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MARCH 2021

FREE

PENINSULA Living & visiting on the Mornington Peninsula

The Running Man • A Century Of Craftsmanship • Born To Lead Manifesting Art • Creation In Isolation • Luminous Views Of Central Australia At Everywhen BYC 2021 Easter Art Show • Out Of India • Simply Scrumptious Score Review? Not Required In 1908!


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contents

Leading 8. The Running Man Mick’s a bloke that loves to run. Not just around the park, or around the block; in fact the longer the run, the more he enjoys it.

Education +Training

16. A Century Of Craftsmanship Sorrento Furniture have made the move to a bigger and better showroom and are celebrating a century in the furniture making game.

Feature

20. Born To Lead Over the past 60 years Heather Barton has set a course for a lifetime of community service.

Arts

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24. Manifesting Art Mornington artist Diane Williamson’s paintings from purely representational to a highly abstract style really get the imagination going.

28. Creation In Isolation Photography and art collaborated throughout lockdown will be exhibited at Sorrento activity centre over Easter.

30. Luminous Views Of Central Australia At Everywhen Panoramic landscapes and paintings of bush flowers and plants feature in a solo exhibition by one of Central Australia’s most talented painters, Selina Teece Pwerle.

53

Must Try Dishes

6

32. BYC 2021 Easter Art Show

Peninsula Styles

Proudly published by

The Blairgowrie Yacht Squadron Easter Art Show is back celebrating its eleventh year in 2021.

Eat & Drink 48. Out Of India

Writers: Andrea Louise Thomas, Cameron McCullough, Joe Novella Photography: Yanni, Gary Sissons Creative: Sam Loverso, Dannielle Espagne Publisher: Melissa McCullough Advertising: Brooke Hughes, 0409 219 282 or email brooke@mpnews.com.au Phone: (03) 5974 9000

All material is copyright, and may not be reproduced without the express permission of Mornington Peninsula News Group, or the original copyright holder in the case of contributions. Copyright of contributed material rests with the contributor. Disclaimer: The authors and publisher do not assume any liability to any party for any loss, damage or disruption caused by errors or omissions, whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident or any other cause. This publication is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians. The reader should regularly consult a physician in matters relating to health and particularly with respect to any symptoms that may require diagnosis or medical attention. Peninsula Essence is produced monthly. 30,000 copies (mix of home delivery and bulk dropped at an extensive network of outlets across the peninsula).

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Linda Martinucci started Simply Swap Foods to help spread the word about the importance of changing to a real food, low sugar diet to improve overall health and quality of life.

Focus On 62. Focus On Frankston Some interesting facts, coffee haunts, and things to do in the seaside town of Frankston.

History The umpires at the 1908 Grand Final between Hastings and Frankston had an easy day. Why? Well, only the Hastings team took the field. How could this have happened?

facebook/peninsulaessence Instagram @peninsulaessence

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51. Simply Scrumptious

68. Score Review? Not Required In 1908!

Registered address: 63 Watt Road, Mornington 3931 www.peninsulaessence.com.au

PEFC Certified This product is from sustainably managed forests and controlled sources. www.pefc.org

After adjusting to, and learning a vastly different language and culture, Jagvir Gill now owns and runs successful restaurants across the Mornington Peninsula.

Cover image by Yanni

Racing studs and horse riding businesses have been a major part of life in the area for decades, with horse back tours regularly taking riders to beach and bush locations all over the peninsula. This mother and foal were photographed on a property on the road to Gunnamatta back beach.

March 2021

Every Month 6. Peninsula Styles 53. Must Try Dishes

50. Recipe 66. Crossword


E S T. 1 9 7 9

living BoDuE SnT IdN AlTeI ss ON HOME SPRING/SUMMER 20-21

OZ DESIGN FURNITURE MORNINGTON


SORRENTO FURNITURE Designed for the contemporary Australian lifestyle, the Nimbus is structured to withstand all weather conditions. Part of The Elements outdoor collection, it is ideal for lazy days around the pool. Available at Sorrento Furniture now located at 42 Watt Road, Mornington sorrentofurniture.com.au

Peninsula OLIEVE & OLIE Luxurious lemon scented gum hand sanitizer will keep your hands bacteria free without leaving them stripped bare. Formulated with 70% certified organic ethanol per WHO guidelines, and infused with olive leaf extract, certified organic aloe vera and palm free glycerin. Available at Olieve and Olie Factory 6 & 7 / 16-18 Henry Wilson Drive, Rosebud or visit olieveandolie.com.au

Styles PRODUCTS FROM THE PENINSULA WE'RE SURE YOU WILL LOVE

MADE BY BOWIE Elevate your morning coffee ritual in a new Sunset Mug by Peninsula potter, Made by Bowie. Available at Emu Plains market and madebybowie.com

AEGEAN DESIGN This vibrant piece is an artist's impression of a birds eye view overhead Blairgowrie Yacht Club in summer. Available at Aegean Design studio 1/3760 Point Nepean Rd, Portsea and online at allisoneartist.com

SKWOSH + RARE HARE Australian swimwear brand, SKWOSH has partnered with Jackalope Hotel's cellar-door restaurant, Rare Hare, to design the perfect trunks. The limited-edition trunk features Rare Hare's unique and colourful caricatures in bright pops of red, yellow, green and blue, combined with SKWOSH's signature fit. Available online at skwosh.com.au  & rarehare.com.au/wine-store 

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The all new GLA. Designed for the wilderness. Enjoyed in the city. The all new GLA is going places. With added character, added space and added safety, this revolutionised compact SUV combines form and function at every turn. With 5 seats and room to spare, it complements the modern urbanite’s busy lifestyle – making it your perfect companion, wherever the road takes you. Start your adventure at Mercedes-Benz Mornington today.

Mercedes-Benz Mornington 29-31 Mornington-Tyabb Road Mornington (03) 5923 0011 LMCT443 www.mbmornington.com.au

*Applicable to new and demonstrator passenger cars for 5 years from the date of first registration of the vehicle. Warranty start time may differ for demonstrator vehicles. Commercial application of vehicle is subject to 5 years from first registration date or 200,000km (whichever occurs first). Battery warranty periods vary. Excludes customers with specific warranty arrangements. For full terms, conditions and exclusions please refer to the warranty statement here www.mbmornington.com.au.


THE RUNNING man

By Joe Novella Photos Gary Sissons & Supplied

M

ick Duyvestyn, or “Duyvo” as he’s more commonly known around his hometown of Mornington, is peninsula born and bred. He’s one of those locals that everyone seems to know, and he’s a bloke that loves to run. Not just around the park, or around the block; in fact the longer the run, the more Mick enjoys it. Mick’s list of running achievements is impressive for someone who started endurance running so late. It includes competing in, and completing the likes of: Arthurs Seat Challenge, Two Bays Trail Run, Surf Coast Century 100k event, Great Ocean Road, Queenstown and Melbourne Marathons, The You Yangs, Wonderland, Devilbend and Mornington half marathons, just to name a few. So where did his love of endurance running start I wondered. Schoolmates perhaps, or an inspirational coach? The answer was much closer to home. “My Mum,” Mick said, smiling. “All thanks to Mum.” Mick grew up with four sisters and a brother, so the Duyvestyn house was always busy. “I was an energetic kid, couldn’t sit still and was an early riser,” Mick explains. “Rather than have me hang around the house, walking round in circles, causing mischief and waking the others, Mum would get me to run around the block a few times. I reckon she did it so I could use up a bit of energy before school.” Mick didn’t mind the early morning runs and towards the end of his time at St Macartan’s Primary, he was pretty fit. “I used to go ok in the school cross-country,” he said, “but I was more interested in team sports like footy, cricket and basketball. Running wasn’t really the main sport for me; it was an individual thing, something I did for fun. I did quite a few fun runs in my teens until I did my knee at 19 and after that everything changed.” continued next page...

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In his twenties, Mick hardly ran at all; his knee couldn’t take the strain. Luckily he had lots going on his life to make him forget his dodgy knee like marrying his childhood sweetheart Renee and building a life together. But it wasn’t a case of happily ever after; like most of us in this journey called life, Mick experienced a few bumps in the road. “I was working long hours back then,” he said. “I was also doing night shift, so I wasn’t eating right. I was also drinking too much and not exercising. I just wasn’t looking after myself and I ended up becoming very overweight and I just wasn’t happy. I didn’t like the person I had become.” It was the birth of Mick’s first child, Ruby, that was the catalyst for change. He knew he couldn’t run, so he started walking. He got fit enough to complete not one but two Oxfam 100K walks, where entrants complete a 100 kilometre walk in less than 48 hours, raising money for Oxfam in the process. But his knee gave way again and a second knee reconstruction was required. His Physio advised Mick not to stress the knee again or there was a risk of not being able to walk at all.

“I never challenged the opinion,” Mick said. “I just accepted it. That was my lot. I was 35 and had young kids. I didn’t want any more injuries. So I stopped walking and exercising altogether and pretty soon I’d ballooned out to over 115 kilos, which is massively overweight for me. I sank pretty low; hated myself. I started drinking alcohol at times I shouldn’t be, like when the kids were in bed, all by myself. Drinking by yourself is never a good sign, but I was depressed and I needed an escape.” In 2014, just by chance at Sydney airport, Mick bumped into a mate who had just completed the New York Marathon and they organised a catch-up for when they were both back home on the Peninsula. “I couldn’t believe Marcus had completed the NY Marathon and I said as much to him when we caught up. He just looked at me and said, ‘You can do it too if you put your mind to it. Just get out of bed tomorrow and start with a 5 kilometre run and build up slowly from there. Don’t go mad, just once or twice a week.’”

You can do it too if you put your mind to it. Just get out of bed tomorrow and start with a 5k run and build up slowly from there

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And that’s exactly what Mick did, despite all the advice from the medicos. continued next page...


The very next morning he ran his first 5 kilometres in 48 minutes, which wasn’t going to break any speed records, but it was a start. “It was hard,” Mick said, “my body was screaming out to stop, my knee hurt and I was scared it might give way again. I spewed up a few times, but I also felt a kind of satisfaction in the pain, that I could endure it. Getting through the pain and fear was like a release from all my other worries. In fact the pain and fear, and the adrenalin that came with them, made me feel alive and I couldn’t wait to do it again a few days later.” Mick started running 5 kilometres on alternate days and soon the weight began to drop off. Mick’s mate, Marcus, worried that Mick might overdo it, bought Mick a book titled, 'Run Less, Run Faster', which helped Mick build a sustainable program that would ensure he could continue building his fitness levels without doing permanent damage. “That book was a game changer, I realised that before I just did my running helter-skelter and that probably contributed to my injuries but the book taught me how to be systematic.”

52 minutes, but the time wasn’t important; he had achieved his goal. And as an added bonus, he’d made a few friends who invited him to join a social running club called The Mornington Misfits. “My running had always been an individual pursuit. Even at school, I always saw running as an individual thing. But becoming part of a group like The Mornington Misfits, I started to mix with like-minded people who understood me and shared their stories with me and I with them. It was like I found my tribe. After that I saw running in a totally different light and got involved in my local parkrun as a runner and volunteer. And now I find I love the friendships as much as I love the runner’s high. And I love that I can bring along my wife and kids, even the dog to a parkrun and get them all involved in a healthy lifestyle.”

My running had always been an individual pursuit. Even at school, I always saw running as an individual thing

As Mick’s fitness returned, he found he wanted to run further and further. “For me, running is like an addiction,” Mick said. “It’s just you and the trail; you forget about all your troubles because you’re focusing on the world around you. Even though everything should hurt, you feel alive and calm, almost euphoric, and you want that feeling over and over, so you keep doing it, you keep wanting to push your limits and experience the highs that come from being in a zone many refer to as ‘runner’s high’.” And so in 2015, approaching his 40th birthday, after two knee reconstructions, Mick started with the help of a new physio, a 14week training program, to achieve his most ambitious goal to date: The Great Ocean Road Marathon. Forty four kilometres of pain. After the 14 weeks, he lost Ten kilos and was the lightest he’d been in decades. He limped through the race in a time of 4 hours and

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It’s hard to imagine Mick being overweight and depressed; he seemed so lean, so Zen and chilled out during our interview. I asked him to name his favourite spot on the Peninsula to go for a run. “That’s easy. Baldry’s Crossing through to Greens Bush on the Two Bays Trail. It’s so beautiful up there with the bird life and the bushland. I’ll take you up there one day.”

“I can’t mate,” I replied. “I’m too old, out of shape and I have bad knees.” He laughed. “No excuse, mate,” he said, “You can walk and it’s all about getting out and active. We live in the most beautiful spot on the planet, and most of us don’t even know how beautiful our backyard really is.” You’re right, Mick, on so many levels. Keep running, and keep inspiring us all to get out and about in our big beautiful backyard.


WHEN WE SUPPORT LOCAL BUSINESS – EVERYONE WINS.

L

ocal business is the lifeblood of the Mornington Peninsula. We live in fluid times and our local business community has continued to demonstrate resilience reconnecting to their customers in COVID safe ways despite phases of rapid change. The Mornington Peninsula Shire applauds these efforts. As the weather cools and autumn settles across the Peninsula, the Shire urges everyone – community members, organisations, and businesses – to consider how we spend, recommend and utilise local services.

Learn more about local Business Round Tables, hosted later this month to explore opportunities and solutions for future COVID recovery activities for our business community.

For more stories of local business innovation, visit: mpbusiness.com.au/supportlocal

With autumn seasonal produce now on the menu, support local farmers, farm gates, green grocers, and butchers by sourcing all you need to feed the family with fresh in season essentials. There is no better time to appreciate our local region. Close to home, rediscover outdoor adventures amongst the changing landscape, and enjoy world-class wine, craft brewing and distilling, art, and culture. Meet the makers and creators across the Peninsula – you will not be disappointed. Through your support, local tourism businesses can continue to deliver their unique offerings. Need a big job done? Maybe you are a business, organisation or school that needs to tender for some work. Think local and employ local contractors and consultants.

Craft brewer David Golding, of Red Hill Brewery.

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A CENTURY OF

craftsmanship By Cameron McCullough Photos Gary Sissons & Supplied

t is set to be a huge year for Sorrento Furniture. They have made the move to a bigger and better showroom and are celebrating a century in the furniture-making game.

I

And while Robert Walsh died in 1959, fourteen years later a young 15-year-old started his upholstery apprenticeship, stretching the furniture manufacturing to a third generation.

"My grandfather’s name was Robert Hamil Walsh,” said Sorrento Furniture’s Gerard Walsh.

“I struggled at school. It just wasn’t for me. I was dyslexic and back then the answer was to punish you. As a result, I just didn’t fit in,” said Gerard.

“He had returned from the First World War and had managed to save enough money to open a furniture business in Ballarat in 1921.” Robert Walsh specialised in chairs in those days; not far removed from a century later with Sorrento Furniture specialising in customer sofas and chairs. “Eventually, my father started work for him and learned the trade, although after returning from the Second World War, he went out of the furniture game,” said Gerard.

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“But a strange thing happened when I went to trade school. I excelled at it, and as a result, the opposite happened. I absolutely fitted in and thrived”. The lesson was not lost on Gerard, who to this day talks of his dyslexia, and overcoming adversity on the path to success. “My dad was a kind and gracious man,” said Gerard. “He was very encouraging and proud that I was following in the family footsteps.” continued next page...

March 2021


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But as they say, it takes decades to become an overnight success, and Gerard and Cynthia Walsh had to do it the hard way. After marrying young, Gerard began upholstering at night in the garage of their Dandenong home. “Gerard would work during the day and come home at night and do his private jobs”, said Cynthia. “We felt it was important to have our own business and after much hard work, we managed to get a factory in Dandenong”. The business morphed from upholstery to a custom furniture design business. Cynthia found her place as well, with a natural eye for design and style that helped customers bring their furniture ideas to life. Eventually Sorrento Furniture was born and a fourth generation joined the ranks with son Jason winning Apprentice of the Year for upholstery in 2014. The Walshs cemented themselves as the experts at handcrafting any solution to suit your furniture needs. “Our design process is all about you. We harness your ideas and focus them to create custom furniture instilled with your vision for your living space. Built with the finest attention to detail by expert craftsmen, we take pride in our work, and guarantee your final piece will be an enduring addition to your home,” said Gerard.

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And while the pandemic may not be completely behind us all, Gerard and Cynthia are looking forward to a bright 2021. “We are very proud to be celebrating the 100th anniversary, and are humbled at the occasion,” said Gerard.

We are very proud to be celebrating the 100th anniversary, and humbled at the occasion

“We are working hard to ensure the unique skills we have as furniture makers and upholsterers are passed down to the next generation”. And while many have done it tough over the last 12 months, demand has skyrocketed for their products. “Like everybody, we were nervous about what would happen as a result of the pandemic,” said Gerard.

The bigger showroom has allowed Sorrento Furniture to extend their range to include Stressless recliners and has enhanced the consumer experience.

“We owe a debt of gratitude for the strong support of locals who have allowed us to do what we are so passionate about", said Gerard. “We are proud that we are growing. We are employing more staff, and are proud to be passing on the skills to the next generation”. And what would Robert Walsh think of it all? “I think he’d be really pleased. He came from a generation that went through wars and a depression. He’d be proud we stuck it through our own challenging 2020 and came out smiling”.

“But we found that people were wanting to spend on quality Australian-made products.” In fact, they have been so busy that they have had to move to larger premises to keep up with demand. “We just couldn’t keep up with the work at our old location,” said Gerard. “The new location at 42 Watt Road in Mornington is more like a shop than a factory floor and allows us to present our products in the best possible light”.

Sorrento Furniture. 42 Watt Road, Mornington. P: 5975 0344. E: info@sorrentofurniture.com.au. W: sorrentofurniture.com.au

March 2021

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BORN TO lead

Photos Yanni

L

ittle did she know it, but the writing was on the wall when, in secondary school, Heather Barton was elected as the class Social Service Captain several years in a row. This meant leading classmates to choose worthy causes and organising fundraisers to support those causes. It seems that this set the course for a lifetime of community service extending over the past 60 years. continued next page...

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"Previous generations of my family were heavily involved in community life, so although I didn’t plan it, it’s not surprising that it rubbed off, and I’m also doing ‘my bit’ to make this world a better and happier place."

Now, more than ever, girls can benefit so much from the Guide program

"In my early 20’s my initial drive was to help young women navigate the difficult teenage years safely and realise their potential – this continues today," she said. For over 25 years, as a leader of girls aged 14-18 age, she helped them to achieve their own goals in personal development and leadership. Recalling some of the adventures, she remembers weekends hiking and camping, gliding, snow camping, cooking and canoeing, and the muchanticipated all-night bus trips visiting workplaces, seeing the vital role that people who work night-shift play to keep our essential services operating. "It was a salient reminder of how your actions as a leader can define reality when, many years later, one young woman said: ‘I still remember that weekend when, during a huge, unexpected downpour we had to walk all day in waist-high fast-running water, and you said – I think it was to try and cheer us up - we do things for the memories, not the rewards’ – we learnt a lot and that message has stuck with me ever since."

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Heather’s professional life has been in non-profit organisations, in roles where she is known for her skills in leading and inspiring individuals and teams to achieve beyond their expectations. These have included The Smith Family’s Victorian Manager; National Manager VIEW Clubs; CEO, Girl Guides Victoria and, following a move to the Peninsula, at Seawinds Community Hub and currently Sorrento Community Centre. Heather’s enthusiasm comes through in her training roles, sharing her experiences in leadership, volunteer management, fund development and governance. She firmly believes that through her volunteer roles, particularly in Guiding, she gained the knowledge, experience and confidence to grow her career, particularly during a five-year term as State Commissioner for Guides Victoria. Heather admitted that she is still learning how to say ‘no’. So it’s not surprising that she is also in Rotary, currently Secretary at the Rotary Club of Rosebud-Rye, and public speaker for The Smith Family. Firm in the belief that Guiding is as fresh today as it was over 100 years ago, her Guiding role is now Mornington Peninsula District Manager.


In 1999, Heather was appointed a Member of the General Division of the Order of Australia (AM) in recognition of her services to the community and to youth. The 2021 International Women’s Day (IWD) theme of #Choose To Challenge rings true for her. ‘There is no doubt that choosing to challenge myself to become a Guide Leader, has changed my life. "Being a parent presents challenges as well as joys; it is no different as a Guide Leader. I remember when we went abseiling for the first time….all the girls had done their first jump but I was hanging back doubting myself. Finally the instructor took me aside and threatened that he would not help us any more if I didn’t participate….that was enough to go over that ledge!’ But the benefits far outweigh the effort." "In our COVID-19 world, I think people are re-assessing their priorities, looking for more meaning in their lives, and wanting to help make a difference – particularly in their local communities. It is a great privilege working with the girls as they have fun, experience new adventures and you can see them grow in confidence; their enthusiasm is infectious and you gain a great sense of achievement." "Now, more than ever, girls can benefit so much from the Guide program – away from the screens, out of doors, new experiences and new friendships. And they need women who will rise to the challenge and become their leaders." Guides caters for girls as young as 5 into teens and young adults. Units meet weekly during school terms, usually after school into the early evening. No Guiding experience is necessary; all training and resources are provided. "They say that ‘90% of success is turning up – this is about taking up that challenge for yourself and getting involved. And in return? You become part of a supportive network of like-minded women, learn new skills, and gain increased confidence, energy and knowledge – and the memories are priceless!

Dr Peter A. Scott is a specialist orthodontist offering orthodontic care for children, teens and adults alike in both the Mornington Peninsula and inner Melbourne areas. He is also a consultant orthodontist at the Royal Childrens Hospital.

Specialist Orthodontist Creating Beautiful Smiles On The Peninsula For 30 Years Expertise In Child And Adult Orthodontics Early Assessment Of Dental Development And Facial Growth Ideal Age Of Initial Assessment 7-9 Years Early Intervention Where Appropriate For Best Outcome No Referral Necessary

And, based on my experience, being a ‘Woman in Leadership’ can lead to improved opportunities in professional life."

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Contact Heather at hbarton@guidesvic.org.au www.guidesvic.org.au

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www.drpeterscottorthodontist.com.au www.facebook.com/drpeterscottorthodontist March 2021

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Arts

MANIFESTING art

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Continued next page... March 2021


By Andrea Louise Thomas Photos Yanni

M

ornington artist Diane Williamson’s paintings really get the imagination going as she tries to convey the intangible essence of a subject rather than just what meets the eye. For instance, while listening to music she paints the sounds of the notes, tonal changes and movements in a piece. Her interpretations create interesting compositions. Diane can paint in any style from purely representational to highly abstract, but gravitates more to the abstract. There was never any doubt Diane was going to be an artist. Even as a toddler, before she had the words to express her desire, she reached to her mother for pencils to draw with. Both parents were creative. Her mother ran a home décor shop and her father was a musician. Diane’s affinity with music came from her father. In the 1960s, Diane left the cosseted life of a small private school, where she was really very shy, to enter the wide world of arts at Caulfield Institute of Technology. It was an environment that expanded her thinking and opened up her world. Originally, she wanted to study ceramics, but opted for a more practical degree in graphic design. Diane has enjoyed a wonderfully diverse career having worked as a graphic designer for advertising agencies, restoring and retouching photographs by hand, working as a professional face painter and body artist, as a leadlight artist and teacher, and also as a wedding photographer. Of all the types of work she has done in the art field, Diane most enjoyed face painting and body art. It taught her to paint faster and gave her a living canvas. As The Face Painting Lady, she loved working with young children whose enthusiasm was infectious. Nowadays, Diane focuses solely on painting. She has no interest in being famous; she just wants to produce work that people love and connect with. “If people like something enough to buy it and love it, that means a lot to me,” she says, adding, “Art adds beauty to life. Like a song, it can take someone back to a place or make them look at something and see it in a different way.” Interestingly, Diane does not preplan or compose a piece. The work comes to her as a fully formed idea. She sees the complete image in her mind and then quickly transfers it to canvas or board. She later spends many hours perfecting the technical aspects of the piece. Her favourite medium is oil as it allows for the smooth blending she likes to incorporate in her work.

continued next page...

I want people to see the world as a beautiful place. I feel this is the place of the artist

Expect to pay around half the price FOR AN APPOINTMENT CALL

1300 230 430 SUITE 6 UPPER LEVEL 38A MAIN STREET, MORNINGTON w w w. d i a m o n d c o c o . c o m . a u March 2021

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Her inspiration comes from many places, such as music, her appreciation of the spiritual aspects of life and the wellspring of beauty found living on the Mornington Peninsula. “The Mornington Peninsula is like living in heaven,” she says.

Art uplifts the spirit, brings awareness of the world and helps to focus thought

Over the years Diane has had the opportunity to exhibit in many places and has won numerous prizes, but what is important to her is connecting to people. She says, “The art prize that means the most to me is the People’s Choice.” A deep connection to spirituality and metaphysics pervades Diane’s work. Her patrons often pick up on that. People are also attracted to her work because she paints what she loves and it comes across. “I look for beauty and paint that or paint a good feeling, or the all enveloping universe of life. I want people to see the world as a beautiful place. I feel this is the place of the artist,” she says.

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“Art uplifts the spirit, brings awareness of the world and helps to focus thought,” she adds. In her work, she likes to create a dynamic image using well-planned compositions with diagonals and intersections for dynamism and circular compositions to hold the viewer’s eye. As her art has evolved, she has moved more towards the abstract than the representational in a quest to convey feelings rather than things. Diane is part of the Peninsula Studio Trail. It has connected her to other artists and to patrons who come along to open-studio weekends or visit her studio by appointment. See what Diane has created by visiting her studio, her website or the PST website. It might just get your imagination going! dianewilliamsonartist.com peninsulastudiotrailinc.org


Now located at 42 Watt Road, MORNINGTON

we have moved! Whether it is custom made lounges, or expert reupholstery, we craft our pieces with love and care. Together we will create furniture that you will love for a lifetime. Now located at 42 Watt Road, MORNINGTON info@sorrentofurniture.com.au | (03) 5975 0344


CREATION IN isolation PHOTOGRAPHY/ART EXHIBITION AT SORRENTO ACTIVITY CENTRE OVER EASTER

A

n interesting exhibition will be on display over Easter, at the Sorrento Activity Centre. Photographers and artists from Studio Sorrento collaborated throughout lockdown – the photography group posted around 80 photos online and the artists used these as inspiration to create artworks in their own style. To date nearly 60 works have been completed. Each time a painting or drawing was submitted, it was a thrill for the photographers to see their photo transformed into something new. For the artists it was a rare treat to have a variety of subjects to paint. Many of the members of Studio Sorrento live on their own and the online exhibition provided connection, for the first time, between the photographers and artists. Other local artists joined in.

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At times, the same photo was painted by several artists, but the interpretation is always different, as is the medium they chose. Landscapes and seascapes, magpies and roosters, lions and highland cattle have all featured so far, and there are more paintings underway.

The exhibition is showing at the Sorrento Activity Centre, Cnr Melbourne and Queens Road, on Easter Saturday, Sunday and Monday, from 10am to 4pm, April 3,4 and 5. Entry $2. Free parking available.


128 Ocean Beach Rd, Sorrento t: 03 5984 1762 m: 0438 537 757 e: marlenemiller3@bigpond.com Specialising in antique jewellery, as well as newly-made jewellery by Melbourne’s top jewellers

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LUMINOUS VIEWS OF CENTRAL AUSTRALIA AT EVERYWHEN Panoramic landscapes and paintings of bush flowers and plants feature in a solo exhibition by one of Central Australia’s most talented younger generation painters at Everywhen in March. Alyawarre artist, Selina Teece Pwerle, 43, is from Ampilatwatja in the Utopia region of the NT, approximately 250k north-east of Alice Springs. Selina has been painting since she was a young woman, having grown up amongst some of Australia’s most famous Aboriginal artists. These include award winning Gloria Petyarre and the late Emily Kame Kngwarreye whose ‘Earth Creation’ set a record for a work by any Australian woman artist when it sold at auction in 2017 for more than $2m. Although not directly related to these artists, due to the communal nature of Aboriginal art, Selina absorbed the practice of art making from a young age. Her mother Lulu Teece Petyarre is also a wellknown artist. Since she started painting in the early 2000s, Selina has developed her own unique styles to represent the plants and flowers of her region. She especially paints her country after rain when it is blanketed with lush grasses and flowers. A favoured theme is the

leaves of the spinifex plant as they move in the wind, while gum blossoms, outlined in delicate dots and lines are featured in others. Her luminous landscapes are of her father’s country and that of her own birthplace of Antarrengeny in the heart of Alywarre lands. In brilliant colour and precise detail, Selina's expansive vistas depict the rivers, red earth, trees, flowers, hills and the ever-changing light of the outback with an intimacy born from her own observations and lifelong knowledge of these lands and that of her forebears who have lived on them for millennia. Selina Teece Pwerl, Antarrengeny – My Country, runs from March 19 to April 6

EVERYWHEN ARTSPACE A: 39 Cook St, Flinders. T: 5989 0496 E: info@mccullochandmcculloch.com.au W: mccullochandmcculloch.com.au Open Fridays -Tuesdays, 11am-4pm. Wed & Thurs by appointment

SELINA TEECE PWERLE - March 19-April 6 Antarrengeny – My Country Landscapes, flowers and plants of the Eastern Desert Open Friday-Tuesday | 11-4 | Wed & Thurs by appt. | 39 Cook Street, Flinders 3929 T: 03 5989 0496 | mccullochandmcculloch.com.au

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Don’t let joint pain hold you back Orthopaedic surgery is available close to home at The Bays Hospital, Mornington The Bays is a leading provider in orthopaedic surgery. We perform minimally invasive surgery using the latest techniques. Specialised orthopaedic surgery for patients with acute injuries and chronic diagnoses is available for foot, ankle, hip, knee, shoulder and spine conditions. For a list of our expert Orthopaedic Surgeons visit thebays.com.au or call 03 5975 2009

The Bays Hospital Trusted by Generations for over 80 years Vale Street, Mornington VIC 3131


2021 EASTER art show BLAIRGOWRIE YACHT SQUADRON 2 – 5 APRIL

T

he Blairgowrie Yacht Squadron Easter Art Show is back, celebrating its eleventh year in 2021. A highlight in the local community’s calendar, the BYS Easter Art Show runs over the Easter long weekend and is proudly supported by Belle Property, Blairgowrie and Moonee Ponds Periodontics & Implant Centre. The show raises funds for the BYS rescue boat fleet which is used to support junior, community and disabled sailing programs and has gone from strength to strength since it began in 2009. The ongoing success of the Easter Art Show is largely due to the quality and diversity of works on display which is refreshed each year. Artists from Melbourne, the Mornington and Bellarine Peninsula’s, by invitation only, have their works exhibited showcasing a broad range of artistic works from a variety of media. Feature artists this year are photographer Ronald Tan and artist Claire McCall, who will be joined by returning and new artists including indoor and outdoor sculptors. Outdoor sculpture takes pride and place on the deck and lawn which adds to the ambiance of the club. Ronald Tan is a hobbyist seascape and landscape photographer. Tan grew up in Melbourne and first learnt photography in his teenage years shooting black and white film. He ventured into the world of digital photography during his university years which allowed him to hone his skills and develop an eye without having to worry about the cost of shooting and developing film. Tan primarily shoots local seascapes on the Mornington Peninsula but also enjoys general landscape photography and, more recently, aerial photography.

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Claire McCall is a modern impressionist painter who in her early thirties had not yet discovered painting but had always found herself drawn into art galleries. It was a single exhibition by one wonderful artist who inspired her to turn all her attention to art and to try her hand at impressionist oil painting and she has not looked back. Claire is a self-taught artist and much of her process has developed intuitively over the years rather than by the 'rules'. Claire's unique style is rapidly gaining recognition across Australia with a number of awards to her name. Our judge this year is Lisa Byrne, the Director of McClelland Sculpture Park & Gallery, who will award prizes in a number of categories. Lisa has a keen interest in the intersection between art, science and local knowledge and we expect this to be reflected in the works she judges to be the best at this year's Easter Art Show. 12–6pm Friday 2 April by appointment only bookings via http:// facebook.com/byseasterartshow/ 10am–5pm Saturday 3 April – Sunday 4 April Tickets at the door, $5 10am–2pm Mon 5 April Tickets at the door, $5 Visitors to the art show are welcome to stay on at the yacht club and enjoy the BYS bistro and deck with stunning views of the bay, or just relax on the lawn or beach. We look forward to welcoming you at the 2021 Easter Art Show! Blairgowrie Yacht Squadron: 2900 Point Nepean Road, Blairgowrie Phone: 5925 960003 For more information visit FB: byseasterartshow/ or website bys.asn.au


SPECIAL FEATURE

Education +Training

Something for the whole family!

Featuring Peninsula-based training facilities & activity centres to educate & inspire you

AGES 8-18

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Developing young people through the performing arts We offer weekly classes for all ages and abilities taught by a dedicated team of performing arts industry professionals.

Classes in Frankston & Mornington Peninsula

+ 19 locations across metro Melbourne

Enrolments Now Open Call 03) 8199 844 to book!

AGES 4-7

BEGINNERS ON STAGE

AGES 8-18

MUSICAL THEATRE

For more info call 03) 8199 8344 | stageschool.com.au

March 2021

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Education+Training

for the whole family!

DEVELOPING LIFELONG WELLBEING HABITS 10 MINUTES AT A TIME Research tells us that people who have the tools to support their wellbeing actively are more likely to have greater self-control, be better at self-regulation and coping, perform better in school, and have stronger relationships with the people around them.

E – Engagement. When we are engaged in things that we love doing, we lose track of time and live in the moment. Practising mindfulness techniques, appreciating being in the 'now', and identifying your character strengths are all ways to build engagement.

At Toorak College, we aim to develop aspiring young people with confidence and character and equally prioritise the academic and personal growth of every student. To do this, we make sure that our students can make informed choices to strengthen their wellbeing that will enable them to live a more fulfilling life.

R – Relationships. Humans are inherently social creatures and positive relationships have a significant impact on our wellbeing. Making new friends, having conversations with people you don't know well, or reconnecting with people you haven't seen for a while are all ways to build relationships.

Every day at Toorak College starts with a 10-minute tutorial dedicated to developing lifelong wellbeing habits. By encouraging our students to incorporate small daily habits, such as practicing gratitude or mindfulness or taking the time to reflect on their week or connect with others, we are help them to understand themselves and the way they engage with the world around them. Our senior students also undertake the Flourishing Survey to increase their wellbeing self-awareness, set wellbeing goals and track progress. By tracking 14 core wellbeing areas, students can identify their top wellbeing contributors and areas for development. This not only improves student-teacher pastoral conversations but ensures students are in a better position to be able to take ownership of their own wellbeing. Wellbeing is embedded into Toorak’s curriculum at all year levels via Seligman's PERMA+H Theory of Wellbeing. 'Taught' curriculum is where we use specialist teachers and guest speakers to educate our students of theory, research, and real-life application of these elements. 'Caught' curriculum is where we are able to catch these moments and invite students to reflect on their reaction and their success or failures by working through the obstacle or event. This could happen 'on the fly' in a classroom or in the playground with friends. Experiential opportunities, such as camps, also allow students to step outside their comfort zone so they can find their pinch points in a safe and supportive community. P - Positive Emotion. Positive emotion is more than just 'happiness' and includes emotions such as amusement, hope, joy and pride. Taking time to find things you are grateful for in your life, spending time with people you care about, and doing activities you enjoy can help raise your positive emotions.

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M – Meaning. To have a sense of meaning, we need to feel that what we do is valuable and worthwhile. Finding your passion or working towards a higher purpose looks different for everybody so understanding and embracing your authentic self is key to finding meaning. A – Accomplishment. Accomplishment contributes to our wellbeing, although, it often occurs handin-hand with setback so having grit, resilience, and perseverance is critical. H – Health. Exercise, sleep, and nutrition all contribute to our physical and mental health. Eating well and establishing routines that nourish your mind and your body are important in maintaining wellbeing. The University of Pennsylvania's faculty of Positive Psychology says it best: "A good life for one person is not necessarily a good life for another. There are many different routes to a flourishing life." At Toorak, we aim to give our students the skills and education to form habits to allow them to find their unique 'good life.' A: 73-93 Old Mornington Rd, Mount Eliza P: 9788 7200 W: toorakcollege.vic.edu.au


TOORAK COLLEGE

OPEN DAY SAT 20 MARCH

Inspiring confidence and character in every girl so they can leap fearlessly into their future.

toorakcollege.vic.edu.au/visit


Education+Training

for the whole family!

CONNECTED COMMUNITY At Balcombe Grammar School we pride ourselves on our strong sense of community spirit – we are a connected community. Our School is small enough for each student to be known personally and recognised, yet large enough to offer an extensive range of opportunities that assist our students to grow and develop into well-rounded young adults. In 2020 we launched our Learning and Wellbeing models, which are visible throughout our School Community. They remind us daily of some key factors that are essential when aspiring to provide a stimulating and supportive learning environment both inside and outside the classroom.

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At Balcombe Grammar, we are committed to providing a learning environment which nurtures and challenges each student to discover their potential, passion and purpose. We are looking to build on our innovative and community-focused initiatives which play a pivotal role in assisting our students to develop the fundamental skills necessary to form strong connections and thrive in our ever-changing world. Balcombe Grammar is moving into a very exciting time in its short 14-year history and we encourage you to arrange a time to visit and tour our beautiful school. During this visit you will have the opportunity to meet our caring staff, wonderful students and, most importantly, see our school in action. A: 389 Nepean Hwy, Mount Martha P: 5970 1100 W: balcombegrammar.vic.edu.au


Education+Training

for the whole family!

A HOPE-FILLED LEARNING COMMUNITY Learning brings hope and, in a Catholic school, it is seen as a journey of endless possibilities, where students are inspired to search for meaning and explore questions about the world around them. At Padua College, students are encouraged to develop a courageous approach to learning in a culture where mistakes are welcomed and seen as an opportunity for learning. It is a positive, creative, and hope-filled learning community where Catholic values and spirit are shared and the sacred dignity of each person is nurtured. Established in 1898, Padua consists of three junior campuses (Year 7-9) at Mornington, Rosebud and Tyabb and a senior campus (Year 10-12) at Mornington. Excellent staff, facilities, grounds and resources at each campus provide ample opportunity for students to excel in areas of curriculum, leadership, arts, and sports at Padua College. A culture of high expectation across the cognitive, spiritual, physical, social and emotional domains informs the learning and teaching programs at the College. This assists students to develop their capacity to make informed, reasoned and ethical judgements that impel them to act and make a positive impact on their world. Padua’s social justice programs are just one example of where learning connects beyond the walls of the classroom to the real life context. Padua students are supported in their development as self-aware, self-regulated and independent learners who feel empowered to present their own ideas, opinions, knowledge and experience; and futurefocussed learning equips them to thrive in a rapidly changing environment. By knowing their students and building positive relationships that support engagement, Padua teachers ensure that each student’s cultural and social background, and their needs and abilities are respected in the classroom. An inclusive and differentiated curriculum that is flexible and accessible to all provides a positive and empowering learning environment. Padua College delivers a diverse curriculum offering multiple pathways to suit the specific learning needs and interests of its students. All Year 7 and 8 students undertake a common, integrated curriculum that provides a strong

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foundation, a love of learning and a sample of the subjects offered in the subsequent years of schooling. In Year 9, students attend a dedicated Aspire9 Centre at one of its three junior campuses. The Aspire9 program is specifically tailored to the needs of this adolescent period and designed to engage and foster a range of 21st century skills including innovation, collaboration, communication, critical thinking and creativity. Students then move to the Year 10-12 Campus at Mornington where they can undertake a wide variety of elective subjects, or begin their VCE pathway through an accelerated subject. Padua also offers the Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL), a Senior Secondary Qualification which provides Year 11 and 12 students with an alternative to VCE and prepares them for further studies in vocational education and training and for employment. It allows for individualised learning programs based on each student’s interests and strengths, focusing on the practical application of work skills. Padua also offers nationally recognised vocational certificate (VET) programs that allow students to include vocational studies within their Year 10, VCE or VCAL Certificate. By enabling students to make meaningful connections and engage in authentic learning experiences, it is the hope that each individual is able to recognise their God-given talents, be the best that they can be, and make a positive impact on their world. Padua College is hosting a series of Twilight Open Days in March and you’re invited to learn more about what the College can offer your child. To register your interest, visit: W: padua.vic.edu.au


TWILIGHT

OPEN

DAYS 2021

Rosebud 7-9 Campus Wednesday 10 March 4–7pm Tyabb 7-9 Campus Wednesday 10 March 4–7pm Mornington 7-12 Campus Thursday 11 March 4–7pm Experience a taste of the curriculum, sporting, cultural and spiritual life that Padua College can offer your child.

Open 1 February 2021 Close 14 May 2021 Visit our website to enrol online or book a Twilight Open Day tour


Education+Training

for the whole family!

A COMMUNITY OF VIBRANT LEARNING WHERE EACH STUDENT IS SUPPORTED AND CHALLENGED TO ACHIEVE EXCELLENCE John Paul College is a co-educational Catholic Secondary School in Frankston, with a commitment to maintaining an environment and culture where all members of the College community experience a sense of belonging and are recognised as unique individuals. Principal Mr John Visentin says “John Paul College is a vibrant learning community where each student is supported and challenged to achieve excellence. We offer an education that promotes resilience and faith in action. We are committed to maintaining high positive expectations and are attentive to the needs, goals and abilities of every student.” At the heart of the College is the desire for each student to flourish across religious, physical, cognitive, emotional and social domains. Students enjoy coming to school as their personal narrative is known, respected and valued. A diverse and rich curriculum is provided in all year levels to ensure interests, talents and aspirations are catered for and nurtured. We aim to challenge students, to inspire them to achieve, to explore, to understand different ways of thinking and to take advantage of the many opportunities that are available to them. An array of extracurricular activities are on offer at John Paul College, including sports, debating, public speaking, community service, youth ministry, social justice, chess club and performing arts. John Paul College offers students the opportunity to experience community life in a faith-filled

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environment. Each student is invited to develop their personal faith through sacramental celebration, prayer, liturgy, year level retreats, social justice initiatives, fundraising efforts and immersion programs to the Philippines, East Timor and India. The College grounds are large and beautifully landscaped, providing plenty of space for students to learn and socialise. Our state-of-the-art facilities include a modern and well-appointed Resource Centre, sporting grounds and courts, Individual Learning Centre, VCAL dedicated classrooms and fully equipped Food Technology Centre and Science laboratories. The Ngargee Centre for Performing and Visual Arts is a wonderfully appointed space comprising modern facilities for music, drama, dance, media and fine arts. Involvement in the Arts provides students with the platform to develop their creativity and confidence in a supportive, challenging and engaging environment. Sporting opportunities are wide and varied for students at all year levels in both individual and team competitions. Students of all skill levels are encouraged to participate through the House Swimming, Athletics and Cross-country carnivals and those who excel are supported to go on to higher level competitions at regional, state and national levels. Book a College Tour online via our website today to discover what makes John Paul College a place to learn, grow and thrive. W: jpc.vic.edu.au


A community of vibrant learning Enrol now for Year 7 2023 Book a College Tour to explore John Paul College’s expansive grounds and state of the art facilities and discover what makes JPC a place to learn, grow and thrive. Bus service available to Carrum, Bonbeach, Chelsea, Chelsea Heights, Patterson Lakes and Sandhurst.

Visit jpc.vic.edu.au

McMahons Road, Frankston VIC 3199 | 03 9784 0200 | johnpaul@jpc.vic.edu.au | jpc.vic.edu.au


Education+Training

for the whole family! ADVENTUROUS MINDS ARE EDUCATED HERE

A Woodleigh education provides more than just an excellent academic preparation for the future. It offers a journey of experiential learning and discovery, which prepares each individual for life's challenges beyond school. Woodleigh encourages students to be adventurous with their learning. It affirms creativity, independence, self-motivation and initiative; elements you can sense as soon as you enter the school. Our three unique campuses, Minimbah in Frankston South, Penbank in Moorooduc and the Senior Campus in Langwarrin South, are entirely coeducational and committed to the belief that this is the only suitable setting to educate both boys and girls for adult life. We see the development of academic learning, personal wellbeing, and student engagement as being interdependent.

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As a result, we promote the development of student outcomes across the essential elements of learning: the understanding of concepts, the acquisition of knowledge, the mastery of skills and the ability to perform meaningful tasks in real-world settings. We understand that such deep learning happens best in safe, supportive and respectful environments where students can take risks, question their assumptions, respond creatively, and explore new ways of thinking. For this reason, our approach to teaching is paced to students' learning needs, tailored to their learning preferences, and built around their specific interests as learners. To discover more about Woodleigh School, visit our website or contact our Enrolments Team who will be more than happy to help. P: 5971 6100 E: enrol@woodleigh.vic.edu.au W: Woodleigh.vic.edu.au


ADVENTUROUS

MINDS are expressive and imaginative. Original, passionate and persistent. Adventurous Minds create and innovate, They are ready to find a different path, an original vision.

BOOK YOUR PLACE AT ONE OF OUR REGULAR INFORMATION SESSIONS OR CAMPUS TOURS

www.woodleigh.school/enrol

M O R N I N G T O N P E N I N S U L A • E A R LY C H I L D H O O D T O Y E A R 12

5971 6100

woodleigh.vic.edu.au


Education+Training

for the whole family! YOUR GIRL GUIDE FRIENDS ARE WAITING As a parent, you might ask, “What does Girl Guides have to offer my daughter in 2021?” As the peak organisation for girls aged 5-17, the Girl Guide mission is to empower all girls to become confident, engaged, and responsible community members through a unique program that has been alive for over 100 years. Interested in joining? Up for something new? Jump into Girl Guides and bring your friends. Set challenges, learn, grow and try new things. Hike, travel, camp and make new friends along the way. With limitless possibilities, the list is yours to write! Enjoy earning badges if you like. However, the ultimate reward will be your great sense of achievement.

Crib Point Community House

M: 0418 974 994

W: girlguidesvic.org.au

IT’S EASY WHEN YOU KNOW HOW

A: 7 Park Rd, Crib Point P: 5983 9888

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Fun

If you’d like to get involved in your local community, there’s no better place to meet people. You could become a volunteer or share your skills by tutoring others. Give us a call or drop in for or a cuppa and chat.

eate •

Cr

e • It’s easy when you know how! • Laug ip h • Fri e n d s h

is

You can also join one of our classes to learn Yoga, Lady’s Woodwork, Meditation, Art (Multi Medium) and Patchwork. We have different talks and workshops on each term which can include Making a Will, Power of Attorney, Numerology and more. We also have social outings including Op shop trips.

lp

earn • Volunteer • L •

• S o cial

Wellness Craft, Café Chat, Easy Walking, Material Girls, Family Tree Circle, Cackle 'n Craft Knitters and Hookers and Photo Scrapbooking where you can learn a skill or just enjoy the company.

Heart of the Community

He

At Crib Point Community House we provide a welcoming and encouraging place to learn and make friends. You are welcome to join in any of our friendly Special Interest Groups which include:

– Join us @ –

Crib Point Community House 7 Park Rd Crib Point 3919 Ph: 5983 9888 - Email:info@cpch.org.au Web: www.cpch.org.au


Education+Training

for the whole family!

LIBRARIES AFTER DARK AT CARRUM DOWNS Carrum Downs library welcomes you with open (but socially distanced) arms after hours on Thursdays. Thanks to the Libraries After Dark program, Carrum Downs library is open until 10pm every Thursday night, in a bid to combat social isolation and gambling-related harm. Between 2018 and 2019, $559 was lost at the poker machines per adult in Frankston City, which is higher than the Victorian average of $538. “Frankston City residents lost more than $62 million during this period. These losses have far reaching consequences for our community, beyond their financial impacts. Gambling can be detrimental to relationships, mental health and overall wellbeing,” Frankston City Council's David Asker said.

Amanda Murphy, CEO of Connect Health & Community, which delivers the Gambler’s Help Southern program said, “We know that overcoming a problem with gambling can be one of the most challenging times in a person’s life, but recovery is possible. “Please reach out to a loved one or to Gambler’s Help Southern for support. If you need somewhere to go, without the temptation of gambling, consider Carrum Downs Library.” A: 203 Lyrebird Dr, Carrum Downs P: 8773 9539

“During the pandemic lockdown, when access to gaming venues was limited, our local community saved around $32 million that would have been spent on gambling.”

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Education+Training

for the whole family!

Be inspired to discover your creativity Our studio is a fun and friendly space for people who would like to explore their creativity, no matter their age or skill level! We will guide you to discover your unique creative self. Pre-Primary and Primary Kids classes A comprehensive timetable of School Holiday Classes Adult Art and Creative classes Family Workshops Group classes and Private lessons (NDIS compliant) Online and in-store Art and craft supplies Custom workshops

location: 6 High Street Hastings VIC 3915 website: www.creativemakes.com.au email: melscreativemakes@gmail.com | phone: 0425 867 919 facebook/melscreativemakes | instagram/_creativemakes_

EVERYONE IS CREATIVE In the modern world of technology, fast living and full lives what does it mean to be creative? Creativity is not as narrow as being able to draw, paint, or play a musical instrument. The Cambridge definition of creativity is: ‘the ability to produce or use original and unusual ideas’. From this, we can then start to form the idea that moves away from the often-narrow school of thought that if you cannot draw, paint or play a piece of music you are not creative. So much of what we think of as not being a creative person is actually a lack of creative confidence. If you can come up with a new idea, think outside the box, form a plan in your mind, deviate from the recipe, or you can imagine something different to your current reality, you are creative. Be inspired to discover your creativity at the creative makes studio. A: 6 High Street Hastings E: melscreativemakes@gmail.com M: 0425 867 919 W: creativemakes.com.au FB: /melscreativemakes INSTA: _creativemakes_

FUN, SAFE, INDOOR SPORT FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY Table tennis is a Commonwealth Games and Olympic sport. Doesn’t matter if you are social, beginner, or competitive player, MPTTA has you covered. • The Whole family can play on the same night. • Spinneroos and GIRLS ONLY Spinneroos for primary school aged children with emphasis on FUN, FRIENDSHIPS and SKILLS development. • FRIDAY NIGHT is JUNIORS NIGHT with games, coaching and lightning competition. • GET FITT (Females in Table Tennis) open to any female of any age and ability. Includes 3 x FREE lessons - all equipment supplied. • Coaching to improve your game.

will develop your child’s passion for table tennis, with all the benefits of an active lifestyle.building friendships & having fun. To register go to spinneroos.com.au

FITT (Females in Table Tennis) encouraging females of any age and ability. FRIDAY NIGHT IS JUNIORS NIGHT Fun activities, games, coaching, competition.

• Adult and family evening competitions.

MORNINGTON PENINSULA TABLE TENNIS ASSOCIATION

Mornington Sports Complex 350 Dunns Rd Mornington M: 0498 003 788 E: mptta88@gmail.com W: mptta.org.au

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Education+Training

for the whole family!

REDISCOVER LIFE’S JOYS THROUGH PAINTING Colour Your World Art helps children and adults reconnect with the joy in their lives through painting, offering classes that allow you to create, play and feel whilst building confidence, developing new skills, raising self-esteem and allowing for self-expression in a fun and safe environment. This can enable positive change in your life. Michele’s motto is “Learn to paint; anyone can” and she holds the belief where there is a will, there is a way. “Frequently I hear people say, ‘I can’t paint’ or ‘I failed art at school’ – but you can; you just need to be shown how. My teaching style is step-by-step in a relaxed, nurturing and non-judgmental space.” Her inspirational classes are suitable for first-time painters along with anyone wanting to brush up on their skills. Located at Mornington, there is a range for adults and kids to choose from. A mobile service is also available, which is perfect for team events or art parties. COLOUR YOUR WORLD ART A: 15/1140 Nepean Highway, Mornington M: 0417 425 116 W: colouryourworldart.com FB: colouryourworldart INSTA: colouryourworldart

MUSIC CLASSES FOR BABIES TO 5 YEAR OLDS Children under six create over one million new neural connections per second. Making music is ‘super food’ for a child’s developing brain, as it engages areas involved in speech, listening, movement, intellect, socialisation, emotions and creativity.

Mini Maestros Music Classes for 0-5 years

Mini Maestros, for babies to five year olds, specialises in fun, whole-brain development, through play-based sequential learning. It is the longest running and most successful Australian business of its kind. Mini Maestros provides the highest quality lesson content, developed by early childhood music education experts and delivered by a team of thoroughly trained, big-hearted professional music teachers. • Build Confidence • Nurture Whole Brain Development • Social Interaction for Parent and Child • Age-Specific for Children’s Developmental Stages • Preparation for Kinder and School Frankston/Langwarrin | Kate | 0406 062 254 Mt Eliza | Kylie | 0409 020 495 Safety Beach/Dromana | Tiff | 0404 967 676

Frankston/Langwarrin | Kate | 0406 062 254 Mt Eliza | Kylie | 0409 020 495 Safety Beach/Dromana | Tiff | 0404 967 676

minimaestros.com.au March 2021

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Eat & Drink

OUT OF India

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Eat & Drink

By Andrea Louise Thomas Photos Gary Sissons

M

ount Martha businessman Jagvir Gill, owner of The Chutney Bar in Mornington, immigrated to Australia with his family when he was a boy. They came from a small farming village in the northern Indian state of Punjab. His father was a farmer who came to Australia ahead of his family to work in agriculture. Coming to Australia was a huge adjustment for Jag. He had to learn a vastly different language and a culture that was totally foreign to him. Other than a love of cricket, he didn’t have anything in common with Australians. He left behind his beloved grandmother and his village. As a Sikh, he wore his hair in a patka (Sikh turban) for which he was regularly teased at school, but he learned to roll with it. He mastered the art of adaptation as the family moved from place to place following the farming seasons of sugar cane in Northern New South Wales and Queensland and tobacco in the Victorian Alps. Coming from a Sikh background where hard work, sharing and service are cornerstones, a career in hospitality was a perfect fit for Jag, though it wasn’t where he originally pictured himself. He did a degree in Engineering at RMIT thinking he would follow in his grandfather’s footsteps as an engineer, but his connection to business and hospitality had a greater pull.

Now on offer at The Chutney Bar is a one-of-a-kind on the Mornington Peninsula. It’s called The Maharaja Thali (The Royal Dining Experience) and it’s an education in Indian cuisine. It can be served for one or two, but it includes a selection of curries, spiced yogurt, chutney, papadums, dessert and mango lassi. Each dish represents a different region of India. While Indian food might be perceived by the uninitiated as too hot and spicy for an Australian palate, it is in fact a smorgasbord of flavour from mild to wild. There is something for every palate and the Royal Dining Experience gives the opportunity to discover the best in Indian cuisine all on one platter. (The food can be adapted to suit Vegans and Vegetarians and those with food allergies.) Jag credits his parents for his passion for flavour. Both were great cooks. He worked alongside his father at The Rasoi in Mount Eliza and viewed him as an inventor in the kitchen. He was a natural chef with exquisite taste and he passed that on to his son. Together they made all of the bases from scratch and concocted new flavours by trail and error.

I can make anything taste good

Jag started his first restaurant, The Rasoi (which means kitchen in Punjabi) in Mount Eliza sixteen years ago. He opened other Rasoi restaurants in Mount Martha, Sorrento, Sandringham and Bright. He also owns and operates The Chutney Bar in Inverloch. When COVID hit, his businesses adapted and at The Chutney Bar in Mornington, he set up Jag’s Kebabs, serving take away food. It still does a roaring trade as the little window shop is open until 3am on Saturday and Sunday mornings. Offering authentic flavourful food and a unique dining experience is what makes Jag’s restaurants so successful. Every aspect is taken into consideration from the cutlery and crockery to the beautifully appointed décor. At The Chutney Bar in Mornington, the ceilings are decorated in colourful handwoven Punjabi fabric (phulkari) that a traditional bride wears, but it also insulates the dining space so that patrons can hear one another when the restaurant is busy. Food and drinks, even the cocktails, are paired to bring out the best flavours. As Jag says, “I can make anything taste good.”

Despite his incredible success in business, Jag says, “You never stop learning in hospitality.” That’s what they teach at his hospitality school in Melbourne. It’s called AVETA (Australian Vocational Education and Training Academy), offering courses and diplomas in everything from commercial cookery and hospitality to business and leadership management. From a little rural farming village in Northern India to the Mornington Peninsula, Jag has brought his hardworking ethic, sharing culture and finely developed palate to build a small hospitality empire in Victoria. He is a real testament to the immigrant experience. Book in to The Chutney Bar in Mornington to experience The Maharaja Thali and taste the real flavours of India. Know that this dining experience is coming from an authentic place.

The Chutney Bar, 44 Main Street, Mornington P: 5976 1006 W: chutneybar.com.au

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recipe LAMB ROGAN JOSH Ingredients 3.5 tbsp ghee, substitute butter 6 green cardamom pods, lightly bruised 1 cinnamon stick 4 cloves 1 large onion, finely chopped 3 cloves garlic, finely minced 1 tbsp ginger, finely grated 5 tbsp tomato passata 1 tsp salt 750g/1.5lb boneless lamb shoulder, cut into 3cm/1.2" cubes 1.5 cups / 375ml chicken stock, salt reduced (broth) Spices 2 tbsp paprika, normal or sweet 3/4 tsp chilli powder 4 tsp ground coriander 4 tsp ground cumin 2 tsp turmeric powder 1/4 tsp nutmeg 1 tsp garam marsala 1/2 tsp fennel powder

Method Melt ghee over medium heat in large heavy based pot. Add cinnamon, cardamom and cloves and cook for one minute. Add onion and cook for 7 minutes, stirring frequently, until pieces are golden and starting the brown on the edges. Add the garlic and ginger, cook for another minute. Stir in the spices, cook for 30 seconds. Mix in the tomato puree and salt, then add stock and mix. Add lamb, stir, bring to simmer. Place lid on and adjust heat to low or medium-low so it's simmering gently.

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Cook 1 hour 45 minutes, giving it an occasional stir, until lamb is quite tender. Use 2 forks to check it should pry apart pretty easily. Remove lid, and continue cooking for another 15 minutes (to reduce sauce slightly) - lamb should be very tender by this stage. Stir in the Yogurt, the extra garam marsala and fennel. Cook for another few minutes. Serve with basmati rice, sprinkled with fresh coriander leaves and other garnishes if desired. The Chutney Bar, 44 Main Street, Mornington P: 5976 1006 I chutneybar.com.au


SIMPLY scrumptious L

inda Martinucci started Simply Swap Foods to help spread the word about the importance of changing to a real food low sugar diet to improve overall health and quality of life. With a background as a food writer and cookbook author, she has spent the last 15 years following nutrition studies and medical research based on the best way to fuel our bodies for optimal health.

One of the keys to successfully transitioning to this new lifestyle was being able to indulge in favourite cakes and desserts from time to time. She wanted to be able to enjoy family celebrations and not feel deprived during dessert time.

Our values are at the forefront of everything we do

Three years ago, Linda made the decision to completely overhaul her lifestyle by switching to a real food diet which was naturally low in sugar and full of healthy fats. She was amazed to see 15kg of stubborn excess weight drop off (over a period of six months) and her energy levels and mental clarity increased to an all-time high. Her husband David also adopted similar habits and lost 20kg easily in around eight months, plus had energy he never thought possible.

So, Linda went to work and spent countless hours in the kitchen perfecting the baking and porridge mixes that are for sale through her website. She knew that having low sugar treats to enjoy would be the key to sustaining this way of eating for life. She has also developed many low sugar recipes that taste just like their traditional versions and these recipes are available on her website and through ebooks.

All of the products are low carb, keto friendly, sugar free, use premium real food ingredients and plant-based sweeteners, have no artificial colours or flavours, no genetically modified ingredients, are pet friendly (no xylitol), super easy to prepare at home and taste great! Continued next page... March 2021

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you can have your cake and feel great too!

Linda says, “Our values are at the forefront of everything we do. We are so proud to be a 100% Australian owned and operated business and are passionate about education of our community around sugar and nutrition so everyone can live their best and healthiest life.” To support this, each year, Linda we will be making a donation to SugarByHalf, an Australian not-for-profit organisation led by a team of health experts which provides education and resources so that Australians can live better, stronger and healthier lives. Study after study is now proving that excess sugar is the main issue for many conditions in our community including obesity, type 2 diabetes, arthritis, inflammation and general low energy and loss of mental clarity. Further to creating products that are beneficial to our bodies, Simply Swap Foods also strives to minimise environmental impact and have put lots of resources into sourcing services and products that are kind to the earth. They use Sendle for most of their Australia-wide shipping. Sendle are the first parcel delivery service in Australia to offer 100% carbon neutral shipping and offer compostable sending satchels which are made from biodegradable materials. They also use recycled cardboard boxes for shipping cartons, packing peanuts which are fully biodegradable and compostable, and soft plastic product packaging which can be recycled through soft plastic recycling units found at most local Woolworths/Coles stores. “The majority of our wraps and paper are sourced from environmentally aware businesses. We support Australian businesses and source our ingredients locally as much as we can”, says Linda. Linda hopes that her products and recipes will help others experience the enormous benefit of changing to a real food low sugar diet and taking care of the planet!

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She said, “Simply Swap Foods is all about helping transition to a low sugar lifestyle by providing a range of indulgent and delicious, sweet premix products and free online recipes. I love creating nutritious treats for everyone to enjoy.” You really can have cake and feel great too!

Check out the range at simplyswapfoods.com.au and follow Linda on her Facebook and Instagram pages, @ simplyswapfoods, for regular updates, photos and delicious recipes.

.com.au


Must try

Dishes

Green Curry filled to the brim with nourishing veggies, rice and a good kick of delicate heat.

Twice cooked pork belly, with JimmyRum boozy Silver apple sauce (GF).

Heirloom tomatoes with garlic hummus, horseradish and kombucha dressing.

Emu Plains Market Little Beauty Market

Jimmy Rum Distillery

Zigis Bar at Flinders Hotel

emuplainsmarket.com.au littlebeautymarket.com.au

6 Brasser Ave, Dromana P 5987 3338 jimmyrum.com.au

Cnr Cook &, Wood St, Flinders P 5989 0201 flindershotel.com.au

In house patsitsio, the Greek lasagna, with hints of herbs and spices - a delicious meal that leaves you wanting more!

Mr Jackson’s falafel bowl. House made falafel, carrot hummus, smoked yogurt, beetroot relish, mixed grains, raw spinach, harissa & crushed nuts.

Delicious and succulent is what comes to mind as you experience our Eye Fillet.

Limani Cafe and Wine Bar

Mr Jackson

104 Main St, Mornington P 5976 8482 squiresloftmornington.com

3762 Point Nepean Rd, Portsea P 0418 367 007 limaniportsea.com.au

Squires Loft Mornington

1/45 Main St, Mornington P 5909 8815 mrjackson.com.au

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HIT THE SWITCH! What do you remember as a kid? No doubt it’s a few key experiences that stand out in your mind. Family travels, adventures, or maybe trying new things for the first time?! If that’s what you remember, then how about you ‘hit the switch’ on your everyday routine and create your own key experience by enjoying some Ranch Life. Bring yourself, partner, mates or your family and get amongst everything that The Ranch has to offer. Stay in one of our cosy log cabins, and couple it with a ride package where you can experience the views of Bass Strait while riding one of our beautiful horses. Our horses are hand-picked to suit your size, riding ability and requirements. We have different trails to suit all riding abilities.

If you’re looking for a more relaxing stay, grab a book and lounge around the pool or send the kids to do some activities while you chill and enjoy a tea or coffee and a bite to eat in our new café. At night, you can simply sit, sip and watch the sunset. We can’t wait to have you here. Whether it’s just for coffee and cake, a day trip, a weekend away or a full week of fun and adventure. See you soon! A: 810 Boneo Rd, Cape Schanck P: 5988 6262 W: theranchmp.com.au

The Ranch have also partnered with Peninsula Nomads who specialise in creating and setting up private tipi experiences and pop up picnics. Glamping at The Ranch is a unique experience that delivers peaceful surrounds with the sound of the ocean in the background and the varying sounds and calls from the roaming animals. Try something new by booking some of our activities. How about mountainboarding, archery, rock climbing, giant swing or crate stack. Adventure doesn’t only have to be for the kids. Adults can also share in the. Nothing like a little rivalry between the kids and the adults and/or adults among their mates!

STAY & PLAY

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STAY & PLAY STAY & PLAY PLAY STAY &

Hit the Switch on your every day routine and make the most of a weekend theaSwitch onof your every day routine andactivities make the and mosthave of a weekend away! Hit Grab couple families, book some a family Hit away! the Switch on your every day routine and make the most of a weekend a couple families, somefun activities and have a family camp. The Grab 'big kids' willofhave just book as much as the little ones. away! Grab a couple of families, some and have a family have justbook as much funactivities as the little ones. Make camp. up forThe all 'big thekids' lost will catch up time you've missed in 2020, bundle all your camp. The kids' haveinjust as much as the little ones. Make up'big for all the will lost time 2020, bundlefun all your mates and have some mates and have some FUN! Stay in a cabin, try mountainboarding, take a FUN! in athe cabin, mountainboarding, take scenicmates horse and trail, have fire ansome Make upStay for all losttry time in 2020, bundle allayour scenicarrow, horsehave trail, fire an arrow, fun have a giant swing...the fun is endless. a giant swing...the is endless. FUN! Stay in a cabin, try mountainboarding, take a scenic horse trail, fire an arrow, have a giant swing...the fun is endless.

GLAMPING GLAMPING

Want something different? Experience GLAMPING Experience glamping at The Ranch with glamping at The Ranch with Peninsula

Nomads. Enjoydifferent? wakingwaking up Experience in our unique Peninsula Nomads. Enjoy up in our Want something setting, the sounds of our glamping atwith The Ranch with Peninsula unique setting, with the sounds ofanimals, all ourthen enjoy a coffee and breakfast in our cafe the Nomads. Enjoy waking upbreakfast in our unique animals. Enjoy a coffee and in our next morning. setting, with the sounds of our animals, then cafe the next morning.

enjoy a coffee and breakfast in our cafe the For more information: morning. Fornext more information: www.theranchmp.com.au

admin@theranchmp.com.au www.theranchmp.com.au For more information: 5988 6262 admin@theranchmp.com.au www.theranchmp.com.au 5988 6262


TAKE YOUR LOVE SOARING TO NEW HEIGHTS THIS (BELATED) VALENTINE'S DAY Ahhh… Valentine’s Day. The perfect time to spoil the one you love. Arrgh… but sadly this year, perfect timing is never a guaranteed thing! But not to be outsmarted by the changing times we have become used to, Covid will not stop the love here at Arthurs Seat Eagle. The Eagle has ‘pressed pause’ on regular Valentine’s celebrations and moved the whole event a month along. After all, Sunday the 14th is still the same(ish) even if it is in March. For a special ‘date night’ option to belatedly celebrate Valentine’s Day, a private gondola soaring with your sweetheart could be the perfect surprise experience you need. You’ll take an extended twilight flight (1 Hour), with two glasses of T’gallant sparkling (or alternate

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beverage), matched with a gourmet grazing platter and a sweet treat by Mornington Peninsula Chocolaterie. Oh, and of course a single red rose by Artful Blooms to give your chosen one! That’s right, you can now soar high above the bay in your private gondola while sipping a glass of wine and snacking on a gourmet platter. Fancy an extra drink on your journey? Book in for a ‘top up’, and as you glide through the station one of our team will refill your glass so you can keep on enjoying those views without leaving your seat! Surprise your Valentine, Galentine or Palentine with this unique night out! This romantic package for two is $140 and is available on Sunday 14th March 2021. Book Online A: 1085 Arthurs Seat Rd, Arthurs Seat W: aseagle.com.au/soaring-valentine


MORE IN MORNINGTON An interest store of curious goods in the heart of Main Street Mornington. Albert & Daphne is so much for than a store. It’s a place to get lost and a place to find yourself. We curate the most beautiful collections for men and women from artisans all around the world and offer it to you in one neat package. Think unique clothes from Poland, stunning shoes from France, homewares from rural Victoria…if it’s gorgeous we’ve got it! Our little interest store of curious goods will inspire you to explore more, adventure more and enjoy more! A: 103 Main Street, Mornington W: albertanddaphne.com.au

Support local, support handmade, support innovation, support love, support small business... support your local market! EMU PLAINS MARKET : MAR 20 | 9-2 EMU PLAINS RESERVE, BALNARRING www.emuplainsmarket.com.au LITTLE BEAUTY MARKET : MAR 27 | 9-2 CRN HIGH & YOUNG ST, FRANKSTON www.littlebeautymarket.com.au Love supporting small businesses? Why not check out our interest store of curious goods!

ALBERT & DAPHNE

103 MAIN STREET, MORNINGTON | WWW.ALBERTANDDAPHNE.COM.AU

$ *

20CHER

U VO

The LARGEST shoe store on the Peninsula.

Bayside Shoes has one of the largest ranges of quality footwear on the Peninsula, allowing our customers plenty of space for social distancing. Offering ladies, mens, childrens, fashion, weddings, After 5, large sizes, problem feet, podiatry, hospitality, nursing, work boots and more... BAYSIDESHOES.COM.AU 9785 1887 * OFFER ENDS 31/3/2021. VALID ON ALL NON SALES ITEMS OVER $80. PLEASE NOTE, ONLY A SMALL PART OF OUR RANGE IS ONLINE.

BAYS I D E

103 Railway Parade, Seaford.

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WANT TO LEARN ABOUT BACKYARD HENS?

T

he growing popularity of owning backyard hens has largely been due to families wanting to become more self-sustainable. So why is keeping backyard hens so good for your family? Well, hens make for fantastic pets! Our breed of hens are Hy-line Browns which are extremely friendly and placid. They love company and like nothing more than to spend time interacting with their owners. We hear lots of entertaining stories from our customers such as their hens going on school runs, on swings with the kids and happily jumping up onto their laps. Good egg-laying breeds like our Hy-Line also quickly pay for themselves by providing your family with highly nutritious and delicious eggs throughout the year. Their eggs are high in protein and minerals but low in calories. You also have peace of mind knowing exactly how your hens are treated and what food they have eaten. Of course, you can’t get more “local” food than what you get from your own backyard! When combined with a vegetable garden, your family becomes far more self-sufficient and able to live more sustainably. If you really had to avoid social contact, your hens and vegetables could keep your household well fed over the long-term.

Looking for backyard hens but unsure where to start?

Hen ownership also teaches children some important, practical lessons about life. Not only do they need to be responsible for feeding and providing water for their hens but they must collect eggs daily and keep the coop clean and safe. Excess eggs can also be sold or given away to friends and neighbours which is a great way of benefiting others in your local community. We are holding our 2nd Annual - Open Weekend on the 6th & 7th of March 2021 from 10am to 4pm. It’s a great chance to visit the farm and see what keeping backyard chickens is all about. There will be a range of fun activities for the kids such as a petting zoo, face painting, craft activities, presentation on backyard hens and more...Come visit us!

3590 Frankston-Flinders Rd, Merricks M: 0406 691 231 W: talkinghens.com.au Facebook: @TalkingHens

OPEN ND WEEKE ar M 6th - 7th 2021

Talking Hens is a family business that loves backyard chickens! We like them so much that we specialise in supplying only the friendliest, best-laying hens along with the best quality products to keep them happy and healthy. There’s nothing like the friendship, entertainment and nutrition that you receive from our laying hens - a pleasure to be shared!

Visit our Website to learn more and download our FREE, Beginner’s Guide to Backyard Chickens at:

www.TalkingHens.com.au

Open Thursday to Monday 10am till 4pm (Closed Tue & Wed). 3590 Frankston-Flinders Rd Merricks. For enquiries 0406 691 231 www.facebook.com/TalkingHens March 2021

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on

Frankston

Frankston City is a local government area in Victoria about 40 kilometres south of the Melbourne CBD. It has an area of 130 square kilometres. The first individuals who occupied the land of Frankston City were the Boon Wurrung and Bunurong Aboriginal citizens Despite its similar area and name, Frankston City is a different entity to the former City of Frankston which existed from 1966 until 1994 It was a continuation of the former Shire of Frankston and was abolished by then premier Jeff Kennett under local government reforms. The George Pentland Botanical Gardens, named after a former Shire Secretary and Town Clerk, were established in 1975 on part of the old nine holes golf course. It is home to a large array of Australian native plants with a focus on plants from South Eastern Australia and plant communities from the Mornington Peninsula. The major part of the City was first incorporated in 1860 as the Mornington Roads District, which became a shire in 1871 and was renamed Shire of Frankston and Hastings in 1893, losing its western riding to form the Shire of Mornington, which has since been amalgamated into the Shire of Mornington Peninsula. On 19 October 1960, the Shire of Frankston and Hastings split in two, with the western part remaining as the Shire of Frankston, and the eastern part being incorporated as the Shire of Hastings. Frankston City is one of six Central Activates Areas (CAA) being developed by the State Government. It has attracted significant public funding for urban renewal, landscaping and community facilities with some exciting projects planned.

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Median house price in Frankston is $620,000 for sale and $390 per week rent. Frankston is a modern city, fronting Port Phillip Bay. The commercial centre of Frankston incorporates the Bayside Shopping Centre and the Bayside Entertainment Centre that includes cinemas, eateries and fashion outlets. A short distance east is the Karingal Shopping Centre and Star Zone, an entertainment precinct featuring Village Cinemas, restaurants, indoor play centre, gym, TAB, hair and beauty stores and free parking. Frankston has a thriving arts and theatre scene with the popular Frankston Arts Centre and several galleries. A visit to the McClelland Sculpture Park & Gallery is a great experience. The beaches around Frankston are mainly calm and sandy, ideal for swimming, boating and other aquatic activities. To the south, the sandy beaches make way for rocky cliffs and headlands. Panoramic views can be enjoyed across Port Phillip Bay and north along the beachside suburbs from vantage points such as Olivers Hill. The Frankston Waterfront precinct incorporates Frankston Pier, a visitor information centre, restaurant/cafe, a scenic boardwalk that extends to the boat ramp at the base of Olivers Hill to the south and crosses the Landmark Bridge to the north and ends at the Waves restaurant. The Frankston City population is forecast to grow to 163,610 by 2041.

Coffee Safari

Freshly brewed coffee is a must-have for weekends away and the Mornington Peninsula's coffee haunts are secondto-none. Here are just a few to check out when you head down to this beautiful part of the world.

Two Boys one Beagle and a Coffee Shop 59 KAREELA ROAD

A boutique café nestled in the Karingal neighbourhood serving local coffee roasters Commonfolk coffee, an allday brunch menu and home baked cakes. Expect a relaxed and friendly vibe and some super cute pink décor.

Parcha

36 WELLS ST Enjoy breakfast, lunch or dinner with a Turkish twist! The coffee is made from specialty espresso blend 'Rose St' and single origin beans from Industry Beans. Pair with the Parcha Stack, or the housemade baklava for best results.

Wildness

135 BEACH STREET Cafe by day and restaurant by night, Wildness serves a specialty fair trade and certified organic coffee blend alongside an all day breakfast. The lunch menu is broad ranging including toasties, wraps and burgers, and more substantial mains.


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What to do Take a walk along the Frankston waterfront precinct extending from the boat ramp at the base of Olivers Hill, crossing the Landmark Bridge, and ending at Waves restaurant. Enjoy the views across Port Phillip Bay or head down to Bayside Shopping Centre to browse some of the 250 specialty stores and major department stores. Stroll through the Frankston city lanes and take in eye-catching street art murals, or picnic in the family-friendly, lush Botanical Gardens which are equipped with barbeque facilities and a playground. If you're looking for something on the screen or stage, catch a movie at Hoyt's cinemas or a live performance at the Frankston Arts Centre. Photos Yanni

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Exclusive Property Management is Leading the Way Exclusive Property Management is one of the very few property management-only specialist servicing the Mornington Peninsula. Connecting landlords with like-minded tenants is what Director, Shae Lawrie does best. With over 16 years experience, Shae is dedicated to delivering exceptional relationship governance to secure the best outcome for both landlords and tenants. Interpersonal care is the key to longevity-based results in the property management industry and this is where Exclusive Property Management leads the way. Shae is a people-first property- secured agent who prides herself on being able to identify the needs of landlords and tenant to match them accordingly. Shae takes the time to listen and liaise with all parties from the onset to ensure an ongoing relationship is based on trust and respect. Her finely honed relationship management skills also means she is an adept problem solver. Exclusive Property Management’s extensive portfolio has been fostered through a dedication to building relationships that last. It continues to grow as a result of Shae’s intimate understanding of how demanding moving in and out of a property can be from both sides and her steadfast commitment to personalised service. With the most up-to-date technology, a paperless office devoted to carbon footprint reduction and a strong network of industry insiders and tradespeople around her, Shae and her team at Exclusive Property Management are setting new standards across the Mornington Peninsula. Contact the team at Exclusive Property Management for all of your property management needs.

W: www.exclusivepm.com.au M: 0491 640 812 E: shae@exclusivepm.com.au A: Suite 2, 7/3 Torca Tce, Mornington


Puzzle

Corner

ACROSS 1. Tastes 5. Segment 9. Make on loom 12. Effeminate 16. Dog restraint 17. Biblical tower 18. Stows away 20. Fully conversant with, ... of 22. Largest fish, ... shark 23. Egg meals 24. Puccini & Verdi works 26. Skimpy pool outfit 27. Asian waxed cloth 28. Formal endorsement 31. Seasons (dish) 32. Property 34. Term 36. Zodiac sign 37. Unsympathetic (3-8) 40. Korean martial art, ... kwon do 42. German river 43. Articulate 45. Dumping 47. Ogled, ... at 49. Total 50. Logically presented 52. Ranted 54. Paints roughly 55. S American mountains 56. ... & gutter 58. Exacts (revenge) 59. Quickly 60. Real, ... fide 61. Interrupting cough 62. Nincompoop 63. Ireland, the Emerald ... 64. Weighted 67. Protected 68. Extremities 69. Pink-eyed rabbit 72. Typist's complaint (1,1,1) 74. Dukes & ... 78. Numero uno 79. Wow! 80. Margarine container 81. Heavy horned animal 82. Lugs 85. Spacious 87. UAE state, Abu ... 88. House top 90. Earth scientist 91. Falls (behind) 92. Draught cattle

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93. Relative amounts 94. Vietnam's capital 95. All-male (party) 96. Slightly open 97. Story 100. Stuck-up person 102. Quoted 103. Timidly 104. Ventured 106. Asinine 108. Chinese lunch, yum ... 109. Pallid 110. Order of the British Empire (1,1,1) 112. Assortments 116. Retch 118. Demented 120. Adult leveret 121. Exceptional 123. Re-enter (data) 125. Mideast port 126. Student's composition 127. Royal standard 128. Brazilian jazz style, bossa ... 129. Pinkish-violet 130. Haemorrhage 131. Murder (2,2) 132. Garret 134. Wind instrument 136. Wooden peg 139. Illuminates (6,2) 141. Elf 142. Hurled 144. Leftover 146. Prohibited 147. Skewered meat 148. ... or nay 149. Water between Australia & Africa (6,5) 151. Income 152. Perceives 155. Poet, Dylan ... 158. Clasp 159. Unacceptable 162. Sewage pipe trap (1-4) 164. Intercepted, ... off 165. Sensual 166. Ladies' partners 170. Belonging to them 171. Gush 172. Anger or love 173. Physicist, ... Newton 174. Flinch 175. Subtracts 176. Embankments 177. Retains 178. Politician

March 2021

DOWN 1. Residential district 2. Judderings 3. Unforeseen (8-3) 4. Mistrust 5. Behave affectedly (4-3) 6. Reflected radar beam 7. Alternatively, or ... 8. Bread shops 9. Which? 10. Screens on TV 11. Test 12. Unlacing 13. Mushy sentimentality 14. Three-colours ice cream 15. Cedes 19. Radiate 21. Rhythm 25. Visualising 26. Bravely 29. Truly! 30. Scents 33. Sportswomen 35. Proximity 36. Womaniser (4-6) 38. Fermented 39. Blots out 41. Attempting 42. Disreputable publication 44. Fighter ace, the ... Baron 46. Tossed greens 48. Scandinavian language 49. Steak cuts (1-5) 51. Sea north of Crete 53. Harmed 55. Sourness 57. Mattress ensemble 60. Overalls, ... & brace 65. Surgical cleansing agents 66. Misjudgment 70. Escorts 71. Neutrally 73. Cluelessness 75. Exhort 76. Entertaining 77. People's self-pride 78. Gaining possession of 83. Torture 84. Contrite 85. Unbending 86. Different 89. Long way 91. ... Angeles, California 92. Once in a while 96. Supplementary (3-2) 98. Old school, ... mater

99. Urn 101. Drinking spree 103. Diabolic 105. Overshadowed 107. Superficially 111. Monsters 112. Pique 113. Shoe lining 114. Grills 115. Ceylon (3,5) 117. Quarrels 119. Battery size (1,1,1) 120. Helicopter's landing places 122. Legendary gold city (2,6) 124. Little bit 132. Evocative of mood 133. Expression of rebuke 134. Limited in magnitude 135. Votes into office 137. Gossamer snare 138. Fat-reduction surgery 140. Avouched 141. Socially adept 143. Peaceful 145. Distasteful 150. Aggravating 153. Tidies up 154. Constructed 156. Recluses 157. Genetic aberrations 158. Endowed with talent 160. Regrets 161. Single entity 163. Ballroom performer 166. Slimy matter 167. Tidings 168. Humble 169. Famous, of ...


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History

Score Review? Not Required In 1908! By Lance Hodgins

T

he umpires at the 1908 Grand Final between Hastings and Frankston had an easy day. Why? Well, only the Hastings team took the field. How could this have happened? A Football Association is formed After a number of disputed seasons, football followers on the Mornington Peninsula were ready for a formal competition and an organised premiership. Representatives from Frankston, Somerville, Mornington, Tyabb, Dromana and Hastings formed the Peninsula Football Association. On Thursday 25 April 1908, delegates met at the Somerville Hotel where the owner, CJ Davies, was elected president. The new Association sat late into the night deciding on the rules of the competition. They considered fixtures, player permits, appointment of umpires and several other matters which were printed on neat folding cardboard and rapidly snapped up for three pence each by the players and supporters. There was even a trophy. Mrs E J Watson, a wealthy Frankston supporter, had come forward with an attractive offer of either a pennant or caps for the premiership players. The competition begins Tyabb withdrew just before the first round and several good players drifted to both Hastings and Somerville. This created a bye,

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however, and the opening round of the new Peninsula Football Association on 9 May featured two matches. Frankston travelled to Somerville where the ground sported new goal posts but still had the huge slope which tested the not-so-fit when running uphill. Amongst the supporters was Mrs Watson who had come to see her team take out the win. Frankston 5-7 defeated Somerville 3-4. Hastings journeyed to Dromana where they found the ground in good shape, but not so their hosts. Dromana struggled to field a strong side, with only seven senior players and the rest from junior ranks. The competition’s best player, Ernie Rudduck, had gone to Western Australia and their young gun, 18-year-old Doug Chapman, was playing for Richmond in the VFL. Hastings took control from the first bounce and ran out easy winners 10-22 to 2-3. Early signs indicated that Frankston and Hastings would be the dominant teams. When they met in round three the weather was perfect for football and a large crowd of spectators gathered at Hastings Park. The home club put a heavy, well-trained eighteen into the field and jumped to an early lead which they consolidated as the game went on. Half time leaders by 24 points to 7, Hastings finished over the top of Frankston 5-14 to 3-4. Play was rough and tumble throughout and the game was full of incidents. After one such episode, a Hastings player incurred the wrath of even his own club committee, who sanctioned him and suggested he “stand down” for the remainder of the season.


The following weeks saw some spirited football. Mornington and Somerville both showed improvement but ultimately lacked the fitness and physical strength to challenge the leaders. At the half way point of the season, Hastings headed the premiership table with 5 wins from 5 games ahead of Frankston (4 wins), Somerville (3), Mornington (2) and Dromana (1). The season continues and the arguments begin Given their ladder positions, it was only natural that the match on 4 July between Frankston and Hastings would arouse much interest. The Hastings team arrived on the mid-day train and brought over 100 supporters with them. They had a handy lead at the main break but were held scoreless in the second half to suffer their first defeat of the year. Frankston 1-12 defeated Hastings 2-0, the low scores

reflecting a close and exciting tussle as the ball passed from end to end with clever play from both sides. The battle between Hastings and Frankston continued off the field and their delegates clashed angrily at the Association meeting on the following Wednesday. Frankston were already in a complaining mood. They had protested the legality of the Dromana player, Chapman, who had played for Richmond and then played against them - clearly against PFA rules - but the protest was dismissed as the wrong date had been stated. Frankston then turned to the Hastings match, in which the umpire had, quite rightly, reported a case of obscene language made towards one of their players by an opponent. This protest was also dismissed because “Smith”, the perpetrator, had given a false name to the umpire. continued next page...

Below: A local practice match, circa 1908.

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Above: A Frankston street scene of that era. Bottom right: Aerial view of Mornington Main Street and football ground.

Hastings hit back. They claimed that one of the Frankston players, Prater, had played for another club. Frankston replied that Prater had taken the field at halftime for their opponents in a practice match during their bye weekend. When that protest was dismissed, Hastings entered another one which alleged that Frankston was playing a William Pidoto, of the Fitzroy Trades team, under an assumed name. The matter was held over until the next meeting by which time a letter was received from Pidoto swearing that he had never played for Frankston - and the matter was conveniently dropped.

the livery stables struggled to provide enough vehicles for the large number of supporters wanting to go to the Somerville ground. The large crowd was not disappointed. Frankston were held scoreless in the first quarter only to fight back in the final term and win by a solitary point: 1-7 to 1-6.

The second half of the season brought no change to the ladder. Hastings continued on top with nine wins from 10 games, and were the “minor premiers”. They were followed by Frankston (8/10), Somerville (5/10), then Mornington on percentage ahead of Dromana (both 4/10).

Hastings also protested their loss on two grounds: an illegal Somerville player and a behind that had been disallowed by the goal umpire. As only one deposit was lodged, the Association ruled that only one protest could be heard and Hastings chose to pursue the illegal player.

The finals begin In the system that was widely used at the time, first would play third and second play fourth in the semi-finals. The two winners would then play off in the final. If the winner was not the team that had finished on top of the ladder (the “minor premier”), then it had the right to challenge for the premiership. On 1 August, two exciting semi-finals were played, with both matches being won by a point. The Somerville and Hastings game at Frankston was a splendid contest. Hastings entered as favourites despite being without a couple of their better players and facing an improving Somerville team at full strength. The play was rough and so was the supporters’ barracking, and the local constable’s notebook was kept busy. Somerville led all day. The final term was particularly torrid as Hastings fought back strongly, and excited spectators repeatedly spilled onto the playing field. A Hastings goal just before the bell left everyone confused as to who had won. Finally it was announced: 5-6 to 5-5 for Somerville and they were into the final. The other semi-final was between Mornington and Frankston and

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The Association meeting the following Thursday was always going to be a busy one and it went until after midnight. Mornington protested that Frankston had used an illegal player. Frankston claimed an honest error in spelling the man’s name on the team sheet and the matter was held over for investigation.

Hastings claimed that WG Thornell had been living at Ryanston, in Gippsland, for almost a year. Somerville contended that Thornell had regularly come “home” to his birthplace on most weekends and holidays. After much argument, and taking into account the confused nature of the score in the game, it was suggested that the match be played again. The Hastings delegates consulted their captain and a few others waiting outside the meeting, and decided to accept this - but not under the same umpire. A date was set and the Association ruled that the central umpiring would be “shared” between that umpire, Wilson, and another. On 15 August the Hastings-Somerville replay took place at Frankston in front of a large crowd. A calm, fine day was perfect for football and the Frankston Brass Band added to the atmosphere. By mutual agreement, the teams were the same as in the previous match, except for one Somerville player who had sprained his ankle and had to be replaced. Wilson umpired the first and third quarters and Brown the second and fourth. Ironically it was Thornell who scored the first goal from a free kick for Somerville. When “Nipper” Floyd responded with one on the run for Hastings, the tone was set for a to-and-fro tussle. Hastings were ahead by 6 points at half time but ultimately relinquished the lead and were well beaten by Somerville 8-6 to 5-7.


The right of challenge Hastings were now out of the finals and the question arose: did they, as the minor premiers, have the right to challenge the winner of the final? This matter dominated the business of the next Association meeting. Rule 3 of the Association stated that all matches were to be played under VFL rules except where superseded by local rules. VFL rules gave the team which finished on top of the ladder the right of challenge in a final game for the premiership, but the Association stopped short of including the challenge. Rule 24 simply stated there would be two complete rounds of matches, after which the first four clubs would be placed in semi-finals, the winners of each semi-final to play off for the premiership. The delegates of the Association agreed that their general understanding at the beginning of the season was that the minor

premiers would have the right of challenge. Hastings had that right and 12 September was put aside as the date. On Saturday 22 August, Frankston faced Somerville in their “final”. The Somerville club had arranged a special train to Mornington which picked up many passengers along the way. Many vehicles also left Frankston and it is estimated that over 1,000 people watched the game. Again Wilson and Brown took turns in umpiring quarters. It was generally a sportsmanlike game until the final moments when several players “lost their heads”. Frankston won the flag by 14 points: 5-9 to 3-7. There was much jubilation at the conclusion of the game and, amidst their celebrations, rumours were rife that Frankston would not be entertaining a challenge final. They even organised a Frankston v Old Players game for the date that had been set aside by the Football Association for the challenge. continued next page...

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For the Hastings players, it was to be an empty 12 September. They ran onto the Mornington ground, umpire Brown bounced the ball, a behind was kicked, and the game was declared in favour of the Blues. When the Football Association next met at Mornington’s Grand Hotel with Mr L Harrison in the chair and two delegates from each club, the Frankston delegates were noticeably absent. In their place was a letter from the Frankston club secretary stating that, as they had won the premiership legally and there was therefore no business to discuss, their delegates would not be attending. Frankston pointed out that three days before the scheduled challenge match, their club secretary had written to the Association clearly stating that the team had no intention of playing. In response, one delegate pointed out that the Association had frequently referred to the right of challenge throughout the year. In fact, the minutes of the 23 July Association meeting showed that they had even nominated the ground for such an occurrence, specifically “… that in the event of a challenge match the ground would be Mornington”. It was noted that no protest had been offered by the Frankston delegates at that time. Above: Mornington's Grand Hotel, scene of the Football Association meeting. Below: The 1908 Hastings Premiership team. Back row (l to r): Mr Brown, Nick Amendola, Bert Francis, Albert Whitehead, Tom Knox (Captain), Walter Perriam, Nipper Floyd, Mr Jim Unthank. Centre row (l to r): Les Potts, Hughie Carmichael, Mal Carmichael, Jim Wilson, Fred Knox, Paddy Gomm. Front row (l to r): George Hobden, Jim Mentiplay, G “Tanna” Mirabella, Chris Sposito, Andy Amendola.

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Above: The 1908 premiership pennant.

Dromana moved that Rule 21 be invoked, and demanded that Frankston be fined 10 shillings for missing a game, which was carried unanimously. In terms of the umpiring fee, Hastings had already paid Brown his 15 shillings. As umpire Wilson had also put in his account it was agreed that it be forwarded to Frankston for payment. The Mornington delegate felt that Frankston had treated the Association with contempt. The discussion quickly escalated until Dromana moved, and Hastings seconded, that Frankston be banned for life. The debate was keen but without malice and some felt that many Frankston players and supporters had been hijacked by a small group. After a long time total agreement was reached and, on the motion of Somerville and Hastings, it was decided that Frankston be given a chance to pay the fine and the umpire’s fee. At the next Association meeting, a letter from the absent Frankston delegates was received. They flatly refused to pay either the fine or the umpire’s fee since “the delegates had acted outside the rules in allowing the challenge match”. They also asked for the withdrawal of the Association statement that Hastings were premiers. The Mornington delegate led a vote to disqualify Frankston “at the pleasure of the Association” and this was passed with only one vote against.

accepting them. He then produced the pennant the Association had purchased: a two metres one of blue material with the lettering in white – “HFC Premiers 1908”. The official meeting then adjourned to the hotel dining room for a presentation smoke night. In toasting "The Premiers", the Association chairman Harrison stated that Frankston had been illadvised and that their behaviour and attitude to the hardworking delegates, who had frequently travelled long distances, was “beyond words”. He believed that Frankston had shared an understanding of the right of challenge since the start of the season, and in the end had taken advantage of a doubt in the rules. On 10 October, the 1908 premiership pennant finally came home to Hastings at a social evening held in the hall. Delegate TR Pearce said that the players and officials of Hastings had played by the rules at all times but, on several occasions, had met with contemptible treatment. Councillor JD Hodgins stated that Hastings had played honourably and won a moral victory. The captain of the Hastings team, Thomas Knox, was to have the last word. He stated that all Hastings wanted was the premiership for which they had fought so hard. As far as he was concerned, Frankston could keep their caps. Postscript

The Watson ‘trophy’ The Association secretary informed the meeting that he had written to Mrs Watson, who had promised caps for the premiers, warning her that Frankston’s absence from the challenge match would cause them to forfeit. Mrs Watson replied that she had received legal advice that Frankston were the premiers and that she was going to present the caps. She did this on 12 September ironically, and perhaps quite pointedly, the very day set down for the challenge match. The secretary felt that under the circumstances the Frankston players had been “dishonourable and unsportsmanlike” in

Expelled by the Peninsula Football Association, Frankston fielded a team in the Federal League in 1909 but was allowed to return in the following year. Meanwhile, Hastings were premiers again in 1909 and then, for good measure, they defeated Frankston in the Grand Final in 1910, completing what these days is referred to as a ‘three-peat’. The saga of the 1908 premiership is covered by Lance Hodgins in his series of booklets on the histories of the Hastings Football Club and the Peninsula Football Association. Copies can be purchased from Lance by calling (03) 5979 2576. March 2021

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