 2 bdrm condo, 1 bath, laminate flrs, balcony, elevator, coin op laundry. Avail. Dec. 1 (A360) $1000 Alysen Pl., 6th floor, 1 bdrm and a den, 6 appl, sec’d parking, incl. heat. Avail. Now (OT410) $1100 Across from Skaha Beach, top flr, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 5appl, extra storage, cov’d parking, incl. cable. Avail. Dec. 1 (A443) $1500 Lakeview, 6th floor condo, 2 bdrm + den, 6appl, 2 sec’d parking, extra amenities. Avail. Jan. 15 (A352)

TOWNHOUSES: $1100 3 bdrm, 3 bath, basement, f,s, d/w, w.d, close to schools, recently reno’d, 1 year lease req’d. Avail. Now (Th497) $1200 Naramata townhouses brand new, 2 bdrm + den, 2.5 bath, unfin bsmt, garage, near school. Avail. Now (Th496-1)

FURNISHED RENTAL: $1100 Furnished lakefront 2 bdrm home, 2 bath. Avail. from now until May or June 2012 (OT441)

HOUSES: $1100 3 bdrm upper duplex, 5 appl, view of lake and mountains, on Vancouver Hill. Avail. Now (H746-2) $1100 Downtown, newer 2 bdrm, 2 bath, ½ duplex, laminate flrs, ss appliances, low maint. yard. Avail. Now (H747) $1500 Near Wiltse School, 5 bdrm, 2.5 bath, spacious family home, carport, deck off kitchen. Avail. Now (OT438) Prospective tenants must complete an application form at:

280 MAIN STREET, PENTICTON, B.C. V2A 5B2 PHONE: 250-493-4372 - www.rentalspenticton.com Only qualified applicants will be contacted.


Penticton Western News Wednesday, November 9, 2011

www.pentictonwesternnews.com 29

Be Àrst to add to the story or read what you neighbour thinks. Be a part of your community paper. Comment online.

Rentals

Rentals

Transportation

Auto Financing

Office/Retail

Townhouses

1200-5000sq’ of Industrial/ Commercial Space for lease with compounded yard. Warren Ave. 250-765-3295

Reno’d 2bdrm+ loft, 1.5 bath, 5appl, ns preferred, small pets ok , South Penticton, $1025/mo + util. 250-493-8333

Storage

Transportation

Boat & Car Storage, enclosed. Call 250-488-6896 Jeff or 250498-7276 Doug.

Auto Accessories/Parts

Suites, Lower 1bdrm bsmt suite, fully furn., all util., for one working person, close to malls, ns, np, nd, with work ref’s, $675/mo., sec. dep., (250)493-5881 2bdrm suite. Quiet neighborhood, Mature wrkg person. New appls, ns/np, util incl $800/mo 250-493-3428 7km north of Penticton, large 2bdrm+ den, full kitchen, f/s, $700, Dennis at Realty Executives, (250)493-4372 Brand new 2bdrm suite, private entrance, np, ns, female preferred, avail. Wiltse area, avail. Dec. 1. (250)486-7974 after 4pm Summerland. 2 bedroom, 1 den/office, daylight ground floor, fridge/stove, washer/dryer. Garage. N/S, N/P. $850 per month plus utilities. 250 494-8617

4-20575R14 winters on Ford chrome wheels, $400, (250)493-1397 4 Studded winter tires, Firestone 205 70R15. $160. Call(250)809-3845 5 winter tires on rims, 16”. $400 for all. (250)492-6436 Used Tires, Huge Selection of used tires and wheels in stock. We might have what you need. Prices vary according to size and quality. Starting at $25.00. Call us or drop in to Larsens Excel 555 Okanagan Ave East 250-492-5630 Penticton

Cars - Domestic 2001 Ford Taurus, good condition, power everything, 4 door, new fuel pump & starter, 143,000kms, $3500 obo, (250)486-2223 2004 CTS CADDY, BLACK ON BLACK, LOADED, NAVIGATION,141,000 KLM, WIFE DIED SELLING CAR, $8500 OR BEST OFFER 250-7100033 BOB 250-519-1007 WENDY 2005 Chev Cavalier, 180K, 2dr auto, a/c, looks & runs exc.,$3050.obo.250-307-0002.

Suites, Upper 1 bdrm suite in Penticton, n/s, n/p. Avail immed. Call 250276-6386 Young St area, 2 lrg bdrm, newly reno’d, new bathrm, hardwood flrs, outdoor deck, incl w/d, f/s. $925/mo incl utils. $425 dd. Avail Jan/Feb 1, n/s, n/p (negotiable), prefer 35+. Refs required. Call Judy (250)493-0566.

voices W there’s more online » Cars - Domestic

Cars - Domestic

Cars - Sports & Imports

UapplyUdrive.ca

1995 Volkswagen Jetta GL, standard, FWD, alarm, alloy wheels, anti-theft, cloth interior, cruise, PL, Sony CD player, sunroof, tinted windows, winter tires, 218,000kms, Gold, new alternator 2006, new battery 2008, winter tires 2008, new clutch 2011, very clean, $2900, call 250-488-1989 2004 Chrysler Crossfire loaded leather, Immaculate, V6, 6-spd $12,900. (250)612-1008

Townhouses 3bdrm, Baskin Gardens, reno’d, paint, f/s/w/d, fenced yard, large storage room, close to school, kids welcome, 1 small pet, $1050/mo (250)490-9082

www.pentictonwesternnews.com Cars - Domestic

Auto Financing Need A Vehicle! Guaranteed Auto Loan. Apply Now, 1.877.680.1231 www.

Cars - Domestic

Cars - Domestic

Cars - Domestic

Cars - Domestic

blowout pricing pricing in effect! BETTER HURRY ON THESE....

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2010 Ford Fusion SEL 4 Dr. Sedan

2009 Chevrolet HHR 4 Dr. Retro Sedan

2008 Dodge Ram 1500 Quadcab 4x4 SLT 5.7L Hemi

The only way to describe this one is “WOW” 3.0L 6 cyl., 6 speed automatic, leather heated seats, microsoft SYNC, satellite radio, alloy wheels. PEARL WHITE. P167A

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2009 Chevy Silverado 1500 Extended Cab 4x4 with the 6.0L Vortec MAX tow package. It comes with a 6 speed automatic transmission, electronic brake controller, alloy wheels, satellite radio, power seat & lots more great features. Rare truck so hurry! P183A

3.6L V6 engine 296 HP, automatic transmission, traction control. Cold air intake, dual exhaust, alloy wheels, satellite radio, Onstar, what a car! BLACK. Only 8,900 kms! P160A

$

28,998 $25,998

2009 Chevrolet Aveo 5 Hatchback Looking for the lowest payment possible? This is it! 4 door, 1.6L 4 cylinder, 5 speed manual transmission. Sharp looking, alloy wheels. BLACK. PO6124C

1999 Cadillac Catera 4 Dr. Luxury Sedan

2011 Kia Soul 2U 4 Dr. Wagon - Uplevel

3.0L V6 engine, leather heated seats with memory, power rear sunshade.Alloy wheels, fog lights, AM/FM/Cassette & CD player & more. WHITE. PO966B

2.0L 4 cyl. engine, automatic transmission, alloy wheels, heated seats, height adjustable drivers seat, MP3, IPod, USB, CD player, air conditioned& plenty more on this 14,300 kms WHITE BEAUTY. P187A

$

$

9,998 $7,498

28,998

HEAVY DUTY

EDDIE BAUER

7,998 $4,998

BLOWOUT PRICED!

$

18,998

BLOWOUT PRICED!

2008 Pontiac G6 4 Dr. Sedan

LOADED WITH EXTRAS

2010 Chevy Camaro LT

PRICED RIGHT!

$

28,998

BLOWOUT PRICED!

WORLD!

2007 Saturn VUE FWD 4 Dr. SUV

Economical 4 cyl. engine, 5 speed manual transmission, air conditioned, power windows, power locks, CD player, Onstar, steering wheel audio controls & more. 68,000 kms. BLUE GRAY. P123A

$

12,998 $9,998

2009 Dodge Ram 2500 HD Long Box Quadcab 4x4 5.7L Hemi, automatic. Full 8 foot box, alloy wheels, Satellite radio, U-Connect with Bluetooth, running boards, power seat, fog lights & a lot more. Hard to find another like this. 39,000 kms. WHITE. P172A

$

31,998

3.5L V6 automatic transmission, only 41,400 kms on this very nice sport sedan. Fog lights, Onstar, MP3, CD player & many more great options. WHITE. P121B1

was $14,998 $11,998

2010 Ford Explorer Eddie Bauer 4x4 with 3RD Row Seats 4.0L V6 engine, traction control, leather heated seats with memory, Satellite radio, 6 SYNC CD, microsoft SYNC, alloy wheels, WHITE/TAN. P186A

$

31,998

2005 Ford Mustang GT 2 Dr. Sport Coupe 4.6L high output V8 engine. Automatic transmission, traction control system, alloy wheels, leather heated seats, 6 disc CD. WHITE WITH BLACK STRIPES. P162A

$

18,998 $15,998

2006 Jeep Liberty Sport 4 Dr. 4x4

3.7L V6 engine, automatic transmission, part time/full time 4x4 selector, 77,000 kms. Alloy wheels, CD player & more. Atlantic Blue. P104A

$

18,998

$

13,998

ON THE SPOT FINANCING O.A.C.


30 www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Transportation

Cars - Sports & Imports 2005 Mercedes Benz SL55 AMG Kompressor AMG Sport Package, 5.5 litre V-8, 493 HP. Hardtop retractable roof, 31,000 km. Online auction now: www.bcacuction.ca. Info: 250-952-5003 2005 Toyota Scion, 2007 Toyota Corolla, $7200. ea exc cond, loaded, 250-549-1703 2007 Toyota Yaris, 2dr hatchback, 5 spd, $6,475, 2004 Toyota Matrix automatic, air, 112K, $6,975 Gov’t inspected, re-built vehicles, Vernon. 250260-4415

Motorcycles $AVE. End of Season Sale. 2011 Electric Scooters $995-$1295. Save Now. Buy before Spring! www.scoot4u.com 866-203-0906 / 250-863-1123

Recreational/Sale 10.5 ft. Okanagan Truck camper. New hot water heater, wiring, roof. Fridge, stove, furnace in good working order, washroom/shower, in very good shape for 1980 model. $1,600obo. Call 250-493-8925 Car Dolly: Rewired, wheels have been greased very recently. Works very well. Asking $799. Call 250-354-7471. Located in Nelson

Wednesday, November 9, 2011 Penticton Western News

R U O Y Y U B S O T O PH ! E N I L ON

Scrap Car Removal 1AA SCRAP CAR REMOVAL Min $60 cash for full size vehicles, any cond. 250-899-0460 SCRAP BATTERIES WANTED We buy scrap batteries from cars & trucks & heavy equipment. $4.00 each. Free pick-up anywhere in BC, Minimum 10. Call Toll Free 1.877.334.2288

Scrap car removal, will pay up to $120.We are licensed & insured, more weight, more money,250-328-8697, Pent.

Snowmobiles 2011 VERNON SNOW SHOW! Sat Nov 12, 2-10 at the Vernon Rec Centre Auditorium. Just a toonie to get in, and kids get in FREE. See the latest sleds and ATV’s from Arctic Cat, Polaris, Ski-Doo and Yamaha! Customized sleds, accessories, safety gear, search & rescue, CAC. www. vernonsnowmobileclub.org

Sport Utility Vehicle 1990 Jeep Cherokee Sport, ton of mechanical just done. $2800. 250-306-8760.

Trucks & Vans 1994 F-150 Ext.Cab, S/Box, XLT Lariat, 4x4, 351, 2 fuel tanks, remote start, alarm, 233,000 kms, green w/matching canopy, 1 season old winter tires on rims $3500 250-309-1159

2001 F350 Dually Diesel, very clean, will take newer car on partial trade, $14,500 obo 250545-9014 or cell 250-558-8289 2003 GMC Sierra 2500 HD, 4x4 ext cab(4 door) air, tow package. $5300.250-492-6648

Adult Escorts A Hardbody 4 hire, in/out, 30yr, sweet, petite, discreet, tight ,toned, tanned & talented, Clover 250-462-3510, Pent. BEACH BUNNIES New First Class Spa Now Open! #32-2789 Hwy 97 Blue Heights www.beachbunnies.ca 250-448-8854 We only hire the very best MALE 4 Male Erotic Massage $95, waxing, intimate grooming & skin care for the face & back. Winfield, 9-9 Daily 250-766-2048 XXX’s and O’s by Donna, Independant, Penticton & area (out calls), 250-809-7444

WHERE DO YOU TURN

TO LEARN WHAT’S ON SALE?

YOUR NEWSPAPER:

The link to your community

A NEW WAY to purchase photos published in the Penticton Western News Go on online line e to

www.pentictonwesternnews.com click on Buy Photo Link (just below the weather)


Penticton Western News Wednesday, November 9, 2011

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

up to $29.99 value with $250 purchase

Ad tch Ma

TOYS WE CHECK CHECK PRICES PR RICES

SO YOU DON’T HAVE TO!

Every week, our Ad Match Team checks our major compeƟtor’s Ňyers and matches the prices on hundreds of items*. Look for the Ad Match message on shelf for the items we’ve matched. * Look for the symbol in store. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES (note that our major supermarket compeƟtors may not). Due to the fact that product is ordered prior to the Ɵme of our Ad Match checks, quanƟƟes may be limited. We match select items in our major supermarket compeƟtors’ Ňyers throughout the week. Major supermarket compeƟtors are determined solely by us based on a number of factors which can vary by store locaƟon. We match idenƟcal items (deĮned as same brand, size, and aƩributes) .

FREE

*

up to $29.99 value with $250 purchase

FREE

*

Energizer Max Value Pack

5pc value pack includes AA12, AAA8, C2, D2 and 9V1

Energizer Max Value Pack

5pc value pack includes AA12, AAA8, C2, D2 and 9V1

save

$

12

*Get free Energizer Max Value Pack when you spend $250 or more before applicable taxes at Real Canadian Superstore locations. Excludes purchase of tobacco, alcohol products, prescriptions, gift cards, phone cards, lottery tickets, all third party operations (post office, gas bars, dry cleaners, etc.) and any other products which are provincially regulated. The retail value of up to $29.99 for the Energizer Max Value pack will be deducted from the total amount of your purchase before sales taxes are applied. Limit one coupon per family and/or customer account. No cash value. No copies. Coupon must be presented to the cashier at time of purchase. Valid from Friday, November 4th, until closing Thursday, November 10th, 2011. Cannot be combined with any other coupons or promotional offers. No substitutions, refunds or exchanges on Free product. 464704 4

87

47

619019

9

chick or jumbo

236766

Fijit Friends interactive

10000 00936

live Atlantic lobster

pork shoulder butt steaks

club size

31

328582

88

97

1

each

8

/lb 4.14/kg

fresh pineapple product of Costa Rica 722103

/lb 19.77/kg

fresh seedless Mandarin oranges

large 9 lb box

product of China

Alphie

97

34

430038

Limit 1, after limit price

44.99 ea.

715808

96

1

each

28

5

each

Bakeshop pan bread

Tassimo T Discs save up to

100% Colombian, 110 g, Cappuccino, 456 g or House Blend, 126 g

$

8

white or 100% whole wheat, sliced, 450 g

711811

select Hasbro board games

97

14

877512 / 506786 / 277949 / 577759

each

Limit 6, after limit price

7.97 ea.

203448

97

4

28

1

each

PC® tomato clam cocktail

Fur Real Snuggimals 804553

Limit 3, after limit price

9.99 ea.

6

selected varieties, 1.89 L

6 X 136’s

719295

674753

1

each

98

3

each

463732

Limit 3, after limit price

5.99 ea.

93

3

each

Limit 4, after limit price

4.77 ea.

each

Dove shampoo or conditioner

Tresemmé hair care

2 X 355 mL

selected varieties and sizes

466618 / 493151 / 698139

Cars 2 character cars

each

no name® facial tissue

89

94

each

469854 / 414622

99

2

each

Limit 4, after limit price

5.26 ea.

88

3

each

>ÃÌiÀ >À`

Prices are in effect until Thursday, November 10, 2011 or while stock lasts. Quantities and/or selection of items may be limited and may not be available in all stores. NO RAINCHECKS OR SUBSTITUTIONS on clearance items or where quantities are advertised as limited. Advertised pricing and product selection (flavour, colour, patterns, style) may vary by store location. We reserve the right to limit quantities to reasonable family requirements. We are not obligated to sell items based on errors or misprints in typography or photography. Coupons must be presented and redeemed at time of purchase. Applicable taxes, deposits, or environmental surcharges are extra. No sales to retail outlets. Some items may have “plus deposit and environmental charge” where applicable. ®/TM The trademarks, service marks and logos displayed in this newspaper ad are trademarks of Loblaws Inc. and others. All rights reserved. © 2011 Loblaws Inc. Customer Relations: 1-866-999-9890.

©MasterCard & PayPass are registered trademarks of MasterCard International Incorporated. President’s Choice Back a licensee of the marks. President’s Choice Financial MasterCard is provided by President’s Choice Bank. President’s Choice Financial banking services are provided by the direct banking division of CIBC. PC points loyalty program is provided by President’s Choice Services Inc. ©PC, President’s Choice, President’s Choice Financial and Fresh Financial Thinking are registered trademarks of Loblaws Inc. Trademarks use under licence.


32

www.pentictonwesternnews.com

Wednesday, November 9, 2011 Penticton Western News

|

FURNITURE

APPLIANCES

|

|

MATTRESSES

LEATHER S

MEGA SALE! HOMETOWN

ON FURNITURE, MATTRESSES AND APPLIANCES THIS WEDNESDAY - THURSDAY - FRIDAY - SATURDAY GOLDEN COLLECTION BOXSPRING AND MATTRESS SET

KING SET

QUEEN SET

With Pocket Coil, Memory Foam and Foam Encased Edge Guard Guard.

MICROFIBRE SOFA ~ $299.99 MICROFIBRE LOVESEAT ~ $279.99 MICROFIBER CHAIR ~ $229.99

DOUBLE SET

$799.99 $529.99 $499.99

ALSO AVAILABLE IN STONE

METRO 8 PIECE BEDROOM SUITE

ALL 8 PIECES

$899.99

Dresser, Mirror, 5 Drawer Chest, 2 Night Tables, Headboard, Footboard and Rails.

30” FREE STANDING, SELF CLEANING, TRUE CONVECTION RANG WITH HIDDEN ELEMENT

CONVECTION OVEN!

$749.99

PILLOWY PARADISE EUROTOP BOXSPRING AND MATTRESS SET EXTRA THICK PILLOW TOP, NON-FLIP.

ALSO AVAILABLE IN DARK BROWN

KING SET

QUEEN SET

DOUBLE SET

$699.99

$499.99

$449.99

VARIOUS COLOURS

MICROFIBRE ROCKER RECLINER CHAIR

$299.99

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK!

2549 SKAHA LK. RD.

2504920613 PENTICTON

First Come, First Served. While Supplies Last.

DAMAGED

MICROFIBRE RECLINING SOFA ~ $469.99 MICROFIBRE RECLINING LOVESEAT ~ $449.99 MICROFIBRE RECLINING CHAIR ~ $329.99 FRONT LOADING

KING MATTRESS AND FRIDGIDAIRE WASHER AND DRYER SET BOXSPRING SET

$199.99

PALLISER

SAMSUNG

BROWN MICROFIBRE RECLINING SOFA

BUILT-IN DISHWASHER

$399.99

$499.99

$899.99

SINCE 1988 BY

KONDOLAS

JOE KANDOLA Owner / Operator

WE DELIVER TO OLIVER, OSOYOOS, KEREMEOS, WESTBANK, PEACHLAND, GRAND FORKS AND PRINCETON

Penticton Western News  

November 9th, 2011 Edition

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