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FALL & WINTER 2010-2011

north olympic

peninsula newcomers’ & visitors’ guide

port townsend/jefferson county | sequim/dungeness valley | port angeles | olympic national park | west end | north/west coast | victoria, bc

a publication of the Peninsula Daily News fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  1


Sure, you could drive. You could vacation in an industrial park, too, but that doesn’t make it a smart choice. Instead, you’re visiting the awe-inspiring Olympic Peninsula. So why spend the first several hours of your trip gazing at the brake lights of the car in front of you? Gaze down on the most scenic corner of the continent during our 35-minute flight from Seattle instead. And with our new partnership with Alaska Airlines, Port Angeles is but a click away from more than 90 cities throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico on AlaskaAir.com. Participants in the award-winning Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan even earn 250 miles each way on our flights.

HeathMoffattPhoto.com

Sounds like the smart way to go is to fly Kenmore Air Express . . . the Peninsula’s Airline.

Ask about our preferred rates with Budget Rent-a-Car in Port Angeles.

0A5092954

866.435.9524 • KenmoreAir.com William R. Fairchild Int’l Airport, 1404 West Airport Road, Port Angeles, local tel. 360.452.6371

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8/14/2010 3:16:30 PM


publisher’s letter

WELCOME TO THE PENINSULA Congratulations! You’ve reached one of the most enchanting and diverse regions on Earth! Whether you’re a first-time visitor, a returning visitor or a new resident of the North Olympic Peninsula, you’ll find our coastlines, our mountains, our towns, valleys and historical sites breathtaking and memory-making. This North Olympic Peninsula Newcomers’ and Visitors’ Guide is divided into six sections designed to give you a flavor of each of our towns or regions: Port Angeles, Sequim-Dungeness Valley, Port Townsend-Jefferson County, Forks-West End, the North/West Coast and, just across the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Victoria. Too, you’ll find important information about Olympic National Park, the Pacific Coast and other interesting destinations. Included in this guide is a wealth of information about the goods, services and activities available on the Peninsula. We combine all the adventures of wilderness recreation with the comforts of a premiere resort destination. While you’re here, we encourage you to read the Peninsula Daily News, the newspaper of the North Olympic Peninsula. It not only has news about the region and the world, but it contains updated information about community events throughout the fall, winter and spring. The PDN’s entertainment magazine, Peninsula Spotlight, appears Fridays, and a list of “Things to Do” appears daily. The Peninsula Daily News is available throughout Clallam and Jefferson counties. Once you leave this area, you can keep in touch by logging onto the PDN site on the Internet: www.peninsuladailynews.com. Welcome to the wonderland of the North Olympic Peninsula.

Kalaloch Beach

Best regards, John Brewer, Editor and Publisher fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  3


contents

NORTH OLYMPIC

PENINSULA

newcomers’ & visitors’ guide

Fall, winter, spring 2010-2011 editor & publisher John C. Brewer executive editor Rex Wilson special project editors & designers Jennifer Veneklasen Trisha McMahon

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editorial assistant Lee Zurcher advertising director Suzanne Delaney advertising operations manager Sue Stoneman interim circulation director Michelle Lynn director of technical services David Weikel

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on the cover: Waves crash on the shores of Rialto Beach on the North Olympic Peninsula’s West End. For more information about West End coastal beaches, turn to page 85. Photo by Trisha McMahon

The North Olympic Peninsula Newcomers’ and Visitors’ Guide is a semiannual publication of the Peninsula Daily News, the North Olympic Peninsula’s daily newspaper since 1916. A total of 50,000 copies are distributed at locations throughout the North Olympic Peninsula. All content © 2010, Peninsula Daily News. The guide makes every attempt to be accurate at the time of its compilation. Report any errors to 360-417-3527 or via e-mail to news@peninsuladailynews.com. Advertising issues can be discussed by calling 360-417-3541 or via e-mail to ads@ peninsuladailynews.com. n

4  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

contributing photographers Keith Thorpe, Chris Tucker, Jeff Chew, Erik Hidle, Lonnie Archibald, Diane Urbani de la Paz, Paige Dickerson, Trisha McMahon, Jennifer Veneklasen, Steve Mullensky, Stevan Reddish, Miller Hull Architects, Russ Veenema, Tom Giske, Tom Callis cartography Keith Thorpe advertising Vivian Hansen, Jen Clark, Sue Roaf, Jeanette Elledge, Diane McCrimmon, Gary Smith, Richard Stephens, Kim Jons, Lyndi Bertman, Michelle Rohde, Chris Christie, Holly Wickersham and Lindsey Shannon creative services manager Roger Hammers graphic designers Keith Curtis, Sam Nugent and Verlie Wynne


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miles of adventure The North Olympic Peninsula draws hundreds of thousands of visitors each year — and for good reason. There are a seemingly endless variety of things to do and see while you’re here. From the peaceful, snow-covered peaks of the Olympic Mountains to the wild Pacific Ocean beaches, prepare to be awed by nature’s majesty in one of the most beautiful places on earth.

regions 10 Port Townsend & Jefferson County 21 Sequim & the Dungeness Valley 42 Port Angeles 70 Olympic National Park 80 North/West Coast 85 Forks & the West End 92 Victoria, British Columbia

features 19 Northwest Maritime Center 23 Olympic Game Farm 26 Halloween happenings 33 Golfing on the Peninsula 34 Bird watching 35 Olympic Discovery Trail 36 Call the Peninsula home 46 Biking adventures 63 Fishing & hunting 68 Wineries 90 Waterfall refuge 83 Fun for kids

reference 58 Peninsula map 99 Events calendar 105 Directory 113 Index of advertisers

fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  5


twilight

Welcome to

'twilight' country

The best-selling books and blockbuster movies — although not filmed in Forks — have drawn fans from all over the world to the West End town. Forks and the rest of the North Olympic Peninsula have been bitten by Twilight mania, and the excitement doesn’t appear to be letting up anytime soon. Die-hard fans, eager to see the birthplace of author Stephenie Meyer’s famous books, come here to retrace the footprints of their favorite characters — from Forks High School where Bella and Edward attend school, out to LaPush where Bella visits her werewolf friend, Jacob.

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ost of the four books in the Twilight series — and now three motion pictures — are set in tiny Forks. The fourth book is set to be adapted into two more movies, to be released in November 2011 and November 2012. Forks, the epicenter of the vampire werewolf territory, is about 60 miles west of Port Angeles along U.S. Highway 101. You’ll spot the famous “Welcome to Forks” sign as you enter, where fans from all over the world have had their pictures taken. The Forks Visitor Center, 1411 S. Forks Ave., is at the south end of town. At the visitor center, the staff will direct visitors to local landmarks as well as share all the juicy tidbits about the area. While you can give yourself a self-guided tour through all the Twilight hot spots, some businesses also provide tours. >>

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twilight building facade, at 261 S. Spartan Ave. The school is where Bella and Edward first meet in biology class. Old, deteriorating portions of the campus have begun to be replaced, but it is unclear if the original facade will remain intact. Other key Forks locations to check out: n Forks Visitor Center, 1411 S. Forks Ave., to take photos next to a replica of Bella’s red Chevrolet pickup truck. Find Twilight information here as well. n Forks Police Department, 500 E. Division St., to take pictures next to a car just like the one belonging to Police Chief Charlie Swan, Bella’s father. n Forks Community Hospital, 530 Bogachiel Way, where Bella — a self-proclaimed klutz — is a frequent visitor and Dr. Carlisle Cullen — Edward’s “father” — is employed. The hospital even has a special reserved parking spot for Dr. Cullen. n Forks Outfitters, 950 S. Forks Ave., considered the “Newton’s Olympic Outfitters” store owned by the Newton family and where Bella works.

LaPush Both Port Angeles and Forks are home to Dazzled by Twilight, a store specializing in all things 'Twilight.'

Fiction and real life intertwine as fans find locations and elements from the novels throughout town. Although Stephenie Meyer didn’t have specific Forks homes picked out when she described them in her books — she didn’t visit Forks until after the first book was completed — the Forks Chamber of Commerce has dubbed a couple of homes as those of Bella and Edward. The McIrvin residence at 775 K St. is considered the Swan residence. Fans are welcome to drive by the house, but since it is a private residence, they are asked to respect the family’s privacy and not go on the property or ask to take photos inside. The Miller Tree Inn, 654 E. Division St., with its large windows and open and airy layout, fits the bill for the Cullen house. Each day, “Esme” — Edward’s “vampire mother” — leaves a note on a dry erase board outside to let fans know what the Cullens are doing. Feel free to take pictures, but please do not go inside unless you are a registered guest. As of publication, visitors still had the unique opportunity to see the original 1925 Forks High School

About 15 miles west of Forks on state Highway 110 is LaPush, another town with Twilight fame. LaPush may be off-limits to vampires, but werewolf fans — and, yes, vampire fans, too — can visit the Quileute reservation where Bella’s friend Jacob lives. You’ll know you are getting close when you see the treaty line marked with a “No vampires beyond this point” sign. Visitors can enjoy the natural beauty of the Quileute reservation while checking out First Beach, where Bella first learned of “the cold ones” from Jacob, who is later revealed to be a werewolf. The cliffs where the werewolves and Bella are said to have gone cliff diving are also visible from LaPush — but visitors should beware that such diving is dangerous and illegal. The Quileute have a strong connection to wolves in legends, although no werewolves and vampires actually exist in them. Each Wednesday, a drumming and healing circle is set up for tribal members to share stories, dance and culture with each other and any visitors. The event is at the Quileute Community Center, just off of First Beach. A field located near the Quillayute Prairie Cemetery has reportedly been the site of some unusual baseball games. Please be respectful of the cemetery. While Forks has no movie theater, “Twilight,” “The Twilight Saga: New Moon” and “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” were shown in Port Angeles at Lincoln Theater, 132 E. First St., which is considered the same theater where Bella and her friends see films. Fans often show up before opening night to take in all the excitement; lines to the ticket counter form days before the special midnight showings of each movie. >> fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  7


twilight

n Bella Italia restaurant in Port Angeles is the setting for Bella and Edward's first date in Stephenie Meyer's debut novel. Go there to dine on mushroom ravioli with a Coke, just as Bella did. Die-hard fans will know that because Edward is a vampire, he didn't eat on their date. Bella's red pickup truck can be seen at the Forks Chamber of Commerce. n

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Port Angeles is also home to several other Twilight landmarks, all located near the theater: n Bella Italia, 118 E. First St., where Edward and Bella have their first date after he saves her in the alley (called La Bella Italia in the novel). You can even dine on mushroom ravioli with a Coke, just as Bella did. n The bookstore where Bella goes to shop after her friends look for dresses has two possibilities — it could be either Odyssey Bookshop, 114 W. Front St., or Port Book and News, 104 E. First St., which are both near Bella Italia. n Although the store where Bella’s friends buy their dresses is not named in the books, Black Diamond Bridal, 109 E. First St., is considered the store the characters shopped at in Port Angeles.

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introduction

{nature’s playground }

Lake Crescent

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The mountains and the beaches are perhaps the biggest draw for outdoor adventure on the North Olympic Peninsula, but festivals and community events in the friendly towns rate just as high for most people. Take, for example, the Sequim Irrigation Festival, which at 116 years, is the oldest continuously running festival in Washington. In the winter, Olympic National Park — a World Heritage Park designated for its rare qualities — can be explored on snowshoes, crosscountry skis or by car.

As well as boasting the highest mountains this side of the Cascades, the Olympic Peninsula also has nearly 65 miles of wilderness beaches included in Olympic National Park. The temperate rain forest, the Hoh, on the western side of the North Olympic Peninsula provides the perfect growing conditions for some of the largest trees in the world. Although many of their brethren on adjacent commercial lands were logged long ago, many record trees still stand in the park and in Olympic National Forest.

The west end of Clallam County is famous for its rainfall. The Hoh Rain Forest, 90 miles west of Port Angeles, typically records 135 inches of rain annually! One of the benefits of the West End’s abundance of precipitation is the number of waterfalls it creates. Accessibility and scenic beauty combine to make Marymere Falls, just off U.S. 101 at Lake Crescent, a must see. Wherever you go on the Peninsula, you are sure to be surprised and delighted at every turn. n

fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  9


Jefferson County Courthouse

port townsend / jefferson county

COUNTY OF DREAMS Welcome to Jefferson County, where Port Townsend, Quilcene, Brinnon, Nordland, Port Ludlow and the “Tri-Area” of Port Hadlock, Irondale and Chimacum offer small-town friendliness and a taste of history along with a variety of activities. Tourists can find lighthouses, as well as farmhouses, attend a town festival and dig for clams — all in the same day!

Victorian seaport

Port Townsend sits on the tip of the Quimper Peninsula, surrounded by the Strait of Juan de Fuca to the north and Puget Sound to the east. There are numerous harbors around Port Townsend Bay and Admiralty Inlet, including Point Hudson Marina and Port Townsend Boat Haven. At the turn of the 20th century, Port Townsend was a bustling seaport and many elegant buildings lined the waterfront. It was known as the “City of Dreams” because of speculation that it would be the largest harbor on the West Coast. Port Townsend’s past is kept alive as the city is full of Victorian houses and business buildings that have been restored, the result of an organized effort by city residents. Port Townsend was the first city in Washington state to establish the Main Street program, encouraging preservation of historical districts, renovation and restoration of buildings. There is so much history preserved in Port Townsend that it is one of only three cities nationwide that are on the National Register of Historic Places. The city and Fort Worden State Park are also national landmarks. 10  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

Many of the historical homes have been redesigned as bed-and-breakfast establishments. For an overview of the historical sites, take a walking tour. Downtown, visitors may feel as though the main thoroughfare, Water Street, came out of an old-fashioned western movie. But art galleries, chic clothing boutiques and unique shops make the window shopper feel like this is Seattle. Be sure to check out the seaside restaurants and cafés, where you can relax and watch kayakers paddling by or sailboats catching the breeze. On a clear day you can see Mount Rainier and Mount Baker. The Bell Tower on the bluff at Tyler and Jefferson streets, overlooking the downtown Port Townsend business district, was built more than a century ago and historically used to summon volunteer firemen. The Haller Fountain, a statue at Taylor and Washington streets, is a replica of one presented to the city in 1906 by Theodore Haller and is the centerpiece of a renovated plaza. The Jefferson County Courthouse, built in Port Townsend in 1891, includes the Hall of Honor, which is sponsored by the Jefferson County Historical Society to honor the county’s early pioneers. >>


port townsend / jefferson county

Stops along the way Nature parks

Nearly two dozen parks dot Port Townsend. The showpiece is Chetzemoka Park at Jackson and Blaine streets. Named in honor of the Klallam chief Chetzemoka, friend of the pioneers, the park overlooks Admiralty Inlet. It includes a bandstand built in 1905, gardens, picnic area, children’s playground, hiking paths, arbor, beach access and restrooms. Kah Tai Lagoon is a nature park that is home to many species of seabirds and other fowl. It was developed with volunteer labor and grant funding into a community park. For those who prefer a quiet moment near water, North Beach, a favorite destination for many locals, offers beautiful vistas of the Strait of Juan de Fuca inlet during daylight hours. The park, located at the end of Kuhn Street, features sandy stretches framed by steep bluffs.

Industry on the water

Mt. Townsend Creamery, 338 Sherman St., Port Townsend, produces wonderful local cheeses. The creamery itself is housed in a 50-yearold warehouse that has been home to boat builders, glass repair companies, a radical fringe publisher and, most recently, the Department of Licensing.

Step back in time

The Rose Theatre, 235 Taylor St., and The Uptown Theatre, 1120 Lawrence St., both in Port Townsend, are two charming movie theaters.

Point Hudson Marina is one of two moorage facilities in Port Townsend. Port Townsend Boat Haven and the adjacent industrial park illustrate one of the town’s leading industries: boat building and related marine activities. Port Townsend Paper Corp. mill at Glen Cove is the town’s major industry. Ships load kraft paper products for other parts of the world in the deepwater port. The Jefferson County Historical Society Museum, 540 Water St., Port Townsend, offers Jefferson County artifacts, archives and family histories. The Rothschild House at Taylor and Washington streets was built in 1867. This New England-style house was the home of D.C.H. Rothschild, one of the town’s first merchants. The house is maintained by the state parks department and run by the Jefferson County Historical Society. Union Wharf, built in 1867, was the first incorporated business in Washington Territory. It was most recently a fish processing plant, one of many activities during its long career, which included being home to the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, a brothel and a blacksmith. It has been renovated and features a timber-frame pavilion. Manresa Castle on Castle Hill in Port Townsend was built in 1892. It later was owned and remodeled by the Jesuit priests. The beautifully restored building is now used as a hotel and restaurant.

Aldrich’s Market, 940 Lawrence St., Port Townsend, is a must-see stop because it is the descendant of one of the oldest grocery stores in the state and you can often buy fish and crab right off the fishing boats in the marina.

On the bay

Between Port Townsend and Port Angeles, U.S. Highway 101 winds around the south end of a tranquil bay. Discovery Bay is an ideal place to take a rest from the road, stay overnight or just get away from the faster pace of living. The Port of Port Townsend owns a public recreational boat launch in Gardiner. While kayakers sometimes paddle along the shoreline, the bay is typically quiet. However, the bay’s quiet waters once served as an anchorage for wooden tall ships. British explorer Capt. George Vancouver found Discovery Bay in 1792 and named the body of water after his flagship, HMS Discovery. After a sawmill was built in 1853, boats carried wood in and out of the bay. n

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To pl an your trip call (360) 385-4777 or visit www.jeffersontransit.com

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fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  11


port townsend / jefferson county

Three parks to explore Jefferson County forts offer outdoor recreation, wildlife viewing, rich history and scenic beach trails.

Fort Townsend Fort Townsend State Park is a 367-acre marine camping park located four miles south of Port Townsend. It features 3,960 feet of saltwater shoreline on Port Townsend Bay, nature and history interpretive events, and 6.5 miles of hiking trails through a natural forest area. The heavily wooded park has a rich military history dating from pioneer days. The park occupies more than a third of the original Fort Townsend built in 1856 by the U.S. Army for the protection of settlers. The fort was closed between 1859 and 1874 — declared “unfit” after an inspection — and reopened in 1874. In 1895, fire destroyed the barracks. The property was then used as an enemy-munitions defusing station during World War II.

Perched on the northeastern tip of the Olympic Peninsula, Point Wilson at Fort Worden State Park near Port Townsend is the perfect place to catch the sunrise as the first rays hit the ground. Don't forget your camera.

360-385-1771

© 2008 by the True Value® Company, Chicago, Ill. 60631

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0A5095178

Port Hadlock 901 Ness Corner Road

Fort Flagler Located at the northern tip of Marrowstone Island is Fort Flagler State Park, a 784-acre park surrounded by salt water on three sides, making it a prime location for on-the-water activities. With its island location and historical turn-of-the-20th-century Army base, Fort Flagler is a popular place for visitors to find a variety of outdoor activities. Barracks, officers’ quarters and a hospital were used in World War I and World War II. A favorite feature that can be toured: the nine-gun batteries atop the bluff. Fort Flagler also has four miles of hiking and biking trails, and the woods are home to a variety of wildlife, including blacktail deer, skunk, coyote and bald eagle. Built between 1897 and 1907, the Army base was the first of seven coastal artilleries constructed in Washington. Along with Port Townsend’s Fort Worden and Fort Casey on Whidbey Island, the fort was part of the “Triangle of Fire” that guarded the entrance to Puget Sound.

Fort Worden Fort Worden State Park — a turn-ofthe-20th-century army base — offers an unmatched combination of natural beauty and historic interest. Acres of saltwater beaches, wooded hills, and open fields are framed by stunning vistas of the Olympic and Cascade ranges and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. It’s a place where the land stops, the sea begins — and the mind keeps going. With its original buildings now restored for use as park, conference, educational and entertainment facilities, Fort Worden offers an insight into the military history of the area during the first half of the 20th century. It is the home to the Centrum Foundation and the Port Townsend School of Wood Working, which offers courses for woodworkers of all skill levels. Centrum is a gathering place for artists and creative thinkers from around the world, students of all ages and backgrounds, and audiences seeking cultural enrichment. For more information on Centrum, phone 360-385-3102 or click on www.centrum.org. Fort Worden State Park offers numerous scenic beach trails and the Point Wilson Light Station. The light station helps guide ships past the famous riptides off Point Wilson where the waters of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and Puget Sound meet.


Port Townsend map: Point Wilson

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Victorian buildings

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Visit the New

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fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  13


port townsend

1. Pacific Traditions Daily 10-6 637 Water St. 360-385-4770 Local & nationally recognized Native artists of distinction. www.pacifictraditions.com 2. Ancestral Spirits Galler y Open Daily 701 Water St. 360-385-0078 Fine Native Art by indigenous artists and craftspeople of North America and Siberia. "An exquisite art gallery". National Geographic Traveler www.ancestralspirits.com

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Open Daily 10am 3. Port Townsend Galler y 715 Water St. 360-379-8110 Fine art and jewelry from the hearts, hands, and studios of local artists. Come in and enjoy our waterfront location and artful garden. www.porttownsendgallery.com

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4. Earthenworks Daily 10-5:30 702 Water St. 360-385-0328 Voted one of the Top 100 Retailers of American Craft www.earthenworksgallery.com

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5. Forest Gems Galler y Daily 10-5:30 807 Washington St. 360-379-1713 A haven for people who love wood. Highly figured Northwest woods by Northwest artists. www.forestgems.com

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6. Elizabeth Haight Galler y by appointment Port Townsend 360-385-3075 Regional, abstract, figurative, glass, botanical & religious art. www.elisabethhaight.com

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7. Artisans on Taylor Daily 11-6 236 Taylor St. 360-379-1029 An unmatched collection of local, regional and national fine art and crafts. Jewelry, beads, glass, paintings and more...Specializing in wedding bands and bridal accessories. www.artisansontaylor.com

10 0A5095068

8. William's Galler y Mon-Sat 10-6, Sun 12-5 914 Water St. 360-385-3630 For the naturally sophisticated, a gallery of fine arts and crafts. www.williams-gallery.com 9. Wynwoods Galler y & Studio Daily 10-7 940 Water St. 360-385-6131 Located in beautiful James and Hastings Building, built in 1889. Fine contemporary handcrafted jewelry, beads & treasures. www.wynwoods.com 10. Galler y 9 Thurs-Tues 10-6, Wed noon-4 1012 Water St. 360-379-8881 North Olympic Artists' cooperative www.gallery-9.com 11. Northwind Arts Center Thurs-Mon 12-5 2409 Jefferson St. 360-379-1086 A non-profit center connecting the arts and community. We feature juried and invitational exhibits, workshops, lectures, a venue for writers, and a yearly studio tour and arts festival. www.northwindarts.org

14  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

Old V Cent isitors er

11 To New Visitors Center, proceed to Boat Haven


jefferson county

Boatbuilding alive and well

small town charm Several quaint towns dot the western edge of Jefferson County. Find harbor seals, hiking trails, dairies and top-rated golfing.

Quilcene & Brinnon

Nestled like two jewels between the calm waters of the Hood Canal and the great Olympic National Forest are Quilcene and Brinnon. Quilcene Bay, on Hood Canal — which is a naturally formed fjord, not a man-made canal — is known for producing some of the Northwest’s most delicious oysters. A public beach is located at the end of Linger Longer Road, just past Quilcene off U.S. Highway 101. Many hiking trails wind through areas of Olympic National Forest and Olympic National Park. Mount Walker, the easternmost summit of the Olympic Mountains, offers one of the most fantastic views of Puget Sound. Mount Walker Viewpoint Road is 5 miles south of Quilcene on Walker Pass. South of Quilcene is Brinnon, another community known for its shellfish. Harbor seals can often be seen near Seal Rock, two miles north of Brinnon.

Tri-Area

Jefferson County has a rich maritime past that continues to thrive today. Port Hadlock is home to the famous Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding, locally known as “The Boat School.” The school’s mission is to teach and preserve the skills and crafts associated with fine wooden boatbuilding and other traditional maritime arts with emphasis on the development of the individual as a craftsperson. Since its founding in 1981 by Puget Sound Master Shipwright Bob Prothero, the school has taught the marine trades vocationally and recreationally. More than 1,000 students have graduated from the school’s vocational programs, and thousands more have attended summer and community workshops in traditional maritime arts. The tradition continues today on the new Heritage Campus, located on the historic Port Hadlock waterfront. The school currently offers six courses which can lead to an associate’s degree. The Boat School shops are open to visitors Mondays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and the school welcomes walk-in visitors. Self-guided tours are available anytime during hours of operation, and guided tours are offered Mondays and Fridays at 10:30 a.m. The Boat School is associated with the Port Townsend Bay Maritime Education Alliance. For more information, go to www.nwboatschool.org or phone 360-385-4948.

Port Hadlock, Chimacum and Irondale are the gateway to Marrowstone Island. Marrowstone Island is home to Mystery Bay State Park, a 10-acre marine park near the Nordland General Store. The community holds a chilly polar bear dive each New Year’s Day. The famous Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding is located in Port Hadlock, known for its maritime crafts. (See sidebar on this page). An excellent view of Naval Magazine Indian Island, a Navy ammunition station, can also be found in Port Hadlock. To the west, Chimacum is known for its dairy farms spreading across Chimacum Valley. It has a farmer’s market on Sundays and hosts an Old Time Fiddlers Jam in September.

Port Ludlow

Nearby is Port Ludlow, a residential and recreational community built up around the shores of Ludlow Bay. It boasts a top-rated championship golf course, the Resort at Port Ludlow, scenic drives, hiking trails and boat launches. n Top photo: The Olympic Mountains serve as a backdrop above the Dosewallips River at Brinnon. fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  15


jefferson county

Winter Worship Services METHODIST Trinity United Methodist Church 609 Taylor Street Port Townsend • 385-0484 trinityumc@olympus.net www.trinityumcpt.org Rev. Wendell Ankeny

PORT TOWNSEND PRESBYTERIAN First Presbyterian Church of Port Townsend 1111 Franklin Street • 385-2525 Dr. Bob Slater We are a welcoming community sharing the Spirit of Christ. • Loving Generously • Serving Selflessly • Living Justly SUNDAY 8:15 a.m. Worship & Children’s Church 9:30 a.m. Adult Education & Children’s Church 11 a.m. Worship & Youth Education Professional Childcare web page: www.fpcpt.org

SUNDAY 10 a.m. Worship Come hear our 19th century tracker and 18th century Silberman pipe organ. We are a friendly, welcoming, caring congregation. Gospel choir, child care available and handicap accessible.

New Life Church 1636 Hastings Avenue Port Townsend (360) 385-7717 www.newlifept.org

SUNDAY 9:00 a.m. & 11:00 a.m. Worship Service MONDAY 7:00 p.m. Recapture, Recovery and Support Groups WEDNESDAY 7 p.m. Classes for Adult Youth and Children

Authentic Transformative Spiritual Community Masonic Hall Jefferson/Van Buren, Port Townsend (360) 385-6519 Rev. Pamela Douglas-Smith

FRIDAY 6:30 a.m. Bible and Breakfast for Men at the Bayview Café

SUNDAYS 11 a.m. Inspirational Service & Children’s Circle

ROMAN CATHOLIC

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St. Mary Star of the Sea

Check for classes and special events.

Home of the Daily Word Come Home to Unity!

1335 Blaine Street Port Townsend (360) 385-3700 Rev. Father John Topel, S.J. MASS SCHEDULE SATURDAY 9:00 a.m. sabado misa en español 5:30 p.m. Vigil Mass SUNDAY 8:15 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. WEEKDAYS Mon., Thurs., Fri. 12:05 p.m. Wed. 6:30 p.m. COMMUNION SERVICES 12:05 Tuesday 0A700834

READING ROOM 633 Water Street, (360) 379-1139 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily except Wednesday and Sunday

To sustain a sacred space within a just and caring community

PO Box 1853 Port Townsend, WA 98368

WEDNESDAY 10:00 a.m. Bible Study

WEDNESDAY Noon Testimony Meeting (Wednesdays)

SUNDAY 9:15 & 11:15 a.m. Worship 9:15 a.m. Religious Education for children Childcare at both services

Unity Church of Port Townsend

SUNDAY 9:15 Christian Education 10:30 a.m. Worship with Holy Communion

SUNDAY 10 a.m. Sunday Service 10 a.m. Sunday School

2333 San Juan Avenue Port Townsend (360) 379-0609 Minister Rev. Bruce Bode www.quuf.org email: quuf@olympus.net

UNITY

Evangelical Lutheran Church in America 1120 Walker • 385-1595 Rev. Coe Hutchinson, Pastor

275 Umatilla, near Discovery and San Juan Port Townsend • (360) 531-2719

Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship

Rental Space Available

Grace Lutheran Church

Visit us on the World Wide Web:

UNITARIAN

A Welcoming Congregation Handicap Accessible Sanctuary

LUTHERAN

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE First Church of Christ Scientist Port Townsend

ASSEMBLIES OF GOD


jefferson county

Winter Worship Services BAPTIST

QUILCENE

PORT LUDLOW

San Juan Baptist (SBC) “The Church on Discovery” 1704 Discovery Road Port Townsend, 98368 (360) 385-2545

PRESBYTERIAN Quilcene First Presbyterian Church

COMMUNITY CHURCH

Pastor: Dr. Conrad B. Dodd

“A Little Church With A Big Heart”

SUNDAY 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. Worship Service (nursery provided) 9:45 a.m. Sunday School for all ages (nursery provided)

PORT TOWNSEND EPISCOPAL Saint Paul’s Episcopal Church An Open And Inclusive Faith Community 1020 Jefferson Street P.O. Box 753 (Corner of Jefferson & Tyler) Port Townsend • (360) 385-0770 Rev. Elizabeth A. Bloch, Rector Rev. Karen L. Pierce, Decon Ann Raymond, Youth Director SUNDAY 8 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite I 10 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II 10 a.m. Children’s Program WEDNESDAY 10:30 a.m. Holy Eucharist www.stpaulspt.org

WEDNESDAY 7:00 p.m. Youth Group (Middle & High School) Also Offered: Prayer Ministry, Men’s/Women’s Ministries, Weekly Home Bible Groups And More. We Are Special Needs’ Friendly. Call Church Office For More Information. 360-385-2545 www.sanjuanbaptist.org

First Baptist Church 1202 Lawrence St. Uptown Port Townsend, WA 98368 (360) 385-2752 www.ptfbc.org Skip Cadorette, Pastor

(PCUSA)

294433 Highway 101 P.O. Box 387, Quilcene (360) 765-3930 Scott Schaefer, Pastor SUNDAY 10:00 a.m. Adult Bible Study 11:00 a.m. Family Service

PORT HADLOCK EVANGELICAL FREE Irondale Church A Place of Promise – To Grow and Belong

681 Irondale Road, Port Hadlock (360) 385-1720 Pastor David Hodgin

Port Ludlow Community Church “Connecting Christ and Community” 9534 Oak Bay Road Port Ludlow, WA 98365 (360) 437-0145 Dennis LaMance, Pastor SUNDAY 9:00 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m. Worship Service WEDNESDAY 7:00 p.m. Prayer Meeting THURSDAY 9:00 a.m. Women’s Prayer 10:00 a.m. Women’s Bible Study email: plcc@olympus.net web: portludlowcommunitychurch.org

SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:30 a.m. Worship Service 6:30 p.m. Evening Bible Study Call for more information www.irondalechurch.org

Loving God and Loving Port Townsend SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Worship Service Nursery provided.

CHIMACUM

A relaxed, blend of contemporary and traditional styles of music, prayer and honest Biblical teaching.

EVANGELICAL METHODIST Evangelical Bible Church

2135 San Juan Ave. (360) 385-2076 or (360) 385-0479 Pastor James Lyman (360) 385-4544 SUNDAY 10 a.m. Sunday School 11 a.m. Morning Worship

Lutheran Church of the Redeemer BAPTIST Oak Bay Baptist Church (SBC)

1314 Oak Bay Rd., Port Hadlock (360) 385-2897 Dr. Stiles Watson A small church with a big heart. A place for learning about the love and forgiveness from God. SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School all ages 10:45 a.m. Morning Worship 7:00 p.m. Evening Service WEDNESDAY 7:00 p.m. Midweek Bible Study www.oakbaybaptistchurch.org

45 Redeemer Way Chimacum, WA 98325 (360) 385-6977 Don Pieper, Pastor SUNDAY 8:00 a.m. Traditional Service 9:30 a.m. Sunday School (Adults & Children) 10:30 a.m. Contemporary Worship Service 5:00 p.m. Youth Group 9:30 a.m. Men’s Bible Study 9:30 a.m. Women’s Bible Study 11:00 a.m. “Upper Room’’ Prayer Group 1:00 p.m. Women’s Bible Study 0A700835

WEDNESDAY 7 p.m. Bible Study

LUTHERAN

fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  17


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940 Water Street • Port Townsend

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WYNWOODS GALLERY & BEAD STUDIO

• Fine Fibers • Needles • Books • Local Buttons • Yarn • Expert Advice


port townsend

Spirit of discovery

The Northwest Maritime Center was created to nurture the rich maritime legacy of Puget Sound for present and future generations. It first opened to the public in September of 2009. The center is home of the Wooden Boat Foundation and is situated between historic downtown Port Townsend and Point Hudson Marina. It features public open spaces, a rebuilt dock and two new

Port Townsend

HEALTH CARE

Katherine Ottaway, MD Takes Time to Listen and Explain

Care for people of all ages in the context of their health, history, family and community.

Madrona Hill Walk-In Medical Care 2500 W. Sims Way, Port Townsend

360-344-3663

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Quimper Family Medicine

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New & Walk-In Patients Welcome

“green” buildings filled with resources, programs and activities to engage and educate people of all generations in traditional and contemporary maritime life. The Wooden Boat Chandlery is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days per week. For more information, phone 360-385-3628 or visit www. nwmaritime.org. n

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jefferson county

Classic holiday escape

Key City Public Theatre's Shakespeare in the Park production of "The Tempest" played to recordbreaking audiences in August 2010. More than 1,750 people enjoyed the theatrical tradition in Port Townsend's beautiful Chetzemoka Park. Key City offers public performances year round.

Live theater performances Port Townsend's 50-year-old theater puts on award-winning shows Key City Public Theatre has been Port Townsend and Jefferson County’s premier theater for more than 50 years. The playhouse is currently located at 419 Washington St., but the nonprofit organization is currently working toward its goal of building a new facility. PT Shorts is a monthly series of literary readings produced by the group. You can catch PT Shorts during the Gallery Walk on the first Saturday of every month beginning at 7:30 p.m. in the Pope Marine Building, at Water and Madison streets in Port Townsend. Admission is free. Other fall and winter performances include: November — A WordPlay Reading Series and Teen Lab December — “The Little Match Girl,” “The Eight: Reindeer Monologues” and “Seven Poor Travelers” January and March — Stand-up comedy nights February — The 15th annual Playwrights’ Festival with week-long events March — Third annual “Here, There & Everywhere” benefit, a program of monologues by contemporary women playwrights from around the world April and May — “La Zuffa è Servita” based on the classic by Carlo Goldoni. For more information on any of these performances — including times, dates and ticket prices — phone 360-379-0195 or click on www.keycitypublictheatre.org.

Black Percheron horses can be seen pulling a festive carriage along Port Townsend’s Historic District during the winter holiday season. The carriage traditionally gives Santa a lift to Haller Fountain for the annual Christmas community tree-lighting. The tree-lighting and Santa visit will be on Dec. 4 at 4:30 p.m. this year. The Port Townsend Livery & Carriage Co. operates on a walk-up basis most weekends in downtown Port Townsend. Ten-minute rides through the historic downtown district, or 20-minute rides out to the end of Point Hudson with beautiful views of Admiralty Inlet and Mount Baker are available. They also offer longer tours of the uptown district and its beautiful Victorian homes. Go to www.ptlivery.com or phone 360-765-3222 for more information.

Jefferson County Museums Port Townsend Aero Museum Located at Jefferson County International Airport 105 Airport Road, Port Townsend 360-379-5244 Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend 360-385-0373

Fort Flagler Historical Museum 10541 Flagler Road, Nordland 360-385-3701

Commanding Officer’s Quarters Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend 360-385-1003

Jefferson County Historical Society Museum 540 Water St., Port Townsend 360-385-1003 www.jchsmuseum.org

Rothschild House Franklin and Taylor streets, Port Townsend 360-385-1003

20  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

Quilcene Historical Museum 151 E. Columbia St., Quilcene 360-765-4848


sequim

Dungeness Recreation Area

THE RAIN SHADOW Mild, sunny climate draws retirees to Sequim Protected from U.S. Highway 101 traffic by a bypass, Sequim is a friendly town that offers access to the Dungeness Valley. Sequim (pronounced “Skwim”) is sometimes referred to as the “blue hole” because it sits in the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains and only gets about 17 inches of rain each year. >>

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sequim Sunny weather is one of many things that makes Sequim a favorite retirement spot and a good bet for a rain-free picnic. If this is your first visit, stop by the Chamber of Commerce Visitors Center at the east end of town for a self-guided tour of local attractions, both in town and in the valley beyond. The in-town tour includes the scale model of a working water wheel at the Visitors Center, the Sister City Friendship Garden at Carrie Blake Park, Pioneer Park with its colorful flower gardens and foliage, the city’s scenic murals and Heritage Park, Sequim’s newest park on the way to the downtown business district. Downtown, you’ll find specialty gift shops, art and antique dealers and smalltown cafés. Efforts are under way to make the downtown areas even more pedestrianand bicycle-friendly. Irrigation — namely, the opening of the first ditch channeling water from the Dungeness River — brought the community together more than 100 years ago. Today, the annual Irrigation Festival — the oldest continuing festival in Washington — celebrates the initiation, development and support of the irrigation ditches that brought water to the once dry prairies of Sequim. For more information on the festival, turn to page 28. The Scenic Loop Drive is a driving tour through Sequim that takes you along Marine Drive, with its breathtaking view of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, the Dungeness Spit and Lighthouse and — on a clear day — Victoria, British Columbia. To get some exercise while exploring Sequim, go for a walking tour. Walking maps are posted at five locations around town — two at the public restrooms at Sequim Avenue and Washington Street; and one each at the Seal Street mini park, Washington and North Seal streets; Water Reuse Demonstration Site, North Blake Avenue and Fir Street; and Carrie Blake Park, North Blake and Cedar streets. Framed by local artist Karin Anderson’s verdant rendering of farmland, fish, elk, mountains and other natural features, the maps show walking routes that offer such an interesting array of scenes and scents you’ll forget you’re exercising! There’s the 1.1-mile blue line along Cedar; the 2.6-mile gold route from East Washington through Carrie Blake Park and up across Fir Street. And the 2.3-mile green line almost circumnavigates the city core, going out Sequim Avenue to Hendrickson Road and then back in along Fifth Avenue to Bell and Maple streets. The beauty — one of them at least — is that all Sequim walks are flat. n

In downtown Sequim you’ll find specialty gift shops, art and antique dealers and small-town cafés. Efforts are under way to make the downtown areas even more pedestrian- and bicycle-friendly. Sequim pit stops n Cline Spit, off Marine Drive in the New Dungeness area of the original New Dungeness town, was the first Clallam County seat. In the early 1890s, a thriving community developed at the edge of a three-quarter-mile dock, the remains of which can still be seen. n The McAlmond House, built in 1861, is west of the Old Dungeness Schoolhouse, on the bluffs. Designated a national historical site, it was the first house of sawed lumber built in the county. The home is not open to the public. n Carrie Blake Park on the east side of Sequim offers a picnic area with a playground for kids and a small stream and pond for feeding ducks. The park hosts outdoor concert series throughout the summer, and there is also a community center that is the site of other events. n Sequim Bay State Park is a year-round, 92-acre marine camping park with 4,909 feet of saltwater coast in the Olympic Mountains’ rain shadow. The entrance to the park is west of Sequim on U.S. Highway 101. n The Sequim Dog Park is an off-leash park for your four-legged pals. The park at 202 N. Blake Road is on the east side of Carrie Blake Park. The park is “self policing” for users, so please be considerate and clean up after your animals. For park rules, guidelines and information, visit www.sequimdogparks.org. n Old Olympic Highway offers a pretty, quiet country drive for those who want to escape U.S. Highway 101. Old Olympic Highway is accessible from many Sequim streets. n 7 Cedars Casino is a popular spot to stop by. Operated by the Jamestown S’Klallam tribe, the casino is right off U.S. Highway 101 east of Sequim in the town of Blyn. Also treat yourself to a visit to the Northwest Native Expressions Art Gallery, located at the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribal Center, featuring a wealth of Native American artwork, a majority of which comes from the North Olympic Peninsula and also Vancouver Island. n Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge encompasses Dungeness Spit and part of Dungeness Bay. This is a prime nesting area for waterfowl and shorebirds, and the tideflats house clams, crabs, oysters and other shellfish. The refuge is open all year for hiking, with camping available at the adjacent Dungeness Recreation Area.

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sequim

A Kodiak bear waves her paw while resting in a field at the Olympic Game Farm. The farm also has black bears.

WILD THINGS ROAM Get up close with wild animals at Olympic Game Farm, 1423 Ward Road, Sequim. The game farm houses about 30 species of animals, including timber wolves, Bengal and Siberian tigers, African lions and Tibetan yaks.

206.954.1667 or 206.780.9703

Sequim Beach House

4 Bedrooms, 4 Baths, Sleeps Up To 16

Mid-Week Special as low as $249 per night. 1.3 acres of flat, no-bank waterfront. The beach is sandy and there even is a lagoon to splash around in! You have a view right in front of the home of the Sequim Lighthouse, the Dungeness Sand Spit, the Strait of Juan De Fuca, and the incredible ship traffic from the front windows. The other direction you view mountains and wetlands with all kinds of wildlife.

Quilcene Bay Hideaway

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The bears are a big hit with visitors, as they will beg for food from just a short distance away. A self-driving tour — which lasts about 45 minutes — lets you experience the wildlife at close range. Feeding the animals wheat or whole grain bread is permitted, but watch your fingers. A freshly baked loaf of bread can be purchased for $2 at the main gate. The farm was established more than 50 years ago by Lloyd and Catherine Beebe. After Walt and Roy Disney learned of Lloyd’s knack for communicating and handling the animals, Olympic Game Farm worked exclusively for Walt Disney Studios during the 1950s and ’60s. The farm was originally a holding compound for the animal actors in between movie shoots, but in 1972, the Beebes opened Olympic Game Farm to the public. In May, the farm began offering a new “mini tour” that provides visitors the additional experience of a guided tour through the historical studio barn and entry to the petting farm and freshwater aquarium. Guests enter at their own risk, and visitors are asked to follow the rules at all times: Stay in your vehicle; keep doors, sunroofs and large windows closed; follow directional markers and stay on the roadway; drive slowly but steadily through the entire area; and avoid feeding buffalo near the gates. For more information and admission rates, call Olympic Game Farm at 360-683-4295 or click on www.olygamefarm.com.

Call For Our Low Season Bargain Prices:

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Mid-Week Special as low as $169 per night. Your own private retreat on 10 wooded acres with 500 ft of warm summer swimming waterfront. Oneof-a-kind vacation rental with breathtaking view of the Olympic Mountains. Enjoy a short trail to the beach. You can rent our kayaks and go across the Bay with the resident seals to explore the National Forest land to your heart’s content. Ride bikes down the country road into Quilcene or just take a stroll around the area.

or visit http://mv-vacationrentals.com

★ Profits raised from Martha’s Vacation rentals go ★ directly to Blakelyhillfarm our homeless animal farm

fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  23


sequim

Dungeness Spit

NATURAL SAND HOOK The Dungeness Spit has become a prime destination for many North Olympic Peninsula visitors. And it’s no wonder with the gorgeous views of Canada, Mount Baker and Protection Island on clear days. The vast, sandy beach — inhabited by assorted waterfowl and critters — rarely seems crowded. At about five miles long, the spit is the largest natural sand hook in the nation. It was formed from sand and clay that eroded from the high bluffs to the west and were then deposited by tidal and wave action near the mouth of the Dungeness River. The bay formed by the spit is as famous as its namesake, the Dungeness crab. Like many aspects of Mother Nature, the spit is often breached in harsh weather, but it then gently heals itself. Much of the Dungeness Spit and part of Dungeness Bay formed by the sandy hook are in the Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge, a prime nesting ground for waterfowl. Because of this, the inside of the spit is off-limits to beach walkers. A walk along the outside can still net many sightings to add to a birdwatcher’s life list, or just to enjoy. Shorebirds include sanderlings and black-bellied plovers, while common seabirds are pigeon guillemots and marbled murrelets. It’s also a good location for spotting resident bald eagles 24  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

and the more elusive peregrine falcons. The spit and other parts of the wildlife refuge are open only to foot traffic. There are trails for horseback riding. Be prepared for quick changes in the weather and the water, usually for the worse. Check the tides. If you’re going to hike any distance, plan your walk for an outgoing tide and the firm, wet sand that it leaves behind. To get there, drive U.S. Highway 101 west from Sequim. Turn north on Kitchen-Dick Road. Continue three miles to Dungeness Recreation Area and drive through to the refuge parking lot. Leave your pets, mountain bikes and plans for a campfire back on the bluff. They are prohibited. Horseback riding is by reservation only and you supply the horse. Reservations are also required for boat landings at the lighthouse. A single-visit $3 permit is required to help pay for conservation efforts and will allow the permit holder and family to enter the refuge. There is no charge for children younger than 16. Hours are daily from sunrise to sunset. n See page 25 for information on the Spit's lighthouse.


sequim

JOHN WAYNE MARINA Film legend John Wayne frequently sailed the Sequim Bay waters with his yacht Wild Goose and believed it would be a great location for a marina. Fulfilling that desire, John Wayne Marina was constructed on 22 acres of landed donated by The Duke. This picturesque marina is the perfect setting for a picnic or relaxed walk. Owned and operated by the Port of Port Angeles, the marina includes permanent and guest moorage, boat launch ramps, showers, laundry and banquet facilities, fuel facilities, public beach access and a restaurant and picnic areas. Dockside Grill, a Northwest waterfront restaurant, and the Sequim Bay Yacht Club are both located at the marina. It is accessible from U.S. Highway 101 east of Sequim. Follow the signs at Whitefeather Way.

We work within your budget on... Residential & Commercial Design or Renovation Project Planning & Coordination Interior Space Planning & Design Lighting Design

Beacon of light At the end of the Dungeness Spit is the New Dungeness Lighthouse. The lighthouse is the oldest beacon north of the Columbia River — built in 1857 and opened about one week before the lighthouse on Tatoosh Island off Cape Flattery at the Olympic Peninsula’s northwestern tip. The light is automated, but lighthouse tours can be arranged. Volunteers operate the lighthouse daily. The Coast Guard withdrew its last keeper from the light station in March 1994. It planned to board up the building, but members of the New Dungeness Light Station Association offered its help. You can stay for a week and be a lighthouse keeper. Phone 360-683-6638 or go to www.newdungenesslighthouse.com for information. Access to the lighthouse is limited to hikers at low tide and small boats in calm seas.

Nationally featured in “Log Homes Illustrated” and “Country Home” ,

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fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  25


halloween happenings

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FRESH LOCAL PRODUCE • ORGANIC GROCERIES • FOOD TO GO • WINE & BEER • GIFTS & ART

OPEN DAILY Seal St. Park

N. SEQUIM AVE.

N. 2ND AVE.

134 1/2

W. WASHINGTON ST.

134½ W. Washington St., Sequim 360-681-2004 theRedRoosterGrocery.com

Goblins, ghouls and pumpkins October and November are the time for plump squash, towering corn stalks and an element of fright. As Halloween approaches, haunted houses, carnivals and trick-or-treating events are offered all over the Peninsula. Pick up a copy of the Peninsula Daily News or log onto www.peninsuladailynews.com to see what's happening in each town. To indulge your love for fall’s quirkiest holiday, here’s a sampling of what you’ll find in three Peninsula towns: n The Port Angeles Downtown Association hosts an annual trick-or-treating where businesses provide goodies for the kids. Pictures of children in costume are taken at the Conrad Dyar Memorial Fountain on Laurel Street. n The Pumpkin Patch on U.S. Highway 101 at Kitchen-Dick Road is a wonderful spot to spend an afternoon or early evening. n Check out the Port Townsend Downtown Trick or Treat and Costume Parade, traditionally held Oct. 31. For more information, visit www.ptmainstreet.org.

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Get Face To Face to Wildlife Open Daily 9A.M.

Gift Shop Open Year-Round at 9:00 A.M. 1423 Ward Road, Sequim 360-683-4295

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Directions: 101 East to Sequim Avenue Exit Follow Signs • 19.5 Miles from Ferry


sequim

autumn rewards Yellow, red and orange are dominant colors along North Olympic Peninsula roads and highways during fall. Leafy oak and maple trees trade green leaves for an autumn pallet of colors. Hiking, biking or touring the Peninsula by car is a rewarding experience during this time of the year. Above: The colors of autumn paint a colorful pallet around a barn near KitchenDick Road and Old Olympic Highway west of Sequim. 0A5094573

fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  27


sequim

SMART WATER Irrigation Festival celebrates water and the Sequim community The annual celebration that became the Sequim Irrigation Festival started out as a May Day observance. But it was irrigation — namely, the opening of the first ditch channeling water from the Dungeness River — that brought the community together more than 115 years ago. Today, the Irrigation Festival celebrates water and the Sequim community. Months of hard work preceded the May 1, 1896, inauguration of the system that would bring water to the Sequim-Dungeness Valley, which back then was a dry prairie. People started arriving at Callen’s Corner (now the roundabout at Port Williams Road and Sequim-Dungeness Way) early in the morning, traveling hilly, crooked roads in covered wagons, on horseback and on foot. They brought a lot of food — the custom at the time, according to an account from the Sequim Bicentennial History Book Committee, was to bring at least twice as much as was needed to feed your family. Races and ball games followed dinner, along with “much visiting among the families who saw each other seldom in those days of difficult transportation.” >> contiued on Page 30

Clallam County 0A117317

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FULL SERVICE RESTAURANT Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Now Serving Beer & Wine!

Take out available, most items. Sack lunches available. Catering available.

Open 7 days a week from 5:00 am to 9:00 pm

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28  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

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241 S. FORKS AVE., FORKS

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Twilight Specials: Jacob’s Blackberry Cobbler Bella’s Biscuits & Gravy Ask the locals... this IS the place to eat! The Best Food and Service in Town!


sequim Dungeness Schoolhouse

Exploring rich history Visitors to the Sequim Museum & Arts Center — or MAC — love the idea of a woolly mammoth having once roamed the valley. The bones of such a creature were discovered in 1975 during excavation on the Manis family farm near Sequim and make up one of the more interesting exhibits at the museum. The resulting research determined the remains could be traced to that of a mastodon, which roamed the North Olympic Peninsula nearly 12,000 years ago. Photographs of the excavation and a scale model of the site are also on display. Upon request, a video explaining the mastodon discovery can be viewed. A mastodon mural adorns the museum walls, and the bones, which make up about half the animal, are featured in a case. Sequim’s cultural history and art museum also features a variety of neatly displayed exhibits of artifacts, antiques and historic discoveries of the region and memorabilia from pioneer days and Native American life. Another exhibit shows off buttons and pins from the 115-year history of the Sequim Irrigation Festival. Smaller displays offer historic photographs and information about the region, including Jamestown, Dungeness and old downtown Sequim along with a display of historical tools used in the region. The building housing the museum

served as Sequim’s post office until the early 1970s, and the old mail boxes, with their brass fittings, are a prize display. A different featured artist or group show is installed at MAC the first of every month. The gallery area provides a myriad of media, including the annual Sequim Arts Student Show, the Peninsula Scribes Show and the Olympic Peaks Camera Club Show. The new Jamestown S’Klallam Longhouse Exhibit is now also open at the exhibit center. The museum, at 175 W. Cedar St., is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Admission is free, but donations are welcome. Visit www.sequimmuseum.org for more information.

A Jamestown S'Klallam tribal member performs a traditional blessing at the opening of the Jamestown longhouse exhibit at the Sequim Museum & Arts Center.

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Antique Shopping

Golf Course & Golf Learning Center 683-FORE (3673)

7015 Old Olympic Highway A links style course with Something for everyone Low Rates Easy to walk Friendly staff Available tee times Relaxed atmosphere Large grass driving range Superb fairways and greens Drive carts to your ball year round

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Port Angeles

The Museum & Arts Center is managed by a board of trustees; the organization has more than 600 members supporting the mission of the nonprofit museum. The organization also operates the historical Old Dungeness School, located five miles north of Sequim en route to the Dungeness Spit. The picturesque white two-story building with a distinctive red-roofed bell tower and high ceilings is located at 2781 Towne Road, at the corner of Anderson and Towne roads. It has retained its stately manner through the decades thanks to the efforts of volunteers with a strong sense of history. Built in 1893, the schoolhouse served as a place of learning for youngsters until the Sequim and Dungeness school districts were consolidated in 1955. It was designated a Washington State Historical Site in 1973 and in 1988, it was listed on the National Register of Historical Places. The schoolhouse also retains its educational heritage as a venue for Peninsula College classes throughout the year. The facility, which can hold a maximum of 90 people, can be rented for events of all kinds.

Call today for your tee time fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  29


sequim >> The irrigation system grew significantly in subsequent years, and the festival named after it has expanded as well. The Strongman competition is a crowd favorite during the annual Irrigation Festival. Participants compete in feats of strength, including lifting stones weighing more than 200 pounds.

Originally, it was celebrated by the farmers and the people who created the ditches. Now there are floats, bands and lots of people from out of town. There’s also a festival pageant, three parades, a car show, a motorcycle show, a logging demonstration, a strong man competition, an arts and crafts show and a carnival. But it’s still a gathering point for people — indeed, in these days of easy transportation, 10,000 to 15,000 visitors are expected on the culminating Saturday alone. As of press time, plans for the 116th Sequim Irrigation Festival, to be held on May 7-15, 2011, were still in their infancy. Visit www.irrigationfestival.com for a rundown of dates and events, including the crowning of the queen and her court, that will comprise the festival. But one thing’s already known: The weather in Sequim in May can be outstanding.

The Sequim Irrigation Festival attracts thousands of visitors and includes parades, car shows, logging demonstrations, a family picnic and carnival.

Dungeness Courte Alzheimer’s Community

Providing a friendly, home-like setting for our residents and their families. We specialize in improving the quality of life for people with all forms of dementia and memory loss by changing the experience of Alzheimer’s disease in a positive way for

“A Better Way Of Life.”

360•582•9309

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651 Garry Oak Dr., Sequim • www.DunGeneSSCOurte.COm


the arts

Cultural scene An array of music, theater and international performances highlight the arts and entertainment scene on the North Olympic Peninsula. Visitors are often amazed at both the quantity and quality of the cultural scene. It’s really not so surprising though, considering that in addition to locally bred performers, many professionals retire to the area and continue to ply their trade in local groups. The resulting collaboration creates a thriving cultural scene which lights up the gray winter months and invites visitors to plan, in addition to other activities, an evening out on the town. n

Arts & music organizations Port Angeles Symphony Orchestra 360-457-5579 www.portangelessymphony.org The Port Angeles Community Players 360-452-6651 www.pacommunityplayers.com Key City Public Theatre 360-385-7396; www.keycitypublictheatre.org

Olympic Theatre Arts 360-683-7326; olympic-theatre.tripod.com Peninsula Singers www.peninsulasingers.org Port Angeles Light Opera Association 360-457-5630; www.paloa.org The Paradise Theatre School www.theparadisetheatreschool.org

Readers Theatre Plus e-mail: RTPLUS@olypen.com The Ballet Workshop 360-928-3669 www.balletworkshop-pawa.com Juan de Fuca Festival of the Arts www.jffa.org

Larry and Marilyn Cross Welcome You to the Olympic Peninsula • All sizes & locations to choose from • Fully furnished with nice amenities • 2 night minimum • Reasonable rates • Off-season Monthly Rentals Available

Brigadoon VACATION RENTALS

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Enjoy the astounding beauty of the Olympic Peninsula with all the comforts of home...

Come discover a haven of comfort and convenience... 1-800-397-2256 • (360) 683-2255 or email: info@sequimrentals.com • www.sequimrentals.com fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  31


sequim

Commune with nature Railroad Bridge Park is a popular spot for dog walkers, joggers and birdwatchers. At Railroad Bridge Park, the swift waters of the Dungeness River flow beneath a former train trestle, paths explore the river banks, and the Dungeness River Audubon Center educates visitors on the wildlife and natural world around them. The park, so named for the historic structure that supported 70 years of rail service until 1985, is a popular spot for dog walkers, joggers and birdwatchers. It is located about two miles west of central Sequim, accessible from North Fifth Avenue and Hendrickson, or from Carlsborg and Runnion roads. The park is beautiful and easily accessible, with a link to the Olympic Discovery Trail and a short nature trail to glimpse the birds and other wildlife that frequent the river bank. A wheelchair-accessible bridge leads across the Dungeness’ main channel and side channels into a paved path, which passes scenic meadow land and a few homes before linking with the Olympic Discovery Trail. A loop nature trail winds toward the river bank northeast of the bridge. The park offers access to fishing, birding, horse paths and picnic sites. n

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660 Evergreen Farm Way

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360.683.3345

360.681.3100

32  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

Assisted Living with a Difference!

550 W. Hendrickson Rd.

360.683.3348

www.sherwoodassistedliving.com

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Active Retirement Living


sequim

Peninsula Golfing

Sequim map:

Tee Time Take your best swing at one of the Peninsula's golf courses

Old Dungeness School House

Wonderful time of the year Although not a common occurrence, the North Olympic Peninsula does get covered with blankets of snow from time to time. Two winters ago the Sunshine Herb & Lavender Farm just east of “sunny” Sequim on Highway 101 lay under shawls of white snow.

Each golf course on the North Olympic Peninsula offers something different, making a day of golf an easy decision. In Sequim, the Cedars at Dungeness Golf Course is known for its crab-shaped sand trap. The trap is found on the par-5 third hole of the 18-hole course. Phone 360683-6344, Ext. 1, for more information. Port Townsend has two courses — Discovery Bay Golf Club and Port Townsend Golf Club. Discovery Bay is an 18-hole course reminiscent of the early days of golf with a classic clubhouse. The course’s back nine is cut out of forest and offers challenging tee shots. Phone 360-385-0704 for more information. Port Townsend Golf Club is a nineholer with open fairways, great for the beginner. For more information, call 360385-4547. In Port Ludlow, head to Port Ludlow Golf Course, a 27-hole offering that takes you through the woods with views of Ludlow Bay and Hood Canal. Phone 360437-0272 for more information. Back in Sequim, SkyRidge Golf Course is a nine-hole offering that plays between 2,700 and 3,400 yards, and golfers can finish two rounds of nine with a bonus 10th hole that offers a different finish to each round. Located 4 miles west of Sequim, the course was built from 2001 to 2002. For more information and a tee time, phone 360-683-FORE (3673). Also in Sequim, SunLand Golf & Country Club is semiprivate and a favorite with the retirement community. Phone 360-683-6800 for details. Peninsula Golf Club in eastern Port Angeles is semiprivate but offers its 18-hole, par 72 course to public play at designated times as well as reciprocal course play from partner clubs. Phone 360-457-6501 for details. The Salt Creek RV Park west of Port Angeles features a 9-hole, par 3 golf course. Tee up among acres of undulating fairways, towering evergreens and colorful maples. Phone 360-928-2488 for more information. n

fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  33


bird watching

FEATHERED FRIENDS Bird-watching, a popular past time on the Peninsula The Peninsula is located in a prime migratory path for many birds, and because of differing migratory patterns, there is always a season for watching a different type of bird. What local birders have known for so long is that because of the location and the diversity of habitats, the North Olympic Peninsula is one of the best places in Washington to go birding. In the spring and summer, songbirds are in higher numbers, while the summer has shorebirds and gulls migrating through. Mid-fall, song and shorebirds make their way into the area, and then in the winter you have water fowl. Free, guided bird walks are conducted each Wednesday at 8:30 a.m. at the Dungeness River Audubon Center, located at 2151 W. Hendrickson Road at Railroad Bridge Park. The two-hour walks leave from the Audubon Center and cover 1.5 miles on the Olympic Discovery Trail. Walks are held every Wednesday, rain or shine. Each spring, the Olympic Peninsula BirdFest draws birders from across the region. Visit www.olympicbirdfest.org for information. Some other excellent birding locations include: Railroad Bridge Park — flickers, kinglets, finches, nuthatches, towhees and shrike, and the American dipper in the river. John Wayne Marina and Sequim Bay State Park — a variety of shore and seabirds and winter waterfowl. Gardiner Beach — varied diving ducks, loons and grebes, while an adjoining brackish pond has many waterfowl, including hooded mergansers.

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Protection Island National Wildlife Refuge — a major rookery for Glaucouswinged gulls, black oyster-catches and cormorants. The Port Townsend Marine Science Center — wildlife cruises in the spring and fall. Port Angeles waterfront and Ediz Hook — large numbers of shorebirds, sea ducks, brants, gulls and raptors. Northwest Coast — Dozens of bird species migrate along the coast, including trumpeter swans, falcons, sand cranes and bald eagles. Cape Flattery at the northwest tip provides habitat for birds, and sometimes you can spot eagles perched in the trees along state Highway 112. The Dungeness River Audubon Center is a popular place to learn about wildlife and the natural world. It has been encouraging birding activities and educating the public on birds since before it opened the doors to its current interpretive building in 2001. The Audubon Center is a partnership with Jamestown S’Klallam tribe, Olympic Peninsula Audubon Society and Audubon Washington. It features exhibits, displays, programs on topics relevant to the river, wildlife and habitat and more. Events are held throughout the year. For more information, contact the center at 360-681-4076 or visit www.dungenessrivercenter.org.


olympic discovery trail

Step out of the car The Olympic Discovery Trail offers residents and visitors to Clallam and Jefferson counties a safe, accessible and peaceful place to cycle, hike, jog or walk the dog — and in some places even to ride a horse. Double-deck Elwha River Bridge

It’s a wonderful work in progress. When completed, the Olympic Discovery Trail will run more than 100 miles across some of the North Olympic Peninsula’s finest scenery from Port Townsend in the east out west to the Pacific Coast. The trail is a nonmotorized route, open to hikers and bicyclists and also equestrians on county-administered portions of the trail. It follows portions of the now defunct Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad right-of-way. Currently, it can be enjoyed in pieces, with about 30 miles of the trail complete and another 30 miles under construction, including parts of the unpaved “Adventure Route” west of Port Angeles that connects with the Spruce Railroad Trail at Lake Crescent. A recent piece of construction that makes up part of the trail is

the double-deck Elwha River Bridge, where the trail runs underneath the roadbed on a 14-footwide pedestrian deck, keeping hikers, horses and cyclists away from traffic while offering spectacular views of one of the Peninsula’s most scenic rivers. In Port Angeles, the Olympic Discovery Trail is hooked up with the Waterfront Trail, a popular running and bike-riding route that runs from the Coast Guard Station on Ediz Hook to the former Rayonier mill site east of City Pier. From the Rayonier site, the trail continues east toward Sequim Avenue, incorporating Railroad Bridge Park in Sequim. Near Port Townsend, the trail incorporates the Larry Scott Memorial Trail. For more information, click on www.olympicdiscoverytrail.com. n

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Sequim

Bed & Breakfast Directory Clark’s Chambers Bed & Breakfast Inn

(360) 683-7350

The oldest family owned farm in Washington State.

Retreat to your own private luxury caboose. Queen featherbed, 2 person whirlpool tub, fireplace, mini frig, TV/ DVD. Gourmet Breakfast served in our 1937 Zephyr private dining car.

Great mountain & water views. Breakfast is served family style.

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Bob & Glenda Clark 322 Clark Road, Sequim, WA 98382 360-683-4431 www.olypen.com/clacha E-mail: clacha@olypen.com

85299737

A PIONEER FAMILY FARMHOUSE

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MAKE “TRACKS” FOR OLYMPIC PENINSULA’S MOST UNIQUE BED & BREAKFAST EXPERIENCE.

www.redcaboosegetaway.com

fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  35


A new home base

Call the Peninsula home Living on the North Olympic Peninsula gives you all the benefits of a small town, while still allowing you to be close to major cities such as Seattle and Victoria, British Columbia. Within hours, you can be walking on a remote beach, kayaking on a flowing river, hiking in the mountains, or discovering a rain forest. Many retirees consider the Peninsula an excellent place to retire, and many families consider it a great place to raise children. But the Peninsula offers more than just a beautiful retreat. If you need to conduct business outside the area, Kenmore Air — which offers the only scheduled air service on the Peninsula — charter flights, bus and transit companies as well as ferries can help you get to your destinations. The region is home to excellent schools, with private, public and vocational options, the North Olympic Peninsula Skills Center in Port Angeles that teaches vocational training to young adults, and other schools, including the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding in Port Hadlock. Peninsula College in Port Angeles, part of the state’s system of community colleges, offers many associate and transfer degrees, professional certificate programs and community education courses. It was one of the first community colleges in Washington to

Peninsula College campus

offer a four-year degree. Peninsula College also has satellite campuses in Port Townsend and Forks. Through various distance programs, courses can also be taken locally for Western Washington University, Washington State University and Old Dominion University. The Peninsula offers excellent health care centers, including Olympic Medical Center in Port Angeles and Sequim, Jefferson Healthcare hospital in Port Townsend and Forks Community Hospital. There are plenty of stores to find what you need and activities to keep you busy. Small speciality stores, major chain stores, a range of restaurants that offer a variety of flavors, wineries and breweries, farmers markets, fitness centers, senior centers and children’s activities abound.

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36  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

0A117347

0A117345

Directions: 101 East to Sequim Avenue Exit Follow Signs 19.5 Miles from Ferry

& N u r t u re D i r t C o m p o s t

S o ld by th e B a le

OPEN DAILY @ 9AM 1423 Ward Road, Sequim 360-683-4295

0A117346

Gift Shop • Picnic Area Petting Farm

Dan’s Beef & Tractor COMPOST • Apples • Garlic • Potatoes Asian Pears • Cider • U-Cut Christmas Trees

Steve Johnson • 457-5950 or 461-4157 225 Gehrke Road • Port Angeles

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Sequim and Port Angeles


DINING DINING & & SHOPPING SHOPPING

Sequim Waterfront dining at John Wayne Marina Happy memories begin here!

COCKTAILS,WINE AND LOCAL MICROBREWS FRESH SEAFOOD, STEAKS, PASTA, GLUTEN-FREE AND MORE! Lunch 11-3, Dinner 4-9 Wed. thru Sun. Coming Soon The Pelican Room

Banquet facilities are available

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R&T

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www.docksidegrill-sequim.com 360-683-7510

Mexican Grill & Cantina

Award Winning Cuisine Welcome to our Family Style Restaurant, We offer Quality Service & Value in a Real Mexican Atmosphere

Monday - Friday 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Serving Lunch & Dinner

CRYSTALS

360-683-4788

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

531 W. Washington, Sequim, WA 98382 www.el-cazador.com

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158 E. Bell St. Sequim, WA

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681-5087

www.rtcrystals.com

0A5095179

Carvings Beads Massage Tools Natural & Polished Crystals Tumbled Stones Jewelry Findings & Wire Books & Rock Tumblers and Grit Mineral Specimens

Across from the Post Office

fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  37


sequim

Winter Worship Services ASSEMBLIES OF GOD

BAPTIST

Sequim Worship Center

First Baptist Sequim (S.B.C.)

640 N. Sequim Avenue • 683-7981 David Westman, Pastor SUNDAY SERVICES 10:45 a.m. & 6:00 p.m. www.sequimworshipcenter.org email: info@sequimworshipcenter.org

CALVARY

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST Sequim Seventh-day Adventist Church Family

BIBLE CHURCH Sequim Bible Church

847 N. Sequim Avenue (360) 683-4135 Dave Wiitala, Senior Pastor Shane McCrossen, Youth Pastor SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Traditional Service Children’s Classes 10:30 a.m. Coffee Fellowship 11:00 a.m. Contemporary Service Adult Discipleship Classes Children’s Classes ages 3-12 Nursery - Infants - 2 yrs 6:00 p.m. Evening Service E3 High School Youth Group

TUESDAY 9:30 a.m. Women’s Precepts WEDNESDAY 6:30 p.m. Adult Bible Study & Prayer AWANA (begins Sept. 8th) E3 Middle SchoolYouth Group

SATURDAY Mornings 9:30 a.m. Bible Classes - all ages 10:50 a.m. Praise & Worship

THURSDAY 7:30 a.m. Men’s Breakfast & Bible Study at Mariner Café

Come worship with us!

SUNDAY 9:45 Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Worship 6:00 p.m. Praise and Fellowship WEDNESDAY 2:00 p.m. Bible Study & Prayer Nursery available for all services. Call for information on other activities and Bible studies.

RELIGIOUS SCIENCE

Formerly Sequim Church of Religious Science

Meeting at Pioneer Memorial Park 387 E. Washington St., Sequim (360) 681-0177 Rev. Lynn Osborne 10:00 a.m.

Call the church office for information about Precept Bible Studies, Home Bible Studies and Prayer Meetings. email: sqmbible@olypen.com www.sequimbible.org

38  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

Cornerstone Baptist Temple (Fundamental-Independent) 44 Joslin Rd. (360) 681-3832 (Off Hwy. 101, W. of old Costco) Daniel M. Savage, Pastor SUNDAY 10 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Worship 7 p.m. Evening Worship WEDNESDAY 7 p.m. Bible Study & Prayer Nursery provided all services “We Preach Christ”

METHODIST Trinity United Methodist Church

100 S. Blake Ave., Sequim (Next to Carrie Blake Park) P.O. Box 3697 • (360) 683-5367 Bill Gordon, Pastor SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Celebration Service 9:30 a.m. Sunday School and Nursery 10:30 a.m. Fellowship/ Refreshments 11:00 a.m. Traditional Service

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For activities throughout the year, call, email or visit our web site.

MONDAY 5:30 p.m. Youth Group

MONDAY 7:00 p.m. Precepts

30 Sanford Lane (Off Sequim Ave.) Pastor Dale Kongorski (360) 683-7373 sequimadventist@qwestoffice.net sequimadventistchurch.org

WEDNESDAY Evenings 7:00 p.m. Prayer Meeting

10:00 a.m. Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Worship Service

GARBC 7652 Old Olympic Highway (360) 683-7303 Lonnie Jacobson, Pastor faithbaptist@olypen.com www.faithbaptistsequim.com Family Oriented Ministry Emphasizing Bible Preaching and Teaching

Serving Sequim and Port Angeles 91 South Boyce Road (West of Sequim off Hwy 101) P.O. Box 651 Carlsborg, WA 98324 360-683-5995 Hans Bailey, Pastor “We teach through the Word”

email: sequim@calvarychapel.com www.calvarychapelsequim.com

(Corner of Fir & Brown)

Faith Baptist Church

Calvary Chapel Sequim

WEDNESDAY 7:00 p.m. Bible Study 7:00 p.m. Calvary Kid’s Club Childcare Available Home groups meet throughout the week

SUNDAY 9:00 a.m. Spanish Worship 9:30 a.m. Small Group Bible Study for all ages 11:00 a.m. Worship Service 6:00 p.m. Worship Service

WEDNESDAY 6:00 p.m. Adult Bible Study & Prayer

SEQUIM

SUNDAY 9:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m. Worship 9:00 a.m. Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Children’s Church

1323 Sequim-Dungeness Way 683-2114


sequim

Winter Worship Services NONDENOMINATIONAL Eastern Hills Community Church

Committed To The T.A.S.K.S. 81 Savannah Lane, Carlsborg (across from Carlsborg Post Office) (360) 681-4367 Mark Weatherford, Pastor Scott Adams, Worship Pastor Larry Loucks, Youth Pastor

pal

62 ds

SUNDAY 9:00 & 11:00 a.m. Worship

SEQUIM CATHOLIC St. Joseph Catholic Church

121 E. Maple St. PO Box 1209 ~ 683-6076 Rev. Victor Olvida, Pastor DAILY MASS 8:30 a.m. Tues. ~ Fri. WEEKEND MASSES 5:00 p.m. Sat. 8:30 & 10:30 a.m. Sun. www.sequimcatholicchurch.org

TUESDAY 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. Youth Group and Children’s AWANA

Sequim Community Church

Sunday School for all ages Loving Infant Care

Dungeness Valley Lutheran (E.L.C.A.)

337 West Spruce Street • 683-9174 SUNDAY 10 a.m. Service 8:45 a.m. Sunday School (in the Reading Room) WEDNESDAY 7 p.m. Testimonial Meeting CHRISTIAN SCIENCE READING ROOM at 121 N. Sequim Ave. Open Noon-3 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday

925 North Sequim Ave. • 681-0946 Pastor Jack Anderson Parish Assistant, Mary Griffith, RN SUNDAY 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. Worship 9:40 Christian Education WEDNESDAY 6:00 p.m. Potluck 6:45 p.m. Christian Education Nursery Service Available www.dvelca.org email: dvlcoffice@gmail.com

Faith Lutheran Church (LCMS) 382 W Cedar • 360-683-4803 Rev. Steve Eaton Rev. Roger Stites

www.easternhillscommunitychurch.org

PENTECOSTAL

Dungeness Community Church

SUNDAY 10:00 a.m. Worship Services 10:00 a.m. Sunday School (2 yrs. thru high school) Nursery available Adult Electives Available www.dcchurch.org

Sequim Valley Foursquare Church

9090 Old Olympic Hwy. • 683-7382 Randy Hurlbut, Pastor SUNDAY 9:15 a.m. Sunday School 9 & 10:30 a.m. Worship Service 6 p.m. Home Groups WEDNESDAY 7 p.m. Adult Bible Study Nursery Available for All Services

CONGREGATION OLYMPIC B’NAI SHALOM Jewish Community of Sequim and Port Angeles Monthly Shabbat Services & Onegs High Holy Days and Other Jewish Holiday Services

CHURCH OF CHRIST Sequim Church of Christ 360-681-2081

Please call for times and meeting location.

Social and Cultural Events... Bi-Monthly Newsletter Connections to Seattle and Tacoma Congregations For Information: www.obsh.org, (360) 452-2471 or write P.O. Box 553, Port Angeles, WA 98362

SUNDAY 8:30 & 11:00 a.m. Worship 9:45 a.m. Sunday School & Adult Bible Classes Youth Groups & Activities Christian Preschool HOLY COMMUNION 1st & 3rd Sundays of the month Both Services

FRIENDS/QUAKER Peninsula Evangelical Friends Church

Between Sequim & Port Angeles on Old Olympic Hwy. 1291 N. Barr Road, Pt. Angeles 452-9105 Pastor Jonathan D. Fodge Ministers: The Entire Congregation SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Meeting for Worship Call for times and dates of Evening Meetings, Bible Studies and other services jfodge@olypen.com Families worshiping and learning together www.pefcpa.com

9A122682

www.SequimCommunityChurch.org

First Church of Christ, Scientist

Uplifting The Name Of Jesus. Friendly Atmosphere, Upbeat Music, Relevant Messages

Join a small group 950 N. 5th Ave., 683-4194 office@SequimCommunityChurch.org Dr. Scott Koenigsaecker, Senior Pastor SUNDAY WORSHIP 9 & 11 a.m. Contemporary 10 a.m. Traditional

LUTHERAN

Bible Study Fellowship Groups Meet Throughout The Week Call for information (360) 681-4367

45 Eberle Lane • 683-7333 (Off Sequim-Dungeness Way) info@dcchurch.org Pastors: Scott Culver, Wayne Yamamoto Parish Nurse: Jenny Hartman Children’s Ministries Leader: Cherrie Bishop Church Administrator: Gary Rude

PRESBYTERIAN

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  39


FALL/WINTER 2010

Fifth Avenue

WRE/SunLand Windermere Real Estate

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

Lori Tracey REALTOR® Cell: (360) 550-6042 Office: (360) 683-4844 Toll Free: (800) 431-0661 E-mail: loritracey@olypen.com

WRE/Sequim East

Windermere Real Estate 842 East Washington St. Sequim, Washington 98382

Team McAleer

(360) 683-1500

email:info@teammcaleer.com www.teammcaleer.com

Locally Owned 190 Priest Rd. and Operated PO Box 1060 We KNOW Sequim, WA 98382 Sequim!

360-683-3900 www.blueskysequim.com

Linda J. Ulin REALTOR, SRES Cell: (360) 271-0891 Office: (360) 683-4844 Toll Free: (800) 431-0661 www.lindaulin.mywindermere.com

WRE/Sequim East

Rita A. Adragna

Broker, ABR, ASR, CNE, CRS, GRI Cell: 360.460.3692 Home Office: 360.683.6138 Toll Free: 800.998.4131 E-mail: Ritaa@olypen.com www.JohnLScott.com/Ritaa

Windermere Real Estate 842 East Washington St. Sequim, Washington 98382

Sequim Office 1190 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382

SEQUIM

Bill Humphrey

Sequim Office 1190 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382

40  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

UPTOWN REALTY

Jean Irvine, CRS, GRI, ASR, SRES

Office: (360) 417-2797 Cell: (360) 460-5601 website: www.JeanIrvine.com

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Associate Broker, REALTOR® (360) 460-2400 BillHumphrey@olypen.com www.johnlscott.com/billhum Toll Free: 800-998-4131 x 138 Fax: (360) 683-8081


FALL/WINTER 2010

Harriet Reyenga Broker, Certified EcoBroker

Office: Cell: Email:

WRE/Port Angeles

(360) 457-0456 Ext. 30 (360) 460-8759 harriet@olypen.com www.harrietr.com Windermere Real Estate 711 E. Front St. Port Angeles, WA 98362 www.harrietr.com

Margo Petersen-Pruss Cell: 460-4251 Office: 452-3333 Toll Free: 1-800-453-9157

margo@olypen.com www.portangelesrealty.com

PORT ANGELES

Tanya M. Kerr

Designated Broker Direct: (360) 670-6776 Tanya@olypen.com www.johnlscott.com/tanyakerr Office: (360) 457-8593 Fax: (360) 457-0941 Port Angeles Office 1134 E. Front St. Port Angeles, WA 98362

Kathy Love

Designated Broker Office: 452-3333 1-800-453-9157 klove@olypen.com

www.portangelesrealty.com

®

PORT ANGELES

Don Edgmon

BROKER®, GRI, ABR

Toll Free (800) 446-8115 Office (360)457-8593x310 Cell (360) 460-0204 Fax (360) 457-0941 dedgmon@olypen.com www.johnlscott.com/doned Get on the leading “EDGE” with Edgmon!!!

Charles A. Rogers REALTOR®

Cell: 360.808.4741 Direct: 360.417.8589 charlesrogers@olypen.com www.CLALLAMPROPERTIES.com

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port angeles

A line of lights illuminates a floating walkway between slips at Port Angeles Boat Haven.

FROM SEA TO SUMMIT Nestled between the Olympic Mountains and the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Port Angeles — the Peninsula's largest city — is a gateway to Olympic National Park and to Victoria, British Columbia. It's known as the place where you can go from sea level to ski level in an hour and enjoy spectacular views along the way. Port Angeles is considered the “authentic Northwest” on the North Olympic Peninsula, with its central location to surrounding towns and exciting opportunities. Whether you want to head into the mountains and Hurricane Ridge, catch the ferry to Canada or just relax and shop in town, here is a sampling of what Port Angeles has to offer.

Hurricane Ridge, rising 5,320 feet above sea level, is one of Olympic National Park’s most scenic areas, offering a panoramic view of both the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the alpine meadows and glacier-capped peaks of the Olympic Mountains. The ridge is a family recreation area with picnicking and hiking in the summer. The Olympic National Park Visitor Center, south on Race Street/Mount Angeles Road, can provide you with park details. For more information about the park, turn to Page 70. City Pier is a great place for fishing and squidding. It has an observation tower, promenade, picnic area and short-term moorage for small boats. 42  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

A beach stroll along the adjacent Hollywood Beach — or on the walk- and bike-friendly Waterfront Trail — might be the ticket to end your day. The City Pier area also includes the Feiro Marine Life Center, a marine laboratory open to the public. The Feiro center features a mural of life in the early days of Port Angeles, depicting a Klallam village at nearby Ennis Creek and, a hundred years later, the men and women who settled there as part of the Puget Sound Co-operative Colony (1887-1904). The center is open on weekends during the winter months. Phone 360-417-6254 for more information.

Clallam County Courthouse, at Fourth and Lincoln streets, was placed on the state register of historical sites in 1971 and the national register in 1988. Built in 1914, the Georgian-style brick structure has such distinctive features as a stained glass skylight, marble steps and a clock tower. A larger, solar-heated courthouse was built onto the rear of the old building in 1979. >>


port angeles Veterans Park, at Second and Lincoln streets, has a replica of the Liberty Bell and benches for resting and quiet time. The bell, purchased by the community to commemorate the U.S. Bicentennial, was forged in the same foundry in England where the original Liberty Bell was made.

the abstract, conveyed in various media. Along Laurel Street are 11 steel sculptures called “Avenue of the People.” These abstract pieces were modeled on everyday Port Angeles people and have become a popular photo opportunity for visitors.

The Museum at the Carnegie offers a glimpse into Clallam County’s past. Learn about early settlers, listen to stories from the tribes that call the North Olympic Peninsula home, explore the arts and examine the issues behind the creation of Olympic National Park. Located at 207 S. Lincoln St., the Carnegie building itself — originally the Carnegie Library — is a piece of history. Dedicated in 1919, it was one of the last libraries funded by the Carnegie Corporation in the nation. The museum is operated by the Clallam County Historical Society, which also operates the Museum of the Clallam Historical Society. Exhibits of early Clallam County settlement, growth, development and maritime history are on display in the lobby of the Richard B. Anderson Federal Building (named for a World War II Medal of Honor winner from Clallam County), located at First and Oak streets in downtown Port Angeles. This building is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Port Angeles Boat Haven on Marine Drive, west of downtown, is home to numerous fishing and pleasure boats.

Art on the Town is an ever-changing outdoor art project that graces the downtown sidewalks. The art ranges from the realist to

A Rayonier steam locomotive, a remembrance of the North Olympic Peninsula’s timber past, serves as a landmark at Locomotive Park on Lauridsen Boulevard between Chase and Peabody streets. The engine was built in 1924. The Elwha River Casino, 631 Stratton Road, features more than 120 electronic slot machines, a full service deli and gift shop. Located 15 miles west of Port Angeles, the casino is owned and operated by the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe. Lake Sutherland is a freshwater fishing lake surrounded by private homes. It is about 15 miles west on Highway 101, just before Lake Crescent. Freshwater Bay, where river water spills into the Strait of Juan de Fuca, is a great place for an outing — from kayaking to picnicking. It is only 10 miles west from Port Angeles ­— go west on state Highway 112, then north three miles on Freshwater Bay Road.

locally grown In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed an executive order designating Port Angeles the "Second National City," with Washington, D. C., being the first.

The Port Angeles Farmers Market at The Gateway Transit Center, located at the corner of Front and Lincoln streets in downtown Port Angeles, is open on Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. year round. The market is a great source for locally grown food and local crafts.

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port angeles

underground history

Learn about marine life

Walk through downtown Port Angeles and you are walking atop history. Literally. Heritage Tours offers a guided walking tour through Port Angeles’ past. The tour takes you through historic downtown buildings — including an old brothel — past murals that tell stories, and into the “Port Angeles Underground.” When the downtown street levels were raised above the tidal flats in 1914, the Port Angeles Underground, with its subterranean walkways and old storefronts, was created. While the majority of the Underground has been filled in due to city repairs and water main projects over the years, one block of the Underground remains safe and accessible. That spot is located on the west side of Laurel Street between Front and First streets and is the last stop of the tour. Walking tours leave at 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m at the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center, 121 E. Railroad Ave. For reservations, rates and information, phone 360-452-2363, Ext. 0. If you’re interested in learning more about Port Angeles’ history, visit during the annual Heritage Weekend, held in August. The weekend includes the historical walking tour and Underground, plus driving tours of historic homes with a visit to the Historical Society Museum, demonstrations, displays, food and more.

Two marine attractions in Port Angeles are within steps of each other — the Arthur D. Feiro Marine Life Center and the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary’s Olympic Discovery Center. The Feiro Marine Life Center at the entrance to Port Angeles City Pier is a sea-creature friendly place. It offers a display of marine specimens, with a large touch tank for a closer examination of marine animals. For information, rates and hours, call 360-417-6254, or click on www.feiromarinelifecenter.org. Begin a journey to the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary by first stopping by the Olympic Coast Discovery Center, located upstairs in The Landing mall — the multicolored building immediately west of City Pier. The center offers an interactive opportunity to examine the intricacies of the marine sanctuary off the Peninsula’s Pacific Coast, which extends from Cape Flattery at the northwest tip of the Olympic Peninsula to central Grays Harbor County. For information and hours, go to www.olympiccoast.noaa.gov or call 360-457-6622.

Mild

winter weather

Against a backdrop of Mount Baker and the Strait of Juan de Fuca, a gull joins his friends on a railing at Port Angeles City Pier.

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Port Angeles enjoys a coastal climate that is mild throughout the year. On average, temperatures range from the 30s in the winter months to the 70s in the summer months. Average rainfall is 25 inches per year in Port Angeles.


port angeles

GEM-LIKE SETTING FOR CONTEMPORARY ART Located in the shadow of Olympic National Park, the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center’s setting provides an inspiring frame for cultural offerings that are equally delightful to art sophisticates and five year olds. Serving as an Olympic Peninsula art museum since 1986, the Port Angeles Fine Arts Center — PAFAC — is the westernmost center for contemporary art in the lower 48 states. Located in the shadow of Olympic National Park, its superlative physical setting provides an inspiring frame for cultural offerings. The gallery and offices occupy long time Port Angeles artist and benefactor Esther Barrows Webster’s former home, which was built in 1951 from the modernist design of noted Seattle architect, Paul Hayden Kirk. The center offers original, thought-provoking exhibitions with a Northwest flavor featuring master and emerging artists, imaginatively displayed in the historic, semi-circular hilltop aerie. Set against an awesome vista of marine and mountain views that are ever present through sweeping window panoramas, the living landscape and abundant natural light create a gem-like setting that makes its exhibitions sparkle. With the creation of Webster’s Woods Art Park in 2000, the surrounding five-acre estate has been transformed into a “museum without walls” with sculptures and site works seamlessly integrated into a unique sylvan setting that is a microcosm of nearby Olympic National Park. More than 200 works by Northwest artists have been placed through the annual renewals of Art Outside. Visitors who walk the rustic trails will delight in discovering more than 100 artistic interventions that have accumulated over the years, and which are of equal delight to art sophisticates and five year olds. Lectures, concerts, readings and other special, live programs complement the visual fare. PAFAC hosts the Juan de Fuca Festival of the Arts each Memorial Day weekend. The ArtPaths education program receives more than 4,000 student visitations annually and has served as a staple of local arts education for more than 15 years. The gallery and art park are open year round and admission to the exhibitions is free. For more information, phone 360-417-4590 or click on www.pafac.org. fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  45


bike riding

Call Now!

A SEAT WITH A VIEW Port Angeles 1210 B East Front Street

When it comes to biking, whether you’re a road biker or a mountain biker, you’ll find something to your liking on the North Olympic Peninsula. Sequim

755 West Washington

In the Sequim-Dungeness area, the trails are as vast as the mountains that bear them. For scenic mountain biking beauty, it’s hard to beat the hills flanking the Dungeness Valley. For a complete map of the area, stop at the Sequim-Dungeness Valley Chamber of Commerce in Sequim, located at 1192 E. Washington St. Burnt Hill Road and Johnson Creek Trail are fantastic trails for the bike enthusiast, while Miller Peninsula is also a great little trail. For those with youngsters who want to get them interested in mountain biking, try taking them along Robin Hill Farm County Park, a nice little trail for beginners and for the family. In Port Angeles, the Waterfront Trail is a popular route for bike rides. The mostly paved, relatively flat trail runs from the Coast Guard station on Ediz Hook to the former Rayonier mill site east of City Pier. For a shorter ride, you can pick up the trail part-way at Hollywood Beach, just in front of the Red Lion Hotel. If you want to venture up Hurricane Ridge south of Port Angeles, try the Foothills Trail off Lake Dawn Road. The Spruce Railroad Trail is a great trail for mountain bikes. The trail, which is the only one in Olympic National Park that allows bicyclists, travels along Lake Crescent as it follows an old World War I railbed.

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Dam removal Be sure to visit the Elwha River dams this year because beginning in summer 2011, construction begins on their removal. The two dams — the 105-foot Elwha Dam that creates Lake Aldwell and the 201-foot Glines Canyon Dam that forms Lake Mills — were constructed in 1913 and 1927, respectively, without fish ladders, preventing salmon from migrating upstream to spawn. Their removal, a project estimated to cost about $350 million, will restore the river to its natural free-flowing state.

Smoked Salmon DIRECTIONS: For the Elwha Dam, take state Highway 112 west from Port Angeles and turn left onto Lower Dam Road (by sign for RV Park). For the Glines Canyon Dam, take U.S. Highway 101 west from Port Angeles and turn left onto Olympic Hot Springs Road.

Northwest

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Your Year-Round Hurricane Ridge Adventure begins in Downtown Port Angeles Start off the day with a delicious breakfast, pick up maps and guide books, rent snowshoes or stock up on hiking supplies. After your trip, dine in one of the several great restaurants, tour the large Art on the Town collection of public art and other local galleries, shop for a wide range of unique items and enjoy the charms of a classic All-American town.

Port Angeles

Downtown

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www.portangelesdowntown.org

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port angeles

We’re here when you need us! Shipping rates direct from UPS

Travel Light Ship your gear to your destination... then home again!

When you’re on the go, KatyFranchise Owner

136 E. 8th St. Port Angeles, WA 98362

360-452-6602 The UPS Store

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kincare

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106 North Lincoln • Port Angeles • www.SkinCareSuites.com

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tranquil setting “The Hook,” as Ediz Hook is known locally, is an ideal spot from which to view the city and the Olympic Mountains rising in the background.

Ediz Hook, entered at the west end of town and “hooking” back easterly, is a naturally formed sand spit that juts into the Strait of Juan de Fuca to form Port Angeles’ deepwater harbor. It’s a popular destination for bicyclists, runners, inline skaters, kite flyers and sea kayakers. Join the thousands of local families and visitors who picnic there or pile stones on the rip rap to create small rock towers as a tribute to nature. Access to Ediz Hook is via Marine Drive, which passes through the Nippon Paper Industries USA paper mill. Near the end of the Hook there’s a large boat launch. It is just before the Puget Sound Pilots’ station and the entrance to the Coast Guard’s Port Angeles Group/Air Station. Entrance to the base is restricted. Ediz Hook offers six picnic sites with windbreaks and restrooms. n

VOTED BEST HOTEL IN CLALLAM COUNTY FOUR YEARS RUNNING!

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The Red Lion Hotel Port Angeles would like to thank than nk you ou for for your you y ourr continued support. We wouldn’t be successful without you!

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fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  49


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port angeles Complete Automotive Repair & Electric Service

Salt Creek Recreation Area is a 196-acre county park located 15 miles west of Port Angeles off state Highway 112. One of Clallam County’s premier parks, it features panoramic views of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Crescent Bay and Vancouver Island, British Columbia.

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DIRECTIONS: Take Highway 112 west from Port Angeles. After about 9 miles, turn right (north) onto Camp Hayden Road (near milepost 54). Travel approximately 3 miles. The park entrance will be on your right.

Commercial Property Management Furnished Rentals Investment Properties Full Real Estate Office

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The site was once the location of Camp Hayden, a World War II harbor defense military base. Two concrete bunkers that housed 16-inch cannons and some smaller bunkers preserve its military history. The adjacent Tongue Point Marine Life Sanctuary includes a rocky outcropping that at low tide reveals starfish, sea urchins, limpets, sea cucumbers and many other forms of marine life. The sanctuary designation means wildlife and its evidence, such as shells, must be left undisturbed for others to enjoy. The park also provides hiking trail access to the Department of Natural Resources’ trails to the Striped Peak Recreation Area. The year-round Salt Creek campground offers 90 premium campsites and includes restrooms, a large playground, picnic areas, a picnic shelter, baseball field, horseshoe court, dump station and more.

Residential Property Management

330 E. 1st St., Ste #1 Port Angeles 360-452-1326 Fax: 360-457-3212

Mike Kesl

Certified Instructor

Scuba Supplies 457-3190

120 East Front St., Port Angeles

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Experienced Instructor Everything You Need!

One block from the BC Ferries!

Full service lounge with all your favorite drinks! 101 E. Front • Downtown Port Angeles • 360-452-9692

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We offer a wide range of Scuba classes to fit your schedule and skill level

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port angeles

– CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS – Boys & Girls Clubs 400 W. Fir St., Sequim 2620 S. Francis, Port Angeles Monday thru Friday 2:30 - 6:00 Mary Budke 683-8095 George Rodes 417-2831

Olympic Driftwood Sculptors 1st Wednesday Every Month, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Sequim Prairie Grange, 290 Macleay Road Tuttie Peetz, Instructor 360-683-6860 Barbara Ralph, Info 360-681-2535 info@ods.org

Clallam County Democratic Club 2nd Wednesday of every month 7 p.m. Pioneer Memorial Park 387 E. Washington, Sequim CL. Co. Democratic Headquarters 360-683-4502 150 S. 5th Ave. #1, Sequim www.clallamdemocrats.org

Olympic Peninsula Audubon Society 7:00 p.m., 3rd Wednesday of every month except July, August & Decemeber Dungeness River Audubon Center Railroad Bridge Park 2151 W. Hendrickson Road, Sequim Audrey Gift, President, 360-681-4076, agift@q.com

Clallam County Family YMCA 302 S. Francis St., Port Angeles “Power of Community” ccfymca.org Open Seven Days A Week 306-452-9244 Clallam County Republican Party Republican Headquarters, 509 S. Lincoln, P.A. 3rd Monday each month at 7 p.m. 360-417-3035 Dick Piling 360-460-7652 Clallam Economic Development Council 3rd Thursday of Month 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. Lincoln Center, Room 208 905 W. 9th St., Port Angeles Linda Rotmark, Executive Director 360-457-7793 Disabled American Veterans (DAV) 216 S. Francis St. Port Angeles Mon. - Thur. 10-2 p.m. *Volunteer Drivers Needed 2nd Sunday every month. 1 p.m. Potluck, 2 p.m. Meeting Vance Percival 360-417-9444 or 417-2630 www.davchp9.org Dungeness Bonsai Society 1st Tuesday of every month, 10:00 a.m. No meeting december or January Pioneer Park, Sequim Bob Stack 360-457-7321 Exchange Club of Port Angeles 1st & 3rd Wednesday 3:00 p.m. Healthy Families of Clallam County in Boardroom 1210 E. Front St., Port Angeles Brian Pettyjohn 360-417-5188 International Footprint Association Olympic Peninsula, Chapter 74 Dinner meeting 2nd Monday, 6 p.m. Sequim Elks Lodge No. 2642, 143 Pt. Williams Gene Mattson 360-681-0533 Kiwanis Club of Port Angeles North Olympic Skills Center 905 W. 9th St. Port Angeles Noon on Thursdays Lloyd Eisenman, President 360-565-1116

52  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

Order of Eastern Star (OES) Ester Chapter #19 2nd Monday, Social Meeting, 6:30 p.m. 4th Monday, State Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Masonic Center 622 S. Lincoln St., Port Angeles Mary Miller, Secretary, 360-417-9236 PALOA Musical Theater 360.457.5630 - www.paloa.org ROCKY HORROR SHOW NOV 11, 12 & 13, 2010 Port Angeles Business Association Joshua’s, 113 DelGuzzi Rd., Port Angeles Tuesdays 7:30 a.m. Ted Simpson 457-9344 Port Angeles Senior Center 328 E. 7th Street, Port Angeles 98362 Business Hours: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday-Friday, Closed Holidays D Bellamente, 360-417-4554 www.portangelesseniorcenter.com Port Angeles Symphony 5 Symphony Concerts 6 Chamber Orchestra Concerts 2 POPS Concerts 360-457-5579 www.portangelessymphony.org Port Angeles Yacht Club 1305 Marine Drive 3rd Friday, 6:00 p.m. 360-457-1808 Rotary Club - Nor’wester Seasons Cafe - Olympic Memorial Hospital Friday @ 7 a.m. Norm Scheaf 452-2367 Rotary of Port Angeles Wednesdays 12:00 to 1:00 p.m. CrabHouse/Red Lion Meeting rooms Jody Moss, Secretary, 360-457-3011

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Newcomers’ Club Serving the North Olympic Peninsula Meeting place to be announced 1st Tuesday Heidi Hansen 360-477-5322

Olympic Peninsula Shrine Club 3rd Saturday of every month, 11:00 a.m. Call for information: Dave Hansen 360-912-0291


Port Angeles map:

port angeles

– CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS – Rotary Club of Sequim Thursdays at Noon Sunland Baquet Hall 109 Hilltop Dr., Sequim Sara Maloney 683-3300 www.sequimnoonrotary.org Sequim Chamber of Commerce-Luncheon 2nd & 4th Tuesday monthly, 12 Noon Call for location Jeri Smith 360-683-6197 www.sequimchamber.com Sequim Valley Lions Islander Pizza & Pasta Shack 380 E. Washington, Sequim 2nd & 4th Thusday at 5:30 p.m. Betty Wilkerson 360-457-5600 Ardnt Lorenzen 360-683-7550 Sequim Elks Lodge #2642 143 Port Williams Road, Sequim E. Merrill Roragen - Exalted Ruler, 360-683-2763

Soroptimist International P.A. Jet Set Senior Center Corner of 7th & Peabody 7:00 a.m., Every Thursday Marsha Robin 360-452-7925 www.sijetset.com United Way of Clallam County www.unitedwayclallam.org 102 1/2 E. First St., Port Angeles Jody Moss, Executive Director 360- 457-3011 Help call 211 or visit www.win211.org VFW Post #6787 Monthly, 3rd Saturday, 11:00 a.m. Mariner Café, 707 E. Washington Sequim Marty Arnold 360-457-4683

0A5095130

VFW Post #1024 and Ladies Auxilliary 216 South Francis St. Port Angeles 1st Friday of the month Potluck at 12:00 p.m., Meeting at 1:00 p.m.

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port angeles

Souvenirs

Washington & Canadian

TRIBAL HERITAGE

Twilight Merchandise

T-shirts • Jackets • Gifts Jewelry • Embroidered Clothing Red Hat Accessories • Lots more

Lower Elwha bring their creativity into the Port Angeles community.

What’s In Store 457-1427

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Located in the Landing Mall 115 E. Railroad Ave., Port Angeles

CENTER

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The Lower Elwha Klallam Heritage Center, a project of the Lower Elwha Klallam tribe, is located at 401 E. First St. The 9,808-square-foot center offers classes to the general public as well as worker training and other assistance to people enrolled in the tribe’s social welfare services. Classes are on traditional tribal crafts such as making paddles, baskets, masks and drums, and will be open to anyone who wants to register for them. The corner of Peabody and First streets in Port Angeles was once the site of a twopump gas station. The tribe was conscious of green building, sustainable technology and using recycled materials when it built the heritage center. By locating a showplace for their art in town, the Elwha have brought their creativity to the Port Angeles community. Workshops for a community of artists is integral to the center’s purpose. In a separate, future construction project, the tribe is planning a cultural center and museum on the Tse-whit-zen site, one of the largest and oldest Native American villages found in the nation. The museum will house the thousands of artifacts that were unearthed in 2003 and 2004 from the site at the west end of Port Angeles harbor during construction of a dry dock to build replacement components for the Hood Canal Bridge.

Jazz festival of Downtown Port Angeles with a visit to the Underground Experience local history brought back to life! Walking tour leaving from the Smuggler’s Landing (Behind the Chamber of Commerce)

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Call today

Reservations taken at the Chamber of Commerce Visitors Bureau. 121 E. Railroad Ave. (360) 452-2363 ext. 0

The 2011 Jazz In The Olympics festival, held Friday, April 1 through Sunday, April 3, will feature 10 bands performing over the course of four days at four Port Angeles venues Many family oriented activities will coincide with the festival, and as always, there will be shuttle buses between venues. For more information, click on www.jazzolympics.com or phone 360-808-2824.


joyce

Just 16 miles west of Port Angeles is Joyce, a small town full of character.

Stylish & elegant accommodations in the heart of Downtown Port Angeles!

The Joyce General Store on Highway 112 was built in the early 1900s and remains very much the same — false front, beaded ceilings, wooden floor. Much of the store’s interior is made of remnants from the opera house and Markum house, which stood in the town of Port Crescent in the 1800s. Joyce Museum, housed in a former railroad station, is located next door. Built about 1915, it is considered to be the last remaining log depot from the Milwaukee Line. It houses memorabilia, photographers and artifacts from railroads and historical surrounding towns. Phone 360-928-3528 for information about the museum. For more information about Joyce, visit www.joycewa.com.

• Next to the Victoria Ferries • 100% Non-smoking • Affordable rates • Large groups welcome • Located in the center of downtown P.A.

Whales in coastal waters

Serving The Community Since 1911

JOYCE GENERAL STORE

1011⁄2 E. Front St. Port Angeles, WA (360) 565 - 1125 (866) 688 - 8600 toll free

~ Built in 1914 ~ ~ Restored 2003 ~

Warmth, friendliness, local color and a touch of history come with every purchase. The Joyce General Store, located on Hwy. 112 between beautiful Lake Crescent and Crescent Beach, has been in the same family for 48plus years. We are more than happy to take time to chat and tell you about visiting the mythical University of Joyce. We will also give any directions to anywhere you might be interested in.

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Drop in at the Joyce General Store and step into a building that has had few changes since the early 1900’s. The false front, beaded ceiling, oiled wood floors and many of the fixtures remain the same. Much of the interior of the store is from the Markhum House Hotel which stood in the now vanished town of Port Crescent in the 1800’s. The store carries gas, groceries, tackle, bait, and other items. There also are unique gifts, souvenirs, and Indian arts and crafts.

www.portangelesdowntownhotel.com

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Here there be whales. That’s the message of new signs installed along the Whale Trail, a string of marked locations in Washington state where visitors are likely to see whales in coastal waters. The project is the state’s first network of viewing sites for whale watching. A sign at Salt Creek Recreation Area — positioned in the northwest corner of the park, near the stairs leading to Tongue Point — overlooks Crescent Bay, where gray whales are often seen. See page 51 for directions to Salt Creek. Along state Highway 112, other Whale Trail signs — each specific to its location — have been installed at Freshwater Bay County Park, the Sekiu Overlook and Shipwreck Point. The 20 locations that have been pinpointed on the Whale Trail so far also include Cape Flattery, LaPush, Port Townsend Marine Science Center and Dosewallips State Park. Each site will include a marker, informational signs and community artwork. Whale Trail locations will be published on a printed map and on a website. The project will be finished in three phases, to be completed by 2013. For more information, visit www.thewhaletrail.org.

in beautiful downtown Joyce • 360-928-3568 “We are the oldest continuous operating General Store in the State of Washington”

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port angeles

PORT ANGELES A Million Acre Park Is Just The Start...

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Growlers & Beers to Go Expanded Menu & Ed’s Killer Chili

452-2802 OPEN DAILY 3 blocks up from BC Ferries 2nd & Lincoln, P.A. w w w. p e a k s p u b . c o m

Tue - Sat 10 am to 5 pm Next to Karon’s Frame Center

629 E. Front • PA • 452-9863

✁ 0A5094586

COUPON

Lu Specnch ials!

0A5092959

Buy one dinner entree and 2 beverages at regular price & receive second dinner entree for:

1

$

Olympic Tire & Auto Repair, Inc.

56  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

731 E. First St., Port Angeles

452-9711

Serving BREAKFAST & LUNCH Breakfast ‘til 11:00 Weekdays HOMEMADE DELI SALADS SOUPS & DESSERTS • CATERING TO GO ORDERS WELCOME! Hours: 8 am - 3 pm Tues. thru Sat.

704 Marine Dr., P.A. 417-6961

0A700845

Expires May 30, 2011

222 N. Lincoln St., P.A. 360-452-4995

Servicing Domestic & Foreign Cars and Trucks Brakes • Tune-ups • A/C Service • Electrical • Clutches Cooling Systems • Trans Flush • Timing Belts Oil Change, Lube and much more...

0A700828

(20% off to go orders)

L O C A L B R E W E R Y

0A5095529

Call & make an appointment to consign your clothes today. 09700833

One block from ferry terminal

A

WOMEN’S & TEENS CLOTHING & ACCESSORIES

Mon-Sat LUNCH: 11am - 2:30pm DINNER: 4:30pm - 8:30pm Closed Sunday

Cocktails, Beer & Wine 360-452-4995 222 N. Lincoln St., P.A.

T H E


PORT ANGELES

port angeles

DINING

Beer • Wine Mixed Drinks

00

OFF for Two

LUNCH ~ ORGANIC ESPRESSO ~ GIFTS LOCAL ART ~ SOUVENIR CLOTHING

We Accept Visa/MasterCard/Discover and EBT/Food Stamps

FREE PARKING

FREE WiFi

Just ask and we’ll bake your whole Pizza for you too! Only $1.00 extra!

Mon-Fri 7:30am - 3:00pm

Hours: 10:30am - 8:00pm ◆ Monday - Saturday 10:30am - 6:00pm Sunday 814 South C Street ◆ Port Angeles, WA 98363

(360) 417-5600 w w w. v a n g o e s . c o m

CAFE LLC BREAKFAST SE Y RVE D ALL DA

FAIRCHILD INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT TERMINAL Port Angeles, Washington

(360) 457-1190

All Major Credit Cards Accepted

0A5092960

(360) 457-4113 www.bushwhackerpa.com

2 large slices of pizza or 2 tamales and beverage Only $6.00

AIRPORT

0A700846

Open: 11:30 am Mon – Fri 4:00 pm on Sat – 9:00 am on Sunday 1527 East First Street

Gourmet

Pizza & Mexican

Pizza by the slice Burritos Tamales and Tacos served hot all day!

(360) 327-3225 ~ hungrybear@olypen.com Milepost 206, Beaver, Washington 98305

!

$

HONEST PRICES – GOOD FOOD

2

Bring in this ad for

Van Goes

0A5092961

GOOD FOOD – HONEST PRICES

0A5095359

EAT. RELAX. ENJOY.

940 E. First • Port Angeles 417-2963

0A700832

www.kokopelli-grill.com

Family Mexican Restaurant

0A5095530

203 E. Front St., P.A. 360-457-6040

Come in for our Home Style Cooking!

0A5094461

Discover the savory riches in the cuisine of the Southwest

fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  57


Makah Cultural Museum

te Flat

Neah Bay

s National Wildlife Re ry Rock fuge

ary tional Marine Sanctu

Ozette Reservation

tra

S

Cape Flattery

Olympic C o a s t Na

Makah Reservation

112

Sekiu

it o

f Ju

an

de F

Clallam Bay

uc a

Pysht

Sa Re

Ozette 113

Lake Pleasant

101

Beaver

lD uc

R

ive

te yu lle ui Q

Bogachiel State Park

l River Bogachie

Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center

Hoh Rain Forest

c

N

Ol ym pi

r

Forks

110

Quileute Reservation

Oc

ti o Na

rk l Pa uge Re f na tio dlife Wil Na nal

s dle ee

Hoh River Oil City

n

Ruby Beach

r Rive ter a rw ea

Lighthouse

Public campground

Ranger station

Information

Hospital

Golf course

National park lodging

Kalaloch

10 Kilometers 10 Miles

Queets

101 Quinault Reservation Q

Port Townsend/Jefferson County see page 10 58  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

Rain Fore

Olympic National Forest

Clearwater

Kalaloch Lodge

Marina 5

Queets

er Riv Que ets ue

Cl

Airport

5

Q

ea

Hoh Reservation

MAP KEY

1

So

Mora

Destruction Island

0

Lake Crescent Lodge Sol Duc Hot Spring Resort

Olympic National Forest

LaPush

0 1

Lake Crescent

Sappho

l Park

na pic Natio Olym

Lake Dickey

Lake Ozette

Rialto Beach

ic Pacif

Map of the North Olympic Peninsula:

Vancou

Tattosh Island

ult na ui

Amanda Park er i Rv

Sequim & the Dungeness Valley see page 21

Lake Quin


uver Island

yI be hid W New Dungeness Lighthouse

Quilcene

Mount Fricaba

Mount Mystery Mount Constance

Dabob Ba

Mount Walker

Dosewallips

Du

iver u i n a u lt R

in Qu

ck a bush Rive r

a Ha

3

Poulsbo

Coyle

Dosewallips State Park

Brinnon Triton Cove State Park

m H am

y

i ve r

r ive

N.

Fo r

kQ

rk Fo E.

Dosewallips R

Ca na l

Mount Deception

Mount Queets

lt R au

fe r r y

Port Gamble

Hood

Gr a

104

Shine

The Brothers

Quinault Rain Forest

Port Ludlow

Mount Townsend

Mount Anderson

eets n est

y Ba

r ve Ri

7,980 ft.

o W

ry

ha

Mount Mount Olympus Tom

Olympic National Park

y

r ive lf R

525

19

Olympic National Forest

Deer Park

lw

Mount Carrie

Irondale Nordland Port Hadlock

20

7 Cedars Casino

Obstruction Peak

Fort Flagler State Park

Chimacum

Blyn

Blue Mountain

Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center E

sc o ve

Jamestown S’Klallam Reservation

r/ ge

Fort Towsend State Park

Di

Eagle

ay

Lake Mills

er Riv

Mount Angeles

gs

Sequim Bay State Park

im B

Heart O’ the Hills

u Seq

Elwha

Sequim

ess

Storm King Information Center

D u ng e n

Lake Sutherland

en P ass

101

Olympic National Park Visitor Center

Keystone

Port Townsend

John Wayne Marina

ic le

Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge

112 Lake Aldwell

Keyport

Silverdale

Seabeck

305

303

101

mma River

Bremerton

Eldon

Port Orchard

sh

R ive

r

ee

l

Lilliwaup

Hoo dC an a

i om

ch

Lake Cushman

k ko

W yn oo

160

rk S

Ri ver

Staircase o S. F

e nault

Fort Worden State Park

ve h

Port Reservation Angeles

Log Cabin Resort

20 Coupeville

Elwha Lower alt Creek ecreation Area River Elwha Casino Klallam

Joyce

Oak Harbor

sla

Passenger/vehicle ferry

nd

Victoria

Hoodsport

Port Angeles see page 42

West End & North/West Coast see pages 80, 85

3 16 106

Olympic National Park see page 70

fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  59


port angeles

Winter Worship Services NONDENOMINATIONAL Eastern Hills Community Church

Committed To The T.A.S.K.S. 81 Savannah Lane, Carlsborg (across from Carlsborg Post Office) (360) 681-4367 Pastor Mark Weatherford Scott Adams, Worship Pastor Larry Loucks, Youth Pastor SUNDAY 9 & 11 a.m. Worship

PORT ANGELES EPISCOPAL St. Andrew’s Episcopal 510 East Park Ave. (1 block east of PA High School) (360) 457-4862 FAX (360) 457-4807

SUNDAY 8 & 10 a.m. Holy Eucharist 9:00 a.m. Children’s Sunday School & Nursery

TUESDAY 6:30 to 8 p.m. Youth Group and Children’s AWANA Bible Study Fellowship Groups Meet Throughout The Week Call for information (360) 681-4367 Uplifting The Name of Jesus. Friendly Atmosphere, Upbeat Music, Relevant Messages www.easternhillscommunitychurch.org

9:00 a.m. Morning Prayer

SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Worship Service 6:30 p.m. Evening Service WEDNESDAY 7 p.m. Evening Service SATURDAY 7:00 p.m. Prayer Service

For Information: www.obsh.org, 452-2471 or write P.O. Box 553, Port Angeles, WA 98362

METHODIST First United Methodist & Congregational Church 110 E. 7th St. (7th & Laurel) (360) 452-8971 portangelesumc@tfon.com Rev. Jo Ann “Joey” Olson

FREE METHODIST Lael Family Life Fellowship Meeting at Port Angeles Yacht Club 1305 W. Marine Drive Port Angeles • 360-452-2206 Pastor Jon Krause P.O. Box 2486 Port Angeles, WA 98362 SUNDAY 11:00 a.m. Worship Service laelflf@hotmail.com

Contact us for info about the free Clothes Closet and other programs for all ages.

9:00 a.m. Morning Prayer

FRIENDS/QUAKER Peninsula Evangelical Friends Church

Between Sequim & Port Angeles on Old Olympic Hwy. 1291 N. Barr Road, Pt. Angeles 452-9105 Pastor Jonathan D. Fodge Ministers: The Entire Congregation SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Meeting for Worship Call for times and dates of Evening Meetings. Bible Studies and other services jfodge@olypen.com Families worshiping and learning together www.pefcpa.com

60  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

ROMAN CATHOLIC Queen of Angels 209 West 11th • 452-2351

Parish Office Hours: 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

MASS Saturday Vigil 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 & 11 a.m. Monday & Tuesday Prayer Service 8:30 a.m. Tuesday Evening 6:00 p.m. Wednesday thru Saturday 8:30 a.m. Sacrament of Reconciliation 30 Minutes prior to all Masses Saturday 4:00 to 5:00 p.m. 23 Hour Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament Friday: Exposition 9:00 a.m. Friday: Divine Mercy 3:00 p.m. Saturday: Benediction 8:00 a.m.

UNITY Unity in the Olympics

2917 E. Myrtle • (360) 457-3981 Rev. John Wingfield SUNDAY 10:30 a.m. Worship Service 10:30 a.m. Children’s Classes

Home of the Association of Unity Churches - “Daily Word”

0A700836

EVERY WEDNESDAY 6:30 p.m. Bible Study Invite your friends & neighbors for clear, biblical preaching, wonderful fellowship, & the invitation to a lasting, personal relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ.

506 S. Francis • 457-1030 Corner of 5th & Francis Omer Vigoren, Pastor Jeff Douglas, Music/Youth Leader

FRIDAY 5:30 p.m. Friendship Dinner for all–free

4:30 p.m. Contemplative Prayer

EVERY SUNDAY 9 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Worship Service Nursery available during AM services

PENTECOSTAL Bethany Pentecostal

Nursery provided for all services

11:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist

Corner of 2nd & Race P.O. Box 2086 • (360) 457-4839 Pastor Neil Castle

Monthly Shabbat Services & Onegs High Holy Days & Other Jewish Holiday Services Social and Cultural Events... Bi-Monthly Newsletter Connections to Seattle & Tacoma Congregations

SUNDAY 8:30 a.m. Worship 9:45 a.m. Sunday School 11:00 a.m. Worship Noon - Fellowship Time 4:00 p.m. Youth Group

8:15 p.m. An Order for Compline

NAZARENE Port Angeles Church of the Nazarene

CONGREGATION OLYMPIC B’NAI SHALOM Jewish Community of Sequim and Port Angeles


Winter Worship Services FOURSQUARE

PRESBYTERIAN

CHRISTIAN

Harbor of Hope Foursquare Church

First Presbyterian Church

The Crossing Church

1018 W. 16th St., Port Angeles (360) 461-7979 David & Debbie Rich, Pastor

SUNDAY 10:00 a.m. Worship Service Self-care Nursery 10:00 a.m. Children’s Ministry

PORT ANGELES BIBLE CHURCH Independent Bible Worship Center 452-3351

SATURDAY 6:00 p.m. Upper Room Service 112 North Lincoln St. PA SUNDAY 8:15 a.m. & 11 a.m. Worship Services 9:50 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 116 E. Ahlvers Road, PA indbible.org

UNITED PENTECOSTAL Cornerstone Tabernacle United Pentecostal Church

“You Can Experience God” Meeting downstairs at 510 E. Park Ave., Port Angeles SUNDAY 4:00 p.m. Sunday School 5:00 p.m. Worship Service

Free, no obligation, in-home Bible Studies available.

BAHA’I The Baha’i Faith

www.bahai.us (360) 417-1869 • 1-800-22UNITE “So powerful is the light of unity that it can illuminate the whole earth.’’

www.harborofhopechurch.com davidrich8@gmail.com

BAPTIST Hillcrest Baptist Church (SBC) 205 Black Diamond Road 457-7409 Ed McKay, Pastor

SUNDAY 9:45 a.m. Bible Study, all ages 11 a.m. Worship Nursery provided WEDNESDAY 6:00 - 8:00 p.m. AWANA THURSDAY 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Bible Study/ Prayer Meeting

Nursery provided Call for more info regarding other church activities.

LUTHERAN St. Matthew Lutheran (Missouri Synod) Lincoln at 13th St. • 457-4122 Patrick Lovejoy, Pastor

SUNDAY 8:45 a.m. Sunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship Service www.stmatthewportangeles.org

First Baptist

Real Faith for Real Life (American) 105 West 6th Street • (360) 457-3313 Tim Hughes, Pastor SUNDAY 9:30 & 11:15 a.m. Worship Service (nursery available) 9:30 a.m. Children’s Church www.fbcpa.org

SUNDAY 8:30 &11 a.m. Worship Services 9:45 a.m. Sunday School www.fpcpa.org

PRESBYTERIAN REFORMED Redeeming Grace Orthodox Presbyterian Church Meeting at Scandia Hall 131 W. 5th St., Port Angeles Rev. Andrew Elam

SUNDAY 9:15 a.m. Study Hour 10:30 a.m. Worship Service www.rgopc.org

NONDENOMINATIONAL Calvary Chapel Port Angeles

Glen Douglas, Pastor (360) 452-9936 Casual Environment, Serious Faith Now meeting at the Deer Park Cinemas Corner of Hwy101 and Deer Park Rd. Sunday 9:30 a.m. Nursery and Children’s Church for all ages

Everyone Welcome www.thecrossingchurch.net

Christian Church of Christ

1233 E. Front St., Port Angeles (360) 457-3839 Jerry Dean, Pastor SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:45 a.m. Worship Call us for small group meeting times. churchofchristpa.org

232 W. 8th St. Suite A A Ministry Center (360) 504-2106 Andrew McLarty, Pastor

SUNDAY 10:00 a.m. Worship Service Nursery and children’s class WEDNESDAY 6:30 p.m. Bible Study at Ministry Center

COMMUNITY CHURCH Fairview Bible Church

385 O’Brien Road • 457-5905 (1/4 mi. south of KOA from Hwy. 101 E.) P.O. Box 1281 Derrell Sharp, Pastor SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Sunday School–all ages 10:30 a.m. Worship Service New in town? Passing through? We’d love to have you worship with us. www.fairviewbible.net

Holy Trinity Lutheran Church & Preschool

(ELCA) 301 East Lopez • (360) 452-2323 www.htlcpa.com htlc@olypen.com Pastor Richard Grinstad Pastor Julie Kanarr SUNDAY 8:30 a.m. Worship with Communion

9:45 a.m. Fellowship, Coffee and Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Worship with Communion Nursery available during morning services Broadcast on KONP 1450 at 11 a.m. We have many ongoing Bible studies, youth and social activities. Call us for more info.

0A700837

“The betterment of the world can be accomplished through pure and goodly deeds, through commendable and seemly conduct.’’ from Baha’i Holy Writings

7:00 p.m. Teaching & Training

139 West 8th • (360) 452-4781 Ted Mattie, Pastor Shirley Cruthers, Lay Pastor

fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  61


Port Angeles

Bed & Breakfast Directory Eden by the Sea

0A117356

www.edenbythesea.net

0A117354

1027 Finn Hall Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 360.452.6021

0A117320

• Gourmet Breakfast • Panoramic Water & Mountain Views • Nominated for Northwest Best Places to Kiss! • Elegant French Decor

Domaine Madeleine Sense the Romance

• Spectacular views • Jacuzzi-style tubs • Fireplaces • Private entrances • 5-course breakfast • Exquisite gardens Selected by Sunset Magazine as one of 20 Best Seaside Getaways

www.domainemadeleine.com

0A117357

(360) 457-4174 (888)811-8376

Toll Free: 1-877-457-9777 Local: 360-457-9197 www.colettes.com

62  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

0A117355

146 Wildflower Lane, Port Angeles, WA 98362

Ten Acre Oceanfront Estate • Luxurious Accommodations Oceanfront King Suites • Romantic Fireplaces Two Person Jacuzzi Spas • Gourmet Breakfast


Fishing

Saltwater Beach On The Strait Of Juan de Fuca 19 Miles West Of Port Angeles Off Hwy. 112 3 Miles West Of Joyce Privately Owned & Operated

0A5092978

Everything from heavy, world-class salmon to small, fun-to-fight alpine brook trout can be caught with a rod and reel on the North Olympic Peninsula. Olympic National Park is an endless source of streams and rivers perfect for the trout hound, while the Strait of Juan de Fuca is well known for its salmon and halibut.

Cabins at the beach year ‘round

fishing aplenty

Call for reservations: (360) 928-3489 PO Box 130 • Joyce, WA 98343

Olympic National Park

• 16 large non-smoking/smoking units with queen beds, kitchens or microwave/refrigerators • Single or 2 bed units • Cable TV • Mountain View • Ample parking for boats & trucks • Newly installed coin operated laundry for all motel guests

095095325

There are separate rules for Olympic National Park, where no fishing license is required (except when fishing in the Pacific Ocean from shore), but regulations are sometimes more strict. Copies of the park rules and schedules may be obtained at any entry station, ranger station or park visitor center, or downloaded at www.nps.gov/olym/fishing.htm. Park lakes close at the end of October, just when the weather starts to turn. The park even offers a trout species found nowhere else on Earth. The reclusive Beardslee trout lives only in Lake Crescent. The hook-shaped lake on the northern edge of the Peninsula starts 15 miles west of Port Angeles. If you want to catch these blue-backed fighters, you won’t have to buy a license. However, you also won’t be able to keep the fish as Lake Crescent is entirely catchand-release. It is open to fishing until Oct. 31 and can only be tackled with artificial lures or flies with single, barbless hooks.  >>

Sorry No Pets 2909 Hwy. 101 E., Port Angeles • 360-457-6196 www.sportsmenmotel.com

Assisted Living programs available.

www.villageconcepts.com

A Village Concepts Retirement Community 1430 Park View Lane Port Angeles, WA 98363

1-888-548-6609

Apartments Now Available

Call Today for a Complimentary Lunch & Tour!

“BRING RETIREMENT TO LIFE”

0A5092982

360-452-7222

fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  63


Fishing/hunting

Marine waters

Fishing is closed in marine waters unless specifically noted in the Fish and Wildlife regulations. Specific seasons in the Strait of Juan de Fuca — which includes parts of three Marine Areas (4, 5 and 6) — can be found in the sportfishing rules pamphlet. For salmon seasons, see the Fish and Wildlife regulations. Charter boats throughout the Peninsula send trips out for both salmon and halibut. There are also boat docks available for those with their own tow.

Saltwater

Salmon seasons are varied, and anadromous fish runs in the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Admiralty Inlet and Hood Canal fluctuate from year to year. Immature chinook, also called blackmouth, can be taken from parts of the Strait and Admiralty Inlet in November. The winter blackmouth season is open mid-February through mid-April in the Strait and Canal. Admiralty Inlet is open to kings beginning in mid-January. Rockfish, cod and other bottomfish are

Licenses and regulations also available in the waters off the Peninsula, although there is a 120-foot depth restriction inside the Strait when seasons are open. In Hood Canal, many of these fisheries are permanently closed due to low levels of dissolved oxygen. Always check the regulations before heading out. It’s also a good idea to stop by a tackle shop or sporting goods store, where last-minute rule-changes are often posted. Those without boats also have saltwater options — like beach-casting for coho from Point Wilson (north of Port Townsend) or Quilcene Bay (on Hood Canal).

Freshwater

The trick to fishing rivers on the Peninsula is hitting them at the right time. The Quillayute System contains some of the best steelhead and salmon rivers in the state. The Sol Duc, Calawah, Bogachiel, Dickey and Quillayute make up the five-river system. The Hoh, Elwha and Dungeness rivers are also home to steelhead and salmon. However, the removal of two dams from the Elwha in September 2011 will make the river unfishable.  n

The lowdown on hunting Visitors to the North Olympic Peninsula can hunt everything from elk and deer to bear and cougar — even rabbit and grouse. Areas around Forks, Clallam Bay, Neah Bay and Sequim provide chances at large Roosevelt elk, while blacktailed deer can be found all around the Peninsula. NOTE: Hunting is prohibited inside Olympic National Park.

Sequim elk

There is a herd of elk in the Sequim area, but hunting of that herd has decreased significantly as housing developments and commercial development have put trophy elk into “no shoot” zones. State Fish and Wildlife and Native American tribal officials have done studies about how to move the elk out of the Sequim area.

Blacktail deer and elk

Modern firearm deer season for blacktail deer is mid- to late October, with a late season in November. Modern firearm general elk season is in early November. Early muzzleloader season for blacktail

deer is in September and October. Early muzzleloader season for elk season is in October, with late seasons in November and December. The early archery seasons for blacktail deer and elk are in September, with late archery seasons in November and December.

Cougars and bears

For cougars, archery season is in September and the muzzleloader season is September and October. Any weapon can be used from mid-October through March. Fall black bear season lasts until midNovember. It is illegal to kill spotted cougar kittens or an adult accompanied by such kittens. Dogs may not be used to hunt bear or cougar. Grizzly bear and lynx, while not found on the Peninsula, are protected and may never be killed in the state.

Forest grouse, rabbits and hares

Forest grouse season runs statewide Sept. 1 to Dec. 31. Blue, ruffed and spruce grouse may be shot. Cottontail rabbit and snowshoe hare can be hunted statewide Sept. 1 to March 15.  n

64  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

Fishing/shellfish regulations: All anglers should refer to Fish and Wildlife fishing regulations before departing on any trip. Pick up a copy of the state Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet, available where licenses are sold or online at www.wdfw. wa.gov/fishing. It details fishing boundaries, regulations and licensing information. Fishing/shellfish licenses: A combination license costs $48.20 for residents and $91.40 for nonresidents, with discounted prices for youth and the disabled. Licenses specific to saltwater, freshwater, razor clamming and shellfish and seaweed can also be purchased. Fishing licenses can be purchased at most sporting goods stores. Prices are from the state’s 2010 Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet, effective until April 30, 2011.) Boater alert: A warning to private boaters with state fishing licenses only — make sure you stay on the U.S. side of the Strait. Those wanting to try the Canadian half must first obtain a license from British Columbia. Hunting regulations: Information about hunting seasons and regulations can be found in the Washington Big Game Hunting Seasons and Rules pamphlet or the Migratory Waterfowl and Upland Game Season rules pamphlet, both of which also lay out boundaries, restrictions and licensing information. Pamphlets are usually available wherever licenses are sold and can also be downloaded at www.wdfw.wa.gov/hunting/ regulations. Game Management Units 601, 602, 603, 607, 612, 615, 618, 621, 624 make up the North Olympic Peninsula. Hunting licenses: Washington law requires first-time hunters born after Jan. 1, 1972, to successfully complete a hunter education class before they can purchase a hunting license. A combined elk/deer/cougar/bear license (tags included) can be purchased for $81.20 for state residents or $794 for non-residents. Small game licenses cost as much as $38 for residents and $182 for non-residents. Licenses can also be purchased online at fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov or at sporting goods stores. (Prices are from the state’s Big Game Hunting Seasons and Rules pamphlet, effective until March 31, 2011, and the Migratory Waterfowl and Upland Game Season Rules pamphlet, effective until Aug. 31, 2011.) More information: Peninsula Daily News publishes local outdoor columns in the sports section every Thursday and Friday. They are also available on the newspaper’s website, www. peninsuladailynews.com.


shellfishing

Try your hand at shellfishing Looking for bucket-loads of oysters and clams or going after crab and shrimp are popular pursuits on the Olympic Peninsula. Seasons fluctuate regularly. Always check the state fishing regulations pamphlet the for seasons and rules contact the state Department of Fish and Wildlife before departure. The best way to figure out what’s open and what’s not is to visit wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/ shellfish. Looking up the information online will save you the headache of wading through the state shellfish regulation hot line (866-880-5431). Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge sets its own seasons and rules. Contact the refuge at 360-457-8451. Licenses are required for shellfish harvesting and may be purchased at most tackle shops and a variety of multi-purpose stores.

Clamming

Razor clams are available on many coastal beaches, but domoic acid, a naturally occurring marine toxin that can cause amnesic shellfish poisoning in humans, sometimes causes digging closures.

However, in recent years, beaches have routinely opened to harvesting. Kalaloch Beach, which runs along the south coast of the Peninsula off U.S. Highway 101, opened to digging several times during the 2009-10 season after being closed for two straight seasons because of poor clam populations. Other species of shellfish, including a variety of hardshell clams, are currently considered unsafe and should not be harvested from an beach on the state coastline. For the latest information on which shellfish are and are not safe, and dates and locations on seasons, call the state Department of Health’s beach closures/shellfish toxin hotline at 800-562-5632 and log onto the Fish and Wildlife website at wdfw.wa.gov.

Oysters

The best oyster beaches are along Hood Canal. Quilcene Bay on the Hood Canal is known for producing some of the Northwest’s most delicious oysters. To the south in Brinnon, oyster-gathering opportunities are also said to be excellent. Local seafood lovers know that beneath

the pebble and sand along the shore of the day-use Wolfe Property State Park, just north of the Hood Canal Bridge by a half mile, are mussels, steamer clams, geoducks and rock clams.

Crab and shrimp

Crab harvesting is typically best in Sequim and Dungeness bays, but Dungeness and red rock crabs can also be found elsewhere along the Strait of Juan de Fuca from Port Townsend to Neah Bay. You can catch crab by a variety of methods, including pots and ring traps. Many people enjoy wading for crabs on low tides at locations like Pillar Point and Dungeness Bay. Catch-record cards for Dungeness crab are required and available wherever licenses are sold. There are shrimping opportunities in Port Angeles Harbor and a few other areas. Hood Canal is easily the most popular shrimping destination. Normally the areas have short seasons and are only open certain days of each week. Hood Canal, for example, was only open four days in May 2010. Call ahead or consult www.wdfw.wa.gov to check on availability prior to your visit.  n

• Modern 123 acre industrial park and manufacturing campus • 35 minutes from SEA-TAC Int’l Airport • 30 minutes from Victoria Int’l Airport • Corporate hanger sites available • Deep water port for int’l shipping • Business ready work force with local college for specialized training A BEAUTIFUL PLACE TO LIVE AND WORK

IS THAT BIG CITY OVERHEAD REDUCING YOUR BOTTOM LINE? CONSIDER RELOCATING TO THE PORT OF PORT ANGELES AIRPORT INDUSTRIAL PARK

Patrick Deja Marketing and Properties Manager

360 417 3435 patd@portofpa.com www.portofpa.com

0A5095016

Contact:

fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  65


pet services

Pet Services 0A117309

O LYMPIC P ENINSULA H UMANE S OCIETY

Adopt a friend for life!

63 years of helping homeless animals on the Olympic Peninsula. Adoptions • Receiving Lost and Found Assistance Spay and Neuter Assistance Animal Licensing Microchip Clinics

Port Townsend

0A117344

Port Angeles

360.457.8206 www.CCHUMANE.com

2105 W. Hwy 101 Port Angeles, WA 98363

Laundro-Mutt Self-Service Dog Wash

160 DelGuzzi Drive Port Angeles, WA 98362

452-7686

Practice Limited to Small Animals, Dogs & Cats

0A117340

0A117343

No Appointment Needed

2457 Jefferson • Red Door behind PetTown Port Townsend, WA • 385-6805

Port Townsend, WA

www.frogmountainpetcare.com

• Veterinarian Recommended • 24-hour care NEAR PORT ANGELES AIRPORT • Lives on Site Count on Mary for tender, loving care. Close to P.A. Airport. Covered outside pens, dogs in at night. Ask about Doggy Day Care.

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0A117335

0A117342

Harold Elyea (360) 385-2957 Email: frogmountain@olympus.net By Appointment Only

0A117334

The Exceptional Boarding Facility for Your Dog or Cat A g ility & O b ed ien ce Train in g Available


0A117310

Pet Services Sequim V E T E R I N A R Y H O S P I TA L

Tails are Waggin’ & Dogs are Braggin’ About The Condo Suites at

Country Paws Resort & Grooming

Jane Elyea owner

42 Dory Road, Sequim • 360.582.9686

0A117339

We are pleased to offer a full range of services:

CozyCarePetBoarding@wavecable.com

Assorted Treats, Toys and Premium Dog Foods

www.greywolfvet.com

1102 E. Washington St. • Sequim 360-683-2106 • email: wildones@olympus.net

0A117338

Dr. Mike Tyler, DVM Dr. Maya Bewig, DVM Dr. Jennifer Tavares, VMD

Life Care Plans Preventive Care Geriatric Services Dentistry Radiology Videoscopy Behavior & Training Classes Diagnostics Surgery Dermatology Reproduction Services Nutritional Services Secure indoor pet boarding with outdoor exercise area and care tailored for special needs pets. Professional full-service grooming

0A117341

Grooming and DOGGIE DAY CARE

www.pacificnwvet.com

Welcoming New Clients • Complete Veterinary Care for dogs, cats and exotics, including birds and reptiles.

By Appointment Only

360-681-0113

0A117337

• Boarding Open 7 Days a Week • Certified Grooming • 22+ years experience

Rural Sequim Facility Easily Accessible from Hwy 101

Linda Allen, DVM Toni Jensen, DVM & Staff (360) 681-3368 289 West Bell St., Sequim

0A117336

Dog & Cat Boarding with a Professional & Compassionate Touch

COMPANION ANIMAL PRACTICE

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wineries The North Olympic Peninsula is home to several worldclass wineries that have made names for themselves. Visit them to taste wines as distinctive as their locations, while exploring hidden back roads and seeing spectacular countryside. Most of the local wineries are small, producing less than 2,000 cases a year, and they are definitely handson operations. Often you’ll find the winemakers themselves pouring in the tasting rooms and greeting visitors. A handful of the wineries have banded together to form the Olympic Peninsula Wineries Association. Information on the association can be found at www. olympicpeninsulawineries.org. Some hold events throughout the year, with popular ones pairing the wines with delectable treats such as chocolate and cheese. Many of the wineries utilize grapes from the Columbia River Valley, Oregon and California, although some grow their own cool-climate grapes or utilize berries from local farms for fruit-flavored wines. In any case, the wines are made using classic methods that produce the perfect complement to any meal. Visit all of them by doing a winery-loop tour, or stop by just one or two for a quick glass. Plaques and medals from various wine competitions testify to the success the wineries have had with their vintages.

Enjoy the flavor of small wineries with big taste.

winery loop

Wineries & Wine Sellers on the Peninsula

,

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0A117350

0A117351

www.eaglemountwinery.com (360) 732-4084 2350 Eaglemount Rd. 9 mi. south of Port Townsend near Hwy 101

0A117313

Established in 2006. Offering varietal and Bordeaux-style red wines, hard apple ciders, and specialty ciders including ginger cider


north olympic peninsula wineries Black Diamond Winery 2976 Black Diamond Road Port Angeles 360-457-0748

Eaglemount Wine & Cider 2350 Eaglemount Road Port Townsend 360-732-4084

Harbinger Winery 2358 Highway 101 West Port Angeles 360-452-4262

Camaraderie Cellars 334 Benson Road Port Angeles 360-417-3564

FairWinds Winery 1984 Hastings Ave. Port Townsend 360-385-6899

Olympic Cellars 255410 Highway 101 East Port Angeles 360-452-0160

Christina James Winery 205 St. James Place Port Townsend 360-531-0127

Finnriver 330 Country Meadow Road Chimacum 360-732-6822

Sorensen Cellars 274 S. Otto St. Port Townsend 360-379-6416

Visit Our Website at

0A117319

Olympic Peninsula Wineries

www.olympicpeninsulawineries.org

85311565

We Invite You to Visit 7 World Class Wineries, 1 Spectacular Region!

85311566

Visit us at 334 Benson Rd., Port Angeles 98363

Open to the Public

Open Daily Mon.–Sat. 11am - 6pm & Sun. 11am - 5pm Conveniently located on Highway 101 W, 3 mi. west of Port Angeles

360-452-4262

85311564

85311569

www.camaraderiecellars.com (360) 417-3564

Wine Tasting

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olympic national park

Marymere Falls trail in Olympic National Park

OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK Olympic National Park — a World Heritage Park designated for its rare qualities — can be explored on snowshoes, cross-country skis or by car.

While Olympic National Park is a popular destination year-round, the scene is slightly different during the winter. Don’t be surprised if the roads are closed. In winter, the roads can be treacherous, often difficult to drive. Sometimes, the roads are not even plowed. For most of the more arduous trips, you’ll need a topographic map, which you can buy at visitor centers and ranger stations. There are 168 miles of roads that provide access to various points; however, 99 miles of the roads are gravel, most of which are closed in the winter. All park roads are “spur roads” off U.S. Highway 101. No roads traverse the Olympic wilderness. The Olympic National Park Visitor Center on the route to Hurricane Ridge in Port Angeles is fully accessible, as is the Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center in the West End. 70  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

Other centers and ranger stations provide varying levels of accessibility and hours of operation. Several nature trails are paved and wheelchair-accessible. Others are gravel, but fairly level, and they may be accessible with some assistance. More than a million visitors enjoy Olympic National Park each year. The wilderness in all its rugged beauty is nevertheless a fragile environment. To help protect animal and plant life, waterways and each person’s wilderness experience, the National Park Service creates and enforces regulations. Campers must take care and be aware of the impacts of their actions. Olympic National Park is just as exciting to visit in the fall and winter as it is during the warmer spring and summer months. Just be sure to check the weather forecast in case of snow or rain.


Mountains

The Olympic Mountains are not very high. Mount Olympus, the highest, is just under 8,000 feet, but the Olympics rise almost from the water’s edge and intercept moisture-rich air masses that move in from the Pacific. As this air is forced over the mountains, it cools and releases moisture in the form of rain or snow. At lower elevations, rain nurtures the forests, while at higher elevations snow adds to glacial masses that relentlessly carve the landscape. The mountains wring precipitation out of the air so effectively that areas on the northeast corner of the Peninsula experience a rain shadow and get very little rain. Surrounded on three sides by water and still crowned by alpine glaciers, the Olympics retain a distinctive character that developed from their isolation. Hurricane Ridge is the focal point for snow and winter recreation, with snowshoeing and cross-country and downhill skiing opportunities.

Coast

More than 60 miles of Pacific Ocean coastline form a vital component of Olympic National Park. Whatever the season, walking along the sandy beaches during low tide is a great way to explore the diversity of the intertidal zone. This coastline has remained little changed except for the impact of the pounding surf and storms. It looks much as it did when Native Americans built their first villages thousands of years before Europeans arrived. Today the Hoh, Jamestown S’Klallam, Lower Elwha Klallam, Makah, Port Gamble S’Klallam, Skokomish, Quileute and Quinault continue to live along the shores where their ancestors did so long ago. The coast is where the land meets the sea, vibrating with life and energy —

arches and sea stacks; the roar of crashing waves; the calls of gulls, bald eagles and black oystercatchers; dramatic sunsets and the vastness of the ocean. At low tide you can walk toward the surf, stopping at tidepools along the way. If you squat down and spend some time just looking, you will be amazed at what you see as your eyes start ferreting out objects that look like rocks, but which in fact are small sea animals.

Glaciers

Glacial ice is one of the foremost scenic and scientific values of Olympic National Park. There are about 266 glaciers crowning the Olympics peaks. The prominent glaciers are those on Mount Olympus covering 10 square miles. Beyond the Olympic complex are the glaciers of Mount Carrie, the Bailey Range, Mount Christie and Mount Anderson. In the company of these glaciers are perpetual snowbanks that have the superficial appearance of glacial ice. The climate influencing Olympic glaciers is wet and temperate. The movement of glacial ice past and present has produced striking geological features in the Olympic Mountains. The lake basins, U-shaped valleys and jagged peaks are the products of massive glacial erosion that occurred thousands of years ago when the yearround climate was much colder.

Forest

There are four basic types of forests on the Olympic Peninsula: temperate rain forest, lowland, montane and subalpine. Temperate rain forest is found at low elevations along the Pacific Ocean coast and in the western-facing valleys of the Peninsula where lots of rain, moderate temperatures and summer fogs exist. The lowland forest grows farther inland from the coast and above the rain forest valleys. The lowland forest gives way to the montane forest.

As elevation increases, temperatures cool and more moisture falls as snow; growing seasons get shorter and the subalpine zone takes over. The lower portion of the subalpine zone consists of continuous forest, but in the upper part of this zone the forest thins out. Increasing elevation causes even more severe climatic conditions. Trees become fewer, shorter and more misshapen. When tree line is reached, beyond which trees do not grow, a profusion of wildflowers often rewards your eye in a vivid display that is an effective foil to the scenery below, now visible because the trees no longer block the view.

Rain forest

The temperate rain forest in the valleys of the Quinault, Queets and Hoh rivers are protected and contain some of the most spectacular examples of the Sitka spruce community. This ecosystem stretches along the coast from Oregon to Alaska; other temperate rain forests are found in several isolated areas throughout the world. The forests are excellent destinations once a bit of the snow melts. Winter is the wet season and the rain forest radiates in deep, healthy greens. Precipitation here ranges from 140 to 167 inches — 12 to 14 feet — every year. This abundant rainfall produces some of the largest trees in the world. The mountains to the east also protect the coastal areas from severe weather extremes. Seldom does the temperature drop below freezing in the rain forest, and summertime highs rarely exceed 80 degrees. Nearly every bit of space is taken up with a living plant. Some plants even live on others. These are the epiphytes, plants that do not come into contact with the earth, but also are not parasites. Mosses, lichens and ferns cover just about anything else.  n

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hurricane ridge

Snowshoeing at Hurricane Ridge

WINTER PLAYGROUND With a vertical rise of 665 feet, Hurricane Ridge offers cross-country and downhill skiing, snowboarding and snowshoeing fun in the winter, plus breathtaking views of the Olympic Mountains.

If your idea of a perfect winter vacation is mountain peaks and fun in the snow, the North Olympic Peninsula is the place to be. Port Angeles is the gateway to Hurricane Ridge, a towering 5,223-foot winter playground with breathtaking views of the interior face of the Olympic Mountains.

Road open daily

This year, the road to Hurricane Ridge will be open daily during the fall and winter, weather permitting. In the past, the 17-mile road from Port Angeles to the Ridge was only open on the weekends during the late fall and winter seasons, Monday holidays and a two-week period at the end of the year. Through fundraising and donations from Clallam County, the cities of Port Angeles and Sequim, local businesses and individuals, the community raised the necessary $75,000 to match a $270,000 appropriation from the U.S. Department of the Interior to keep the road open daily from late fall through the beginning of spring on a trial basis. To get to Hurricane Ridge, follow Race Street south out of Port Angeles. The road becomes Mount Angeles Road. 72  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

The Olympic National Park Visitor Center will be on the right and can provide you with information about road and snow conditions, maps and activities. From Mount Angeles Road, watch for the sign and bear right onto the Hurricane Ridge Parkway. Always call the park at 360-565-3131 before you head up for updated road and weather conditions.

Safety first

After entering the park at Heart O’ The Hills, about five miles south of the visitor center (a $15 seven-day entrance fee or $30 annual park pass is required), you begin your ascent to the mile-high beauty of Hurricane Ridge. Drive carefully and heed speed limits. The road can be icy, especially where snowmelt has frozen across the winding road. Carrying chains is required. At the top, next to the downhill ski area and at the starting point for all the area’s cross-country trails, is the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center. You can view the majestic Olympic Mountains from the center’s upper levels and take in interpretive exhibits. It offers food service, a gift shop and a ski shop with snowshoes, alpine and cross-country ski rentals.  n


Downhill thrill seekers Hurricane Ridge Ski and Snowboard Area offers runs for all levels.

W

Port Angeles is the gateway to Hurricane Ridge, a towering winter playground with breathtaking views of the interior face of the Olympic Mountains.

ith a summit elevation of 5,223 feet, the Ridge has 40 to 160 inches of snow on the ground during the winter. The Hurricane Ridge Ski and Snowboard Area is a small, family-oriented ski area, offering to residents and visitors alike a quality winter sports experience, without the high cost and congestion of most ski areas. The Ridge boasts some groomed areas, but for the accomplished skier or snowboarder, the steeps, bowls and glades are well worth the effort it takes to hike there. The Hurricane Ridge Winter Sports Club is a nonprofit organization that operates both rope tows and the Poma lift atop the mountain on selected weekends. The club operates the ski lifts under permit with Olympic National Park. It strives to be a good steward of the environment while promoting healthy outdoor activities for the youth, community and visitors of the Olympic Peninsula. During the winter season — usually mid-December through March — the rope tows and Poma lift operate on weekends: Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. While the Hurricane Ridge Road will be open daily this winter, the rope tows and Poma lift will continue to run only on weekends and holidays. A five-week Ski School program for ski and snowboard lessons is offered starting in late January for ages 4 and up and all skill levels. Private lessons are also available, subject to instructor availability. In March, citizens ski, snowboard and snowskate races are held as well as a Special Day in the Olympics for special needs citizens. For more information and rates about the Hurricane Ridge Ski and Snowboard Area, call the Hurricane Ridge Winter Sports Club at 360-457-2879 or visit www.hurricaneridge.net.  n

Tubing and sledding A small kids’ tubing and sledding area is located across from the visitor center. It is open and supervised Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, snow and weather conditions permitting. Always call the information line at 360-565-3131 before heading up for tubing, as it may be closed due to unsafe, icy conditions. The Ridge does not offer tube rental, nor are there facilities at the top for inflating tubes. There is no tubing, hiking or sledding allowed in the downhill ski areas.

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hurricane ridge

Where to rent gear Some suggested locations for renting gear: D  Hurricane Ridge D  Brown’s Outdoor, 112 W. Front St., Port Angeles; 360-4574150 D  NXNW Surf and Snow, 902 S. Lincoln St., Port Angeles; 360-452-5144

slower pace Snowshoes offer maneuverability and easy hiking, making them family friendly and a great way to explore Hurricane Ridge.

For many visitors to Hurricane Ridge, the panorama of Olympic peaks and forested trees invites a slow pace of exploration and enjoyment. During winter, a blanket of white snow won’t keep people from enjoying the trails. One of the best ways to achieve that pace during that time — late December to early March — is on snowshoes. The Ridge offers 20 miles of trails and routes. The Olympic National Park Visitor Center, located in Port Angeles just before the turnoff to the Hurricane Ridge Parkway, can provide you with information on the routes. Just west of the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center, you can walk along the Hurricane Hill route, which offers a little bit of something for every skill level. Or, just explore the meadows above the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center, which offer gentle, easy terrain for everyone and excellent views in fair weather. For those who don’t want to venture out on their own and want a bit of an educational experience with the walk, guided snowshoe walks with park rangers are usually offered on Saturdays, Sundays and Monday holidays from around late December through March, as long as the road to the road is open. The walks last 90 minutes and cover a one-mile loop through the trees and around the ridge, where the views include the Strait of Juan de Fuca and Vancouver Island. The naturalist talk is kid-friendly, as rangers discuss the difficulties faced by flora and fauna at such high elevations. Dress warmly with hats, gloves, sturdy waterproof boots, sunglasses, sunscreen and insulated layered clothing. Space is limited so register at the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center at the summit at least 30 minutes before the scheduled walk. Snowshoes are provided, and a donation of $5 per person helps the park continue the walks and maintain the snowshoes. You can also rent snowshoes either at the ski shop on the lower level of the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center or outside the park, or bring your own. Organized groups such as youth or school groups must make advance reservations for snowshoe walks. Space is limited so groups should call Olympic National Park at 360-565-3136 for reservations and more information.  n

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Park entrance fees D  A park pass is good for up to seven consecutive days at any Olympic National Park entrance. The pass is $15 for vehicles and $5 for individuals on foot, bicycle or motorcycle. Children 15 and younger are admitted free of charge. D  An annual pass costs $30 and is good at any Olympic National Park entrance for one year from the month of purchase. D  If you plan to visit more of America’s national parks, you might want to consider purchasing an America the Beautiful pass. The annual America the Beautiful pass is $80. D  A lifetime America the Beautiful pass is available for seniors (62 and older) for $10. D  There are also other discounted and volunteer pass options. Visit www.nps.gov/olym for more information on passes.


Fine Arts in

Port Angeles 115 E. Railroad, P.A. 360-452-2406

0A5095028

(in the Landings Mall next to the BC Ferries)

Port Angeles Community Players presents A Season of

s e s i r p r

Su

0A5094996

A full season of comedy, drama, love and laughter, murder, zombies and a few other surprises!

1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd., P.A. 360-452-6651 www.pacommunityplayers.com

0A5095331 09700850

1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., Port Angeles 360-457-3532 • www.pafac.org

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rv parks/campgrounds

RV Parks & Campgrounds

on the Peninsula

Port Angeles Tenting, Camping & RV Sites Seal Watching, Rock Hunting

Open All Year

Harrison Beach Campground

0A117328

(360) 928-3006

299 Harrison Beach Rd. • Port Angeles, WA 98363 5 Miles West of Joyce - off W. Lyre River Rd.

9 Hole Golf Course Clubhouse Pull Thrus Propane Group Discounts

Campground & RV Park Shadow Mountain

360-457-4101

2372 Highway 101 E. • Port Angeles www.mobuiltrv.com

em ail: crescent@ olypen.com

360-928-3344

ever-changing surf • sea shells • eagles sand dollars • awesome sunsets DAY - TENTS - RVs(w/e/s) Laundry • Hot Showers

Half Mile Sand Beach

15 m iles W est of Port A ngeles off H w y. 112

WiFi Hot Spot

Offering: Tent & RV Campsites Campsite Reservations Full-service Restrooms Playgrounds & Picnic Sites Birding Beach Recreation Hiking Trails

RV available for nightly or weekly rentals 0A117330

0A117322

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0A117326

Peabody Creek RV Park 127 S. Lincoln, PA 457-7092 • 800-392-2361

0A117327

Quiet, clean, complete facilities for RV Travelers, situated along a peaceful creek, within walking distance to shops and ferries. Located in the heart of Port Angeles, the “Gateway” to the Fabulous Olympic National Park, Hurricane Ridge and Victoria, B.C.

Full Hookups, Tent Spaces, Laundry, Store, Deli, Fuel

Discounts for Active Military, Police & Firemen www.shadowmt.com

www.olypen.com/crescent

PEABODY CREEK RV PARK

Close to Olympic National Park 15 miles W. of P.A. on Hwy. 101 Across from Lake Sutherland

232951 Hwy. 101 Port Angeles (360) 928-3043 (877) 928-3043

Crescent Beach & RV Park

0A117332

0A117331

53802 Hwy. 112 West Port Angeles (360) 928-2488 www.olypen.com/scrv

LARGEST PARTS & ACCESSORIES STORE ON THE PENINSULA! 0A117329

Located on Washington’s Beautiful Olympic Peninsula

Mobuilt RV Parts • Service • Repair


RV Parks & Campgrounds

Sequim Sequim’s NEWEST RV PARK

400 Brown Road (behind Econo Lodge & across from QFC shopping center)

360/452-1324 • 1-888-445-4251

Jefferson County Jefferson County Fairgrounds

58 Full & Partial hook-ups 24+ Tenting sites Showers Close to Fort Worden

Riverview RV Park & Storage

• 32 acre Riverfront Property • Riverside Camping • Full & Partial Hookups • RV & Boat Storage On-Site

• 5 Mi. to Pacific Ocean Beaches • Guided River Fishing Trips • Spacious & Quiet www.olympicanglers.com 33 Mora Road, Forks (360) 374-3398 • 640-4819 • 640-4820

0A117323

e-mailjeffcofairgrounds@olypen.com www.jeffcofairgrounds.com

West End

0A117333

0A117324

RV Group Camping Available 4907 Landes Street Port Townsend 360-385-1013

0A117325

Full Hookup, 50-30-20 Amp; w/“Free” DSL high speed internet & cable; Paved Pads & Roads, Clubhouse, laundry, showers. 28 sites, including 19 pull-throughs, some up to 87’ long. www.gilgaloasisrvpark.com

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hurricane ridge

Cross-country Unmarked and ungroomed routes give cross-country skiers and snowshoers a chance to explore the forests and meadows around Hurricane Ridge. These routes range in difficulty from easy to quite challenging. The terrain and weather in the Olympic mountains can create ideal conditions for avalanches. If you are headed to Hurricane Ridge or elsewhere in the high-country of the Olympics, always check current avalanche forecasts. Check at the Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center for information and current conditions.

Cross-country skiing is popular on the ungroomed trails and in backcountry bowls of Hurricane Ridge.

visitor center The Olympic National Park Visitor Center, on the route to Hurricane Ridge from Port Angeles, is open daily. Hours vary according to season. There you can find visitor information, exhibits about the park’s natural and cultural history and a hands-on discovery room for kids. The Discovery Room offers children a wide array of indoor entertainment. A collection of activity drawers contain puzzles and games to teach children about geology, history and tidepools. Other exhibits include a life-sized model of a forest ecosystem that includes a stuffed elk and a stuffed cougar. An award-winning 25-minute orientation film is shown upon request. There are also two nature trails; one is accessible with some assistance. Note that wet weather can make for a harder hike than normal. Phone 360-565-3130 for more information about the park. Park information is also available at the Forks Parks and Forest Information Center, Hoh Rain Forest Visitor Center and Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center.  n 78  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011


olympic national park

Pedaling along the shore of Lake Crescent

Camping in the park

lake crescent

T

he turnoff from U.S. Highway 101 to Olympic National Park’s Storm King Ranger Station at Lake Crescent leads to several picnic tables nestled in trees and makeshift sites along the shoreline. The area contains restrooms and access to portable water, a ranger station, a boat launch and trails. One of the most attractive aspects of the picnic area is the wide array of recreational opportunities that await after the picnic is over. Some nearby trails include the Moments in Time Nature Trail, Marymere Falls Trail and Storm King Trail. More information about hiking is available at the ranger station. If you’re looking to diversify the trip, both the Elwha and Sol Duc areas and trails are less than a 30-minute drive from Lake Crescent. In the spring and summer, enjoy the hot spring soaking pools (and freshwater pool) at Sol Duc. Day-use passes are available if you are not a guest of the resort. From the west end of Lake Crescent, the Hoh Rain Forest is about an hour, while the coast can be reached in about 45 minutes.

Tips while in the park Plan ahead and prepare

Hike on existing trails down the middle of the trail, even if they are wet or muddy. Camp in existing sites and minimize impact by not altering them.

Dispose of waste properly

Always remember this important guideline: Pack it in, pack it out. Inspect your campsite and rest areas for trash or spilled foods. Pack out all trash, leftover food and litter. To wash yourself or your dishes, carry water 200 feet away from streams or lakes. Avoid using soap. Strain out food particles and scatter your dish water.

Leave what you find

Do not touch cultural or historical structures or artifacts. Leave rocks, plants and other natural objects as you find them. Avoid introducing or transporting nonnative species. Do not build structures or dig trenches.

Respect wildlife

Never feed or approach the wild residents of the park. These actions change natural behavior patterns and make animals dependent on people’s handouts, which can increase their chances of disease and winter mortality. Feeding wildlife is also illegal.

Although Olympic National Park boasts more than 900 campsites, many are only open in the summer. A handful of campgrounds are open year-round, but be aware that most of these are primitive sites with pit toilets and no potable water, and may have limited access due to snow in the winter. Phone the park at 360-565-3130 to find out if a campground is open and accessible. All campsites are on a first-come, first-serve basis (with the exception of Kalaloch during the summer). Call the park to find out if a campground is full. The nightly fee for camping in one of Olympic’s established campgrounds ranges from $10 - $18, depending on location and season, with the majority charging $10-$12 per night. Wheelchair-accessible restrooms are available at 11 of the park’s 16 campgrounds. Several campgrounds also offer paved campsites and picnic tables with extensions to accommodate wheelchair-users. Campfire restrictions are in effect for many areas, so please check first. Practice minimum-impact camping. Pack out your own trash and leave the site as if you were never there. Complete regulations, recommendations and information for safe camping in the area are available for free at the Olympic National Park Visitors Center, the Wilderness Information Center and entrance stations. For the more adventurous — and experienced — camper, you can venture into the park’s wilderness. Wilderness Camping Permits are required for all overnight stays in the park’s backcountry. Wilderness use fees apply to all overnight trips into the park’s backcountry and consist of both a permit registration fee and a per person nightly fee. For less rustic visits in the park, the park’s lodges offer charming, comfortable accommodations. Sol Duc Hot Springs Resort, Lake Crescent Lodge and Log Cabin Resort at Lake Crescent are generally open late spring to early fall. Kalaloch Lodge and Lake Quinault Lodge are open year-round.

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north/west coast

True nature lovers visiting the Olympic Peninsula will want to include a trip to the North/West Coast in their itinerary. The coastal area includes Clallam Bay and Sekiu, twin seafront towns about 50 miles west of Port Angeles, and Neah Bay, home of the Makah tribe.

Wildlife at Cape Flattery

NATURAL BEAUTY To reach the seafront towns of Clallam Bay and Sekiu, drive west from Port Angeles on state Highway 112, the Juan de Fuca National Scenic Byway. The drive offers fabulous views of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, and you can stop for a picnic at Pillar Point or on the beach along the way. Clallam Bay and Sekiu (pronounced SEEK-you) are the fishing headquarters for the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Here you can find charters for fishing — halibut, salmon, lingcod and rockfish are good catches — plus diving, whale watching, birdwatching and general sightseeing. The beach area between the two towns is a good place to beachcomb, hunt agates and explore tidepools. Continuing on from Clallam Bay to Neah Bay, there are year-round sightings of seabirds and maritime animals. Dozens of bird species migrate along the coast, including trumpeter swans, falcons, sand cranes and bald eagles. Watch also for whales, such as gray, humpback, pilot and orca, which pass the coast on their semiannual Pacific migrations and sometimes in the Strait of Juan de Fuca. In Neah Bay, be sure to visit the Makah Cultural and Research Center, the museum on the left as you enter town. The focus of the museum is the Ozette collection, the largest archaeological collection of any U.S. tribe. The artifacts come from a 500-year-old Makah village located eight miles south of the Makah Reservation. The site was preserved by a mudslide and uncovered in 1970.

Other items on display include artifacts from an archaeological dig at the Hoko River, west of Sekiu. The dig revealed a fishing camp nearly 3,000 years old and a rock shelter about 1,000 years old. You can find mysterious, centuries-old rock carvings in the area as well. These petroglyphs were carved by natives on a promontory on the beach leg of the nine-mile Ozette trail. Nearby Shi Shi Beach — considered one of the most beautiful beaches in America — is surrounded by towering sea stacks, jagged headlands, lush tidepools and an old growth forest. Shi Shi (pronounced SHY-SHY) is an arcing 2.3-mile beach that sits between the photogenic Point of Arches to the south and a crop of sea stacks to the north. A mostly flat, 2-mile trail leads to the beach from a small parking area off Hatchery Road. A short drive past Neah Bay brings you to Cape Flattery, the northwesternmost point of the continental United States. Visible from the point is the Cape Flattery lighthouse on Tatoosh Island, built in 1858 and now automated. You will need a $10 per car permit to hike the Flattery Trail. It can be purchased at the museum, Washburn’s General Store and other shops. Because of the North/West Coast’s location beneath the Pacific flyway, birdwatchers find great opportunities to observe more than 250 different species that visit the Neah Bay area. Keep a watchful eye out for bald eagles, especially the rare albino that is occasionally seen between Clallam Bay and Neah Bay.

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Preparing baked salmon in Neah Bay

Sport fishing boats leave Curley’s Resort in Sekiu

In the early spring, an immense gathering of hawks waits at Cape Flattery for good flying conditions to cross the Strait of Juan de Fuca and continue the journey north. Wherever you go, be sure to obey any signs warning about areas that are open to tribal members only. And in order to keep this untamed part of the country as wild as it is, the rule of the Makah should prevail: “Leave only footprints; take only photographs.”

For information about Clallam Bay and Sekiu events and attractions, contact the Clallam Bay/ Sekiu Chamber of Commerce at 360-963-2339 or visit www.sekiu.com. For information about Neah Bay activities and attractions and the Makah, visit www.makah.com and www.neahbaychamberofcommerce.com.  n

Lodging

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Strait of Juan de Fuca Highway Cape Flattery Tribal Scenic Byway

Makah Museum In 1970, tidal erosion uncovered an ancient whaling village at Ozette, parts of which had been covered by a mudslide hundreds of years ago. The artifacts found now make up part of the Makah Cultural and Research Center in Neah Bay, located on the left as you enter town. Its Ozette collection is the largest archaeological collection of any U.S. tribe. On display are about one percent of the 55,000 artifacts recovered from Ozette, all between 300-500 years old. The museum also has large, illustrated displays with information on Makah history, canoes, a 26-foot-long skeleton of a 31-ton gray whale suspended over handcrafted cedar canoes plus a gift shop. The museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, call 360645-2711.

Exhibits artifacts recovered from the ancient Ozette village mudslide, replicas of whaling, sealing & fishing canoes, a full-sized longhouse, and dioramas. The museum also has a store with art made by local Makahs. Open daily 10am to 5pm

Ozette Loop

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At 9.3-miles round trip, the Ozette Loop can be a long day hike or a short backpack trip. The trail offers a part of the coast that is inaccessible by car. Upon reaching Cape Alava, visitors are immediately greeted with a collection of large, spruce-encrusted islands that loom offshore. To the north is Tskawayah Island, so close to shore that it can be reached on foot at low tide. This island is part of the Ozette Reservation and climbing onto it is not permitted. Far to the west, the Bodelteh Islands appear to be a single mass from this vantage point. The long, lean ridge of Ozette island rises across a rocky tidal flat to the southeast. Cape Alava is reputed to be one of the best places on the coast to see marine mammals, including the majestic

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gray whale. To get to the Cape Alava trailhead, take Highway 112 to Hoko River Road west of Sekiu and follow the signs.

Sand Point Trail

An ocean campground can be reached after a short 3-mile walk that promises crashing breakers, sandy beach and Makah petroglyphs on rock. Two trails depart from Ozette Lake Campground. The preferred trail is Sand Point, which is shorter than the one to Cape Alava and easier because it is all on boardwalk. The sandy beach is more attractive to kids than the cannonball-shared rocks at Cape Alava. To get to the trailhead, take Highway 112 to the “Ozette Lake” sign and turn onto Hoko-Ozette Road. Follow 22 miles to the trailhead at the north end of Ozette lake. A ranger station is located at the trailhead.


kids’ activities

kids’ activities I

t’s easy to keep youngsters entertained on the North Olympic Peninsula. Kids will love simply being out in nature collecting rocks and shells along Salt Creek, Rialto Beach or one of the area’s many beaches. Riding a bike along Olympic Discovery Trail is an easy trek that parents and children can enjoy together. Opportunities for outdoor exploration are endless, but here is a small sampling of other kid-friendly activities for you and your little ones: Aglazing Art Studio, 207 W. First St. in downtown Port Angeles, offers a creative outlet for people of all ages. Families can paint their own ceramics, fuse glass or play around with wet clay. The studio has more than 4,000 bisque pieces to choose from, making the possibilities for artistic expression endless. Phone 360-477-9957 or click on www.aglazingart.com for more information. Have fun at an old-fashioned arcade at the Gateway Gaming Center, 222 N. Lincoln St., Port Angeles (located beneath the India Oven restaurant in downtown Port Angeles). More than a dozen arcade games are available, including a few classic games that can be played for just a quarter. For more information, call 360-8088808 or click on gatewaygamingcenter.com. Dream Playground in Port Angeles is an ideal location for a family outing. It’s located at Erickson Park, a wooded area on Race Street near Civic Field. Built in September 2002 by one of the largest group of volunteers the county has ever seen, it took just five days for more than two thousand locals to

build the delightful playground. You’ll find picnic tables, public restrooms and a skateboard park nearby that features a three-bowl layout and extra smooth concrete. Carrie Blake Park, 202 N. Blake Ave., Sequim, is a popular spot with softball fields, playground equipment, BMX track and skateboard park. With an off-leash dog park, you can even bring the furry friend along for some exercise. For the future angler, Port Angeles holds an annual fishing derby for kids in the spring. The free event is held in April at the Lincoln Park Ponds and is for children ages 5-14 years. If it’s rainy or dreary outside, take the kids to one of the Peninsula’s fine libraries for a read. For more indoor educational entertainment, visit any of the museums on the Peninsula. History, art and more are the focus of the different museums, and many have exhibits that change throughout they year. The Sequim Aquatic Recreation Center has an indoor, full-size Olympic pool and shallow pool. What makes SARC a kid favorite is the wild, tunneled water slide that’s good for hours of fun. Port Townsend and Port Angeles also have indoor swimming pools. Local farmers markets offer good food, local products and lots of fun. Port Angeles holds a farmers market year-round at the Gateway Center downtown. The market is held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays. Other Peninsula towns offer seasonal farmers markets from summer into fall.  n

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Peninsula tribes

cultural traditions

Pullers with the Quileute tribe of LaPush during the Tribal Canoe Journey. The annual journey is a cultural event that traces the ancestral trading routes of tribes from Western Washington and British Columbia using traditional canoes.

Native Americans are a strong part of the North Olympic Peninsula’s history. Today, the tribes maintain strong cultural identities and provide many services for tribal members while also supporting the surrounding communities.

Jamestown S’Klallam

East of Sequim in Blyn, the Jamestown S’Klallam tribe’s campus offers visitors entertainment, art, food and culture. The tribe operates several businesses, including the popular 7 Cedars Casino, which features live entertainment, restaurants, slot machines, gaming tables and more. For a glimpse into Native American art, visit the Northwest Native Expressions Art Gallery, located at the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribal Center. It features a wealth of artwork, a majority of which comes from the North Olympic Peninsula and also Vancouver Island. The Cedars at Dungeness Golf Course, located on Woodcock Road, is known for its crab-shaped sand trap, found on the par-5 third hole of the 18-hole course.

Lower Elwha Klallam

The Lower Elwha Klallam tribe is immersed in many projects, including the Elwha River dam removal project, salmon restoration, salmon hatchery, and Heritage Center — to name a few.

Tear-down of the dams, scheduled to begin in 2011, is the nation’s largest dam removal to date. The Lower Elwha Klallam tribe has lived on the river for more than 2,700 years. In fact, Port Angeles was once home to a huge village called Tse-whitzen, which was unearthed in 2003 at the west end of Port Angeles Harbor. The tribe’s new Heritage Center opened in 2010. The Elwha also operate the Elwha River Casino, located 15 miles west of Port Angeles.

Quileute

The Quileute gained recent fame due to the prominent role many Quileute characters have in the Twilight novels. While the fictional Quileute have legends of vampires and werewolves, no such stories exist in reality — although the tribe and many of the places mentioned in the books, including LaPush and First Beach, are quite real. Visitors can stay at the popular Quileute Oceanside Resort and take in the beauty of the coastal beaches, try some surfing, and watch for whales and other wildlife.

Hoh

The Hoh tribe is a small tribe in West Jefferson County, located along the Hoh River. The reservation’s present 640 acres are located on flood plain at the

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mouth of the Hoh River south of Forks. With acres of land the tribe acquired, plus the transfer of another 37 acres of Olympic National Park to the tribe, the reservation will expand to 1,102 acres, and allow the Hoh to move members to higher ground and out of the river’s flood zone.

Makah

The Makah Nation is located on the northwestern tip of the Olympic Peninsula. It is the home of the Makah Cultural and Research Center, which houses, among other things, the Ozette collection, the largest archaeological collection of any U.S. tribe. From the reservation you can also reach Cape Flattery, the most northwesternmost point of the lower 48 states.

Quinault

The Quinault Nation consists of the Quinault and Queets tribes and descendants of five other coastal tribes: Quileute, Hoh, Chehalis, Chinook and Cowlitz. Their home is located in the rainsoaked lands on the southwestern portion of the Peninsula. The reservation is primarily in Grays Harbor County, with some parts in Jefferson County. Among the tribe’s enterprises is the Quinault Beach Resort and Casino.  n


WEST END

The West End, which is centered along U.S. Highway 101, twists through some of the area’s most natural, pristine beauty. Although thrown into the spotlight with fictional vampires and werewolf legends, the area was famous long before these creatures made their appearances.

AWAY FROM THE ORDINARY Spruce Trail in the Hoh Rain Forest

If you’re looking for a great place to get away from the ordinary, try the West End. Abundant rain forests, miles of wild rivers and coastal beaches are just part of the West End, a region rich with scenery. From the coasts and the rain forests to Native American history and pioneer legend, it’s one-stop shopping for adventure. The lush forests in the Quinault, Queets, Hoh and Bogachiel valleys are some of the most spectacular examples of primeval temperate rain forest in the Lower 48 states. The drive to get there is beautiful in its own right, but the going can be a bit slower than most Peninsula trips. The main route, U.S. Highway 101, twists and turns around Lake Crescent, and you may compete with recreational vehicles and log trucks, but the appreciation for natural beauty, pristine even outside of Olympic National Park boundaries, makes it worthwhile. Here are of the highlights of a trip to the West End:

Forks

Forks acts as the gateway to the Hoh Rain Forest, a temperate rain forest that is part of Olympic National Park. Near the south end of town, you’ll find the Forks Timber Museum and the Forks Loggers Memorial with its 12-foot tall carved logger.

The free museum has exhibits depicting the history of logging in the area. Among the displays are an old-time steam donkey, threshing machine and a bunkhouse.

Forks Historic Walking Tour

This self-guided tour allows those venturing for a look back in history to stop at one of nine signposts in downtown Forks that feature pictures and stories about historic buildings or happenings. Stop by the Forks Chamber of Commerce at 1411 S. Forks Ave., or phone 360-374-2531 for more information.

Ocean beaches

Another glory of the West End is the accessibility of its beaches. One of the most reachable is Rialto Beach, about 15 miles west of Forks near LaPush. Located on the north side of the Quillayute River, visitors can drive to the beach and watch the surf. A 1.5-mile hike (3-miles round trip) with take you to “Hole-in-the-Wall,” a unique tunnel carved in the cliff by ocean waves. Enjoy the natural beauty of the Quileute reservation at LaPush while exploring First Beach. During the summer, surfing is a popular activity at the beaches of LaPush.  >> fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  85


Looking south from LaPush across First Beach

Also close to LaPush are Second and Third beaches near LaPush; both involve hikes but are worth the effort. Ruby Beach, located about 35 miles south of Forks, is one of the most scenic beaches in the state that is accessible to the public. It offers rugged sea stacks, flat sand and a small stream that flows through it just at the base of the short trail from the parking lot. The beaches at Kalaloch are easy walks from car to shore. Kalaloch beaches are numbered 6, 4, 3, 2 and 1.

Hoh Rain Forest

East of U.S. 101, this rain forest — which is the result of the West End getting 100-plus inches of rain each year — is one of the best examples of a temperate rain forest in the world. But unlike Chile and New Zealand, the flora and fauna aren’t tropical. Instead, the wilderness is temperate and primeval, with ferns growing the size of large shrubs and trees as tall as football fields are long blocking out the sun. The forest lies on the west side of Olympic National Park, less than an hour from Forks. It is accessed by the Upper Hoh Road, off Highway 101. Even if you stay in your car, the green giants of the Hoh Rain Forest are visible. Throughout the winter season, rain falls frequently in the

Hoh Rain Forest, contributing to the yearly total of 140 to 170 inches (or 12 to 14 feet) of precipitation each year. These trees can grow as tall as 300 feet with a circumference of 23 feet around. Just a hint: One of the biggest trees is right next to a small parking lot.

Hall of Mosses

This hike starts at the visitor center at the end of Hoh River Road. The trek is a an easy, 0.8-mile loop that takes about 45 minutes round trip. Near the center of the Hall of Mosses is the Spruce Nature Trail, a 1.2-mile loop through temperate rain forest to the Hoh River. It is about an hour round trip.

Quinault

Travel farther south on Highway 101 and you’ll come across additional lush, green scenery at Queets, and as the road begins to wind inland a bit, take a drive to Lake Quinault. This glacier-carved lake is surrounded by the old-growth trees of the Quinault Rain Forest. Sometimes called the “Valley of the Rain Forest Giants,” this area is home to some of the state’s largest trees. A 0.2-mile trail near Lake Quinault Lodge will take you to the largest Sitka spruce tree in the world.  n

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WEST END

WILD COAST Kalaloch beaches offer travelers a ‘good place to land.’

A camera is important to carry along on a visit to the Kalaloch beaches. This area of Washington’s wild, wondrous coast — about 35 miles south of Forks along U.S. Highway 101 — has attractions for visitors in all four seasons. Ruby Beach is the northernmost tip of the seven main spots in the Kalaloch area. From there, marked trails 1 through 4 offer access to pristine, sandy beaches. Right in the area of the lodge and campground are several unnamed paths that also allow close contact with the sand and waves. In the absence of fog, sunsets spread a spectacular light over the sea, setting up the potential for a photographer’s paradise.

A guided beach walk stops by a tidepool near Kalaloch.

Migrating shorebirds and sea mammals such as otters can be observed, especially with binoculars. At low tide, seek out the tidepools for a glimpse at all the marine life.

Open 7 days a week from 5 a.m. to 8 p.m.

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Through spring, visitors also can enjoy the crash and bang of roughwater storms. But visitors should take note of the tides and be careful when walking the beach to avoid incoming logs that wash up in the tide. Some are very large and have been known to strike and kill people. Tidal updates are posted at each of the trailheads. Migrating shorebirds and sea mammals such as otters can be observed, especially with binoculars. At low tide, seek out the tidepools for a glimpse at all the marine life. According to Place Names of Washington, Kalaloch (pronounced KLAYlock) is the Quinault tribe’s term for “good place to land.” The book describes the beach as the only safe landing spot for canoes between the Hoh and Queets rivers. Those who want to stay a night or two in the area have a couple of options. Olympic National Park provides a campground with flush toilets and water, although no utility hookups are available for recreational vehicles. Kalaloch Lodge also has rustic cabins and other accommodations at hand. Both locations are open all year; more information can be obtained by calling the park at 360-565-3130 or the lodge at 360-962-2271.  n

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outdoor adventures

olympic national forest The Olympic Peninsula features more than 2,132,300 acres of federal lands for visitors to enjoy. Of this area, more than 633,600 acres are managed by Olympic National Forest, which blankets the foothills of the Olympic Mountains and surrounds much of Olympic National Park. Most of the forest falls within Clallam and Jefferson counties, with parts also in Grays Harbor and Mason counties. Its diverse landscape includes temperate rain forest, radiating mountain ranges, large lowland lakes, cascading rivers and saltwater beaches and tidelands.

Visitors should know which agency manages the site or lands they plan to visit because opportunities and regulations differ from one agency to another. Visitors can enjoy Olympic National Forest for one day or several, from the comfort of a cabin or from a tent. Cabin rentals, campgrounds, wilderness areas and picnic sites can all be found within the forest. Picnic sites in Olympic National Forest are located at developed recreation sites, including several campgrounds and a cabin. All campgrounds in Olympic National Forest are available only on a first-come, first-serve basis. A recreation pass is needed for visiting Olympic National Forest. Recreation passes do not cover fees for winter sno-parks, cabin rentals, or climbing and wilderness permits. They also do not cover developed campgrounds. A National Forest Recreation Day Pass costs $5 per day and is honored at all Forest Service entrances or day-use fee sites in Washington and Oregon. An annual Northwest Forest Pass is available for $30. For those who might visit a lot of the public lands, an annual Interagency Annual Pass is available for $80. Information about passes and permits can be found by visiting www.fs.fed.us/r6/olympic/passes or calling 1-800-270-7504. For more information about Olympic National Forest, visit www.fs.fed.us/r6/olympic. ­– U.S. Forest Service

Set up camp at state parks

Forks Visitor Information Center at the south end of Forks, offers restrooms, restaurant and lodging guides, activity suggestions, Olympic National Park information, and, of course, maps for Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight fans. Beach information for La Push, Rialto, and Ruby Beach is available as are ideas for a days’ or a weeks’ entertainment as well as access to services travelers may need. Located next door to the Forks Timber Museum, and across the street from the Forks Airport, the VIC is easy for find and also has WiFi capability for visitors. 0A5092971

1-800-443-6757 www.forkswa.com

Take in the beauty of the North Olympic Peninsula through Washington State Parks. Reservations can be made online at www.parks.wa.gov or by calling 888-CAMPOUT or 888-226-7688. For more information on fees, visit www.parks.wa.gov/fees. For 2010, camping fees range from $19 to $24 for a standard campsite, $25 to $33 for a utility campsite, and $12 to $14 for a primitive campsite. Campsite fees include parking for one vehicle at the site. Additional vehicles parked at the campsite must be registered at check-in, and campers must pay $10 per extra vehicle per night. There is a maximum of 8 people per campsite. For a list of park rules, visit www.parks. wa.gov/rules. While many parks close around fall, some keep campsites open during the winter. Some popular state parks on the Peninsula include: Sequim Bay State Park is a yearround, 92-acre marine camping park with 4,909 feet of saltwater coast. The

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park is open year round for camping and day use. Some campsites are closed in winter. Bogachiel State Park is a thickly forested, 123-acre camping park on the banks of the Bogachiel River, south of Forks. The park is open year-round for camping and day use, although some campsites are closed in winter. All campsites are first-come, first-serve. Fort Worden State Park is a 434-acre multiuse park in Port Townsend with more than two miles of saltwater shoreline and a wide variety of services and facilities. Dosewallips State Park is a 425-acre, year-round camping park with 5,500 feet of saltwater shoreline on Hood Canal and 5,400 feet of freshwater shoreline on either side of the Dosewallips River, near Brinnon. Many day use state parks can be found in the Peninsula as well, but often close during the winter. Visit www.parks.wa.gov for more information on state parks. – Washington State Parks


west end

Warning: Watch out for the tides The Olympic Peninsula’s northern and Pacific coasts offer a wealth of beaches for recreational fun, but if you plan to explore them, keep an eye on the tides and surf. Rescues by the Coast Guard, Olympic National Park rangers or both are occasionally necessary for people who either failed or didn’t know to consult a tide table and weather report before heading out. Headlands extending out to the water’s edge can create alcoves and grottos that may be readily accessible by thin strips of beach exposed during low tides.

Unfortunately, when the tide turns, the incoming waters can trap visitors who must frantically scramble to reach high ground. Tide books are available at many shops catering to tourist or saltwater fishermen. Peninsula Daily News publishes a tide table daily on its weather page for various areas around the North Olympic Peninsula. Or just go to www.peninsuladailynews. com and search for “tides.” The tide table also helps determine the best times to fish. Grab your shovel and bucket during extremely low or minus tide and go clamming on the exposed beaches or crabbing in the shallow waters. But beware of “killer logs,” as the locals call them. Particularly on the Pacific coast, the tall conifers that make the North Olympic Peninsula so beautiful can be a hazard when washed up by the surf as

logs and driftwood on the beaches. As you clamber over these beached logs, it’s hard to believe you can’t always see them coming, but as a wave crests, it can obscure your view of what is riding behind it. Always keep an eye on the waves, whether you’re in the water or walking along the shore. And remember that the logs so easily tossed ashore are still loose. Many a beachcomber has fallen and incurred injury when logs shift on the beach.  n

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outdoor adventures

Seek sanctuary at Peninsula waterfalls.

RELAXING WATERS For visitors needing a quiet refuge, the Peninsula’s waterfalls offer the perfect opportunity to get away from it all. One of the most popular sights is Marymere Falls, only 35 minutes from Port Angeles in Olympic National Park. This 1.8-mile round trip trail leads day hikers through some of the park’s most pristine environment, weaving through old-growth forest. To reach the falls, take U.S. Highway 101 west from Port Angeles to the Storm King Ranger Station on Lake Crescent. The trailhead begins as a paved walkway that runs alongside of the ranger station, a re-creation of the original station built in the early 1900s. You’ll see a nice view of the north side of the lake before wandering inland toward the falls. For about the first three-quarters of a mile of the trail, wheelchairs may be used with assistance. The final trek to the falls is a steep uphill climb, with the choice of two lookouts, one about 50 feet above the falls, the other at its base.

Other falls worth seeing:

Madison Creek Falls: Follow U.S. Highway 101 to Olympic Hot Springs Road near the Elwha River bridge, turn south, and follow the road about three miles to the park entrance station. This is the park’s most accessible waterfall — only about 150 yards from the parking area over a fully-paved, wheelchair-ready trail. Sol Duc Falls: Take U.S. Highway 101 west from Port Angeles for 30 miles, or 26 miles east from Forks. Turn southeast on the Sol Duc Hot Springs road and follow it 14 miles to the trailhead parking lot. Trail-guide maps are available at the trailhead. There is a wide gravel trail and a railed viewing area at this falls. Falls View: Follow U.S. Highway 101 south of Quilcene to Fallsview Campground (about 3½ miles). A nature trail in the campground leads to viewpoints of this long waterfall, which cascades over a rocky cliff. Check out www.olympicpeninsulawaterfalltrail.com, a site that identifies more than 20 cascades and includes photos, driving directions and information on best viewing times.  n 90  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

Sol Duc Falls


west end

WILDLIFE REFUGES Wildlife refuges running along the Pacific Coast present plenty of opportunities to see seabirds and marine life. From Grays Harbor to Neah Bay, more than 600 rocks, reefs and islands dot the rugged Olympic Peninsula coastline. Three wildlife refuges totaling 430 acres are within the boundaries of Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary and Olympic National Park. The Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary is a 3,300-square-mile underwater set-aside that stretches from Cape Flattery in the north southward to Copalis and seaward between 30 and 40 miles. It also shares about 60 miles of coastline with Olympic National Park and Native American tribes. It encompasses some of the world’s richest marine habitats — both above and below the waves. Hundreds of seabirds and other marine animals can be observed from numerous vantage points along the way, particularly near Kalaloch and LaPush. During migration seasons, more than one million birds gather in the area. The Flattery Rocks National Wildlife Refuge runs from Cape Flattery to the Ozette area. Quillayute Needles National Wildlife Refuge extends from that southern boundary to about Kalaloch. The last of the three is Copalis National Wildlife Refuge, from south of Queets to just north of Grays Harbor.

All of the islands and other features are closed to the public to protect the habitat. But visitors can still observe crowds of seabirds, either from land or sea. Binoculars and cameras are good accessories to have on hand. Most of the islands are small enough that they have never earned names on a map. But Destruction Island and Point Grenville are among some of the more well-known locations. Refuge staff warn that boaters should stay at least 200 yards off the islands, both for their own safety and to avoid disturbing the flighty creatures who live there. The refuge areas are the primary breeding grounds for the tufted puffin, with its striped head and peculiar beak and the common murre, which resembles a little penguin. The region, where 80 percent of the state’s seabird population nests, supports 12 types of marine birds. In addition, peregrine falcons and bald eagles reside with their cousins. Several types of seals, sea lions and otters also stop by the local kelp beds. President Theodore Roosevelt established what would become the refuge complex by executive order in 1907. The public pushed for the action because seabirds were being exploited for their eggs and feathers.  n

Winter Worship Services FORKS LUTHERAN (ELCA) Prince of Peace Lutheran Church

374-9184

MASS SCHEDULE Saturday 5:30 p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. Sunday 5:00 p.m. SPANISH

CLALLAM BAY CATHOLIC St. Thomas Mission MASS SCHEDULE Sunday 11:00 a.m.

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250 N. Blackberry Avenue, Forks 360-374-6343 Pamela Hunter, PastorSUNDAY 9:00 a.m. Adult Bible Study 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:15 a.m. Sunday School Call for schedule changes, additional activities or other infomation.

CATHOLIC St. Anne’s Church

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VICTORIA, BC

victoria, british columbia Take an international day trip to Victoria, where you will find a city with old British charm only a ferry ride away.

Taking the ferry across the Strait of Juan de Fuca from Port Angeles may not exactly rank as an overseas journey, but travelers definitely are in another country when they set foot in Victoria. You can make the approximately 20-mile trip to Victoria for a one-day trek, a weekend fling or a long-term visit, using the quaint city with British atmosphere as the starting point for an extended tour of Vancouver Island. The ferries from Port Angeles land in downtown Victoria — a city with an estimated metropolitan population of more than 300,000 — after a scenic cruise across the Strait of Juan de Fuca and through Victoria Harbour. The Fairmont Empress Hotel dominates the waterfront as ferry passengers arrive at Victoria’s Inner Harbour from Port Angeles. Harbor tours give visitors a different perspective of this Canadian city. Victoria is an excellent city for sightseeing by foot. First-time visitors might want to start at the Greater Victoria Visitor Information Center, on the waterfront across from the Empress Hotel, and just a short walk from the ferry terminal. The center has maps, brochures, information on accommodations and lots of friendly advice. You won’t want to miss the Royal British Columbia Museum, located within walking distance of the ferry landings. The museum has special exhibits, but its mainstay is the unparalleled First Nations area. 92  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

The National Geographic Theater at the museum presents an IMAX experience with a six-story-high screen showing several movies that provide worldwide adventures. Visitors will find plenty of shops along Government Street. The real ‘‘main street,’’ however, is Douglas Street, and everything from major department stores to out-ofthe-way specialty shops can be found on side streets off Douglas between Courtney and Pembroke. Food-fanciers should note that some of the finest bakeries in the world are found on Fort Street between Douglas and Blanshard. Elsewhere, gourmet restaurants are dotted throughout the downtown area, featuring everything from escargot to fish and chips. And authentic British and Irish pubs are a great way to take a break from shopping and walking. Old-fashioned London double-decker buses leave on tours from in front of the Empress Hotel for such attractions as the world-famous Butchart Gardens. Or, if you’re looking for a more romantic kind of transport, there are horse-drawn carriages available. Victoria offers several first-run movie theaters, a number of drama companies, a symphony orchestra, an opera company, dance companies, night spots featuring famous entertainers and concert tour appearances by major rock bands and jazz performers in a modern indoor arena.  n


Cruising to Victoria

Royal British Columbia Museum

explore the city With the Parliament Buildings, Royal British Columbia Museum, downtown shops and restaurants, Chinatown and more all located within walking distance of the ferry landing, and easy transportation to other popular sites, Victoria is an easy city to explore even if you leave the car state side. Victoria’s Chinatown, founded in 1858, is the oldest and most intact such district in Canada. If you enter from Government Street, you’ll pass under the Gate of Harmonious Interest. The gate is made of Taiwanese ceramic tiles and elaborate, decorative panels. Explore the shops and stands as you wander through the narrow alleys like Fan Tan Alley, which is only five-feet wide.

Victoria’s Chinatown, founded in 1858, is the oldest and most intact such district in Canada. One of Victoria’s oldest landmarks, Market Square, is a block south of Chinatown; an easy 5-to 10-minute walk from Inner Harbour. Meticulously preserved to maintain its unique character, Market Square is the heart of Victoria’s Old Town. It has more than 35 independently owned and operated shops, eateries and a nightclub. Heritage brick buildings surround an open air courtyard that is great for lunching in the summer sun among colorful, hanging flower baskets. A bit farther from downtown — so you may want to catch a ride — the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, 1040 Moss St., a is a public art museum with almost 17,000 works of art. When it first opened in 1951, the gallery exhibited art in the historic Spencer Mansion. The mansion, built in 1889, is now adjacent to the museum’s seven modern galleries. You can also catch a ride — you can travel by pedicab for a relaxing tour — to Craigdarroch Castle, 1050 Joan Crescent, a lavishly furnished 1890s mansion. The legendary Victorian mansion was built on a hill overlooking Victoria. It has 39 rooms, 87 steps to the tower, stained glass and woodwork.  n

Port Angeles and the North Olympic Peninsula not only offer natural beauty and recreational opportunities, they also are the gateway to an international experience. The privately owned ferry MV Coho takes both passengers and vehicles between Port Angeles and Victoria year round. From Oct. 12 to Jan. 2, 2011, departures from the Port Angeles ferry landing, at 101 E. Railroad Ave., are daily at 8:20 a.m. and 2 p.m. Return trips from the Victoria ferry landing, at 430 Belleville St., are at 10:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. Crossing time is 90 minutes. Passenger fares are $15.50; children 5 to 11 are $7.75; vehicle and driver are $55; motorcycle and driver are $32; and a bicycle is $6. Departure times and fares are subject to change, so always check schedule information for the MV Coho by phoning 360-457-4491, or visiting www.cohoferry.com. The passenger-only Victoria Express ferry (360-452-8088; www.victoriaexpress.com) provides transportation between Port Angeles and Victoria. It has a crossing time of 55 minutes and has operated only during summer. But its owners recently announced they are exploring the possibilities of year-round weekend service. As of publication, weekend service was extended through October.

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VICTORIA, BC

PROVINCIAL capital Victoria is the capital city of British Columbia. Visitors can stop by the Parliament Buildings, where the B.C. provincial government assembles.

A visit to Victoria’s Parliament Buildings can be a rewarding experience for the average American. It is a chance to peer into a governmental system that is vastly different from those that are familiar to most American citizens. But the mysterious ways of provincial government are easily demystified by a tour of legislative hub and a glimpse into the workings of lawmakers. Even when the British Columbia Legislature is not in session, the grandiose buildings themselves are a lesson in history and grand architecture. Located on Victoria’s Inner Harbour, the seat of British Columbia’s provincial government is among the first things a visitor sees when arriving at Victoria by ferry. At night, the imposing rotunda and granite buildings are illuminated by 3,300 bulbs outlining the exterior, much like Christmas all year long. The parliament grounds are dotted with statues depicting figures from regional history, overseen by a seven-foot tall, gold-covered rendition of 18th century explorer Capt. George Vancouver atop the central dome. Fountains and gardens surround the building, providing a place of respite with a feeling of historical significance. Victoria has been the capital of British Columbia dating 94  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

back to colonial days, with the first government buildings erected in 1859. Construction on the current legislative buildings began in 1897, with additions built in several phases from 1911 to 1915. The buildings are a gallery of the finest materials, including tons of marble from as far away as Verona, Italy, that surround provincial leaders. Stained glass is everywhere, including the showcase Queen Victoria Diamond Jubilee window in the reception room near the Legislative Chamber. Self-guided tours are available. Annually, about 900 school groups use a visit to parliament to learn about comparative governments. This includes hundreds of groups from Washington state. All tours are free of charge. Sessions of British Columbia’s Legislative Assembly are open to the public. Parliament buildings are a short walk from ferry terminals for visitors from Port Angeles. Dozens of hotels, motels and bed-and-breakfast establishments are within walking distance. Downtown shops, the Royal British Columbia Museum and the Fairmont Empress Hotel are also within sight. For more information on tour availability and times, call 250-387-3046.  n


Travel plans: Passport requirements Most visitors to Port Angeles plan to make at least a day trip to Victoria as part of their North Olympic Peninsula travel plans. All U.S. citizens and permanent residents who cross the international border must carry a valid passport or an accepted traveler program card to return to the United States via sea, including passengers aboard the ferries to the Port Angeles port of entry. This is due to the implementation of the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative, a homeland security measure that resulted from the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. It also affects travel to Mexico, Bermuda and Caribbean nations. Citizens of the United States and Canada will need to present one of the following: • Passports, passport cards or trusted traveler program cards — NEXUS, SENTRI and FAST. • Enhanced driver’s license

CT I V

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• Enhanced tribal cards (when available), U.S. military identification with military travel orders, U.S. Coast Guard Merchant Marine ID document when traveling on official maritime business, Native American tribal photo identification cards, Form I-872 American Indian cards. Oral declarations of citizenship alone are not accepted. Visitors to the North Olympic Peninsula who are not U.S. or Canadian citizens will be required to have a passport and

possibly a visa to enter the United States. A permanent resident of the U.S. will be required to show his or her immigration “green card” at the ports of entry into Canada and the United States. Travelers must hold a machine-readable passport to be eligible. All U.S. and Canadian citizens 15 and younger only need proof of their citizenship with an original or photocopy of a birth certificate or citizenship card. Groups of U.S. and Canadian citizen children 18 and younger, when traveling with a school or religious group, social organization or sports team, will be able to enter under adult supervision with originals or copies of their birth certificates or other proof of citizenship. For more information, visit U.S. Customs and Border Protection at www. cbp.gov, and Canadian Border Services at www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca. In addition, government personnel at the ferry terminals in Port Angeles and Victoria can also answer questions.  n

425 Quebec St., Victoria, BC • 1-800-663-7515 • www.royalscot.com fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  95


VICTORIA, BC

More than 1,000 varieties of flowers can be smelled, touched and ogled during a walk through the world-class gardens.

BUTCHART GARDENS

photo courtesy of The Butchart Gardens

In the winter, gardens are decorated with lights for the holidays and an outdoor skating rink is installed.

What started as a sweet pea and a single rose in 1904 has blossomed into The Butchart Gardens, a 55-acre cascade of color that overwhelms the senses. Well more than 1,000 varieties of flowers can be enjoyed during a walk through the gardens, but allow yourself plenty of time — one visit can take several hours. The former cement factory and quarry site at Tod Inlet can be reached by taking the ferry from Port Angeles to Victoria, then traveling 12 miles north by bus or car. Transit and tour buses are found just east of the Victoria ferry landing. Butchart is really a series of gardens, each with a distinct flair.

The gardens’ full-time, year-round gardeners are constantly planting different flowers, which are identified in a published flower guide noting different flowers by common names written in several languages. The gardens keep with the Victorian tradition of seasonally changing the outstanding floral displays. In autumn, fall colors take over the gardens. During winter, walk past the Twelve Days of Christmas displays and go skating on the 3,300-square-foot outdoor rink that is installed just for the holiday season. After dark, enjoy the colored lights that illuminate the plants. Many plants still grow in the temperate winter climate and eventually makes way for the new spring blooms. The gardens are open year-round. Admission varies, so call toll-free at 866-652-4422 or visit the website at www.butchartgardens.com for more information.  n

Located in the heart of Victoria, just a block from the magnificent Inner Harbour, National Geographic IMAX Theatre, Royal BC Museum, shopping and attractions. Experience Barkley’s Steakhouse, the charming Caffé d’ Amore, Doubles Oyster Bar and Bartholomew’s Bar and Rockefeller Grille.

Complimentary High Speed Wireless Internet. 96  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

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Located across the street from the Royal BC Museum, IMAX Theatre, and only steps away from the Inner Harbor, US Ferry Terminal, and Beacon Hill park, the QV Hotel & Suites offers comfort, convenience and location.

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or visit www.qvhotel.com | 655 Douglas Street fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  97


How to go duty free

VICTORIA, BC

Well-kept hideaways When you tire of the traditional tourist sights in Victoria, you can seek solace at Witty’s Lagoon, Fort Rodd Hill or Goldstream Park All are within 15 minutes of downtown Victoria. They are lower Vancouver Island’s hideaways and provide a perfect break from the island’s tourist attractions. You can spend an hour or a day at Witty’s Lagoon, 12 miles west of Victoria near the coastal town of Metchosin, which offers a 56-hectare park (2.47 acres equals 1 hectare), blending dense woodland, tidal lagoon, sandy beach and rocky shore — and near seclusion. Bilston Creek snakes through forested second-growth, laced with delicate lady fern. It’s only a short hike along the trail (be sure to bring hiking shoes that can handle mud) before you leave the dense greenery and come upon the lagoon. Here, the waters are warm and shallow, and sea snails, rock crabs and a variety of fish migrate from the ocean. At low tide, you can traverse a spit that leads to Tower Point to look for purple sea stars or white acorn barnacles. Occasionally, a harbor seal or sea lion swims by amid the kelp.

Heading back toward Highway 1A near Colwood, stop at Fort Rodd Hill and historic Fisgard Lighthouse. The fort dates back to the early 1800s, when it was built to guard Esquimalt Harbour. This former base for the Royal Navy’s Pacific Squadron still boasts bunkers, a battery tower, headquarters and living quarters. Visitors can look down the barrels of original guns, explore underground artillery magazines and searchlight encampments. The lighthouse is reached by a short causeway that connects the fort to Fisgard Island. Constructed in 1860, it is the oldest on the west coast of Canada. Inside the lighthouse, displays inform the visitor of the “Graveyard of the Pacific” that has claimed so many ships over the last nearly 200 years. You should leave an entire day for a visit to Goldstream Provincial Park, fewer than 10 miles north and west of Victoria, just off Highway 1 (Trans-Canada Highway). From the parking lot, take a 10-minute walk through 600-year-old Douglas firs, red alder, cottonwood, red cedar and arbutus to the Freeman King Nature House and the Goldstream Estuary.  n

Victoria Bed & Breakfast Directory Bed & Breakfast

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If you’ve been in Canada less than 48 hours, you’re limited to $200 every 30 days. You may include with the exemption your choice of the following: 50 cigarettes and 10 cigars and 150 milliliters (5 fl. oz.) of alcoholic beverages or 150 milliliters (5 fl. oz.) of perfume containing alcohol. If you bring back more than $200 worth of dutiable items, or if any item is subject to duty or tax, the entire amount will be dutiable. If you’ve been in Canada for more than 48 hours, you can bring back $800 worth of goods duty-free every 30 days. One liter of alcohol and 200 cigarettes or 100 cigars may be included. Additional restrictions may apply.

Canadian residents:

If you’ve been away from Canada for 24 hours or more, you can claim up to CAN $50 worth of goods without paying any duties. You cannot include tobacco products or alcoholic beverages. If the goods you bring in are worth more than CAN $50 in total, you have to pay full duties on all goods you bring in. After an absence of 48 hours or more, you can claim up to CAN $400 worth of goods without paying any duties. You can include some tobacco products and alcoholic beverages in the exemption. Additional restrictions may apply. Requirements and regulations are subject to change. For more information, visit U.S. Customs and Border Protection at www. cbp.gov, and Canadian Border Services at www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca.

MISTY VICTORIA, MEADOWS BC Elegant Country Estate 20 Minutes From Downtown

BED and BREAKFAST, NORWEGIAN FJORD HORSES

Phone (250) 727-6405 Fax: (250) 727-6409

Email ckoshman@shaw.ca Website www.mistymeadows.com 98  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

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05115800

Victoria

U.S. residents:


events calendar october Port Townsend/Jefferson County

Port Townsend Farmers Markets, Lawrence and Tyler streets every Saturday, through Dec. 18, 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Centrum Gala Dinner and Auction, Oct. 16 Stand-up Comedy Night, benefit for Key City Public Theatre, Key City Playhouse, Oct. 21 Hauntownsend, Port Townsend, last two weekends in October Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Tri-Area Community Center, Chimacum, Oct. 23 Big Band Workshop, Centrum, Fort Worden, Port Townsend, Oct. 28-31 Port Townsend Community Orchestra Fall Concert, Chimacum High School Auditorium, Oct. 30 Downtown Trick or Treat, Port Townsend, Oct. 31

trick or treat

Kids can go trick or treating in downtown Port Angeles on Oct. 30. Businesses will provide treats for youngsters, plus enjoy other events.

Sequim/Dungeness Valley

Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park Port Angeles Symphony Chamber Orchestra, Sequim Worship Center, Oct. 16 Pumpkin Party/Country Fair, Sequim Prairie Grange, Oct. 23 Sequim City Band Concert, Oct. 24. Fourth Annual Biz 2 Biz Expo, SunLand Golf and Country Club, Oct. 26 Port Angeles

Farmers Market, The Gateway, 125 E. Front St., Saturday mornings. Master Gardener Plant Clinic, Clallam County Courthouse, Mondays Dungeness Crab & Seafood Festival, City Pier area, Oct. 9, 10. “Smoke on the Mountain: Homecoming,” Port Angeles Community Playhouse, Sept. 24-Oct. 11 Studium Generale, Preview International Forest Storytelling Festival, Peninsula College, Oct. 10 Port Angeles Symphony Chamber Orchestra, Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, Oct. 15 Forest Storytelling Festival, Peninsula College, Oct. 15-17. Studium Generale, Kate Reavey on teaching in Italy, Peninsula College, Oct. 21 Global Lens Series, “Gods” (Peru) and “Masquerades” (Algeria), Magic of Cinema series, Peninsula College, Oct. 22 Senior Center Harvest Dinner, Vern Burton Center, Oct. 23 Carlos Reyes, Foothills Writers Series, Peninsula College, Oct. 26 Studium Generale, Ed Bowlby, “Explorations for Deep-Sea Coral,” Oct. 28 “Wait For the Blackout,” Port Angeles Community Playhouse, Oct. 29-30 Global Lens Series, “Leo’s Room” (Uruguay) and “My Tehran for Sale” (Iran), Magic of Cinema series, Peninsula College, Oct. 22 Holloween Dodgeball, Oct. 30 Downtown Trick or Treat, Oct. 30 West End

Harvest Dinner, Downtown Forks, Oct. 15 Victoria

Royal BC Museum: Behind the Scenes, year long project and exhibits

Return of the Samurai: Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, through Nov. 14 Pacific Northwest Ballet, Royal Theatre, Oct. 15-16 A Masque: Orpheus and the Animals, Alix Goolden Hall, Oct. 16 “Wingfield’s Progress” at Chemainus Theatre Festival, 1-800-565-7738, through Oct. 30 Art of the Cocktail, Crystal Gardens, $40, Oct. 16-18 Victoria Symphony, Dvorak Cello Concert, Royal Theater, Oct. 18 Victoria Symphony, Beltone Pops Concert, Royal Theatre, Oct 21 “Twilight Tango,” Ballet Victoria, McPherson Playhouse, Oct. 22-24 Victoria Symphony, Concerts for Kids, Royal Theatre, Oct. 24 Cesar Millan (“the dog whisperer”,) Save on Foods Memorial Center, Oct. 26 Victoria Symphony, Halloween Fantastique, Royal Theatre, Oct. 30-31 Graphic Radicals, Legacy Art Gallery, through Oct. 31

november

Port Townsend/Jefferson County

Port Townsend Farmers Markets, Lawrence and Tyler streets every Saturday, through Dec. 18, 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Gallery Walk/Artists Receptions, Port Townsend, First Saturday PT Shorts, “The Humor of Holiday Dining,” Pope Marine Building, Port Townsend, first Saturday, 7:30 p.m. United Way Outrageous Games, Port Hadlock, Nov. 5 Quilcene First Saturday Art Walk, Nov. 6 JeffCo Holiday Fair, Jefferson County Fairgrounds, Nov. 6-7 Port Townsend Woodworkers’ Show, Port Townsend, Nov. 6-7 WordPlay Reading Series, “Intimate Exchanges: Volume I,” by Allan Ayckbourn, Key City Public Theatre, Port Townsend, Nov. 11, 12 Passport to Autumn Wine Tour, throughout area, Nov. 13-14 Teen Lab, Key City Playhouse, Port Townsend, Nov. 19-21 Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Tri-Area Community Center, Chimacum, Nov. 27

fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  99


events calendar Quilcene Holiday Craft and Gift Bazaar, Nov. 27 Merchants’ Holiday Open House, Port Townsend, Nov. 27 Sequim/Dungeness Valley

First Friday Reception and First Friday Art Walk, Nov. 6 Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park Holiday Bazaar, Agnew Helpful Neighbors Club, Nov. 13 L.O.E. Christmas Bazaar, Nov. 13 Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Sequim Prairie Grange, Macleay Hall, Nov. 13 Passport to Autumn Wine Tour, throughout area, Nov. 13-14 Pancake Breakfast, Sequim Prairie Grange, Nov. 14 Boys and Girls Club Auction and Dinner, Nov. 13 McComb Gardens Wreath Making, Wednesdays through Saturdays Nov. 17 through Dec. 24, phone 360-681-2827 Santa’s Coming to Town, Bank of America Park, Nov. 27 Sequim City Band, Nov. 27 “The Thwarting of Baron Bollingrew,” Olympic Theatre Arts, Nov. 26-28 Port Angeles

Farmers Market, The Gateway, 125 E. Front St., Saturday mornings Studium Generale, Rocky Horror Picture

Show cast discussion, Peninsula College, Nov. 4 Caleb Barber, Foothills Writers Series, Peninsula College, Nov. 2 Global Lens Series, “Ordinary People” (Serbia) and “Ocean of an Old Man” (India), Magic of Cinema series, Peninsula College, Oct. 22 Port Angeles Symphony Orchestra, Port Angeles High School Auditorium, Nov. 6 A Taste of the Peninsula, YMCA, Nov. 6 “The Rocky Horror Show,” Peninsula College, Nov. 11-13 Studium Generale, Ashland Shakespeare Festival actors combination program, Peninsula College, Nov. 12 Christmas Cottage, Vern Burton Center, Nov. 12-14 Passport to Autumn Wine Tour, throughout area, Nov. 13-14 Second Weekend Art Event, downtown Studium Generale, Rosa Nguyen and father on trip to Thailand, Laos and Vietnam, Peninsula College, Nov. 18 Winterfest and Ski Swap, Vern Burton Community Center, Nov. 19-21 Annual Reading for Hunger Relief, Port

rhody fest

Angeles Public Library, Nov. 19 “Meet Me In St. Louis” Port Angeles Community Playhouse, Nov. 19-Dec. 5 Global Lens Series, “Shirley Adams” (South Africa) and “The Shaft” (China), Magic of Cinema series, Peninsula College, Oct. 22 Community Christmas Tree Lighting, Conrad Dyer Memorial Fountain, Nov. 27 Festival of Trees, Vern Burton Community Center, Nov. 26-28 West End

Forks Wine and Cheese, Downtown Forks, Nov. 13 Victoria

Royal BC Museum: Behind the Scenes, year long project and exhibits Return of the Samurai: Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, through Nov. 14 Daniel Leveille Danse, McPherson Playhouse, Nov. 5-6 Salsa Baroque, Alix Goolden Hall, Nov. 6 John McDermott, McPherson Playhouse, Nov. 7 Michelle Wright, Alix Goolden Theatre, Nov. 10 “Rodelinda,” Pacific Opera Victoria, Royal Theatre, Nov. 11, 13, 16, 18-20 “A Christmas Carol” at Chemainus Theatre Festival, 1-800-565-7738, Nov. 11-Jan. 8 “Blood Brothers,” Metro Studio, Nov. 12-14 “The Wizard of Oz,” McPherson Theatre, Nov. 19-21 and 26-28 Music Theatre based on Maurice Maeterlinck’s play, “Interieur,” Belfry Theatre, Nov. 16-Dec. 19 Billy Connolly, Royal Theatre, Nov. 23 Festival of Trees, Empress Hotel, Nov. 25-Jan. 4 “The Nutcracker,” Royal Theatre, Nov. 26-28 Victoria Chamber Orchestra, First Metropolitan United Church, Nov. 27 Santa Light Parade, downtown, TBA Concert: Diabolus in Musica, rose tres bele, Alix Goolden Hall, Nov. 6

december

Port Townsend/Jefferson County

The Rhododendron Festival, the oldest annual festival in Jefferson County, will be held in Port Townsend May 8-14. 100  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

Port Townsend Farmers Markets, Lawrence and Tyler streets every Saturday, through Dec. 18, 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Resumes in May Gallery Walk/Artists Receptions, Port Townsend, First Saturday “The Little Match Girl,” Key City Playhouse, Port Townsend, Dec. 2-12.


PT Shorts, “The Wizard of Oz Unplugged,” Pope Marine Building, Port 5 Townsend, first Saturday, 7:30 p.m. ” Community Treelighting, Santa Arrival na), and Parade, Union Wharf, Haller Founlege, tain, Port Townsend, Dec. 4 “The Eight: Reindeer Monologues,” Key g, City Public Theatre, Port Townsend, Dec. . 27 9-19. u- Port Townsend Community Orchestra Holiday Concert, Chimacum High School Auditorium, Dec. 4 Olympic Art Festival, Quilcene, Dec. 11 “Seven Poor Travelers,” by Charles Dickens, Key City Playhouse, Port Townsend, Dec. 14-22 First Night, non-alcoholic family New es, Year’s Eve celebration, Port Townsend City Hall, Dec. 31 of Sequim/Dungeness Valley

ay- Handmade Christmas Fair, Sequim Prairie Grange, Dec. 4 ov. 6 “The Thwarting of Baron Bollingrew,” use, Olympic Theatre Arts, Dec. 2-5, Dec. 9-12 Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railre, road Bridge Park Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Sequim Prairie RoyalGrange, Dec. 18 McComb Gardens Wreath Making, Wednesdays through Saturdays through ov. Dec. 24, call 360-681-2827 to sign up. First Friday Art Walk, Dec. 3 Sequim-Dungeness Christmas Bird Count, Contact River Center, 360-681atre, 4076 Christmas Tea and Santa’s Bake Shoppe, Dungeness School House, Dec. 11-12 y Breakfast with Santa, Citizens for Sequim Schools, TBA 3 v. Port Angeles Farmers Market, The Gateway, 125 E. v. Front St., Saturday mornings Christmas Open House, downtown, Dec. Met- 3-5 OMC Christmas Fair, Vern Burton Community Center, Dec. 4-5 res Studium Generale, Seasonal music, Dennis Crabb and the PC Music Department, Peninsula College, Dec. 2 “Meet Me In St. Louis” Port Angeles Community Playhouse, Nov. 19-Dec. 5 Second Weekend Art Event, downtown Open mic, Foothills Writers Series, Peninday, sula College, Dec. 7 Second Weekend Art Event, downtown Port Angeles Symphony Orchestra, Port rt Angeles High School auditorium, Dec. 11 Shop ‘Til You Drop, downtown, Dec. 16 ay- Reindeer Run, City Pier, Dec. 18

West End

Moonlight Madness, Forks downtown merchants, Dec. 4 JT’s Sweet Stuffs Twinkle Light Parade, Forks, Dec. 4 Forks Festival of Trees, Dec. 3 and 4 Victoria

“A Christmas Carol,” at Chemainus Theatre Festival, 1-800-565-7738, Nov. 11-Jan. 8 Royal BC Museum: Behind the Scenes, year long project and exhibits Festival of Trees, Empress Hotel, Nov. 25-Jan. 4 Music Theatre based on Maurice Maeterlinck’s play, “Interieur,” Belfry Theatre, Nov. 16-Dec. 19 “Wilde Holiday Shorts” at Chemainus Theatre Festival, 1-800-55-7738, Nov. 11-Jan. 8 “The Hobbit,” McPherson Playhouse, Dec. 4-6 and 10-12 Santa Shuffle, a 5km run or 1km walk, Dec. 4 “The Snowman and the Bear,” Royal Theatre, Oct. 5 Rach 2, Royal Theatre, Dec. 6 “My Funny Christmastime,” Victoria Symphony, Royal Theatre, Dec. 10-11 “It’s a Wonderful Life,” McPherson Playhouse, Dec. 15, 17-19 The Rankin Sisters, McPherson Playhouse, Dec. 16 “The Dali Universe,” Vancouver City Dance Theatre, Royal Theater, Dec. 17 Canadian Tenors Christmas, Royal Theatre, Dec. 18 “Comedy of Errors,” Metro Studio Theatre, Dec. 17-19 “Singing for Supper,” Tom Jackson and Guests, Royal Theatre, Dec. 20 “Beauty and the Beast,” Ballet Victoria, Royal Theatre, Dec. 27-30 “Nutcracker and Sugar Plum Fairy,” Canadian Pacific Ballet, McPherson Playhouse, Dec. 28-30

january

Port Townsend/Jefferson County

Gallery Walk/Artists Receptions, Port Townsend, First Saturday Quilcene First Saturday Art Walk PT Shorts, readings of literary works,

Pope Marine Building, Port Townsend, first Saturday, 7:30 p.m. Stand-up Comedy Night, a benefit for Key City Public Theatre, Key City Playhouse, Jan. 13. Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Tri-Area Community Center, Chimacum, Jan. 22 Strangebrew Festival, Port Townsend, Jan. 28-30 Sequim/Dungeness Valley

First Friday Reception and First Friday Art Walk, Jan. 7 Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Sequim Prairie Grange, Macleay Hall, Jan. 8 Port Angeles Symphony Chamber Orchestra, Sequim Worship Center, Jan. 15 Port Angeles

Farmers Market, Clallam County Courthouse parking lot, Peabody and Fourth streets, Saturday mornings. Studium Generale, programs Thursdays at noon, Little Theater, Peninsula College. Second Weekend Art Event, downtown Port Angeles Symphony Chamber Orchestra, Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, Jan. 14 Snowgrass 2011, local bands, Port Angeles High School, Jan. 29 Victoria

Royal BC Museum: Behind the Scenes, year long project and exhibits. A Christmas Carol at Chemainus Theatre Festival, 1-800-565-7738, Nov. 11-Jan. 8 Festival of Trees, Empress Hotel, Nov. 25-Jan. 4 A Viennese New Year’s, Victoria Symphony, Royal Theatre, Jan. 1 2011 Canadian Figure Skating Championships, Save on Foods Memorial Center, Jan. 17-23 Dance of Romance, Victoria Symphony, Royal Theatre, Jan. 20-22 Tafelmusik: Baroque Masterpieces, Alix Goolden Hall, Jan. 22 “The Cryptogram,” by David Mamet, Belfry Theatre, Jan. 25-Feb. 27 Les Grands Ballets, Royal Theatre, Jan. 28-29 Chen Plays Mozart, Royal Theatre, Jan. 31

february

Port Townsend/Jefferson County

Gallery Walk/Artists Receptions, Port Townsend, First Saturday. fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  101


events calendar Quilcene First Saturday Art Walk PT Shorts, readings of literary works, Pope Marine Building, Port Townsend, first Saturday, 7:30 p.m. Red Wine and Chocolate, throughout area, Feb. 12-13, Feb. 19-21 “Chesapeake” reading by author, Lee Blessing, location to be announced, Port Townsend, Feb. 10 19th Annual Playwrights’ Festival, Key City Public Theatre, Port Townsend, Feb. 11-27 Port Townsend Community Orchestra Winter Concert, Chimacum High School Auditorium, Feb. 26 Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Tri-Area Community Center, Chimacum, Feb. 26 Sequim/Dungeness Valley

First Friday Art Walk, Feb. 4 Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park Owl Prowl in the Owlympics, Dungeness River Audubon Center, Feb. 12 Red Wine and Chocolate, throughout area, Feb. 12-13, 19-21 “Nunsense,” Olympic Theatre Arts, Feb. 4-6, 9, 11-13, 16, 18-20 Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Sequim Prairie Grange, Macleay Hall, Feb. 12 Irrigation Festival Royalty Pageant, Sequim High School Auditorium, Feb. 26 Port Angeles

Farmers Market, The Gateway, 125 E. Front St., Saturday mornings. Studium Generale, programs Thursdays at noon, Little Theater, Peninsula College Port Angeles Symphony Orchestra, Port Angeles High School Auditorium, Feb. 5. Second Weekend Art Event, downtown Red Wine and Chocolate, throughout area, Feb. 12-13, 19-21 Annual Doll and Bear Show, Vern Burton Community Center, Feb. 5 “Black Coffee,” Agatha Christie, Port Angeles Community Playhouse, Feb. 25-March 13 Port Angeles Symphony Applause Auction and Dinner, Feb. 26 KONP Home Show, Port Angeles High School, Feb. 26-27 North/West Coast

Sekiu Winter Salmon Derby, Clallam Bay/Sekiu, TBA Victoria

Royal BC Museum: Behind the Scenes, year long project and exhibits “The Cryptogram,” by David Mamet, Belfry Theatre, Jan. 25-Feb. 27

Victoria Symphony, Royal Theatre, Feb. 2 Victoria Film Festival, multiple venues, Feb. 4-13 Laplante plays Beethoven, Royal Theatre, Feb. 5 “The Big Sneeze,” McPherson Playhouse, Feb. 6 Victoria Chamber Orchestra, First Metropolitan United Church, Feb. 11 “Sleeping Beauty Act III/Gaite” Canadian Pacific Ballet, Royal Theatre, Feb. 12-14 “La Boheme,” Royal Theatre, Feb. 17, 19, 22, 24, 26 “The Penelopiad and the Odyssey,” CCPA Performance Hall, Feb. 17-19 Baltimore Consort: Heavenly Harmony in Shakespeare’s England Alix Goolden Hall, Feb. 18 18th Annual Seedy Saturday, Feb. 19 Toroto Dance Theatre, McPherson Playhouse, Feb. 25-26

wine & chocolate

march Port Townsend and Jefferson County Gallery Walk/Artists Receptions, Port Townsend, First Saturday. Quilcene First Saturday Art Walk PT Shorts, readings of literary works, Pope Marine Building, Port Townsend, first Saturday, 7:30 p.m. “Here There and Everywhere” benefit monologue program, Key City Playhouse, Port Townsend, March 8 Arts Exploration (grades 7-9), Centrum, Fort Worden, Port Townsend, March 6-11 JeffCo Community Garage Sale, Jefferson County Fairgrounds, March 19 Victorian Days, Port Townsend, March 19 and 20 Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Tri-Area Community Center, Chimacum, March 26 Stand-up Comedy Night, benefit for Key City Public Theatre, Key City Playhouse, Port Townsend, March 31 Sequim/Dungeness Valley

First Friday Reception and First Friday Art Walk, March 4 Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Sequim Prairie Grange, Macleay Hall, March 12 Port Angeles

Farmers Market, The Gateway, 125 E. Front St., Saturday mornings. Studium Generale, programs Thursdays at noon, Little Theater, Peninsula College Easter Bunny comes to downtown, TBA “Black Coffee,” Agatha Christie, Port

102  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

The Olympic Peninsula Wineries Association will hold its “Red Wine and Chocolate” event the weekends of Feb. 12-13 and 19-21, where you can enjoy delicious wines and delectable samples of chocolate.

Victo “Car Playh Alvin Tam Marc Ellen Gool “Rum hous Roya Marc

Angeles Community Playhouse, Feb. 25-March 13 apr Port Angeles Symphony Orchestra, Port Port Angeles High School Auditorium, March 12Galle Second Weekend Art Event, downtown Town Quil West End PT S Quillayute Valley School District Schol- Pope arship Auction, Bank of America, TBA first Nate Crippen Memorial Basketball Chor Tournament, TBA tion Port Victoria “La Z Royal BC Museum: Behind the Scenes, Thea year long project and exhibits. Port Sinfonia New York: The Art and Ecstasy Sprin of the Chaconne, Alix Goolden Hall, Audi March 5 Old Beethoven Symphony No. 6, Royal The- mun atre, March 7 Port


Victoria

bird walks

Morning bird walks are held each Wednesday at Railroad Bridge Park in Sequim.

Royal BC Museum: Behind the Scenes, year long project and exhibits Royal Winnipeg Ballet, Royal Theatre, March 31-April 2 Belton Pops Concerts, Royal Theatre, April 7-9 “Lawyers On Stage — Hair,” McPherson Playhouse, April 8-9 “The Birth of the CPR,” McPherson Playhouse, April 10 “Wall to Wall Percussion,” Royal Theatre, April 10 “2 Pianos 4 Hands,” by Ted Dykstra and Richard Greenbalatt, Belfry Theatre, April 12-May 15 Songs of Spring, Royal Theatre, April 13 “Emily, A Lady In White,” McPherson Playhouse, April 16-17 “New World Symphony,” Royal Theatre, April 18 “Crazy For You,” McPherson Playhouse, April 27-29 “Vanessa,” Pacific Opera Victoria, April 30

may

Port Townsend/Jefferson County

Victoria Symphony, March 10-12 “Carmen,” Ballet Victoria, McPherson Playhouse, March 18-20 Alvin Ailey, Royal Theatre, March 22-23 Tam Plays Tchaikovsky, Royal Theatre, March 26-27 Ellen Hargis: The Garden of Love, Alix Goolden Hall, March 26 “Rumpelstiltskin,” McPherson Playhouse, March 27 Royal Winnipeg Ballet, Royal Theatre, March 31-April 2

april

reopens, Lawrence and Tyler Streets, Saturday, April 20 JeffCo EXPO, Jefferson County Fairgrounds, last weekend in April Sequim/Dungeness Valley

First Friday Reception and First Friday Art Walk, April 1 Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Sequim Prairie Grange, Macleay Hall, April 9 “Too Old for the Chorus,” Olympic Theatre Arts, April 29-30

Port Townsend/Jefferson County

Port Angeles

Gallery Walk/Artists Receptions, Port Townsend, first Saturday Quilcene First Saturday Art Walk PT Shorts, readings of literary works, Pope Marine Building, Port Townsend, first Saturday, 7:30 p.m. Choro Intensive and Creative Nonfiction Weekend, Centrum, Fort Worden, Port Townsend, April 14-17 “La Zuffa Z Servita,” Key City Public Theatre, Port Townsend, April 22-May 14 Port Townsend Community Orchestra Spring Concert, Chimacum High School Auditorium, April 23 Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Tri-Area Community Center, Chimacum, April 23 Port Townsend Farmers Market

Farmers Market, The Gateway, 125 E. Front St., Saturday mornings. Studium Generale, programs Thursdays at noon, Little Theater, Peninsula College Jazz Festival, 10 bands, four venues, April 1-3 Second Weekend Art Event, downtown Port Angeles Symphony Orchestra, Port Angeles High School Auditorium, April 16 Kids Fishing Derby, Lincoln Park, April 16

Gallery Walk/Artists Receptions, Port Townsend, First Saturday. Quilcene First Saturday Art Walk PT Shorts, readings of literary works, Pope Marine Building, Port Townsend, first Saturday, 7:30 p.m. JeffCo Homes Show, Jefferson County Fairgrounds, May 7-8 Rhody Festival, Port Townsend, May 8-14 Rhody Run, Port Townsend, May 15 Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Tri-Area Community Center, Chimacum, May 28 Sequim/Dungeness Valley

First Friday Art Walk, May 6 Wednesday Morning Bird Walks, Railroad Bridge Park “Too Old for the Chorus,” Olympic Theatre Arts, May 1, May 5-8, 12-15 Irrigation Festival, May 7-15 Old Time Fiddlers Jam, Sequim Prairie Grange, Macleay Hall, May 14 Irrigation Festival Grand Parade, May 14 Port Angeles Symphony Chamber Orchestra, Sequim Worship Center, May 14 Master Gardeners Spring Plant Sale, TBA Port Angeles

West End

RainFest, multiple venues, April 15-17 Fabric of the Forrest Quilt Show, April 15-17

Farmers Market, The Gateway, 125 E. Front St., Saturday mornings Studium Generale, programs, Thursdays at noon, Little Theater, Peninsula College “Nude With Violin,” by Noel Coward, Port Angeles Community Playhouse, May 6-22

fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  103


events calendar “12 Angry Men,” Port Angeles Community Playhouse, May (days not established) North Olympic Mustang Annual Show, Gateway Transit Center, May 7-8 Second Weekend Art Event, downtown Port Angeles Symphony Chamber Orchestra, Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, May 13 Juan de Fuca Festival of the Arts, multiple venues, May 27-30

final shot

West End

Annual Olympic Coast Beach Cleanup, TBA Victoria

“2 Pianos 4 Hands,” by Ted Dykstra and Richard Greenbalatt, Belfry Theatre, April 12-May 15 Victoria Chamber Orchestra, First Metropolitan United Church, May 6 “Vanessa,” Pacific Opera Victoria, May 3, 5, 7 “Broadway: Decades in Revue,” McPherson Playhouse, May 6-7 13-15 “Verdi Requiem,” Victoria Symphony, May 14-15 Victoria Day, fireworks and other events, May 23

For more information... These listings represent those events scheduled by Sept. 15. More events are being planned monthly. For a complete, up-to-date look at North Olympic Peninsula activities, check “Things to Do” in the Peninsula Daily News. Each day’s edition has the list for that day and the next. Online, go to www.peninsuladailynews. com. In addition, you can gather more information on cities by contacting these chambers of commerce or visitor centers: n Clallam Bay/Sekiu 360-963-2339, www.sekiu.com n Forks 800-443-6757, www.forkswa.com n Neah Bay www.northolympic.com/makah n Port Angeles 360-452-2363, www.portangeles.org n Jefferson County 888-365-6978, jeffcountychamber.org n Quilcene-Brinnon 360-765-4999, www.quilcene.com n Sequim/Dungeness Valley 800-737-8462, www.sequimchamber.com

Tongue Point, Salt Creek Recreation Area

104  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011


directory Art & Antiques Port Townsend/Jefferson County Ancestral Spirits Gallery 701 Water St., Port Townsend 98368; 360-385-0078; www.ancestralspirits.com Fine Native art by indigenous artists and craftspeople of North America and Siberia. “An exquisite art gallery” National Geographic Traveler. See our ad on Page 14 Artisans on Taylor 236 Taylor St., Port Townsend 98368; 360-379-1029 Specializing in art, glass, silver jewelry, water color paintings, hats, wood bowls and other wonderful things. See our ad on Page 14 Earthenworks Gallery 702 Water St., Port Townsend 98368; 360-385-0328 Voted one of the Top 100 Retailers of American Craft. Unique interior and exterior sculpture and art, fountains, glass works and art for the home. Open daily 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. See our ad on Page 14 Elizabeth Haight Gallery Port Townsend studio, by appointment; 360-385-3075; www.elisabethhaight.com Regional, abstract, figurative, glass, botanical and religious art. See our ad on Page 14 Forest Gems Gallery 807 Washington St., Port Townsend 98368; 360-379-1713; www.forestgems.com A haven for people who love wood. Highly figured Northwest woods by Northwest artists. Open daily 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. See our ad on Page 14 Gallery 9 1012 Water St., Port Townsend 98368; 360-379-8881; www.gallery-9.com Cooperative art gallery of 32 local artists and artisans. Oil, pastel, watercolor photography, jewelry and much more. Thursday through Tuesday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Wednesday noon to 4 p.m. See our ad on Page 14 and 18 Northwind Arts Center 2409 Jefferson St., Port Townsend 98368; 360-379-1086; www.northwindarts.org A non-profit center connecting the arts and community. Juried and invitational exhibits, workshops, lectures, a venue for writers and a yearly studio tour and arts festival. Open Thursday through Monday noon to 5 p.m. See our ad on Page 14

Pacific Traditions Gallery 637 Water St., Waterstreet Hotel, Port Townsend 98368; 360-385-4770; www.pacifictraditions.com Local and nationally recognized Native artists of distinction. Open daily 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. See our ad on Page 14 Port Townsend Gallery 715 Water St., Port Townsend 98368; 360-379-8110; www.porttownsendgallery.com A fine arts gallery showcasing quality art, sculpture, jewelry, photography and crafts by regional artists. Come in and enjoy our waterside location and artful garden. See our ad on Page 14 Williams Gallery 914 Water St., Port Townsend 98368; 360-385-3630; www.williams-gallery.com Wide selection of fine arts and crafts from local Northwest and national artists. Open Monday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. See our ad on Page 14 Wynwoods Gallery and Bead Studio 940 Water St., Port Townsend 98368; 360-385-6131; www.wynwoods.com Fine contemporary handcrafted jewelry, beads and treasures. Beads and yarn very large selection. See our ad on Page 14 and 18 Port Angeles Landings Art Gallery 115 E. Railroad Ave., Landing mall; Port Angeles 98362; 360-452-2406 Co-op gallery showcasing award winning local artists working in several mediums. Giftshop with jewelry, cards and art prints. See our ad on Page 75 Unique Treasures 105 W. First St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-452-5995 Antiques and collectibles, furniture and gift items. See our ad on Page 29

Assisted Living Sequim/Dungeness Valley Dungeness Courte Alzheimer’s Community 651 Garry Oak Drive, Sequim 98382; 360-582-9309 A friendly, home-like setting for its residents and their families. Day care and respite care provided. See our ad on Page 30

Attractions, Tours, Events Native American Footprints 877-459-TOUR (8687); www.nativeamericanfootprints.com; tours@naftours.com Cultural tours and retreats to the Indian country of the Olympic Peninsula. See our ad on Page 54 Port Townsend/Jefferson County Centrum — A Center for Arts and Creative Education Fort Worden State Park, P.O. Box 1158, Port Townsend 98368; 360-385-3102; www.centrum.org Presenting workshops and festivals for more than 30 years; chamber music, fiddle tunes, jazz, blues, writing and dance, plus Seattle men’s and women’s chorus. Marine Science Center 532 Battery Way, Fort Worden, Port Townsend 98368; 360-385-5582; www.ptmsc.org Admission for nonmembers from Nov. 5 through March 27 reduced admission $3 adults, $2 youth, under 5 free. Open Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Closed in January. April 1, all exhibits open, $5 adults, $3 youth, under 5 free. NW Maritime Center and Wooden Boat Foundation 431 Water St., Port Townsend 98368; 360-385-3628 The Northwest Maritime Center and Wooden Boat Foundation is a non-profit organization that focuses on maritime educational programs. You can take a sailing class, watch wooden boats being built and restored, visit Wooden Boat Chandlery (where you’ll find both traditional boat building tools and fine nautical gifts), wander the commons or snack in Aldrich’s Galler. We also rent space for meetings, conferences, weddings and other events. See our ad on Page 13 Sequim/Dungeness Valley Museum and Arts Center 175 W. Cedar St., Sequim 98382; 360-683-8110; www.SequimMuseum.org, info@ SequimMuseum.org Local history; mastodon exhibit; veteran’s exhibit. Tuesday through Saturday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sunday 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. summertime; free to public. Olympic Game Farm 1423 Ward Road, Sequim 98382; 360-683-4295

fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  105


directory Elks, lions, tigers, bears, gift shop, petting farm, driving tours. See our ads on Page 26 and 36

seamlessly integrated into nature, to be discovered along rustic trails. See our ad on Page 75

Olympic Theatre Arts 414 N. Sequim Ave., Sequim 98382; 360-683-7326 Live theater at its finest. See our ad on Page 25

Victoria Butchart Gardens 800 Benvenuto Ave., Victoria B.C.; 350-652-5256 55 acre multi-themed garden.

Port Angeles Elwha River Casino 631 Stratton Road, Port Angeles 98363; 360-452-3005; www.elwharivercasino.com Home of the hottest slots in town. Featuring over 100 bingo style electronic slot machines. River’s Edge Deli, breakfast, lunch and dinner specials. Barista bar, coffee and specialty drinks. See our ad on Page 115

Craigdarroch Castle 1050 Joan Crescent, Victoria, B.C. V8S365; 250-597-5323 1890s lavishly furnished Victorian mansion, 39 rooms, 87 stairs to tower.

Feiro Marine Life Center Port Angeles City Pier at Railroad and Lincoln streets; 360-417-6254 Come see what’s in the sea! Guided tours, special programs, pre-arranged tours. Open Saturday and Sunday. Hurricane Ridge Visitor Center Olympic National Park; Port Angeles 98363 Just 17 miles south of Port Angeles, this must-see national park destination offers spectacular views of glacier-clad peaks and endless outdoor activities to be enjoyed. Gift shop and snack bar. Sky equipment rental. Three surface lifts/800 vertical feet of skiing. Please call the National Park Service for current road conditions: 360-565-3131. Heritage Tours 360-452-2363, ext. 0 Daily guided walking tours of downtown Port Angeles and the historic downtown. Port Angeles. History comes to life as you tour underground store fronts, survey murals and even drop in at a large brothel. See our ad on Page 54 Museum at the Carnegie 207 S. Lincoln St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-452-2662 Clallam County history exhibits and Native American artifacts on display at the renovated Carnegie Library. Port Angeles Fine Arts Center 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., Port Angeles 98362; 360-457-3532; http://pafac.org; pafac@olypen.com Wednesday through Sunday. Nov.-Feb. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.. March-Oct. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Webster’s Woods open all daylight hours. Free admission. Thought-provoking exhibitions with a Northwest flavor feature master and emerging artists and are imaginatively displayed in the historic, semi-circular hilltop Webster House, set against an awesome vista of marine and mountain views. Webster’s Woods is a five-acre “museum without walls” featuring over 100 sculpture and site works

BC Museum and IMAX 675 Belleville St., Victoria, B.C. V8W9W2; 250-356-7226 Major museum with permanent and traveling exhibits. And, IMAX giant screen 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. with feature films in evenings.

Auto, RV Port Angeles Mobuilt RV 2372 E. Highway 101, Port Angeles 98362; 360-457-4101; www.mobuiltrv.com RV structural and appliance repair for over 25 years and the largest retail RV inventory on the Olympic Peninsula. No one has the inventory that we do — parts, accessories, hitches, electrical, plumbing and more. Awning and other special products available for order. Friendly, long term employees and are individually owned and operated. Repair shop open: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Retail store summer hours — open at 9 a.m. See our ad on Page 76 Olympic Tire and Auto Repair Inc. 731 E. First St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-452-9711 American Car Care Centers. Servicing domestic and foreign cars and trucks, brakes, tuneups. A/C service, electrical, clutches, cooling systems, trans flush, timing belts, oil change, lube and much more. See our ad on Page 56 Rudy’s Automotive and Auto Electric 202 N. Francis St. (Front and Francis streets), Port Angeles 98362; 360-457-0700 Complete automotive repair and electric service since 1974. See our ad on Page 51

Brew Pub Port Angeles Peak’s Brew Pub 130 W. Lincoln St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-452-2802; www.peakspub.com Best selection of micro and domestic beer. Watch us brew our award winning house beers. Home of Ed’s killer chili! See our ad on Page 56

106  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

Campgrounds and Parks Port Townsend/Jefferson County Jefferson County Fairgrounds P.O. Box 242, 4907 Landes St., Port Townsend 98368; 360-385-1013; fax 360-385-0865 Full hook-ups water/power/septic 82 camp sites. Bathrooms, showers, septic dump. See our ad on Page 77

Laun ers; p tion; by; q mont hours firew See ou

Shad 2329 360-9 Full h fuel; High See ou

Sequim/Dungeness Valley County Dungeness Recreation Area Kitchen-Dick Road; 360-683-5847 By Dungeness Wildlife Refuge at Dungeness; 66 secluded campsites, RV and tent sites, group area by reservation; beach access, Fork picnic area, playground, RV dump station, Hung restroom with showers. Milep See our ad on Page 76 360-3 The H PRIVATE recrea GILGAL “Oasis” RV Park 400 Brown Road (behind Econo Lodge and Ocea across from QFC shopping center), Sequim Natio Enjoy 98382; 360-452-1324 or 888-445-4251 or in Sequim’s newest RV park; 28 sites, 19 pull Break throughs; amenities. See ou See our ad on Page 76

River Port Angeles 33 M County Dungeness and Salt Creek Recreation Areas River Port Angeles, Clallam County, 360-417-2291 See ou Both destinations offer camping, playgrounds, hiking, picnicking, birdwatcheng and more. See our ad on Page 76

Chamb

PRIVATE Sequ Crescent Beach & RV Park Sequ 2860 Crescent Beach Road, Port Angeles 1192 98363-8703; 360-928-3344 RVs and tents; daily, weekly, monthly rates; 683-6 laundry, hot showers, fire pits, picnic tables; www. sandy beach, surfing, beach-combing, kayak- See o ing. Fee for beach use. Reservations accepted. Fork See our ad on Page 76 Fork 1411 Harrison Beach Campground 299 Harrison Beach Road off West Lyre River 9833 www. Road; 360-928-3006 24 sites, tenting, camping and RV sites; beach- See ou combing, seal watching, rock hunting. Day-use fee, overnight camping, open yearround; jasper, agate, fossils, etc., use deposit box. Cof See our ad on Page 77 Port Black Peabody Creek RV Second and Lincoln streets; 127 S. Lincoln Eight 360-4 St., downtown, Port Angeles 98362; 360Hom 457-7092 and 800-392-2361 Large Laundry, showers, pets allowed on a leash, quiet peaceful area in city, walking distance to See ou ferry and shops. Tours of Victoria available. See our ads on Page 76

Comm

Salt Creek RV Park 53802 Highway 112 W., Port Angeles 98363; Port 360-928-2488 Port


Laundry, open 24 hours; restrooms; hot showers; pet walk areas; security patrol; dump station; picnic tables; pay phone and store nearby; quiet off-highway parking; daily, weekly, monthly rates; pets welcome (on leash); quiet hours (10 p.m. to 8 a.m.); fires only in grates; fireworks and firearms prohibited. See our ads on Page 76

208 N. Laurel St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-457-9614 Representing over 200 businesses in downtown Port Angeles, we present community events, art tours and business education opportunities throughout the year. See our ad on Page 47

Shadow Mountain Campground & RV Park 232951 Highway 101, Port Angeles; 360-928-3043 or 877-928-3043 Full hookups; tent spaces, laundry, store/deli; fuel; 15 miles west of Port Angeles on U.S. Highway 101 across from Lake Sutherland. See our ad on Page 76

Dining

Forks/West End Hungry Bear Cafe, Motel and RV Park Milepost 206, P.O. Box 236, Beaver 98305; 360-327-3225 The Hungry Bear is centrally located to many recreational possibilities including lakes, Pacific Ocean beaches, the Hoh Rainforest, Olympic National Park and many inviting communities. Enjoy a peaceful night’s rest in a motel room, or in your R.V. parked in the grassy R.V. park. Breakfast, lunch and dinner available in the cafe. See our ad on Page 57 Riverview RV Park & Storage 33 Mora Road, Forks, 360-374-3398 Riverside camping, guided river fishing trips. See our ad on Page 77

Chambers of Commerce Sequim/Dungeness Valley Sequim Chamber of Commerce 1192 E. Washington St., Sequim 98382; 360683-6197 www.cityofsequim.com See our ad on Page 27 Forks/West End Forks Chamber of Commerce Visitor Center 1411 S. Forks Ave./P.O. Box 1249, Forks 98331; 360-374-2531, 800-443-6757 www.forkswa.com, e-mail info@forkswa.com. See our ad on Page 88

Coffee Port Angeles Blackbird Coffee Eighth and Peabody streets, Port Angeles; 360-452-3999 Homemade sandwiches and espresso drinks. Large assortment of breakfast and lunch items. See our ad on Page 28

Community Organizations Port Angeles Port Angeles Downtown Association

Port Townsend/Jefferson County Dos Okies Barbeque 2310 Washington St., Port Townsend 98386; 360-385-7669; wwwdosokiesbarbeque.com J’eet yet? A fun and funky barbeque joint next to Boat Haven for a BBQ picnic on your boat or on the beach! Open Tuesday to Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. See our ad on Page 18 The Salal Cafe 634 Water St., Port Townsend 98368; 360-385-6532 Breakfast is served all day, lunch after 11:30 a.m. Organic with many vegetarian choices. Voted best breakfast many times in 28 years! See our ad on Page 18 Sequim/Dungeness Valley Dockside Grill 2577 W. Sequim Bay Road, Sequim 98382; 360-683-7510 Northwest Waterfront dining at John Wayne Marina. See our ad on Page 37 Domino’s Pizza 755 W. Washington St., Sequim 98382; 360-582-1600 The best pizza at the best prices. Open Monday-Thursday from 11 a.m. to midnight, Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 a.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. See our ad on Page 46 El Cazador 531 W. Washington St., Sequim 98382; 360-683-4788; el-cazador.com Serving lunch and dinner. Open seven days a week. Family friendly restaurant. See our ad on Page 37 Port Angeles Airport Cafe LLC Fairchild International Airport, Port Angeles 98363; 360-457-1190 Breakfast served all day. Lunch, organic espresso. Free Wi-Fi available. Free parking. Gifts, local art, books, souvenir clothing and much more! Open 6:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily. All credit cards accepted. See our ad on Page 57

a well rounded selection of local and other varieties of wine and beer. Join us Sundays for waffle bar which includes other breakfast items and a variety of toppings. We offer over 30 items under $10 everyday and happy hour deals Monday through Friday. Our full menu is available online. We are open Monday through Friday at 11:30 a.m., Saturday at 4 p.m. and Sundays at 10 a.m. Reservations for larger parties welcome anytime. See our ad on Page 57 Cornerhouse Restaurant 101 E. Front St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-452-9692 Classic home cooking at affordable prices. Breakfast, lunch, dinner, cocktails. Open 6 a.m. daily. See our ad on Page 51 Domino’s Pizza 1210 E. Front St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-452-4222. The best pizza at the best prices. Open Monday-Thursday from 11 a.m. to midnight, Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 a.m., and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. See our ad on Page 46 Puerto de Angeles 940 E. First St., Port Angeles 98362; 360417-2963 Authentic Mexican cuisine. Serving beer, wine and mixed drinks. See our ad on Page 57 Kokopelli Grill 203 E. Front St., Port Angeles 98362; 360457-6040; www.kokopelli-grill.com The very best in Southwest gourmet cuisine. All freshly made on site, sauces, dressings, rubs to accent the best cuts of steak and local seafood. See our ad on Page 57 Plunkin Shack Cafe 704 Marine Drive, Port Angeles; 360-417-6961 Serving breakfast and lunch. Lunch specials, breakfast ‘til 11 a.m. weekdays. See our ad on Page 56 Port Angeles CrabHouse Restaurant 221 N. Lincoln, Port Angeles 98362; 360-457-0424; wwwredlionportangeles.com Stunning waterfront views, newly remodeled lounge, great seafood and wine selections. See our ad on Page 49 Thai Peppers Restaurant 222 N. Lincoln St. #1, Port Angeles 98362; 360-452-4995. Reservations requested for six or more. Authentic Thai cuisine. All dishes made to order. Fresh ingredients. No MSG. Spicy hot can be spicy not! See our ad on Page 56

Bushwhacker 1527 E. First St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-457-4113; www.bushwhackerpa.com Outstanding seafood, steaks, wraps and sandwiches. Famous appetizers and salad bar. We have a fully stocked bar that includes fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  107


directory Van Goes Gourmet Pizza and Mexican 814 S. C St., Port Angeles 98363; 360-417-5600 Pizza by the slice, burritos, tamales and tacos served hot all day. EBT/Food Stamps accepted. See our ad on Page 56 Forks/West End Forks Coffee Shop 241 S. Forks Ave., Forks; 360-374-6769 Breakfast, lunch and dinner. Full service restaurant. Seven days a week. Ask the locals. This is the place to eat! See our ad on Page 28 and 87 Quileute Rivers Edge Restaurant Seasonal: 360-374-0777 Presents breath-taking sea views and freshoff-the-boat seafood. See our ad on Page 116

Home Design Sequim/Dungeness Valley Sherry Grimes Designs P.O. Box 2066, Sequim 98382; 360-683-2012 Custom home design. See our ad on Page 25

Lodging Martha’s Vacation Rentals 206-954-1667 or 206-780-9703 Vacation rentals. Low season rates. Special mid week rates. See our ad on Page 23

Domaine Madeleine 146 Wildflower Lane, Port Angeles 98362; 360-457-4174 or 888-811-8376 Panoramic views, private entrance, Jacuzzi style tubs, fireplace, sun deck, beautiful Asian-influenced grounds, TV/VCR/CD and a five-course breakfast. See our ad on Page 62 Downtown Hotel 101½ E. Front St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-565-1125 Seventeen view rooms one block from Victoria ferries, in the center of downtown Port Angeles. See our ad on Page 55 Eden by the Sea B&B 1027 Finn Hall Road, Port Angeles; 360-452-6021 A unique Eden by the Sea. Holds many enchanting experiences for the curious traveler. See our ad on Page 62 La Place Sur La Mer 2026 Place Road, Port Angeles 98363; 360-565-8029 Three unique vacation suites with all amenities. Private pampering at reasonable rates. See our ad on Page 62 Red Lion Hotel 221 N. Lincoln St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-452-9215; www.red-lion-port-angeles.com Business center, conference rooms, meeting space, pool, CrabHouse restaurant and lounge. See our ad on Page 49

Sequim/Dungeness Valley Brigadoon Vacation Rentals 62 Balmoral Court, Sequim 98382; 360-6832255, 800-397-2256; sequimrentals.com Lovely homes and cabins from Joyce to Gardiner. See our ad on Page 31

Sportsmen Motel 2909 Highway 101 E., Port Angeles 98362; 360-457-6196; www.sportsmenmotel.com. 16 rooms with kitchens, cable TV, smoking and non-smoking. Brand new coin operated laundry room available for all guests. Eight minutes to downtown Port Angeles. Ample parking, close to restaurants, shops, grocery store. See our ad on Page 63

Clark’s Chambers Bed & Breakfast 322 Clark Road, Sequim 98382; 360-6834431; e-mail clacha@olypen.com A pioneer family farmhouse with great mountain and water views. The oldest family owned farm in Washington state. See our ad on Page 35

Whiskey Creek Beach 1392 Whiskey Creek Beach, Joyce, 98343; 360-928-3489 Saltwater beach on the Straits of Juan de Fuca. Cabins at the beach year ‘round. Camping and RV site seasonal. Call for reservations. See our ad on Page 63

Red Caboose B&B P.O. Box 3803, Sequim 98382; 360-683-7204 or 360-683-7350 Retreat to your own private luxury caboose. Gourmet breakfast served in our 1934 Zephyr dining car. See our ad on Page 35 Port Angeles Colette’s Bed & Breakfast 339 Finn Hall Road, Port Angeles 98362; 360-457-9197 or 800-457-9777 Luxury accommodations, 10-acre waterfront estate. See our ad on Page 62

North/West Coast Quileute Oceanside Resort 330 Ocean Drive; P.O. Box 67, LaPush 98350; 360-374-5267 or 800-487-1267 Slow your pace, renew your energies, come away! Take a step back from the rush of everyday life and absorb the peaceful hospitality of the Quileute tribe and the naturally beautiful surroundings of the Pacific Coast. 58 units ranging from condo style suites to camping cabins; RV sites; grocery; beachside Lonesome Creek RV Park with restrooms, showers, laundry; beaches, rocky cliffs, rivers. See our ad on Page 116

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Winter Summer Inn B&B 16651 Highway 112, Clallam Bay 98326; 360-963-2264; , www.wintersummerinn.com Clallam Bay bed and breakfast. See our ad on Page 81 Forks/West End Dew Drop Inn P.O. Box 1996, 100 Fernhill Road, Forks 98331; 888-433-9376 22 rooms; complimentary breakfast; direct TV; phone; air-conditioning; microwaves and refrigerators; in-room coffee makers; restaurants nearby. See our ad on Page 89

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Olympic Suites Inn 800 Olympic Drive, Forks, 98331; 800-2623433; www.olympicsuitesinn.com Madr Spacious one- and two-bedroom suites/rooms 2500 in quiet off-highway location. Suites at motel 360-3 rates. Mino See our ad Page 86 illnes immu Pacific Inn Motel See ou 352 S. Forks Ave., P.O. Box 1997, Forks 98331; 360-374-9400 or, for reservations, Quim 800-235-7344 2120 Microwaves and refrigerators in all rooms, 360-3 wireless Internet, close to rain forest, beach Care walking and many other interests. Suite avail- their able. Come on home to Forks! See ou See our ad on Page 89 Victoria Executive House Hotel 777 Douglas St., Victoria, B.C. V8W 2B5; 800-663-7001 The best of Victoria at our doorstep. See our ad on Page 96 Misty Meadows 2627 Bukin Drive, Victoria, B.C. V9E1H4; 250-727-6405; 250-727-6405 Peaceful Norwegian Fjord horse farm with guest trail riding. Close to city. See our ad on Page 98

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Fort North 360-3 Queen Victoria Hotel and Suites A mu 655 Douglas St., Victoria, B.C.; light 800-663-7007 www.qvhotel.com the b Located across the street from the Royal Brit- trails ish Columbia Museum, IMAX Theatre and only steps away from the Inner Harbour, US Jeffer Ferry terminal and Beacon Hill Park. The QV 540 W Hotel & Suites offers comfort, convenience Locat and location. (1892 See our ad on Page 97 oral h Marc Royal Scot Suite Hotel 425 Quebec St., Victoria; B.C. 250-388-5463 or 800-663-7515 Suites and deluxe rooms, restaurant, free parking and courtesy downtown shuttle. See our ad on Page 95


Marina Forks/West End Quileute Marina LaPush 98350; 360-374-5392; 800-487-1267 Moorage, charters, fuel and marine services. See our ad on Page 116

Medical Services Port Townsend/Jefferson County Generations Dental 642 Harrison St., Port Townsend 98368; 360379-1591 Expert dentistry for every stage of life. Visitors and new patients welcome. See our ad on Page 19 Madrona Hill Urgent Care 2500 W. Sims Way, Port Townsend 98368; 360-344-3663 Minor emergency and walk in clinic treating illness and injury. Providing x-ray and lab, immunizations and physicals. See our ad on Page 19 Quimper Family Medicine 2120 Lawrence St., Port Townsend 98368; 360-385-3826 Care for people of all ages in the context of their health, history, family and community. See our ad on Page 19

Museums Port Townsend/Jefferson County Fort Worden 200 Battery Way, Port Townsend; 360-344-4400 The site of a 19th century military fort, this 433-acre park features restored officers’ quarters and barracks, museum, marine science center, hiking and biking trails. Fort Flagler North end of Marrowstone Island; 360-385-1259 A museum and guided heritage tours highlight the park’s military history. Also walk the beach and the miles of hiking and biking trails in this 784-acre park. Jefferson County Historical Museum 540 Water St., Port Townsend; 360-385-1003 Located in Port Townsend’s historic City Hall (1892). Jefferson County artifacts, archives, oral histories and photographs. Hours daily March through December 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Quilcene Historical Museum Columbia and Center Valley Road, Quilcene 98376; 360-765-4848 Artifacts, photos and documents of the people, events and activities of the Quilcene area. Logging, farming, clubs, businesses, school, Native American are usual exhibits. Open April 21, Friday through Monday. Sequim/Dungeness Valley Museum and Arts Center 175 W. Cedar St., Sequim 98382; 360-683-8110; www.macsequim.org; e-mail info@SequimMuseum.org. Local history; mastodon exhibit; veteran’s exhibit. Tuesday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. See our ad on Page 75 Dungeness Schoolhouse 2781 Towne Road, Sequim 98382; 360-683-4270 Classes, programs and seminars are held in this restored Washington State Historical Site. Tour information at 360-683-4270. Port Angeles Museum at the Carnegie 207 S. Lincoln St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-452-2662 Local Clallam County history exhibits and Native American artifacts on display at the renovated Carnegie Library. Wednesday through Saturday, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Joyce Depot Museum 50999 Highway 112, Joyce Housed in the Milwaukee Line’s last remaining log depot. Displays, railroad memorabilia, area photos and artifacts. North/West Coast Makah Cultural and Research Center 1880 Bayview Ave., Neah Bay 98357; 360-645-2711; MakahMuseum@centurytel.net Open daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Five hundredyear-old artifacts from coastal archeological dig, Ozette houses, cedar canoes, replicas of whaling, sealing and fishing canoes, a fullsized longhouse and dioramas. Gift shop. See our ad on Page 82 Forks/West End Forks Timber Museum At the end of town adjacent to the Visitor Center; 360-374-9663 This museum highlights the area’s logging and homesteading history. Closes end of October, reopens May. Group tours during the winter by appointment. Victoria Craigdarroch Castle Historic House Museum 1050 Joan Crescent, Victoria V8S 3L5; 250-592-5323 An 1890s mansion with exquisite stained glass windows and period antiques.

603 Fort Rodd Hill Road, Victoria V9C 2W8 Visit a working lighthouse, Canada’s oldest west coast lighthouse and stroll the ramparts of three batteries built over a century ago. Maritime Museum of British Columbia 28 Bastion Square, Victoria B.C. V8@IH9; 250-385-4222 Public programs, events and exhibits. Royal BC Museum 675 Belleville St., Victoria V8W 9W2; 260-356-7226 The Museum showcases the human and natural history of British Columbia and temporary exhibits from other countries and cultures. Authentic artifacts and specimens are displayed in highly realistic settings, giving visitors the experience of another time and place.

Nurseries and Farms Sequim/Dungeness Valley Dan’s Beef and Tractor 242 Cook Road, Sequim 98382; 360-6836883 or 360-808-2581 Premium quality hay for Clallam County. Sold by the bale. See our ad on Page 36 Port Angeles Lazy J Tree Farm and Nurture Dirt Compost 225 Gehrke Road, Port Angeles 98362; 360457-5950 Christmas trees; apples; potatoes; garlic; cider; Asian pears; compost. See our ad on Page 36

Outdoor Activities and SUpplies Sequim/Dungeness Valley SkyRidge Golf Course & Learning Center 7015 Old Olympic Highway, Sequim 98382; 360-683-3673 10-hole golf course with two ninth holes. Course plays 2,700 to 3,400 yards for nine holes, with four different sets of tees. See our ad on Page 29 Port Angeles Port of Port Angeles 338 W. First St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-417-3435; www.portofpa.com Marinas, airports, boat ramps and marine terminals. See our ad on Page 65

Fort Rodd Hill and Fisgard Lighthouse National Historic Site fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  109


directory Complete veterinarian services. See our ad on Page 66

Scuba Supplies 120 E. Front St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-457-3190 Scuba supplies, tank refills, specialty gear, guided dives and instruction classes offered. See our ad on Page 51

Pet Supplies/Services Port Townsend/Jefferson County Frog Mountain Pet Care 870 Martin Road, Port Townsend 98368; 360-385-2957 Exceptional boarding facility for your dog or cat. By appointment only. See our ad on Page 66 Laundro-Mutt 2457 Jefferson St., Port Townsend 98368; 360-385-6805 The best Olympic Peninsula self-service dog wash. See our ad on Page 66 Sequim/Dungeness Valley Country Paws Pet Resort and Grooming 42 Dory Road, Sequim 98382; 360-582-9686 Grooming and boarding. Pick-up and delivery service. Twenty years experience. See our ad on Page 67 Cozy Care Pet Boarding Sequim 98382; 360-681-0113 Dog and cat boarding with a professional touch. By appointment only. See our ad on Page 67 Goin’ to the Dogs 53 Valley Center Place, Sequim 98382; 360-681-5055 Dog grooming and training. Indoor and outdoor training facility. See our ad on Page 67 Greywolf Veterinary Hospital 1102 E. Washington St., Sequim 98382; 360-683-2106 Complete veterinary care for dogs, cats and exotics. See our ad on Page 67 Pacific NW Veterinary Hospital 289 W. Bell St., Sequim 98382; 360-681-3368 Companion animal practice. See our ad on Page 67 Port Angeles Angeles Clinic for Animals 160 Del Guzzi Drive, Port Angeles 98362; 360-452-7686

The Cat’s Pajama’s: A B&B for Cats 318 Howe Road, off N. Barr, Agnew area, Port Angeles 98363; 360-565-1077 We provide an environment devoted to and exclusively for cats and kittens. See our ad on Page 66 Olympic Peninsula Humane Society 2105 W. Highway 101, Port Angeles; 360-457-8206 Open Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. See our ad on Page 66 Westside Grooming and Pet Sitting 464 Gagnon Road, Port Angeles 98363 (near PA airport); 360-457-6997 Pet grooming and pet sitting. Ask about Doggy Day Care. See our ad on Page 66

Real Estate, Escrow and Construction Sequim/Dungeness Valley Blue Sky Real Estate 190 Priest Road, P.O. Box 1060, Sequim 98382; 360-683-3900; www.blueskysequim.com See our ad on Page 40 John L. Scott/Rita Adragna, Broker 1190 E. Washington St., Sequim 98382; 360-460-3692 Real Estate Broker. See our ad on Page 40 John L. Scott/Bill Humphrey 1190 E. Washington St., Sequim 98382; 360-460-2400 Real Estate Associate Broker. See our ad on Page 40 ReMax 5th Avenue/Team McAleer 560 N. Fifth Ave., Sequim; 360-683-1500 Realtors Mike McAleer, E. Michael McAleer and Colleen McAleer. See our ad on Page 40 Windermere Sequim East/Linda Ulin SRES 842 E. Washington St., Sequim 98382; 360-271-0891 Real Estate Agent. SRES See our ad on Page 40 Windermere Sequim East/Lori Tracey 842 East Washington St., Sequim 98382; 360-550-6042 Realtor. See our ad on Page 40 Windermere — SunLand 137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 98382; 360-6836880; 800-359-8823; www.sequimproperty.com See our ad on Page 40

110  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

Port Angeles Coldwell Banker Uptown Realty — Jean Irvine 1115 E. Front St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-417-2797 Realtor. See our ad on Page 40 Jace The Real Estate Co.— Charles Rogers 933 E. First St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-808-4741 Real estate agent. See our ad on Page 41 Jace The Real Estate Co.— Tammy Newton 933 E. First St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-417-8598 Realtor. See our ad on Page 41 Jace The Real Estate Co.— Pat Holland 933 E. First St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-640-3976 Realtor. Home staging expert. See our ad on Page 41 John L. Scott Real Estate — Don Edgmon 1134 E. Front St., Port Angeles 98362; 360457-8593 Ext. 310; www.johnlscott.com/doned See our ad on Page 41 John L. Scott/Tanya Kerr 1134 E. Front St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-670-6776; www.johnlscott.com/tanyakerr See our ad on Page 41 Port Angeles Realty/Kathy Love 1129 E. Front St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-452-3333 Real Estate Designated Broker. See our ad on Page 41 Port Angeles Realty/Margo Petersen-Pruss 1129 E. Front St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-460-4251 Quality first. Expect it. See our ad on Page 41 Properties By Landmark 330 E. First St., suite 1, Port Angeles 98362; 360-452-1326; PortAngelesLandmark.com Complete real estate rentals and property management specialists. See our ad on Page 51 Windermere — Harriet Reyenga 711 E. Front St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-457-0456 ext. 30; www.harriet.com See our ad on Page 41

Retirement Homes Sequim/Dungeness Valley Sherwood Assisted Living 550 W. Hendrickson Road, Sequim 98382; 360-683-3348; www.sherwoodassistedliving.com. Assisted living with a difference. Also providing short stay respite and a special-needs unit for residents with Alzheimer’s disease and


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dementia. Call our assisted living facility for a gers private tour. See our ad on Page 32

The Lodge at Sherwood Village 660 Evergreen Farm Way, Sequim 98382; 360-681-3100; www.TheLodgeatsherwood.com. wton Luxury retirement living. Beautiful, bright, 1 and 2 bedroom apartments, full-service, restaurant-style dining, weekly housekeeping, linen service, limo transportation, daily activities, day spa, bistro and beauty salon. See our ad on Page 32 d

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Port Angeles Park View Villas 1430 Park View Lane, Port Angeles 98363; 360- 452-7222; www.villageconcepts.com Voted #1 Assisted Living three years in a row! Located in the heart of Port Angeles, Park View Villas allows you to relax and enjoy retirement amidst a thoughtful, caring community on Washington’s beautifully rustic Olympic Peninsula. At Park View Villas, we strive to enhance the quality of your life, whether you are pursuing an active, independent lifestyle or you require more personal living assistance. Bring retirement to life, at Park View Villas. See our ad on Page 63

Rock Collecting

Port Angeles Harrison Beach uss 299 Harrison Beach Road, off West Lyre River Road; 360-928-3006 Day-use fee, overnight camping, open yearround; jasper, agate, fossils, etc., use deposit box. See our ad on Page 76

Whiskey Creek Beach 62; About three miles west of Joyce off state Highway 112; 360-928-3489 Fees for car and driver, each additional person; phone for day-use times; open year round, phone for details on rock hunting See our ad on Page 63

Seafood, Smoked Meats

Port Angeles Sunrise Meats 1325 E. First St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-457-3211 or 800-953-3211 Smoked and vacuum-packed products; gift 2; packages; smoked salmon, kippered-hard .com. smoked salmon jerky, salmon pepperoni, beef vidjerky and smoked sausage. unit See our ad on Page 47 d

Port Angeles Peninsula College 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., Port Angeles 98362; 360-452-9277, 877-452-9277 Provides educational opportunities in the areas of academic transfer, professional, technical, basic skills and continuing education. Awards BAS and two-year degrees as well as professional certificates. See our ad on Page 50

Shipping Services Port Angeles The UPS Store 136 E. Eighth St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-452-6602; www.theupsstorelocal.com/2889 Locally owned franchise providing full document services, notary, fax, private mailboxes. Freight service for large items as well as packaging and shipping. See our ad on Page 48

shopping (general) Port Townsend/Jefferson County Diva Yarn 940 Water St., Port Townsend 98368; 360-385-4844; wwwdivayarn.com Located in beautiful James & Hastings Building, built in 1889. Open daily with yarn, fiber, buttons, jewelry,books, needles, everything for fiber enthusiasts. Come visit our shops in person and see our playground for yourself. Daily 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. See our ad on Page 18 Hadlock Building Supply 901 Nesses Corner Road, Port Hadlock; 360-385-1771 You will find everything you need to complete your next project here! Whether you are a commercial contractor, custom home builder or landscaper — we have it. See our ad on Page 12 Mountain Propane 265 Chimacum Road, Port Hadlock 98339; 360-385-6883 or 360-683-1881; www.mountainpropane.com Mountain Propane is a locally owned and operated, full service propane store with many years of experience in the propane industry. See our ad on Page 11 Mystery Bay Shipping Company 877-404-6272 or 360-385-3263; www.mysterybayshipping.com Stylish gift baskets. Featuring local goods and gifts from the Olympic Rain Shadow. See our ad on Page 18 Sequim/Dungeness Valley Eclipse Minerals Worldwide 360-797-1176

645 W. Washington St., suite 216, Sequim 98382; meteoritemip@hotmail.com Come be amazed by the beautiful selection of meteorites, fossils, minerals, jewelry, museum pieces and fine art. We are a store that will amaze! Stop by and check out the beauty of the world. See our ad on Page 37 R&T Crystals 158 E. Bell St., Sequim 98382; 360-681-5087 Beautiful items made of semiprecious gemstones. Beads, jewelry findings, jewelry, large tumbled stone selection, crystals and much more. See our ad on Page 37 The Red Rooster Grocery 134½ W. Washington St., Sequim 98382; 360-681-2004 Local items include seasonal produce, grass fed natural beef, cheese, milk, eggs, organic seeds, roasted coffee, honey, bread, chocolate, wine, beer, soap, cooking items, homemade soup to go! See our ad on Page 26 Port Angeles Captain T’s 124 W. Railroad Ave., Port Angeles 98362; 360-452-6549, www.captaints.com The biggest little gift shop with engraved, screen printed, embroidered and customized gift items, Port Angeles and Peninsula themed gifts. See our ad on Page 46 Charming Consignments 629 E. Front St., Port Angeles 98362; 360-452-9863 Designer women’s and teen’s clothing and accessories. Brand name clothing. Sizes 0 to plus. Open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. See our ad on Page 56 Joyce General Store 50883 Highway 112 W., Joyce 98343; 360-928-3568 Vintage general store, serving the community since 1911 — gas, groceries, tackle, bait and other items. Unique gifts, souvenirs and Indian arts and crafts. See our ad on Page 55 Pacific Rim Hobby 138 W. Railroad Ave., downtown Port Angeles 98362; 360-457-0794 Model hobbies, radio control, rocketry, kites and planes, specialty tools and railroads. See our ad on Page 54 What’s In Store 115 E. Railroad Ave., Port Angeles 98362; inside The Landing mall; 360-457-1427 Souvenirs of Washington and Canada. Fashion jewelry, apparel, gifts, postcards, Twilight merchandise, accessories. Next to the B.C. ferries. See our ad on Page 54

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directory spa, fitness and beauty services Port Angeles Skincare Suites Spa 106 N. Lincoln St., Port Angeles 98362; 360o-565-0200 Voted First Place Best Spa on the Peninsula. An elite spa offering full body skin rejuvenation, red light therapy, massage including couples massage, hot stone massage, deep tissue and Swedish massage, also facials, chemical peels, paraffin and sea clay body wraps, detox wrap and hydration wrap, teeth whitening, full body waxing and brow tinting. See our ad on Page 48

transportation Port Townsend/Jefferson County Ferries: Call 800-843-3779 for complete Washington state ferry information. State ferries depart from Port Townsend for Keystone on Whidbey Island daily; schedules available at ferry dock in downtown Port Townsend and at many shops. Jefferson County International Airport 320 Airport Cut-Off Road, Port Townsend Six miles southwest of Port Townsend, 3000 foot runway, 12,500-pound aircraft capacity. Jefferson Transit Call 360-385-4777 or 800-773-7788 for complete schedule information Serves all of East Jefferson County and provides connections with Clallam Transit, Kitsap Transit, and Island Transit (Whidbey). Routes to Port Hadlock, Port Ludlow, Discovery Bay, Brinnon, Quilcene and Chimacum. See our ads on Page 11 Sequim/Dungeness Valley Sequim Valley Airport 3 miles west of Sequim; Website: www.sequimvalleyairport.com 3500-foot paved lighted runway. Privately owned, open for public use. Tie Downs and Avgas available. Port Angeles Black Ball Transport Inc./MV Coho 101 E. Railroad Ave., Port Angeles; 360-4574491; www.ferrytovictoria.com Year-round car and passenger walk on ferry service between Victoria and Port Angeles with daily sailings. Offering full travel packages and tours with bookings for hotels, attractions, car rentals and more. See our ad on Page 48 Kenmore Air Express William R. Fairchild International Airport, 1404 West Airport Road, Port Angeles 98363; 360-452-6371 or 866-435-9524; KenmoreAir.com Several round-trip flights daily between Port Angeles and Seattle, 35-minute flight time,

amazing views! Also serving Orcas, San Juan and Whidbey Island daily. See our ad on Page 2 Olympic Bus Lines 111 E. Front St., Port Angeles 98362; 800-457-4492 Regular, daily passenger service Seattle, SeaTac, Kinsgston, Edmonds, hospitals, Greyhound, Amtrack. See our ad on Page 115 Victoria Express (Victoria Rapid Transit) 138 E. Railroad Ave., The Landing mall, downtown Port Angeles 98362; 360-452-8088 North/West Coast Sekiu Airport Off Highway 112 on Airport Road, Sekiu. 24-hour air strip; 2,000-foot runway with lights, hangars and tiedowns available, restrooms and phone. Forks/West End Forks Municipal Airport On South Forks Avenue across from the Forks Visitor Center Lighted 2400-foot asphalt runway and apron parking area. Quillayute Airport 10 miles west of Forks, between Forks and LaPush. Former Navy base, one active runway. Victoria Black Ball Transport Inc./MV Coho 101 E. Railroad Ave., Port Angeles 98362; 360-457-4491 Vehicle and passenger ferry service between Victoria and Port Angeles. See our ad on Page 48 Victoria Clipper 800-888-2535; or 250-382-8100 in Victoria; or 206-448-5000 in Seattle. Victoria International Airport Located 18 kilometers north of Victoria. Modern, airport with up-to-date passenger services and recently renovated terminal. Shuttle service to Victoria.

Wineries Port Townsend/Jefferson County Eaglemount Winery 2350 Eaglemount Road, Port Townsend 98368; 360-732-4084 Offering fine wines and hard ciders from one of the original homestead orchards. See our ad on Page 68

112  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

FairWinds Winery 1984 Hastings Ave. W., Port Townsend 98368; 360-385-6899 www.fairwindswinery.com See our ad on Page 69 Finnriver Farm and Tasting Room 62 Barn Swallow Road, Chimacum 98325; 360-732-6822 Artisan hard ciders, wines and spirits, MayOctober: Thursday through Monday, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Se our ad on Page 69 Sorensen Cellars — LTD 274 S. Otto St., Port Townsend 98368; 360379-6416; www.sorensencellars.com Taste our collection of premium Washington state wines. See our ad on Page 69 Other Areas Hoodsport Winery 23501 N. Highway 101, Hoodsport 98548; 360-877-9894, 800-580-9894 Located on Highway 101 just south of the town of Hoodsport. See our ad on Page 68 Port Angeles Black Diamond Winery 2976 Black Diamond Road, Port Angeles 98362; 360-457-0748 We specialize in fruit and grape wines. See our ad on Page 69 Camaraderie Cellars 334 Benson Road, Port Angeles 98363; 360417-3564; Open event weekends in November and February. See our ad on Page 69 Harbinger Winery Highway 101, 3 miles west of Port Angeles, Port Angeles; 360-452-4262 Wine tasting. Open to the public. See our ad on Page 69 Olympic Cellars Winery Washington “Working Girl” Boutique Winery Six miles east of Port Angeles on U.S. Highway 101; 255410 Highway 101, Port Angeles 98362; 360-452-0160 Taste award winning wines; browse our extensive gift shop and sample gourmet food products; tasting room. Open daily 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. See our ad on Page 69


Advertiser Directory We have provided this list of our advertisers so that you can easily look up information about their businesses. Please patronize and thank them for making this information available to you.

Northwest Maritime Center ........................13 Olympic Bus Lines ....................................115 Olympic Game Farm ........................ 26 & 36 Olympic Suites ........................................... 86 Olympic Theatre Arts ................................. 25 Pacific Inn .................................................... 89 Pacific Rim Hobby ...................................... 54 Park View Villa ............................................ 63

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Black Ball Ferry ........................................ 48 Brigadoon Vacation Rentals ................. . . 31 Campgrounds & RV Directory ......... 76-77 Clallam County Parks Crescent Beach & RV Park GilGal Oasis Harrison Beach Jefferson County Fairgounds Mobuilt RV Peabody Creek RV Riverview RV Park Salt Creek RV & Golf Shadow Mountain Captain T’s ...............................................46 Clubs & Organizations .....................52-53 Coffee Directory .....................................28 Cornerhouse Restaurant .........................51 Dew Drop Inn ...........................................89 Domino’s Pizza ........................................46 Downtown Hotel .......................................55 Dungeness Courte ..................................30 Elwha River Casino ...............................115 Executive House ......................................96 Farms & Nurseries .................................36 Forks Chamber of Commerce ................. 88 Forks Coffee Shop ..........................28 & 87 Hadlock Building Supply ..........................12 Heritage Tours .........................................54 Jefferson County Art Galleries..............14 Jefferson County Churches ............16-17

Jefferson County Healthcare ................19 Jefferson County Dining & Shopping ..18 Jefferson Transit .......................................11 Joyce General Store .................................. 55 Kenmore Air .................................................. 2 Lodge at Sherwood Village ....................... 32 Makah Cultural Museum ........................... 82 Martha’s Vacation Rentals ........................ 23 Mountain Propane ..................................... 11 Mist Meadows ......................................... 98 Native American Footprints ....................... 54

fall | winter 2010/2011  C  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  113


Advertiser Directory We have provided this list of our advertisers so that you can easily look up information about their businesses. Please patronize and thank them for making this information available to you.

Peninsula College ...................................... 50 Pet Directory .....................................66-67 Angeles Clinic for Animals Cat’s Pajamas B&B Cozy Care Pet Boarding Country Paws Frog Mountain Goin’ to the Dogs Greywolf Veterinary Hospital Laundro-Mutt Olympic Peninsula Humane Society Pacific NW Veterinary Hospital Westside Grooming

114  Newcomers’ and visitors’ guide  C  fall | winter 2010/2011

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Port Angeles Art Directory ...................75 Port Angeles B&Bs ............................... 62 Colette’s Domaine Madeleine La Place Sur La Mer Eden by the Sea Port Angeles Churches .................. 60-61 Port Angeles Downtown Assoc. ............. 47 Port Angeles Dining & Shopping ... 56-57 Port of Port Angeles ............................... 65 Properties by Landmark ......................... 51 Queen Victoria Hotel ............................... 97

Quileute Resort .................................... 116 Real Estate Directory ...................... 40-41 Red Lion Hotel ........................................ 49 Red Rooster Grocery .............................. 26 Royal Scot Hotel ..................................... 95 Rudy’s Automotive .................................. 51 Scuba Supplies ....................................... 51 Sequim B&Bs ........................................ 35 Clark’s Chambers Red Caboose Sequim Chamber of Commerce ............. 27 Sequim Churches ............................ 38-39 Sequim Dining & Shopping ................. 37 Sherry Grimes Designs .......................... 26 Skincare Suites ....................................... 48 Skyridge Golf Course ............................. 29 Sportsmen Motel .................................... 63 Sunrise Meats ......................................... 47 Unique Treasures..................................... 29 UPS Store ............................................... 48 West End Churches .............................. 91 What’s in Store ....................................... 54 Whiskey Creek Beach ............................ 63 Wine Association .................................... 69 Wine Directory ...................................... 68 Winter/Summer Inn ................................. 81


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Monday nights are all about the men at the Elwha River Casino! Guys earn DOUBLE POINTS and $10.00 SLOT PLAY Hot Seat Prizes!

tuESdayS, 7:00PM – 10:00PM: ladiES niGht

Oh yes… it’s Ladies Night every Tuesday at the Elwha River Casino! Girls earn DOUBLE POINTS and $10.00 SLOT PLAY Hot Seat Prizes!

WEdnESdayS, 10:00aM – 9:00PM: SEnior day

It’s a fun-filled day for the 55 and over crowd every Wednesday at the Elwha River Casino! Seniors earn DOUBLE POINTS, 30% off in the deli, and $10.00 SLOT PLAY Hot Seat Prizes!

frEE ShuttlE SErvicE

Looking for something fun to do for your group or party? The Elwha River Casino shuttle bus is the answer! Reserve the bus for your next party or group outing to the Elwha River Casino, special packages available! For more information, call the Elwha River Casino at 452-3005.

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Royal Phoenix Brilliant Butterfly Puppy Tails Blazing Seven Frenzy Black and White Frenzy

MondayS, 7:00PM – 10:00PM: Guy’S niGht out

www.ELWHARIVERCASINO.com

Serving: Port Angeles • Sequim • Port Townsend • Discovery Bay • Kingston • Edmonds • Greyhound • Amtrak • Downtown Seattle • Sea Tac Airport • Seattle Hospitals

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Port Angeles/Sequim (360) 417-0700 Outside the area toll free (800) 457-4492 www.dungenessline.us

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A unique experience awaits at

Quileute Oceanside Resort on the Pacific Coast

Ancient Spirit calms your senses. Quileute hospitality warms your heart.

THE RESORT. Quileute Oceanside Resort offers a range of accommodations, from caper cabins and comfy family units to luxurious ocean-view suites. 800-487-1267

THE CONVENIENCE STORE. Quileute Lonesome Creek Store boasts all the essentials – plus a deli, espresso booth, gas station and much more. 360-374-4338

THE RV PARK. Quileute RV Park features spacious, ocean-front sites with pump-outs, a club house, laundry and shower facilities. 360-374-4338

THE MARINA. Quileute Marina offers transient moorage, charters, fuel and marine services. 360-374-5392

THE RESTAURANT. Quileute Rivers Edge restaurant presents breath-taking sea views and fresh-off-the-boat seafood. 360-374-5777

THE EXPERIENCE. No phones. No TV. Just all you need for an invigorating experience. Right on First Beach. Olympic National Park is within walking distance, rain forests a short drive away.

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Twilight & Whale Watching Packages Available

Open year-round, Quileute Oceanside Resort is located just off Highway 101 on the Olympic Peninsula, in the Quileute Village at La Push, Washington

For reservations and information:

800-487-1267 330 Ocean Drive, LaPush, WA 98350

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Visit our website for Special Packages www.quileuteoceanside.com


Fall 2010 - Winter 2011 Olympic Peninsula Vistors and Newcomers Guide