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May 1, 2011

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Jefferson County Historical Society Executive Director Bill Tennent tells of the history of the BartlettCotton Building during its rededication Saturday afternoon. Dorothy Cotton, left, listens.

‘A great space’ for art in PT Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News

Gage Little, right, of Little and Little Construction sets bolts in the foundation of the Jefferson County Historical Society Research Center as Malcolm Tice moves wood panels out of the foundation site Friday. More information about the new $1.5 million building — which will be located on a 4-acre site at 13694 Airport Cutoff Road and is scheduled for completion later this year — will be given during the Founders’ Day celebration in the historic Port Townsend City Council chambers, 540 Water St., at 1 p.m. today.

It was a Capitol offense Ex-Rep. Kessler given art she fought over in Olympia By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — Centrum officials have presented retired lawmaker Lynn Kessler with a series of prints based on images in a controversial mural that was taken down in the 1990s from a wall in the state Capitol in Olympia. “You have no idea how much these mean to me because they were so much a part of my life in my office,” Kessler said at Friday’s presentation, which followed a Centrum board meeting at Fort Worden State Park. “This is such a kind present, which I will keep for the rest of my life.” Kessler, a Democrat from Hoquiam, represented the 24th District for 18 years, 12 as House majority leader, before her retirement last year. The district covers Jefferson and Clallam counties and part of Grays Harbor County. Rep. Steve Tharinger, a Democrat from Sequim, was elected to her seat in November. Kessler took the opportunity to speak for public support of the arts. “It saddens me to see that legislators are looking to cut support for public art as a way to balance the budget when art is part of the balance of life,” she said.

By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — The historic Bartlett-Cotton Building’s new life as a visitor center and a place for community gatherings and public art displays began Saturday with a dedication ceremony that drew about 35 people. “This is a great space,” said Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Teresa Verraes. “It’s a wonderful place for us to meet our families and neighbors to enjoy public art.” The restoration of the 1888 building down- Verraes town at 607 Water St. was part of a $5.1 million refurbishment of the Civic District — the area between Monroe and Madison streets in downtown Port Town­send. “It took a whole lot of people to make this happen,” said Mayor Michelle Sandoval as she presided over the short ceremony that preceded a panel discussion about art in public places. Turn

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Work to start on Border Patrol HQ By Paul Gottlieb

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Work will begin within three weeks on the North Olympic Peninsula’s new Border Patrol headquarters, barely a month after Eagles Aerie 483 Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News completed the $2 million sale of its lodge to Former state Rep. Lynn Kessler is presented with original prints of “The Labors of the federal government. Hercules” by artist Michael Spafford during a visit to Fort Worden State Park on Project manager Mike Sangren of the Friday. The images were used in a mural that caused controversy during Kessler’s U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said Friday first terms in the Legislature. the building at 110 Penn St. east of downtown Port Angeles will be gutted and redone “I understand the trouble during a Centrum residency at draw a parallel to mythical and a new roof put on in two to three weeks. they are in with the current Fort Worden and were copied occurrences in Olympia, Greece, The 19,000-square-foot Border Patrol budget, but life without art from a mural that he had where Hercules’ struggles station “will just look newer on the outside” isn’t life; it’s just existence.” painted in 1980 for display in against evil and monsters are when the $5.7 million construction project The prints “The Labors of the House of Representatives’ depicted at the Temple of Zeus. is completed by April 2012, Sangren said. Hercules” were created by visitors gallery. Seattle artist Michael Spafford Spafford’s intention was to Turn to Artwork/A7 Turn to Patrol/A6

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Sunday, May 1, 2011

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Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2011, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Mariah Carey, Nick Cannon parents again MARIAH CAREY AND Nick Cannon celebrated their third anniversary with another milestone — becoming parents to a baby girl and boy. Carey’s representative, Cindi Berger, confirmed the births to The Associated Press. The singing superstar gave birth Saturday at 12:07 p.m. at an undisclosed hospital in Los Angeles. Berger said the baby girl was born first, weighing 5 pounds 3 ounces, and was 18 inches long; her brother was next, at 5 pounds 6 ounces, and was 19 inches. Berger said the couple have not named the children yet. Cannon drove Carey to the hospital in their RollsRoyce Phantom. Berger said the 41-year-old Carey, who had gone through false labor, was calm, thinking that it was another false alarm. Meanwhile, the 30-year-

she’s done.

Mohr on ‘Intent’

The Associated Press

Mariah Carey and Nick Cannon arrive at the 82nd Academy Awards, in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles on May 7, 2010. old Cannon was so nervous he went to the wrong department at the hospital and was guided to the maternity ward by a nurse. “It was like right out of an ‘I Love Lucy’ skit,” said Berger. Berger said they were listening to Carey’s “We Belong Together” after the children were born. The couple are expected to renew their wedding vows today. The couple plan to live a bi-coastal life, and have luxurious nurseries in both New York and Los Angeles. As far as more children, Carey recently declared

Jay Mohr said appearing on “Law & Order: Criminal Intent” made him more nervous than he ever felt working opposite Hollywood’s biggest stars. Mohr, who calls “Criminal Intent” his favorite TV show, guest stars as a hard-living fashion Mohr designer on today’s season-debut episode airing at 9 p.m. on USA Network. The first scene filmed by Mohr put his character in the interrogation room with detectives investigating a murder. Mohr said he felt intimidated working with series stars Vincent D’Onofrio and Kathryn Erbe in the tense scene. He said a guest shot on any “Law & Order” show is a test that actors either pass or fail. So how did he do? The actor-comedian said his wife, actress Nikki Cox, deemed him “excellent.”

Passings

Laugh Lines A NEW ZEALAND airline is offering what they call “cuddle class.” Don’t all airlines have that? It’s called “coach.” Jay Leno

THURSDAY’S QUESTION: Gov. Chris Gregoire said Wednesday she probably will veto part or all of the medical marijuana bill. Is she right or wrong to veto it? She’s right  44.8%

By The Associated Press

ERHARD LORETAN, 52, a famed Swiss mountain guide who was one of the few climbers to ever reach the summits of all 14 of the world’s peaks above 26,200 feet, has died in a climbing fall on his birthday. Swiss police said Friday that Mr. Loretan died leading a client up the summit ridge of the Gruenhorn, in the Bernese Alps in Mr. Loretan Switzerland. in 1998 The accident occurred Thursday at noon. The pair had skied up partway, then roped up for the final ascent. They fell for unknown reasons at 12,500 feet up the 13,264-foot peak. Mr. Loretan died at the scene, police from the Swiss canton of Valais said. Police are still investigating. Mr. Loretan, originally from the canton of Fribourg, began climbing at age 11. He climbed his first 26,200foot peak, Pakistan’s difficult Nanga Parbat, in 1982. It took him 13 years to make it up the other 13 tall peaks. His 1986 ascent of Mount Everest, without bottled oxygen and in a nighttime push with climbing partner Jean Troillet that took just 40 hours, stunned the alpine climbing world and made headlines in climbing magazines and newspapers. “We didn’t intend to

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL

climb Everest in two days; we just set off and we were fortunate to do it in two days,” he told last year’s Trento Film Festival in Italy, in a video posted on its webite. Mr. Loretan’s legendary exploits in the mountains were nearly overshadowed by the debate he prompted on babyshaking in Switzerland after he pleaded guilty to negligent manslaughter in the death of his 7-monthold son.

_________

ERNESTO SABATO, 99, a writer who led the government’s probe of crimes committed by Argentina’s dictatorship, has died in Buenos Aires. The writer died of complications of bronchitis, his friend and collaborator Elvira Gonzalez Mr. Sabato Fraga told in 2002 Radio Mitre. Mr. Sabato was a widely admired 73-year-old intellectual, author of works such as On Heroes and Tombs, when President Raul Alfonsin asked him to lead an investigation into crimes committed under

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots ON THE BEACH at Fort Worden, a driftwood table set for two, with barnacle cups, rolled-seaweed napkins and an entree of beach glass ala clamshell. . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or email news@peninsuladaily news.com.

the soldiers who led Argentina from 1976 to 1983. He called his work of helping to document the murders, tortures and illegal arrests committed by a regime he had initially supported a “descent into hell.” The commission’s report, “Never Again,” served as the basis for prosecuting key figures in the dictatorship after the return to civilian rule. Official and independent agencies estimate that 12,000 to 30,000 were killed by government forces seeking to wipe out leftists. Like many Argentines, Mr. Sabato initially welcomed the coup that overthrew President Isabel Peron following economic problems, social turmoil and clashes with leftist guerrillas, but he grew critical by 1979, denouncing censorship.

She’s wrong 

46.6%

Undecided  8.5% Total votes cast: 995 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com

NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1936 (75 years ago)

Arno B. Cammerer, National Park Service director testifying at a House Public Lands Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., on a bill to create a Mount Olympus National Park, said national parks from an economic standpoint are “our finest examples of sustained yield.” The bill, introduced by Rep. Mon C. Wallgren, Did You Win? D-Everett, whose district State lottery results includes the North Olympic Peninsula, represents a Friday’s Daily Game: “distinct issue between the 6-7-6 lumber industry and [U.S.] Friday’s Keno: 02-03Forest Service on the one 05-06-08-12-14-17-19-25-29- hand, and the National 35-37-40-42-43-53-55-67-75 Park Service on the other,” Friday’s Match 4: Cammerer told the com01-16-19-23 mittee. Friday’s Mega Mil“The committee must lions: 09-10-11-33-51, decide on the question of Mega Ball: 29 the use to which this gorSaturday’s Daily geous stand of virgin timGame: 5-4-8 ber is to be put. Saturday’s Hit 5: “You must remember 01-03-11-27-39 Congress never created a Saturday’s Keno: 03-06-14-15-18-19-20-21-25- national park — only God 28-32-39-46-50-51-60-73-77- can do that.” 79-80 1961 (50 years ago) Saturday’s Lotto: 10-13-22-28-36-48 A Loyalty Day program Saturday’s Match 4: under the sponsorship of 04-08-13-19 Clyde Rhodefer Post No. Saturday’s Powerball: 1024 of the Veterans of For06-13-15-32-41, Powerball: eign Wars will be held in 3, Power Play: 2 Port Angeles today.

Post Commander Julian E. Meek said the main feature of the program will be an assembly at the high school featuring speakers state Sen. Gordon Sandison and Lt. Cmdr. Jack Lyon of the Port Angeles Coast Guard Air Station. Meek said the VFW nationally created Loyalty Day as May 1 to counteract communist May Day celebrations behind the Iron Curtain. Clallam County commissioners proclaimed Loyalty Day today across the county.

1986 (25 years ago) A critical nursing shortage and a possible decline in the quality of nursing care have prompted Forks Community Hospital commissioners to call for an investigation of staffadministration relations. “We are still able to perform, but we are not always able to deliver the quality of care we promise [to patients],” administrator Dave McIvor told the Hospital Board. But after the meeting, Jean Fletcher, director of nursing, said the nursing shortage “is not at a point where it has affected care yet.”

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS SUNDAY, May 1, the 121st day of 2011. There are 244 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On May 1, 1961, the first U.S. airline hijacking took place as Antulio Ramirez Ortiz, a Miami electrician, commandeered a National Airlines plane that was en route to Key West, Fla., and forced the pilot to fly to Cuba. On this date: ■  In 1707, the Kingdom of Great Britain was created as a treaty merging England and Scotland took effect. ■  In 1786, Mozart’s opera “The Marriage of Figaro” premiered in Vienna. ■  In 1811, the frigate HMS Guerriere boarded the merchant

brig USS Spitfire and seized master apprentice John Diggio, a native of Maine, heightening tensions between the U.S. and Britain. ■  In 1898, Commodore George Dewey gave the command, “You may fire when you are ready, Gridley,” as an American naval force destroyed a Spanish squadron in Manila Bay during the SpanishAmerican War. ■  In 1911, the song “I Want a Girl (Just Like the Girl That Married Dear Old Dad),” by Harry Von Tilzer and Will Dillon, was first published. ■  In 1931, New York’s 102story Empire State Building was dedicated. ■  In 1941, the Orson Welles

motion picture “Citizen Kane” premiered in New York. ■  In 1960, the Soviet Union shot down an American U-2 reconnaissance plane over Sverdlovsk and captured its pilot, Francis Gary Powers. ■  In 1971, the intercity passenger rail service Amtrak went into operation. ■  In 1982, the World’s Fair opened in Knoxville, Tenn. ■  Ten years ago: President George W. Bush committed the United States to building a shield against ballistic missile attack. FBI Director Louis Freeh announced his retirement. Thomas Blanton Jr. became the second ex-Ku Klux Klansman to be convicted in the 1963 bombing of a church in Birmingham, Ala.,

that claimed the lives of four black girls; he was sentenced to life in prison. ■  Five years ago: Hundreds of thousands of mostly Hispanic immigrants in the U.S. skipped work and took to the streets, flexing their economic muscle in a nationwide boycott. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Anna Nicole Smith could pursue part of her late husband’s oil fortune. Bolivian President Evo Morales nationalized the country’s vast natural gas industry. ■  One year ago: Pakistanborn U.S. citizen Faisal Shahzad failed in an attempt to set off a homemade bomb in an SUV parked in New York’s Times Square.


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, May 1, 2011

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Briefly: Nation Predator drones likely won’t be decisive in Libya

elle Giffords — need to stick around for a Monday launch attempt or come back sometime around Mother’s Day. Technicians spent Saturday draining fuel from the shuttle and then getting into the WASHINGTON — President crowded guts of the left rear Barack Obama’s decision to use compartment. unmanned Predator drones in Their job is to figure out just Libya widened what had what went wrong in a heating become very limited U.S. partici- system for a power system that pation in the air war, but the controls crucial hydraulics. aircraft credited with taking out The problem was severe terrorist leaders in western enough to make NASA postpone Pakistan probably won’t prove Friday’s launch, which had decisive against Moammar Gad- become a spectacle. hafi’s forces. Kennedy Space Center Sending just two remotely appeared mostly empty Saturpiloted Predators, each with two day, foreshadowing what might Hellfire missiles designed to happen after the shuttle propierce armor, over Libya 24 gram ends this summer. hours a day is far from a gameGone were the crowds hoping changing addition to an air to see the second-to-last shuttle campaign that features an launch and throngs of media for array of high-flying French, the saga of Giffords, shot in the British and other European jets head by a would-be assassin in bombing Libyan ground targets January, and her husband, and enforcing a no-fly zone. Endeavour commander Mark The small scale of this Pred- Kelly. ator deployment suggests that drones, while effective, have a Today’s news guests downside. n ABC’s “This Week” — Rep. Paul The weapon has become a detested symbol of U.S. military Ryan, R-Wis. n NBC’s “Meet the Press” — Sen. might in Pakistan, where their Marco Rubio, R-Fla.; New York City use is tolerated by the U.S.Mayor Michael Bloomberg; Gov. Bob backed government but widely McDonnell, R-Va.; David Axelrod, top adviser to President Barack Obama’s recriticized by Pakistanis. election campaign. Afghan President Hamid n CBS’s “Face the Nation” — Sen. Karzai sometimes has decried John McCain, R-Ariz.; Gov. Robert Bentthe use of U.S. drones, which he ley, R-Ala. blames for civilian deaths. n CNN’s “State of the Union” — Their use in Libya is really Sens. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., Michael Bennet, D-Colo., and Lamar Alexander, only a half-step back into the R-Tenn.; Rep. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md.; fight. Bigger U.S. bombers and Stephen Hadley, national security other firepower remain idle.

Shuttle to be delayed? CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Engineers should know today whether Endeavour’s six-man crew and their families — including wounded Rep. Gabri-

adviser to President George W. Bush; former Rep. Jane Harman, D-Calif.; Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers. n “Fox News Sunday” — Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn.; Sens. Kent Conrad, D-N.D., and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.

The Associated Press

Briefly: World NATO strike kills Gadhafi’s son; leader escapes TRIPOLI, Libya — A NATO missile struck a house in Tripoli where Moammar Gadhafi and his wife were staying Saturday, missing the Libyan leader but killing his youngest son and three grandchildren, a government spokesman said. Seif al-Arab Gadhafi was the sixth son of Gadhafi and brother of the better-known Seif alIslam Gadhafi. The younger Gadhafi had spent much of his time in Germany in recent years. Moammar Gadhafi and his wife were in the Tripoli house of his 29-year-old son, Seif al-Arab Gadhafi, when it was hit by at least one bomb dropped from a NATO warplane, according to Libyan spokesman Moussa Ibrahim. “The leader himself is in good health,” Ibrahim said. “He was not harmed. The wife is also in good health.”

ing on demonstrators to try to suppress the popular revolt — action that has drawn international condemnation and U.S. financial penalties on top figures in his regime. The military raid on the Omari mosque in Daraa came a day after 65 people were killed most of them in the town on Syria’s border with Jordan. Friday was the second deadliest day since the uprising began in mid-March in Daraa.

Trio making bomb?

KARLSRUHE, Germany — Three suspected al-Qaida members were working on making a shrapnel-laden bomb in Germany to attack a crowded place such as a bus — a plot that shows Europe faces an ongoing terror threat, officials said Saturday. Law enforcement officials said the trio, arrested Friday after being under surveillance for months, hadn’t picked a specific target but were experimenting with explosives and detonators before authorities swooped in. The suspects include a Syria troops kill four Moroccan, a German with Moroccan citizenship and a GerBEIRUT — Syrian troops man with Iranian citizenship. killed four people Saturday The attack was “still in the while storming a mosque that became a focal point for protest- experimentation stage,” anti-terers in the besieged southern city rorism prosecutor Rainer Griesof Daraa, and security forces in baum said at a news conference. Officials decided to arrest the Damascus kept dozens of three in the western cities of women from marching on parDuesseldorf and Bochum after liament to urge President surveillance indicated they were Bashar Assad to end his crackdown on a six-week-old uprising. tinkering with making a detonator and had explored possible More members of Assad’s ruling Baath Party resigned in explosive materials — signs protest as human-rights activthey might be close to carrying ists said the death toll soared to out an attack. 535 from government forces firThe Associated Press

The Associated Press

This is an aerial view of tornado damage as residents in Tuscaloosa, Ala., continue the process of cleaning up Saturday.

Volunteers tending to storm-ravaged victims Tornadoes’ death toll reaches more than 340 across 7 states By Jeffrey Collins and Michael Kunzelman The Associated Press

PRATT CITY, Ala. — Whether it’s refilling blood-pressure medicine or patrolling neighborhoods in a grocery-filled pickup truck, tornado victims in splintered Southern towns said volunteers are ensuring they’re well-fed and warm at night. At least a few, though, say they need more from the government: help getting into their homes and cleaning up endless debris. Across the twister-ravaged South, students and church groups aggressively tended to those who needed it most, clearing away wreckage and handing out food and water. Wednesday’s tornadoes marked the second-deadliest day of twisters in U.S. history, leaving 341 people dead across seven states — including 249 in Alabama. Thousands were hurt, and hundreds of homes and businesses have vanished into rubble. Federal Emergency Management Agency workers handed out information to people in shelters about how to apply for help.

National Guard soldiers stood watch, searched for survivors and helped sift through debris. Churches transformed into buzzing community hubs. In Tuscaloosa, Ala., a Red Cross shelter was handing out clothes and providing counseling for folks like Carol Peck, 55, and her 77-year-old mother. She said the shelter’s First Aid station even refilled her blood pressure pills without her having to ask.

Medication refilled She can’t explain how it happened, but she suspects her clinic contacted the shelter. “Evidently, because I sure didn’t call,” she said. “They knew I was here. I don’t know how, but they found me.” In Ringgold, Ga., Poplar Springs Baptist Church had been transformed into an informal help center. Crews were dispatched from the church, some with chain saws to chop through the debris, others with bottled water and food. Inside the gymnasium, a barbecue buffet was feeding those without power.

“You’ve got elderly people out there who can’t get out there and do it,” said volunteer Kathleen Hensley, 40, of Ringgold. “They need a hand.” The University of Alabama’s athletic department was pitching in around hard-hit Tuscaloosa, with more than 50 athletic training students giving Gatorade, bottled water and protein bars to residents.

University helps out “Anything they have to give athletes, they’re giving away,” said Jenny Sanders, one of the volunteers. And most were grateful to get whatever they could. Niki Eberhart, whose home in the Alberta City neighborhood of Tuscaloosa was shredded by the tornado, said Saturday that her husband and two children are getting everything they need at the shelter. And it isn’t the first time they’ve counted on the Red Cross. When their home in Meridian, Miss., burned down last year in an electrical fire, Eberhart said the Red Cross responded within an hour. “We feel like we’ve been blessed,” she said. “Both times it could have been much worse. We lost things. Material possessions can be replaced.”

President Obama says gas, oil tax breaks ‘need to end’ By Jim Kuhnhenn

The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama said oil companies are profiting from rising pump prices and he wants Congress to end $4 billion in annual tax breaks for the oil and gas industry. “These tax giveaways aren’t right,” Obama said in his weekly radio and Internet address Saturday. “They aren’t smart. And we need to end them.” Drivers in 22 states are paying more than the national average of $3.91 per gallon. In Alaska, California and Connecticut, it’s $4.20 or more. The price jump has slowed economic growth and hurt Obama’s public approval ratings. Exxon Mobil Corp. last week

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reported nearly $11 billion in profits for the first quarter of this year. Competitors also had huge gains. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said he plans to consider Obama’s proposal as early as this coming week. The president said money recouped from ending the oil and gas tax subsidies should go to new energy resources and research. He said he refuses to cut spending on clean energy initiatives. “An investment in clean energy today is an investment in a better tomorrow,” he said. “And I think that’s an investment worth making.” Obama’s critics said ending the subsidies would mean tax increases that would end up

costing jobs. “The president may think he’s punishing CEOs of big companies, but his plan will hurt the everyday consumer of energy and imperil the jobs of millions of hardworking people in Americanbased companies,” Rep. James Lankford, a first-term congressman from Oklahoma, said in the Republicans’ weekly address. Eager to show action on gas costs, Obama has pushed to stop the subsidies while also conceding it would not have an immediate effect on prices. He has also called for the Justice Department to investigate possible price fixing and said this week he was also prodding oilproducing countries such as Saudi Arabia to increase production.

. . . more news to start your day

West: University targets more out-of-state students

Nation: R.I. diocese urges civil unions rejection

Nation: Spectator waiting for launch hit by car, killed

World: Britain’s new royal couple seek private time

THE UNIVERSITY OF California is looking for out-of-state solutions to its money problems. Faced with sharp cuts in state funding, the 10-campus system is ramping up its campaign to recruit high-paying students from other states and countries, even as record numbers of California students seek a UC education. For a second year, UC officials in April reported a significant increase in out-of-state and international students admitted for the coming fall term. UC charges students from outside California nearly $35,000 in annual tuition, about three times what state residents pay.

THE ROMAN CATHOLIC Diocese of Providence has urged Rhode Island lawmakers to reject an alternative establishing civil unions for gay couples, calling them a “stepping stone” to gay marriage. It followed state House Speaker Gordon Fox’s decision to stop his push for gay marriage and offer civil unions as a compromise. Fox, who is openly gay, said he didn’t believe he could deliver the votes needed for gay marriage to pass but that civil unions legislation would keep the issue alive and grant vital legal rights to same-sex couples. The legislation is expected to be introduced in the coming week.

POLICE SAID A spectator waiting for the space shuttle to launch was hit by a car and killed. Police said 70-year-old John Devoles was walking across the street Friday when he was hit. The street was jammed with cars on both sides of the four-lane highway as drivers tried to catch a glimpse of the space shuttle Endeavour. The launch was later scrubbed. The crash is under investigation. Charges are pending against the driver, who authorities said may have been speeding. Devoles died at a hospital a few hours after being hit. Authorities said he was not walking in a crosswalk.

SHUNNING AN IMMEDIATE overseas honeymoon and opting instead for a quiet weekend at a secret British location, Prince William and Princess Catherine made it clear Saturday they want space for themselves. This fight for privacy is crucial if they are to avoid being hounded like William’s mother, the late Princess Diana, whose every move was tailed. The royal newlyweds started the day by asking the media not to intrude this weekend and to leave them alone when they eventually start their honeymoon. Separately, palace officials also asked the media not to reveal where the couple live in Wales. (Related stories, Pages A5, D1)


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, May 1, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

June trial date set for hit-and-run suspect By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Michael J. Moyle will be tried in June for allegedly deliberately ramming a car carrying four people — including two small children — last month. The 28-year-old Port Angeles man pleaded not guilty Friday to charges of first-degree assault of a child, two counts of second-

d e g r e e assault, second-degree assault of a child — all of which come with an alternative charge Moyle of vehicular assault — and hit-and-run injury accident. His trial is set for June 20. A four-day trial

is expected. Moyle remained in Clallam County jail Saturday; his bond is $500,000. According to police, Moyle on April 13 chased a sedan from the Albertsons store parking lot at 114 E. Lauridsen Blvd. up South Laurel Street to near Viewcrest Avenue, where he rammed it with his car, sending it into a telephone pole.

The passengers, including a 5-year-old boy and 2-year-old girl, were hospitalized. All were released within a few days. Police said Moyle was picked up about a block away and driven from the scene by Timothy P. Smith. The next day, police said they found a loaded handgun in Smith’s truck, which he is not allowed to possess as a convicted felon.

Smith, 27, of Port Angeles, will be tried June 13 on charges of first-degree rendering criminal assistance and first-degree unlawful possession of a firearm in connection with the vehicle assault. Smith also will be tried July 11 on charges of second-degree possession of stolen property and possession of a controlled substance.

While searching for Smith, police said they found a stolen motorcycle in his auto body shop and methamphetamine in his house. Smith bailed out of jail April 20. Bail was set at $3,500.

________ Reporter Tom Callis can be reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. com.

No bikes allowed in skate park, PA says By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Skateboarding may not be a crime, but bicycling is another story — at least in the city’s skate park. Police said they are stepping up enforcement of the park’s no-bike policy because of concerns that two-wheeled thrill seekers are causing too much damage and sometimes displace skateboarders.

Stepping up Last Thursday, officers began stepping up their presence at the park, talking to users about the rule excluding bikes, said Deputy Police Chief Brian Smith. Such “emphasis patrols” will continue indefinitely, he said. But beginning Monday, Smith warned, any violators can expect to

receive a 90-day no-trespass notice or even a fine. “It’s been a continual problem that comes and goes,” he said. “We’re going to approach it this time a little more comprehensively.”

Fines Fines are determined by Clallam County District Court, but Smith said they could range between $60 and $100. The increased enforcement was prompted by a complaint from Doc Reiss, past president of the Nor’Wester Rotary Club, which sponsored the Race Street park. “Somebody got a hold of me and complained that there were so many bicycles in the skate park that their kids couldn’t get in,” he said. “When it got to the point

that skateboarders can’t get into the skate park, that’s when I wrote the letter.” Reiss said he also is concerned of the damage the bikes’ pegs, handlebars and pedals cause to the concrete, which is why they are banned from the park. Corey Delikat, city streets and parks superintendent, said he shares the concerns. “There’s no major damage yet, but it’s bound to happen,” he said. “Once it gets broke,” Delikat added, “there’s not a real good fix. “Obviously, you can patch it . . . but it doesn’t want to hold as well.” Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Install gates

Eight-year-old Kenny Oman of Port Angeles skates in one of the bowls of Delikat said he is work- the Port Angeles skateboard park at Erickson Playfield on Saturday.

ing with the Rotary Club to Reporter Tom Callis can be install gates that are impos- could only be unlocked by access, he said. The $200,000 skate park reached at 360-417-3532 or at tom. authorities, would be sible to bring a bike through. Another gate, which installed to allow medic opened in 2005. callis@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula College sundial memorial donated Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — On a sunny day, Peninsula College students have a rather large “artful” clock to measure the time. The sundial — which is 8 feet tall, 4 feet wide and 8 feet deep — was donated by the late Honey Davis of Port Angeles in honor of her son, Ben Davis, who died in 2008. The sundial, which casts a shadow and shows the time of day when in direct sunlight, is a polar analemmatic type invented by David Harbour in 1997 and later redesigned by Ben Davis, Peninsula College said in a statement. Because of Ben Davis’ interest in sundials, his mother decided to donate one to the college in his honor, the college said. “Honey Davis’ very generous gift to Peninsula College is deeply appreciated,” said Peninsula College President Tom Keegan. “It’s fitting that it be placed by our Science and Technology Building so that Ben’s amazing engineering skills serve as an inspiration to our students and

encourage them to stop and look and study his sundial.” The sundial, which was placed on a concrete pad specifically made for it in July, was dedicated last month, with Honey Davis and other family and friends present. The sundial was placed in a well-traveled, sunny area, said Mary Hunchberger, executive director of the Peninsula College Foundation, which accepted the art piece. “Students often take time to stop and investigate the substantial sundial.” Ben Davis’ cousin, Ben Schrenzel, said he liked the idea that Davis’ legacy is living on in a way that is both interesting and educational. “Ben had a gifted engineering mind and could do anything with his hands,” Schrenzel said. Although Davis had no formal engineering training, he served as a draftsman for General Motors in Detroit, designing and building tools. For information on the Pictured in front of the sundial redesigned by the late Ben Davis are, from left, Jerry Morris, college or foundation, visit Honey Davis’ son-in-law; Peninsula College President Dr. Tom Keegan; and Ben Schrenzel, Ben Davis’ cousin. www.pencol.edu.

Portable signs removed from rights of way

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picked up at that location. Questions can be directed to the city Planning and Public Works departments at 360-683-4809. The sign removal is to improve motorist safety, Haines said. “The city has received numerous complaints about sandwich-board and other temporary signs that are being placed in the roundabout medians and at other intersections,” he said in his email. “The signs are a distraction to motorists and impair their line of sight.” The first signs to go will be those located near intersections that are surrounded by crosswalks or where crosswalks could be striped, he said. “The city will review this approach for its effectiveness in improving safety over the next several months,”


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, May 1, 2011

A5

Elks host high tea to fete royal wedding By Leah Leach

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — If Arlene Blume had known how much interest a British royal wedding would draw in Port Angeles, she would have sold more tickets. As it ALSO . . . was, the ■ Fashion E l k s firms rush N a v a l to copy royal L o d g e wedding club mangown/D1 ager organized a high tea for 75 people — 71 women and four men — on Saturday, a day after the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton, which aired on the U.S. West Coast at 3 a.m. Friday. “We could have sold another 100 tickets,” Blume said later that day, after spending hours filming the wedding for screening Saturday. “Our phone has been ringing off the wall,” she said. “We limited ourselves to 75 because we had no idea how it would take off.” The Elks High Tea began at noon with a hat-decoration session.

week,” Blume said. “A lot of the women who come are in the work force Monday through Friday.” Most of the food was cooked in the Elks’ kitchen, but some — Murchie’s tea and handmade, one-of-akind cookies, for instance — was imported from Victoria in the foreign country across the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The cookies were included in take-away bags, one given to each guest, in which the royal wedding’s colors of robin’s-egg blue, white and gold figured heavily. Each bag also contained a tea cup and tea pot and royal crest. The Elks also raffled off a royal china set in the pattern of the newlyweds, Blume said. All guests left with the memory of sipping tea and nibbling finger sandwiches while watching a procession through the streets of LonKeith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News don, a splendid wedding cerCaroline Putman of Port Angeles, left, demonstrates the proper way to drink tea with her little emony offering the first finger extended to Maria Aragon of Port Angeles during a high tea Saturday at the Naval Elks glimpse of Kate’s dress, the Lodge in Port Angeles. newly wedded couple waving from a horse-drawn carriage At 1 p.m., people dressed mousse tarts and petit fours, watched a two-hour mosaic Why celebrate the wed- that took them from Westin their best finery were as well as seafood salad and of highlights of the royal ding of the British royal cou- minster Abbey and — on served such delicacies as sausage rolls. wedding on a big-screen ple a day late? the balcony of Buckingham praline scones, chocolate Throughout, they television. “People work during the Palace — a royal kiss.

MV Salish finishes its initial sea trials By Charlie Bermant Peninsula Daily News

The Associated Press

The coal-burning TransAlta plant is shown Friday near Centralia.

Bill signed to close state’s last coal plant Peninsula Daily News news sources

the variable-pitch propeller system. The Salish and the Chetzemoka will both operate on the route until Sept. 25, at which time one of the boats will be used to cover routes throughout the system as boats are taken in for servicing, the state ferries system said. Two-boat service on the Port Townsend-Coupeville route will resume in the spring.

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or at charlie. bermant@peninsuladailynews. com.

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SEATTLE — The Washington State Patrol said a pedestrian who tried to cross Interstate 5 in Seattle early Saturday was hit by a car and caused a spectacular crash, and it’s remarkable no one was killed. Twenty-six-year-old Joel Martinez-Jose was driving a 1993 Honda Civic northbound when he tried unsuccessfully to swerve to avoid 39-yaer-old Thau Qual Le. The impact threw Le clear of the roadway, and

the Civic wound up in the next lane over where it was almost completely demolished by a U.S. Postal Service semitruck. Investigators said it’s amazing that MartinezJose suffered only minor injuries. Le was taken to Harborview Medical Center in serious condition and is expected to survive. The highway was closed for several hours.

third, the Kennewick — destined for the Point Defiance-to-Tahlequah route once it enters service sometime this winter — is now under construction. The Chetzemoka was slated to go into service in August but was delayed until November because of problems with the fixedpitch propeller. The new ferry will have a variable-pitch propeller, which will make it easier to maneuver, the state ferries system said. Coursey said Friday she did not expect the Salish to have any problems navigating Keystone Harbor due to

125111381

The Associated Press

Then, it will be taken to Eagle Harbor in Bainbridge Island, where the crew will be trained before test runs are made on the Port Townsend-Coupeville route. No firm schedule for the tests have been established. The Salish, a 64-vehicle ferry, is the second of three Kwa-di Tabil Class boats contracted by the state at a cost of $213.2 million to be built by Todd Pacific Shipyards in Seattle. The first, the Chetzemoka, began service on the Port Townsend-Coupeville run in November while the

The MV Salish is docked at Everett Shipyard for final outfitting in March.

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Crew training

Washington State Ferries

SequimElectrolysis ✁

OLYMPIA — The last step to start shutting down the only coal-burning power plant left in Washington state was taken Friday when Gov. Chris Gregoire signed a measure that mandates the gradual closure of the TransAlta facility in Centralia. Gregoire signed the bill at the plant surrounded by officials from the Canadian company that owns it, plant workers, environmentalists and other lawmakers — marking an end to a prolonged fight over air pollution that culminated in this legislative session. Conservationists applauded a move they said would clear haze from Olympic National Park and Mount Rayonier. “Today, Gov. Gregoire signed into law legislation that will literally clear the air above two of Washington state’s most beautiful and iconic natural areas, Mount Rainier and Olympic National Parks,” said Stephanie Kodish of the National Parks Conservation Association in a statement. Gregoire acknowledged the importance of the plant to the region when she

signed the law. “The Centralia power plant has long been a critical part of the regional economy,” Gregoire said. “The men and women here who keep it running not only power homes and businesses, you serve as the backbone of your communities. We will build on your skills and your know-how to power our grid and our future.” The debate behind the shutdown centered on environmentalists pushing for cleaner air, while local lawmakers argued that closing the TransAlta plant would result in a loss of jobs for Lewis County and the surrounding area. Earlier this year, lawmakers reached a compromise that calls for TransAlta to provide $55 million in economic development assistance and to install new pollution controls at the plant before it finally closes by 2025. TransAlta also will get expedited permits to build a natural-gas-fired plant in Lewis County to come online by 2020. The Canadian company also will be allowed to enter into long-term agreements to sell its electricity to other utilities.

“TransAlta is a progressive power company that strives to produce more electricity with less environmental impact, every day,” said TransAlta President and CEO Steve Snyder. “With this bill, TransAlta will be able to continue powering this community with new investments in power production and new jobs.” The bill would shut down one of two boilers at the TransAlta plant by 2020 and the second by 2025. The Centralia facility is a major source of greenhouse gases and other pollutants. “Today, we are one significant step closer to being truly free from coal in the Northwest, which will bring about a cleaner, safer, healthier and more prosperous future,” said Bruce Nilles, deputy conservation director for the Sierra Club, in a written statement.

Conservationists say closure will help clear haze from park

PORT TOWNSEND — The MV Salish finished its initial sea trials last week and is scheduled for delivery to Washington State Ferries on Thursday. The Salish is expected to join the MV Chetzemoka on the Port Townsend-Coupeville route in July. “We are on time and within the budget,” said state ferries system spokeswoman Marta Coursey on Friday. “Everything is going well.” Sea trials for the new ferry took place Monday through Wednesday with state ferries system Deputy Chief George Capacci and other personnel aboard to witness the demonstration of stopping distances, steering and other operational tests. It is scheduled to be towed to the Todd Pacific Shipyards facility in Seattle before being transferred to state ferries system control.


A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, May 1, 2011 — (J)

Peninsula Daily News

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

The former Eagles Aerie 483 sits vacant on South Penn Street in Port Angeles on Saturday. The site will become a headquarters for the U.S. Border Patrol. Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News

Touring

downtown

Port Townsend

Gail Rogers, left and Bill Putney, center, tour the upper floor of the former Port Townsend Elks Building with its owner, David Hero, on Friday. More than 85 people took an evening tour of 10 properties now for sale or rent. The tour was organized by Port Townsend Main Street and was part of the weekend’s celebration of the finishing of the town’s Civic District.

Downtown: Project

cost over $1.4 million Continued from A1 Sandoval acknowledged City Manager David Timmons, Planning Director Rick Sepler, Public Works Director Ken Clow and project manager Tom Miller for their roles in the building’s renovation. Among those attending was Dorothy Cotton, whose family members were the most recent private owners of the building. Cotton said she was honored that her family name was being preserved and glad the space was being used to promote art. The one-story brick building was built as a three-story structure in 1888, said Bill Tennent, Jefferson County Historical Society executive director. It was a popular resort that contained a saloon, wine parlor and a club room. At various times since, it has been a hardware store, bowling alley and mortuary. In 1955, the Cotton family removed the top two stories after a wind storm damaged them. From 1975 to 2009, the structure housed the Port Townsend Police Department, which has moved to Mountain View Commons. The city now will rent the space for various functions and display rotating art exhibitions. “We had an old building here, but we have preserved it in a way that we can use it for community programs,” Timmons said.

Timmons said the path to preservation had several obstacles, including the removal of five fuel tanks and the eradication of lead paint and mold. The project cost $1,415,000. The work was funded by a Federal Emergency Management Agency Hazard Mitigation Grant and a 2008 city bond. The current exhibition in the building explores the development of Gerard Tsutakawa’s “Salish Sea Circle,” which will be installed on the corner of Water and Madison streets and dedicated Saturday, May 14.

$70,000 bronze statue Another project in the sprucing-up of the Civic District, the $70,000 bronze statue was funded through the city’s One Percent for Arts Program, which allocates 1 percent of the capitalized costs of eligible public construction projects for public art, and the city bond. Pope Marine Park in the Civic District also was renovated, with $224,000 from the city bond, and Madison Street improvements stretched from Memorial Field to the Pope Marine Building at 100 Madison St. — a $678,000 project funded by a Public Works Board Small Communities in Rural Counties grant and the 2008 city bond. The $2 million Water Street streetscape project placed overhead utilities underground and installed a stormwater pipe with grant funding from the state

departments of Transportation and Ecology, the Jefferson County Public Infrastructure Program and the city bond. Also as part of the downtown work, the Wave Viewing Gallery’s damaged pilings were replaced in a $758,000 project funded by an Aquatic Lands Enhancement Account grant and the city bond. Still to come this summer is the retrofitting of the Wave Viewing Gallery for handicapped access and the conversion of the Tidal Clock into an amphitheater.

Founders’ Day Today, a variety of children’s art activities are planned from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. in the Pope Marine Building at Water and Madison streets during Main Street’s Art Wave, and the Jefferson County Historical Society will hold its annual Founders’ Day celebration at 1 p.m. in City Council chambers, 540 Water St. Founders’ Day will be followed by a reception in the Cotton Building that will feature desserts prepared from recipes from the newly published Rothschild House Dessert Cookbook. These two events are free but have limited seating and will require reservations, available by phoning 360385-1003.

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or at charlie. bermant@peninsuladailynews. com.

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Patrol: Site to include

radio tower, 3 dog runs Continued from A1 the new facility will be half as bright as the Ruddell The 3.4-acre site also Auto Mall vehicle dealerwill include a 40-foot radio ship just east of the buildtower, three dog runs, a ing, according to the draft impact kennel and a chain-link environmental fence topped by razor wire, statement for the project. After waiting several with the outside lit at night. Inside will be two hold- months — the Corps of ing cells, the same number Engineers and the Eagles as in the current, smaller agreed on the $2 million Border Patrol headquarters purchase price at least five at the Richard B. Anderson months ago — the Eagles Federal Building at 138 W. have been on the fast track First St., which Border for the past two weeks. Patrol officials said the Sale closed agency has outgrown. In 2006, four agents Sale of the site by the worked in the Port Angeles Eagles for $2,015,000 closed headquarters. April 14, two weeks earlier That number had than anticipated, said Pili increased to 25 as of August. Meyer of Coldwell Banker Uptown Realty, who repreMore agents? sented the Eagles in the The new facility will be transaction. The parcel was listed in built for up to 50 agents, a May 2010 for $1.99 million. standard size for the agenThe Clallam County Assescy’s headquarters. Sangren said there are sor’s Office valued it at no plans to expand the $2.14 million. “They were waiting for agent numbers for coverage of Clallam and Jefferson the environmental study to get signed off, and it just got counties. But the draft environ- signed off,” Meyer said Frimental impact statement day. “The keys were turned for the project said: “Future over a few days later.” staff expansion is anticiA week later, on April 21, pated for the Port Angeles the Eagles purchased propstation.” erty east of the city limit The Corps of Engineers behind the 2709 E. U.S. is building a 75-agent staHighway 101 Safeway from tion in Bellingham. Brad Maxhimer of Port Building plans are stanAngeles for $184,450, dardized. according to Clallam “It does not make finan- County Auditor’s Office cial sense to custom-build a records. station for every location,” Sangren said. Former St. Vincent’s Blackhawk Constructors LLC of San Antonio won Today, the Eagles plan to the contract for the project. open their temporary new The outside lighting at facility at the former St.

By Paul Gottlieb

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Border Patrol activities will be the focus of a protest today at the planned site of a new building for Border Patrol agents. The Stop the Checkpoints Committee plans a May Day Rally from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at East First and Penn streets, where Homeland Security will begin work to modify the former Eagles Aerie building into new Border Patrol head-

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quarters. The rally will be in support of worker and immigrant rights, said organizers with the group, which protests “the erosion of civil rights and liberties on the North Olympic Peninsula by the U.S. Border Patrol,” according to www.stopthe checkpoints.com. Those attending are asked to bring signs, noisemakers, drums and banners. David Cowan, member of Stop the Checkpoints, said a new Border Patrol headquarters in Port Angeles does not have any “long-term benefits” to the North Olympic Peninsula. “It’s a manufactured need,” he said. “The need has not been established.”

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The money could be better spent on the nation’s southern border, Cowan added. The new facility is part of a broader federal effort to upgrade Border Patrol facilities, said project manager Mike Sangren of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on Friday. “This money was earmarked at least last year for these projects,” he said, noting Bellingham also is getting a new Border Patrol headquarters. “It’s just the direction the Department of Homeland Security has been given, to expand and allocate money to build stations, and we are just executing their plan,” he said.

The Border Patrol denied a Peninsula Daily News request for arrest data for the Port Angeles station, citing national security concerns. The agency instead provided arrest data for the Blaine Sector, which includes Alaska, Oregon and the western half of Washington. Border Patrol agents made 673 arrests in the 2010 fiscal year ending Sept. 30, a 20 percent drop from 2009 and about two for every agent. The entire sector has 322 agents at stations in Port Angeles, Blaine, Bellingham and Sumas, the Border Patrol said.

May 13, 2011

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Vincent de Paul Thrift Store at 112 E. Eighth St. and will rent it from Peninsula Community Health Center, located next door. Tonight, the Eagles will review potential design plans presented by the organization’s building committee, with hopes of moving into a new lodge by February, real estate committee member Kevin Wheeler said Friday. “It’s a case of, OK, [the building sale] part is done, we’re waiting in a holding pattern now, and now we have to move forward,” Wheeler said. But the developments are a touch bittersweet for Eagles members faced with having to move from their longtime home because dwindling membership could not support maintenance and upkeep of the Penn Street facility. The new facility will be 5,500 square feet, roughly one-quarter the size of the Eagles’ former home, said Thomas DeJoy, a member of the Eagles’ board of trustees. It won’t include the Eagles’ renowned “floating” dance floor from the old lodge, though some members did take pieces of it, DeJoy said. The Penn Street lodge has been a second home for many Eagles for many years, DeJoy said. “But we also realize we need to downsize,” he added.

Senior Staff Writer Paul Gottlieb can be reached at 360-417-3536 or at paul. gottlieb@peninsuladailynews.com.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

A7

(J) — Sunday, May 1, 2011

Fluoride foes file lawsuits against PA, Forks By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

Fluoride opponents filed a lawsuit last week against the cities of Port Angeles and Forks in hopes of ending the practice of fluoridating public water on the North Olympic Peninsula. The lawsuit, filed Thursday in Clallam County Superior Court, is the third the activists have filed against Port Angeles and the first against Forks. Forks has fluoridated its water for nearly six decades, while Port Angeles has used fluoride since 2006. Anti-fluoride activists from the Port Angeles and Sequim areas began challenging Port Angeles’ use of fluoride before it started. A lawsuit filed in 2005 seeking to require the city to meet criteria under the state Environmental Protection Act before fluoridating its

water was tossed out of Jefferson County Superior Court. The state Court of Appeals upheld that decision in 2007. Then last year, the state Supreme Court sided with City Hall in a legal challenge seeking to put antifluoride initiatives on the Port Angeles ballot. The petitioners — Protect the Peninsula’s Future, Clallam County Citizens for Safe Drinking Water and retired Sequim physician Eloise Kailin — are now challenging the use of fluoride in the two communities on the basis that it doesn’t meet other state criteria. The suit points to a section of the Washington Administrative Code that says drug products must have an approved new drug application from the Federal Food and Drug Administration to be used in the state.

Kailin said the petitioners believe the types of fluoride used by the cities — sodium fluoride in Forks an fluorosilicic acid in Port Angeles — have never received such an approval. They base that on a public records request with the federal agency for the NDA documents but were told by the agency that they don’t exist, she said. “As far as I know, this is the first time this issue has been raised,” Kailin said. But why now in Forks? Clallam County Citizens for Safe Drinking Water President Jim Bourget said it was time to expand the groups’ efforts. “I just think to get it out of both systems would be the prudent thing to do,” he said. Forks Mayor Bryon Monohon said he wasn’t surprised the city is included in the lawsuit because the petitioners have been seeking

information on its water fluoridation program for a while. But Monohon he said he is confident that fluoridation, intended to fight cavities, has been good for the people of Forks. “We’ve been fluoridating water since the 1950s,” Monohon said. “We believe it is a safe and effective thing to do.”

‘Safe and effective’ Forks City Attorney Rod Fleck said he had partially reviewed the lawsuit, and he questioned the validity of its claims during an interview Saturday. “I don’t really understand their attempt to loop in some letter from the FDA that we’ve never seen,” he said. “They’ve laced together a group of things that myself, [Port Angeles City Attorney] Bill Bloor and others are

still trying to sort through.” Kent Myers, Port Angeles city manager, said Friday he hadn’t reviewed the suit and couldn’t comment on its legal claims. Bloor said Saturday he was out of town attending a Washington State Association of Municipal Attorneys Conference last week and had not had time to review it. The petitioners said they are opposed to the use of fluoride in public drinking water over concerns that too much can cause adverse health effects. Overuse of fluoride, both a naturally occurring mineral and industrial by-product, can cause teeth spotting and brittle bones. A National Academy of Sciences report from 2006 said brittle bones can be caused by a lifetime of drinking fluoride at amounts of more than 4 parts per million.

Forks and Port Angeles reduced their fluoride amounts from 1 part per million to 0.7 parts per million after the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced it was reducing the recommended range to 0.7 parts per mill­ ion from 0.7 to 1.2 parts per million. The federal agency announced the proposed change in January after a recent government study that found two out of five adolescents have tooth streaking or spotting because they are receiving too much fluoride. Port Angeles started fluoridating its water with the help of a $260,000 grant from the Washington Dental Service Foundation. The agreement with the foundation says the city must continue to use fluoride for 10 years unless a court order stops it.

Jefferson to open bids for East Prince Street project Peninsula Daily News

The three Jefferson County commissioners will open bids for the East Price Street improvement project at their meeting Monday. The meeting will begin at 9 a.m. in chambers, 1820 Jefferson St. This project is listed in both the 2011-2016 Six-

Year Transportation Improvement Program and the 2011 Annual Construction Program. The engineer’s estimate is $212,643. The project will be funded through the roads fund. Commissioners also are expected to set a 10 a.m. May 23 public hearing on an application form for the

Eye on Jefferson Mats Mats Beach Homeowners’ Association for a nonexclusive franchise for water effluent lines for three single-family residences. The commissioners also are scheduled to consider

Artwork: Paintings were

inappropriate, some say Continued from A1

But some lawmakers felt the abstract paintings were inappropriate in the state Capitol. “This was during the same time when [photographer Robert] Mapplethorpe’s pictures were thought to be obscene and there was a controversy about using public funds to support art,” said Centrum Executive Director John MacElwee. “These images were also thought to be obscene and were removed from the Capitol building,” MacElwee said. In 1993, the House put $162,000 in the budget to remove the Hercules paintings — nearly double what the state paid Spafford to create them, according to a Fort Worden statement. Kessler, who was in the first term of her legislative career, fought unsuccessfully to keep the murals. One version of the images that were presented to Kessler hung in her office for 14 years. “I was fortunate to be in the Capitol for one term while the murals were in the gallery,” she said. “After they were taken down, there were people who wanted to bury them, but after I became majority leader, I used the influence of that office to say that I was going to put them in a place where people could see them and enjoy them.” Kessler said the images depicted contained subtle messages for lawmakers, which were ignored because of the controversy. One image, which was characterized as a “rape” by one legislator, actually had a different meaning, Kessler said. “It wasn’t a rape but a

Kessler speaks out against state park fees Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — Retired Rep. Lynn Kessler spoke against charging for state park access during a Centrum meeting Friday. A bill that would initiate a $10 one-day parking fee or an annual $30 “Discover Pass” to use state parks across the North Olympic Peninsula and statewide is on Gov. Chris Gregoire’s desk. The fee would be charged to users of state parks — Fort Worden and Fort Flagler near Port Townsend, Bogachiel near Forks and Sequim Bay on the Peninsula — as well as state Department of Natural Resources and state Fish & Wildlife recreation areas. murder — not that it’s any better,” she said. “Hercules is murdering the Amazon queen because of a rumor, and the lesson to us is don’t go on rumors, make sure it is true and that you think things through before you act,” Kessler said. Kessler added that the artist, who is a personal friend of hers, was disturbed that the messages were taken out of context and “turned into something they are not.” Upon the completion of Kessler’s last term, she was allowed to receive gifts costing more than $50, so Centrum decided to give her the prints as a token of appreci-

Kessler said during the gathering at Fort Worden State Park that such a move would keep poor people out of what should be a public area. “I’ve lost the battle on this,” she said. “But there will need to be some kind of allowance for Fort Worden because I don’t see how they will be able to get $10 more from everyone who comes here for [Centrum’s Festival of American] Fiddle Tunes.” Fort Worden State Park also is home to businesses, a Peninsula College branch campus and other educational institutions, the Port Townsend Marine Science Center and Centrum’s music festivals in and around McCurdy Pavilion.

PT City Council The Port Townsend City Council will discuss the designation of surplus property for low-income housing use at its regular Monday

ation for her longtime support of the arts, MacElwee said. The prints have not been appraised, but are probably worth between $5,000 and $10,000, he said. Kessler said she plans to hang the prints in her living room and eventually give them to her son, who runs an art gallery. The mural images were taken to a museum in Centralia, where they are now on display.

________ Jefferson County Reporter Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360-385-2335 or at charlie. bermant@peninsuladailynews. com.

PUBLIC MEETING TO DISCUSS PROPOSED INCREASE OF PUD WATER RATES

Public utility district The Jefferson County Public Utility District commissioners will meet Tuesday. The commissioners will meet at 5 p.m. at 230 Chimacum Road in Port Hadlock. No agenda was available Saturday.

Jefferson Healthcare The Jefferson Healthcare hospital commissioners’ meeting originally scheduled for Wednesday, has been canceled.

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& Technology Committee — 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday, first-floor conference room. ■  Non-Motorized Transportation Advisory Board — 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday, first-floor conference room. ■  Council Ad Hoc Nonprofit Committee — 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Friday, first-floor conference room.

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several contracts and personnel actions including: ■  An employment contract with JeffCom 911 Director Janet Silvus for $64,726.92 per year. of ■  Reappointment Planning Commissioners Gary Felder and Patricia Farmer. ■  Five reappointments to the Jefferson County Solid Waste Advisory Committee for Joanne Tyler, Mike Mullin, Valerie Johnstone, Robert Burns and Kent Kovalenko. ■  The appointment of Nancy O’Neill to the board of the Jefferson County Peninsula Regional Services Network.

business meeting. The meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. in council chambers at City Hall, 540 Water St. Two parcels are under consideration for such development, one located at the intersection of Discovery Road and Beech Street and the other on Cherry Street. The city will discuss entering into an agreement with Homeward Bound for development of the properties. Other city meetings, to be held in conference rooms at 250 Madison St., are: ■  Arts Commission — 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Monday, first-floor conference room. ■  Council Community Development Land Use Committee — 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, first-floor conference room. ■  Historic Preservation Committee — 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, third-floor conference room. ■  Council Information


A8

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, May 1, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Gregoire vetoes parts of medical pot bill By Mike Baker

The Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Gov. Chris Gregoire vetoed key parts of a bill Friday that aimed to regulate medical marijuana dispensaries, saying she could not approve a measure that might put state workers at risk of federal criminal charges. The state’s two U.S. attorneys previously told Gregoire that state employees would not be immune from prosecution for their role in regulating the industry.

Licensing scheme? Prosecutors contend that the measure would create a licensing scheme that permits large-scale marijuana cultivation and distribution. A union that represents thousands of state employees asked Gregoire to veto the bill. “I cannot disregard federal law and our two U.S. attorneys on the chance that state employees may never be prosecuted,” Gregoire said. “What do you say to

them if they are? What would you tell that employee?” There are three medical marijuana dispensaries on the North Olympic Peninsula, and local and regional law enforcement have said they can operate according to existing law.

Spokane raid The veto came just a day after federal authorities raided at least two dispensaries in Spokane. It immediately brought condemnation from advocates who noted that other states with similar laws haven’t seen state workers charged. “Unfortunately, I don’t think you can get any better than the solution that was on her desk that she chose to veto,” said Shankar Narayan, legislative director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Seattle. “She should have signed the entire bill.” Federal law still prohibits marijuana for medical uses. Gregoire said she is interested in working with governors in other states on

pushing to change federal law and reclassify medical marijuana as a Schedule 2 substance, putting it on par with addictive but accepted drugs such as morphine or oxycodone.

Murky areas The bill sought to address murky areas of the state’s medical marijuana laws. Dispensaries have popped up all around the state since the voterapproved medical marijuana law from 1998, even though those outlets aren’t specifically allowed nor forbidden in the statutes. Some police officers and prosecutors worry that the operations could be shielding broader criminal enterprises. Current state law does not allow for marijuana sales and says patients must grow it themselves or designate a caregiver to grow it for them. Proponents of the law contend that patients with terminal or debilitating conditions do not have the ability or resources to grow marijuana, so they believe retail-like access points are

needed to prevent a black market for the product. Gregoire did approve of parts of the bill, such as increased protections from state penalties. She also approved of cooperative grow operations. The bill allows groups of patients to collaborate on community gardens, which could have up to 45 plants. Only qualified patients would be allowed to use the marijuana grown in these gardens.

Pot registry Gregoire said she wants to continue working with the Legislature on passing other parts of the bill, such as a pot registry that would be accessible to law enforcement. State Sen. Jeanne KohlWelles, D-Seattle, said she was disappointed by the veto of a bill that was more than a year in the making. She said she believes the risk of federal prosecution of state employees is low and that the state needs the provisions to help qualifying patients get access to a legal and reliable source

The Associated Press

Gov. Chris Gregoire talks to reporters Friday at the Capitol in Olympia about her plans to veto key parts of a bill that would have regulated medical marijuana dispensaries in Washington state. of medicine. Lawmakers have only about three weeks remaining in a special session called largely to deal with the state’s budget.

“While the time constraints are significant in passing a bill during the special session, I am optimistic we can get the job done,” Kohl-Welles said.

Briefly . . . $1.5 million settlement in shooting

Birk later maintained Williams had threatened him, but the department’s firearms review board ruled the shooting unjustified, and Birk resigned. The knife was found SEATTLE — The city of folded at the scene. Seattle said Friday it is According to the settlepaying $1.5 million to the family of a homeless wood- ment announced Friday, the city will pay $250,000 carver who was shot by a in trust to Williams’ police officer last summer, mother and place a killing that helped prompt a top-to-bottom fed- $1.25 million in escrow for his estate. eral review of the city’s A judge will oversee dispolice department. tribution of the money Officer Ian Birk shot John T. Williams in August from the estate, and a special representative will be after the Native American appointed to determine woodcarver crossed the whether Williams had any street in front of Birk’s children who might be patrol car while holding a entitled to the money. piece of wood and a small knife. No children have been

Jackson, 22, of White thy F. Murphy, was relieved Swan died April 24 of injuof duty after a drunkenries suffered in Afghanidriving stop in Anacortes. stan when an improvised explosive device detonated. Waltz into spring Flags should remain at SEQUIM — Since half-staff until close of spring is the season of business Tuesday or first Relieved of duty romance, dance teachers thing Wednesday morning. EVERETT — The comPam and Derek Perkins mander of the Everettwill wrap up their spring Grants workshop Ferry fares up based guided-missile series of classes with PORT TOWNSEND — destroyer USS Momsen OLYMPIA — The state instruction in the waltz. A free workshop, “Granthas been relieved of comferry peak-season surThe sessions — for sinseeking Basics for Individmand while the Navy charge begins today, and gles and couples — start uals in the Arts,” will be investigates allegations of many fares will go up Tuesday and run through held at the Port Townsend misconduct. 25 percent. May 24 at the Sequim Library, 1220 Lawrence St., The Navy said Cmdr. The ferry system said Prairie Grange Hall, 290 on Wednesday. Jay Wylie was relieved the surcharge applies to Macleay Road. Scott Ullman from the full-fare vehicle-driver tick- Wednesday due to what One-hour classes are at was termed “loss of confiets. 7 p.m. for beginners and at Foundation Center in San Francisco will host the sesdence in his ability to com- 8:30 p.m. for intermediate It does not affect passion from 9 a.m. to senger-only fares, except on mand.” dancers. 10:30 a.m. He was reassigned to a Anacortes-San Juan routes. Men are especially For artists looking for San Diego post. For example, a typical encouraged, since the funding to finish a project, A fleet spokeswoman, instructors typically see a mount an exhibition, put Lt. j.g. Beth Teach, said she shortage of them in class. on a performance or anydid not have details about The cost is $8 per perthing else arts-related, he the allegations. son per session, though will cover: Wylie is the second intermediate students can ■  How to identify Navy officer removed from participate in both classes funders supporting individa command in less than a for $12 per night. week. Private lessons are also ual artists. ■  How to explore the Capt. Donald Hornbeck, available from the Percommander of Destroyer kinses, who can be reached option of fiscal sponsorship. ■  Creating a step-bySquadron 1 in the Arabian at 360-582-0738 or step plan to find funding as Sea, was removed Saturkeendancer@q.com. an individual grant seeker. day while the Navy investiFor more details, stop by gates allegations that he the Port Townsend Library had an inappropriate rela- Flags lowered OLYMPIA — Gov. Chris or phone librarian Cris tionship. Wilson at 360-379-4441. To Teach said the incidents Gregoire has directed that Washington state and sign up, visit www.Grant are unrelated. space.org. Two weeks ago, the com- United States flags at all state agency facilities be mander of a training squadron for electrical war- lowered to half-staff TuesThree scholarships day in memory of Marine fare aircraft at Whidbey PORT ANGELES — Island Naval Air Station in Corps Lance Cpl. Joe Jack- Three Port Angeles High son. Oak Harbor, Cmdr. TimoSchool students were rec-

located thus far. “This is one step towards justice, but it is only a step,” Williams’ brother, Rick, said in a news release issued jointly with the city. “Nothing can make up for the loss of my brother.”

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Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, May 1, 2011

A9

Nash Huber’s latest award named for kindred spirit By Diane Urbani de la Paz

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — Nash Huber calls himself the “local, radical hippie” and “odd guy out.” And for years — throughout the 1980s at least — his Nash’s Organic Produce operation grew the kind of food that was not all-therage in his adopted hometown of Sequim. But over the past decade, a revolution has taken place. Americans — including Seattleites and the people of the North Olympic Peninsula — developed an appetite for the organic carrots, cauliflower, strawberries and now wheat from Dungeness Valley fields. Since his start here in 1979, Huber has expanded his operation to more than 110 varieties of vegetables, herbs, fruit and berries on some 400 acres, though much of that is leased, not owned, by Nash’s. And along with watching his produce sell speedily at farmers markets from Port Angeles to Seattle’s University District, Huber has collected an armload of awards, the latest of which is the Pellegrini, named for a kindred spirit from Tuscany. The late Angelo “Babbo” Pellegrini emigrated from Italy to Washington state as a boy who spoke no English; he grew up to teach Shakespeare at the University of Washington. Pellegrini loved to invite students and other professors to his home, where he sat them down for feasts of foods he’d grown and prepared himself. He wrote nine books

Farm tour, lunch, brunch, dance slated at Nash’s By Diane Urbani

Paz

$20 for children ages 5 to 12, and that includes lunch at the Dungeness Schoolhouse. DUNGENESS — A farm tour, a Some scholarships are available for locally grown lunch and brunch, and a farmers. barn dance will converge Saturday, Participants, and all community May 14, and Sunday, May 15, as Nash’s members, are invited to Nash’s semiOrganic Produce opens its doors and annual barn dance the night of May 14 gates for “Cultivating the Next Genera- in the shed near Nash’s Farm Store, tion of Farmers,” an event presented by 1865 E. Anderson Road. Admission is PCC Farmland Trust. $7 at the door or free for kids 16 and That Saturday, participants will be younger. transported by bus around the DungeTo finish off the weekend, the Alder ness Valley to many of the 400 acres Wood Bistro of Sequim will serve a Nash’s manages. “Sunday brunch with Nash,” featuring During the tour, they will learn local, organic food and a panel discussion with the farmers and Alder Wood about innovative growing methods, chef Gabriel Schuenemann. said trust publicist Kelly Sanderbeck. Tickets are $30 for adults or $15 for Nash Huber, who has been farming children ages 5 to 12. here since 1979, trains his crew in For details and reservations, visit organic, sustainable practices. www.PCCFarmlandTrust.org or phone He is working on a method to tran206-547-9855. sition the business to the young farm________ ers he works with so they can eventually take over ownership, Sanderbeck Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can added. be reached at 360-417-3550 or at diane.urbani@ Tour tickets are $50 for adults or peninsuladailynews.com. de la

Peninsula Daily News

about the joys of fresh vegetables, good friends and lively conversation; among them is The Food Lover’s Garden, in which Pellegrini brought Americans inside his Eden of delights. “Nash approaches life the way Pellegrini did — put honest, good food in front of people and relate to them. It’s a tremendously important component to a good life,” 2006 Pellegrini winner Jon Rowley said when he nominated Huber for the award. “Nash’s produce has helped Seattle change the way it eats,” Rowley added.

But the Pellegrini plaque, presented Wednesday at Seattle’s Paramount Theater at a restaurant showcase called the Voracious Tasting, was handed not to Huber but to his wife of 17 years, Patty McManus-Huber. Nash Huber, you see, was busy enjoying life, nature, food and friendship in Moab, Utah. An avid mountain biker, Huber takes this trip every year during the last week of April. “It’s about 75 degrees right now,” Huber said Thursday afternoon,

Crescent schools OK cuts in anticipation of state reductions By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

Many awards He can place the Pellegrini plaque next to the American Farmland Trust’s 2008 Steward of the Land award and the national Ecological Farming Association’s Steward of Sustainable Agriculture, or “Sustie,” honor from January. “When you get to the stage in your life when they start giving you awards, you wonder,” Huber said. At least these aren’t being presented posthumously, he joked. McManus-Huber, for her

de la

Paz/Peninsula Daily News

part, said her husband would have hit it off with Pellegrini. Both men want people to sit down and share good food and talk, she said. Pellegrini, McManusHuber learned, loved to engage people — just as Nash Huber does in something called “men’s breakfast.” It’s been at the Huber house every Thursday for 22 years and has grown to include about a dozen guys. “It’s not ‘no women allowed,’” McManus-Huber said. She’s stayed for the meal a few times before rushing to work. “Everybody brings something,” such as fresh eggs from the men’s hens, jam and applesauce to go with waffles made with Nash’s Organic wheat. “They make a huge scramble with fresh vegetables. And they love talking. They talk politics, especially local politics,” McMa-

nus-Huber said. “It’s turned into an ad hoc support group — not deliberately; it’s just ‘Hey, we’re friends.’ “And they’ve helped each other through a lot of things. There have been bouts with cancer, divorces, deaths in the family.” Famed Seattle chef Greg Atkinson, in a tribute to Huber in the Seattle Weekly, writes about the men’s breakfast as one reason the farmer was chosen for the Pellegrini. Huber, as host, “is the glue that holds the group together,” using local food and freewheeling discussions to “nurture what’s growing, whether it’s a field of carrots or an entire community.” “Nash certainly does bring people to the table,” McManus-Huber added.

________

Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360417-3550 or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com.

not be passed until August. The plan had to be passed because teachers who are to be laid off must be notified by May 15. The state Legislature began Tuesday a 30-day special session to finish balancing a budget in the face of a $5.3 billion deficit.

____________ Reporter Paige Dickerson can be reached at 360-417-3535 or at paige.dickerson@peninsuladaily news.com.

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JOYCE — The Crescent School Board approved cuts that include four layoffs when it met last week. A half-time Spanish teacher and a half-time special-education teacher and two para-educators could be laid off if expected state cuts materialize. The board voted unanimously to approve a “reduced education plan” to balance an estimated $319,000 in anticipated cuts from the state Legislature, Superintendent Tom Anderson said Friday. “If the amount of cuts we are anticipating doesn’t materialize, we hope to add back some of the programs,” Anderson said. “Our first priority is to add the staffing back,” he added. “We are making cuts as far away from classrooms as we can and trying to preserve programs for kids.”

program, EduJobs. The state Legislature has said it would reduce what it gives schools by the same amount each district receives from the federal program. The board also decided no money would be moved from the general fund to capital projects. Although the reduced education plan was passed Thursday, the budget with all the official numbers will

reached on his cellphone. But “the water in the coffee pot froze last night. It kinda whiplashes you.” Huber is looking back and forward these days at his life as a grower.

Diane Urbani

Wheat is now among the organic crops Nash Huber grows in the Dungeness Valley. Local bakeries are using the grain.

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In addition to the layoffs, the board approved $75,000 in cuts to materials and services or other contracts and cuts such as a $26,000 cut of its extended-day programs, which allow students to go to school early or stay late for special music, crafts or homework help, Anderson said. The board also voted to take $75,000 from the reserve fund, he said. All of the cuts were made in anticipation of what is expected from the state Legislature, which has not finalized a budget for the next biennium. “Every school district is in a similar situation — making cuts and going into next year with a lot less resources this year and every year, it seems,” Anderson said. In addition to the $319,000 reduction, district officials also expect an additional loss of $95,000, which represents the amount the district gets from a federal

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Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, May 1, 2011

Commentary

PAGE

A10

Parents’ latest purchase a hurdle MY MOTHER CALLED me a few days ago to proudly announce that she and my father now have voice mail, which they don’t. What they have is an W. Bruce answering Cameron machine my mother found at a garage sale, which is where I think she also found my birthday presents: four T-shirts that all say “Call Me Pinky” on the front. When I dutifully wear the T-shirts to the gym, people come up to me and say, “Hey, Pinky.” I don’t like that. My mother likes garage sales because they are a less expensive place to buy things she doesn’t need. She brings her purchases home and puts them, naturally, in her garage. Maybe someday she’ll have the inventory for a garage sale of her own. Before this newest technological addition to their household, my parents’ answering machine

was my father. My father sits by the telephone and basically hasn’t moved since 1981. He would take messages like, “Oh, your doctor called.” “When?” my mom would ask. “I don’t know. Awhile ago.” “What did he say?” “I don’t know. Does it matter? You’ve already outlived your life expectancy.” For my father, the fact that he beat his life expectancy in overtime means the only thing left to focus on is drinking champagne in the locker room. My mother, though, wants to take another lap, so she goes to the doctor pretty much every day. The way things are going, they’ll both outlive me. When I call my parents now, here’s what happens. First, the phone rings four times. (When my father was the answering machine, it usually rang until the ballgame was over.) Then a woman’s mechanical voice comes on. Mechanical Voice: The party you are trying to reach is not available to take your call . . . At this point, you hear my father.

Speaking Out

Dad: What? There’s a woman talking. Mechanical Voice: At the tone . . . Mom: What do you mean, a voice? Dad: I’m telling you, there’s some woman on the phone. Mechanical Voice: At the end of your message . . . Mom: Well, maybe someone is calling. Give it to me. Hello? Hello? Dad: No, we’re supposed to be recording our message. Give it to me. Hello? Where’s the thing we wrote down? Mom: I just had it. Dad: Well, where is it? Mom: Here. Dad: That’s not it. That’s the letter I wrote to the home association. Mom: You wrote the home association again? Do you know how humiliating that is? Dad: Just find the script. Mom: I have to see those people every day. Dad: Here it is. We’re not home right now. Please . . . Mom: Say who it is. Dad: What?

Mom: Don’t just say we’re not home, say it is the Cameron residence. (At this point, if you have met my parents, you already know it is the Cameron residence.) Dad: You have reached the Camerons. We’re not home . . . Mom: Don’t say we’re not home. What if it’s burglars? Say we can’t come to the phone. Dad: We’re home, but we can’t come to the phone. Mom: Well, that just sounds rude. Dad: Do you want to do it? Mechanical Voice: Thank you. (Beep) Me: Hi, Mom and Dad, it’s me, your son, leaving a message on your high-tech voice mail. (There’s a sudden crashing noise, the sound of my father’s breathing, and in the background, a ballgame.) Dad: Hello? Me: Hi! (The sound of an extension being picked up.) Mom: Don’t hang up! Dad: Who’s that? Mom: It’s me, who do you think? Dad: Where are you?

Mom: I’m upstairs! Dad: Why are you shouting? Me: She’s not shouting. It just sounds louder because she’s on the extension. Mom: Who’s that? Dad: It’s me. Me: Hi, Mom. Mom: Bruce? Why do you sound so far away? Me: It’s because Dad’s on the extension. Mom: What’s he doing on the extension? Dad: I answered the phone! Mom: I thought I answered the phone. Mechanical Voice: Sorry, you’ve reached the maximum length of time for your message. Thank you for calling. Goodbye. (Click.) (There’s complete silence from the phone as my parents process this event.) Me: This voice mail thing is working out pretty well. Mom: Bruce? Who was that woman?

________ W. Bruce Cameron is a nationally syndicated humor columnist. His column appears on this page every Sunday. Email Cameron at www. tinyurl.com/3p56epk.

What do you think of Donald Trump possibly running for president?

Tim Merrick

Judith Deacon

James Fritz

Terri Randall

Carl Turner

Alicia Workman

Kelly Coughlin

Laura Miller

Retired engineer Port Angeles

Retired Port Townsend

Retired engineer Port Townsend

UPS truck driver Port Angeles

State employee Sequim

Waitress Forks

Excavator Port Angeles

“I don’t think we need a clown for president. He’s an idiot to even try. I’m from New York originally and know a lot of people like Donald Trump. Egomaniac. A bad candidate.”

“A lot of what he says makes sense. I like the way he defends our country. The country needs someone like him who can accomplish things and negotiate with world leaders.”

“He’s all about creating an image for himself. All Republican candidates are unacceptable, but the ideal pairing would be with Sarah Palin. That would guarantee the Democrats would win again.”

“I’m a little concerned because I don’t know what political experience he’s had. I’m kind of on the fence. He looks good on TV, but I’m not sure.”

“I think if he ran, it’d turn out to be a joke. He’s good at what he does as a businessman but not a world leader. We don’t need a man like that. We have enough problems.”

“Atrocious. We don’t need another Republican in office. He’s more concerned about his money and not the country’s morals and what’s right for the country.”

“Don’t like the idea. The rich will just get richer. He’s not a good candidate. He doesn’t know us normal people. If he was elected, he’d probably say to us, ‘You’re fired.’”

Homemaker-medical receptionist Port Angeles

Interviews

Peninsula Voices Change cleanup It’s my experience that Olympic National Park bends over backward to discourage nondesignated trails from inland roads to remote coastal areas yet conveniently uses these trails to facilitate cleanup of these beaches around Earth Day. Unfortunately, in recent years, wooded areas near and behind campsites away from the beach in these remote places have become eyesores of debris dump piles. Importantly, there is a way to reduce and eventually eliminate this growing situation and accommodate all users of these beaches. How? By moving beach cleanup day to early or mid-summer. This would give late winter and spring beachcombers the full opportunity of salvaging things that are of value to them and should lighten the

burden of those cleaning up the beaches later in the year. Additionally, if the program is properly managed, more people could contribute to the process. Last year, as a beachcomber, I packed out more than 400 pounds of collectable debris before beach cleanup day April 17. Some of this debris would have ended up in these growing piles back in the woods. Other debris would have been left on the beach because of weight and/or bulk consideration. We need a smarter winwin approach to keeping our beaches relatively clean while managing them for all public users. Stan Fouts, Forks

overwhelming to county officials that often problems never get fixed — at least not without a “study” by someone first, thereby squandering many dollars that could have been used for part of the project. But I was reminded by the letter April 27 about the Deer Park underpass [“Deadly curve”] and wrong thinking once again prevailing over good judgement. Life on the North Olympic Peninsula lends well toward a maze-like and circular sense, where we go into town, do our thing and go back home, always on the same road — U.S. Highway 101. When “the big one” hits next week or year or decade, and Morse Creek bridge falls down (and other bridges?), people of Bridge issues Port Angeles are stranded. Another idea would be As a rule, I dislike whinto take those dollars and ing about local problems. build another bridge across Rectification seems so elusive or otherwise Morse Creek at perhaps

Peninsula Daily News John C. Brewer Editor and Publisher

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Wall Street or Terry Mills Road off Deer Park Road. Hookup with Old Road across the creek and reconnect to U.S. Highway 101 headed wherever. Theater patrons or residents may then take that route to Port Angeles as well and also have another possible escape route from west of Morse Creek. Clallam County planners had best tell Olympia that we’ll need help getting in and out of town and not merely off Deer Park Road, so appropriate those funds as such. Greg Houghton, Port Angeles

Easter egg hunt I had a good time at the Carrie Blake Park Easter egg hunt. I appreciate the people for helping me at Carrie Blake Park. It was really nice of all of you. I sure appreciate it so much. It was wonderful.

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com

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“I heard a quote that ‘anyone capable of getting into the presidency is not a good fit.’ We need a humble public servant, not Donald.”

and

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and email

And I appreciate the Hazel Sheet group home and all of you who took care of my brother Glen when he was living there. I am getting good care here at Sequim Health Center. Arlayne Cogburn, Sequim

learning to trust adults and respect the liberties they’re afforded on their way to adulthood, they learn instead that adults lie to get what they want. When I see the effect that antiquated propaganda has on families, I feel sorry for the parents who allow their children to Pot gives cancer? wander helplessly like deer in the headlights. “Marijuana smoke Marijuana ruins a causes cancer” is what the healthy child’s social, menteacher told my daughter tal and physical well-being. during class. We all know that. She came home conInstead of lying to our cerned that maybe her kids about why they should teacher knew something I abstain from its use, we didn’t. might consider newer ways We talked, and I to establish drug-free partassured her that the active nerships between children elements in marijuana may and parents that become keep the smoke from the foundation of respect becoming carcinogenic. that our children should It’s too bad that so have for their own wellmany people still believe being before they begin that the best way to get a making decisions on their kid to do the right thing is own. to scare them beyond their Kiah Roberts, own understanding. Port Angeles It’s too bad, because Turn to Voices/A11 when children should be

Have Your Say ■ Paul Gottlieb, commentary editor, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


Peninsula Daily News

CommentaryViewpoints

Peninsula Voices Continued from A10 (subprime mortgages), and these secondary markets provided buyers for mort‘Misleading’ gages that primary lenders The April 24 letter developed. “GOP ‘a danger’” was selfIn 2000, the Commodity serving and misleading. Futures Modernization Act, The whole story can be with support from the Clinfound on the Internet by ton administration and googling “A Short History Treasury Secretary Sumof Financial Deregulation mers and bipartisan supin the United States” and port in Congress, prevented “Subprime Mortgage Crithe Commodity Futures sis.” Trading Commission from The Glass-Steagall Act regulating over-the-counter of 1933 imposed sweeping derivative contracts. regulations on banks. You will find Republican This act was repealed in stages by Congress and the and Democratic administrations involved in this Supreme Court: 1978; mess, but the knockout 1980; 1982 (1987 the S&L blows landed in the late deposit fund is declared 1990s. Many of the prime insolvent); 1994; 1996; players have leadership 1998; and finally in 1999, roles in Congress and the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act, with support from Fed government today. Ray DeJong, Chairman Alan Greenspan, Sequim Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin and his successor, Liberalism’s fault Lawrence Summers, repealed the balance of With reference to the Glass-Steagall with many April 24 letter “GOP ‘a thinking this action led danger,’” it is impossible for directly to the financial cri- me to refute the writer’s sis of 2007, according to the mindless twaddle in detail Center for Economic Policy within the [approximately] and Research. 250 words permitted me, so Also, in the mid-1990s, I’ll just say this: Congress pressured Fannie From abortion to xenoMae and Freddie Mac to philia (the adoption of the increase lending to lesserWestern European qualified borrowers Socialist culture), modern

Our readers’ letters, faxes

progressivism-liberalism is singularly responsible for every evil that besets our society today. Ethan Harris, Sequim

rine, the type located at Bangor, has 24 tubes for D-5 ballistic missiles. Each missile can carry eight warheads. So, 24 times eight equals 192 warheads per sub. Each of these warheads Bangor’s Tridents can be individually tarAn article in the Peningeted. sula Daily News dated Each warhead contains April 25 stated that the a nuclear weapon much Navy is seeking $750 milmore powerful than that lion to upgrade a wharf unleashed on Nagasaki handling missiles at Banand Hiroshima. gor [“Speakers: Bangor Bangor services eight Naval Cache ‘Cold War such submarines and Relic.’ $750 Million Wharf would like to service 10. For Handling Missiles The eight submarines Sought By Navy”]. serviced at Bangor can Also, it indicated that destroy 1,536 individual there is a public comment cities. period currently open, The Navy plans to which ends Monday. The article says, “While upgrade its submarine fleet doing nothing is an option, beginning in 2019 and be completed by 2026. that’s unlikely. Congress The first new boat is has approved the $750 millikely to cost $6 billion to lion . . . ” What is left for the pub- $7 billion, while later boats may possibly drop to lic to comment about? $5 billion. Barring a major earthBangor will continue to quake fault directly under service the new boats into the base, this is a done the indefinite future. deal. Do we really need this Here are some reasons we, as a country, should kind of arsenal? What kind choose the option of doing of outcome would we have nothing, or rather eliminat- if all these missiles were ing nuclear submarines released at once? altogether: These missiles cannot be aimed at military tarThe Ohio-class subma-

Sunday, May 1, 2011

A11

and e-mail

gets without the loss of hundreds of thousands of civilians, or more. I have to admit that to me, this sounds like insanity. Dennis Daneau, Port Townsend

‘Akin to theft’ The U.S. has serious debt and economic problems that need to be addressed, but there is no near-term crisis. Presently, our national debt, at 96 percent of gross domestic product, is higher than some and lower than other industrialized nations. We will resolve this problem over the next 10 years or more. In the end, it will be resolved by the usual means of ending our wars, stronger economic growth, health care and other spending reforms, and otherwise making sure that we tax enough to cover our spending. Unfortunately, there are those who benefit from the high-hysteria approach that has been injected into our debt debate. Conservatives view it as an opportunity to wreck essential social programs.

U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan set out immediately to destroy Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security while slashing taxes for the wealthy and corporations. Sens. Lindsey Graham, Rand Paul and Mike Lee recently released their “Social Security Solvency and Sustainability Act.” Under this plan, Social Security surplus funds (taxes less benefits) will be increased from the present $2.6 trillion to $6.2 trillion. It slashes benefits so severely that none of the $6.2 trillion is ever intended to be repaid to Social Security. These Social Security funds will be “borrowed” for other government purposes as they have been for the past 30 years (wars and lower taxes). This is more akin to theft than borrowing. They now want Social Security, which had nothing to do with this deficit, to bail them out. The real deficit is in the honesty and character of those who are perpetrating this financial fraud on the American people. Malcolm D. McPhee, Sequim

Peninsula Daily News Rants & Raves Compiled By Lee Zurcher

He came to get our riding mower for repairs. After we explained the probRave of the Week lem, Pat fixed it in two minutes and then refused any payment or tip. A GIGANTIC RAVE for the You definitely have our lifeSalt Creek Easter egg hunt. It was our first time going out, time business and many referrals to follow! and my 3-year-old had a fantastic time. RAVE TO MARY KLOCK, I want to thank everyone involved and let them know they nurse at the Park View Villas in Port Angeles. made my 3-year-old’s day. She is dedicated to her residents, has great patience and . . . and other Raves advocates the very best for them. LAST WEDNESDAY WAS an extremely windy day. Getting into the Port Townsend courthouse was quite difficult. I must laud and thank Karen in the Auditor’s Office for walking me to my car so I would not fall. Thanks so much. You are a wonderful person. TO THE CARING person from Port Angeles who had lunch in Silverdale and found my canceled check and receipt next to your car and mailed the items back to me. Thanks for your help. A BIG RAVE to everyone involved in the Poetry Slam on April 21 at the Port Angeles Public Library. The sixth-grade-throughninth-grade poets showed amazing poise and courage in the recitation of their poems, the majority of which were their own original works. These young adults showed amazing sensitivity, creativity and awareness of the world around them. Well done, poets! SPECIAL RAVES TO the Olympic Medical Center (Port Angeles) staff in the emergency room, critical care unit, “2 Main,” Diagnostics and PT. Due to your skill and care, my recovery is assured. A GRATEFUL RAVE to Pat at Sunset Wire & Rope, Port Angeles.

A BIG RAVE for Walmart’s (Sequim) electronics department. Missing pieces of a new TV were found with a smile and super attitude by Lindsey! What a gal! A RAVE FOR Carrie at the Port Angeles Walmart. She was a great lady who helped me out with a pair of sunglasses that needed to be repaired. She was very nice, thoughtful and helpful. MANY HUGE RAVES to Dr. Meg Gordon and the entire staff at Blue Mountain Animal Clinic (Port Angeles). Everyone there went above and beyond to get our Li’l’ Annie Bananie back to her new, normal self. Annie is also in awe of the compassion shown to her by her many dog-park pals and pooches. A BIG RAVE for the “quacktacular” job all the Port Angeles Duck Derby folks are doing. Quack on, you guys. THANK YOU TO the Clallam County employees for their magnanimous generosity in their donations of tuna to the food bank. Their selfless display at Vern Burton Community Center (Port Angeles) on Monday showed the true spirit of giving. RAVES TO THE Clallam County and city of Port Angeles employees for bringing in an unprecedented 15,000-plus cans

of tuna to the food bank. This is yet another example of how government employees give back and the community in which they live. THANK YOU CLALLAM County employees for their third year of supporting the tuna drive. A special thanks to Juvenile and Family Services and the Sheriff’s Department for their combined contribution of 4,646 cans of tuna, 55 percent of the total of 8,381 cans donated by county employees. Everyone deserves to not go to bed hungry. RAVE TO ORGANIZERS of the “The Bite,” held in Port Angeles on Tuesday. It was wonderful. We had a great time It was well-organized and efficiently run, and it gave us a chance to get into some establishments and restaurants that we would like to go back to. Kudos to everyone involved. Hope to see it happening again next year. RAVE TO THE Port Angeles Downtown Association for sponsoring “The Bite” on Tuesday. It was a treat to visit the eateries and restaurants on the tour. Anticipation of what delicious bite or drink would be offered added to the fun. Didn’t realize there were so many wonderful and varied places to eat downtown. Hope you do it again. WHAT A WONDERFUL evening spent at “The Bite” in Port Angeles. There were great-tasting delicacies along with perfect wines, plus freshly made beers. We were happily marinated. Looking forward to another one soon. THANK YOU, LINCOLN High School students and staff, for an excellent spaghetti dinner and entertaining program Thursday. We’re glad you had such a great turnout for this fundraiser, which will help supplement costs

to attend the Seattle Art Museum. Have a great time!

Rant of the Week A RANT AGAINST commercials that show babies, kids and adults chewing food with their mouth open, food dripping out of the corners of their mouth, licking food from around their mouth. It’s disgusting, and nobody really wants to see that mess.

. . . and other Rants WHY IS IT, seeing how popular tea is to drink these days, that we are still having it served in all kinds of clunky coffee servers, along with thick, heavy mugs, lukewarm water and plastic containers of substitute cream? The correct way is a teapot of boiling water, with a cup and saucer, teaspoon, a small pitcher of milk and a bowl of sugar with a spoon to serve it. PEOPLE, PLEASE, BE responsible for your animals and keep them safe. If we all did this, we wouldn’t have to thank our neighbors for waking us up in the middle of the night to tell us our beloved pet has been hit by a car. Would you also let your children roam around in the streets after dark? TO SEQUIM BUSINESSES: If you’re going to advertise an Easter event for kids from 10 a.m. to noon, please organize it so it actually runs until noon. To have it finished at 10:05 a.m. was heartbreaking to the little ones. I WANT TO rant about the Easter egg hunt at the Pumpkin Patch. While the idea was good, the follow-through was abysmal. Parking was a nightmare. There was nobody in charge.

Cars parking everywhere, blocking the street. We got there at 9:07 a.m., and none of my kids got any eggs because they were all gone. A BIG RANT to drivers who, after replacing a headlight, fail to aim it properly, thus blinding oncoming cars. A BIG RANT that Olympic National Park isn’t going to have the Whiskey Bend Road open for hiking the Humes Ranch Loop trail until September. I want them to open it now. EDITOR’S NOTE: Whiskey Bend Road is closed to all vehicle traffic but open to pedestrians, bicyclists and stock users. RANT TO PEOPLE who move into a retirement community who don’t think it is not going to look like a nursing home. What, you don’t think you’re going to get old? Insurance doesn’t pay nursing homes for taking care of you for just being old. SOMEBODY RAN OVER my phone in the Starbucks parking lot and did not stop when I yelled at them.

________ (CLIP AND SAVE) To participate, call our Rants & Raves hotline at 360-417-3506 (works 24 hours a day), email us at letters@peninsuladailynews.com or drop us a postcard, 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Keep comments brief — 50 words or less. And, please, no libel, no responses to letters to the editor or news stories; no personal attacks on individuals or on businesses identified by name; no thank you notes to your favorite restaurant, dry-cleaner, grandchild (we simply don’t have enough room for those); no inaccurate information or unverified rumors; no calls for boycotts; no political endorsements; no charity fund appeals; no commercial pitches. Also, only one rant or rave per writer. Don’t forget to tell us where things happen — Port Angeles, Chimacum, Sequim, etc.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, May 1, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Theme sought for Sand Sculpture Classic Entries must be postmarked by May 9 Peninsula Daily News

WANTED! A theme for the ninth annual Windermere Sand Sculpture Classic at this summer’s Arts in Action festival on Port Angeles’ waterfront. If your theme is picked by a judging committee, you will win $100 worth of Port Angeles Downtown Dollars, which can be used as cash at participating downtown merchants. Mail your suggested theme, including your name, address and phone number, to 2011 Sand Sculpture

Theme, c/o Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Entries must be postmarked by no later than Monday, May 9. All entries must be mailed — not hand-delivered — and become the property of Nor’wester Rotary, organizer of the annual festival. Multiple entries are allowed, but each entry must be on a separate piece of paper and mailed in its own envelope. Only residents of Clallam and Jefferson counties are

eligible to enter the contest. Entries may be submitted by an individual or group. There is no age limit for entrants. The winning entry in the theme contest will be chosen on the basis of creativity, originality and appropriateness to the festival. In case the winning theme is suggested by more than one person, the entry with the earliest postmark will be declared the winner. This year’s sand sculpture contest is presented by Windermere Real Estate and co-

sponsored by Peninsula Daily News and other local businesses. Members of the Port Angeles Nor’wester Rotary Club; employees of Windermere Real Estate in Port Angeles, Sequim, SunLand and Port Ludlow; employees of the Peninsula Daily News; and judging committee members — and the immediate family of the members of these four groups — are not eligible to enter the contest. Last year’s theme was “Legends of Science Fiction,” submitted by Kelly McKillip of Sequim. Other past themes: ■ 2009: “Wonders of the World.”

United States and Canada will participate in the Windermere Sand Sculpture Classic during the Arts in Action festival July 22-24 at City Pier and Hollywood Beach. Spectators will be able to watch as piles of sand come to life in intricate forms as the skilled craftspeople do their work. The sculptures will be judged, and winners will receive cash awards. The annual festival also features food, live music, a car show and about 50 arts and crafts vendors. Other participants For more information, Sand sculptors from the phone Reiss at 360-461-0613. 155119541

Mother’s Day

■ 2008: “Great Inventions.” ■ 2007: “Circus Comes to Town.” ■ 2006: “Fun on the Farm.” ■ 2005: “Legends, Fantasies and Myths.” ■ 2004: “Under the Sea.” ■ 2003: “Fairy Tale Characters.” The theme must be broad enough to allow the sand sculptors creative license, said Doc Reiss of Nor’wester Rotary and Windermere Real Estate. “The more generic, the better,” Reiss said.

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Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, May 1, 2011

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

Prep Notes

When money matters in sport ONE OF THE more unpopular remedies for cash-strapped high school athletics programs is pay to play. That a stuMatt dent might not participate in Schubert sports simply because his or her family doesn’t have enough money to pay for it comes off as unjust. Unfortunately, shrinking budgets have left many North Olympic Peninsula administrators with no choice. It’s either institute pay-to-play or start cutting programs entirely. That doesn’t mean coaches have to like it, especially when they start to see their own programs suffer. Sequim track and field coach Brad Moore said he has definitely noticed a difference with his because of pay to play. Sequim has required students to pay to play three times during his 16-year tenure as coach. Each time, his team’s numbers have dropped significantly. In fact, accord- Moore ing to Moore, two of his three lowest turnouts were during pay-to-play years. When the district first tried it for one year in the early 2000s, he went from averaging 65-plus athletes a year to 48. After it was ALSO . . . brought back the ■ Prep past two years, standings Moore’s roster size for baseball, fell to 54 in 2010 softball, and a career low of soccer/B3 43 this spring. “For track it kills you, because you really rely on depth. It’s a key part of it,” said Moore, who has coached six state champions during the past six years. “Part of it is track usually gets kind of peripheral athletes. They are good at stuff, but they don’t turn out for the other sports.” Thus, asking for a start-up fee at the beginning of the season likely turns some athletes away. It doesn’t help that Sequim has one of the higher pay-to-play fees in the area. At $75 per sport (the third sport is free), it is double that of archrival Port Angeles ($37.50). Like many other districts that do pay-to-play, Sequim does offer special scholarships for those in need. A couple of the athletes on Moore’s teams were even recipients of that money. Still, he insists there are others who are likely not coming out because of pay to play. “Unless you have kids who come forward and actually say, ‘Hey I’d like to do this, but [I don’t have enough money],’ you don’t know who give the information to,” Moore said. “It’s tough. “I understand why it had to happen. When they tell you they slashed X amount of dollars out of the budget, you have to find something to make it work. But I don’t like it, because I think it keeps kids from coming out, and I think I have good evidence to prove that.”

Seattle goes for quantity Hawks pick up seven players in final three rounds of draft By Tim Booth The Associated Press

RENTON — K.J. Wright wanted to scream. The situation dictated he whisper. When Wright wasn’t taken in the third round of the NFL draft Friday, the Mississippi State linebacker knew that

Saturday could get a little odd and a little awkward. Wright knew he was going to get drafted. The problem came with the timing. Would Wright get the phone call he’s always wanted to receive in the middle of his college graduation ceremonies? Yep.

“As soon as I got off the phone, two minutes later I had to go up there and walk across the stage,” Wright said. The drafting of Wright was the beginning of a busy final day of the NFL draft for the Seattle Seahawks. Picking seven times in the final three rounds, Seattle addressed the defensive side of the ball after spending the first two days working to better an offensive line that was a problem in Pete Carroll’s first year.

Several area athletes are starting to figure out what the future holds. All-state Port Angeles girls basketball player Jessica Madison committed to Division II University of Alaska-Anchorage back in November. Here’s a few other athletes who have made college decisions: ■ A.J. Konopaski (PA, Sr.) — Baseball pitcher/first baseman committed to Division III Pacific Lutheran University last week. ■ Drew Rickerson (Sequim, Sr.) — Wolves pitcher/outfielder will likely play baseball for Pacific Lutheran University on an academic scholarship. Lutes football coaches also want the prolific All-Olympic League quarterback to suit up for the football team. to

Schubert/B4

ALSO . . . ■ Hawks continue to beef up offensive line/B4

Seattle grabbed a trio for its secondary with Stanford cornerback Richard Sherman, Appalachian State free safety Mark LeGree, a three-time Associated Press FCS firstteam all-American, and Clemson cornerback Byron Maxwell. Turn

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Hawks/B4

The Associated Press

Washington quarterback Keith Price passes off to tailback Chris Polk during the first quarter of Saturday’s spring football game in Seattle.

Price on the mark Husky QB states his case in spring game The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Keith Price completed 20 of 28 passes for 212 yards and three touchdowns in the Washington spring game Saturday at Husky Stadium. Price also rushed 29 yards for a touchdown as the Dawgs beat the Huskies 31-14 in front of an estimated crowd of 10,000.

Price, a sophomore, appears to be leading the competition with Nick Montana to replace Jake Locker at quarterback. Locker was taken No. 8 overall in the NFL Draft Thursday by the Tennessee Titans. Montana, a redshirt freshman and the son of Hall of Famer Joe Montana, completed

9 of 20 passes for 146 yards and two touchdowns. Neither quarterback threw an interception. Washington coach Steve Sarkisian has yet to decide whether Price or Montana will start in the season opener Sept. 3 against Eastern Washington. The Dawgs team featured the No. 2 offense and the No. 1 defense. The Huskies team featured the No. 1 offense and No. 2 defense. Price and Montana each played one half with the No. 1 offense. Price started the game with the No. 1 offense.

He started one game last season when Locker was injured. “What Keith Price brought today I thought was really effective not only throwing the football but running the ball,” Sarkisian said. Price threw a 5-yard touchdown pass to Jermaine Kearse, a 13-yard score to DiAndre Campbell and a 2-yard touchdown pass to James Johnson. Price also broke free untouched on a bootleg left for a 29-yard scoring run. He rushed for 53 yards on five carries. Turn

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Dawgs/B4

Mariners win fifth straight The Associated Press

Lonnie Archibald/for Peninsula Daily News

College awaits

Turn

SCOREBOARD Page B2

Forks base runner Alyssa Feldewert dives safely back to third base during the first game of an SWL-Evergreen Division doubleheader in Forks on Friday.

Spartans get split Forks still in playoff race Peninsula Daily News

FORKS — The Forks softball team kept its playoff hopes alive Friday. Splitting a doubleheader with Elma on senior night, the Spartans staved off postseason elimination with one week to go in the SWL-Evergreen Division season.

Jillian Raben went the distance on the mound to lead Forks to a 6-5 win in the first game before the Spartans fell 15-1 in the nightcap. “That’s probably the best game she’s pitched all year,” Forks coach Scott Justus said of Raben’s Game 1 performance. “She kept their stud hitters off balance.

Prep Softball “Her junk was really working for her, and she kept it down.” Walking none and striking out two in seven innings of work, Raben kept the Spartans (3-7 in league, 3-10 overall) in the game. The Forks bats then came alive in the fifth and sixth innings. Turn

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Softball/B3

BOSTON — Seattle righthander Doug Fister knew he had some luck on his side against the Red Sox. Fister worked out of trouble three times in 5 2/3 scoreless innings and the Seattle’s bullpen con- Next Game tinued its solid stretch, Today lifting the vs. Red Sox Mariners to a at Boston 2-0 win over Time: 10:35 a.m. Boston on On TV: ROOT Saturday. “I felt like it was a constant struggle,” Fister said. “It still hasn’t sunk in yet.” The tricky night started right off the bat for Fister when Boston loaded the bases in the first inning but couldn’t capitalize. Boston aided him when it loaded the bases with no outs four innings later, but had a base running gaffe by Jacoby Ellsbury that helped squelch the threat. “It looks to me that he looks like he’s at his best when it’s a tough situation,” Seattle manager Eric Wedge said. Turn

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Mariners/B2


B2

SportsRecreation

Sunday, May 1, 2011

Today’s Area Sports

can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Golf PENINSULA GOLF CLUB April 27 Men’s Club Better Nine Individual Event Gross: Mike Clayton, 37; Rick Parkhurst, 38; Bob Brodhun, 38. Net: Bob Reidel, 31.5; John Tweter, 32.5; Gary McLaughlin, 33.5; Ray Dooley, 33.5; Dennis Ingram, 33.5; Gene Middleton, 34. Team Event Gross: Jeff Colvin and Win Miller, 73; Tom Hainstock and Steve Callis, 75. Net: Curtis Johnson and Win Miller, 61; Jeff Colvin and Curtis Johnson, 63; Gary McLaughlin and Al Osterberg, 64; Jeff Colvin and Craig Jacobs, 64; Win Miller and Craig Jacobs, 65; Tom Lowe and Ray Dooley, 65; Bernie Anselmo and Ray Dooley, 65; Andy Duran and Jack Morley, 65; Andy Duran and Bob Reidel, 65. Merchant League April 27 ­— Week One Team Points 1. Fryer Insurance 17 2. Team Crestwood 16 3. Glass Services 14.5 4. Les Schwab 14.5 5.Callis Insurance 13 6. Liquid Painting 12 7. Triggs Dental Lab No. 2 10.5 8. Peninsula College 10.5 9. Dream Team 8 10. Triggs Dental Lab No. 1 8 11. Laurel Lanes No. 2 8 12. John L. Scott 6 13. D&K Painting 5 14. Allstate Insurance 4 15. APS Electrical 3 16. Windermere 2 17. Lakeside Industries 1 18. Laurel Lanes No. 1 0 19. Olympic Restoration 0 Division One (0 to 8 Handicap) Gross: Greg Senf, 37; Jim Root, 38. Net: Rick Hoover, 31; Gene Norton, 34; Kurt Anderson, 36; Jack Heckman, 36; Randy Barber, 37; Steve Moreno, 37; Ron Jones, 37; Dan Reeves, 37; MIke Payton, 37; Bob Sheldon, 37; Jacob Oppelt, 37; Mike Robinson, 37. Division Two (9 to 12 Handicap) Gross: Tom Craker, 41; Dan Mock, 45. Net: Jim Hoine, 34; Matt Elwood, 34; Jerry Brinkman, 35; Tom Arnold, 37; Mike Tetnowski, 38; Bill Riley, 38; Andy Slack, 38. Division Three (13 and up Handicap) Gross: Todd Irwin, 49; Sue Barber, 52; Trent Peppard, 52. Net: Helen Arnold; Matt Murray, 39; Bruce Johnstad, 40; Warren Taylor, 40; Nancy VanWinkle, 41; Mark Derousie, 41. Peninsula Lady Golfers 9 Hole Scramble Winning team was Dolly Burnett, Linda Bruch and Ruth Thomson.

NORTH OLYMPIC LEAGUE Standings through April 29 Cal Ripken Majors American League Team W L Local 155 6 0 Swain’s 5 0 Mobile Music 3 2 Eagles 3 2 Elks 3 3 National League Team W L Laurel Lanes 3 2 Rotary 2 3 Rotary 2 3 Hi-Tech Electronics 1 4 Tranco Transmissions 0 5 Lions 0 5 Babe Ruth Major Solftball Team W L PA Power Equipment 4 0 Reid & Johnson Motor 3 1 Paint & Carpet Barn 2 2 Boulevard Wellness 2 2 Jim’s Pharmacy 1 3 Olympic Labor Council 0 4

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Bowling Mix & Match Men’s high game: George Peabody, 269; men’s high series: George Peabody, 749. Women’s high game: Rita Berson, 211; women’s high series: Rita Berson, 552. Leading team: Glass Action.

American League

American League W 16 15 13 13

L PCT 11 .593 12 .556 14 .481 15 .464

GB - 1 3 3.5

W NY Yankees 15 Tampa Bay 15 Toronto 13 Baltimore 12 Boston 11

L PCT 9 .625 12 .556 14 .481 13 .480 15 .423

GB - 1.5 3.5 3.5 5

W Cleveland 18 Kansas City 14 Detroit 12 Chicago Sox 10 Minnesota 9

L PCT 8 .692 13 .519 15 .444 18 .357 17 .346

GB - 4.5 6.5 9 9

Texas LA Angels Oakland Seattle

WEST HOME ROAD RS RA 11-5 5-6 140 114 6-7 9-5 108 92 5-6 8-8 90 94 5-8 8-7 109 122 EAST HOME ROAD RS RA 11-6 4-3 134 100 7-8 8-4 115 99 6-5 7-9 125 118 7-8 5-5 104 115 5-6 6-9 107 113 CENTRAL HOME ROAD RS RA 12-2 6-6 141 95 11-5 3-8 135 134 6-6 6-9 113 134 4-8 6-10 109 143 4-6 5-11 82 139

DIFF +26 +16 -4 -13

STRK Won 1 Lost 1 Lost 1 Won 5

L10 5-5 4-6 4-6 7-3

DIFF +34 +16 +7 -11 -6

STRK Won 1 Won 1 Lost 1 Won 2 Lost 2

L10 6-4 7-3 5-5 6-4 6-4

DIFF +46 +1 -21 -34 -57

STRK Won 5 Won 2 Lost 5 Lost 4 Lost 5

L10 6-4 3-7 4-6 3-7 3-7

DIFF +23 -15 -1 -12 -22

STRK Won 1 Won 2 Won 1 Lost 2 Lost 3

L10 5-5 6-4 4-6 3-7 2-8

DIFF +32 +16 +19 -10 -13

STRK Won 3 Lost 1 Lost 2 Lost 1 Lost 3

L10 8-2 7-3 5-5 3-7 6-4

DIFF +38 +21 +13 -31 -24 -34

STRK Won 4 Won 1 Lost 1 Won 2 Lost 1 Won 1

L10 8-2 5-5 5-5 4-6 4-6 4-6

National League W Colorado 17 LA Dodgers 14 Sa Francisco 13 Arizona 11 San Diego 9

L PCT 8 .680 13 .519 13 .500 15 .423 17 .346

GB - 4 4.5 6.5 8.5

W Philadelphia 18 Florida 16 Atlanta 13 Washington 12 NY Mets 11

L PCT 8 .692 9 .640 15 .464 14 .462 16 .407

GB - 1.5 6 6 7.5

W 16 14 13 12 12 10

L PCT 11 .593 13 .519 13 .500 14 .462 15 .444 17 .370

GB - 2 2.5 3.5 4 6

St. Louis Cincinnati Milwaukee Chi Cubs Pittsburgh Houston

WEST ROAD RS RA 10-3 119 96 6-8 109 124 9-8 97 98 4-7 127 139 5-6 72 94 EAST HOME ROAD RS RA 9-4 9-4 120 88 10-5 6-4 109 93 4-7 9-8 110 91 7-7 5-7 98 108 5-8 6-8 118 131 CENTRAL HOME ROAD RS RA 6-6 10-5 144 106 8-7 6-6 142 121 8-5 5-8 118 105 6-8 6-6 106 137 4-8 8-7 91 115 6-9 4-8 117 151 HOME 7-5 8-5 4-5 7-8 4-11

Women’s League Championship Game April 28 Seven Cedar’s Casino 43, Elwha River Casino 37 High scorers: SC: Bracey Barker, 12; Kathleen Wilson, 11; Alison Crumb, 11 EC: Tricia Buckingham, 13; Suzanna GoplenDean, 9; Marsha Shamp, 9.

Okajima 1 0 0 0 2 0 Bard 1 0 0 0 0 1 Matsuzaka pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. Umpires—Home, Sam Holbrook; First, Greg Gibson; Second, Todd Tichenor; Third, Gerry Davis. T—3:07. A—37,845 (37,493).

Baseball

NBA Playoffs

Mariners 5, Red Sox 4 Friday Seattle Boston ab r h bi ab r h bi ISuzuki rf 4 2 2 0 Ellsury cf 4 1 1 0 Figgins 3b 4 2 2 0 Pedroia 2b 4 0 0 0 Bradly lf 5 0 0 0 AdGnzl 1b 4 1 2 0 Olivo c 5 1 1 1 Youkils 3b 3 0 1 1 Smoak 1b 4 0 1 2 Ortiz dh 4 0 1 1 Cust dh 2 0 1 1 Lowrie ss 4 0 0 0 AKndy 2b 3 0 0 0 Camrn rf 4 2 2 2 JaWlsn 2b 0 0 0 0 Varitek c 3 0 1 0 MSndrs cf 2 0 0 0 J.Drew ph 1 0 0 0 Ryan ss 3 0 0 0 DMcDn lf 2 0 0 0 Totals 32 5 7 4 Totals 33 4 8 4 Seattle 200 010 200—5 Boston 012 100 0 00—4 E_D.McDonald (1), Albers (1). DP—Seattle 2, Boston 1. LOB—Seattle 9, Boston 4. 2B— Figgins (5), Cust (3). HR—Cameron 2 (2). SB—M.Saunders (2). S—Ryan. IP H R ER BB SO Seattle Vargas W,1-2 7 8 4 4 2 4 J.Wright H,7 1 0 0 0 0 1 League S,6-6 1 0 0 0 0 1 Boston Matsuzaka 4 3 3 1 4 4 Albers 2 1 0 0 1 1 Jenks L,1-2 BS,1-1 1 3 2 2 1 1

Basketball All Times PDT FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) WESTERN CONFERENCE Memphis 4, San Antonio 2 Sunday, April 17: Memphis 101, San Antonio 98 Wednesday, April 20: San Antonio 93, Memphis 87 Saturday, April 23: Memphis 91, San Antonio 88 Monday, April 25: Memphis 104, San Antonio 86 Wednesday, April 27: San Antonio 110, Memphis 103, OT Friday, April 29: Memphis 99, San Antonio 91 CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7) WESTERN CONFERENCE L.A. Lakers vs. Dallas Monday, May 2: Dallas at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 4: Dallas at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 6: L.A. Lakers at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, May 8: L.A. Lakers at Dallas, 12:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 10: Dallas at L.A. Lakers, TBA x-Thursday, May 12: L.A. Lakers at Dallas, TBA x-Sunday, May 15: Dallas at L.A. Lakers, 12:30 p.m.

All Time EDT Saturday’s Games Tampa Bay 2, L.A. Angels 1, 10 innings Texas 11, Oakland 2 N.Y. Yankees 5, Toronto 4 Cleveland 3, Detroit 2, 13 innings Baltimore 6, Chicago White Sox 2 Kansas City 11, Minnesota 2 Seattle 2, Boston 0 Today’s Games Detroit (Coke 1-4) at Cleveland (Masterson 5-0), 10:05 a.m. Toronto (Litsch 2-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Nova 1-2), 10:05 a.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 3-2) at Boston (Wakefield 0-0), 10:35 a.m. L.A. Angels (Weaver 6-0) at Tampa Bay (Cobb 0-0), 10:40 a.m. Baltimore (Britton 4-1) at Chicago White Sox (Floyd 3-1), 11:10 a.m. Minnesota (Pavano 2-2) at Kansas City (Hochevar 2-3), 11:10 a.m. Texas (Harrison 3-2) at Oakland (G.Gonzalez 2-2), 1:05 p.m.

National League Saturday’s Games Philadelphia 2, N.Y. Mets 1 St. Louis 3, Atlanta 2 San Francisco 2, Washington 1 Houston 2, Milwaukee 1 Cincinnati 4, Florida 3, 10 innings Chicago Cubs 5, Arizona 3 Colorado 4, Pittsburgh 1 San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, 7:10 p.m. Today’s Games San Francisco (Cain 2-1) at Washington (Zimmermann 1-4), 10:35 a.m. St. Louis (J.Garcia 3-0) at Atlanta (D.Lowe 2-3), 10:35 a.m. Milwaukee (Narveson 1-1) at Houston (Norris 1-1), 11:05 a.m. Pittsburgh (Morton 2-1) at Colorado (Jimenez 0-1), 12:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (C.Coleman 1-1) at Arizona (D.Hudson 1-4), 1:10 p.m. Florida (Nolasco 2-0) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 3-2), 1:10 p.m. San Diego (Moseley 0-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Garland 1-1), 1:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (C.Young 1-0) at Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 2-2), 5:05 p.m.

Oklahoma City vs. Memphis Sunday, May 1: Memphis at Oklahoma City, 10 a.m. Tuesday, May 3: Memphis at Oklahoma City, 6:30 p.m. Saturday, May 7: Oklahoma City at Memphis, 2 p.m. Monday, May 9: Oklahoma City at Memphis, 6:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 11: Memphis at Oklahoma City, TBA x-Friday, May 13: Oklahoma City at Memphis, TBA x-Sunday, May 15: Memphis at Oklahoma City, TBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Chicago vs. Atlanta Monday, May 2: Atlanta at Chicago, 5 p.m. Wednesday, May 4: Atlanta at Chicago, 5 p.m. Friday, May 6: Chicago at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Sunday, May 8: Chicago at Atlanta, 5 p.m. x-Tueseday, May 10: Atlanta at Chicago, TBA x-Thursday, May 12: Chicago at Atlanta, TBA x-Sunday, May 15: Atlanta at Chicago, TBA Miami vs. Boston Sunday, May 1: Boston at Miami, 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 3: Boston at Miami, 4 p.m. Saturday, May 7: Miami at Boston, 5 p.m. Monday, May 9: Miami at Boston, 4 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 11: Boston at Miami, TBA x-Friday, May 13: Miami at Boston, TBA x-Monday, May 16: Boston at Miami, 5 p.m.

Hockey NHL Playoffs CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS (Best-of-7) WESTERN CONFERENCE Vancouver 1, Nashville 0 Thursday, April 28: Vancouver 1, Nashville 0 Saturday, April 30: Nashville at Vancouver, late Tuesday, May 3: Vancouver at Nashville, 6 p.m.

Briefly . . . Equestrian team to hold exhibition PORT ANGELES — The Sequim High School equestrian team will hold a special team exhibition today at Freedom Farms, 493 Spring Road. Equestrian team riders will perform some of the events they ride at their meets, including drills, pairs and other team and individual events. There will be two performances at 4:30 p.m. and 6:15 p.m., followed by a light supper.

Sequim won the District 4 overall small team championship trophy this spring and won the overall average points for the highest placing team on its way to claiming 35 medals. The team will travel to the state meet in Moses Lake on May 12-15 “It has been a amazing year, and we are looking forward to state,” Sequim coach Terri Winters said in a news release. Limited tickets for Sunday’s event will be available at the door for a suggested donation of $10. For more information, contact Winters at 360-4605400.

Kids fishing

Sunday hoops back

FORKS — The Forks Kids Fishing Day will be held at Bogachiel Rearing Pond just west of town today from 6 a.m. to noon. The annual event is open to children ages 12 and younger. A special section will be reserved for tots 5 or younger. More than 3,400 trout have been stocked in the pond, with 325 of those fish weighing two pounds or more. There is a five-fish limit for all anglers. Free refreshments will also be served. Fish not caught at the event will be dumped into Wentworth Lake.

PORT ANGELES — Sunday night basketball returns to the Port Angeles High School gym tonight. The competitive weekly coed pickup game, supported by Port Angeles Parks and Recreation, is open to adults ages 18 and older. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. each Sunday, with five-onfive games typically running on two or three courts. Participants must pay a $1 entry fee for one night or an annual fee of $25. For more information, contact Matt Schubert at matt.schubert@peninsula dailynews.com. Peninsula Daily News

Dawgs: QBs dueling for starting spot Continued from B1 Despite the strong showing by Price, Sarkisian declined to pick a starter. “Today wasn’t going to define who was going to be our starting quarterback,” Sarkisian said. “It’s a body of work. “It’ll give myself and our offensive staff a chance to really evaluate the entire body of work of 15 practices.

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Baseball and Softball

Peninsula Daily News

“We’ll assess it all and when the timing’s right we’ll make a decision.” Montana threw a 70-yard touchdown pass to Cody Bruns late in the game. He also tossed a 15-yard touchdown pass to Johnson and rushed for 26 yards on six carries, including a 23-yard scamper. “I think it’s a great battle to watch these guys continue to compete not just with one

another but with themselves and to deal not just with their own play at the moment but some of the adversity that can come with it,” Sarkisian said. “Maybe they struggle for a day and the other guy has a good day. Maybe they have a couple of drops.” Sarkisian likes his options. “They both have improved at a high level,” he said. “To

think that we have a redshirt freshman and a redshirt sophomore competing for this job and they’re playing the way they are is very encouraging to me.” Bruns led the receivers with four catches for 102 yards and a touchdown. Johnson had six receptions for 52 yards and two scores. Tailback Johri Fogerson rushed for 72 yards on 12 carries.

Today 10 a.m. (4) KOMO (6) CHEK NBA Basketball, Memphis Grizzlies at Oklahoma City Thunder in Western Conference Playoffs. 10 a.m. (7) KIRO Off Road Racing, Off-Road Pro 2 and Pro 4 at Firebird, Ariz. 10 a.m. (28) TBS MLB Baseball, Toronto Blue Jays at New York Yankees. 10:30 a.m. (25) ROOT MLB Baseball, Seattle Mariners at Boston Red Sox. 11 a.m. (5) KING Equestrian, Championship at Equestrian Park in Lexington, Ky. Noon (5) KING NHL Hockey, Detroit Red Wings at San Jose Sharks in Stanley Cup Playoffs. Noon (7) KIRO PGA Golf, Classic of New Orleans at TPC Louisiana in Avondale, La. Noon (26) ESPN College Baseball, Auburn at South Carolina. 12:30 p.m. (4) KOMO (6) CHEK NBA Basketball, Boston Celtics at Miami Heat in Eastern Conference Playoff. 12:30 p.m. (8) GBLBC PGA Golf, Classic of New Orleans at TPC Louisiana in Avondale, La. 1 p.m. (47) GOLF LPGA Golf, Avnet Classic at Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail in Mobile, Ala. 1 p.m. WGN MLB Baseball, Chicago Cubs at Arizona Diamondbacks. 4 p.m. (2) CBUT NHL Hockey, Tampa Bay Lightning at Washington Capitals in Stanley Cup Playoffs. 5 p.m. (26) ESPN MLB Baseball, New York Mets at Philadelphia Phillies. Thursday, May 5: Vancouver at Nashville, 5:30 p.m. x-Saturday, May 7: Nashville at Vancouver, 5 p.m. x-Monday, May 9: Vancouver at Nashville, TBA x-Wednesday, May 11: Nashville at Vancouver, TBA San Jose 1, Detroit 0 Friday, April 29: San Jose 2, Detroit 1, OT Sunday, May 1: Detroit at San Jose, 12 p.m. Wednesday, May 4: San Jose at Detroit, 5 p.m. Friday, May 6: San Jose at Detroit, 4 p.m. x-Sunday, May 8: Detroit at San Jose, 5 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 10: San Jose at Detroit, TBA x-Thursday, May 12: Detroit at San Jose, TBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Tampa Bay 1, Washington 0 Friday, April 29: Tampa Bay 4, Washington 2 Sunday, May 1: Tampa Bay at Washington, 4 p.m. Tuesday, May 3: Washington at Tampa Bay, 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 4: Washington at Tampa Bay, 4 p.m. x-Saturday, May 7: Tampa Bay at Washington, 9:30 a.m. x-Monday, May 9; Washington at Tampa Bay, TBA x-Wednesday, May 11: Tampa Bay at Washington, TBA Boston 1, Philadelphia 0 Saturday, April 30: Boston 7, Philadelphia 3 Monday, May 2: Boston at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 4: Philadelphia at Boston, 4 p.m. Friday, May 6: Philadelphia at Boston, 5 p.m. x-Sunday, May 8: Boston at Philadelphia, 12 p.m. x-Tuesday, May 10: Philadelphia at Boston, TBA x-Thursday, May 12: Boston at Philadelphia, TBA

Mariners: Win Continued from B1 Added Wedge, “You’ve got to make pitches at this level, especially against this lineup.” Seattle’s Milton Bradley had an RBI double before being ejected a few minutes later, and the Mariners’ bullpen pitched the final 3 1/3 innings. Seattle’s pen has held opponents scoreless for the last 13 1/3 innings. It was the Mariners’ fifth straight win. “Everybody is real confident,” Seattle catcher Miguel Olivo said. “Right now I don’t see anybody afraid to throw the ball.” Boston lost for the fourth time in five games after winning eight of nine. The Red Sox went hitless the final five innings — two against the bullpen — in Friday’s 5-4 loss. Boston left 11 runners on Saturday and was 0-for11 with runners in scoring position. “If you’re feeling pressure you’re not going to do the job,” Red Sox first baseman Adrian Gonzalez said. “Everybody’s got that little thing they go to.

“I’ve got the little thing I go to. We’ve all got to find that little thing.” Fister (2-3) allowed five hits, walked five and fanned four. Aaron Laffey pitched 2 1-3 of one-hit relief and Brandon League got the final three outs for his seventh save in seven attempts. Bradley’s double gave the Mariners a 1-0 lead in the second, halting a 15 1-3 inning scoreless stretch by John Lackey (2-3). Ichiro walked and Chone Figgins singled before Bradley doubled just inside the left-field line. “The first one I had one that hit right on the line,” Lackey said. Bradley, standing at second following his double, was ejected by second base umpire Gerry Davis after Olivo was out on a close grounder at first. Wedge had just gone back to the dugout after arguing the play with Tim Tichenor, but was not tossed. “I guess when I was coming off the field they got him,” Wedge said. Jack Wilson’s sacrifice fly made it 2-0 in the sixth.


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, May 1, 2011

PA, Sequim settle for split Doubleheader features several tight matches Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — A full afternoon of girls tennis ended up in a split for archrivals Port Angeles and Sequim on Friday. The Wolves and Roughriders each won a match in their Olympic League doubleheader, with the former winning the first match 4-3 and the latter taking the second 5-2 Due to the length of the matches being played in the first set, the second match was an abbreviated format, playing one pro set instead of the traditional best 2 out of 3 sets to determine the winner. “In all of my years coaching at Port Angeles High School, I’ve never been involved in such a close match,” said coach Brian Gundersen. “We enjoy playing against Sequim every year because their girls play the right way, are wellcoached, and the matches are always so competitive.” Rider seniors Alexis Corn and Laney Boyd won both doubles matches of the doubleheader, getting special praise from Gundersen. “Alexis and Laney are our only seniors and they are playing their best tennis of the year right now,” he said. Serena Okamoto had two victories for Sequim as well, first winning the No. 1 singles showdown in the first match, then teaming up with Anna Prorok to win the No. 2 doubles in the second match. Prorok also earned a singles victory in the first match, winning the No. 2 matchup. The Riders travel to Kingston on Wednesday while Sequim travels to Port Townsend.

Thanks to the win, as well as two North Mason losses this weekend, Port Angeles can clinch a spot in the Class 2A sub-district playoffs with a victory over Sequim at Volunteer Field on Monday. A loss would likely put the Riders (8-7 in league and overall) in a sub-district pigtail playoff with North Mason.

Preps

Sequim 4, Port Angeles 3 Match Report Singles No. 1 : Okamoto (Sequim) def. Bohman (PA) 5-7, 7-6, 7-6. No. 2: Prorok (Sequim) def. Fickas (PA) 7-5, 6-0. No. 3: Smith (Sequim) def. Reyes (PA) 6-4, 6-3. Doubles No. 1: Corn/Boyd (PA) def. Hanson/Chan (Sequim) 6-2, 3-6, 6-2. No. 2: Cook/Rutherford (PA) def. Shore/Smith (Sequim) 7-6,6-2. No. 3: Moriarty/Drake (PA) def. DeFilippo/Powless (Sequim) 6-4, 6-2. No. 4: Mittmann/Guan (Sequim) def. Peet/McFarlen (PA) 7-5, 4-6, 7-6.

Port Angeles 5, Sequim 2 Match Report Singles No. 1 : Drake (PA) def. Smith (Sequim) 8-6. No. 2: Shore (Sequim) def. McFarlen (PA) 8-0. No. 3: Peet (PA) def. DeFilippo (Sequim) 8-6 Doubles No. 1: Corn/Boyd (PA) def. Hanson/Chan (Sequim) 8-3 No. 2: Okamoto/Prorok (Sequim) def. Cook/Rutherford (PA) 8-4 No. 3: Fickas/Bohman (PA) def. Smith/Powless (Sequim) 8-4. No. 4: Moriarty/Reyes (PA) def. Mittman/Guan (PA) 8-4

Baseball Port Angeles 4, Bremerton 0 PORT ANGELES — Brian Senf tossed a two-hit shutout to give the Roughriders a much-needed Olympic League victory Friday afternoon.

Port Angeles 4, Bremerton 0 Bremerton 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 — 0 2 0 Port Angeles 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 ­— 4 8 0 WP- Senf (3-2); LP- Flutz Pitching Statistics Port Angeles: Senf 7IP, 2H, 2BB, 9K. Hitting Statistics Bremerton: Robinson 1-3 (SB). Port Angeles: Morgan 2-4 (R, 2B); Uvila 2-3; Sullivan 1-3 (2B, BB).

Sequim 14, North Mason 1 BELFAIR — The Wolves beat up the Bulldogs to clinch a top-three finish in the Olympic League standings on Friday. Sequim clobbered North Mason pitching for 16 hits, including two home runs and five doubles, on its way to a season sweep. Sequim (11-4 in league, 14-5 overall) closes out its regular season slate with a game at Port Angeles on Monday. Sequim 14, North Mason 1 Sequim 2 0 0 9 3 ­— 14 16 0 North Mason 0 0 1 0 0 — 1 3 2 WP- Yamamoto (3-1); LP- McDonald Pitching Statistics Sequim: Yamamoto 3IP, ER, 3H, 2BB, K; Hudson 2IP, 0BB, 2K. North Mason: McDonald 3.1IP; Young 0.2IP; Hohmann IP. Hitting Statistics Sequim: Rickerson 2-4 (2B, HR, 3RBI); Yamamoto 2-4 (HR, 3R, 3RBI); McFarlen 2-2 (2B, RBI, R, BB); Forshaw 2-3 (3B, RBI, 2R). North Mason: McKean 1-3 (RBI).

Chimacum 19, 9, Sea. Christian 1, 0 SEATTLE — The topranked Cowboys moved their win streak to 13 games after sweeping the Warriors in a Nisqually League doubleheader on Friday. Devin Manix crushed two homers in Game 1 — his third and fourth of the season — while Austin McConnell pitched a one-hitter in five innings. In Game 2, Landon Cray added to his school record home run total (now at seven) with a dinger of his own. Chimacum (8-0, 14-1) next hosts Cascade Christian on Monday. Chimacum 19, Seattle Christian 1 Chimacum 2 0 (14) 0 3 X X ­— 19 11 1 Seattle Chr. 0 0 0 1 0 X X — 1 1 2 WP- McConnell (1-0); LP- Banister Pitching Statistics Chimacum: McConnell 5IP, 5K, H, R, HBP, 3BB. Seattle Christian: Banister 2.1IP, 10ER. Hitting Statistics Chimacum: Cray 2-2 (RBI, 4R); Manix 2-3 (2R, 2HR, 5RBI); Eldridge 1-3 (2B, 3RBI, 2R); Ajax 3-3 (2R, 4RBI).

Chimacum 9, Seattle Christian 0 Seattle Chr. 0 0 0 0 0 X X ­— 0 4 2 Chimacum 2 0 2 5 X X X — 9 9 2 WP- Brown-Bishop (2-0); LP- Abe Pitching Statistics Seattle Christian: Abe 4IP. Chimacum: Brown-Bishop 5IP, 2K, BB, 4H, 0R. Hitting Statistics Chimacum: Cray 1-1 (2R, 2BB, HR); Dukek 2-3 (2B, 2RBI); Eldridge 2-2 (2R, 2 2B, RBI); Brown-Bishop 1-3 (2RBI); Cornachione 1-3 (2B, RBI).

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News (2)

Port Angeles singles player Shayla Bohman returns a ball during Friday’s match against Sequim’s Serena Okamoto in Port Angeles.

North Kitsap 16, Port Townsend 1 PORT TOWNSEND — North Kitsap handed Port Townsend (0-13, 0-14) a stinging loss Friday in Olympic League baseball action. Zac Olson picked up the lone RBI for Port Townsend while teammate Kyle Kelly was 2-for-2 with a stolen base. Port Townsend travels to Olympic on Monday.

Quilcene 4, Tacoma Baptist 3

Quilcene 4, Tacoma Baptist 3

Boys Soccer Sea. Christian 3, Chimacum 0 CHIMACUM — The injury-depleted Cowboys couldn’t quite keep up with the Nisqually League’s top team Friday. The Warriors scored two goals in the final four minutes of the first half, and the Cowboys were never able to find an answer. ‘The boys played exceptionally well,” Chimacum coach Kevin Coate said. “Considering we had very few subs, and they subbed often and tried to wear us out, I was very happy with how the boys played.” Seattle Christian 3, Chimacum 0 Seattle Christian 2 1 — 3 Chimacum 0 0 — 0 Scoring Summary First half: 1, Seattle Christian, 36th minute; 2, Seattle Christian, 38th minute. Second Half: 3, Seattle Christian, 60th minute..

Sequim’s Serena Okamoto hits the return during her match against Port Angeles’ Shayla Bohman on Friday in Port Angeles.

Boys Golf Port Angeles 434, Bremerton 507 PORT ANGELES — The Riders (3-4) earned a win at Peninsula Golf Club behind the outstanding play of junior Jordan Negus on Friday. Negus was match medalist with a 79 that included two birdies. It is the third time he’s won medalist honors as well as his lowest round of the season. Teammates Garrett Payton and Terrance Stevenson both finished the day with a score of 82. The Riders will have their last home match of the season Tuesday against North Kitsap. Port Angeles 434, Bremerton 507 Bremerton (507) Brycen Kulbeth, 95 Port Angeles (434) Negus, 79; Payton, 82; Stevenson, 82; Grimsley, 96; Robland, 96

Track and Field Shelton Invite SHELTON — Port Ange-

les’ Troy Martin and Port Townsend’s Bereket Piatt led the North Olympic Peninsula contingent at the 37-team Shelton Invitational on Saturday. While the Rider senior took home first place in the discus and 11th in the shot put, Piatt won the 3,200meter race and took fourth in the 1,600. Port Townsend teammate Habtamu Rubio finished third in the 1,600 ahead of Piatt. Sequim earned two medals and a ribbon at Saturday’s event. Taylor Bonneau finished first in the freshman and sophomore 100-meter dash with a personal best time of 11.26 seconds. Audrey Lichten posted a season-best time of 11:40.39 in the 3,200 meter to place fifth. Teammate Frank Catelli had a great showing posting personal bests in the shot put, discus and javelin to take fourth, eighth and tenth respectively.

Softball: Sequim continues to romp Continued from B1 That’s when the Spartans scored five of their six runs to turn a four-run deficit into a 6-5 lead. Whitney Fairbanks was 2-for-4 with two RBIs, while Alyssa Feldewert and Alissa Shaw both had two hits and scored two runs to lead the Spartan lineup. Courtnie Paul was also 3-for-4 in the Game 1 win. Elma countered with its ace, Brook Goldsmith, in the final game, and the freshman delivered a nine-strikeout, complete-game performance. Fairbanks drove in the Spartans’ lone run. She and fellow senior Taylor Morris were both honored during the doubleheader in a special ceremony. “The program is really going to miss them not just as good athletes but as great people,” Justus said. “They are both special in different ways. They’re both good softball players too.” The duo will get one more set of home games with a rescheduled doubleheader against Tenino set for Thursday.

The Spartans must travel to Hoquiam before that on Tuesday to take on the undefeated Grizzlies in another Evergreen Division doubleheader. Forks will likely have to win each of those games to reach the playoffs. Forks 6, Elma 5 Elma 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 ­— 5 12 2 Forks 0 0 1 0 2 3 X — 6 9 0 WP- Raben (3-9); LP- Ruppright Pitching Statistics Elma: Ruppright 6IP. Forks: Raben 7IP, 12H, 5ER, 2K, 0BB. Hitting Statistics Elma: Demar 2-4 (R); Pearson 3-4 (2R). Forks: Paul 3-4; Feldewert 2-3 (2R); Fairbanks 2-4 (2RBI); Shaw 2-3 (2R).

Elma 15, Forks 1 Forks 1 0 0 0 0 ­— 1 8 5 Elma 1 (10) 4 0 X — 15 18 0 WP- Goldsmith; LP- Raben (3-10) Pitching Statistics Forks: Raben 4IP, 15R, 9ER, 18H, 2BB, 0K. Elma: Goldsmith 5IP, 9K, 2BB, 8H. Hitting Statistics Forks: Fairbanks 1-2 (RBI); Reed 1-1. Elma: Demar 3-4 (2R); Goldsmith 2-4 (2R); Wollen 2-4 (2R).

Chimacum 10, 2, Sea. Christian 0, 4 SEATTLE — A Jekylland-Hyde performance kept the Cowboys from sweeping their Nisqually League doubleheader on Friday. After tagging Seattle Christian pitching for 11 hits

and 10 runs in the opening game, the Cowboys couldn’t bring the lumber against the same pitcher in Game 2. And Cowboys starting pitcher Cydney Nelson, who threw a one-hitter in the first contest, couldn’t quite summon the same brilliance in the second five-inning game either. Chimacum (4-2, 8-3) hosts Cascade Christian on Monday. Chimacum 10, Seattle Christian 0 Chimacum 1 0 0 4 5 ­— 10 11 1 Sea. Christian 0 0 0 0 0 — 0 1 3 WP- Nelson (3-1); LP- Beule Pitching Statistics Chimacum: Nelson 5IP, H, 5K, BB, 0R. Seattle Christian: Beule 5IP. Hitting Statistics Chimacum: Cossell 2-4 (2 2B, 2RBI); Snyder 3-3 (3RBI, HR); Dukek 2-3 (RBI).

Seattle Christian 4, Chimacum 2 Sea. Christian 0 1 3 0 0 ­— 4 7 2 Chimacum 0 0 0 0 2 — 2 4 3 WP- Beule; LP- Nelson (3-2) Pitching Statistics Seattle Christian: Beule 5IP. Chimacum: Nelson 5IP, 3K, 4R, 7H, 4R, 3ER. Hitting Statistics Seattle Christian: Wrolstad 2-3 (2B, 2RBI). Chimacum: Dukek 1-3 (RBI).

Baseball Olympic League Standings As of April 30 League Overall Kingston 12-2 12-5 North Kitsap 12-3 13-4 Sequim 11-4 14-5 Olympic 7-5 8-5 Port Angeles 8-7 8-8 North Mason 7-8 7-10 Bremerton (3A) 4-11 5-12 Klahowya 1-11 2-13 P. Townsend (1A) 0-13 0-14 Friday’s Games North Kitsap 16, Port Townsend 1 Port Angeles 4, Bremerton 0 Sequim 14, North Mason 1 Kingston 7, Klahowya 2 Saturday’s Games Klahowya at Olympic (DH), Late Bremerton 5, North Mason 2 Franklin Pierce 9, Port Angeles 8 Monday’s Games Sequim at Port Angeles Port Townsend at Olympic (DH) Kingston at North Kitsap North Mason at Klahowya 1A Nisqually League Standings As of April 30 League Overall Chimacum 8-0 14-1 Cascade Christian 4-2 4-4 Vashon Island 5-3 6-5 Charles Wright 4-3 9-4 Orting 2-4 3-7 Seattle Christian 1-7 2-9 Life Christian 0-5 0-6 Friday’s Games Chimacum 19, Seattle Christian 1 Chimacum 9, Seattle Christian 0 Charles Wright 12, Cas. Christian 9 Vashon Island 8, Life Christian 1 Saturday’s Games Bell.Christian at Cas. Christian, NR Nook. Valley at Cascade Christian, NR Monday’s Games Cascade Christian at Chimacum Life Christian at Charles Wright Seattle Christian at Orting Vashon Island at Fife

Boys Soccer

North Kitsap 16, Port Townsend 1

Quilcene 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1­— 4 2 3 T. Baptist 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0— 3 5 2 WP- Plienes; LP- NR Pitching Statistics Quilcene: Pleines, 6IP, 2ER, 4H, 1BB, 6K; Davidson, 2IP, H, BB, K, 0ER. Hitting Statistics Quilcene: Bancroft 1-2 (R, BB, HBP); Murray 1-4 (2B) T. Bap.: Herdle 1-3 (2B, BB); Peterson 2-4 (2B, 3B, R)

Preps

Olympic League Standings As of April 30 League Pts Overall Bremerton 6-1-0 18 9-5-1 Kingston 4-0-2 14 9-1-3 North Kitsap 4-1-1 13 9-3-1 Port Angeles 3-1-2 11 9-3-2 Sequim 3-3-0 9 7-6-0 North Mason 2-3-1 7 3-7-1 Port Townsend 2-5-0 6 4-9-1 Olympic 1-5-0 3 2-12-0 Klahowya 0-6-0 0 1-10-0 Friday’s Game Klahowya 1, Black Hills 0 Saturday’s Games North Kitsap at Bainbridge, Late Tuesday’s Games North Kitsap at Port Angeles Olympic at Sequim Port Townsend at Klahowya Kingston at North Mason

North Kitsap 3 6 3 2 2 ­— 16 14 0 Por Townsend 0 0 0 1 0 — 1 4 1 WP- Hawkins; LP- Aumock Hitting Statistics NK: Urquhart 2-4 (3RBI); Gieri 2-3 (2SB); Smit 1-3 (2R)Nick Benish 2-5 (3RBI, 2B); Kuntz 2-3 (2R); Al. Smith2-2 (3R, RBI); Minder 2-3 (2B, 3RBI); Nettleton 2-2 (2B, 2RBI) Port Townsend: Kelly 2-2 (R, SB); Olson 1-2 (RBI, 2B)

TACOMA — The Rangers (7-2, 6-2) picked up a Sea-Tac League win on the road in extra innings Saturday against the Crusaders.

B3

the Bulldogs in Olympic League action Friday. Cindy Miller, Maddy Zbaraschuk and Hannah Grubb all homered for Sequim in the victory. Demiree Briones went the distance for the Wolves on the mound. Sequim 13, North Mason 0 Sequim 3 3 1 2 4 ­— 13 13 1 N.Mason 0 0 0 0 0 — 0 4 2 WP- Briones; LP- Johnson Pitching Statistics Sequim: Briones 5IP, 0R, 4H, 2K Team: Johnson, 0.1IP, 3R, 3ER, 2H; Bolin, 4.2 IP, 10R, 8ER, 11H Hitting Statistics Sequim: R. Zbaraschuk 2-4 (2R, 3B); Miller 2-3 (3R, RBI, HR); Hopson 1-1 (4R, 3BB); M. Zbaraschuk 2-3 (2R, 5RBI, 2B, HR); Briones 2-3 (4RBI, 2B); Besand 2-4 (R, RBI, 2B); Grubb 1-1 (R, RBI, HR). North Mason: Stromberg 2-3; Johnson 1-2; Marshall 1-2

Port Townsend 9, North Kitsap 8

PORT TOWNSEND — The Redskins picked up their second win of the season by hanging on to defeat the Vikings in Olympic League play Friday. Chelsea Whipple was a perfect 2-for-2 at the plate Sequim 13, and scored four of Port North Mason 0 Townsend’s nine runs. BELFAIR — The Wolves Although the Vikings (12-0, 15-0) chalked up out hit the Redskins 13-6, another win with a rout of Port Townsend tightened

up their defense to get out of a bases loaded situation in both the sixth and seventh innings. Port Townsend 9, North Kitsap 8 N.Kitsap 0 3 0 0 0 3 2 — 8 13 1 Port Townsend 0 1 0 3 3 2 X ­— 9 6 4 WP- LeMaster; LP- Keller Pitching Statistics PT: LeMaster 7IP 8K, BB, 6 IP NK: Keller 6IP, 6K, 6BB, 3HBP Hitting Statistics PT: Rutenbeck 1-4; Conway 1-4; Whipple 2-2 (4R, 2B, 1B); Kilham 1-4; Olin 1-2

Port Angeles 10, Bremerton 0 PORT ANGELES — The Riders (13-1 in league and overall) slugged their way past the Knights in Olympic League play Friday at home. Port Angeles belted out 15 hits, including back-toback home runs by Mariah Frazier and Meleny Fors, in the six-inning victory. Stacy Webb gave up only one hit while striking out five to earn the win. Port Angeles 10, Bremerton 0 Bremerton 0 0 0 0 0 0 ­— 0 1 1 Port Angeles 4 0 1 1 1 3 — 10 15 1 WP- Webb; LP- NR Pitching Statistics Port Angeles: Webb, 5IP, H, 5K Hitting Statistics Port Angeles: Frazier 2-4 (HR); Fors 2-4 (HR); Wahto 4-4 (4R, RBI); Hinsdale 2-4 (2RBI, HR); Webb 2-3 (R).

1A Nisqually League Standings As of April 30 League Pts Overall Seattle Christian 9-1-0 27 11-2-0 Vashon Island 6-0-4 22 8-1-4 Cas.Christian 6-2-3 21 6-5-3 Charles Wright 5-3-2 17 6-3-3 Orting 2-6-2 8 2-9-2 Chimacum 0-8-2 2 1-10-2 Life Christian 0-8-2 2 0-10-2 Friday’s Games Seattle Christian 3, Chimacum 0 Vashon Island 7, Life Christian 0 Cascade Christian 2, Orting 0 Charles Wright 0, University Prep 0 Tuesday’s Games Chimacum at Vashon Island Seattle Christian at Life Christian Seattle Academy at Cascade Christian Charles Wright at Orting

Softball Olympic League Standings As of April 30 League Overall Sequim 12-0 15-0 Port Angeles 13-1 13-1 Kingston 10-3 11-3 North Mason 5-8 5-8 Klahowya 4-7 4-8 Olympic 4-7 5-7 Bremerton 4-10 5-10 Port Townsend 2-9 2-9 North Kitsap 2-11 3-12 Friday’s Games Port Angeles 10, Bremerton 0 Sequim 13, North Mason 0 Port Townsend 9, North Kitsap 8 Kingston 9, Klahowya 5 Monday’s Games Klahowya at Port Townsend (possible doubleheader) Tuesday’s Games Klahowya at Port Angeles Sequim at Bremerton Olympic at Kingston North Kitsap at North Mason

Golf Olympic League Boys Standings As of April 30 Record Port Townsend 7-0-0 Sequim 6-1-0 North Kitsap 5-1-0 Olympic 3-3-1 Kingston 3-4-0 North Mason 2-4-1 Port Angeles 2-4-0 Klahowya 1-6-0 Bremerton 0-6-0 Olympic League Girls Standings As of April 30 Record Port Angeles 6-1-0 Sequim 5-1-0 North Kitsap 4-1-0 Kingston 4-2-0 North Mason 3-4-0 Klahowya 3-4-0 Bremerton 1-5-0 Port Townsend 0-7-0 Olympic 0-7-0

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B4

SportsRecreation

Sunday, May 1, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Sounders shut down Toronto Evans scores 2 MLS Soccer in Seattle’s 2nd James Riley sent a long ball to Evans down straight victory through the right side, and Evans The Associated Press

Steve Mullensky/for Peninsula Daily News

Opening

with a bang

Nickolas Weidner, 6, holds up a three-pound trout he helped his dad, Ben, catch during opening day at Anderson Lake in Jefferson County on Saturday. While the largest crowd was at Anderson on Saturday, the most productive lake on the North Olympic Peninsula was Sandy Shore Lake with an average of 3.3 fish per angler.

Hawks load up on beef Seattle addresses O-line with first 2 picks of draft By Tim Booth

The Associated Press

RENTON — No question, new Seattle assistant head coach Tom Cable had an impact on the Seahawks’ draft approach. It was all about the offensive line during the first two days of the draft. After trading out of the second round to acquire more picks, the Seahawks grabbed Wisconsin guard John Moffitt with the 75th overall pick in the third round of the NFL draft on Friday night. The selection of Moffitt came on the heels of Seattle grabbing Alabama offensive tackle James Carpenter and after Seattle took Russell Okung in last year’s draft with the sixth overall pick. Throw in the return of Max Unger after he missed all but one game last season following toe surgery, and Seattle could be looking at an offensive line in 2011 with four starters who are either rookies or have just one season of NFL experience. “The intentions were clear what we wanted to get done these first couple of days and we’re very happy with how it turned out,” Seattle coach Pete Carroll said. “To get another guy who brings the attitude and toughness and competitiveness that we talked about on day one is really clear.” The revamp of Seattle’s offensive line is needed after

the Seahawks ranked 31st in the NFL in rushing offense and the line was a constant juggle due to injuries and ineffectiveness. The arrival of Marshawn Lynch midway through the season didn’t yield the results the Seahawks had hoped because of the offensive line woes. Enter Cable, who was hired shortly after his firing as head coach in Oakland, with the intent of committing to a zone-blocking run offense based around brutish linemen. Cable told general manager John Schneider a week ago his preference on linemen — based on Seattle’s spots in the draft — were Carpenter and Moffitt. “The Seattle Seahawks, as we all know if you look back just a few years ago, had a tremendous offensive line, was a real strength, backbone of this football team,” Cable said. “It was the reason they went to all those playoff games and ultimately the Super Bowl. If you’re going to be that kind of team, you have to get back to that.”

Badger blocker Moffitt was a first-team Associated Press all-America selection in his senior season at Wisconsin. The 6-foot-4, 319-pound guard made 42 career starts for the Badgers, spending most of his time at left guard, but he also played center.

SEATTLE — Brad Evans scored twice in the second half and set up Alvaro Fernandez’s first-half goal in the Seattle Sounders’ 3-0 victory over Toronto FC on Saturday night. Seattle won consecutive games for the first time this season and is 3-0-3 in its last six games and 3-2-3 overall. Toronto (1-3-4) is winless in six games, going 0-2-4 since a 2-0 home win over Portland on March 26. Goalkeeper Kasey Keller had his second straight shutout. “I thought for the team overall, this was just a good push going forward,” said Evans, whose multiple-goal game was the first of his career. “We played players in different formations and different positions as well, so I think everybody had a good attitude from that standpoint.” Evans was one of those players, moving to the right side, and with spectacular results. “Brad has played on the right before, and he’s comfortable out there,” Sounders coach Sigi Schmid said. “He has a good cross with the ball, as he showed on the first goal, then obviously, he finished his goal. He was unlucky not to get a couple more.” Fernandez, who started for the first time since March 19, scored his second goal of the season.

floated it across the penalty area. Fernandez headed it into the right corner. On a quick counterattack in the 52nd minute, Evans took a through ball from Fredy Montero down the right side, took it just inside the box and sent a shot off of goalkeeper Stefan Frei’s hands into the left corner. “I thought we were a little unfortunate to only be ahead by one at halftime,” Schmid said. “We said the first 15 or 20 minutes of the second half would be important. We got that second goal early in the second half, so that helped us establish our rhythm. Evans converted a penalty kick on a handball call in the 75th minute, giving him three goals this season. The match was Seattle’s first since starting midfielder Steve Zakuani’s right leg was broken on a hard tackle by Colorado’s Brad Mullan on April 22. Zakuani is likely out for the season, and Mullan received a 10-game suspension Thursday. The Sounders also were without forward O’Brian White, who had surgery on his left leg Wednesday to remove a blood clot, and is out indefinitely. White and Zakuani had accounted for four of Seattle’s previous seven goals. “We talked about before the game of kind of doing it for them, so I think that was in the back of everybody’s mind,” Evans said.

Schubert: Notes The current weight classes for boys are 103, 112, 119, 125, 130, 135, ■ Lea Hopson 140, 145, 152, 160, 171, (Sequim, Sr.) — Wolves softball shortstop will play 189, 215, 285. The new weight classes for College of Southern will be 106, 113, 120, 126, Idaho (part of National 132, 138, 145, 152, 160, Junior College Athletic Seattle Seahawks third round draft pick 170, 182, 195, 220 and 285. Association). John Moffitt was a first-team Associated Press Jim Meyerhoff, assistant ■ Maddy Zbaraschuk All-American guard for Wisconsin in 2010. executive director for the (Sequim, Sr.) — Wolves Washington Interscholastic softball catcher will play Activities Association, told Moffitt didn’t know where Moffitt at right guard, Unger for Division II University the Seattle Times this week Seattle would be using him at center, to-be-determined of Missouri-St. Louis next that the WIAA Executive on the line, but said his at left guard and Okung at spring. Board would likely approve interest in the Seahawks left tackle. ■ Habtamu Rubio was piqued a few days ago “He’s just like you’d pic- (PT, Sr.) — Port Townsend the new weight classes. Port Angeles head coach when Seattle called asking if ture a Madison offensive senior is expected to run Erik Gonzalez said he he was comfortable with the lineman,” Schneider said. for Everett Community approved of the change in Seattle held the 57th pick College next fall. idea of living and playing in in the second round but the Pacific Northwest. Teammate Bereket Piatt the long term, even if it will make things tougher “I think in college the traded the pick at the last has a scholarship to run on his own 103-pounder, amount that I did play center minute to Detroit, gaining a there as well, but he is Josh Basden, in the short my sophomore year really pick in the third round the unsure if he will use it. taught me about the game Seahawks eventually used ■ Alison Maxwell (PA, term. “In terms of the long and I really learned how to on Moffitt, and an extra Sr.) — Roughriders’ lead look at the game and be very fourth-round pick. Seattle distance runner expects to term trend that’s been hapmental in my approach,” also moved up slightly in the run for Middlebury College pening. I think it’s the right thing to do,” Gonzalez Moffitt said. “I really think fifth and seventh rounds. in Vermont. said. Schneider said the trade that helped me become a “The lighter weights was made to grab more Wrestling weights smarter football player.” we’ve had a hard time fillCable said if the picks, and Moffitt being Weight classes for high ing those, and some of the Seahawks started today, it’d available when No. 75 came school wrestlers are likely gaps in the upper weights be Carpenter at right tackle, around was a bonus. to change by the 2011-12 were huge and a little bigseason, according to several ger than they should have Puget Sound-area newspa- been.” pers. ________ The National Federation Matt Schubert is the outdoors Carroll told Sherman he tions with 22 at the end of of State High School Assoand sports columnist for the Peninciations Wrestling Rules could be a “lockup” corner- last season. sula Daily News. His column reguIt was a remarkable rise Committee approved a larly appears on Thursdays and Friback for the Trojans, promptdays. He can be reached at matt. ing Sherman to use “lockup” for LeGree, who went to a shift in weight classes on schubert@peninsuladailynews.com. as part of his email address small high school in Geor- Tuesday. gia with a graduating class ever since. But Sherman decided he of just 28 and got just one wanted to make a statement offer — Appalachian State that kids from Compton — for college. His first college game was could go to a school like Stanford and decided play- Appalachian State’s upset of ing on The Farm was the Michigan back in 2007. “I am so thankful that route he wanted to take. “It’s hard for people to one school felt like I could understand that you can be come in and contribute to a Saturday, June 4th 9am Shotgun an athlete and have high team. I made the most of my academics standards and opportunity,” LeGree said. Cost $10 includes lunch “I just wanted to play achieve high academic Contact Golf Shop to register 683-6800 x13 things,” Sherman said. “So I college football for four www.sunlandgolf.com really wanted to make that more years and go to school 109 Hilltop Dr., Sequim known to people that you for free.” Schneider and the can go to Stanford from Seahawks weren’t deterred Compton.” Sherman has only two by LeGree playing against a seasons playing at corner- lower level of competition. Nor were they turned back, making the switch before his junior year after away by Smith and a disease of the esophagus that he starting at wide receiver. But he fits the mold of eventually needed surgery to what Seattle wants in its repair, or the fact that Durdefensive backs — big. Sher- ham had just 32 catches his Motorized. man stands 6-foot-2 and final season at Georgia. Schneider said they feel nearly 200 pounds. Same goes for LeGree and Max- each guy can fill a niche for well, both of them 6 feet and the Seahawks. “We feel very good about around 210 pounds. what happened in these picks and I think that’s LeGree Overlooked because our information LeGree was one of the top was clear and connected so 681-3713 small college players in the well and we worked country and was the active together so cleanly,” Carroll NCAA leader in intercep- said. Continued from B1

Hawks: Get defensive players Continued from B1

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Wright’s size and his ability to be used in a variety of ways is was attracted the Seahawks.

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The Seahawks closed out the day by drafting defensive lineman Lazarius “Pep” Levingston from LSU and Southern California outside linebacker Malcolm Smith, both in the seventh round. The only offensive player Saturday drafted was 6-foot-5 Georgia wide receiver Kris Durham in the fourth round, a stark turn from the first two days when Seattle focused on the offensive line and took Alabama’s James Carpenter and Wisconsin’s John Moffitt. About the only lingering position Seattle didn’t address — and most expected them to — was quarterback. Charlie Whitehurst is the only QB under contract. “Overall, I think we were able to really improve the athleticism and speed of our team and then we were able to do some things up front from a strength and toughness standpoint,” Seattle general manager John Schneider said.

He played in all 47 games during his career for the Bulldogs, starting 35. He finished his career at Mississippi State with 259 total tackles and nine sacks. At nearly 6-foot-4 and almost 250 pounds, Wright could be a hybrid player in the Seahawks defense, potentially used as an outside linebacker or a passrushing defensive end. He’s in the mold of defensive ends Chris Clemons, who had 11 sacks last season, and Dexter Davis, who was taken in the seventh round a year ago. Wright just wished he could have celebrated the way he wanted, or the way the Seahawks expected. “My mind was going everywhere. I had to whisper, because I really couldn’t talk to them in line, I couldn’t say everything I wanted to,” Wright said. “It was a little different.” It was Carroll who finally found out what was going on after first talking with Schneider. “I just thought he was being pretty quiet,” Schneider said. Sherman nearly became one of Carroll’s players at USC, being recruited by Carroll out of Dominguez High in Compton, Calif.


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, May 1, 2011

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SECTION

Our Peninsula

THINGS TO DO, CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS, DEATHS, WEATHER In this section

Spirits that can

Seven community heroes honored with awards, stories — even music By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Seven community members who have done outstanding deeds of public service were recognized last week with the 2011 Clallam County Community Service Award. About 125 friends, family members, associates and admirers packed into the meeting room at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church for the 90-minute award ceremony Thursday night honoring W. Ron Allen, Jaye Moore, Dewey Ehling, Colleen and Ray Divacky, Alan Barnard and Stephen Rosales. The annual award, now in its 31st year, is co-sponsored by the Peninsula Daily News and Soroptimist International of Port Angeles (noon club). Throughout the night, the audience was moved to both laughter — and even to song. As Ehling received his framed award certificate, a “flash mob” of singers Ehling has directed surprised him and audience members by bursting into the “Hallelujah Chorus” from Handel’s “Messiah.” “[The Soroptimist International] have had the privilege to co-sponsor this event and honor these amazing people who are passionate about their causes,” said Cherie Kidd, a Port Angeles City Council member and the event’s co-host for the Soroptimists. Later she added: “This is an amazing service for our community to give a special view of some very special people.”

Awards criteria Criteria for the Community Service Award includes longevity of service, number of people affected, time commitment and making a lasting contribution to the quality of life in Clallam County communities. “These are seven people whose unselfish efforts have made Clallam County a much better place,” said John Brewer, publisher and editor of the Peninsula Daily News. The seven merit both honor and imitation, he said. “They are role models for all of us, not only because they’ve aspired and dreamed, but because our local heroes’ achievements are within our own reach,” he said. “They show us that all of us can build community, that all of us can be part of something greater than ourselves. “It won’t make you wealthy. It will enrich your life and lives of those you serve. “It will fulfill you and

Keith Thorpe (2)/Peninsula Daily News

Clallam County Community Service Award recipients gather before being honored at ceremonies in Port Angeles. The honorees include, front row, Ray and Colleen Divacky, and back row from left, Jaye Moore, Alan Barnard, Stephen Rosales and Dewey Ehling. challenge you. And it will make our small corner of the world a better place.” Here are summaries of the recipients in the order they appeared at Thursday night’s event:

Dewey Ehling Known as the county’s “Music Man,” Ehling went on stage for the first time at the age of 3 nearly 80 years ago and intends to keep performing as a conductor and musical director for as long as he can — or, he joked, until someone tells him to stop. Nominated by Paul Martin, co-author of a popular history book about Port Angeles, and presented by Phyllis Darling, for-

mer executive director of the Olympic Peninsula Red Cross, Ehling has bettered the community through his participation with Olympic Theatre Arts, the Port Angeles Symphony, the Peninsula Singers, the Port Angeles Light Opera Association, Readers Theatre Plus, Sequim Community Aid and other groups. “For [many] long years, this good and unselfish man has given virtually all of his time and considerable talents and has entertained and motivated us in ways that we may never be able to measure,” Darling said. “He defines himself in relationship to the people who he cherishes so much and who cherish him right back.” Before allowing Ehling to

Community Service Award recipient Ron Allen sits with his wife, Merine, at the conclusion of Thursday night’s awards ceremony.

respond, the more than twodozen singers suddenly stood up at their tables and burst into Handel’s “Messiah.” “Congratulations has been defined in many ways, and the best way has been told to me at the end of rehearsal every week by a psychologist who passes by me,” Ehling said afterward. “He passes by me and says, ‘Thanks for the therapy.’ “And that is the best way I could have defined music.” Ehling began his music work on the North Olympic Peninsula when he was asked to direct PALOA’s production of “The Pirates of Penzance” some 39 years ago. “After that, I assured them I would do anything I was capable of doing,” he said.

Olympic Peninsula” by one of her nominators, Moore said she began rehabilitating wildlife as a child growing up in the Clallam BaySekiu area. She said she was a tomboy who was bored and had little else to do. “I was always dragging in some poor bedraggled creature, and my parents put up with it — and it just got worse as I got older and, well, here I am today,” she said.

Colleen and Ray ­Divacky

A couple that will go to any length to help the Joyce community and the children of the Crescent School District, Colleen and Ray Divacky are known for their quiet volunteerism — backed up by hard work, energy and leadership. Nominated by Phil Brand of Jaye Moore Joyce and presented by Jim Moore works tirelessly as direc- Leskinovitch, a member of the Olympic Medical Center Board of tor of the Northwest Raptor & Commissioners, the Divackys Wildlife Center, a nonprofit, state help plan activities at the Cresand federally licensed facility in Sequim that rescues and rehabili- cent Grange and community tates injured wildlife and releases events including Joyce Daze and Joyce to the World. the animals back into the wild. Colleen is a para-professional Moore has run the center, for the Crescent School District which now partners with Greyand is a member of the Crescent wolf Veterinary Hospital, for the past 29 years without government Educational Foundation. Ray is on the board of the funds, with each permanent aniJohn and Myrtle Gossett Charimal resident of the center costing table Foundation and, with his about $1,000 per year to house. wife, serves on the Joyce ComShe was nominated for the Community Service Award by Nic- munity Scholarship Foundation ola Andrews of Port Angeles, board. Diane Hood of Sequim, Wanda “Many of the programs would Brouillette of Sequim, Melissa not go on without them,” LeskiRandazzo of Port Angeles and novitch said. Sandy Muak-Gyori of Port Ange“They have served as hosts for les — and was presented to the 18 foreign exchange students audience by Kidd. [over the past 12 years] and “Jaye is an exceptional lady,” ensure that they leave with the Kidd said. best care and impression of our “When my son Doug was a litcountry.” tle boy, he used to say: ‘I’m small, Colleen said she began work but I’m mighty.’ at the school after retiring from “Well, Jaye Moore [who is the Postal Service. 4-foot-11] has been described as “I thought, ‘What on earth am small but mighty — she might not I going to do with myself?’” she be very tall, but her spirit is said. mighty.” Called “the St. Francis of the Turn to Awards/C2


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Awards: ‘We are able to help make a difference’ Continued from C1 tours that have brought vintage World War II air“I thought, ‘What on craft to Port Angeles’ Wilearth am I going to do with liam R. Fairchild International Airport. (Barnard myself?’” Colleen said. “My greatest pleasure is announced the planes will return again this June.) to work with the children. “I like to say Alan is my “And Ray is with me all the way — it doesn’t matter allied supreme commander what I volunteer us to do, of the Clallam County Air Force — which is really just he is with me. “I am so thankful for all his one plane,” Benedict of the opportunities that said. “But he is actually really make us feel more a memsignificant to the [Emerber of this community that gency Operations Center] feels truly our home. “Thank you for being because if there is any here. It is a wonderful and disaster, he has gone through something like 40 unexpected honor.” A man of few words, Ray, hours of training. “My hat goes off to him with a smile, added: “I can’t emphasize her words any because I was forced to go more. She’s a good woman.” through it, and it is tough training. “And if there is ever an Alan Barnard emergency, Alan is always Barnard said he planned one of the very first people to be a hermit when he to show up.” moved to the North OlymBarnard, a real estate pic Peninsula but just broker, said he got involved couldn’t resist the urge to in his two passions — public safety and flying — and get involved. Nominated by Michael though he initially resisted Gawley of Sequim and pre- getting involved, he now sented by Clallam County enjoys volunteering. “About 20 years ago, Sheriff Bill Benedict, Barnard has sat on a host of when I moved up here, I committees, including was going to drop out and chairing both the Port live in obscurity, and no one Angeles Public Safety Advi- would know who I was, and sory Board and the Clallam I was going to live the life of County Sheriff’s Citizens a hermit,” he said. “How am I doing?” he Advisory Committee. Barnard also led a group asked. The room erupted in to dedicate a 9/11 monument at Francis Street Park laughter. “We all get frustrated in Port Angeles and organized “Wings of Freedom” sometimes looking at the

“We all get frustrated sometimes looking at the big picture and how we would like things to be. But living in a small community, we can fix things. You don’t have to wait for an election. You can simply get busy and fix and get more people to join in and get it going — and that spirit can move mountains and get some of these things done.”

Alan Barnard recipient of Clallam County Community Service Award

big picture and how we would like things to be,” he said. “But living in a small community, we can fix things. “You don’t have to wait for an election. “You can simply get busy and fix and get more people to join in and get it going — and that spirit can move mountains and get some of these things done.”

Stephen Rosales Rosales said he is a “volaholic” — which, he explained, is a “volunteer-aholic.” Rosales spends more than double the time of a full-time job volunteering each week. Joe Borden, known as “Mr. Sequim Irrigation Festival” and a 2010 recipient of the Community Service Award, presented Rosales to the audience. Borden said Rosales works about 60 hours a

week as a volunteer at the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula and about the same amount of time at the Sequim Food Bank, where he is the interim director. He also works with the Sequim School District and local Little League teams. “I am retired military, and I spent a lot of years knowing that it was duty, honor and country,” Borden said. “Well, Stephen knows that it is duty, honor and community.” Rosales said he was touched but that he felt the real community heroes were the men and women in law enforcement and the military. He also challenged all those in the room to put education and children first. “I don’t like to use the word ‘hero’ because the real heroes are people like Sheriff Benedict, who puts his life on the line every day —

that is a hero right there,” he said, gesturing toward Benedict. “I also want to say there is no future for this country without education. “We have to turn to support the school districts.” Rosales was nominated by his father-in-law, Bryce Fish of Sequim, a 2006 recipient of the Community Service Award, with endorsement letters from Jim Pickett, a 2007 recipient of the award, and Tom Schaafsma, who received the award in 2009.

W. Ron Allen

presented to the audience by Mike Gentry, a Port Angeles-based architect, Allen was hailed for devoting a lifetime to improving the community — creating businesses and jobs, contributing tens of thousands of dollars annually to support innumerable county groups and charities, and promoting the heritage of the Klallam people. “Many movements in the world are defined by technology or spiritual need or a vacuum that needs to be filled by just the right person,” said Gentry. “I believe that Ron Allen is one of those great men that we can trust and depend on to lead us on the right path.” Allen said he hopes to help the larger community of Clallam County look forward during the tough economic times. “This is not a timberdriven community anymore, so we have to think about what else can we do to employ lots of young families and create jobs,” he said. “When we started, we had nothing, and now we have an annual budget of $26 million. “We are able to help make a difference in the community.”

When Ron Allen of Sequim began his job as chairman of the Jamestown S’Klallam tribe 34 years ago, there were zero dollars in the tribe’s bank account. With the support of the tribal elders and the Tribal Council, Allen built the Jamestown tribe into an industry — with the 7 Cedars resort and casino, The Longhouse Market and Deli, Cedars at Dungeness Golf Course, Jamestown Family Health Clinic and businesses that include Jamestown Excavating, Jamestown HomeBuilding and JKT Construction, an annual budget of $26 million and more than 700 jobs. Nominated by Jim Hal_________ lett, president of the Port Reporter Paige Dickerson can Angeles Regional Chamber be reached at 360-417-3535 or at of Commerce, and Sequim paige.dickerson@peninsuladaily resident Ree Huston and news.com.

Briefly . . . Free exercise class slated each Tuesday SEQUIM — Katherin Sumpter is holding “Moving on Purpose with Purpose,” a free exercise class, at 10 a.m. every Tuesday until June 28. The class is held at Sequim Health and Rehabilitation, 650 Hemlock St. Sumpter’s curriculum incorporates balance, proper breathing, stretching, correct form and purposeful movement through a combination of tai chi, qi gong breathing and stretching techniques and eskrima, a martial art that originated in the Philippines. The class is part of a special series of a program of the Dungeness Valley Health & Wellness Clinic, Sequim’s free clinic. The program, titled Dia-

betes Education for Prevention and Self Management, earned the clinic a grant from the state Department of Health. It includes one-on-one and group education for people newly diagnosed with diabetes, as well as programs to help prevent and manage diabetes and other chronic illnesses.

Healthy eating SEQUIM — A free healthy eating series for those with diabetes or other chronic diseases will begin Thursday. The series will be held at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 525 N. Fifth Ave., at 6 p.m. each Thursday for eight weeks. Registered dietitian Christin Maks will present interactive sessions with practical nutrition tips and food tastings. Attendees will learn how to read nutritional information on food labels

When his father decides to move the family and their menagerie to Canada, he boards a ship, experiences a harrowing shipwreck and finds himself the sole human survivor on a lifeboat with a hyena, an orangutan, a zebra with a broken leg and a Bengal tiger called Richard Parker. Life of Pi brings together many themes including religion, zoology, fear and sheer tenacity. Copies of the book are available at the Sequim Book group meets Branch Library and can be requested online through SEQUIM — Yann Marthe library catalog at www. tel’s novel Life of Pi by will nols.org. be discussed at the Sequim Preregistration for the Library, 630 N. Sequim discussion is not required, Ave., at 3 p.m. Saturday, and drop-ins are always May 14. welcome. Martel’s novel tells the For more information, story of 16-year-old Pi, a young man who believes in visit www.nols.org and click on “Events” and Hinduism, Islam and “Sequim,” phone Lauren Christianity. Dahlgren at 360-683-1161 Pi is the son of a zookeeper in Pondicherry, India. or email Sequim@nols.org. and learn about eating local by shopping and preparing meals with locally grown food products. This class is a special series of “WOW! Working on Wellness,” the health education program of Dungeness Valley Health & Wellness Clinic. The healthy eating series is part of the project Diabetes Education for Prevention and Self-Management, which is funded by a grant from the state Department of Health.

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Sequim Rotary Club member Dan Fryer, left, receives the Irrigation Parade Leader’s Baton from fellow member Alice Roragen at a recent Sequim Noon Rotary meeting. Roragen has been the club’s parade organizer for past 10 years.

Torch passed SEQUIM — The Rotary Club of Sequim has organized and directed the Irrigation Festival Parade as a community service for 51 years. For the past decade, Alice Roragen has directed the event. Now, newly married and planning to travel, Roragen has decided to turn over her baton to fellow Rotarian Dan Fryer. “Our club members have always enjoyed stag-

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ing this happy event for the Sequim community, and we are very proud of Alice for her years of hard work,” said noon club President Sara Maloney. “We are confident Dan Fryer will carry on the tradition with his usual expertise.” Fryer, a successful local business man and former club president, has taken the reins and expects the parade this year to be fun and enjoyable for all. Peninsula Daily News

How’s the fishing? Matt Schubert reports. Fridays in

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Hear squeaks, squawks, songs online THE SOUND OVERHEAD was a familiar one: “Gronk, gronk!” That’s how I describe a raven’s call, but that is only one of the sounds they make. Being able to recognize birds by their voices can alert you to their presence even when you don’t see them. The calling ravens turned out to be two mated pairs who were having a heated discussion over who was in whose territory. Both pairs dipped and dove while making passes at one another. They called, scolded and engaged in intricate aerial maneuvers, but the challenging didn’t last very long. When it ended, the victorious pair landed in a nearby tree and “had the last word” loud and long. How do you learn the different songs and calls birds make? It takes time and a lot of looking and listening. However, it doesn’t take as long as it once did. It’s possible to do some Web research that will speed up this learning experience. A reader, frustrated with identifying what she assumed was a calling owl, brought this up. She started doing some research in her field guides, but that only took her part of the way. Searching for bird calls on the Web helped her discover that the

recording made in Seattle. Chestnut-backed chickadees were more challenging. This is a calling bird Joan Northwest bird. was indeed an The videos and recordings for Carson owl, a barred chickadees were top-heavy with owl. They are the black-capped chickadee, who known for their is familiar throughout North “who-cooks-forAmerica. you” call, but A video done by the Massathey make chusetts Audubon Society not other sounds, only featured the black-capped too. Liz had good chickadee, but presented the chapter’s program for learning success on the bird songs. YouTube webA second presentation that site www.YouTube.com/birdsounds. The site is originated in Western Washington featured the house finch. not only educational, it’s a lot of Both the video and a recording of fun. I started searching through it the bird singing were well-done. The house finch has a beautiby entering “sounds ravens ful song, but it is very complex. make.” That was the start of an Describing it is just about imposinteresting exercise. sible, but the recording was so Not only have countless people sent in their recordings of the good that I was tempted to open a window to see if our resident sounds birds make, but they are house finch would reply to it. accompanied by videos. There are going to be hits and Yes, they’re pretty amateur for misses when doing this search on the most part, but viewing them bird songs and calls. is a lot like looking out the I ran into a great one. A purkitchen window at the action on ple finch was the main actor, and and under the bird feeders. The eastern part of the counI tried it out because this finch try always appears to be better also has a beautiful song and one represented than the West, espe- you don’t hear as often as that of cially the Northwest, but this is the house finch. getting better. The video showed a purple The best singing song sparrow finch sitting in a tree, and the I could find was on a video and sounds of wind were all you

BIRD WATCH

Paul Carson

The song of the purple finch is worth hearing as it is beautiful and isn’t heard as often as that of the house finch. could hear. Then, very soft squeaks were heard. The finch didn’t open its mouth. I kept watching as the video played to the end. All I heard were the soft squeaks chickadees make when calling to one another. Birds could be heard in that video, but they weren’t purple finches. A second search yielded a beautiful video and some excel-

lent recording of a purple finch singing its heart out. Spring is the perfect time to study bird sounds. Some time spent exploring YouTube just might surprise you.

________ Joan Carson’s column appears every Sunday. Contact her at P.O. Box 532, Poulsbo, WA 98370, with a selfaddressed, stamped envelope for a reply. Email: joanpcarson@comcast.net.

Port Angeles School District

Standing from left, Dry Creek classroom volunteer Eleanor Geiger, watches as Dry Creek Principal Kate Wenzl, center, shows off a quilt Gieger made for the school’s Read Across America event in March as Port Angeles Superintendent Jane Pryne and School Board President Cindy Kelly look on.

Port Angeles School District

Mike McHenry, Lower Elwha Klallam tribe habitat program manager, center, helps Dry Creek students Grant Abrams, left, and Joey Surina plant a tree during the school’s annual Earth Day tree planting.

Volunteers thanked Earth Day feted at School Board meet Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles School Board recently honored school volunteers with a resolution expressing thanks for their commitment and enthusiasm. “Volunteers are called upon to assist teachers and staff with the day-to-day activities involved in providing a balanced education for our students and are an important part of a team that strives to ensure that each and every one of our students succeeds,” read the proclamation. “Countless volunteers are spending innumerable hours serving schools in the Port Angeles School District as chaperons, mentors, after-school tutors, club leaders, booster club members, PTA and PTO members, guest speakers, classroom helpers, athletics coaches and in countless other ways.”

■ Dry Creek Elementary: Eleanor Geiger, Tiffany Kovalenko, John McHenry, Michael Pace. ■ Hamilton Elementary: Carrie Walls, Gemma Love. ■ Franklin Elementary: Merry VanDuesen, Dee Brauninger (and her Seeing Eye dog, Bear), Mike McCarty, Gail Lockhart. ■ Jefferson Elementary: Louisa Monger, Gretchen O’Brien, Becca Busch, Tricia Murphy, Ted Mattie, Cheryl Higbee, Terri Guerrero. ■ Roosevelt Elementary: Pam Alton, Teresa Beckstrom, Leana Leshke, Dr. Jim Mowry, Jamie Wood.

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Lise and Scott Van Dyken, Port Angeles, a son, Isaak Scott, 9 pounds 7 ounces, 10:30 p.m. March 19. Carrie and Christopher Davis, Port Angeles, a son, Wyatt Henry, 9 pounds 1 ounce, 4:29 a.m. April 22.

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PORT ANGELES — Dry Creek Elementary students in Nancy McHenry and Wyndi Cole’s classrooms recently celebrated Earth Day by planting trees near the Lower Elwha Kallam tribal lands in the flood plain located near the estuary.

Led by Wayne Fitzwater of the state Department of Natural Resources and Cam Field of Merrill & Ring, students planted approximately 400 trees — a combination of Douglas fir, noble fir and cedar— continuing a 22-year tradition of student-involved tree planting. The community-spon-

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Superintendent Jane Pryne and board President Cindy Kelly thanked volunteers from each of the schools and honored each with recognition pins. Volunteers honored, listed by school, were: ■ Port Angeles High School: Anne Todnem, Jeff Bohman, Scott Napiontek, Brian Shirley, Joe Marvelle. ■ Lincoln High School: Linda Kaas, Tyleen Bickel. ■ North Olympic Peninsula Skills Center: Glenn Adolphsen, Mike Martineau. ■ Stevens Middle School: Michele Haworth, Vicki Helwick, Leslie Perrizo.

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Dad-to-be questions twin’s future role DEAR ABBY: My fraternal twin, “Marla,� was always difficult. When we were kids, she was physically and emotionally abusive. She stopped hitting me only after I outgrew her in high school, but she continues to try to control me. When I started dating my wife, “Gloria,� Marla would tell me Gloria wasn’t good enough for me. At first, it gave me serious doubts about the woman who is the love of my life. We’re now expecting our first child — a daughter — and Marla has been offering parenting advice that goes against what Gloria and I feel about child-rearing. When I politely decline

DEAR ABBY Abigail

her advice,

Van Buren Marla

accuses me of being “selfish� for not appreciating it. A parenting book was delivered anonymously to our home. It took me a few days to remember that Marla had mentioned it. Five days later, she sent me an angry email because I hadn’t thanked her for it. Spats like this usually result in our not speaking for months. I harbor no ill will toward my sister and

often don’t know why we’re fighting. She seems to thrive on the drama she creates with these artificial rifts. I want my daughter exposed to healthy adult relationships, not abusive ones. How do I tell my twin I love her but that she must stop trying to control me and create conflict where none exists? I don’t want to have to cut her out of my life. Soon-to-be-Dad Dear Soon-to-be-Dad: The patterns of a lifetime won’t change without work on both your parts. Tell your twin that if she wants to be a part of your life — and your

PORT TOWNSEND — The Songwriting Works Educational Foundation will hold Music for Wellness discussion and focus groups in Jefferson County in May. Participants will experience and discuss a new intergenerational Music for Wellness program that offers tools for healthier living through music-making and creativity. They can provide feedback on the Music for Wellness toolkit that “will guide people to restore health

through music in their own homes and communities.� Organizers believe the event is especially relevant to older adults, family caregivers, beginning and seasoned musicians, and teens and young adults. The workshops are free; refreshments will be given. The workshops will be at ■  Tri-Area Community Center, 10 West Valley Road, at 5 p.m. Wednesday. ■  Quilcene Community Center, 294952 U.S. Highway 101, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Monday, May 9. ■  Northwind Arts Center, 2409 Jefferson St., from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday, May 11. For more information,

how, after all this time, she could change course and put our relationship on the back burner. Amanda says she wants us to stay together and promises that everything will be all right. I love her with all my heart. Do you think after four years in the Navy, our love Dear Abby: I am a will be as strong? At our 25-year-old man. I have age, is it worth keeping been in a two-year relation- ourselves exclusive to each ship with the most beauti- other? ful woman I have ever met. In Shock “Amanda� is 23, and she in California has just told me she plans on joining the Navy. Dear In Shock: I wish I respect her decision you had mentioned why and courage to better her Amanda has decided to join life and future career. How- the military. Could it be ever, my feelings are deeply she’s doing it because, in hurt. I don’t understand return for her service, they

will pay for her education? If that’s the case, then respect her decision and her determination to better her life. Whether your romance can weather the separation her service in the Navy will require depends, frankly, on how much each of you has invested in it. Other couples have managed. My advice is to take it day by day, and you’ll have your answer.

_________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

Lecture on chickens set at Quimper Grange in PT

Briefly . . . Music for Wellness set this month

daughter’s — some radical changes will be necessary. Offer to join her in family therapy. If she agrees, recognize that change won’t be easy for her. If she refuses, do what you must to protect your child from her controlling and manipulative behavior.

phone 360-385-1160.

Pet adoption PORT ANGELES — The Olympic Peninsula Humane Society is holding weekly pet adoption events at Airport Garden Center, 2200 W. Edgewood Drive, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Fridays through this fall. The weekly events are part of the Humane Society’s efforts to make adoptions accessible at sites other than the shelter. Animals can still be adopted at the Olympic Peninsula Humane Society, 2105 W. U.S. Highway 101 For more information, phone 360-457-8206. Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — Chicken breeder Jean Ball will discuss her experiences raising chicks, egg-laying hens and meat birds, including turkey, at a lecture at the Quimper Grange, 1219 Corona St., on Monday. The program starts at 7:30 p.m. and is preceded by a potluck dessert/fingerfood social half-hour from 7 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Ball will cover the basic requirements for raising happy, healthy birds including breed selection, breeding practices, feed and

water, housing, health issues, predator control, composting of manure and humane butchering. Participants will learn how to grow their own wholesome, local protein and will acquire an appreciation of the interesting and fun aspects of chicken personalities. Ball will bring in an assortment of her chicks in several different breeds for demonstration and purchase. Those wishing to buy chicks should bring a small box for transport.

Local carpenter Jeff Stoneman also will be on hand with a sample of his portable chicken houses. Ball grew up on a farm in Vermont and has nearly always had chickens along with other critters. She raises meat sheep, fruits and vegetables, mushrooms and poultry on her small farm in Chimicum with her husband, Ryan. Suggested donation is $5 to $10. For more information, phone Charlotte Goldman at 360-385-3455.

Clubs and Organizations Kiwanis Clubs Three Kiwanis clubs meet every Thursday in Port Angeles. n The Olympic Kiwanis Club meets at 7 a.m. weekly at the Cornerhouse Restaurant, 101 E. Front St. n The Juan de Fuca Kiwanis Club meets at 10 a.m. at the Vern Burton Community Center, 308 E. Fourth St. n The Kiwanis Club of Port Angeles meets at noon at the North Olympic Peninsula Skills Center, Eighth and B streets, Port Angeles. For more information, visit the club website at www.kiwanispa.org. Other Kiwanis clubs meet in Sequim and in Port Townsend. n Sequim-Dungeness meetings are every Thurs-

day at noon at Paradise Restaurant, 703 N. Sequim Ave. For further information, phone Shell McGuire at 360-681-0805. n The Port Townsend meetings are every Wednesday at noon at Manresa Castle, Seventh and Sheridan streets. For further information, phone Jim Strong at 360-7320574.

meets at noon at the Northwest Maritime Center, 431 Water St., Port Townsend, 360-385-5688. n Wednesdays: Port Townsend Sunrise Rotary meets at 7:15 a.m. at Seaport Landing, 1201 Hancock St., Port Townsend. Port Angeles Rotary Club meets at noon at the Port Angeles CrabHouse Restaurant, 221 N. Lincoln St. n Thursdays: East Jef7 Rotary clubs ferson County Rotary The seven Rotary clubs meets at 11:45 a.m. at the of the North Olympic PenTri-Area Community Ceninsula meet at various ter, 10 West Valley Road, times throughout the week, Chimacum. encouraging meeting Sequim Rotary Club “makeups� from visiting meets at noon at the Elks Rotarians. Lodge, 143 Port Williams Here are the clubs and Road, Sequim. their meeting times and n Fridays: Port Angeles locations: Nor’wester Rotary meets at n Tuesdays: Port 7 a.m. at the Olympic MedTownsend Rotary Club ical Center cafeteria, 939

Caroline St., Port Angeles. Sequim Sunrise Rotary meets at 7 a.m. at SunLand Golf & Country Club, 109 Hilltop Drive, Sequim.

Weight Watchers Sequim meetings at 150 E. Bell St. are at the following times: Mondays at 10 a.m., Thursdays at 7:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m., Fridays at 8:45 a.m. and Saturdays at 9 a.m. Port Angeles meetings at 513 S. Lincoln St. are at the following times: Mondays at 6:30 p.m., Wednesdays at 11 a.m. and Saturdays at 9 a.m. Port Townsend meetings at the Madrona Hill Professional Building, 2500 Sims Way, are at the following times: Mondays at 6:30 p.m. and Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m.

The club requests that members arrive 30 minutes before the meeting time to register. Meetings usually last less than one hour. Additional information is available at 800-3749191 or at www.weight watchers.com.

Port Angeles TOPS meetings There are four weekly meetings of TOPS groups in Port Angeles. TOPS 125 meets Wednesdays with weigh-in at 5:45 p.m., followed by a meeting at 7 p.m., at the Veterans Center, 216 S. Francis St., Port Angeles. TOPS 1163 meets Wednesdays with weigh-in at 8:45 a.m. and a meeting at 10 a.m. at St. Andrew’s

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VW club Strait Air Volksgruppe, a club for Volkswagen owners and enthusiasts, will meet today at noon at Joshua’s Restaurant, 113 DelGuzzi Drive. For further information, phone 360-452-5803.

Tennis club meets The Peninsula Tennis Club, a nonprofit Community Tennis Association, meets regularly for free community play at Erickson Park, Fourth and Race streets. The Peninsula Tennis Club promotes tennis play and supports improvements to tennis facilities in Clallam County. For information on club activities, visit the website at www.peninsulatennis club.com or phone 360-4602588.

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The Mount Angeles unit of Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula meets regularly weekdays from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. at 2620 S. Francis St. For information on membership, phone 360417-2831. The Peninsula Dream Machines will meet today at 11 a.m. at Fairview Grange, 161 Lake Farm Road. For more information, phone 360-452-3288.

Jeff Berry 461-6246

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Want a new deck, but don’t know where to start or who to call? Come get all your questions answered at our Spring Decking Event! Learn about beautiful, low-maintenance, composite decking materials. Choose the right color and texture for your project. PLUS, visit with local building contractors. MEET THESE BUILDERS:

Episcopal Church, 510 E. Park Ave. TOPS 1493 meets Wednesdays at 10 a.m. with weigh-in from 9:15 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. at the Lighthouse Christian Center, 304 Viewcrest St. For further information, phone Pat Ferris at 360477-2180. TOPS 1296 meets Mondays with weigh-in at 10:30 a.m., followed by an 11 a.m. meeting, at 2531 E. Helm Drive; phone Carol Packer at 360-452-1790. For further information about all chapters, phone Maria Goss, area captain, at 360-275-2179.

The Port Angeles Toastmasters Club 25 meets Mondays from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Clallam Transit Office, 830 W. Lauridsen Blvd. For further information, phone Bill Thomas at 360460-1040 or Leilani Wood at 360-683-2655. Turn

to

Clubs/C5


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, May 1, 2011

C5

May Day rooted in growing around globe HURRAY, HURRAY! THE first of May . . . My international holiday begins and ends today. That’s right, in my household, the May family, May Day is our absolute favorite holiday of the year. Better than the candy of Halloween, the barbecues of Memorial Weekend and the harmless pranks of April 1. For me, my own international recognition day is pretty hard to beat. There is no Smith or Jones Day, no Gregoire or Obama Day. Even George Washington has to share his day with all the rest of the presidents. I just love May Day. And does a name influence what’s around or associated with it? Do April showers really bring May flowers? The origins of May Day are deeply rooted — well before the working-class unions and communism co-oped the celebration of planting and spring May 1, 1886, declaring eight hours the legal working day. May Day well precedes the European churches of the Middle Ages, which conspired to outlaw

A GROWING CONCERN the raucous pagan celebraMay tion of fertility, planting and the return of the sun. The druids of the British Isles held May Day as their second-mostheralded holiday, calling it Beltane to honor the day of fire. (Bel was the Celtic god of the sun, and May 1 splits the year into two equal halves.) May 1 until Nov. 1 was planting and harvest time, the ground fertile, and animals bred and plants flourished while the other six months were cold, brutal, dormant and fallow, agriculture on hold throughout much of Europe. Pre-Christian Rome celebrated April 27 to May 3 as the festival of Flora. Floralia, as this five-day holiday was known, honored the Roman goddess of flowers and vegetation. The Saxons partied hard May

Andrew

1 as well, beginning the night of April 30 by playing games, torching wheels of fire and feasting, all in honor of the end of winter, the beginning of soil fertility and the return of the sun. So from its beginning, the name May was fused with flowers, planting, fertility and crops. But as human history progressed, so did May Day as flowers grew in symbolic significance. Roman influence in Europe dominated, and Floralia and Beltane cross-pollinated into various rituals of trees, maypoles, flowers, fertility and mating. In France, King Charles the IX gave each lady of the court a sprig of the aromatic lily of the valley each May 1, and today, the ritual of giving lily of the valley to a lady persists, though a kiss is traditional to give in return. In Cornwall, England, the flower boat ritual happens every May Day as a model of the ship The Black Prince, covered in flowers, is paraded from Quay at Millbrook and cast adrift at the Cawsand beach after passing through villages adorned in floral decorations. In the Rhineland region of Germany, young men deliver a tree covered in streamers to the

lady of their interest the night before, while young ladies place roses or rice in the form of a heart at the house of their beloved one. Even in America, early settlers erected maypoles and danced around them. In Sequim, numerous maypoles were erected May 1 in anticipation of the Irrigation Festival, scheduled May 6-15. Many other American pioneers and settlers gave May baskets filled with flowers and treats, hoping to be caught by the person receiving them in exchange for a kiss. My father, Thomas May, was a gardener when he married my mother, and both received their floriculture (i.e. greenhousing) degrees from Cornell University. They then set forth, worked at a huge greenhouse and had me, another little May. Later, they bought a cornfield and erected from the ground up the Mayflower Greenhouse, known for its beautiful flowers. This article ends with the tagline “dreams of having Clallam and Jefferson counties nationally recognized as Flower Peninsula USA.” Why?

Because even this year, as more and more people joke about when, if ever, spring will arrive, we on the Peninsula will celebrate the festivals of Floralia and Beltane all year long. May Day is omnipresent here, with flora green all calendar long. We are the Evergreen State by the banana belt in or next to the Blue Hole, and even the West End has the Enchanted Valley up the Quinault river basin. So perhaps my surname has nothing to do with my family, but your family has everything to do with how great we can grow things on the Peninsula. Celebrate May Day — and each day — by growing in your yard because many people, for a very long time, celebrated heartily for a climate we so abundantly have. But don’t be discouraged if they do not name a day after you for the effort.

________ Andrew May is an ornamental horticulturist who dreams of having Clallam and Jefferson counties nationally recognized as “Flower Peninsula USA.” Send him questions c/o Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362, or email news@peninsuladailynews.com (subject line: Andrew May).

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C4

Fibromyalgia group The Fibromyalgia support group meets the first Monday of the month at 11:30 a.m. at the Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St. The support group is for those diagnosed with fibromyalgia and for family and friends to better understand the condition. For more information, phone Penny Brewer at 360-681-3045.

Fly fishers club The Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishers club meets the first Monday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Loomis Log Cabin at Lincoln Park, off West Lauridsen Boulevard. The public is invited. For more information, phone Darlene Whitney at 360-457-2799.

Men’s chorus The Olympic Peninsula Men’s Chorus meets every Tuesday at 6 p.m. at the Monterra Community Center, in the Agnew area between Sequim and Port Angeles. Take Gunn Road to Finn Hall Road. Turn left onto Finn Hall, turn right on Monterra Drive, and Monterra Community Center will be straight ahead. The chorus, a chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society, is open to any men who have an interest in music and singing. There are no requirements to read music, nor is solo singing a requirement to join the chorus. The chorus sings songs in four-part harmony in barbershop style and also other a cappella song styles. Visitors are welcome at any meeting. For more information, phone 360-681-7761.

Garden club meets Lincoln Heights Garden Club will meet Tuesday at 11:45 at Scandia Hall, 131 W. Fifth St.. Hostesses for the luncheon are Margaret Sallstrom, Jane Radich, Karen Sage and JoAnn Statom. The program “Fair Advice” will be presented by Gladys Wallace, who will demonstrate procedures for making garden entries. The 2011 Clallam County Fair theme is “Rock With the Stock.” A garden exchange is planned, and members are reminded to bring items for a garden exchange; plant starts, seeds, small planting pots and gardening magazines are welcome. For more information, phone 360-452-4047, 360457-9607 or 360-417-7531

German speakers A German conversation circle, der Stammtisch, for those who speak and understand German meets weekly Wednesdays, with time and location variable. Members discuss current events, movies, books, music, food, evolving and changing language, or other subjects. For further information, phone 360-457-0614 or 360-808-1522.

Submit your club news The weekly Clubs and Organizations listing focuses on groups across the North Olympic Peninsula. There is no cost to have your club included. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the club’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. To submit your club’s news: ■ EMAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ FAX: 360-417-3521 ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

Wednesday of every month. This month, the group will meet for dinner at 6 p.m., followed by a 7 p.m. meeting, at Joshua’s Restaurant, 113 DelGuzzi Drive. RV owners or those interested in RVing are welcome. For more information, phone 360-683-3197 or 360-683-0120.

SMUG meets

The Strait Macintosh Users Group will meet Wednesday at 7:15 p.m. at the Port Angeles Public Library, 2210 S. Peabody St. The topic will be GarageBand software. Rick Johnston will demonstrate recording tracks, Wapiti Bowmen using loops, using Flex The Wapiti Bowmen Time and Groove Matching Club meets the first to improve timing and Wednesday of the month at Magic GarageBand to cre7 p.m. at the group’s clubate a backup band. house, 374 E. Arnette Road. He also will discuss For more information, GarageBand’s Learn to phone Pete Joers at 360Play music lessons and 681-2972. podcasting features. Refreshments will be RV club meets served. Hurricane Ridge RV Club meets the first

teer in an atmosphere of support, friendship and fun are invited to join. For further information, visit the group’s website at www.sijetset.com.

area. Howe Road is 0.5 miles south of Old Olympic Highway off Barr Road. Howe is west off Barr. Visitors are welcome.

Golden Agers

Surgical weight

Surgical Weight Loss Support Group meetings are Thursdays from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Terrace Apartments, 114 E. Sixth St., in the multipurpose room. There will be a broad spectrum of people, some beginning the process to get a gastric bypass and PA Lions Club some who have already The Port Angeles Lions had surgery and are willClub will meet Thursday at ing to help others acquire noon at the Port Angeles vital information on the CrabHouse Restaurant, process. 221 N. Lincoln St. Guest speakers will Helen Freilich, city of assist with information and Port Angeles Solid Waste a question-and-answer Division director, will talk time. about reducing waste and For further information, recycling. phone Janet E. Boyce at Guests are welcome. 360-417-2896. For information on the Lions’ hearing aid and eyeWoodworkers meet glass recycling program, The Peninsula Woodphone 360-417-6862. There will be a roast for workers Club meets the first Thursday evening of Lion Bob Philpott on Saturday from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. every month. The club is composed of in the Social Hall of First members interested in all United Methodist Church, phases of woodworking, 110 E. Seventh St. furniture and cabinetmakAll friends of Philpott ing, wood-turning, carving, are welcome. boat-building, instrumentmaking and construction. Clowns meet For location, which varThe Laff Pack clowns ies from month to month, will meet Thursday from phone Ed McKay at 3604 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at 928-3331 or Gary Haubold Olympic Unitarian Univer- at 360-452-4919. salist Fellowship Hall, 73 Turn to Clubs/C6 Howe Road, in the Agnew Golden Agers meet every Thursday from noon to 3 p.m. at the Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., for bingo and socializing. For further information, phone 360-457-6558

All are welcome.

Methodist women Port Angeles United Methodist Women will have their monthly meeting Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. in the parlor of the church at 110 E. Seventh St. Phoebe Circle will present a program, “Shine, Shine, Shine.” Lunch bunch “D”’ will provide a noon meal. All the women of the community are invited to attend. For further information, phone the church office at 360-452-8971

Soroptimist meets The Soroptimist International Port Angeles-Jet Set meets every Thursday at 7 a.m. at the Port Angeles Senior Center, Seventh and Peabody streets. The group’s mission and core purpose is to improve the lives of women and girls in local communities and throughout the world. Those wishing to volun-

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, May 1, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C5

MOPS meets Mothers of Preschoolers will meet Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Fairview Bible Church, 385 O’Brien Road. Refreshments and child care will be provided. For more information, phone 360-457-5905.

Oneness Blessings The Oneness Blessings group meets the first Thursday of every month from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Olympic Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 73 Howe Road. Everyone is invited to experience receiving divine grace with the blessings. Drop-ins welcome. Love offerings accepted. For more information, visit www.Oneness University.org or phone 360-681-4784.

For the ladies auxiliary, phone Venay Money at 360-681-7085.

Sewing group Strait Sew-ers, an American Sewing Guild group, meets the first Saturday of each month from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Viking Sew & Vac Shop, 707 E. First St. Visitors are welcome. For more information, phone Marilyn Williams at 360-582-3072.

Sequim and the Dungeness Valley Cooties meets Cooties meets the first Sunday of the month at 3 p.m. at the VFW Hall, 169 E. Washington St. For more information, phone the post at 360-6839546.

Food policy council German club Clallam Food Policy Council is a monthly event held the first Thursday of each month from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Port Angeles Library Raymond Carver Room, 2210 S. Peabody St. The event is free and everyone is welcome. All current information and details of past and future events are recorded at www.clallamfoodpolicy council.weebly.com. This month, there will be a talk sponsored by Jayme Wisecup of the Emergency Management Team in Clallam County and given by Mike Pressler from the Olympia office of the state Department of Agriculture/Homeland Security. Pressler will present,“Rural Security Planning: Protecting Family, Friends and Farm.”

Soroptimists meet Soroptimist International Noon Club meets every Friday at noon at the Bushwhacker restaurant, 1527 E. First St. Soroptimist is an international organization with a focus on making a difference for women. Locally, the club supports the community though scholarships, Operation Uplift and other community projects.

Stop smoking The Nicotine Anonymous Fellowship Group meets every Friday at 5 p.m. at Cedar Grove Counseling, 1020 Caroline St. For further information, phone 360-452-2443.

HOPE meets Humorous OpenMinded Parent Educators is an inclusive group of home-schooling parents and children who meet Fridays. Time and location are variable. All are welcome. For further information, phone Lisa Harvey-Boyd at 360-452-5525 or visit http://tinyurl.com/ 476hj8b.

A German club meets Mondays at 2 p.m. at Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave. For more information, phone 360-681-0226 or 360-417-1111.

Chorus invitation The Grand Olympics Chorus invites women who enjoy singing to join the Sweet Adeline practice any Monday night at 6:30 p.m. at Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave. No formal training or experience needed. For further information, phone 360-683-0141 or, from Port Townsend, phone 360-385-4680.

Sequim City Band The Sequim City Band rehearses each Monday from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Swisher Hall behind the bandstand at the James Center for the Performing Arts, 563 N. Rhodefer Road, just north of Carrie Blake Park. For further information, phone 360-683-4896 or visit the website at www. sequimcityband.org.

Duplicate bridge The Sequim Duplicate Bridge Club meets regularly each Monday and Friday at noon at the Masonic Temple, 700 S. Fifth Ave. The club is affiliated with the American Contract Bridge League, which provides sanctions for standard duplicate, unit and championship games. Play is open to the public, with visitors welcome at any time. Coffee and refreshments are offered at each game. For further information, phone 360-691-4308; for partnership arrangement, phone 360-582-1289.

3 p.m. at the Assured Hospice office, 24 Lee Chatfield Way. For further information, phone 360-582-3796.

Visitors are welcome. There will be a short meeting to take care of club business. There will be sign-up sheets for the sculptures to be included in the exhibit Senior softball at the MAC for June. Sequim Senior Softball The balance of the meetRecreational Club meets ing time will be spent by Tuesdays and Thursdays members working on wood at 9:30 a.m. at Carrie projects. Blake Park (weather perFor information on mitting) for practice and upcoming driftwood sculppickup games. ture classes taught by cerAll levels of players, tified LuRon instructor men 55 years and older Tuttie Peetz, phone 360and women 50 years and 683-6860. older, are welcome to parPrior to an available ticipate for fun and exerclass, prospective members cise. are invited to attend a For further information, meeting the first Wednesphone John Zervos at 360- day of each month to pick 681-2587 or email up some instruction from jazervos@gmail.com. experienced club members. For more information, Bonsai society visit the club’s website at www.olympicdriftwood The Dungeness Bonsai sculptors.org or email info@ Society meets the first olympicdriftwoodsculptors. Tuesday of each month at 10 a.m. at the Pioneer Park org. Clubhouse, 387 E. Washington St. VFW auxiliary Each month, a speaker The Veterans of Foreign presents a program or Wars men’s auxiliary meets workshop related to bonsai the first Wednesday of the or general garden topics. month at 6 p.m. at the Guests are welcome. VFW Hall, 169 E. WashingFor further information, ton St. phone Bob Stack at 683For more information, 1315. phone the post at 360-6839546.

Just Dolls meets

The Just Dolls of Washington Doll Club meets the first Tuesday evening of every month and is open to anyone interested in dolls and/or bears. Club members conduct business and share dolls, engage in community service and organize an annual doll show. New members are welcome. For further information and location, which varies from month to month, phone Dori Beachler at 360-683-1006.

Toastmasters SKWIM Toastmasters meets the first and third Tuesday of every month promptly at 7 p.m. at Blue Sky Real Estate, 190 Priest Road. Arrival at the meeting is requested for 6:50 p.m. Guests are welcome. For more information, phone the president and chairman at 360-808-2088.

Outriders meet The Olympic Peninsula Outriders, an organization of informal retired motorcycle riders, meets Wednesdays at 7:30 a.m. at The Mariner Cafe, 707 E. Washington St. No dues, no rules; just friendship among retired riders. The group has day rides and other rides throughout the year.

Quilters meet

The Sunbonnet Sue Quilters meets every Wednesday at 9 a.m. at the Food Addicts In RecovSequim Masonic Temple, ery Anonymous meetings 700 S. Fifth Ave. are Thursdays. The second Wednesday For information on place of the month is the busiand time, phone 360-452ness meeting. 1050 At the close of the business meeting, birthdays of Vegetarian potluck the current month are celeThe group meets to brated with cakes and the enjoy a monthly vegetargift of a fat quarter (an PA Peggers ian/vegan potluck and pro- 18-inch-by-22-inch piece of PA Peggers meet Frigram the first Monday of fabric popular with quildays with a 5:30 p.m. every month at 5:30 p.m. at ters). check-in and a 6 p.m. start the fellowship hall of the On the last Wednesday for games at the Eagles Seventh-day Adventist of the month, the guild Aerie, 110 S. Penn St. Church, 30 Sanford Lane. meets to work on commuThe weekly events are Future programs might nity quilts. nine games played against include cooking demonstraCompleted quilts are nine different opponents. tions and lessons on distributed to fire victims, New members are welhealthy living. Habitat for Humanity come. For more information or home recipients, foster chilThe group is an Ameridirections, phone Heather dren and other needy or can Cribbage Congress, Reseck at 360-385-0150 or worthy causes. Grass Roots Cribbage Club. Walter Grant at 360-683All meetings are open to The season runs from 1414. the public. the first of September to For further information, the end of May. phone Joan Mack at 360French Club For additional informaThe French Club invites 681-0795. tion, phone Jim or Lisa anyone who knows French Duff at 360-808-7129 or TOPS 1135 or would like to learn to email papeggers@hughes. meet every week at the TOPS 1135 meets net. Sequim Bible Church, 847 Wednesdays with weigh-in N. Sequim Ave. at 9:15 a.m. and a meeting VFW Post 1024 Beginners meet Tuesat 10 a.m. at Sequim Bible Veterans of Foreign days from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m., Church, 847 N. Sequim Wars Post 1024 meets the intermediates meet TuesAve. first Friday of each month days from 2 p.m. to Visitors are welcome. at 1 p.m. at the Veterans 3:30 p.m., and advanced For further information, Center, 216 S. Francis St. meet Fridays for a reading phone Lynnette Baughman For more information, and conversation group at 360-683-7178. phone the service office at from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. 360-417-0294. For further information, Driftwood artists The Clyde Rhodefer phone 360-681-0226. The Olympic Driftwood VFW Post 1024 Ladies Sculptors will meet Auxiliary also meets the Wednesday from first Friday of every month, Bereavement The Sequim Bereaveand a potluck lunch is 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the served at noon, prior to the ment Group meets TuesSequim Prairie Grange, regular meeting at 1 p.m. days from 1:30 p.m. to 290 Macleay Road.

Food addicts meet

Spanish club A Spanish club with conversation and study for intermediate Spanish students meets every Thursday at 2 p.m. in Prairie Springs Assisted Living, 680 W. Prairie St. For further information, phone 360-681-0215.

Gamblers meet Gamblers Anonymous meets Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. at Calvary Chapel Sequim, 91 S. Boyce Road. For further information, phone 360-460-9662.

Retired scientists Retired Scientists of Sequim meet the first Thursday of every month at 1:30 p.m. in the Sequim Library meeting room, 630 N. Sequim Ave. North Olympic Peninsula residents with scientific training and background are invited to attend meetings. There are no dues or other obligations.

Stamp society Strait Stamp Society will meet Thursday from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Sequim Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave. After the general meeting, there will be a presentation by Dick McCammon on “Stamp Collecting: Why it Matters.” This will be followed by a show-and-tell of interesting philatelic items by members. Bring any questions you have about your collection or stamp collecting in general There will be an auction of items left over from the April meeting, and free periodicals and some club material will be available for sale. Strait Stamp Society is

a chapter of the American Philatelic Society and the Northwest Federation of stamp clubs and receives the latest news on new stamp releases, stamp shows and other related information to help collectors find and sell stamps. There are no dues, though donations are welcome. For more information, phone 360-683-6373.

Olympic Minds Olympic Minds, The Institute of Noetic Sciences community group for Sequim and Port Angeles, meets the first three Thursdays of each month at 1 p.m. in the conference room of The Lodge at Sherwood Village, 660 Evergreen Farm Way. The meetings are free and open to the public. For more information, phone 360-681-8677.

Forks and the West End FOFA meets Friends of Forks Animals monthly meetings are the first Wednesday of the month at 6:30 p.m. at the Forks Community Center, 91 Maple St. The public is welcome to attend. For further information, visit the FOFA website at www.friendsofforksanimals. org or phone the message line at 360-374-3332.

Port Townsend and Jefferson County Exchange group A local currency group, North Olympic Exchange, will host an orientation to explain how this system works to build a more sustainable community by trading services, skills and goods Sunday at 5 p.m. at Dundee Hill Center, Hancock and 32nd streets, Port Townsend. For further information, phone Mike Dobkevich at 360-379-2627 or email dobkevich1@msn.com.

TOPS in PT The Port Townsend Chapter of Take Off Pounds Sensibly meets every Monday at 5:30 p.m. at the Church of Christ, 230 A St., Port Townsend. For further information, phone 360-385-1081.

Camera club meets The Port Townsend Camera Club meets the first Monday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Port Townsend Community Center, 620 Tyler St. Participants share and critique digital, print and slide photographs. Anyone interested may come for guest speakers, refreshments, photo contests, field trips, classes in all photography-related subjects and public showings of work with other club members.

Car club Rakers Car Club, a

50-year-old organization, meets the first Tuesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Highway 20 Road House, 2152 Sims Way, Port Townsend. People interested in old cars and trucks are invited. There is a minimum age of 21 to attend meetings.

PT Scrabble Club The Port Townsend Scrabble Club meets Wednesdays from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Water Street Creperie, 1046 Water St. (next to Public House). Players will be matched up at their level and will be helped to improve their score. The group provides Scrabble dictionaries. Participants are asked to bring a Scrabble board if possible. For more information, email newsmann@ mannpublications.org.

TOPS meeting TOPS 1393 meets Thursdays with weigh-in at 8:15 a.m. and meeting at 9 a.m. at the Beacon Light Center, 1820 Irondale Road, Port Hadlock. For further information, phone Maria Goss, area captain, at 360-275-2179.

Soroptimists meet Soroptimist International of Port Townsend/Jefferson County, a professional businesswomen’s club, meets the first three Thursdays of the month at noon at Discovery View Retirement Apartments, 1051 Hancock St., Port Townsend. For information on joining the organization, visit the website at www. soroptimistpt.org.

Rhododendron The Olympic Peninsula Chapter of the American Rhododendron Society will meet Thursday at 7 p.m. at the Tri-Area Community Center, 10 West Valley Road, Chimacum. Chris Berg will speak on how to use dwarf rhodies in bonsai and how to make a landscape. Members also will bring plants from their own gardens for sale. The meeting is open to the public, and refreshments will be provided.

Rhody Os Dance The Rhody Os Dance Club holds dances every first and third Friday with rounds from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. and mainstream square dance from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. at the Gardiner Community Center, 980 Old Gardiner Road. There are also Tuesday night square dance lessons from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. For further information, phone 360-797-2106 or 360-457-8620.

Food Addicts Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous, a support group, meets Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at First Baptist Church, 1202 Lawrence St., Port Townsend. For further information, phone 360-385-0318.

Things to Do

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula Today and Monday, May 1-2, in: ■ Port Angeles ■ Sequim-Dungeness Valley ■ Port TownsendJefferson County ■ Forks-West End

Port Angeles Today Lions breakfast — All-youcan-eat. Crescent Bay Lions Clubhouse, Holly Hill Road and state Highway 112, 8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. $6 adults, $3 for children. PA Vintage Softball — Co-ed slow pitch for fun, fellowship and recreation. For women 45 and older and men 50 and older. Elks Playfield, 14th and Pine streets, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Phone Gordon Gardner at 360452-5973 or Ken Foster at 360683-0141. Feiro Marine Life Center — City Pier, noon to 4 p.m. Admission by donation.

Phone 360-417-6254.

Refreshments at 9 p.m. Phone 360-457-4081.

Port Angeles Fine Arts Center — “Strait Art 2011” Monday 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd., 11 Overeaters Anonymous — a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. Show runs till May 15. Phone 360-457- St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 510 E. Park Ave., 9 a.m. Phone 3532. 360-477-1858. May Day Celebration — Clallam-WSU Master GarArts and crafts, games, drum circle. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Port deners plant clinic — WSU Angeles Fine Arts Center’s Extension Office, Clallam Webster’s Woods Art Park, County Courthouse, 223 E. 1203 E. Lauridsen Blvd. $10 Fourth St., 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. per family. Proceeds fund the Free. Open to the public. Bring samples of plants for identificacenter’s education programs. tion. Phone Muriel Nesbitt, proGrange lecture — Angel gram coordinator, at 360-565Crest Gardens will present at 2679. Through Oct. 25. No Dry Creek Grange, 3520 W. clinic July 4 or Sept. 3. Edgewood Drive. 3 p.m. Potluck dinner follows at 4 p.m. Walk-in vision clinic — Information for visually Easter dinner and show impaired and blind people, — Hillcrest Baptist Church, 205 including accessible technolBlack Diamond Road. 5 p.m. to ogy display, library, Braille 7 p.m. $20 for adults, $5 for training and various magnificachildren 12 and younger. tion aids. Vision Loss Center, Armory Square Mall, 228 W. Sons of Norway dance — First St., Suite N. Phone 360Sons of Norway Hall, 131 W. 457-1383 for an appointment Fifth St., 6:30 p.m. with 30 min- or visit www.visionloss utes of instruction, followed by services.org/vision. folk and ballroom dance. $2 Turn to Things/C7 members, $3 nonmembers.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Things to Do Quilt Guild — Veterans Center, 216 S. Francis St., 6:30 p.m. Bring own project or lend Guided walking tour — a hand with gratitude quilts for Historic downtown buildings, an old brothel and “Under- local veterans. Phone JoAnn ground Port Angeles.” Cham- Vickery at 360-461-0506. ber of Commerce, 121 E. RailChoir concert — The road Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 NorthWest Women’s Chorale senior citizens and students, spring concert, Got Spirit!, will $6 ages 6 to 12. Children be held at Holy Trinity Lutheran younger than 6, free. For reser- Church, 301 Lopez Ave., 7 p.m. vations, phone 360-452-2363, $10 donation. ext. 0.

Continued from C6

Dream Center — For youths ages 13-24 who are homeless or at risk for homelessness. Drop in from 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, 535 E. First Street, corner of First and Albert streets. Housing and planning help, plus basic needs: showers, laundry, hygiene products, etc. Meals served daily. Volunteers and donors, phone 360-4778939 or 360-565-5048. A service of Serenity House of Clallam County.

Sequim and Dungeness Valley

Today Hike — The Olympic Outdoor Club hikes the Upper Dungeness Trail. Email  olympic.outdoors@yahoo.com. VFW breakfast — 169 E. Washington St., 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cost: $5 a person.

Dungeness Spring Fling — Event will feature four free Volunteers in Medicine of workshops filled with tips for the Olympics health clinic — outdoor, fun, fitness and safety. 909 Georgiana St., noon to 5 Each workshop begins inside p.m. Free for patients with no the Dungeness River Audubon insurance or access to health Center, 2151 West Hendrickcare. For appointments, phone son Road, in Sequim. Then, outside activities will follow in 360-457-4431. Railroad Bridge Park. Noon to First Step drop-in center 4 p.m. Phone 360-681-4076. — 325 E. Sixth St., 1 p.m. to 4 Adult Scrabble — The p.m. Free clothing and equipment closet, information and Buzz, 128 N. Sequim Ave., 1 referrals, play area, emergency p.m. Phone 360-681-2619. supplies, access to phones, Musical — “Too Old for the computers, fax and copier. Chorus” presented by Olympic Phone 360-457-8355. Theatre Arts, 414 N. Sequim General discussion group Ave. Tickets are $18. Available — Port Angeles Senior Center, at http://olympic-theatre.tripod. 328 E. Seventh St., 1:30 p.m. to com or box office. Show held 4 p.m. No specified topic. Open Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays to public. and Sundays until May 15. Thursday, Friday, Saturday The Answer for Youth — shows at 7:30 p.m., Sunday Drop-in outreach center for shows at 2 p.m. youth and young adults, providing essentials like clothes, Trivia night — Oasis Sports food, Narcotics and Alcoholics Bar & Grill, 301 E. Washington Anonymous meetings, etc. 711 St., 5:30 p.m. Phone 360-582E. Second St., 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. 3143. Mental health drop-in center — The Horizon Center, 205 E. Fifth St., 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. For those with mental disorders and looking for a place to socialize, something to do or a hot meal. For more information, phone Rebecca Brown at 360457-0431.

Dungeness Spring Fling Hike — Raise funds for the Dungeness River Audubon Center while staying fit. Robin Hill Farm Park hike. Three-plus miles. Phone Gretha/Doug Davis at 360-681-8013 or email gretha.d@wavecable.com. Senior meal — Nutrition Free for Spring Fling participrogram, Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., pants, $5 donation for others. www.dungenessriver 4:30 p.m. Donation of $3 to $5 Visit center.org. per meal. Reservations recommended. Phone 360-457-8921. Walk aerobics — First BapPort Angeles Toastmas- tist Church of Sequim, 1323 ters Club 25 — Clallam Transit Sequim-Dungeness Way, 8 Business Office, 830 W. Laurid- a.m. Free. Phone 360-683sen Blvd., 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. 2114. Open to public. Phone Bill Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Thomas at 360-460-4510 or Jane Lane, 9 a.m. Phone 206Leilani Wood 360-683-2655. 321-1718 or visit www.sequim Bingo — Masonic Lodge, yoga.com. 622 Lincoln St., 6:30 p.m. — Exercise classes Doors at 4 p.m. Food, drinks and pull tabs available. Phone Sequim Community Church, 360-457-7377. 1000 N. Fifth Ave. Cardio-step,

9 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. Strength Port Townsend and and toning class, 10:30 a.m. to Jefferson County 11:30 a.m. $5 a person. Phone Shelley Haupt at 360-477-2409 or email jhaupt6@wavecable. Today com. Port Townsend Aero Free blood pressure Museum — Jefferson County screening — Faith Lutheran International Airport, 195 AirChurch, 382 W. Cedar St., 9 port Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone 360- Admission: $10 for adults, $9 for seniors, $6 for children ages 683-4803. 7-12. Free for children younger Basic yoga — “Basic” to than 6. Features vintage airinclude Flow Yoga as well as craft and aviation art. looking at each individual pose Chimacum Grange Farmand how the body moves. 10:30 a.m. Pacific Elements, ers Market — 9572 Rhody 163 Lost Mountain Road. Drive, Chimacum, 10 a.m. to 2 Phone 360-683-3571 before p.m. attending. Puget Sound Coast ArtilSequim Duplicate Bridge lery Museum — Fort Worden — Masonic Lodge, 700 S. Fifth State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Ave., noon. Phone 360-681- Admission: $3 for adults, $1 for 4308 or partnership at 360- children 6 to 12, free for children 5 and younger. Exhibits 683-5635. interpret the Harbor Defenses Women’s weight loss sup- of Puget Sound and the Strait port group — Dr. Leslie Van of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360Romer’s office, 415 N. Sequim 385-0373 or email artymus@ olypen.com. Ave. Jefferson County Historical Museum and shop — 540 Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for children 3 to 12; free to historical society members. Exhibits German class — Sequim include “Jefferson County’s Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Maritime Heritage,” “James Ave., 2 p.m. Phone 360-681- Swan and the Native Americans” and “The Chinese in 0226 or 360-417-0111. Early Port Townsend.” Phone Health clinic — Free medi- 360-385-1003 or visit www. cal services for uninsured or jchsmuseum.org. underinsured. Dungeness Valley Health & Wellness Clinic, 777 N. Fifth Ave., Suite 109, 5 p.m. Phone 360-582-0218.

Family Caregivers support group — Trinity United Methodist Church, 100 Blake Ave., 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Phone Carolyn Lindley at 360-417-8554.

August 28, 1930 April 26, 2011 Joan E. McHenry of Kingston, Washington, died April 26, 2011. Joan was born in Shelton, Washington, on August 28, 1930, to Grace Wanda (Lutes) and Percy Duane Adams. She married Cecil Ray McHenry on October 18, 1946, in Kamilche, Washington. Cecil preceded Joan in death on April 24, 1996. They moved to the North Olympic Peninsula in 1962. She is survived by her son, Rex, and daughterin-law, Debbie McHenry; daughters and sons-inlaw Sandi and Glen Worsey, Sharon and Rudy Purser, Margaret

Women’s barbershop chorus — Singers sought for Grand Olympics Chorus of Sweet Adelines. Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave., 6:30 p.m. Phone Wendy Foster at 360-683-0141.

Death Notices Feb. 28, 1926 — April 29, 2011

Port Angeles resident Violet L. Embree died of age-related causes. She was 85. Drennan-Ford Funeral Home, Port Angeles, is in charge of arrangements. www.drennanford.com

Jane Margaret Hall Dec. 8, 1926 — April 28, 2011

Port Angeles resident Jane Margaret Hall died of renal failure. She was 84. Services: A memorial service will be held at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 510 E. Park Ave., at 11 a.m. Tuesday. Harper-Ridgeview Funeral Chapel is in charge of arrangements. www.harper-ridgeview funeralchapel.com

Tom and Diana McHenry; sisters and brother-in-law Rose Ellis and June and Kelly Froese; brother Adrian Adams; 25 grandchildren; 41 great-grandchildren; and one greatgreat-grandchild. Mrs. McHenry was preceded in death by her husband, Cecil McHenry; son Mickey McHenry; brother Lester Adams; and sister Anne Archer. A visitation was held Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Harper-Ridgeview Funeral Chapel in Port Angeles. A graveside service will be held Monday at 1 p.m. at the Shelton Memorial Park, 1605 Van Buren Street, Shelton, WA 98584. Memorial contributions can be made to Hospice of Kitsap County, P.O. Box 3416, Silverdale, WA 98383.

Quilcene Historical Museum — Artifacts, photos and documents that tell the history of South Jefferson County. New displays on Brinnon, shellfish and people in uniform join millinery, businesses, mining, logging, farming, home and hearth, kitchen, country store, Jerry Getz and school exhibits. No admission charge, but donations are appreciated. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Friday through Monday, 151 E. Columbia St. Phone: 360-7654848, email quilcene museum@olypen.com or visit www.quilcenemuseum.org.

$20; Thursdays and Sundays, $18. Students $10 at all shows. More info and advance tickets at www.keycitypublictheatre. org. Community Yoga — Room to Move Yoga, 1008 Lawrence St., Second floor. Beginnerlevel class. Learn to move, breathe and relax. 5:30 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. All levels welcome. By donation. For more details or questions, visit www.roomto moveyoga.com or phone 360385-2864.

Monday Yoga classes — A variety of classes are offered at Room to Move Yoga, 1008 Lawrence St., second floor. For more details or questions, visit www. roomtomoveyoga.com or phone 360-385-2864.

Cabin Fever Quilters — Tri-Area Community Center, Free bike clinic — 10 West Valley Road, ChimaChauncey Locklear offers “Port cum, 10 a.m. Open to public. Townsend ReCyclery.” Food Phone Laura Gipson at 360Co-op, 414 Kearney St., 2 p.m. 385-0441. to 5 p.m. Phone 360-643-1755. Puget Sound Coast ArtilPlay — Key City Public The- lery Museum — Fort Worden atre presents “The Soup is State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Served” (“La Zuffa è Servita”) Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for by Germano Rubbi. Perfor- children 6 to 12; free for chilmances Thursdays through dren 5 and younger. Exhibits Sundays through May 15 at interpret the Harbor Defenses Key City Playhouse, 419 of Puget Sound and the Strait Washington St. Curtains of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360Thursday at 7 p.m, Friday and 385-0373 or email artymus@ Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays olypen.com. at 2:30 p.m. General admission Fridays and Saturdays, Turn to Things/C8

MARY ELIZABETH KEATING (BETSY MOAK) April 7, 1966 March 30, 2011 Mary Elisabeth (Betsy) Keating was born on April 7, 1966, in Redwood City, California, to Hugh Bernard Keating and Jean Bruce Keating. Betsy lost her 31⁄2-year battle with cancer on March 30, 2011, in Vancouver, Washington. Betsy moved with her family to Sequim in 1971, when she was 5 years old. During her time in Sequim, she adopted her stepfather’s last name of Moak. She graduated from Sequim High School in 1984. She became involved with the annual operetta productions in the eighth grade and remained involved through high school. She also was a member of the band, crosscountry and managed the girls basketball team.

Betsy joined 4-H at the age of 9 and qualified for the state fair in many of her projects. Her favorites were dogs and horses. She became a Western Games rider and enjoyed riding with private groups as well as 4-H. Betsy also served as Worthy Adviser of the International Order of the Rainbow for Girls and was a grand (state) officer in that organization as well. Following high school, Betsy attended Western Washington University, majoring in chemistry and mathematics. She owned her own company, Stirling Media, with which she traveled extensively. She also owned Arlequin Kennels and bred, trained and exhibited Belgian Tervurens. She trained several champions and was fortunate enough to travel over most of the U.S. as well as visiting Europe several times, with (and sometimes without) her dogs. Betsy is survived by her mother, Jean Keating,

and grandmother, Jean Bruce, both of Des Moines, Washington; brother Greg Moak, his wife, Barbara (Kosse) Moak, and their sons, Cameron and Brandon, all of Federal Way, Washington; and brother Stephen Moak, his fiancee, Debbie Reynolds, and his sons Brian and David, all of Sequim. She is also survived by her fiance, Jeremy Meeks of Keizer, Oregon, his family, her “soul dog” Emma, aunts, uncles and many cousins. She was preceded in death by her father, Hugh, who passed away on April 9, 1966, and her grandfather, Ellwood Bruce, who retired to Sequim and was a past master of the Sequim Masonic Lodge and an avid golfer. No services are planned at this time. Betsy would have appreciated donations to American Belgian Tervuren Club Rescue, www.­belgian tervurenrescue.com, or any cancer research organization.

Death and Memorial Notice HONEY DAVIS January 20, 1915 April 8, 2011 Honey Davis passed away at age 96 in her home, attended by loving family and friends. Honey was born into the large family of Rose and Benjamin Katz in Brooklyn, New York. She was preceded in death by her husband, Lou; son Ben; sisters Lillian and Esther; and brothers Samuel, Arnold, Nathan, Ruben, Morris and Julius. A week before her passing, she was visited by her only surviving sibling and his wonderful companion, Sally, both from Brooklyn. Their visit meant a great deal to Honey, and she treasured their time together. Honey is survived by her daughter, Marilyn

Remembering a Lifetime available at area mortuaries or by downloading at www.peninsuladaily news.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■  Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appear once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www.peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3528.

Mrs. Davis Davis, and her husband, Jerry Morris; granddaughters Lou Ellen Davis of Salem, Oregon, and Terri Davis; and great-granddaughter Karlyn of Chester, California. Honey was loved and cherished by a large extended family of nieces and nephews, both grand

and great, from all over the country and by many friends here in Port Angeles, where she lived for nearly 30 years. Special friends Bonnie, Sandy and Patty cared for Honey around the clock after she broke her hip shortly after her 94th birthday, and Honey referred to them as her “angels.” Honey spoke often of Sequim Health & Rehabilitation and the superior care she was given during her time there; in just a few months, she went from wheelchair to a walker to a cane to walking unattended. They ensured that Honey would spend another two years with us all, for which we are so very grateful. She truly appreciated the care she received from Dr. Larry Gordon and his entire staff, as well as the nurses and aids at Olympic Medical Center.

Bonnie also helped care for Honey during the last weeks of her life. Thanks to Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County for its compassion and support. Honey will be remembered with love. We will always feel honored and elevated to have had her in our lives. We will remember her courage during the worst of times and her solid, basic goodness all the time. She will never stop being a role model. She was a fountain of love and warmth, and we have all been profoundly affected by her loving nature. A celebration of her life is being planned. A donation in her honor may be made to Volunteer Hospice of Clallam County, 540 East Eighth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362.

HELP OUR TROOPS CALL HOME DONATE YOUR OLD CELL PHONES

More than 150,000 troops are serving overseas. Cell Phones for Soldiers is calling on all Americans to support the troops by donating old cell phones. LOCAL DROP OFF CENTER:

Drennan & Ford

Funeral Home and Crematory 260 Monroe Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 457-1210 • 683-4020 • 374-5678 www.drennanford.com www.veteransfuneralhomes.com PROUDLY SERVING THOSE WHO HAVE PROUDLY SERVEDSM

075090614

■  Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-417-3556 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is

Port Townsend Marine Science Center — Fort Worden State Park. Natural history and marine exhibits, noon to 4 p.m. Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for youth and free to PTMSC members. Phone 360385-5582, email info@ptmsc. org or visit www.ptmsc.org.

Death and Memorial Notice

Death and Memorial Notice JOAN E. MCHENRY

C7

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

Violet L. Embree

Monday

Sunday, May 1, 2011


C8

WeatherNorthwest

Sunday, May 1, 2011

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Monday

Tuesday

Yesterday

Wednesday

Thursday

High 55

Low 41

50/39

53/40

56/39

55/42

Mostly sunny.

Rather cloudy.

Cloudy with a couple of showers.

Times of clouds and sun.

Mostly sunny.

Rather cloudy.

The Peninsula High pressure at the surface and aloft will build directly over the region today. This will bring a nice, seasonable day with a mostly sunny sky. Most places will have temperatures reaching the middle and upper 50s with some places reaching the 60s. Neah Bay Port The high will quickly move away tonight, allowing for more 57/44 Townsend clouds to move into the region. A cold front will arrive Port Angeles 58/44 Monday, bringing a cloudy and cooler day with a couple 55/41 of showers. Tuesday will be dry and cool with times of Sequim clouds and sunshine.

Victoria 62/44

61/42

Forks 62/42

Olympia 67/40

Spokane 60/38

Yakima Kennewick 68/34 69/39

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2011

Marine Forecast

Mostly sunny today. Wind west 6-12 knots becoming east. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility clear. Considerable cloudiness tonight. Wind east-northeast 7-14 knots. Waves 1-2 feet. Visibility clear. Cloudy tomorrow with a couple of showers. Wind becoming west 20-30 knots. Waves 3-5 feet. Visibility under 2 miles at times. Tuesday: Clouds and sun. Wind west 12-25 knots. Waves 2-4 feet. Visibility clear.

LaPush

12:21 p.m. ----Port Angeles 1:25 a.m. 3:50 p.m. Port Townsend 3:10 a.m. 5:35 p.m. Sequim Bay* 2:31 a.m. 4:56 p.m.

Today

Tomorrow

Tuesday

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

High Tide Ht

Low Tide Ht

High Tide Ht

Low Tide Ht

7.0’ --6.5’ 6.3’ 7.8’ 7.6’ 7.3’ 7.1’

6:07 a.m. 6:07 p.m. 8:37 a.m. 8:45 p.m. 9:51 a.m. 9:59 p.m. 9:44 a.m. 9:52 p.m.

0.1’ 1.9’ 0.3’ 4.1’ 0.4’ 5.3’ 0.4’ 5.0’

12:07 a.m. 1:06 p.m. 1:47 a.m. 4:30 p.m. 3:32 a.m. 6:15 p.m. 2:53 a.m. 5:36 p.m.

6:47 a.m. 6:47 p.m. 9:04 a.m. 9:25 p.m. 10:18 a.m. 10:39 p.m. 10:11 a.m. 10:32 p.m.

12:40 a.m. 1:50 p.m. 2:12 a.m. 5:08 p.m. 3:57 a.m. 6:53 p.m. 3:18 a.m. 6:14 p.m.

7:26 a.m. 7:26 p.m. 9:34 a.m. 10:05 p.m. 10:48 a.m. 11:19 p.m. 10:41 a.m. 11:12 p.m.

8.2’ 7.1’ 6.5’ 6.6’ 7.8’ 8.0’ 7.3’ 7.5’

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

AFFORS*06503

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula Continued from C7 Quilcene Historical Museum — Artifacts, photos and documents that tell the history of South Jefferson County. New displays on Brinnon, shellfish and people in uniform join millinery, businesses, mining, logging, farming, home and hearth, kitchen, country store, Jerry Getz and school exhibits. No admission charge, but donations are appreciated. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Friday through Monday, 151 E. Columbia St. Phone: 360-765-4848, email quilcenemuseum@olypen.com or visit www.quilcenemuseum. org. Open until Sept. 18. Silent war and violence protest — Women In Black, Adams and Water streets, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Book Lover’s Cafe — Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand by Helen Simonson. Group meets the first Monday of the month at the Port Townsend Community Center Lounge, 620 Tyler St., 2:30 p.m. Sponsored by the Port Townsend Library. All are welcome. For information, phone Cris Wilson at 360-379-4441. Team Survivor NorthwestPT exercise class — Discovery Physical Therapy, 27 Colwell St. (off Rhody Drive), Port Hadlock, 4:20 p.m. to 5:20 p.m. For more information, visit www.tsnw-pt. org.

San Francisco 68/48

-0.2’ 2.2’ -0.2’ 4.4’ -0.2’ 5.7’ -0.2’ 5.4’

8.2’ 7.2’ 6.5’ 6.9’ 7.8’ 8.3’ 7.3’ 7.8’

-0.5’ 2.3’ -0.5’ 4.7’ -0.7’ 6.1’ -0.7’ 5.7’

Denver 46/26

May 10

May 17

New York 69/50

Washington 72/55

Kansas City 60/38

Atlanta 82/60 El Paso 80/53

Last

May 24

World Cities Today City Hi Lo W Athens 73 62 pc Baghdad 80 58 s Beijing 80 55 pc Brussels 66 44 s Cairo 86 73 s Calgary 52 30 pc Edmonton 58 28 pc Hong Kong 85 77 t Jerusalem 64 53 s Johannesburg 65 46 t Kabul 82 51 s London 67 48 pc Mexico City 80 54 t Montreal 64 50 s Moscow 50 32 pc New Delhi 110 78 s Paris 73 56 c Rio de Janeiro 90 75 s Rome 71 55 pc Stockholm 48 37 s Sydney 71 60 s Tokyo 73 61 r Toronto 63 44 sh Vancouver 61 50 s Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Houston 88/67

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice

Moon Phases Full

Detroit 66/46

Chicago 62/41

Los Angeles 88/55

Sunset today ................... 8:27 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 5:55 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 4:52 a.m. Moonset today ................. 7:23 p.m. First

Minneapolis 52/35

Miami 85/75

Fronts Cold

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Warm

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

0s

National Cities Today

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Hi 54 52 63 82 65 73 65 51 48 63 54 66 83 44 62 70 58 74 66 46 62 66 67 51 55 87 88 50

Lo W 37 pc 35 s 45 s 60 pc 44 s 51 pc 32 s 33 c 30 s 37 pc 40 s 48 sh 60 s 24 r 41 pc 51 t 32 s 46 s 49 r 26 c 37 pc 46 sh 44 s 32 c 31 c 72 pc 67 pc 39 sh

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 60 73 74 88 85 63 52 78 85 69 56 62 88 88 72 83 74 78 64 81 66 54 90 82 68 53 52 72

Lo W 38 c 55 s 54 r 55 s 75 s 40 pc 35 pc 59 t 70 pc 50 s 38 c 34 pc 67 s 60 s 51 s 56 s 46 s 56 s 36 s 42 s 46 r 31 pc 60 t 55 s 48 s 27 pc 29 pc 55 pc

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 105 at Laredo, TX

Low: 0 at Berthoud Pass, CO

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The Port Townsend Ananda Meditation Group — Meets Mondays (except holidays) at 7 p.m. at Azaya Wellness Center, 1441 F St. Meditation instruction is available at 6:45 p.m. All are welcome to join in meditation, chanting and teachings of Paramahansa Yogananda. Phone 360-531-3308.

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Forks and the West End Play — Forks High School spring drama production of “The Somewhat True Tales of Robin Hood.” 2 p.m., Forks High School Commons Theater. General admission is $5, with four-person family four-day passes available for all shows for $40 and a single four-day pass for $10.

Billings 51/33

145118410

A

ff o r d a b l e Roofing

Things to Do

Seattle 67/44

Sun & Moon

May 2

Everett 60/46

Seattle 67/44

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

Sunday, May 1, 2011

-10s -0s

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

National Forecast

Statistics are for the 48-hour period ending at 5 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 54 38 0.00 7.75 Forks 55 30 0.02 63.71 Seattle 56 43 0.12 18.79 Sequim 60 40 0.02 7.96 Hoquiam 54 40 0.00 38.24 Victoria 56 43 0.03 16.59 P. Townsend* 53 39 0.01 8.54 *Data from www.ptguide.com

New

Port Ludlow 60/42 Bellingham 62/43

Aberdeen 60/46

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Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, May 1, 2011

Business

SECTION

D

 $ Briefly . . . PA chamber gets review of Hurricane Ridge PORT ANGELES — A report on all-week access to Hurricane Ridge during the winter will be given by Olympic National Park Deputy Superintendent Todd Suess to the Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce on Monday. Suess, former superintendent of Jewel Cave National Monument in South Dakota who became ONP deputy superintendent in FebSuess ruary, will substitute for Superintendent Karen Gustin, who was originally scheduled to speak but will be out of town. Since December, the southbound road out of Port Angeles to Hurricane Ridge has been open every day, weather permitting, paid for by about $75,000 in North Olympic Peninsula donations and an additional $250,000 in federal funds. For years, the road to the ski and snow-play area was open only Fridays through Sundays during the winter months. Open to the public, Monday’s chamber lunch­eon — which also will feature announcement of the monthly community Beautification Award — begins at noon and returns to the Port Angeles ­CrabHouse Restaurant’s upstairs banquet room at the Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St. Luncheon tickets are $13 and can be purchased from the meeting room cashier.

Biomass project PORT TOWNSEND — A progress report on the proposed Port Townsend Paper Corp. cogeneration project will be part of a Team Jefferson economic report at this week’s Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce luncheon meeting on Monday. Team Jefferson chair Bill Wise will discuss the $55 million Port Townsend Paper project that would generate up to 24 megawatts of elec- Wise trical power by burning biomass as well as other business projects in the county. Open to the public, Monday’s lunch meeting of the Jefferson County chamber, combining former chamber organizations in Port Townsend, Port Ludlow and the Tri-Area, begins at noon at the Port Townsend Elks Lodge, 555 Otto St. Subway of Port Townsend provides a variety of sandwiches available to the chamber audience for $8 each. Credit cards are not accepted.

Coffee Talk Tuesday Then on Tuesday, the chamber will sponsor its monthly Coffee Talk meeting in Port Ludlow for chamber members who cannot attend the weekly noon luncheons. Speaker at Tuesday’s meeting will be Christina Pivarnik, a Jefferson County marketing consultant and Port Townsend Pivarnik city marketing director, who will discuss the new “Share Your Washington” statewide tourism campaign. The effort is part of a switch from the government-funded state tourism agency to a private consortium of local visitor organizations. Tuesday’s hour­long Coffee Talk begins at 8 a.m. at the Inn at Port Ludlow, 1 Heron Road, Port Ludlow. Breakfast is available for $8, $9 or $10.

Business meeting FORKS — The Forks Chamber of Commerce will hold a business meeting for its members Wednesday. The chamber normally has a

Centuries of age fixed by craftsman

Real-time stock quotations now at peninsuladailynews.com

Market watch April 29, 2011

Dow Jones industrials

Worn Bibles restored in Port Ludlow

+47.23 12,810.54 +1.01

Nasdaq composite

2,873.54

Standard & Poor’s 500

+3.13 1,363.61

Russell 2000

By Janet Tu

+3.74

The Seattle Times

865.29

NYSE diary

Advanced: Declined:

Unchanged:

1,969 1,060 127

Volume:

3.7 b

Nasdaq diary

Advanced: Declined:

Unchanged:

1,431 1,152 144

Volume:

2.4 b

AP

Editors: All figures as of: series of weekly luncheon 5:46 PM EDT speakers between September and NOTE: but Figures reflect market fluctuations June, reserves the first after close; may not match other AP content Wednesday meeting of each month to discuss items of interest to chamber members. Wednesday’s meeting starts with no-host lunch at noon at <AP> MARKET BRIEF 042911: Chart JT’s Sweet Stuffs, 80 N. Forks shows daily market figures for Dow, Ave. S&P, Russell 2000 and Nasdaq, along Lunch costs $8; a bowl of with NYSE and Nasdaq diary; standsoup; $4.75; and a cup of soup, alone; 1c x 4 1/2 inches; 47mm x 114 $4. mm; ETA 6 p.m. </AP> Phone Marcia Bingham, chamber director, at 360-3742531 for further information.

PABA business PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Business Association will hold a business meeting for its weekly breakfast Tuesday. Usually PABA schedules a keynote speaker or speakers to address the membership, but Tuesday’s meeting will be reserved Ahlburg for topics of interest to the business association, which is led by 2011 president Kaj Ahlburg. Open to the public, Tuesday’s PABA meeting begins at 7:30 a.m. at Joshua’s Restaurant, 113 DelGuzzi Drive, Port Angeles. There is a $2.16 minimum charge by Joshua’s for those who do not order breakfast.

Midwife joins clinic PORT ANGELES — Jennifer “Jenn” Brown recently joined Olympic Medical Physicians Women’s Clinic. Brown, ARNP, CNM, will provide midwifery care and offer a full range of maternity and gynecological care. She joins Brown three other practicing certified nurse midwives and nurse practitioners at the clinic, 930 Caroline St. “We feel her experience with high-risk labor and delivery patients will really enhance the care we provide our patients at the Women’s Clinic,” said Kitty LaBarge, OMP director of surgical services. Brown previously worked for the University of Texas Medical Branch School of Medicine in Galveston, Texas, as a maternal child specialist. “I became passionate about midwifery and women’s health after my own experience with a midwife,” said Brown. “It is my goal to provide the best care possible to the women in our community. The Women’s Clinic is a wonderful practice for me to accomplish this goal.”

Business expands SEQUIM — Hand Over Heels Mobile Nailcare is expanding its nail care and beauty services to include makeup for special events. Turn

to

Politics and Environment

Briefly/D7

PORT LUDLOW — In a small, quiet workshop on three acres of rural land, bookbinder David Myhre carefully wrapped an Ace bandage around an old, worn Bible. The Bible was centuries old, its ornate leather cover rotted in places, its spine barely held together when it arrived at Myhre’s doorstep. Over several days, he carefully scraped old glue off the underside of the old leather with a dull X-acto knife, pared sheets of new leather to replace the old, and glued the restored original spine cover on top. “When you get injured, what do you do?” asked Myhre, who put the bandage on to make sure pressure is evenly distributed as the new glue dries. “You put an Ace bandage on it. Well, this book is sort of injured. It needs a new spine.” In this painstaking, meticulous way, Myhre, 61, gives new lives to old Bibles that often have great personal meaning for their owners. Myhre binds and restores all sorts of publications — from books to newspapers to legal documents — at his one-man shop, DuckaGary Settle (2) bush Book Bindery, at 247 OlymDavid Myhre, Port Ludlow bookbinder, holds the partiallypic Ridge in Port Ludlow.

restored cover of a 1597 Bible he is repairing. Below, after gluing the original cover to new leather, Myhre wraps the Bible in an Ace elastic bandage to set But in recent years, he’s creovernight.

150 last year

ated a niche restoring old Bibles — about 150 of them last year. For Myhre, it’s been a spot of economic brightness in a trade that’s seen demand plummet as books and other publications increasingly go digital. Though, by many accounts, the market is small, “People still want to preserve old family Bibles or Bibles they were given,” said David Bundy, associate provost for library services at Fuller Theological Seminary. At the workshop next to his home, Bibles and books to be restored are stacked on tables. Sheets of decorative paper and thin leather line pullout shelves, and large pieces of machinery — some manufactured between the Civil War and World War I — stand tall. Despite his passion for the craft, Myhre didn’t set out to get into the book — or Bible — restoration business. He didn’t even particularly like to read as a kid. But shop classes? Those he liked. Turn

to

Bible/D3

New rage: Princess’ royal gown By Anne D’innocenzio The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Vanessa Kelterborn, a store manager at ABS Clothing Collection Inc. in Santa Monica, Calif., on Saturday arranges a knockoff design of the royal wedding gown worn by Kate Middleton. (To see the real thing, see the official royal portrait of the new Duke and Duchess of Cambridge on Page D8.)

NEW YORK — Fashion firms want a piece of the fairy tale. Seconds after Kate Middleton emerged from her car outside Westminster Abbey in a ball gown with lace sleeves, designers around the country, glued to their TV sets, were sketching her look, setting in motion a mad rush for mass-produced versions that are expected to be in stores as early as late June. For brides-to-be who can’t wait even four weeks, David’s Bridal, the nation’s largest bridal chain, was already trumpeting a strapless look from Oleg Cassini, paired with a lacey bolero jacket, on its website as an already available stand-in as it scrambled to push out modified knockoffs of the real thing to stores by September. Meanwhile, QVC said shoppers will be able to pre-order earrings inspired by the diamond drops worn by the princess as early as Monday night. Turn

to

Gown/D8


D2

BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Sunday, May 1, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Work on big oil tank nears finish CONTRACTORS ARE FINISHING up a project at the Tesoro Petroleum tank farm on Port Angeles’ Ediz Hook that began last fall and was postponed later in the season thanks to Mother Nature. It all began when a routine inspection revealed potential problem areas in Tesoro’s largest storage tank, used to store fuel for the ships that visit Port Angeles Harbor. Inspections and repairs had been completed, and all that remained to be done was to sandblast, pressure wash and paint the tank when the high winds of last November ground all work to a halt. When the oil storage tank was assembled in 1985, the pre-rolled sheets of steel used to form the tank arrived on site with a coat of primer — except along the edges where the sheets would be welded together. It is those areas where no primer was used that required the most attention. A windscreen now enshrouds the 85,000-barrel tank and the scaffolding surrounding it, and the time consuming job of painting a structure that encompasses more than an acre of surface area is well under way. Once painting is completed, the insulation and outer protective skin will be reattached, and the 3.5-million-gallon tank will be placed back into service.

Border protection The North Olympic Sail and Power Squadron will hold its monthly meeting May 9 in the banquet room at the Cedars at Dungeness, 1965 Woodcock Road, northwest of Sequim. Anyone interested in boating is invited to attend. The guest speaker this month is Jonathan Michienze of the Office of Air and Marine, a division of U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Jonathan will explain how the OAM uses airborne and maritime assets to detect, interdict and prevent acts of terrorism, and the unlawful movement of people, illegal drugs and other contraband into the United States. He also is expected to touch on the contribution boaters can make to this effort by reporting suspicious activity. Dinner will be served at 6

ON THE WATERFRONT p.m., preceded by a social hour Sellars beginning at 5 p.m., which is an excellent opportunity to meet and greet the incoming bridge that assumed the watch April 11. The squadron’s commander this year is Doug Schwarz, who will be assisted by the executive officer, Torben Blichfeld. Judy Shanks is secretary, Jan Jones is treasurer and Ted Shanks is the education officer. This year’s executive committee is comprised of Svein Seljeseth and Duke Sparks. Cost is $19 per person. To make reservations or for further information, phone Commander Doug at 360-683-1444.

David G.

Log race

David G. Sellars/for Peninsula Daily News

The Port Angeles Yacht Club held a predicted log race in the waters of southern Vancouver Island on April 23. The concept of the event is similar to a road rally with autos. The course was 19 miles long with a number of fixed waypoints — and the only navigational instrument used was a compass. Participants must use a “fixed throttle” for the event. Prior to starting the contest, each boat traverses a measured mile to determine its throttle setting for the duration of the competition. Any deviation from this setting means an immediate disqualification for the transgressor. Although the starting time for the event was flexible, all participants must cross the finish no earlier than noon and no later than 12:15 p.m. This year’s course started at the Dock Island Light near Sidney, B.C., and ran down Cordova Channel to the finish line, which was just off the Lewis Reef Light that sits between Discovery Island and the city of Victoria. According to last year’s winner and this year’s commodore of the club, Steve DeBiddle, the currents this year created challenges for the participants that they had not dealt with in years past.

The 3.5-million-gallon main storage tank at Tesoro Petroleum’s tank yard on Ediz Hook in Port Angeles Harbor is covered, top, as work is completed to paint the huge structure. The tank is shown at right shortly after heavy November winds ripped protective covering material off the scaffolding as the tank’s outer surface was being cleaned and repainted. All work then ground to a halt until recently. Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Steve said Dave Miller aboard Papillion, a 36-foot Nauticat motorsailer, crossed the finish line first She was a victim of the heavy currents and was disqualified for being too early. For the second time in three years, Al Davis aboard his vintage 45-foot Chris Craft and his navigator, Jim Ball, earned the victory. Sunny Sue, owned and skippered by DeBiddle, was guided through the navigational challenges by her former owner, Chris Zook. Al Gross, a 12-time winner and perennial favorite aboard

The following week she was in the port city of Colon on the Atlantic side of the Panama Canal, awaiting her time slot to transit the canal to the Pacific Ocean. Filling up On April 24, she left Dutch Tesoro Petroleum on Thursday Harbor, Alaska, to make her way bunkered Napier Star, a 495-foot to Port Angeles for the bunkers. refrigerated cargo ship, in Port ________ Angeles Harbor. For the past 30 days, the vesDavid G. Sellars is a Port Angeles resisel — which is flagged in Berdent and former Navy boatswain’s mate who enjoys boats and strolling the waterfronts. muda — has been busy. Items involving boating, port activities and On March 27, she was in DelNorth Olympic Peninsula waterfronts are aware Bay, an estuary bordering the always welcome. Email dgsellars@hotmail. the states of New Jersey and com or phone him at 360-808-3202. Delaware. His column appears every Sunday. Eldorado, a 35-foot Chris Craft that he has owned for more 50 years, came in third with his son, Gary, as the navigator.

FAA shakes up air-traffic control bosses The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Federal Aviation Administration on Friday replaced three high-level managers in the nation’s air traffic control system following embarrassing incidents of controllers sleeping on the job and making potentially dangerous mistakes. In a shake-up of the system, new managers were appointed to key positions that oversee the operation of airport towers and regional radar centers that handle planes flying at high altitudes as well as approaches and departures, the agency said in a statement. A new manager was also appointed to run a regional radar center near Cleveland. The previ-

ous managers are being reassigned. The performance of mid-level managers is also being reassessed, the FAA said. And teams of experts are examining several of the agency’s more complex facilities, including the Cleveland center and one on Long Island in New York, to ensure agency policies are being followed and professional standards upheld. “This sends a powerful message, and it’s the right message,” said Gregory McGuirk, an associate professor of air traffic management at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Daytona Beach, Fla. “It’s one way to shake up the culture.” But Missy Cummings, an asso-

ciate professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said shuffling managers doesn’t get at the root cause of many of the incidents. The limits of human physiology necessarily mean that night shift workers in all industries, not just controllers, are going to fall asleep on the job from time to time, said Cummings, a human factors expert. Boredom is also a factor. The less activity there is to keep workers’ minds engaged in the dead of night, the more likely they are to fall asleep, she said. Last month, a controller working an overnight shift at the Cleveland center was suspended for watching a DVD movie while he was supposed to be directing

Notice is hereby given that the hereinafter described personal property is available for sale to the highest and best bidder for cash pursuant to RCW 53.08. et. seq. at the Port of Port Angeles, Port Angeles Boat Haven located at 832 Boat Haven Drive, in the City of Port Angeles, County of Clallam, on Thursday, the 19th day of May 2011, at 10:00 AM to satisfy Port charges, including costs of sale and related legal expenses.

Business Name _____________________________________________________________________ Address____________________________________________________________________________ City__________________ State________________ Type of Business________________________ Zip Telephone________________________________ What date is your anniversary?_______________________________________________________ Which anniversary is your business celebrating?______________________________________________ Please Mail or Bring to: Peninsula Daily News 305 W. 1st St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 Attn: ANNIVERSARY EVENT

The successful bidder must arrange with the Director of Finance & Administration to remove vessel(s) from the marina or dry storage or arrange moorage with the Harbormaster.

Caps On

LAST KNOWN OWNER

REASONABLE DESCRIPTION OF VESSEL

Stephen Shumaker 101 Elwha Rd. Port Angeles, WA 98363

45’ Wood Powerboat Slip: N-11

FAA regulations require a separation of at least five miles when the plane in the lead is significantly larger to prevent the trailing plane from encountering dangerous wake turbulence. Controllers at Andrews also directed Obama’s plane to abandon its landing and circle the air base to give the cargo jet time to get off the runway. Also Friday, FAA named a fivemember review panel composed of internal, labor, industry and academic safety experts to evaluate the agency’s training of new controllers. “This is just the beginning of the process to make sure we have the best possible team in place,” Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said.

The Peninsula Daily News wants to congratulate North Olympic Peninsula businesses celebrating anniversaries in May. On May 6th, we will publish a FREE ad listing the businesses who respond to this special event by May 2nd. Is your business having an anniversary later this year? You can use this coupon now to let us know the date.

NOTICE OF BOAT SALE

VESSEL NAME

air traffic. In February, a supervisor at the Long Island center complained that controllers on late night shifts routinely took naps during breaks and played electronic games when traffic was light. On Wednesday, FAA replaced the acting manager of a regional radar facility in Warrenton, Va., that handles approaches and departures for airports in Virginia and Maryland. The action came a week after a controller at the facility allowed a plane carrying first lady Michelle Obama and Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, to fly less than three miles behind a much larger military cargo jet as the planes approached Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland.

We’d like to help you celebrate! During your anniversary month, you can run an ad at the following discount prices: (One time only – any day of the week. No variations of size or price) PDN

29’ Fiberglass Sailboat Slip: Q-10

Full Page..............................$1000 Half Page...............................$650 Quarter Page..........................$450 Plus we will give you 1 COLOR FREE

Dated this 25th day of April, 2011. PORT OF PORT ANGELES WILLIAM R. JAMES DIRECTOR OF FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION

(360) 417-3541 • FAX (360) 417-3507 • 1-800-826-7714

115105064

Pam Williamson 1229 Thompson Rd. Sequim, WA 98382

155119265

WN 9559 MF


BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, May 1, 2011

D3

Court voids stem cell research ban 1996 law involves tax funding The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Opponents of taxpayerfunded stem cell research has lost a key round in a federal appeals court. In a 2-1 decision Friday, a panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals in District of Columbia overturned a judge’s order that would have blocked taxpayer funding for stem cell research. The judges ruled that opponents of taxpayerfunded stem cell research are not likely to succeed in their lawsuit to stop it. The panel reversed an opinion issued last August by U.S. District Judge Royce Lamberth, who said the research likely violates the

law against federal funding of embryo destruction. “We’re thrilled with this decision and look forward to allowing federally funded scientists to continue with their work without political constraints,” said Sean Tipton, a spokesman for the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Researchers hope one day to use stem cells in ways that cure spinal cord injuries, Parkinson’s disease and other ailments.

Linked to abortion Opponents say the research is a form of abortion because human embryos must be destroyed to obtain the stem cells. The 1996 law prohibits the use of taxpayer dollars in work that harms an embryo, so private money has been used to cull batches of the cells. Those batches can reproduce in lab dishes indefinitely, and the Obama

administration issued rules permitting taxpayer dollars to be used in work on them. The lawsuit was filed by two scientists who argued that Obama’s expansion jeopardized their ability to win government funding for research using adult stem cells — ones that have already matured to create specific types of tissues — because it will mean extra competition. Lamberth, the chief judge of the U.S. District Court in Washington, issued a preliminary injunction in August to block the research while the case continued. The Obama administration immediately appealed and requested the order be stopped. The appeals court quickly ruled that the research could continue at the National Institutes of Health while the judges took up the case. As a result of the appellate ruling Friday, the original lawsuit can continue

Children’s Hospital, Boston

A colony of human embryonic stem cells growing on mouse feeder cells. before Judge Lamberth, but the taxpayer-funded research also will go on. Lamberth hasn’t thus far either held a trial or issued a final ruling, which he could do based on court filings without taking testimony. Once the cells are culled, they can reproduce in lab dishes indefinitely.

So government policies said using taxpayer dollars to work with the alreadycreated batches of cells is allowed. The Obama administration has expanded the number of stem cell lines created with private money that federally funded scientists could research, up from the 21 that President

George W. Bush had allowed to at least 75 so far. To qualify, parents who donate the original embryo must be told of other options, such as donating to another infertile woman. Congress twice passed legislation specifically calling for tax-funded stem cell research, which Bush vetoed.

Cheaper eye drug proves as good as pricier one The results are a blow to Roche’s Genentech unit, which sells both mediNEW YORK — A much cheaper drug cines. has proved just as good as a $2,000 Avastin is a cancer drug that doctors monthly shot to treat a common eye dis- have used for many years to treat the order that can lead to blindness, a longeye disease even though it is not awaited study has found. approved for that purpose. The results are expected to lead many Genetech later developed Lucentis for doctors and patients to turn away from the eye disease, and it was approved in the pricier Lucentis and instead use $50 2006. shots of Avastin for an age-related condiA company spokesman said Thursday tion called wet macular degeneration. that the company had no plans to seek Vision improvement after one year approval to sell Avastin for eye use. was the same for those given monthly Yet the results are a boon for patients shots of Avastin or Lucentis, the and insurers because nothing prevents 1,200-patient study found. them from using the cheaper Avastin, One concern: more serious adverse eye specialists said. effects occurred among Avastin users. Doctors who use it for the eye disease But they are not the type usually must get a pharmacist to prepare lower seen with these drugs, and only wider doses for injection rather than the intrause and more study will tell whether one venous way it’s used for cancer. is safer than the other, eye experts said. “It’s always good news for patients The Associated Press

with the study. He has no ties to Genentech but has consulted for several other companies developing eye treatments. More than 250,000 Americans are treated for macular degeneration each year, said Dr. Paul Sieving, director of the National Eye Institute, the federal agency that paid for the study. The disease occurs when abnormal blood vessel growth damages the part of the retina responsible for central vision, and the two drugs aim at a protein that spurs blood vessel growth. About 24 percent of Avastin users and 19 percent of those on Lucentis had a Insurance coverage serious side effect, mostly a need for hosAnyone wanting to use Lucentis now pitalization. will have to justify its cost to insurers The study is too small to clearly and policymakers, Dr. Philip Rosenfeld of answer safety questions, and these difBascom Palmer Eye Institute at the Uni- ferences require more study, researchers versity of Miami wrote in an editorial said.

when there are more than one option for a condition. It’s good news for the country. Now we have potential for significant savings at a time when the cost of health care is skyrocketing,” said Dr. Paul Sternberg, chairman of the Vanderbilt Eye Institute. He had no role in the study, which was led by Maureen Maguire at the University of Pennsylvania. Results were published online Thursday by the New England Journal of Medicine and will be presented at an eye research conference today.

Bible: Many carry family histories with them Continued from D1 After graduating from high school, he drew a number in the draft lottery that meant he had a high chance of getting sent to Vietnam. But he found out that if he were a trade apprentice in a union shop, he could get a deferment. Myhre got into an apprenticeship program at a trade bindery and eventually launched his own business, binding everything from issues of Seattle Weekly to legal documents, cookbooks and self-published books. Business was good enough to support a growing family: his wife, Jani Myhre, and their three children.

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Most come from Western Washington; some from other states. Sometimes they are smaller, take-to-church-size Bibles.

Among Eleanor’s most treasured restored Bibles: a New King James version that played a special role in the couple’s romance. Norman had known Eleanor’s first husband decades ago in seminary. They met again after both their first spouses died. Their friendship grew by email. Then, one Christmas,

them what the books need.” “It’s sacrilegious. I guess Myhre, though, does To him, each hard-bound for a Bible, it really is a sac- excellent work,VandeWeghe book he works on is not just rilege.” said, allowing him to see in Rob VandeWeghe, who the restored Bibles why he a vehicle for information. runs Windmill Ministries in fell in love with them in the Books with soul Quilcene, buys and sells first place. antique, illustrated Bibles, “There’s so much art in “It has a little soul,” he turning to Myhre to restore there, and reverence,” said. those in disrepair. VandeWeghe said. But a paperback? “Many people, when they “It’s pretty amazing. It’s “It’s not a book,” he said. fix up these things, they fix “It’s a scratch pad.” a real respect to God.” up some substance on the And don’t get him outside that makes it look For more information started on Kindles and like it’s fixed,” he said. about Duckabush Book their ilk. “But if you open up the Bindery, phone 360-437“That’s a four-letter word Bible 30, 40 times, it’s bro- 1107, or see www. in my shop,” Myhre said. dbbindery.com/index.html. ken up.” While not a religious man — “I like to live my life by a few simple rules,” he said, “don’t be judgmental and be nice” — he was aghast when someone 9 Medical Insurance brought in an old Bible with sections cut from it that the 9 Medicare Solutions previous owner had appar9 Long Term Care ently sold. “Slicing into an old book 9 Life & Annuity Plans like that just isn’t right,” says Myhre, shaking his 426 E. Washington St., Sequim • (360) 683-9284 head. 0C5106522

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Treasured Bible

Norman gave her that Bible. “It has special meaning to me because it was the first gift that Norm gave me,” Eleanor said. Over the years, she used it so much — nearly every day — that it began to fall apart. Myhre resewed the loose pages, replaced the leather cover and put in two ribbon markers, allowing Eleanor to once again read passages from it every morning, refer to it during Bible study on Wednesdays and again at church on Sundays. It takes from a few hours to several weeks, and from $100 to $500 or so, for Myhre to restore an old Bible. The work might include anything from a simple leather reconditioning to more extensive cover, binding and spine repairs, or a complete resewing of the binding. “Clients tell me what they want,” he said. “I tell

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But in the past decade, business dropped, as publications became increasingly digitized. Then the economy tanked. One area that didn’t: Bible restoration. Myhre started slowly, restoring just one or two a month over the years. But as people heard about his work, the niche started to grow and he took more classes on restoring old books. It’s unknown how many Bible restorers there are in the country. Most larger book binderies have a team that restores old books. And “there are little oneperson shops that do that all over the place,” said Mark Melahn, general manager of The HF GroupWashington, which Melahn said is the largest book bindery in the state. “But it’s not nearly what it used to be.” For Myhre, business ebbs and flows. He might get one Bible one month, 20 the next.

Often, he gets bigger ones — each larger than a couple of Yellow Pages stacked together. The big ones are often family Bibles that date back centuries. They became especially popular in the 19th century, possibly because technological advances made Bibles easier to print and railroads made distribution — previously done on horse-drawn carts or in boats — easier, said Paul Gutjahr, associate professor of English at Indiana University in Bloomington. Displaying the big Bibles in one’s home also became “a totem of refinement” among middle-class families, Gutjahr said. Aside from a few limited editions, the big ones don’t often have a high resale value. But they do have sentimental value. Typically, they have a section of family-history pages placed in them, where family members record births, weddings and deaths. People will “show me where their great-greatgrandfather signed it,” Myhre said. “Or sometimes someone will buy a Bible at a usedbook store and want me to remove the old records pages and put in new blank ones for their family.” Myhre restored several Bibles for a Silverdale couple — the Rev. Norman Nideng, 89, a retired Baptist pastor, and his wife, Eleanor Fischer Nideng, 80, a retired director of purchasing at a college.


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Sunday, May 1, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Marines trained on accepting gay recruits By Elliot Spagat

The Associated Press

CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. — Marine instructor Maj. Daryl Desimone stood before an auditorium filled with fatigue-clad troops, carrying an unequivocal message: It’s OK to disagree with letting gays serve openly in the military. It’s not OK to disobey orders. He explained that the impending repeal of “don’t ask, don’t tell” is an order, one heard by generals and rank-and-file alike as the military tries to change the culture of a traditionally conservative institution. Only a few of the roughly 150 Marines stepped up to ask questions. One stood up from a back row and demanded to know why his religious beliefs were being “put aside” in favor of gays, forcing him to “basically grit my teeth and bear it.” “It’s not really open to discussion,” Desimone said. “Nobody’s trying to change your mind.” Sexual orientation will now be a private matter, just like religion or politics,

he said. Sgt. Jay Milinichik of Tulsa, Okla., stood up to ask what would happen if a Marine refused gay roommates. Marines won’t have separate barracks or showers based on sexual orientation, Desimone said. He added that signing up for the Marines comes with an expectation of less privacy. That said, officers may decide to separate roommates to preserve peace, just like they do now when roommates argue. Marines will not be allowed an early discharge for opposing the policy but exceptions will be considered, Desimone said. “You can’t just walk up and say, ‘I don’t like this. I’m outa here,’” he said.

Worldwide classes Classes like Thursday’s for the Combat Logistics Regiment 17 of the 1st Marine Logistics Group are being held at military bases around the world. The Marines expect to finish training by June 1, with all military branches done by summer’s end.

The repeal of the 17-year “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy would go into effect 60 days after the president, defense secretary and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff certify that lifting the ban won’t hurt the military’s ability to fight. Gen. James Amos, the Marine Corps commandant, testified last year that permitting gays to openly serve could disrupt smaller combat units and distract leaders from preparing for battle. When he appeared last month before the House Armed Services Committee, he said he had been looking for problems that might arise under the new policy and hadn’t found any “recalcitrant pushback.” “There has not been the anxiety over it from the forces in the field,” he said. In small group discussions, Marines are being asked to consider their reactions to a wide range of scenarios, from seeing a member “hanging around” a gay bar to hearing lockerroom jokes from others who refuse to shower in front of gays. There is nothing wrong

with “hanging around” a gay bar, the training materials state.

No harassment The officer who witnesses the loud locker-room banter aimed at gays and lesbians should remind the Marines any discrimination or harassment is inappropriate. If a Marine spots two men in his battalion kissing off-duty at a shopping mall, he should react as if he were seeing a man and woman, according to the training materials. If he turns on the television news to see a fellow Marine dressed as a civilian and marching in a parade with a banner that reads, “Support Gays and Lesbians in the Military!” he should accept it as a free right of expression. A top-notch Marine recruiter opposed to the new policy cannot refuse a promising applicant because of sexual orientation. The recruiter might be considered for another assignment or, at the Navy secretary’s discretion, might be granted early discharge.

The Associated Press

U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Chris Lynch, left, listens to a training session at Camp Pendleton, Calif., to familiarize Marines with the military’s new position on gay and lesbian service members and the repeal of the “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy. Chaplains who preach at base chapels that homosexuality is a sin are entitled to express their beliefs during worship. At Thursday’s class at Camp Pendleton, there were several questions about benefits. Desimone said Marines must follow federal law that only recognizes marriage between a man and woman, disqualifying gays from housing allowances and

other benefits afforded to married couples. But he pondered a scenario in which a gay couple would be allowed to live in military base housing because they have children and the partner is a custodial parent. “There are inconsistencies,” he said. “Anyone who looks at it logically will see there are some things that need to be worked out.”

Utah sues U.S. government over wilderness plan By Matthew Daly

The Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY — The state of Utah has filed a lawsuit against the federal government over an Obama administration plan to make millions of acres of undeveloped land in the West eligible for federal wilderness protection. Utah Gov. Gary Herbert called the plan a “midnight ambush.” He agreed that wilderness areas deserve protection but said the federal policy circumvents state

efforts to determine what areas should be deemed wilderness and whether it would harm Utah’s economy. Herbert, a Republican, said he hoped Alaska, Idaho and Wyoming would soon join the lawsuit. The three states also have Republican governors. A spokesman for the Wyoming attorney general’s office said the state is considering its options. Idaho Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter also planned to review the lawsuit.

“We will have further discussions about the concerns raised by the state of Utah. Clearly we have very similar concerns,” said Otter spokesman Jon Hanian. Alaska Gov. Sean Parnell said his state would “participate and support” the lawsuit. Herbert claims the new policy, announced Dec. 23, has no statutory authority and should be overturned. He insisted the order sets aside years of work by the state that would now

GOP lawmakers had have to be redone. “How many do-overs do complained the wilderness we need?” he said. plan would circumvent Congress’ authority and No comment could be used to declare a Kendra Barkoff, a vast swath of public land spokeswoman for Interior off-limits to oil-and-gas Secretary Ken Salazar, said drilling. The so-called “wild she had no comment on the lawsuit, which was filed lands” policy would restore eligibility for wilderness Friday. A budget deal approved protection to millions of by Congress earlier this acres of public lands, reversmonth includes language ing a Bush-era policy that that prohibits the Interior opened some Western lands Department from spending to commercial development. Salazar calls the new money to implement the policy a commonsense soluwilderness policy.

tion that would help the agency better manage public lands, waters and wildlife. But critics accuse him of a land-grab that would lock up millions of prime acres in the West. Nathan Newcomer, of the New Mexico Wilderness Alliance, called the lawsuit “a complete waste of time and money.” “We have a lot of other issues in this country and this petty back-and-forth stuff is ridiculous,” Newcomer said.

New York case underscores privacy dangers with Wi-Fi By Carolyn Thompson The Associated Press

BUFFALO, N.Y. — Lying on his family room floor with assault weapons trained on him, shouts of “pedophile!” and “pornographer!” stinging like his fresh cuts and bruises, the Buffalo homeowner didn’t need long to figure out the reason for the early morning wake-up call from a swarm of federal agents. That new wireless router. He’d gotten fed up trying to set a password. Someone must have used his Internet connection, he thought. “We know who you are! You downloaded thousands of images at 11:30 last night,” the man’s lawyer, Barry Covert, recounted the agents saying. They referred to a screen name, “Doldrum.” “No, I didn’t,” he insisted. “Somebody else could have but I didn’t do anything like that.”

“You’re a creep . . . just admit it,” they said. Law enforcement officials say the case is a cautionary tale. Their advice: Passwordprotect your wireless router.

Other cases Plenty of others would agree. The Sarasota, Fla. man, for example, who got a similar visit from the FBI last year after someone on a boat docked in a marina outside his building used a potato chip can as an antenna to boost his wireless signal and download an astounding 10 million images of child porn. Or the North Syracuse, N.Y., man who in December 2009 opened his door to police who’d been following an electronic trail of illegal videos and images. The man’s neighbor pleaded guilty April 12. For two hours that March morning in Buffalo, agents tapped away at the

homeowner’s desktop computer, eventually taking it with them, along with his and his wife’s iPads and iPhones. Within three days, investigators determined the homeowner had been telling the truth. If someone was downloading child pornography through his wireless signal, it wasn’t him. About a week later, agents arrested a 25-yearold neighbor and charged him with distribution of child pornography. The case is pending in federal court. It’s unknown how often unsecured routers have brought legal trouble for subscribers. Besides the criminal investigations, the Internet is full of anecdotal accounts of people who’ve had to fight accusations of illegally downloading music or movies. Whether you’re guilty or not, “you look like the suspect,” said Orin Kerr, a pro-

fessor at George Washington University Law School, who said that’s just one of many reasons to secure home routers. Experts say the more savvy hackers can go beyond just connecting to the Internet on the host’s dime and monitor Internet activity and steal passwords or other sensitive information.

Neighbors’ networks A study released in February provides a sense of how often computer users rely on the generosity — or technological shortcomings — of their neighbors to gain Internet access. The poll conducted for the Wi-Fi Alliance, the industry group that promotes wireless technology standards, found that among 1,054 Americans age 18 and older, 32 percent acknowledged trying to access a Wi-Fi network that wasn’t theirs. An estimated 201 million households worldwide use

Wi-Fi networks, according to the alliance. The same study, conducted by Wakefield Research, found that 40 percent said they would be more likely to trust someone with their house key than with their Wi-Fi network password. For some, though, leaving their wireless router open to outside use is a philosophical decision, a way of returning the favor for the times they’ve hopped on to someone else’s network to check email or download directions while away from home. “I think it’s convenient and polite to have an open Wi-Fi network,” said Rebecca Jeschke, whose home signal is accessible to anyone within range. “Public Wi-Fi is for the common good and I’m happy to participate in that — and lots of people are,” said Jeschke, a spokeswoman for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a San Fran-

cisco-based nonprofit that takes on cyberspace civil liberties issues. Experts say wireless routers come with encryption software, but setting it up means a trip to the manual. The government’s Computer Emergency Readiness Team recommends home users make their networks invisible to others by disabling the identifier broadcasting function that allows wireless access points to announce their presence. It also advises users to replace any default network names or passwords, since those are widely known, and to keep an eye on the manufacturer’s website for security patches or updates. People who keep an open wireless router won’t necessarily know when someone else is piggybacking on the signal, which usually reaches 300-400 feet, though a slower connection may be a clue.

Apple juggernaut sends ripples through tech world By Peter Svensson

in net income, too. On Thursday, Microsoft reported that revenue from the NEW YORK — Consumer Windows operating system technology companies reporting declined for the second straight financial results this past week quarter because people are buyare looking like rowboats bobbing ing fewer Windows computers. in the wake of Apple Inc.’s superSome prospective buyers are tanker. going to Macs instead — Apple Close to oblivion in 1997, reported that it sold 28 percent Apple is now the world’s secondmore units. most valuable company, after Others are going to iPads. Exxon Mobil Corp. Goldman Sachs now believes that On April 20, it reported net more than 30 percent of iPads income of $5.99 billion for the January-to-March period, nearly sold may be replacing PC sales. In the 1990s, the trend was double that of a year ago. It shipped a record 18.65 mil- the opposite, as Windows PCs were crowding out Macs. lion iPhones during the quarter. n Nokia Corp.: loser. Its iPad tablet computers are Nokia said this week that it so popular the company couldn’t will slash 7,000 jobs through laymake enough. offs and outsourcing. Apple’s ascendancy has proIt still sells more phones than duced many losers and a few winners, as underscored over the anyone else, but it’s losing share to Apple, especially when it comes past two weeks: to smartphones. n Microsoft Corp.: loser. Research firm Strategy AnaApple dethroned Microsoft as lytics also said revenue from the world’s most valuable techApple’s iPhone sales surpassed nology company a year ago. that of Nokia’s phones in the JanIn its mid-fall report, it surpassed Microsoft in quarterly rev- uary-to-March period, as iPhones are much more expensive than enue. the average Nokia phone. In the January-March period That makes Apple the world’s this year, it surpassed Microsoft The Associated Press

largest phone maker by revenue. To better compete with the iPhone, Nokia is ditching its old Symbian software and adopting Microsoft’s Windows Phone 7. But the transition will take time. The first Windows-powered Nokia phones aren’t expected until late 2011 or early 2012. n Research In Motion Ltd.: loser. The maker of the BlackBerry is in a predicament that’s similar to Nokia’s. RIM warned Thursday that net income, revenue and unit sales for the quarter ending in May will come in below its previous forecast. The company’s high-end phones are looking old compared with the iPhone and ones running Google Inc.’s Android software. They aren’t selling as well as the company expected. RIM promised investors that new phones with revamped software will bring sales roaring back in the latter half of the year, but investors are skeptical, sending RIM’s stock down Friday. n HTC Corp., Samsung

Electronics Co. and Motorola Mobility Holdings Inc.: winners, indirectly. Although all three companies compete with Apple’s iPhone, they are doing well. Unlike Nokia and RIM, the three are betting on Google’s Android system, which comes the closest to mimicking the look, feel and functions of the iPhone. Motorola Mobility is a shadow of the old Motorola, once the world’s second-largest maker of phones. But its focus on Android-powered smartphones is showing signs of success. It reported on Thursday a near-doubling of smartphone sales in the first quarter. HTC of Taiwan has been making smartphones for a decade, and sales are really taking off with the help of Android. On Friday, it reported selling 9.7 million in the first quarter. For South Korea’s Samsung, smartphone sales were a bright spot in the first quarter as overall phone sales declined and other electronics were weak. The company is embroiled in patent litigation with Apple.

n Verizon Wireless: winner. The No. 1 U.S. cellphone carrier posted a jump in new contract-signing customers — the more profitable kind — after it introduced its version of the iPhone on Feb. 10, which ended AT&T Inc.’s exclusive grip on the device in the U.S. (Verizon Wireless is a joint venture of Verizon Communications Inc. of New York and Vodafone Group PLC of Britain.) n AT&T and Sprint Nextel Corp: mixed. Verizon’s new subscribers came at the expense of AT&T and Sprint Nextel Corp. But neither carrier saw signs of current customers moving to Verizon for the sake of the iPhone. Rather, it seems customers weighing between carriers were more likely to go to Verizon because of the iPhone. AT&T appeared to be splitting new iPhone customers evenly with Verizon Wireless. Sprint lost lucrative contract customers in the quarter, but continued its long turnaround by signing up a record number of people on cheaper, contract-free plans.


BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, May 1, 2011

D5

Is your food safe to eat? Tests find some bacteria in Seattle whole chickens The Associated Press

The Associated Press

Berkshire Hathaway Chairman and CEO Warren Buffett, center, is mobbed by journalists and shareholders as he stops by a model railroad while touring the exhibit floor where Berkshire subsidiaries display their products in Omaha, Neb., on Saturday prior to presiding over the annual Berkshire Hathaway shareholders meeting.

Buffett: Mistakes were made in handling Sokol Berkshire Hathaway holds shareholders meeting By Josh Funk

The Associated Press

OMAHA, Neb. — Berkshire Hathaway’s annual meeting Saturday was dominated by somber topics, as Warren Buffett explained to roughly 40,000 shareholders how the company had been battered by a trusted former employee’s misdeeds and a string of natural disasters. Buffett assured the crowd at an Omaha convention center that Berkshire is s t r o n g enough to Sokol withstand both the David Sokol scandal and the estimated $1.7 billion in insurance losses that drove profits down 58 percent in the first quarter. Buffett said he doesn’t think he will ever understand why Sokol bought stock in Lubrizol shortly before recommending that Berkshire buy the chemical company. Buffett said he believes Sokol clearly violated Berkshire’s ethics and insider

B

uffett said all of Berkshire’s policies on ethics and insider trading will be reviewed to see if changes are needed, but he doesn’t think it makes sense to create a large compliance office to keep tabs on employees’ personal investments. trading policies. “It’s a situation that’s sad for Berkshire and sad for Dave,” Buffett said. Buffett acknowledged that he made a mistake by not asking Sokol more about his Lubrizol stock when they first discussed the company in January. Buffett said he had no reason to think Sokol had just bought the stock the week before. Buffett previewed Berkshire’s earnings at the annual meeting, ahead of their scheduled release Friday.

Earthquake impact He said the biggest factor in the earnings drop was roughly $1.7 billion in pretax losses related to the Japanese earthquake and tsunami, Australian floods and the New Zealand earthquake.

Puget area ranks 18th in nation on pollution scale The Associated Press

SEATTLE — The Seattle-Tacoma-Olympia metro area is the 18th most-polluted in the country for fine particle pollution, according to a report released Wednesday by the American Lung Association. And the main culprit? Cough, hack: Tacoma and its sooty suburbs. “Our ranking is driven largely by the challenges we face in the Tacoma-Pierce County area, which has been designated as violating clean air standards for fine particle pollution by the Environmental Protection Agency,” said Craig Kenworthy, executive director of the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency. Emissions from diesel and gasoline engines are the biggest contributors to fine particle pollution, but in Pierce County, smoke from wood stoves are a major problem, too. The county’s air quality

consistently drops in winter when more people heat their homes by burning wood. More than 1,100 uncertified wood stoves have been replaced since 2007 through programs jointly operated by the Clean Air Agency, the city of Tacoma and Pierce County. Still, the area has about 75,000 wood stoves and fireplaces, according to city of Tacoma estimates. In the Lung Association’s “State of the Air 2011” report, the Seattle-TacomaOlympia metro area ranked 120th out of 220 metro areas for ozone pollution. Ozone is formed when various pollutants — primarily exhaust from motor vehicles — cook in summer heat and sun. The central Puget Sound region complies with current federal ozone pollution standards, but the EPA is to release a more-protective standard soon.

“We had probably the second-worst quarter for the insurance industry in terms of disasters around the globe,” Buffett said. Reinsurance companies, like Berkshire’s General Re and National Indemnity, sell backup insurance to primary insurers so the industry can cover big losses. Buffett estimates that Berkshire will report $1.5 billion in net income, down from $3.6 billion last year. He did not offer earnings per-share figures. Buffett and Berkshire Vice Chairman Charlie Munger spent nearly six hours answering questions at the annual meeting. One of the early ques-

tions asking why Buffett wasn’t tougher on Sokol drew mild applause from the audience because Buffett has always promised to be ruthless with anyone who hurts Berkshire’s reputation. Buffett said he didn’t have all the information about Sokol when he announced the former MidAmerican Energy chairman’s resignation in March. Buffett said he learned that Sokol had met with investment bankers about Lubrizol only after the deal was announced. Sokol denies any wrongdoing. Before his departure, Sokol had served as chairman of Berkshire’s MidAmerican Energy, NetJets and Johns Manville units. Buffett said all of Berkshire’s policies on ethics and insider trading will be reviewed to see if changes are needed, but he doesn’t think it makes sense to create a large compliance office to keep tabs on employees’ personal investments.

SEATTLE — Most cooks know by now that raw chicken can be a bacterial time bomb. But tests commissioned by Marler Clark, a Seattle law firm, are bringing that message home. Out of 100 whole chickens purchased at Seattlearea grocery stores in March, 80 harbored at least one type of disease-causing bacteria, including campylobacter and salmonella. Ten percent of the samples tested positive for the same antibiotic-resistant strain of staphylococcus bacteria responsible for an epidemic of hospital infections. Organic chickens were just as likely as conventionally raised chickens to be tainted with a wide range of germs. The tests were paid for by Marler Clark, which built its legal reputation on food-safety cases. But the results are similar to other surveys around the country, including one released last month that found nearly a quarter of chicken, turkey, beef and pork contaminated with drug-resistant staph bacteria.

National study A study by Consumer Reports magazine last year showed two-thirds of whole chickens purchased nationwide harbored salmonella

or campylobacter, the leading bacterial causes of food poisoning. “I was intrigued by these studies and wanted to see if we were having the same issues,” said attorney Bill Marler. “I think it’s a warning to consumers . . . and raises the issue of what industry’s responsibility is for lowering that level of bacterial contamination.” Richard Lobb, spokesman for the National Chicken Council, said the industry has done an “excellent job” of improving food safety.

Careful cleanup “But chicken is raw, and it does need to be handled and cooked in the normal and customary manner,” said Lobb. Cooking and careful cleanup can prevent foodborne illness. But it’s easy to spread contamination after handling chicken, Clark said. “You pick it up, then which counter did you set it on?” he asked. “Did you wipe your hands on your pant leg? Did it get under your fingernails?” The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that one in six Americans is sickened every year by food-borne pathogens, with 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths.

Salon can challenge rules on fish pedicure The Associated Press

PHOENIX — An Arizona appeals court said a business owner is entitled to challenge the constitutionality of state rules barring her from using fish in her salon pedicures. The Arizona Court of Appeals ruled Friday that Cindy Vong can sue over the Arizona Board of Cosmetology’s threat to pull her license if she didn’t stop offering the pedicure, which uses fish to eat dead skin

off clients’ feet. The board alleged the fish were unsafe because they couldn’t be sterilized. Conservative watchdog group The Goldwater Institute had filed a civil suit on her behalf, saying the broad ruling violated Vong’s right to run her business in the Phoenix suburb of Gilbert. The lawsuit said the board lacks jurisdiction because the pedicure isn’t a cosmetic service. A lower court had dismissed the suit.

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Sunday, May 1, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Lavender growers group updates website Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — The Sequim Lavender Growers Association has upgraded its website at www.lavenderfestival.com. The group produces the Sequim Lavender Festival, which will feature farm tours and a street fair featuring lavender and lavender products, food, crafts and music on Fir Street between Sequim Avenue and Third Avenue in downtown Sequim on July 15-17. It is one of two festivals planned during Sequim’s “lavender weekend.” “We need to be contemporary in our marketing of lavender,” said Terry Stolz, president of the growers association, in a statement. “There are new generations of interested consumers of our products out there.” Such consumers rely on websites, Facebook, Twitter and emails, he said. Stolz said the association used local

web designers for the upgrade. “We found that by staying local with our contractors we could keep the dollars here and obtain the face-to-face contact that is required for good website maintenance,” he said. “We recently welcomed [Internet provider] OlyPen in Sequim as part of Team Lavender for our service needs.” Stolz said information about the 15th Sequim Lavender Festival is also available by using a smartphone, iPad and other computer devices to scan a QR bar code on Lavender Festival literature and signs. The Sequim Lavender Farm Association, which broke off from the growers’ group earlier this year, will host the other festival — the Sequim Lavender Farm Faire — during the July 15-17 “lavender weekend.” Its vendor fair with lavender and lavender products, food, crafts and music will be based at Carrie Blake Park/

Reuse Demonstration Park. Both festivals will offer tours of Sequim lavender farms during the weekend. The growers’ association tour will be self-guided and free. The farm association’s tour will be by bus and cost $10 for advance tickets, $15 during the fair weekend. No admission will be charged for children 12 and under. Tickets for active military personnel and their dependants will be $10 at all times. For information about the Sequim Lavender Festival, check www.lavenderfestival.com or phone Mary and Paul Jendrucko at 360-582-1907.

May 10 meeting Sequim Lavender Farm Faire organizers will host a meeting to provide information to members of the public and potential volunteers on

Tuesday, May 10. The meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. at the Holiday Inn Express, 1441 E. Washington St. “If you have questions about the two lavender events and lavender weekend, would like to see what we have planned for the community, and learn how it will all work, this is the meeting for you,” said Scott Nagel, executive director of the farm association. At the meeting will be applications for volunteer positions such as manning information booths at Carrie Blake and at lavender farms on the Farm Faire tour; serving as tour bus docents; and working on production, traffic and concert operations. For information on the Sequim Lavender Farm Faire, visit www.sequim lavenderfarms.org, email info@sequim lavenderfarms.org or phone 360-4526300.

Why some fear GOP Medicare plan Some elderly link privatizing to future woes

But Ryan says the comparison isn’t valid because Medicare is financially unsustainable in the long run.

Today’s retirees

By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The Republican plan to privatize Medicare wouldn’t touch his benefits, but Walter Dotson still doesn’t like the idea. He worries about the consequences long after he’s gone, for the grandson he is raising. “I’d certainly hate to see him without the benefits that I’ve got,” said Dotson, 72, steering a high school sophomore toward adulthood. The loudest objections to the GOP Medicare plan are coming from seniors, who swung to Republicans in last year’s congressional elections, and many have been complaining at townhall meetings with their representatives during the current congressional recess. Some experts say GOP policymakers may have overlooked a defining trait among older people — concern for the welfare of the next generations. “I remember the days when we had poor farms and elderly people on welfare, before we had Social Security and Medicare for seniors, and I’m afraid it will lead right back to that situation,” added Dotson, who lives in the town of Cleveland in rural southwest Virginia. Another nagging worry for seniors may have more to do with self-interest.

The Associated Press

House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis., touts his 2012 federal budget — which includes the GOP Medicare plan — during an April 2 news conference. If Congress can make such a major change to Medicare for future retirees, what’s to stop lawmakers from coming back and applying it to everyone currently on the program?

Private insurance The budget passed earlier last month by House Republicans would replace Medicare with a government payment to buy private insurance, for people hitting age 65 in 2022 or later. Hailed as bold and visionary by some in Washington, the pro-

posal is stirring opposition around the country, polls show. No group has been more negative than seniors, although GOP lawmakers carefully exempted anyone now 55 or older. The plan’s author, House Budget Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis., says he thinks the main problem is that President Barack Obama and his allies have distorted the details to scare older people. It is actually going to take something like what he’s proposing to save Medicare for future generations, Ryan maintains. “Seniors, as soon as they real-

ize this doesn’t affect them, they are not so opposed,” Ryan said in an interview. “I really don’t run into that much opposition. I run into some confusion. As soon as people understand what we are talking about, that clears the air.” A study by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office found that future retirees would pay much more under Ryan’s plan than if they went into traditional Medicare. By 2030, a typical 65-year-old would be paying two-thirds of his or her health costs.

Another part of the GOP budget would affect today’s retirees. It calls for repeal of Obama’s health care law, and that would eliminate new help for seniors with high prescription costs. It’s too early to tell how seniors’ views will settle out. The House budget could go down as a political blunder that costs Republicans the support of seniors in the 2012 elections. Or, since the budget has no chance of passing the Democraticcontrolled Senate, it could be a wash. It is already changed the political dynamic, said Robert Blendon, a Harvard professor who tracks public opinion on health care. Last year, nearly three out of five people 60 and older voted Republican, reflecting concern over Medicare cuts to finance Obama’s health care overhaul. Now Republicans are on the defensive. “It’s a way of Democrats taking the health care issue back to their side,” Blendon said. Seniors’ skepticism cuts across party lines, a problem for Republicans. An AP-GfK poll late last year, before House Republicans officially embraced Ryan’s approach, found 80 percent of seniors who are Democrats opposed Medicare privatization. Among Republicans age 65 and up, 71 percent were opposed. The poll asked about the idea generally, without linking it to Republicans.

Casinos sense opening in online poker problems By Oskar Garcia

The Associated Press

LAS VEGAS — The indictments that led to three major online poker companies shuttering U.S. operations have provided an opening for American casinos to cash in on an industry worth an untold billions of dollars.

Casinos want to fill the void created by the crackdown to create their own online poker sites should the game become legal in the U.S., giving them tens of thousands of potential consumers who have seen their pastimes and livelihoods eliminated by the prosecutions.

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Federal ban Internet gambling was effectively banned in 2006 by a federal law that prohibited banks and credit card companies from processing payments from gambling companies to individuals. But it didn’t clearly state what kind of gambling was illegal, and many believe it left the door open for states and companies to consider the issue. “The policy up to now, which is no surprise to anybody, has been murky and arcane. Arcane is a good word from the SATs that

means mysterious and unfathomable,” said Wynn, the chief executive of Wynn Resorts Ltd. Wynn Resorts had a deal in place with PokerStars to partner in offering online poker to Americans if federal laws changed, but nixed the arrangement the same day the indictments were announced. “Most everything in Washington is mysterious and unfathomable,” Wynn told investors last week as his company reported its first-quarter earnings. “We’re trying to figure out what the hell the public policy is and then we can have a corporate policy.” The Department of Justice has yet to pursue legal actions against anyone for playing poker based on the 2006 law. The recent charges dealt with allegations that the poker sites were creating third-party operations that tricked banks into thinking gambling transactions were legitimate.

“The word ‘indictment’ is not one that you take lightly. However, what they’re indicting was the illegal activity of foreign operators in the United States,” said Loveman. “The solution to that problem is not simply to send our law enforcement people out chasing foreign operators. “The solution is to take a very simple pastime that’s been around this country for hundreds of years, and allow licensed, regulated providers to provide it.”

Wants to legalize Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, a former Nevada state gambling regulator who supported the 2006 law, shares that sentiment. Reid attempted to push a bill to legalize online poker at the end of last year, but it fell short. He said it’s important that online poker is legalized in the next couple of years.

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op-ed on the subject this week that the timing is right for casinos to publicly make their push. “Our industry has to modernize itself in a way that allows its services to be provided electronically and not in these massively expensive brick-and-mortar facilities,” Loveman said. “To speak to a younger audience, this is increasingly necessary.”

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Their argument: Americans are playing poker online despite attempts to stop them, so why not allow legitimate casinos to offer the game? They also argue that governments could clearly use tax revenue from poker games. The push has gained momentum in the last week after billionaire casino mogul Steve Wynn and his counterpart at Caesars Entertainment Corp. spoke out in favor of clarifying federal laws to explicitly allow Internet poker. Their advantage — if lawmakers ultimately see things the same way — is that it’s unlikely PokerStars, Full Tilt Poker and Absolute Poker will be allowed back into the U.S. market while their executives face allegations of bank fraud, money laundering and running illegal gambling businesses. Caesars CEO Gary Loveman told The Associated Press after penning an


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Sunday, May 1, 2011

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Internationally, Chevron sold oil for an average price of $95 per barrel, compared with $70 a year earlier. These higher prices led to a $1.25 billion increase in profit from exploring for and producing oil and gas. Refining profits more than doubled, to $622 million.

More lending urged WASHINGTON — Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke on Friday called for more lending to people and small businesses in lower-income neighborhoods, saying they’ve been disproportionately hurt by the recession. Many of the nation’s poorest communities were struggling before the downturn, Bernanke Bernanke said at a Fed conference on community development in Arlington, Va. Bernanke said the national economy is growing at a moderate pace and that job creation is gradually improving, repeating comments he made earlier in the week at a news conference after the Fed’s policy meeting.

Firms get a pass

WASHINGTON — Treasury Secretary TimoNation/World thy Geithner has decided to let companies continue Earnings, spending to trade certain contracts used to guard against WASHINGTON — swings in currency values Americans earned and outside regulators’ view. spent more in March, but New much of the extra money rules require went to pay for gasoline. that many Personal incomes rose 0.5 percent last month and such trades happen consumer spending more transincreased 0.6 percent, the parently, on Commerce Department exchanges reported Friday. where reguBut after adjusting for Geithner inflation, spending rose lators can only 0.2 percent and after- see them. tax incomes were essenBut Geithner is exempttially flat. ing certain contracts used by Consumer spending had companies to hedge curbeen expected to post solid rency rates. gains this year, helped by The new financial overstronger employment haul law authorized Geithner growth and a 2 percentage- to carve out such an exemppoint cut in Social Security tion to stricter regulation. payroll taxes. Business groups argue But Americans are pay- that tighter oversight of ing more for gas, promptsuch contracts would be ing economists to scale costly and unnecessary. back their growth forecasts. But critics, including some regulators, counter Chevron up 36% that the whole market for SAN LEANDRO, Calif. financial contracts called — Chevron Corp. said Fri- over-the-counter derivaday its first-quarter net tives should face stricter income rose 36 percent, the supervision. latest strong earnings The value of derivatives report from a major oil hinges on an underlying company. investment, such as curChevron earned higher rencies, stocks or mortprices for its oil around the gages. globe. Speculators who used In the U.S., Chevron over-the-counter derivasold its oil for an average tives helped fuel the 2008 price of $89 per barrel in financial crisis. the last quarter, compared with $71 a year ago. Turn to Briefly/D8

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southwest Washington. The Federal Way-based company on Friday reported net income of $99 million, or 18 cents per share, in the first three months of the year, compared with a loss of $20 million, or 10 cents per share, last year. Earnings in the most recent quarter included an after-tax gain of $96 million on the previously announced sale of 82,000 acres of timberlands in southwest Washington. Excluding this item, the company reported net earnings of $3 million. Revenue rose 11 percent to $1.58 billion. The company said it is taking advantage of higher demand from Asia by exporting more there. Strong export demand led to better selling prices and volumes for western logs. It is also making further strides in reducing costs in the face of “anemic housing market conditions.” In the second quarter, Weyerhaeuser expects to post a smaller loss in its wood products segment because of seasonally higher volumes. It expects slightly higher earnings in its timberlands and cellulose fibers businesses and a small profit in its homebuilding operations due to higher expected home sale closings.

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PORT ANGELES — Owner Karen Hanan, executive Rhonda director of Port AngelesHeckman based Arts Northwest, has added recently returned from make-overs East Coast Music Awards to her Week 2011 in Charlottemobile nail town on Canada’s Prince care service Edward Island. and consult- Heckman Hanan ing for DO YOU HAVE a was invited bridal parties. business expansion planned, staffing change, new to particiFor a consultation, product line or something newsworthy? pate in the phone Heckman at 360Are you starting a new business? East Coast 477-6262 or email her at The Peninsula Daily News is happy to mention Music rhondahckmn@gmail.com. news of your business in our daily Business Briefly Awards column. 2011 Inter‘Tectoria’ tech Simply send in the information — including a national Hanan phone number for us to get additional information, Program as VICTORIA — The proone of more than 50 interif necessary — to the PDN in any of the following vincial capital’s $2 billion national delegates from the technology sector got its methods: United States, the United first glimpse at the Victo■ Fax it to 360-417-3521. Kingdom, Europe, France, ria Advanced Technology ■ Mail it to PDN news, P.O. Box 1330, Port Germany, Australia and Council’s marketing stratAngeles, WA 98362. Canada. egy at a technology confer■ Bring it to any of our news offices at 305 W. The delegates included ece downtown. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port booking agents, talent buyWelcome Townsend; or 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim. ers, festivals, event and to Tectoria. ■ E-mail it to news@peninsuladailynews.com. venue programmers, arts In a bid Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing presenters, promoters, pubto build its a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch lishers, digital experts and brand and resolution. media from the music tell its story For questions, or to get a Business Briefly form industry. to a broader faxed or mailed to you, please call 360-417-3527 The East Coast Music audience, weekdays. Awards International the tech Gunn Export Buyers Program, council has which took place during rebranded Victoria as Teceninsula aily ews East Coast Music Awards toria and those who work Week, was designed to crein its growing high-tech ate and build export busiindustry as Tectorians. Dan Gunn, council exec- Colleen Robinson will dis360-670-8671 or visit www. ness opportunities for members. utive director, said with cuss National Foster Care cuttinggarden.com. Export business develmore than three million Appreciation Month. opment opportunities prepeople visiting the tourist■  Thursday: Peter Z Salon relocates sented included the Canafriendly region each year Casey, Peninsula CommuPORT ANGELES — Z dian Music East Coast and an additional 50,000 nity Mental Health Center Salon has relocated to 306 Style International Export full-time students studying director, on the center’s E. Eighth St., at the corner Buyers Performance Showin the city, there’s a great fundraiser featuring of Eighth and Chase cases, live performance opportunity to make a actress Patty Duke. streets. pitch sessions, enhanced splash. In a second segment, Ownerone-on-one meetings and Poster places close to Bryan Frazier, director of operator the programming of the Tourism Information Citizens for the Preservaadvanced professional Centre, seaplanes and near tion of Carlsborg, discusses Sue Ziegler offers famdevelopment conference ferry landings to promote the group’s opposition to ily hair care sessions. Tectoria are planned. the Carlsborg sewer projincluding Hanan participated in ect. cuts, perms, the one-on-one meetings Blanchard selected ■  Thursday: Tony coloring, with delegates and sat on a Moore, one of the founding SEQUIM — Mindi R. highlights/ panel focused on festivals Ziegler members of Barrage, in Blanchard, founder and foils, styles and their outreach and president of Sequim-based concert in Port Angeles on and roller sets. community development May 13. Bridge Builders Ltd., was The salon is open from 9 programs. In the second segment, nominated as Small Busia.m. to 6 p.m. Monday She also consulted with ness Administration Small Debbie Hilt, mixed-media through Friday. artists considering the painter and featured Business Person of the Weekends are available challenges of cross-border Waterfront Art Gallery, Year Award for Washington by appointment. touring when coming from Port angeles, artist for May. state. For more information, or Canada to perform and In the final segment, She said to schedule an appointtour in the United States. Harry Von Stark and John she was ment, phone the salon at For more information, Gussman discuss their delighted to 360-457-7400 or 360-460phone Hanan at 360-460project to document the be a finalist 0621. 6363 or email khanan@ Elwha dam removals and among artsnw.org or visit www. river restoration. much larger artsnw.org. Open house and more SEQUIM — Peninsula established New rank Timber meeting Heat, 782 Kitchen-Dick businesses. Blanchard SEQUIM — Dr. Karla Road, will hold an open OLYMPIA — Olympic Blan­ Kurtz Urnes, cardiologist house from 9:30 a.m. to 4 National Forest officials chard was honored at the with Olympic Medical Phyp.m. Friday and Saturday. will host a timber sale purrecent 10th annual Small sicians Specialty Clinic in The open house will chaser meeting at the Business Administration Sequim, has been elected include refreshments and USDA Service Center, 1835 Small Business Awards as a fellow of the American presentations on ductless Black Lake Blvd. S.W., Gala in Seattle. College of Cardiology. heat pumps, forced air sys- Olympia, from 10 a.m. to Bridge Builders proUrnes tems, radiant heat and noon on Tuesday, May 10. vides a variety of “conreceived her indoor air quality. The meeting, open to cierge-like” services for its new rank For more information, the public, will outline senior clients in the during phone Peninsula Heat at ONF timber sale offerings Sequim and Port Angeles recent cere360-681-3333. for 2011. areas. monies at For a complete agenda, For more information, the ACC’s phone 360-683-8334 or Cosmetic procedures phone Jana Carlson at 360annual 956-2263 or email visit www.bridgebldrs.com. meeting in SEQUIM — Sanctuary Urnes Day Spa, 128 W. Bell St., is janacarlson@fs.fed.us. New Nursery classes Orleans. now offering botox and derWeyco profit Established in 1949, the mal filler procedures SEQUIM — Vision ACC is the leading profesFEDERAL WAY — through Dr. Teri Burnett, a Landscape Nursery, 131 sional society for heart spe- plastic and cosmetic surWeyerhaeuser Co., one of Kitchen-Dick Road, will cialists in the United the world’s largest wood offer a variety of gardengeon. products companies, turned ing-related classes in May. States and internationally. A University of AlaFellows of the ACC are All classes, which focus bama-Birmingham Medical a profit in the first quarter, elected based on their cremostly because it sold on container and basket School graduate, Burnett planting, will take place on dentials, achievements and operated a private practice acres of timberland in community contribution to focusing on body contourthe nursery grounds. cardiovascular medicine. For information on the ing and facial cosmetic surPhysicians elected to fel- gery for nine years. classes, the schedule and lowship and who are memfees, phone 360-683-2855. For more information, bers of the ACC can use phone the spa at 360-683KONP talk guests “FACC” as a professional A sprightly little market 4363. designation. PORT ANGELES — unlike any you’ve seen Here is this week’s schedNeed some help? ule for the 1:05 p.m. to 2 Annual plant sale SEQUIM — Northwest p.m. local talk show segTen Reasons SEQUIM — The CutPersonal Assistant is a new ment on KONP radio at ting Garden will hold its to Shop at business offering help with 1450 AM, 102.1 FM and annual plant sale from 10 McPhee’s Grocery www.konp.com on the daily errands, shopping, a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Internet outside the Port pick-up and drop-off, house May 7. 1. Our green tea is greener Angeles area. chores and general help. than their green tea. The Cutting Garden is General The business is owned located at 303 Dahlia 2. Our Chinese lanterns aren’t manager by Tony and Mary Bush. really. Llama Lane, off Woodcock Todd Ortloff For more information, Road in the Dungeness 3. We sell a lot of Asian and hosts the phone 360-670-3086, email Hispanic drinks, but Frank Valley. Monday tonyopgc@hotmail.com or still prefers Russian beer. For more information, through visit www.northwestpa.org. 4. He sells “C” cells in phone Catherine Mix at Thursday McPhee’s Store – and segments, other batteries, too. and Karen Bugher 5. Our silk umbrellas are Hanan silkier than the Dickens. hosts “Art Beat” on Fripr2 and cake are round. 6. days. www.mikes-bikes.net 7. We sell Wonder Bread This week’s scheduled Specialized and wonder what Alice lineup: in Wonderland wondered ■  Monday: Clallam about while wandering County Fire District No. 2 around. Bread? Boys? Chief Jon Bugher. Weekends? ■  Tuesday: Dr. 8. We stock many different Michael Shevach, radiation kinds of soy sauce. Some day I’ll count them for you. oncologist for Olympic Medical Center, discussing 9. Our daifuku tastes better than their daifuku. advances in cancer treat10. If a tree fell in the forest, ment technology. would anyone know? If ■  Wednesday: DungeFrank fell in the forest, ness Health & Wellness would anyone care? Clinic presenter Loraine Lovejoy-Evans discussing 717 RACE ST. knee pain. Mon.-Fri. 10-6; Sat. 10-5:30 PORT ANGELES In a second segment,

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Gown: Is wedding industry renergized? Continued from D1 The piece, which will sell for under $50 and was created by Kenneth Jay Lane, will be available to shoppers in two months. Middleton, now the Duchess of Cambridge, didn’t break new fashion trends on Friday, but fashion experts say her elegant understated look, which featured a V-neck intricate lace bodice, is expected to bring back a new era of classic wedding dressing that was just starting to re-emerge in designers’ collections. In particular, her dress should spur a demand for lacey sleeves in all special-occasion wear and reverse the sexy strapless gowns that have been popular for several years.

Grace Kelly’s dress Many experts say that the princess’ gown, designed by Sarah Burton of Alexander McQueen’s fashion house, even paid homage to what Grace Kelly wore on her wedding day to the Prince of Monaco more than 50 years ago. More importantly, fashion industry experts like Brian Beitler, chief marketing officer of David’s Bridal, believe Middleton could re-energize the wedding industry, which has been hurt by the Great Recession as shoppers focused more on expense-cutting and less on the fairy tale.

The Associated Press

Prince William and Princess Catherine walk hand in hand from Buckingham Palace in London on Saturday.

“I thought it was going to be over the top, but it was more about simplicity and elegance,” said Allen Schwartz, co-owner of A.B.S., which is known for pumping out copies of celebrity dresses. “This is Grace Kelly revisited. This is iconic. She will have a huge impact in fashion. She will be the new ‘It’ girl.” Schwartz, who started sketching as soon as the gown was revealed on TV, said his team arrived at 5:30 a.m. at his Los Angeles showroom, ready to cut the pattern. He unveiled the gown at a charity gala on Friday night and on Saturday, one of his A.B.S stores in the area had a sample on display for customers. The gowns, which will be produced in local factories, should be in department stores by late June. They will retail for $900. “Every bride wants to look like her,” said Shala Moradi, lead designer for family-owned Faviana, a special occasion and wedding dress design company based Vogue in New York. Catherine’s gown is said to “This is going to be the No. 1 pay homage to Grace Kelly’s dress for the bridal line.” wedding dress in 1956 Faviana is expected to finish a when the American actress prototype by Monday and will became royalty in Monaco. either send the sample to one of

Hugo Burnand/Clarence House

via

The Associated Press

The newly married Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, William and Catherine, pose for an official photograph in the throne room of Buckingham Palace shortly after their wedding Friday. its factories in China or have it made domestically. The company’s version will be in stores within the next eight to 10 weeks. Already, she said, a number of department stores have been calling about when they would receive shipments. Pumping out celebrity-inspired dresses isn’t new for companies like A.B.S., David’s Bridal or Faviana.

They’re used to producing sim- 54,000 units of an affordable copy ilar versions on tight deadlines of of Middleton’s sapphire ring since dresses spotlighted at the Oscars her engagement last November. It is priced at just under $40. or the Emmys. Technology has helped speed up the design process. Hat and ring Peter Brown, vice chairman of Hat companies like Serendip- retail consulting firm Kurt ity Tiara have credited Middleton Salmon, says it takes only about for helping to popularize the fasci- 12 hours from design to prototype nator, a feathered hat worn because everything is digitized perched on the side of the head. and people can communicate QVC reported it has sold through email.

 $ Briefly . . . Continued from D7 tion watchdog is investigating the practices of some of the world’s largest banks, Airfares up again DALLAS — United and as well as a clearing house Continental are raising air- and a financial data firm, in the market for credit fares on many U.S. routes by up to $20 per round-trip default swaps. The two probes home in ticket. It is the latest effort to cover spiraling fuel costs on a market that has come across the airline industry. under fire for lacking The two airlines, which transparency and allegedly are merging into a comworsening market turmoil pany carrying the United during the financial crisis. name and Continental logo and colors, raised prices Gas continues up Thursday night. The average price of Spokesman Mike Trevself-serve regular gasoline ino says fares went up $3 in Jefferson and Clallam each way on flights longer counties was $4.05 a gallon than 500 miles, and $10 on Saturday. each way for first-class That is 14 cents above tickets. U.S. airlines have raised the national average and 95 prices more than a halfcents higher than the averdozen times this year. Most age price in Washington still lost money in the first state on May 1 last year. quarter due to higher fuel The average price of diecosts. sel fuel is $4.84 a gallon in Washington. A year ago, EU banks targeted the national average for diesel was $3.07 per gallon. BRUSSELS — The European Union’s competiBenchmark crude for

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14406545

Over 20 years experience at McCrorie Carpet One

“I have been helping folks with their flooring needs for over 20 years. If you need flooring expertise without the high pressure, contact me.”

(1) To get 1.00% Annual Percentage Yield (APY) through 5/31/12, open a High Rate MoneyMarket account with a minimum opening deposit of $10,000, with funds not presently on deposit with Union Bank, and a linked Union Bank personal Tiered Interest Checking account (minimum $100 to open). Maintain a daily ledger balance of $15,000 in your High Rate MoneyMarket account and we’ll waive the regular monthly service charge of $15. Interest rate tiers are based on the combined balance of the linked Tiered Interest Checking account and High Rate MoneyMarket account and applied to the High Rate MoneyMarket balance. 1.00% APY valid through 5/31/12 for combined balances of $10,000 - $499,999. For other balances and after 5/31/12, rates are variable and subject to change daily without notice. Rates as of 4/15/11 are 0.01% APY for combined balances of $0 - $2,499; 0.05% APY for combined balances of $2,500 - $9,999; 1.00% APY for combined balances of $10,000 - $24,999, $25,000 - $49,999, $50,000 - $99,999, $100,000 - $499,999; 0.30% APY for combined balances of $500,000 - $999,999, and $1,000,000 or more. Fees may reduce earnings. If the Tiered Interest Checking account is closed or becomes inactive, the High Rate MoneyMarket account will convert to a regular MoneyMarket account. Signature Banking requires a Signature Banking Tiered Interest Checking or Signature Banking Regular Checking account, a minimum opening deposit of $100 and a minimum combined average monthly balance of $10,000 in qualified accounts. The regular monthly service charge is waived if the combined average monthly balance remains above $10,000. Other charges, such as NSF and overdraft fees of $22 - $34, may be assessed. Available for personal accounts only. Offer available in Oregon and Washington branches only. Not valid with other offers. See our All About Personal Accounts & Services Disclosure and Agreement and Fee Schedule for account details.

Visit us at unionbank.com/guaranteedrate © 2011 Union Bank, N.A.

UBGN0304_PNW_HRMM_Sailor_A_em0.indd 1

client: description:

Union Bank PNW HRMM Sailor Ad

4/15/11 10:40 AM

prepared by: creative director:

Dentsu America B. Gantt

proofr


Classified

Peninsula Daily News

BEAUTIFUL!

Team Schmidt

UPTOWN REALTY

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim Irene: 460-4040 Mike: 460-0331 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland teamschmidt@olypen.com

Kathy Brown, CRS, ABR, GRI Office: (360) 417-2785 Cell: (360) 461-4460 www.RealEstateinPortAngeles.com

www.portangelesrealty.com

BEAUTIFUL, SECLUDED

• Like New 1,700 SF Home • Lots of Southern Exposure • 1,800 SF RV Garage w/Loft • Very Close to the Cedars Golf Course ML#98961/251450 $339,000 www.teamschmidt2.mywindermere.com

WRE/SunLand

Kathy Love

477-5542 dstofferahn@olypen.com

15406604

This 1-acre parcel east of Port Angeles is ready to build on with the electricity, telephone, PUD water, plus a 3 BR septic system on site. The land is cleared with some trees and a mountain view. $115,000 Call KATHY today. ML#260608

Office: 452-3333 1-800-453-9157 klove@olypen.com

Dave Stofferahn

15406612

15406605

15406618

MLS#260717/206813 www.SaveWithDave.com

Impeccably remodeled, this home is a delight! Over 1,800 SF with original oak floors & new heat pump. Custom master suite with built-in sit down vanity & walk-in closet. Upgraded kitchen with dining nook. Landscaping manicured to perfection includes great patio & fire pit. Partial Mt. & water views! $239,000 ML#260798

E1

PANORAMIC MT. VIEW

ALL THE UTILITIES ARE IN!

PICTURE PERFECT!

New 3 BR/2 BA home in the Monterra community. Established, low maintenance landscaping and quiet surroundings. Appliances are new and never have been used. Home has solar tubes for extra interior lighting, 2 showers in the master bath, walk-in closet, walk-in pantry and more. $165,000

Sunday, May 1, 2011

'H' IS FOR HOME & ACREAGE

IS IT POSSIBLE???

THIS IS IT! CE

RI

P GE

T

EN

EM

OV

R MP

I

HU

Beautiful 15.8-Acres with established fruit trees, mature evergreens, rhodys, a pond and a seasonal creek. 3 separate building parcels! Home has large bedrooms, remodeled kitchen and office space. ML#260731 Only $420,000 Always call JACE for Land & Homes on Land!

The one you’ve been looking for. Check out this 3 BR/2 BA contemporary home between PA and Sequim. This open floor plan delivers a striking living room with vaulted ceilings and fireplace. Dining room includes wood floors w/ wine bar. Also, enjoy the stylish kitchen w/granite countertops, breakfast bar for on-the-go meals and a pantry. Beautiful tile and rock work throughout this gorgeous home. Fully fenced yard w/Trex deck. Beautiful Olympic Mt. view. Huge price reduction! ML#260236 $295,000 www.JeanIrvine.com

Find us on Facebook.com/alwayscalljace

WRE/Port Angeles

UPTOWN REALTY

Dan Gase

CLARICE ARAKAWA

(360) 460-4741 (360) 457-0456

UPTOWN REALTY

Eileen Schmitz

Jean Irvine, CRS, GRI, ASR

360.565.2020

Office: (360) 417-2804

Office: (360) 417-2797 Cell: (360) 460-5601 website: www.JeanIrvine.com

mrsjace@jacerealestate.com

1234 E. Front St. Port Angeles, WA 98362

ELEGANCE & VIEWS G

UNIQUE & AFFORDABLE!

A LOTTA HOUSE FOR A LITTLE PRICE

PANORAMIC MT. VIEW

15406614

15406631

15406613

15406606

A Diamond Vista building site...with water view...with a paid Black Diamond water share...with PUD power to the site...for newly reduced price of just $121,900??? Unbelievable??? No, it’s true so call Dan for more information about this great value. ML#242153 Call Dan

Retreat for artist and wildlife enthusiast or equestrian. Very private with Strait view and 8+ acres. Guest quarters for mother-in-law or rental with separate entry. $450,000 MLS#260654/ 202654

IN

W NE

T IS

L

Want to live close to town and still have elbow room? Here’s a home on 1 acre just off the highway. The extra land gives you flexibility for gardening or even animals. 2 BR/2 full BA, fireplace, heat pump, built-in vacuum system. The barn has lots of work and storage with a separate hobby room above. Great buy at $169,000! ML#260718

Remodeled kitchen, new granite countertops & cabinets. Warm & inviting living room w/ fireplace. Sunroom, greenhouse, offices, hobby room, mud room, wine cellar & more. Attached garage, detached garage w/shop, RV parking & loft storage area. Relaxing water feature. Deck w/hot tub. $334,900 ML#260511 Call SHERYL.

Sheryl Payseno Burley 460-9363 www.sequimwa.com

Marc Thomsen, ABR, SRS Managing Broker

Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

UPTOWN REALTY

Bryan Diehl

PILI MEYER, ABR, CRS, GRI

(360) 437-1011 Cell: (360) 821-9056

Office: (360) 417-2799 Toll Free 1-800-292-2978 email: pili@olypen.com

LAVENDER FARM!

RIDING ARENA

LOOK NO FURTHER

SAVOR STUNNING VIEWS

Great package for riders. Newer 1,700 SF, 3 BR/2 BA home on 3 usable acres with a 960 SF barn with heated tack room, plus sand filled riding arena and 4 to 5 paddocks. Great location only a stones throw away from the Discovery Trail. The property is mostly cleared with a fringe of trees left around the perimeter for privacy. $275,000 ML#260811

This 5 acre level lot is located in a great neighborhood close to the Dungeness River and has outstanding Olympic Mt. views. Good soils, power and phone (underground) are in to property, nearby wells are 50-90 feet and 30+ gal. per min. The seller is even offering financing with an acceptable down payment. ML#260266 $165,000 Call Ed (360) 683-3900/ 808-1712

15406622

15406626

15406627

15406633

Own this Lavender Farm on the scenic loop in Sequim. 5 acres with home, lavender, shop, store, greenhouse, business, marketing materials, web site, products and supplies. Gorgeous Mt. view property near the Strait of Juan de Fuca. $569,000 Call Claire for showing or more information. 460-4903

Truly unique 2 BR/2 BA home with master on main floor. Loft office or studio. Artist studio over 2-car garage. Excellent location. Close to golf course. MLS#209549 $199,000.

WRE/Port Ludlow

WRE/Sequim-East

UPTOWN REALTY

15406620

Team Thomsen Realtors®

15406616

15406621

15406615

Gorgeous 4 BR/3 BA with fantastic views of the Strait, harbor, city & the Olympic Mts. New gourmet kitchen w/cherry cabinets (pullouts & self-closing drawers), Silestone Quartz counters, gas range. Great room, formal dining room, living room & a master everyone will love! $360,000

of the Strait, Olympics & Mt. Baker while listening to wave’s crash on the beach below. Watch eagles soar, whales play or lights of Victoria. Sit back and enjoy parades of cruise ships passing in the summer. Water or Mt. views from nearly every Anderson window. Just minutes from Port Angeles or Sequim. Call ALAN $379,900 ML#252118

Claire Koenigsaecker Real Estate Broker (360) 460-4903

Ed Sumpter

www.u-saverealestate.com

190 Priest Rd. 360-808-1712 PO Box 1060 edseds@olypen.com Sequim, WA 98382 360-683-3900 www.blueskysequim.com

'C' IS FOR COUNTRY LIVING

NEW CONSTRUCTION

TOM BLORE

WRE/Sequim-East

tom@sequim.com

Alan Burwell

460-0790 842 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382

360-683-4116 360-683-7814

OLYMPIC VIEW MINI RANCH

HIGH BANK WATERFRONT

E IC D PR UCE D RE

3 BR/2 BA, 1,401 SF, newest of the Future Builder Homes. Currently being constructed; buyer can select some of the finishes. House scheduled for completion in June 2011. This home is built with the same quality as their reputation has built for 11 years. ML#260291 $200,000 Call Brooke for additional details 360-775-6805

Wonderful 3,200+ SF, open concept, 3 BR floor plan on two levels. Lower level features a second great room, bath and lots of spare rooms, too. 4.6+ acres, over 50 fruit trees, a 1,440 SF building with a 1 BR apt. 816 SF barn with 4 horse stalls, tack room and stable. $450,000 ML#242390/29141912

15406607

15406619

15406617

15406632

This classic farm home has over 11 acres and is conveniently located by the city of Sequim, but feels like it is miles away. Nestled in the trees and next to a large irrigation pond, you can relax on the back deck & enjoy the wildlife. There is a shop, an RV site, lots of covered parking and a guest apartment. There are 2 additional 5-Acre parcels available. ML#260829 Only $399,950 Call Tammy!

Perfect future home site. Nice level lot with all utilities in at road. CC&Rs to protect your investment. $250,000 ML#251872.

®

WRE/Port Angeles Tammy Newton

360.417.8598

tammy@jacerealestate.com

1234 E. Front St. Port Angeles, WA 98362

UPTOWN REALTY

BROOKE NELSON

Office: (360) 417-2812 www.RealtorBrooke.com BrookeNelson@olypen.com

Doug Hale

Office: 360-683-6000 Cell: 360-477-9455 email: doughale@olypen.com

Quint Boe

Office: 457-0456 1-800-786-1456


E2

Classified

SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula Pe ninsula

MARKETPLACE

Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Office Hours

Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY

51

51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Homes

$10K DN/$1,244 MO. Cherry Hill, 3 Br., 2 ba, 2,000+ sf, new kitchen, bath, with granite, all the work is done, awesome opportunity. $229,000 477-6325

3 bed, 1.75 bath, 1096 sq. ft on large corner lot. Large kitchen. Bathrooms newly remodeled with tile shower & granite countertops. Peek-a-boo water view & mountain view. 1 car attached garage, detached 27x20 shop with wood heat. Fenced backyard with large patio. Near college. $200,000 360-460-7503

The pros at PENINSULA DAILY NEWS can design AND print your publication. Great quality at competitive prices. Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

51

Homes

A LOT OF HOUSE FOR A LITTLE PRICE! Want to live close to town and still have elbow room? Here’s a home on 1 acre just off the highway. The extra land gives you flexibility for gardening or even animals. 2 Br., 2 full baths, fireplace, heat pump, built in vacuum system. The barn has lots of work and storage with a separate hobby room above. $169,000. ML260718 Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY BEAUTIFUL New 3 Br., 2 bath home in the Montera community. Established, low maintenance landscaping and quiet surroundings. Appliances are new and never have been used. Home has solar tubes for extra interior lighting, 2 showers in the master bath, walk-in closet, walk-in pantry, and more. $165,000 ML260717/206813 Dave Stofferahn 477-5342 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY BEAUTIFUL SUNSETS 2 Br., 2 bath + den, great kitchen and breakfast bar, all appliances stay, propane fireplace, storage and sink in garage, fenced patios. $288,500. M210867/260784 Brenda Clark 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND BEAUTIFUL, SECLUDED Beautiful, secluded retreat for artist, and wildlife enthusiast, or equestrian. Very private, with Strait view, and 8+ acres. Guest quarters for motherin-law or rental with separate entry. $450,000. ML260654/202654. Clarice Arakawa 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

DO YOU WANT?

15406628

2,400 SF, RV garage/shop + a detached 2-car garage with approximately 25’x35’ finished shop, heated, lots of storage with 220V. House is 3 BR/2 BA, 1,856 SF on $255,000 1.81 acres. MLS#252296

(360) 460-7322 (360) 683-1500

www.sequimagent.com

$5K DOWN/$642 MO Near hospital, 2 Br., 1 bath, 675 sf, new kitchen/bath, everything complete, start here, why rent? $118,000 477-6325 CUSTOM INTERIOR The clean lines and style of the craftsman have been maintained while updating this beautiful home in Beaver. Pride in ownership shows throughout with warm colors and rich hardwoods. The master suite allows for complete comfort and natural light fills your sanctuary. $189,900. ML252433/161579. Doc Reiss 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. ELEGANCE AND VIEWS Gorgeous 4 Br., 3 bath with fantastic views of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, harbor, city, and the Olympic Mtns. New gourmet kitchen w/cherry cabinets (pullouts and self-closing drawers), Silestone Quartz counters, gas range. Great room, formal dining room , living room, and a master everyone will love! $360,000. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY Exceptional buy. Older liveable mobile on 5.74 acres, Crescent water share, Recent survey, 1 outbuilding w/elect. Southern exposure. $100,000. 461-4374 anytime, 460-0351/928-0101 eves and weekends. GREAT OPPORTUNITY Conveniently located in Sunland. 3 large Br., 1.75 bath, 1,566 sf, attractive kitchen and dining room, newer roof and water heater. Easy care landscaping. $185,000 ML131039/251993 Deb Kahle 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND Great water and mountain views on .62 private ac near schools and shopping. Del Guzzi built home with living rm, great room, rec rm. Laundry rm with back entry. Private entry on 1st floor. Shop. Warm, south facing, tiled patio. Fruit trees/garden. $325,000. 457-2796. IS IT POSSIBLE? A Diamond Vista building site, with water view, with a paid Black Diamond water share, with PUD power to the site, for newly reduced price of just $121,900? Unbelievable? No, it’s true! ML242153. Dan Gase 417-2804 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY LIKE TO HUNT AND FISH? Nature Lovers getaway to 10 acres across from the Sekiu River. Great for picnics and outdoor games. Baseboard heat, wall heater and free standing wood stove. Just north of approx. 300 SqMi of state trust/timber lands. Bear, deer, elk and cougar habitat. $119,000. ML252065. Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

51

Homes

HIGH BANK WATERFRONT Perfect future home site. Nice level lot with all utilities in at road. CC&Rs to protect your investment. $250,000. ML251872. Quint Boe 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. LOOK NO FURTHER This 5 acre level lot is located in a great neighborhood close to the Dungeness River and has outstanding Olympic Mountain views. Good soils, power and phone (underground) are in to property, nearby wells are 50-90 feet and 30+ gal. per min. The seller is even offering financing with an acceptable down payment. $165,000. ML260266. Ed Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900 NEW CONSTRUCTION 3 Br., 2 bath, 1,401 sf, newest of the Future Builder Homes. Currently being constructed, the buyer can select some of the finishes. House scheduled for completion in June, 2011. This home is built with the same quality as their reputation has built for 11 years. $200,000. ML260291 Brooke Nelson 417-2812 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY OLYMPIC VIEW MINI RANCH Wonderful 3200+ sq. foot open concept 3 bedroom floor plan on two levels. Lower level features a second great room, bath, and lots of spare rooms too. 4.6+ acres, over 50 fruit trees, a 1440 sq. foot building with a 1 bedroom apartment. 816 sq. foot barn with 4 horse stalls, tack room, and stable. $450,000 ML242390/29141912 Doug Hale 477-9455 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY PANORAMIC MOUNTAIN VIEW Remodeled kitchen, new granite countertops and cabinets. Warm and inviting living room with fireplace. Sunroom, greenhouse, offices, hobby room, mud room, wine cellar and more. Attached garage, detached garage with shop, RV parking, and loft storage area. Relaxing water feature. Deck with hot tub. $334,900. ML2260511. Sheryl Payseno Burley 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

Panoramic saltwater, island and mountain view 3 Br. home. Overlooks Port Angeles, Strait of Juan de Fuca and Vancouver Island. Borders Olympic Nat’l Park. Watch ships from your living room! Great home, great location. By appointment. Photos http://www.flickr.com/ photos/waterviewho me FSBO. $248,000. 360-452-8770

51

Homes

FSBO: Water/mtn. view, 3/4 acre, 2+ Br. mobile, 2591 Lower Elwha. $110,000, owner will fiance with $25,000+ down plus approved credit, 10 year contract. 461-4861 PICTURE PERFECT Impeccably remodeled, this home is a delight! Over 1,800 sf with original oak floors and new heat pump. Custom master suite with built-in sit down vanity and walk-in closet. Upgraded kitchen with dining nook. Landscaping manicured to perfection includes great patio and fire pit. Partial mtn and water views! $239,000. ML260798. Kathy Love 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY RIDING ARENA Great package for riders. Newer 1,700 sqft 3 Br., 2 bath home on 3 usable acres with a 960 sqft barn with heated tack room, plus sand filled riding arena and 4 to 5 paddocks. Great location only a stones throw away from the Discovery Trail. The property is mostly cleared with a fringe of trees left around the perimeter for privacy. $275,000. ML260811. Tom Blore Peter Black Real Estate 683-4116 SAVOR STUNNING VIEWS of the Straits, Olympics and Mount Baker while listening to waves crash on the beach below. Watch eagles soar, whales play, or lights of Victoria. Sit back and enjoy parades of cruise ships passing in the summer. Water or mountain views from nearly every Anderson window. Just minutes from Port Angeles or Sequim. $379,900. ML252118. Alan Burwell 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East THIS IS IT! The one you’ve been looking for. Check out this 3 Br., 2 bath contemporary home between P.A. and Sequim. This open floor plan delivers a striking living room with vaulted ceilings and fireplace. Dining room includes wood floors with wine bar. Also, enjoy the stylish kitchen with granite countertops, breakfast bar for onthe-go meals and a pantry. Beautiful tile and rock work throughout this gorgeous home. Fully fenced yard with Trex deck. Beautiful Olympic Mountain view. Huge price reduction! $295,000. ML242153 Jean Irvine 417-2797 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY UNIQUE 1.25 acre, mountainview 3 Br., 2 bath home. Tranquil, pastoral setting. 320 square feet all-seasons sunroom, (not incl. in s.f.), propane stove, kitchen stove and vaulted ceilings. Lifetime roof. Deck with hot tub, detached garage/ shop, fenced back yard area, green house, fruit trees and garden area. $324,900. ML260822. Linda Ulin 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

51

51

Homes

LAVENDER! Own this Lavender Farm on the scenic loop in Sequim. 5 acres with home, lavender, shop, store, greenhouse, business, marketing materials, web site, products and supplies. Gorgeous Mt. View property near the Strait of Juan de Fuca. $569,000. Claire Koenigsaecker U-$ave Real Estate 460-4903

Homes

NEW PRICE 1,952 square feet, 3 Br., 2 bath, living room, family room, den/office, utility/ laundry. Kitchen with granite counter tops, oak cabinetry and formal dining. Fenced yard, fruit trees, outbuilding and mountain view. $277,900. ML260250. Chuck Murphy and Lori Tracey 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East www.peninsula dailynews.com

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51

Homes

PANORAMIC MOUNTAIN VIEW Like new, 1,700 sf home, lots of southern exposure, 1,800 sf RV garage with loft, very close to the Cedars Golf Course. $399,000 ML98961/251450 Team Schmidt 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

CHECK OUT OUR NEW CLASSIFIED WIZARD AT www.peninsula dailynews.com

Homes

FSBO: 4 Br., 1.5 bath, garage, oak floors, 1.5 lots. $189,000. 775-6739 UNIQUE AND AFFORDABLE! Truly unique 2 Br., 2 bath home with master on main floor. Loft office or studio. Artist studio over 2 car garage. Excellent location. Close to golf course. $199,000. ML209549. Bryan Diehl 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow

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95

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02864

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Homes

Monday - Friday 8AM - 5PM


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Classified 51

Homes

SEQUIM: Buy or Rent-to-Own newer 3 Br, 2 ba, 2 car, lg lot $285,000. Owner/ Agent. 582-0101. WANT TO BUY home in Monterra community. 681-8536. WATER AND MOUNTAIN VIEW One Level Water and Mountain View 3 Br., 2 bath home. Enjoy watching the ships, the lights of Victoria and the ever changing sky from the large picture windows in the great room. Hardwood floors, updated kitchen and bathrooms, new windows and doors. $248,000. ML260755/210025. Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

54

Lots/ Acreage

2 LOTS FOR SALE By Owner. CALL 253549-3345 PORT ANGELES lot at 222 W. Park Ave. Half acre +. CLOSE IN TOWN Water, power, and sewer installed. Paved street, walk to Albertson’s and High School. $99,000 Owner financing Diamond Point lot with water view, perc, water $69,000. ALL THE UTILITIES ARE IN! This 1 acre parcel east of Port Angeles is ready to build on with the electricity, telephone, PUD water, plus a 3 bedroom septic system on site. The land is cleared with some trees and a mountain view. $115,000. ML260608 Kathy Brown 417-2812 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY FIVE ACRE PARCEL Partially cleared build your dream home here. Explore the possibilities, water and power at road. $139,000 ML193918/260464 Terry Peterson 683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND PRIME VIEW LOT In Cresthaven, a great, desirable location close to Peninsula College. Build your home in a neighborhood with CC&R’s. $105,000. ML260386. Helga Filler 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

58

Commercial

‘C’ IS FOR COUNTRY LIVING This classic farm home, has over 11 acres and is conveniently located by the city of Sequim, but feels like it is miles away. Nestled in the trees, and next to a large irrigation pond, you can relax on the back deck & enjoy the wildlife. There is a shop, an RV Site, lots of covered parking, and a guest apartment. There are 2 additional 5 acre parcels available. $399,950. ML260829. Tammy Newton 565-2033 JACE The Real Estate Company ‘H’ IS FOR HOME AND ACREAGE Beautiful 15.8 acres with established fruit trees, mature evergreens, rhodys, a pond and a seasonal creek. 3 separate building parcels! Home has large bedrooms, remodeled kitchen and office space. $420,000. ML260731. Jace Schmitz 565-2033 JACE The Real Estate Company REDUCED COMMERCIAL Commercial Arterial zoning allows for many types of businesses. Currently used as a Hair Salon but Tenant will be vacating by May 31st. Salon chairs and hair dryers are negotiable. 5 paved parking spaces in the back off of the alley. Call now to see this charming building! $129,900. ML260036. Terry Neske 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. SEQUIM - OFFICE/ SHOP/STUDIO. Clean, downtown. Finished, heated, bath, $300 incl WSG. 360-683-2668

62

Apartments Unfurnished

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. upstairs, in well managed complex. Excellent references required. $700. 452-3540. CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., quiet, upstairs, references. $550 mo., $450 dep., no smoking/pets. 457-5352.

CENTRAL P.A.: Convenient 1 Br. unfurnished from $395$500, 2 Br. $514 + util. No smoke/pets. 452-4258 COLLEGE AREA P.A. 2 Br., fireplace, W/D, $650, $650 dep., no pets. 452-3423. P.A.: 1 Br. $475. Dwntown, some pets ok. 425-881-7267 P.A.: 1 Br. Downtown location, mountain view, no pets. $550. 582-7241 P.A.: 1 Br., $500 mo. 1st, last, dep. No pets. 452-4409. Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQUIM: Beautiful 1 Br., in quiet 8-plex. $600. 460-2113. SEQUIM: New 2 Br., 1 bath centrally located apartments. $750 includes W/S/G. 683-3339

NEED EXTRA CASH! Sell your Treasures! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011

63

Duplexes

P.A.: 2 Br. Utl. included. $700, dep. No smoke. 452-2577.

64

Houses

64

Houses

64

Houses

P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath. W/D, carport, Sect. 8 ok. $660. 808-0022.

SEQUIM: Lease or Rent-to-Own, newer 3 Br, 2 ba, 2 car, lg lot $1,195 mo 670-6792

P.A.: 3 Br., 1 ba, no pets/smoke. $750, 1st, last, $750 dep. 417-1688 msg.

SEQUIM: Palo Alto Rd. new log cabin, 1 Br. $700, utilities paid. 683-4307.

65 Home on bluff overlooking Straits of Juan de Fuca and wetlands. Quiet neighborhood in Sequim. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, 1,400 sf. Woodstove, heat pump, washer/dryer. $1,050 per month with 1 year lease. Pets possible with deposit. 681-3835 or 360-477-9874

E3

P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, 2.5 car gar., fenced yard, W/D, no smoking/ pets. $1,150. 360-461-4649 P.A.: 3 Br., 2.5 bath beauty. 2 car, yard, centrally located. Sorry, no pets. $1,050. 452-9458.

Share Rentals/ Rooms

P.A.: Private room/ bath, WiFi, 1/2 utilities. $350. 504-2547.

66

Spaces RV/ Mobile

P.A.: Undercover RV site. $300 mo. 457-7315

68

Commercial Space

P.A.: 3 Br., 822 W. 7th, $850 mo., 1st, last, dep. No smoking/ pets. 460-1401. HOUSE FOR RENT 3 Br., 1.75 ba, lg. shop, oversize dbl garage, fenced all around, deck + patio, fruit trees, garden, hardwood, 2 fireplaces, all appliances. Nice. 206-817-2535 or 425-392-2116.

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSE/APT IN P.A. A 1 br 1 ba......$500 A 2/1 util incl...$650 A 2 br 1 ba......$700 H 2 br 1 ba..... $850 D 2 br 1 ba......$900 H 4 br 1.5 ba.$1100 H 3 br 2 ba.....$1200 H 3 br 2 ba....$1350 H 3 br 2 ba.....$1400 STORAGE UNITS From $40-$100 mo.

P.A.: 5 acres with house. $850, last, deposit. 681-4841. P.A.: 611 Cherry. Nice, remodeled 1 Br. No pets/smoking. $625, deposit. 417-8250.

OFFICE / RETAIL Excellent Port Angeles location (KONP Bldg, 721 E. First St). Call for details 457-1450.

P.A.: Immaculate, 3 yr. old home, 3 Br., 2 ba, W/D, utilities incl., no smoking, deposit. $1,150. 670-9329.

Office/Workshop/ Storage Spaces available. 300 sf up to 2,500 sf 360-683-3737

P.A.: New, never lived in 2 Br., 1 ba with att. garage, avail. June. $975, dep. 452-0109

P.A.: Renovated, repainted, ready to go, prime office space on central 8th St, 900 sf, private entrance, excellent exposure, great parking. $800 mo., plus utilities. 457-1032.

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326 Sequim’s Newest

360-417-2810

More Properties at www.jarentals.com LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

SEQUIM 3+BR, 2BA dbl wide on part fenced half acre near schools. N/S, good dog OK. $795 + electric, pics on www.olypenhomes.c om, 683-1179.

DOWNTOWN RETAIL Now Available. 683-3311, days 683-3300, eves.

Clallam County Simply Magnificent Properties, installation of fire alarm, 151 Octane Lane, $4,400. James Souza, floor hydronics and floor insulation installation, 1485 Sequim Bay Road, $7,218. Bob and Darla Shaw, single family residence with attached garage and 120-gallon above-ground propane tank, 162 Lone Eagle lane, $218,584. Susan Valnes, finish basement, 377 Hardwick Road, $10,534. Clark Reeves, interior remodel to relocate plumbing fixture, 209 Sunset Place, $3,000. Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe, vault toilet for scenic pullout, 271391 U.S. Highway 101, $210,000. Thomas J. Bush, single family residence with attached garage, 58646 State Route 112, $250,727. Victoria Ferdig, replace manufactured home, 281 Primrose Lane, $18,000. Robert Reandeau, double-faced sign, Sequim-Dungeness Way, $1,000. Charles and Ruth Adams Trust, detached garage, 318 Lake Sutherland Road, $51,249.1

Port Angeles Rachael M. Wangen, re-roof, 1130 E. Seventh St., $4,970. Arthur K. Hassel, commercial re-roof, 600 E. First St., $12,950. Allen and Nerita Harrison, re-roof, 1834 E. Fifth St., $6,067. Eric P. Schlaffman, re-roof. 222 W. Third St., $5,000. Joy G. Siemion, commercial re-roof, 1135 E. Third St., $5,697. Port Angeles Landing LLC, commercial remodel to erect partition and wall-in office, 115 E. Railroad Ave., $500. Jack L. and Terri L. Harmon, residential remodel, 404 E. Ahlvers Road, $1,800. Grace and John Tietz, install electric furnace, 913 E. Fifth St., $3,618. Parkview Associates, two ductless heat pumps, 1430 Park View Lane, $6,415. Columbia State Bank, commercial addition, 602 E. Front St., $265,000. City of Port Angeles; irrigation water line, risers, backflow; 328 E. Fifth St.; $800. First United Methodist Church, slurry fill, 110 E. Seventh St. $2,500. First United Methodist Church, 500-gallon heating oil tank, 110 E. Seventh St., $2,500. Clallam County Hospital District #2, demolish residence and garage, 1024 Columbia St., $0.

Sequim Exemption Equivalent Trust, re-roof, 618 Fir St. E., $8,200.

Jefferson County Wendy Bailey, repair and replace fire-damaged roof and interior walls, 4393 S. Discovery Road, $33,600. Patricia Burns trustee, garage/shop, 7013 Flagler Road, $39,987. L&J Enterprises, remove and replace letters on existing wall sign, 901 Ness’ Corner Road, $3,700. John Frieberg, re-roof, 221 Montgomery Lane, $12,500. Erik and Barbara Lidstrom, single family residence with attached garage and 120-gallon above-ground propane tank, 2200 E. Marrowstone Road, $443,700.

Port Townsend

61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

61

Apartments Furnished

Department reports Area building departments report a total of 35 building permits issued from April 17-22 with a total valuation of $1,747,616: Port Angeles, 14 at $327,817; Sequim, 1 at $8,200; Clallam County, 10 at $774,712; Port Townsend, 5 at $103,400; Jefferson County, 5 at $533,487.

155119033

Furnished condos (2) avail on golf course $850/mo incl all util; call Gail at Blue Sky PM 360-683-3900.

Dishington Family Limited Partnership, replace exterior center staircase, 824 Grant St., $4,000. Robert E. and Constance C. Davis, deck and interior remodel, 1054 Quincy St., $7,900. John and Carolyn Watts; re-roof, dormer and skylight; 238 Rose St., $7,500. Patricia J. Kenna, retaining wall, 832 Roosevelt, $4,000. Charles W. and Colleen Raker, residential re-roof, 1330 Adams St., $8,900.


E4

Classified

SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SUNLAND

PORT ANGELES

sequimproperty.com/sunland (360) 683-6880 1-800-359-8823

portangeles.com (360) 457-0456 1-800-786-1456

SEQUIM-EAST

PORT LUDLOW

realestate-sequim.com (360) 683-4844 1-800-431-0661

windermereportludlow.com (360) 437-1011 1-800-848-6650

Come See Us For

Or Shop Online at...

The Best in Peninsula Real Estate

www.sequimandportangeles.com

FIVE ACRE PARCEL

GREAT OPPORTUNITY!

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 11-4

BEAUTIFUL SUNSETS

CE

W

NE

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 CELL: (360) 808-0117 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 918-3199 www.listingnumber.com/swt8

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 12:30 - 3:30 PM

WRE/Sequim-East LORI TRACEY CHUCK MURPHY

Brenda Clark

Deb Kahle

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim (360) 683-6880 (360) 797-4802 tpeterson@olypen.com www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

1,952 SF, 3 BR/2 BA, LR, FR, den/office, utility/laundry. Kitchen w/granite counter tops, oak cabinetry & formal dining. Fenced yard, fruit trees, outbuilding & Mt. view. Call LORI or CHUCK $277,900 ML#260250 Directions: Hwy 101 to Kitchen Dick, through Old Olympic to 9523.

WRE/SunLand

WRE/SunLand

Terry Peterson

LIKE TO HUNT & FISH?

15406623

WRE/SunLand

15406603

15406602

15406601

• 2 BR, 2 BA + Den (Built-ins) • Great Kitchen with Breakfast Bar • All Appliances Stay • Propane Fireplace • Storage & Sink in Garage • Fenced Patios ML#210867/260784 $288,500 www.brendaclark.mywindermere.com

• Conveniently Located in SunLand • 3 Large BR/1.75 BA, 1,566 SF • Attractive Kitchen & Dining Room • Newer Roof & Water Heater • Easy Care Landscaping ML#131039/251993 $185,000 www.debkahle.mywindermere.com

• Partially Cleared • Build Your Dream Home Here • Explore the Possibilities • Water & Power at Road ML#260464/193918 $139,000

PRI

(360)550-6042 (360)808-0873 www.sequimhomesandrealestate.com

COMMERCIAL BLDG. ON FRONT ST.

CUSTOM INTERIOR

CED

EDU

ER

C PRI

WRE/Sequim-East

WRE/Sequim-East

Linda Ulin

Carolyn & Robert Dodds

Office: 360-683-4844 Cell: 360-271-0891 linulin@olypen.com

Main Office: 360-683-4844 cell: 360-460-9248 cdodds@olypen.com www.sequimaccess.net

WRE/Port Angeles TERRY NESKE

The clean lines and style of the Craftsman have been maintained while updating this beautiful home in Beaver. Pride in ownership shows throughout with warm colors and rich hardwoods. The master suite allows for complete comfort and natural light fills your sanctuary. $189,900 ML#252433/161579

WRE/Port Angeles DOC REISS Cell: 461-0613 Office: 457-0456

1-800-786-1456 360-457-0456

ONE LEVEL WATER & MT. VIEW

PRIME VIEW

15406630

15406611

15406610

Lot in Cresthaven, a great, desirable location close to Peninsula College. Build your home in a neighborhood with CC&Rs $105,000 260386

Commercial Arterial zoning allows for many types of businesses. Currently used as a Hair Salon but tenant will be vacating by May 31st. Salon chairs and hairdryers are negotiable. 5 paved parking spaces in the back off of the alley. Call now to see this charming building! $129,900 ML#260036

15406609

Nature lover’s getaway to 10 acres across from the Sekiu River. Great for picnics & outdoor games. Baseboard heat, wall heater & freestanding wood stove. Just north of approx. 300 Sq. Mi. of state trust/timber lands. Bear, deer, elk & cougar habitat. $119,000 ML#252065 Call the DODDS

15406608

15406625

15406624

243 Brazil Road - Sequim

Unique 1.25 acre, mountain-view 3 BR/2 BA home. Tranquil, pastoral setting. 320 SF, allseasons sunroom, (not incl. in SF), propane stove, kitchen stove & vaulted ceilings. Lifetime roof. Deck w/hot tub, detached garage/shop, fenced backyard area, greenhouse, fruit trees and garden area. Call LINDA ML#260822 $324,900 Directions: W. on Old Olympic Hwy. L. on McComb Rd., R. on Brazil.

3 BR/2 BA home. Enjoy watching the ships, the lights of Victoria and the ever-changing sky from the large picture windows in the great room. Hardwood floors, updated kitchen and bathrooms, new windows and doors. Only $248,000 ML#260755/210025. Please visit the photo gallery at www.windermere.com/tid313679

WRE/Port Angeles

WRE/Port Angeles Kelly Johnson

Helga Filler

Realtor®, SRS, SFR

helga@olypen.com (360) 461-0538

Cell: (360) 477-5876 kellyjohnson@olypen.com www.kellyjohnson.mywindermere.com

$AVE $$ on your subscription Choose Auto Renewal Credit card required 135114440

Call us today 360-452-4507 1-800-826-7 714

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011

E5

Peninsula Pe ninsula

MARKETPLACE

Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY

SNEAK A PEEK •

CARE AID needed at Prairie Springs Assisted Living in Sequim. Apply in person. Collector buying guns. I.D. and transfer paperwork required. Give me a call, paying fair value. 360-643-1890

COMBO: ‘97 Ford LST 250 diesel power stroke, 38K. 5th wheel, Komfort Camper. Slide out, awning, microwave, stereo system, tub with shower, queen bed. Both $16,500. 360-683-4873 DINING SET: Oak and Marble. Seats 6, 1 extension. 59” long x41” wide. $800. 457-3078 ESTATE Sale: Sun., 8?, 61 Full Moon Trail. In house sale, lots of antiques, pictures, and more!

HALIBUT BAIT: 40 lb. bags, 70¢ a lb. 683-3779 LOST: Ring. Nurnberg High School, waterfront trail, west of downtown P.A. 461-2690

Farm Fresh Eggs. Chicken: $3/12, $4.50/18. Duck: $4/12, $5/18. Optional SAT Delivery: $.50 Kelly 808-1145.

1997 Madza Miata. Good condition, 5speed, <55000 miles, blue, A/C, AM/FM/CD, airbags, power windows and mirrors. Newer rear window and tires. 24 mpg city. $5200. 452-6654 or 4611230, after 4pm. MISC: Cub Cadet 1500 riding mower, with mulcher, $1,500. Queen size brass bed, with mattress & accessories, $500. Oriental art and vases, $100-$250. 681-0131 MISC: Wood burning stove and flueing, $250. Kenwood console piano, $750. Refrigerator, $100. 681-0563 MOWING. Honest and Dependable. 582-7142 OFFICE MANAGER St. Andrew’s Episc. Church. 15-20 hrs wk. Apply online or at church; 457-4862, www.standrewpa.org P.A.: 611 Cherry. Nice, remodeled 1 Br. No pets/smoking. $625, deposit. 417-8250. P.A.: 2 Br., 1 bath. W/D, carport, Sect. 8 ok. $660. 808-0022. P.A.: 2 Br. Utl. included. $700, dep. No smoke. 452-2577.

FORD: ‘97 F250 HD. Ext cab XLT. 4x4 Power Stroke diesel, V8, 103K mi. $14,000. 460-6510. FORD: ‘96 F150 Clubcab. Comes with canopy, new tires, 132K miles. $3,200. 461-2619 Frames for Sale. All sizes $20 and $30 each at LoBo Designs, 865 Carlsborg Road. FREE: Lg. mixed 7 mo. old male, up to date on all shots, micro chipped, great with kids, very sweet, to good home only. 681-3042. FSBO: Water/mtn. view, 3/4 acre, 2+ Br. mobile, 2591 Lower Elwha. $110,000, owner will fiance with $25,000+ down plus approved credit, 10 year contract. 461-4861 Furnished condos (2) avail on golf course $850/mo incl all util; call Gail at Blue Sky PM 360-683-3900. YARD WORKER $10 hr. 683-3197.

PACE ARROW: ‘88 33’, 45K miles. $3,200. 461-2619. PAINT COUNTER PERSON For busy retail/wholesale paint shop, custom tinting and paint mixing skills a must. Knowledge of all paint systems. See Bill at Baxter Auto Parts, 221 W. 1st, P.A. No phone calls. PONTIAC: ‘96 grand AM SE. V6, auto, new tranny, AC, runs and drives great. $2,000/obo. 452-8664 Professional House Cleaning by Julieowner and sole cleaner for 10 years. Outstanding local references ensuring integrity, trust and excellence. See my online add. Call 360820-3845 for an inhome estimate. PUPPIES: Cute, cute, cute! Chi/Pek/Shtz/ Toy Pdl/Pom mix, 9 wks. Must see. 1 boy brown and white, 1 girl black/brindle white markings. $300. 360-477-3879. SEQUIM: Lease or Rent-to-Own, newer 3 Br, 2 ba, 2 car, lg lot $1,195 mo 670-6792

SEQUIM 3+BR, 2BA dbl wide on part fenced half acre near schools. N/S, good dog OK. $795 + electric, pics on www.olypenhomes.c om, 683-1179. SERVER/HOST: Positions part time days. Apply in person at Cafe Garden.

SEQUIM: Buy or Rent-to-Own newer 3 Br, 2 ba, 2 car, lg lot $285,000. Owner/ Agent. 582-0101.

VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM 1981 Subaru Brat 4x4 rebuilt 1800 engine, 4 speed, dual exhaust. Rusty but dependable, hi/lo 4x4. Good tires, glass, brakes, interior. locking canopy. 27-30 mpg. New alt/reg. $1750. 360452-7439 TOYOTA: ‘07 Sienna Van XLE. W/pkg #4, all LTD options except nav. 20,350 mi., orig. owner, always garaged. Immaculate; no chips, scratches, etc. Can be towed behind motorhome. KBB $26,530. Sell $23,750. 681-0151. TOYOTA: ‘74 pickup. Needs clutch/brakes, lots of new parts. $500. 582-7519. TRAILER: ‘01 24’ Nomad. Excellent condition, extras. $7,800. 457-5016. TRANSMISSIONS ‘69 Pontiac Turbo 400, $150. ‘56 Chev over drive, 3 speed, $200. 457-6540 Writers Critique Group Experienced group meets weekly in Sequim, seeks new members. Goal improve each others manuscripts for publication. Tell us about yourself. writers3@ earthlink.net

OR E-MAIL: CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: 4:00 the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

Sequim

Health & Rehabilitation

155119468

BIEWER YORKIE Neutered, 6 yrs. old, 10 lbs., ICB registered, looking for good adult home. 452-9650

Baking Instructor Peninsula College is recruiting for a parttime Instructor to teach at Clallam Bay Corrections Center. Courses cover baking production and specialty methods. Application forms are available at www. pencol.edu or call 360-417-6298. EEO.

Experienced organist/pianist for traditional worship, rehearsals, special services. Works with music director, choir. Good communication skills. Resume, references to Organist/Pianist Search, Trinity United Methodist Church, PO Box 3697, Sequim 98382 by May 17.

CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507

5000900

BAKER: Experience preferred, part time. Apply in person at Cafe Garden.

ANATOLIAN SHPHD: Pure bred, 14 month old male, approx. 135 lbs. Good with people, house trained, good watchdog. Training collar, kennel, supplies included. $450, or make reasonable offer. 640-1477.

Monday - Friday 8AM - 5PM

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD:

T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

Abandoned Vehicle Auction In accordance with RCW 46.55.130, the following vehicles will be auctioned at Evergreen Towing, 703 E. Washington, Sequim, WA 98382. MUST SIGN IN AND RECEIVE AUCTION NUMBER TO BID. 05/04/2011. Viewing at 10 a.m. at 4th & Pine St., Sequim, WA 98382. ‘83 Pontiac 600 WA license#AAH4384 ‘93 Ford Probe WA license#721UJP ‘78 Chev Pickup WA license#B26527B ‘80 Chev Monza WA license#265SAE ‘83 Ford F250 PU WA license#B37177G ‘86 Cadillac ELDCP WA license#549MYG ‘88 Subaru GLSW WA license#156WQN ‘89 Hyundai EXC3D WA license#083XZD ‘90 Olds 98CP WA license#710WDB ‘90 Ford Mustang 2d WA license#842PMH ‘92 Hyundai Son4D WA license#940 UQN ‘92 Hyundai Son4D WA license#032YAM ‘93 AMB MOTORHOME WA license#155GGX ‘94 Ford F150PU WA license#A66025V ‘’96 Toyota Rav4 WA license#948TOR ‘98 Chev S10PU WA license#B78205K ‘99 VW Jetta 4D WA license#455YCV ‘00 Dodge Neon 4D WA license#068VPD

Office Hours

NOW HIRING

Certified Nursing Assitant Full-Time Chef • Part-Time Night Nurse Benefits • Top Wages 650 W. Hemlock, Sequim, WA

Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim 2 Full Time Nurses & Certified Nursing Asst.

Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim Rare Opportunity to join our team!

Sign-On Bonus for First 5 Qualified Full-Time CNAs Hired After 3/11/11.

1XUVH0DQDJHU 52241068

If you re looking for the best home for your lifestyle, turn to the best source for real estate information —Peninsula Classified. It only takes MINUTES to find a home that s just what you want.

Parks Assistant Part Time needed for Jefferson County’s Memorial Field. Duties include lawn mowing, weed eating, athletic field maintenance, trash collection, cleaning & maintaining facilities. Requirements: High School Diploma or GED & WA State Drivers License; experience operating power tools & landscape & lawn care equipment. Must be in good physical condition & willing to work outdoors in weather. This Clerk Hire position works up to 69 hrs/month; may work weekends.

Application and job description available at the: Public Works Dept, 623 Sheridan St, Port Townsend, WA 98368; by calling 360/385-9160; or at www.co.jefferson.wa.us. Applications must be received by 5pm, Fri, May 13, 2011. EOE

155119529

(compare at www.medicare.gov)

EOE

Salary: $10.55/hr, non union, no benefits.

AHCA/NCAL Quality Award Winner Medicare 145117971



PENINSULA CLASSIFIED 452-8435

Come in and see Ramona Jones 1000 S 5th Ave, Sequim or call 582-3900 for more information!

Join OUR team. Apply in person at 1000 S. 5th Ave, Sequim.

360-582-2400

www.extendicareus.com/jobs.aspx

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


E6

Classified

SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sunday Crossword 24 Satirist Mort 26 Drama queen, e.g. 31 Some Millers 32 Neither esta nor esa 33 One with backing DOWN 1 All-in-one Apple 34 Friends, in slang 2 Word from a 35 “__ Wanted crib Man”: 2008 3 Norwegian royal novel name 36 Amendment 4 Hebrew, e.g. dealing with 5 Writer John le unenumerated __ rights 6 Rhyming fighter 37 “You win” 7 Tourist’s aid 41 Amazes 8 Disputed point 9 Ice cream lines 42 Belittle 43 Tender spots 10 Bankrupt 11 Harry Reid’s st. 44 “Steppenwolf” author 12 Cook’s protector 46 Watch secretly 13 Fast-talking 47 Lead-in performer following a 14 Princess jaunt second point 15 It’s always 49 Supple underfoot 52 Corey of “The 16 Troubles Lost Boys” 17 Bygone Nair 53 Going competitor concerns? 18 D.C. setting

121 The Auld Sod 122 Painters’ plasters 123 Pastoral poem 124 Madrid Mrs. 125 Way out

5/1/11

23

Lost and Found

22

Community Notes

Writers Critique Group Experienced group meets weekly in Sequim, seeks new members. Goal improve each others manuscripts for publication. Tell us about yourself. writers3@ earthlink.net

23

LOST: Silver camera on Friday 4/22 at the Lake Mills boat launch. Please email or call KC at knattinger@naturebridge.org, 928-3720 extension 17.

Lost and Found

FOUND: Dog. Female English Bull Dog, 4Seasons Park, P.A. 452-6515 LOST: Bird. Cockatiel, light gray, light yellow, orange cheeks. Port Townsend area. 360-301-4908 LOST: Cat. Short hair male, black with white on belly, 10 mo. old, downtown Sequim. 461-9737. LOST: Cat. Spayed female, dark longhair, white noise with white “mustache”. Lost near W. 12th. 417-8840 LOST: Dog. Old black spayed female dog, about 50 lbs, from Dry Creek area. 457-6997 LOST: Dog. Pomeranian, Male. Last seen from East Georgiana on 4/28/11. Orange and tiny, please call 360-670-1018 LOST: Ring. Nurnberg High School, waterfront trail, west of downtown P.A. 461-2690

CLASSIFIED can help with all your advertising needs: Buying Selling Hiring Trading Call today! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

Help Wanted

ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE The Peninsula Daily News seeks an organized and creative professional who enjoys meeting new people and working in a fun environment. Base salary plus commission selling to an existing account base plus new business, work with numerous clients to assist in their everchanging marketing needs. Training is provided to the candidate who shows the willingness to learn and grow in a fastpaced sales career. Key qualifications include: Strong desire to succeed, Creative and entrepreneurial thinking, Ability to develop new client relationships as well as growth of existing client base, Solid presentation skills. Competitive compensation package including full benefits and 401K plan. If you think you can make a difference in an already successful company, submit a resume and cover letter to: Suzanne Delaney Advertising Director Peninsula Daily News PO Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362 suzanne.delaney@ peninsuladailynews. com

86 88 91 95 96 98 100 101 103 104 105 106 107 108 111 112 113 114 115 116 117

Got all bubbly Jedi adversary Payment option Decides one will Somalian menace Wisenheimer Speller’s clarification Made calls, in a way They’re found in pools Photographer Adams Fed. nutritional no. __ Reader “Only the credits held my attention” et al. Greek war god Crosby, Stills & Nash, e.g. Architect Saarinen A few bucks? Lose support See 64-Across Short sleepers? Anthem contraction

HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. IT’S TIME TO SPEND Solution: 9 letters

G A R D E N  I N G E S U O P S

T T N N E O M F T F S I E C V E N O I M S P ҹ A F ҹ L I ҹ E T ҹ N O

N I E I I L L S K O O B S R L

E V C M T N O E C O B O E A A

© 2011 Universal Uclick

M E O K N A A O D O U A G V S

E R L I E I T N H O T T A E S

C S L D S T A R C C M E G L E

www.wonderword.com

A A E S A P S T O E S E T O N

L R G G U T O E R P S R R A I

P Y E E N S S R L E S S O N S

E C K E R U R A T E T N M S U

R A R A O S E O H S T N A W B

M A C H I N E S C O N C E R T

P A R T I E S E U Q I T N A T

4/30

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Anniversary, Antiques, Boat, Books, Business, Cars, College, Concert, Cottage, Entertainment, Finances, Food, Gardening, Hobbies, House, Investment, Kids, Lessons, Loans, Machines, Makeup, Mortgage, Office, Parents, Parties, Rate, Remodel, Replacement, Sale, Salon, School, Shoes, Sports, Spouse, Tickets, Transportation, Travel, Wants Friday’s Answer: Anglesey THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

EWELH ©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

CTBHA RIHNKS

WSRPAL

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Your answer here: Friday’s

©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

Solution on E7

LOST: Glasses. Black case, Sequim and P.A. areas. 457-6612.

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

55 Apothecary’s weight 56 Old VW camper 59 Greek cheeses 60 Carbon-14, e.g. 63 Buried 64 NASDAQ unit 67 Projection booth item 68 Common conifer secretion 69 Fax forerunners 70 Cribbage pieces 71 Fayetteville fort 72 Tone of the Kansas sequences in “The Wizard of Oz” 73 Oar 77 It meant nothing to Nero 78 Battery current entry point 79 Comedian Black 81 It’s the same in Paris 82 “Unhand me!” 83 “__ Easy”: Guns N’ Roses song 84 Charles River sch.

Sign Up for the IAFLOFCI (OFFICIAL) Jumble Facebook fan club

“UNFINISHED B 89 Colorado River MOVIES” By CHRIS feeder A. MCGLOTHLIN 90 __ bene 92 Am ACROSS 93 First name in 1 Words despotism preceding a 94 Run fast pronouncement 97 Team-player 5 2010 Heisman liaisons: Abbr. Trophy winner 99 Saucer Newton contents? 8 Novel digits 100 Setting for 12 Trig function “Starry Night 19 Guy Over the Rhone” 20 In the style of 102 Film set in a 21 Popeye’s __’ sty? Pea 106 Trapped 22 Sentence 109 Opener’s target alterations 110 Prepared for 23 Film about an baking, as flour embarrassing fig 114 Film about a leaf situation? celebrity golf 25 Film about tournament? winning the 116 Film about Vchicken chip users? breeder’s 118 “The Kids Are trophy? All Right” Oscar 27 Toast triangle nominee Bening topper 119 Art Deco 28 Link letters designer 29 Most prone to 120 Clampett brooding patriarch 30 Film about great cornbread? 35 Buffy’s love 38 Simpson judge 39 Tallow source 40 Scrub over 45 Italian mine 46 Walk pompously 48 Strip 50 Bassoon relative 51 Film about where to put Melba sauce? 54 Film about clashing egos? 57 Catholic college near Oakland 58 45 players 61 Bridge supports 62 “... the whites of __ eyes” 63 TV intro opening 64 With 115-Down, wrinkly pooch 65 Computer addon 66 Film about swabbing drudgery? 71 Some four-yr. degrees 74 Really could use 75 Afterward 76 Bribable 80 Moves back 82 “Kills 99.9% of bacteria” product 83 Lennon classic 85 Film about Milo’s pal Otis? 87 Film about a tick at a kennel club event?

By DAVID OUELLET

31

Help Wanted

AUTO SALESPERSON Koenig Chevrolet Subaru is looking for a highly motivated individual for our Auto Salesperson position. Excellent pay program and benefits. Contact Bill Koenig Chevrolet Subaru 457-4444 Baking Instructor Peninsula College is recruiting for a parttime Instructor to teach at Clallam Bay Corrections Center. Courses cover baking production and specialty methods. Application forms are available at www. pencol.edu or call 360-417-6298. EEO. BRINNON SCHOOL DISTRICT Is accepting applications for a 1.0 FTE teacher, Grades 3-5 for the 2011-2012 school year. Washington Certificate required. Application materials are available at www.bsd46.org. Closes Friday, May 13, 2011. EOE. EXECUTIVE CHEF/ RESTAURANT MANAGER OLYMPIC LODGE is seeking a talented Chef to join our team and operate our breakfast restaurant. Position is hands-on and will involve all aspects of operations including lead cooking, ordering supplies, developing menus, and training staff. Must have at least two years of recent cooking experience in addition to food facility management. Excellent wages & benefits for the right person. Please apply in-person, with Holly at the Olympic Lodge, 140 Del Guzzi Drive, Port Angeles, WA, Monday through Friday, 7am-5pm. Experienced organist/pianist for traditional worship, rehearsals, special services. Works with music director, choir. Good communication skills. Resume, references to Organist/Pianist Search, Trinity United Methodist Church, PO Box 3697, Sequim 98382 by May 17.

ADD A PHOTO TO YOUR AD FOR ONLY $10! www.peninsula dailynews.com

31

Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236. BAKER: Experience preferred, part time. Apply in person at Cafe Garden.

FULL-TIME RN Emergency Surgical Tech Billing Support Clerk Medical Assistant Medical Office Asst Unit Secretary Clinic Nurse Coordinator PART-TIME RN GWYN RN Emergency Clinic Nurse Coordinator AS NEEDED Pharmacy Tech C.N.A. Food Service Worker See all jobs and complete an application at www.olympicmedical.org Human Resources Olympic Medical Center 939 Caroline Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Fax: 360-417-7307 Email: jobs@ olympicmedical.org TRANSPORTATION PLANNER The Quileute Tribe has an opening in La Push WA for a transportation planner. This position will assist in developing annual and semiannual budget reports. Provides updates on IRR (Indian Reservation Roads).This position requires a Bachelor’s degree in urban or regional planning, or civil engineering. This position requires at least three years’ experience in transportation planning, or other related professional experience in land use planning. Writing bids for the funding of transportation projects. Writing grants applications for transit, roads and other transportation projects. Closes April 29, 2011 or until filled. Salary is negotiable. Visit our website at www.quileutenation.org to obtain a job application and job description or call 360-374-4366

31

The Last Word in Astrology

Help Wanted

CARE AID needed at Prairie Springs Assisted Living in Sequim. Apply in person. CERTIFIED CAREGIVERS For in-home care. Current license and training required. Call 681-6206 FARM MANAGER For small oyster farm in Alasla with 2 employees. Must have well rounded skills. For more info Trhendo@yahoo.com Solid Waste Transfer Station Resident Project Coordinator. The Makah Tribe is seeking a qualified Resident Project Coordinator (RPC) to oversee construction of a solid waste transfer station facility near Neah Bay, WA. The RPC will work at the discretion of the Makah Tribes Project Manager and be expected to be on-site each day during construction. Construction is anticipated to begin in June and be completed by December 2011. RPC responsibilities include communicating with the Makah Tribe, Engineer, and Construction Contractor; attending project meetings; tracking and enforcing project schedules; assisting in preparing and distributing daily written status reports; verifying that the Contractor is complying with site health and safety requirements; observing construction work and documenting daily progress and activities; and maintaining project records. Qualified candidates will have a strong background in reading and understanding construction plans and specifications, working knowledge of computers including MS Word and Excel; and strong organizational and communication skills. Interested individuals should send a cover letter and current resume to Administrative Services Bobbi Kallapa at mtcap@centurytel.net or can be reached at 360645-3206 or mail it to P.O. Box 115 Neah Bay, WA 98357

(Answers Monday) GRANT PEBBLE JACKET Jumbles: DAISY Answer: The Martian didn’t like taking the bus because it made him feel — “ALIENATED”

BY EUGENIA LAST

yours. 2 stars

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t be too abrupt. Physical activity will help defuse any anxiety you feel. Energetic entertainment should be planned for the evening hours. You will attract someone who will complement your outgoing and confident attitude. 3 stars

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Opportunities to travel must be taken advantage of, no matter how short or long the distance. Mix business with pleasure. You will learn through the experiences you encounter while en route. Your persuasive manner will win you all the support you need. 5 stars

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Your stress level will be significant if you are holding everything in and not expressing the way you feel to those causing you concern. Indulge in little things that can make you feel good — like a massage or physical activity. 3 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Uncertainties regarding your financial situation will be unnerving. Get involved in activities that will ease your stress and help you feel more confident. It’s time to do more for yourself. Update your image. 3 stars

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Social events or taking part in a fundraiser will lead to interesting new acquaintances. A new hobby can put your talent and skills to the test. The more you do and the more people you meet, the greater your chance to prosper financially, personally and professionally. 4 stars CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’t count on anything until it’s signed, sealed and delivered. An emotional, moody and nagging interlude will develop if you indulge in a no-win situation. Spend time with people who have interests similar to

31

Help Wanted

Field Mechanic, SE Alaska. Prefer experience with crushers, trucks and related equipment. Must be able to work long hours, any day or shift. Must have own tools. Contact Ed. 907-747-8017 ednewberg@gmail.c om GRAPHIC ARTIST AD BUILDER Full-time position in a daily newspaper environment. Must be fluent in InDesign, PhotoShop, Illustrator, and knowledge of Multi-Ad Creator a bonus. Flash experience helpful. Ability to work under pressure with tight deadlines. Email resume to: sue.stoneman@ peninsuladaily news.com

Please put the word “Designer” in the subject line. www.peninsula dailynews.com

31

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): This is not the best day to bring up situations that are bothering you or to try to change the way someone does things. Your personal situation may be unclear and your household disruptive. Make personal changes but don’t try to change others. 3 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Getting together with colleagues socially will enhance your professional reputation. Be ready for adventure if the opportunity arises but be aware of delays if you have to travel. Don’t limit opportunities by staying home alone. 3 stars

Help Wanted

LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840.

Looking for some extra cash? The Peninsula Daily News is looking for substitute paper carriers in the Port Angeles, area. Need some more information? Call Heidi at 417-3512, leave message Maintenance shop helper. Full-time days, mechanical exp. a plus. Duties incl.: LOF/tires, ect. Occasional heavy lifting, all diesel fleet. WSDL required, w/good driving history. Exc. benefits after 90 days. Applications available at: olympicambulance.c om. Submit completed forms to 601 W. Hendrickson Rd., Suite A, Sequim, WA 98382. Position closes May 3. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE!

31

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Open your doors to friends and relatives. Entertaining will put you in a good position to get some needed help. You will meet a prospective partner while promoting your ideas or talking about solutions. 5 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Focus on yourself. The busier you are, the less likely you are to face opposition. Refrain from erratic behavior. Don’t blow situations out of proportion. Difficulties while traveling will lead to problems with someone in a position of authority. 2 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Expect someone to give you a hard time. You must stand up for your rights, especially if this person wasn’t fair to you in the past. Romance can turn your night into something memorable. 4 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Be reasonable when it comes to entertainment or self-improvement. You will get taken advantage of by a sales pitch that claims the impossible. A partnership with someone who thinks the same way you do will develop if you take part in an event dealing with an interest or hobby you have. 3 stars

Help Wanted

Medical Assistant/ LPN Needed part-time, 20 hours a week to work for a busy family practice physician. Experience preferred. Submit resume to 103 W. Cedar St., Sequim. 683-7246 MEDICAL OFFICE RECEPTIONIST Medical office experience preferred. Multi-tasking, team player, heavy phone, patient contact and computer usage. Full-time position. Send resume to: 240 W. Front St., Port Angeles, WA 98362 ON-CALL MEDICAL ASSISTANT Join multi-disciplinary team supporting consumers with chronic mental illnesses in an outpatient setting. Must be program grad & license eligible. Mental health exp. perf’d. Starting rate: $12/hr. Resume to PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org EOE

31

Help Wanted

Local Logging Co. Seeking diesel mechanic with log tuck experience, hook tenders and log truck drivers. Open immediately. Email: nwloggingjobs@ aol.com OFFICE MANAGER St. Andrew’s Episc. Church. 15-20 hrs wk. Apply online or at church; 457-4862, www.standrewpa.org PAINT COUNTER PERSON For busy retail/wholesale paint shop, custom tinting and paint mixing skills a must. Knowledge of all paint systems. See Bill at Baxter Auto Parts, 221 W. 1st, P.A. No phone calls. Pers Lines customer service rep. P&C license preferred. Insurance service & sales. Good benefits. Prior insurance experience preferred. Email resume to wendyr@gellorinsura nce.com or mail to: P.O. Box 2045, Port Angeles, WA 98362


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

ANSWER TO TODAY’S PUZZLE

71

Appliances

WASHER: Maytag Neptune front loading. $150. 437-9752.

72

Furniture

DINING SET: Oak and Marble. Seats 6, 1 extension. 59” long x41” wide. $800. 457-3078 DINING TABLE Solid oak, nice shape, 4 chairs. $300/obo 452-6439 ENTERTAINMENT Center, high quality made with solid Cherry wood, 3 sections with TV opening of 37.5”. $700. 360-437-9752

31

31

Help Wanted

RETAIL MANAGER POSITION The Quileute Tribe in La Push owns and operates a Convenience Store and has an immediate opening for an individual with 2 to 5 years of experience in retail sales management. Retail grocery/convenience store experience is preferred must have a four year degree. Individual must possess knowledge and experience in operating and managing electronic point of sale cash register systems, bookkeeping and/or accounting, budgets, cash handling, customer relations, personnel practices and inventory control procedures. Individual must be able to work with minimal supervision and be a selfstarter and goal orientated. Closes April 29, 2011 or until filled. Salary is negotiable. Visit our website at www. quileutenation.org to obtain a job application, job description or call 360-374-4366 RETAIL SALES/ KAYAK GUIDE Drop off resume, Adventures Thru Kayaking RN/LPN NEW GRADS WELCOME Private Duty Nursing Make a Difference in the Life of a Child! Part-time Noc Shifts in Port Hadlock 1-800-637-9998 www.availhome.com EOE

RNA/CNA: Sign-on bonus. COOK. Golden Years Personal Care 452-3689 ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 Sound Community Bank is hiring a part time teller 25 hrs a wk, various schedules Strong customer service & teamwork skills a must Prior banking and sales experience preferred See Careers link on www.soundcb.com to apply Utility Worker 1 City of Port Angeles $3,250 mo. full-time with benefits. 1 yr. street/sidewalk construction and maintenance exp. Exp. in concrete forming, pouring, finishing and/or asphalt work is preferred. To apply go to www.cityofpa.us to download application and supplemental questionnaire. Closes May 13, 2011. COPA is an EOE.

Help Wanted

SERVER/HOST: Positions part time days. Apply in person at Cafe Garden. STYLIST: Join the team at the Sequim Beauty Salon, part to full-time. Dedicated to giving the best quality service. Ask for Paula 683-5881. YARD WORKER $10 hr. 683-3197.

34

Work Wanted

AARON’S GARDEN Weed control 101. Get the flower, get the root, get the weeds. 360-808-7276 ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding, mowing, etc. 452-2034. Best Choice Lawn Care. Mowing and clean up. Free estimates. Sequim/P.A. 360-683-6296 Everyday Companion Services Errands, car rides, organization, light housekeeping/meal prep, trip arrangements, pet appts./ walks, great conversation, movies, fun day trips, and tons more! Call 775-5077. Experienced, pruning, mowing, hauling, weeding, etc. 1st hr $30, $17 per hour after that. Flat rates . 461-7772 FOR HIRE: Male caregiver, licensed. 683-6866 Handyman service. JTL Handyman services All types of home & appliance repair and installations, Landscaping and lawn care available. No job to small, affordable prices, free estimates. Ph: 360-797-1512 E-mail: jml4455@msn.com Licensed, bonded, & insured contractor #JTLHAHS906Q3 Hannah’s Helping Hands. Need help with the Spring cleaning or any other housecleaning for that matter call me, Hannah Hope at 360-775-1258. I am reliable, bring my own equipment, and am a great worker. HelperTek.com - We offer courteous, professional computer repair and other IT related services at an affordable price. Visit us at helpertek.com or contact us 775-2525 helpdesk@helpertek. com HOUSECLEANING Expereinced. 928-3077 Need some extra help in your home? 15 yrs. of care giving exp. Do you need help with errands, Dr. appts., house keeping, ect? Give me a call. 360-477-3654 References avail.

34

Work Wanted

Lawn mowing, reasonable, references. 452-3076 Mark. MOWING. Honest and Dependable. 582-7142 NEED YARD WORK Mowing, trimming, hedge trimming, hauling yard waste, weeding. Call 360-912-2139 Peabody’s Property Maintenance Complete Yard Service, property clean up, hauling unwanted items. Foreclosure rental cleanouts inside/ out. Free Estimates. Serving Port Angeles, Sequim & Diamond Point. 461-0705. Private caregiver avail. 30 years exp., good local references. 504-2227, 775-5988 Professional House Cleaning by Julieowner and sole cleaner for 10 years. Outstanding local references ensuring integrity, trust and excellence. See my online add. Call 360820-3845 for an inhome estimate.

Seasonal Lawn Service: Accepting new clients in the P.A./ Sequim area to maintain your lawns for the season. Mowing, trimming, and cleaning windows. Ron at 360-797-3023 Yard work, mowing, pruning, clean up, wood cut/chop, reasonable. 452-2951. Young Couple Early 60’s. available for misc. gardening services, as well as hauling, gutter & deck cleaning, moss removal, seasonal cleanup, weeding, general maintenance & repair. Hard working and reliable with excellent references. 457-1213

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

MISC: Large dining table with 4 chairs, light blond finish, $135. 2 matching coffee tables, 1 large $40, 1 small $30. Very nice, must see to appreciate. 681-4429 MISC: Round rattan dining table, 4 chairs, $150. Bedroom set, chest of drawers, end tables, head board, 2 lamps, $750 2 hand crafted hanging lamps, $125 ea. Entertainment center, $300. Big Boy recliner, $350. 3 table lamps, $60 ea. Hutch with glass doors, $300. Electric power recliner, like new, $400. 12 pc. dinnerware set, (about 80 pcs.), $170. Round wall mirror, in ornate frame $75. 417-9403 MISC: Sofa, reclines on each end, $600/ obo. Futon, queen, $200/obo. 4 folding tray tables, $20. 683-3386 MOVING: Love seat with 2 chairs, wood frame, moss green, $285. 42” Panssonic plasma TV with stand, $380. Recliner, light sage, $160. 2 black metal side tables, glass tops, $35 ea. 683-8689. Queen sized bedroom set. Includes mattress and decorative frame, two night stands, dresser and comforter set. Paid $2000, sell for $950. Call 457-1213. SOFA: The Best Chair Company double reclining, light green microfiber, great shape, paid $1,299 new. Sell $400/obo. 681-3299

73

General Merchandise

ANTIQUES: Wedgewood cookstove, $1,500. Solid oak pedestal table, leaf and 4 chairs, $600. Metal dresser, $75. Ornate needlepoint chair, $150. Mahogany oval coffee table, $65. Mahogany round pedestal lamp table, $150. 683-3165.

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

71

MISC: Cal-king Sleep Number bed $950. Sculpted metal king bed frame $250. White chenille custom chaise lounge, $495. Sage upholstered chair with wicker trim, $375. Antique “White” treadle sewing machine, $450. Corner display case, medium wood $195. Call 683-6161

AQUARIUM: 55 gallon glass aquarium with metal stand, complete tropical set up including filter, hood and lights, heater, background, gravel and decorative rock. $125. 477-0903, leave msg.

Appliances

OVEN: Convection/ Counter, never used. $75 cash. 681-5136. STOVE: Wolf commercial gas stove, 6 burners. $2,500. 681-2486

DESPERATELY NEEDED Used, gas-powered push lawn mower. 417-3536

73

General Merchandise

AIR COMPRESSOR New Speedaire 3 phase, upright, single stage. $700 offer. 417-5583 FIREWOOD $185 cord. 360-460-3639 FIREWOOD - BUY NOW, SAVE LATER Mixed green hard wood. $160, split and delivered. Call Scott, 385-3459. FLAGPOLE: 15’ galvanized steel with all the ropes, pulleys, tie offs etc. Pick up at Lake Sutherland. $40. Just in time for Memorial Day, Flag Day and 4th of July! 417-7691 FOR SALE: 44 carat solid crystal opal pendant. 1 carat emerald, 12 grams 14 karat gold. $4,400. Serious only. 670-3110 Frames for Sale. All sizes $20 and $30 each at LoBo Designs, 865 Carlsborg Road. HALIBUT BAIT: 40 lb. bags, 70¢ a lb. 683-3779 MISC: 2010 GE washer (king size) and dryer (super capacity), matching set, white, $500. Black leather/vinyl oversize chair, $175. Roll top oak desk, 45” tall, 32” wide, $100. 360-683-3858 MISC: 5 piece jazz drum kit, good cond., $500. (2) Trex bikes, exc. cond., $250 ea. 477-1362. MISC: Cub Cadet 1500 riding mower, with mulcher, $1,500. Queen size brass bed, with mattress & accessories, $500. Oriental art and vases, $100-$250. 681-0131 MISC: Logging blocks, $25. Welding torch, $100. Welder, $75. Drill press, $75. Shop vice, $40. Macho ramps, $20. Big ropes, $ 5. Rope blocks, $5. Boat anchors, $10 ea. Lg. grinder, $ 5. Socket set, $100. Compressor, $10. Fruit jars, $2 a box. 683-4038. MISC: Wood burning stove and flueing, $250. Kenwood console piano, $750. Refrigerator, $100. 681-0563 MOVING MUST SELL Glass top with fancy iron bottom coffee table, end table, sofa table, $100. Office desk and chair, printer stand, bookcase, $100. 681-4218. MOVING: Craftsman aluminum loading ramps, 750 lbs., used once, $75. Small trailer for riding mower, $75. 683-8689 NETTING: Poultry/ orchard, Cutler 2” knotted 50x150’ 85 lb. test, full new bale. $350. 582-1292 SPA: Clearwater Genesis hot tub, 250 gal., purchased in 2006, seldom used, cover and lift. $2,000/obo 582-0071 SPA: Clearwater Genesis spa, 340 gal., rarely used, like new, used indoors, seats 6, steps, cover with lift. $4,000/obo. 681-6293 TUBE STEPS: Stainless steel, excellent condition, ‘92-’99 Suburban, no drill installation. $100. 457-4756 WANTED: Honda 2000 generator, top condition. 681-8761. WHEELCHAIR Motorized. $5,000. 681-3713 WOOD LATHE: 12” Delta 2 Chucks. $650. 683-2212.

74

Home Electronics

TV: 19” color Magnavox with remote. Works great! $50 or trade for good working clothes dryer. 681-4429.

75

Musical

ACCORDION: Excelsior 120 bass with mussett, midi-able, $625. 477-7181. GUITARS: Squire Stratocaster electric guitar, black, comes with soft case, extras, $200. “Estrada” handmade acoustic guitar from Paracho, Mex., red with black accent, comes with soft case, $100. Washburn electric guitar, tremolo bar, multiple pick ups, electric blue, smaller size, perfect for beginners, replacement strings, $150. All in new condition, great sound! 481-8955. Please leave msg

76

Sporting Goods

GUNS: Model 670, Winchester 30.06, Leupold scope, case. $500/obo. 425-422-6678 GUNS: Ruger LCP-CT 380 with Crimson Trace laser, 2nd mag, like new - only 15 rounds fired. $400. Walther PK380 - NIB UNFIRED w/ Walther LASER. Easy slide action & mild recoil. DA/SA. $400. 360-477-0321

RIFLE: French Lebel Model 1886 8mm Lebel rifle. $599/obo 760-702-7192 WANTED: Gun parts, reloading items, ammo. 379-6519.

77

Bargain Box

FREE: 27” RCA consol tv. Not digital, works, u-haul. 582-0471 MASK: Wood, hand carved, unique. $200. 928-9528. MOTOR: Trolling, Minn Kota Endura. 12v 46lb thrust. $100. 452-4891.

SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011

78D

Garage Sales Eastside P.A.

AUCTION: Sun., 12 noon, 612 N. Larch, unit 183 and 195. 460-0314 to verify. MULTI-FAMILY MOVING Sale: Sat., 9-1 p.m., 1619 E. 5th St., located above Wendy's. Toys, bikes scrapbook supplies, clothes, TV, books, and more. Yard Sale Retirement Sale Sat.-Sun., 9 to 4 4/30-5/1 123 Amarillo Rd. 2 miles up O’Brien Road East P.A. off 101 Tools, Furniture, Pics, Antiques, Clothes, Misc. Lots More

78E

Garage Sales Sequim

SEQUIM Sale: Sat. 94, Sun. 10-2, 321 Duke Dr. , north of Old Hwy. & 5th Ave., right on Wayne, left on Duke. Cash only. Dining set, designer purses, prom dresses, baby clothes, DVD player, tool box. NO EARLY SALES

78F

Garage Sales Jefferson

FLEA MARKET Ron’s Tailgate Inside and Out. Gardiner Community Center, Hwy. 101. Sat. Apr. 30th. 8am-2pm. Tools, fishing, outboard, chainsaw, 2 complete gill nets, glassware, furniture, household, etc.

79

Wanted To Buy

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 Collector buying guns. I.D. and transfer paperwork required. Give me a call, paying fair value. 360-643-1890 WANTED: Costco type 10x20 canvas shelter, all or parts. 457-7183 WANTED: Talking Bubba doll, must be in good condition. 457-9574

FREE: Lg. mixed 7 mo. old male, up to date on all shots, micro chipped, great with kids, very sweet, to good home only. 681-3042. GREAT PYRENEES Pups, (some Maremma), smart and social, only 3 available Wednesday. $225 ea. 775-6552. PEKINGESE/ SHIH-TZU PUPPIES Male, ready to go, needs good home. $350. 452-9553. PUG PUPPIES: Available May 1st, 2 males, 2 females. $300 each 253-380-1762 PUPPIES: Cute, cute, cute! Chi/Pek/Shtz/ Toy Pdl/Pom mix, 9 wks. Must see. 1 boy brown and white, 1 girl black/brindle white markings. $300. 360-477-3879. PUPPIES: Terrier/Chihuahua, 1 black, 1 tan, both female, 8 wks. old. 1st shots, wormed. $300. 797-1980

83

Farm Animals

GRASS HAY No rain, $3 bale. 457-8704, 460-6847 HAY: Good quality grass hay. $5.50 bale. 461-5804.

84

Horses/ Tack

HORSE: Very nice AQHA mare for sale. 9 yrs old, bay with white star, good on trails, great potential. $2,500 includes all tack. 360-452-0933.

WANTED: Quality items in good condition for garage sale on 6/4. No clothing or shoes. Profits benefit WAG, local dog rescue. For pickup call 452-8192

Garage Sales Westside P.A.

ESTATE Sale: Sun., 8?, 61 Full Moon Trail. In house sale, lots of antiques, pictures, and more! GARAGE Sale: New stuff! Sun., 8 a.m.-1 p.m., 1222 Dutch Dr., very west end of 14th St., on bluff. Bookcases, desk, tools, battery operated grease gun, Stihl weed eater, kids clothing. MOVING Sale: Sat. 94 p.m., and Sun. 103 p.m. 2152 W. 4th St. L-shaped sofa with recliner and sleeper bed, oak dining table and chairs, china closet, book cases, dresser, chest of drawers, old trunk, freezer, tools, fishing, bikes, lawn mower, kitchen, bibs, tables, and chairs, lots of misc. Free stuff too!

81 82 83 84 85

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

81

Food Produce

Beautiful Ragdoll Cat TICA reg. 3 yr old, sp female, very sweet. Needs quiet home with no other pets. Indoor only. $150 or $100 to senior. Can deliver for small fee. Please call after 10 a.m. Call Sue at: 360-551-3185

ARIMA: ‘96 17’ SeaRanger. 90 hp Johnson V-4 Oceanrunner, canvas top, VHF radio, compass, depth/fish finder, USCG safety package, Shoreland’r Trailer. Excellent condition. $12,900. 360-681-2638 DILLABAUGH: Rocket 15’ with trailer. Plus 9.5 Einrudd Sportwin OB motor. $1,200. 565-0134. HEWES: 16.3’ Sea Runner. Fully equip. $14,000. 457-4049. HEWESCRAFT: ‘97 17’ 90 hp Johnson, 6 hp Evinrude, both run good, ready to fish. $8,500. 360477-5650, 452-9950. Livingston Model 12T Resort, seats, 2 motors, console, galvanized trailer, extras, show room condition. $6,800. 681-8761 NECKY KAYAKS 14’ with rudder, $600. 12’ with skeg, $400. Paddles included. 360-379-2785 NELSON: ‘80 fiberglass boat, newer Suzuki 25 hp, 4 stroke, electric start and tilt, less than 50 hrs., color fathometer GPS, trailer. $4,000. 452-5356. OWENS: 16’ I/O, 125 hp Mercury motor, needs work. $700/ obo. 681-0828. RUBBER BOAT: 9’ Sea Eagle, with accessories. 3142 Undi Rd., Forks. $450. 360-374-5812. TOLLY: ‘66 38’. Twin 318s, 200 hrs., loaded. Trade for 20’ alum. $25,000. 360-770-2410

94

Motorcycles

SALE/TRADE: 5 yr. old registered, Palomino Quarter Horse gelding, started. $2,000/obo 681-5030, eves.

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘02 883 Hugger. 6K, like new, maroon. Will trade for sidecar bike/small truck. $4,800. 457-4020.

Farm Equipment

Chipper 6 cyl 1969 Asplundh contiuous feed and 1968 Ford 1 Ton DmpTrk rebuilt V8 4 spd man trans. 2 sets of new blades, manual. $5999 cash or cashiers check. Gregg 360-385-6088 9:00 AM-9:00 PM.

Pets

ANATOLIAN SHPHD: Pure bred, 14 month old male, approx. 135 lbs. Good with people, house trained, good watchdog. Training collar, kennel, supplies included. $450, or make reasonable offer. 640-1477.

Marine

DIRT BIKES: ‘05 Suzuki 110, $900. ‘06 CRF 70, $1000. Both in excellent condition. 461-6000

Farm Fresh Eggs. Chicken: $3/12, $4.50/18. Duck: $4/12, $5/18. Optional SAT Delivery: $.50 Kelly 808-1145.

82

93

MISC: Saddles, $150$1,250 or trade for hay. Super H Tractor, $950. 452-0837.

Garage Sales Central P.A.

KIWANIS Garage Sale: Sat, May 7th, 8-1 p.m., 123 South Peabody.

78B

Pets

BIEWER YORKIE Neutered, 6 yrs. old, 10 lbs., ICB registered, looking for good adult home. 452-9650

85

SWORDS: (4) Display collection. $200. 928-9528

78A

82

E7

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

93

Marine

19’ Lightening sailboat, full sails. Teak woodwork, new seats, extended tiller arm, trailer. Good condition, and newly laminated bottom. Must sell, moving. $2,000/obo. 253-245-4531

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘11 Soft Tail Deluxe. Pearl blue, lots of chrome, bags, windshield, never driven, must sell due to health. $19,000/obo. 360-681-4245

HARLEY: ‘03 FLSTFI Fat Boy Custom. Only 3,100 mi., $38,000 invested. Just a few custom features; Harley custom paint set, Thunder Star chrome wheels, D&D Slash Cut exhaust system, Headwins custom headlights with turn signals, Lepera custom seat, chrome passenger back rest, custom foot board, custom windshield (easy removable), leather bag kit, leathers, helmets, and more. All goes. Never outside on a rainy day, must see. $13,900. Call Jim at 360-379-3646 HARLEY: ‘06 Soft Tail Deluxe, special edition, 123rd of 150, 1450cc, fully dressed, immaculate, always garaged, never in rain, in parades and won lots of awards. $17,000/obo. 360-808-3444 HARLEY: ‘88 883. Low miles. $3,800/ obo. 457-1289.

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E8

Classified

SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

LAWN/YARD CARE LOG HOMES RESTORATION

FENCING

TRACTOR

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• Page and Ad Design • Adobe Illustrator • Adobe Photoshop • Multi-Ad Creator • Adobe InDesign

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E10

94

Motorcycles

HD: ‘81 XLS Sportster. 1,000 cc, 9K. $2,900. 461-1501. HD: ‘96 Ultra classic. 20,657 mi., stored in garage. $7,500. 360-374-5755 HONDA: ‘02 VTX 1800 R. Candy apple red, excellent, 13K, loaded, garaged. $6,500/obo 360-477-8923 HONDA: ‘03 Shadow 600cc. Saddlebags, 2,400 miles, showroom quality, stored in heated area. Health forces sale. $3,500. 385-2065 HONDA: ‘04 CRF50. New training wheels, kids. Great learner bike. $700. 417-9531 HONDA: ‘07 Shadow 750, 900 miles. $5,400. 460-4126.

95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘04 27’ Jayco. Big slide, sleeps 6-8, barely used, in great shape. Priced to sell at $10,900. 461-9054.

5TH WHEEL: ‘07 36’ Lakota. Stored inside, very nice inside and out, king bed, 3 slides, built for year around living, lots of storage, supreme 84 mo. extended warranty, interested in trade for motor home, more pics at elgreengos@hotmail.com NADA MSRP is $50,974. Offers welcome. $35,330. 683-7411

HONDA: ‘75 Trail 90. Street and trail legal, hi-lo 4 sp transmission, excellent condition. $1,450. 477-7020 HONDA: ‘90 XR200. Runs great. $700. 683-4761 HONDA: ‘95 Goldwing 1500 GL Interstate. Excellent condition, always garaged. $7,000/ obo. 360-808-9526 or 360-808-5809.

5TH WHEEL: ‘99 25’ Artic Fox. $9,850 This particular fifth wheel is heavily insulated and ideal for the great northwest. Rv cover included. Please call for more information. 360-732-7540

QUAD: ‘06 Kymco 150cc. Low hours/ miles. $1,700/obo. 452-3051

SUZUKI: 2005 Boulevard (S50). Very nice, 800cc, well maintained, garage stored. Gray, saddlebag hardware, great bike for smaller people. 14K miles. $3,000/obo. 460-0012 or jbgoode1017@hotmail .com YAMAHA: ‘01 V-Star. Clean, too many accessories to list. Excellent condition. $3,500. 460-0825.

95

Classified

SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011

Recreational Vehicles

2001 5th Wheel 36 ' Cardinal by Forest River This was our home on wheels. 3 axle, 3 slides, hydraulic disc brakes, Air Cushion hitch, two air conditioners, inverter, Lots of extras. $26,000. 582-0803

101

Legals Clallam Co.

COMBO: ‘97 Ford LST 250 diesel power stroke, 38K. 5th wheel, Komfort Camper. Slide out, awning, microwave, stereo system, tub with shower, queen bed. Both $16,500. 360-683-4873

MOTOR HOME: ‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40 ft. 3 slides, 6 speed Allison trans. micro/conv. oven, 3 burner stovetop, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TVs, Sat. Dome, computer/printer table,light oak interior, washer/drier hookup, 6 KW generator, leveling sys, solar battery charger, low mileage (22k) gently used, non smokers. $108,000/obo 360-683-3887 LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

101

Legals Clallam Co.

95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: Terry. $1,500. 808-5722

33’

5TH WHEEL: ‘96 30’ Coachmen. 12’ slide, rear kitchen, A/C, a must see. $8,900. 452-4132 5TH WHEEL: ‘98 29’ Alpenlite. Non-smokers, great cond. $14,500. 460-9680. MOTOR HOME: ‘00 31’ Flair. 2 tip-outs, fully loaded, 18K. $45,000. 457-3260. MOTOR HOME: ‘06 Winnebago Itasca Suncruiser. Better than new, only 17K mi., 3 slides, many extras, price includes ‘07 Honda CRV, ready to tow with brake system. $120,000. Call for more info or to make an appt. to come check it out. 360-683-1679

MOTOR HOME: 2002 Newmar Kountry Star Class A Diesel 37' 59,000 miles, Generator, Leveling System, 2 Slideouts, Backup Camera, New Tires, W/D, Queen Bed, No Pets, Non-Smoking. Must See. Only $59,500. Bill 360-301-5735 MOTOR HOME: ‘77 Chinook. New tires, shocks, muffler and other upgrades. $3,200/obo 457-1457, call after 1 p.m. PACE ARROW: ‘88 33’, 45K miles. $3,200. 461-2619. TRAILER: ‘01 24’ Nomad. Excellent condition, extras. $7,800. 457-5016.

TRAILER: ‘02 30’ Prowler. Immaculately clean, 8' power slide chair, TV, VCR, CD, DVD, PS2, full kitchen, large refer, separate freezer, micro oven, stove double sinks, skylights, heat/AC, sleeps 6-8, 14K. 670-1163 TRAILER: ‘06 26’ Jayco. Excellent condition, extras. Reduced price. $12,500. 477-3695. TRAILER: 15’ Layton. Self cont., auto level jacks, micro, TV, pressure system, forced air heater, brand new gen., new tires/elec. brakes, HD awnings, $4,850. 582-0802.

101

Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7021.27211 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bank of America, N.A. Grantee: David Long and Karen M. Long, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2008-1215357 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063015-580085 Abbreviated Legal: Lt 18 Canyonedge 7/30 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On June 3, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 18, Canyonedge, according to Plat thereof recorded in Volume 7 of Plats, Page 30, Records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 3770 Hill Circle Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 01/22/08, recorded on 01/29/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1215357, records of Clallam County, Washington, from David R. Long and Karen M. Long, husband and wife, as Grantor, to PRLAP, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Bank of America, N.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 02/22/2011 Monthly Payments $18,987.20 Late Charges $755.20 Lender's Fees & Costs $3,124.38 Total Arrearage $22,866.78 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $508.00 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $70.00 Recording Costs $129.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $777.00 Total Amount Due: $23,643.78 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $160,332.77, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 10/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on June 3, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 05/23/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 05/23/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 05/23/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS David R. Long 3770 Hill Circle Port Angeles, WA 98362 Karen M. Long 3770 Hill Circle Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 05/10/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 05/11/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 02/22/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 5861900. (TS# 7021.27211) 1002.156288-FEI Pub: May 1, 22, 2011

95

Recreational Vehicles

VINTAGE TRAVEL TRAILER ‘66 24’ Kenskill. Everything works. $1,250/obo. 417-5583

96

Parts/ Accessories

MISC: Gasser front axle, Chev disk, 2 springs, $600. 302 Ford with C4, $500. (2) 10”wide slicks on Chev. rims, $100. 417-8829 TRANSMISSIONS ‘69 Pontiac Turbo 400, $150. ‘56 Chev over drive, 3 speed, $200. 457-6540

97

4 Wheel Drive

1981 Subaru Brat 4x4 rebuilt 1800 engine, 4 speed, dual exhaust. Rusty but dependable, hi/lo 4x4. Good tires, glass, brakes, interior. locking canopy. 27-30 mpg. New alt/reg. $1750. 360452-7439 CHEV ‘02 TRAILBLAZER 4x4, 6 cyl, auto, air, LT package, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, and seats. AM/FM /CD, front and side airbags, OnStar ready, dark glass, roof rack, alloy wheels, remote entry, tow package, and more! Low miles. Expires 5-7-11. VIN#317617. $8,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com DODGE ‘07 RAM 3500 QUAD CAB LONGBED 4X4 Big Horn dually, 6.7 liter Cummins turbodiesel, 6 speed manual transmission, alloy wheels, new tires, running boards, tow package, trailer brake controller, bed liner, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, mirrors and drivers seat, cruise control, tilt, air, CD stereo, information center, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $34,050! Sparkling clean inside and out! Save yourself a bundle today at Gray Motors! $27,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

101

Legals Clallam Co.

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV: ‘94 Blazer Silverado 4WD. Very good cond., 5.7L, auto, ABS, all power, tinted, air, tow pkg., luggage carrier, 177K $3,800. 457-8917. CHEV: ‘94 pickup. Ext. cab, lifted wheels/tires, call for more info. $5,000/ obo. 461-4665. DODGE: ‘99 Ram 2500. Cummins turbo diesel, 47,400 mi. $17,800. 379-0575. FORD ‘03 F150 SUPER CAB LIFTED 4X4 4.6 liter V8, 5 speed manual transmission, cold air intake, exhaust, ultra alloy wheels, Maxxis mud terrains, matching canopy, bedliner, tow package, airbags, running boards, brush guard, privacy glass, alarm system, 4 opening doors, cruise, tilt, air, CD/cassette stereo, Cobra CB radio, compass/temperature display, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $13,450! Sparkling clean inside and out! Loads of extras! nice 33” tires! Stop by Gray Motors today! $10,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com FORD ‘03 RANGER SUPER CAB EDGE PLUS 4X4 4.0 liter SOHC V6, auto, alloy wheels, running boards, spray-in bedliner, tow package, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, cruise control, tilt, air, 6 CD stereo, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $13,700! All power options! Only 41,000 miles! Carfax certified one owner! Stop by Gray Motors today to save some bucks on your next truck! $12,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com FORD ‘96 F-250 Extended cab, 4x4 diesel, 5 speed. $9,995 The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 FORD: ‘01 F150. Gettin’ right with God. Crewcab Lariat. Tow pkg, 4.6L, auto, hard tonneau cover, bedliner. Must sell. $9,800. 457-4185.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS Commercial Printing Services 417-3520

101

Legals Clallam Co.

97

4 Wheel Drive

FORD: ‘02 Explorer Sport. Just what you’ve been looking for, 1 owner, totally maintained, V6 engine, auto, 4WD, AM/FM/CD, sunroof, cruise, AC, leather, silver, 185K (freeway) miles. Runs great. Very clean inside and out. Reduced price to $4,000 or call with your best offer. Seller motivated. 360-683-7075 FORD: ‘02 F150 XLT Triton V8. Extended cab, 4 door, 4x4, bedliner, storage box, tow pkg, 100,925 miles, great shape inside/out. $9,995 360-385-3579 FORD: ‘08 F350 LARIAT DIESEL. 4x4 crew cab, dually, 23K mi., new cond., leather interior, dual heaters and heated seats, auto, air, power rear windows, door locks, seats, mirrors, windows, tilt keyless entry, cruise, tow pkg., alloy wheels, moonroof, tinted, adj. pedals, deluxe stereo, limited slip rear end, plus $3,000 aftermarket accesor. $36,750. 452-3200, 452-3272 FORD: ‘86 F350 Crew cab. Utility box. $1,500. 460-5765. FORD: ‘96 F150 Clubcab. Comes with canopy, new tires, 132K miles. $3,200. 461-2619 FORD: 97 Expedition XLT. 7 pass, power options. $3,990. 461-2145/417-3063 FORD: ‘97 F250 HD. Ext cab XLT. 4x4 Power Stroke diesel, V8, 103K mi. $14,000. 460-6510. FORD: ‘99 Explorer. All WD V8, E.B., 152K mi., exc. cond. $5,500. 460-9323. GMC: ‘83 Jimmy 4WD. $500. 460-9776

JEEP: ‘09 Jeep Commander Sport 4x4. 23,549 miles, V6 (better fuel economy than the V8), full time four wheel drive stability/traction control, front and side airbags, CD player with built-in Sirius radio, tow package. $19,499 305-915-0432 JEEP: ‘86 Comanche PU. 86K miles, recent tune up. $1,900. 582-9701.

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File No.: 8318.20055 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Sound Community Bank fka Credit Union of the Pacific Grantee: Theodore E. Hutt, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2003-1100780 Tax Parcel ID No.: 043026-349050 Abbreviated Legal: LT. 2, J. MARTIN SP, 27/50 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On June 3, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 2 of J. Martin Short Plat recorded October 13, 1995, in Volume 27 of Short Plats, Page 50, under Auditor's File No. 729587, being a portion of the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 26, Township 30 North, Range 4 West, W. M., Callam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1196 Taylor Cuttoff Road Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 01/31/03, recorded on 02/05/03, under Auditor's File No. 2003-1100780, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Theodore E. Hutt and Caron E. Hutt, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Land Title & Escrow Company of Callam County, Inc, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Credit Union of the Pacific, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 03/02/2011 Monthly Payments $5,004.00 Late Charges $208.50 Lender's Fees & Costs $36.53 Total Arrearage $5,249.03 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $417.34 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,181.46 Total Amount Due: $6,430.49 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $73,707.26, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 09/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on June 3, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 05/23/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 05/23/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 05/23/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Caron E. Hutt 1196 Taylor Cuttoff Road Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Caron E. Hutt 1196 Taylor Cuttoff Road Sequim, WA 98382 Theodore E. Hutt 1196 Taylor Cuttoff Road Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Theodore E. Hutt 1196 Taylor Cuttoff Road Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 01/26/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 01/27/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 03/02/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 8318.20055) 1002.184040-FEI Pub: May 1, 22, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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LANDROVER: ‘65 88. 250 Chevy 6 cyl, ready for restoration. $2,500/obo. 360-643-2056 TOYOTA: ‘07 Tacoma double cab 4x4 TRD Sport, 50K mi. 6 speed, lift, extras. $25,000. 461-2356.

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CHEV: ‘03 S10, 5 speed. $5,800/obo. 457-7014 CHEV: ‘69 3/4 ton pickup. Excellent mechanical condition, many new parts, lift bed. $925/obo 457-3005, 461-7478 CHEV: ‘80 1 ton extended van, runs and drives. $650. 477-2202 CHEV: ‘89 3/4 ton. Extended cab, clean. $5,500. 457-6156. CHEV: ‘89 Astrovan. Mark III, auto, 232K mi., runs excellent. $800. 683-7173. DODGE ‘05 GRAND CARAVAN SXT WAGON Auto, power slider doors, stow and go seating, DVD, CD. $8,995 The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 DODGE: ‘89 Custom van. Great for camping, new tranny, low mi., will trade for car in good condition or $2,500/obo. Cell 940-391-9957

FORD: ‘90 F250. 7.5L V8 XLT Lariat. 129K mi. In good shape, a real workhorse! $1,500, a bargain! 360-742-9582 FORD: ‘95 F350. Powerstroke EFI diesel, AT, PB, PS, three fuel tanks, 5th wheel towing w/electronic brake, regular tow package w/electric brake, 164K miles. White color, crew cab, one owner, excellent condition. $8,500/obo. 360-450-3767

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DODGE: ‘97 Caravan. 4 cyl. runs excellent. $2,500. 809-3215. FORD: ‘76 1 ton van. Fresh tune up, road ready! $800/obo. 797-3232 FORD: ‘90 Aerostar van. Runs good $1750/obo 808-4661 FORD: ‘98 E350. 110K miles, power locks/windows, A/C, cruise. Ladder rack, all inside racks. $6,000/obo. 460-0556 FORD: ‘98 Ranger XLT Super Cab. 106,500 miles; 6 cyl 4.0 liter 5 sp. man trans; A/C CD AM/FM; power windows & doors; alloy wheels; bed liner; shell; air shocks; very good tires. No body damage, never wrecked. $3,600. 306-797-1624 GMC: ‘89 Vandura. Window van, new tires/brakes/exhaust, very clean, runs great. $2,500. Call 360-452-5912 days 360-775-9946 days GMC: 94 3/4 ton. SLE pkg., canopy, tool box, ext cab, long box, good shape, runs great. $1,800. 360-374-3330

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Pickups/Vans

GMC: ‘72 3/4 ton pick up. $500. 460-9776. JEEP EAGLE: ‘95 Minivan. AWD, 4 new tires, runs good. $3,000. 457-3521. TOYOTA: ‘07 Sienna Van XLE. W/pkg #4, all LTD options except nav. 20,350 mi., orig. owner, always garaged. Immaculate; no chips, scratches, etc. Can be towed behind motorhome. KBB $26,530. Sell $23,750. 681-0151. TOYOTA: ‘74 pickup. Needs clutch/brakes, lots of new parts. $500. 582-7519.

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1952 MGTD: Exclnt cond, great history, long term local owner (25 yrs). Car is being sold to benefit Sequim School Dist and Boys & Girls Club. $22,500. Call for details 683-3311 (ext 123) or 683-3300

GMC: ‘97 V-8 SLE 3 door 5.8l, auto/OD new battery, locking bed cover, bed liner. Alloy wheels/new tires. CD, power, tinted, dual bags, antilock, cruise, tilt, flow exhaust, 123,000. $3,400. 775-7048

1997 Madza Miata. Good condition, 5speed, <55000 miles, blue, A/C, AM/FM/CD, airbags, power windows and mirrors. Newer rear window and tires. 24 mpg city. $5200. 452-6654 or 4611230, after 4pm.

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Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE OF TITLE VII PUBLIC HEARING A special annual meeting will be held by Sequim School District #323 on Tuesday, May 3rd at 5:00 p.m. in the Helen Haller Elementary Library at 350 W. Fir Street in Sequim, WA to discuss the Title VII Indian Education Program for the 2011-2012 school year. The purpose of this hearing and annual meeting is to afford parents of Indian children, staff members, students, and other community members the opportunity to understand the Title VII Indian Education Program, to discuss special needs of Indian students, to make recommendations for program improvement, review the grant proposal for the 2011-2012 school year and elect new officers. Please contact Bev Horan at Sequim Middle School at 808-9874 for further information. Pub: May 1, 2010

File No.: 7236.22675 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. U.S. Bank National Association, as trustee, on behalf of the holders of the Adjustable Rate Mortgage Trust 2007-1, Adjustable Rate MortgageBacked Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-1 Grantee: Rosalie I. Kahn, a married woman as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2006 1189962 Tax Parcel ID No.: 0530131491702001 and 05-30-13149170-2001 Abbreviated Legal: LOT 1 SP 29/38 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On May 13, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 1 of Ouellette Short Plat recorded November 18, 1999 in Volume 29 of Short Plats, Page 38 under Recording No. 1999 1039641, located in the Southeast quarter of the Northeast quarter of Section 13, Township 20 North, Range 5 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 184 J Shea Way Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/17/06, recorded on 10/20/06, under Auditor's File No. 2006 1189962, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Rosalie I. Kahn, a married woman as her separate estate, as Grantor, to Land Title and Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Sun American Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to U.S. Bank National Association, as trustee, on behalf of the holders of the Adjustable Rate Mortgage Trust 2007-1, Adjustable Rate MortgageBacked Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-1, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 20111262382. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 02/07/2011 Monthly Payments $9,462.12 Late Charges $394.25 Lender's Fees & Costs $217.87 Total Arrearage $10,074.24 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $576.90 Title Report $792.41 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,486.43 Total Amount Due: $11,560.67 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $244,184.20, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 08/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on May 13, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 05/02/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 05/02/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 05/02/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Rosalie I. Kahn 184 J Shea Way Port Angeles, WA 98362 Rosalie I. Kahn P.O. Box 2585 Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Rosalie I. Kahn 184 J Shea Way Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Rosalie I. Kahn P.O. Box 2585 Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 01/05/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 01/06/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 02/07/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7236.22675) 1002.181815-FEI Pub: April 10, May 1, 2011


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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Cars

Cars

2008 HONDA CR-V EX Economical 2.4 liter 4cylinder, auto, AWD, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, privacy glass, power moonroof, only 33K miles, balance of factory 5/60 warranty, super clean 1owner factory lease return, non-smoker. Spotless Carfax report, near new condition. $21,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

Peninsula Daily News can print your publication at an affordable price! Call Dean at 360-417-3520 1-800-826-7714

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Cars

CHEVROLET 2007 EQUINOX LT 3.4 liter V^, auto, AWD, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, side airbags, privacy glass, luggage rack, alloy wheels. 41K miles, very, very clean. 1 owner corporate lease return, non-smoker, balance of factory 5/100 warranty. Spotless Carfax report $17,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

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Legals Clallam Co.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE THE PLANNING COMMISSION CLALLAM COUNTY Notice is hereby given pursuant to Section 84.34.037 RCW and Chapter 27.08, Clallam County Code, that the Planning Commission has scheduled a public hearing for May 18, 2011, at 6:30 PM in Room 160 of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 E. 4th Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362 The purpose of the hearing is to receive public testimony regarding applications for Current Use Classification (Open Space or Timber Land taxation) from the Second-Half 2010.

Notice: The Clallam County Finance Committee will meet on Thursday, May 5, 2011 at 9:00 a.m. in the Clallam County Treasurer’s conference room for a special meeting. The meeting will be in Suite 3 of the Clallam County Courthouse located at 223E. 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Pub: May 1, 2011

Applications under consideration are summarized as follows: Second-Half 2010 Current Use Assessment Applications CUA2011-0015 – Open Space Land – David Deoutel: 13.23 acres, TPN 043003-230000; CUA2011-0016 – Open Space Land – Russell & Catherine Mckenna: 4.01 acres, TPN 033006550002; CUA2011-0017 – Open Space Land – Todd & Carla German: 4.93 acres, TPN 033006550001; CUA2011-0018 – Timber Land – Verlain & Jean Sackett: 9.05 acres, TPN 123027-231000-1000, 123027-231000-2001, 123027-230500; CUA2011-0019(A), (B) – Open Space – John Warrick & Ruth Jenkins: 1.52 acres, TPN portion 053010-230105, 053010-230120; CUA2011-0019(C) – Timber Land – John Warrick & Ruth Jenkins: 4.42 acres, TPN portion 053010-230120; CUA2011-0020 – Timber Land – Dennis Lee & Margaret Wahloos: 8.70 acres, TPN 093125330000; CUA2011-0021 – Timber Land – Richard Storch: 4.95 acres, TPN 053032-240050; CUA2011-0022 – Timber Land – Michael Wait: 6.36 acres, TPN 073002-420125; CUA2011-0023 – Timber Land – Judith Hagelstein: 4.81 acres, TPN 053011-420050 CUA2011-0025 – Open Space Land – Terry & Lori Layman: 4.05 acres, TPN 132902-100210; CUA2011-0026 – Open Space Land – Michael & Norma Pearman: 9.72 acres, TPN 053030320800, 053030-320700; Interested parties are invited to attend the public hearing and make their views known to the Planning Commission. For more information, contact Robert Knapp at rknapp@co.clallam.wa.us or 360-417-2416 or the Planning Division at 223 East Fourth Street, Port Angeles, WA 98362 Pub: May 1, 2011

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Legals Jefferson Co.

Legals Jefferson Co.

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Legals Jefferson Co.

File No.: 7283.26546 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. PHH Mortgage Corporation Grantee: Kristy L. Anderson, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 547642 Tax Parcel ID No.: 990400126 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 26, Area 1, Port Ludlow No. 1, Jefferson County, Washington Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On June 3, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: Lot 26, Area 1, Port Ludlow No. 1, as per plat recorded in Volume 5 of plats, page 26 to 32, inclusive, Records of Jefferson County, Washington. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 60 Helm Lane Port Ludlow, WA 98365 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/29/09, recorded on 10/30/09, under Auditor's File No. 547642, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Kristy L. Anderson, a single person, as Grantor, to Jefferson Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Ameican Marine Bank, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to PHH Mortgage Corporation, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 558362. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 03/01/2011 Monthly Payments $6,678.60 Late Charges $164.00 Lender's Fees & Costs $339.25 Total Arrearage $7,181.85 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $737.12 Statutory Mailings $9.56 Recording Costs $28.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,569.68 Total Amount Due: $8,751.53 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $188,398.60, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 10/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on June 3, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 05/23/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 05/23/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 05/23/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Kristy L. Anderson 60 Helm Lane Port Ludlow, WA 98365 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Kristy L. Anderson 60 Helm Lane Port Ludlow, WA 98365 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 01/26/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 01/27/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 03/01/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7283.26546) 1002.183928-FEI Pub: May 1, 22, 2011

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CADILLAC: ‘00 Deville. White, sunroof, leather, NorthStar V8, all power, great condition. $4,500. 452-6663 CADILLAC: ‘01 Seville SLS. 120K, nice. $5,495. 460-9556. CHEVROLET 2007 UPLANDER LS 3.9 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM CD, power windows, locks, keyless entry, privacy glass, 7-passenger with quad seating. Only 28K miles, balance factory 5/100 warranty, very, very clean. 1owner, corporate lease return, nonsmoker, spotless Carfax report. $13,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

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Cars

CHEV: ‘04 Impala LS. Low mi., leather, all power, great gas mi., excl. cond. $7,500. 452-6174. DATSUN: ‘64 Roadster. $2,500. Call for details. 452-3488. FORD: (2) ‘88 Mustangs GT. $2,500 for both. 797-3784. FORD: ‘01 Crown Victoria LX. Beautiful well kept car, leather, new tires, touring pkg., excellent road car, 89K mi. $6,500/ obo. 360-477-5430. FORD: ‘59 2 door wagon, V8, stick, good shape, 105K. $4,900. 683-7847. FORD: ‘69 Galaxy 500. $3,500. Call for details. 452-3488. FORD: ‘95 Mustang GT. 5 sp, V8, black, very nice, 114K mi. $5,850. 460-9078.

102

Legals City of P.A.

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS POLE REPLACEMENTS PROJECT CL05-2010 Sealed bids will be received by the City of Port Angeles, Director of Public Works & Utilities at 321 East Fifth Street, P. O. Box 1150, Port Angeles, Washington 98362, until 2:00pm, May 27, 2011, and not later, and will then and there be opened and publicly read at that time in the Pittis Conference Room at Port Angeles City Hall for the construction of the following improvements: Replacing up to 200 wood poles with new wood or fiberglass poles at various locations throughout the City of Port Angeles on both the 15kV distribution and 69kV transmission systems. Plans, specifications, addenda, and plan holders list for this project are available on-line through Builders Exchange of Washington, Inc. at http://www.bxwa.com. Click on: “Posted Projects”, “Public Works”, “City of Port Angeles”. Bidders are encouraged to “Register as a Bidder”, in order to receive automatic email notification of future addenda and to be placed on the “Bidders List”. Contact the Builders Exchange of Washington (425-258-1303) should you require further assistance. Informational copies of any available maps, plans and specifications are on file for inspection in the office of the Port Angeles Public Works Engineering Services (360-417-4700). Minority and women owned businesses shall be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation, shall not be discriminated against on the grounds of gender, race, color, age, national origin or handicap in consideration of an award of any contract or subcontract, and shall be actively solicited for participation in this project by direct mailing of the invitation to bid to such businesses as have contacted the City for such notification. Further, all bidders are directed to solicit and consider minority and women owned businesses as potential subcontractors and material suppliers for this project. Glenn A. Cutler, P.E. Director of Public Works & Utilities Pub: May 1, 8, 2011

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

99

Cars

FORD: ‘93 Escort Wagon. Must sell. $1,400/obo. 670-6883 HYUNDAI: ‘09 Accent. Low mi. $9,900. 797-3130, after 5. LINCOLN: ‘01 Town Car. 75K, moving, must sell. $5,900/ obo. 360-450-3767 or 360-460-7211. LINCOLN: ‘95 Towncar. exc. cond., 81K orig. miles. $5,000. 602-677-7453 MAZDA: ‘97 Miata. Red, new top/tires, 67K mi. $5,500. 417-3965 MERCEDES: ‘85 380SL, 2 tops, good condition, recent $3,000 work done, beautiful, red. $12,000 or will trade for older restored pick up. 452-5891 leave message.

OLDS: ‘00 Intrigue. 138K, good condition, all power. $3,500. 452-9424. PONTIAC: ‘68 Tempest. ‘350’ auto, runs great, rare, fun. $3,500. 670-3634.

99

99

Cars

TOYOTA ‘03 AVALON XLS Toyota’s flagship car! V6, auto, air, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors and seat, power sunroof, front and side airbags, electronic traction control, alloy wheels, remote entry and more. Extra clean 1 owner automobile. Expires 5-7-11. VIN#278571. $10,995 We Finance Dave Barnier Auto Sales 452-6599 davebarnier.com TOYOTA ‘08 COROLLA S SEDAN 1.8 liter VVT-i 4 cylinder, 5 speed manual transmission, alloy wheels, spoiler, side skirts, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, cruise, tilt, air, CD stereo, dual front airbags. Kelley Blue Book value of $14,355! Sparkling clean inside and out! Super sporty! Great gas mileage! Stop by Gray Motors today! $12,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

&$+ FOR YOUR CAR If you have a good car or truck, paid for or not, see us!

REID & JOHNSON

135114426

2007 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER TOURING EDITION Economical 2.4 liter 4cylinder, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, privacy glass, only 52K miles, very clean local trade in, nonsmoker. Spotless Carfax report $8,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com Abandoned Vehicle Auction In accordance with RCW 46.55.130, the following vehicles will be auctioned at Evergreen Towing, 703 E. Washington, Sequim, WA 98382. MUST SIGN IN AND RECEIVE AUCTION NUMBER TO BID. 05/04/2011. Viewing at 10 a.m. at 4th & Pine St., Sequim, WA 98382. ‘83 Pontiac 600 WA license#AAH4384 ‘93 Ford Probe WA license#721UJP ‘78 Chev Pickup WA license#B26527B ‘80 Chev Monza WA license#265SAE ‘83 Ford F250 PU WA license#B37177G ‘86 Cadillac ELDCP WA license#549MYG ‘88 Subaru GLSW WA license#156WQN ‘89 Hyundai EXC3D WA license#083XZD ‘90 Olds 98CP WA license#710WDB ‘90 Ford Mustang 2d WA license#842PMH ‘92 Hyundai Son4D WA license#940 UQN ‘92 Hyundai Son4D WA license#032YAM ‘93 AMB MOTORHOME WA license#155GGX ‘94 Ford F150PU WA license#A66025V ‘’96 Toyota Rav4 WA license#948TOR ‘98 Chev S10PU WA license#B78205K ‘99 VW Jetta 4D WA license#455YCV ‘00 Dodge Neon 4D WA license#068VPD

99

SUNDAY, MAY 1, 2011

1ST AT RACE ST. PORT ANGELES

MOTORS 457-9663

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104

Legals Jefferson Co.

The Quilcene School Board of Directors will be meeting with Brinnon School Board of Directors in a board meeting with an executive session for final superintendent interviews on Monday, May 9th from 8:00 am to 11:00 am at Quilcene School District in The Learning Center - Admin Bldg. Pub: May 1, 2011

File No.: 7283.26521 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. PHH Mortgage Corporation Grantee: Russell M. Phillips and Jill H. Phillips, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 536829 and loan modification recorded 7/23/2010 under Auditor's File No. 553172 Tax Parcel ID No.: 963 303 608 Abbreviated Legal: 8 & 9, BLK 36, IRVING PARK Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On May 13, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of JEFFERSON, State of Washington: Lots 8 and 9, Block 36, Irving Park Addition to the city of Port Townsend, as per plat recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 42, records of Jefferson County, Washington. Together with that portion of vacated 7th Street and Cedar Avenue adjoining or abutting thereon, which upon vacation attached to said premises by Judgment No. 05-900195-4 filed in Jefferson County Superior Court. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 84 Cape George Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 08/21/08, recorded on 08/29/08, under Auditor's File No. 536829 and loan modification recorded 7/23/2010 under Auditor's File No. 553172, records of JEFFERSON County, Washington, from Russell M. Phillips and Jill H. Phillips, husband and wife, as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Security State Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Security State Mortgage Company to PHH Mortgage Corporation, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 537089. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 02/07/2011 Monthly Payments $15,192.31 Late Charges $564.06 Lender's Fees & Costs $22.50 Total Arrearage $15,778.87 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $675.00 Title Report $951.75 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,729.87 Total Amount Due: $17,508.74 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $298,696.92, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 07/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on May 13, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 05/02/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 05/02/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 05/02/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Russell M. Phillips 84 Cape George Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 Russell M. Phillips P.O. Box POB 1923 Port Townsend, WA 98368 Jill H. Phillips 84 Cape George Road Port Townsend, WA 98368 Jill H. Phillips P.O. Box POB 1923 Port Townsend, WA 98368 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 01/03/11, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 01/03/11 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 02/07/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7283.26521) 1002.181580-FEI Pub: April 10, May 1, 2011

101

Legals Clallam Co.

Cars

PONTIAC: ‘96 grand AM SE. V6, auto, new tranny, AC, runs and drives great. $2,000/obo. 452-8664 PONTIAC: ‘96 grand AM SE. V6, auto, new tranny, AC, runs and drives great. $2,000/obo. 452-8664

99

E11

Cars

NISSAN: ‘95 Maxima. 200K, exc. body. $600/obo. 461-7384. SAAB: ‘90 Model 90. Runs. $1,500. 683-3544 SUZUKI: ‘06 C-50 Boulevard. 4,600 mi $4,900. 460-9556. VOLVO: ‘86 Wagon. Runs great. $800. 360-820-0339

TOYOTA: ‘03 Sequoia. Immac., runs perf, Carfax, all eqpt + rear A/C, dual pwr sts, moonroof (slide, tilt), run brds, priv glass, grill grd, tow pkg, alloys, wnd deflects, 2 rem keys, sir XM & boost, grt tires. 133K. Can't beat this deal! $11,000/obo. 360-461-1595 Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

101

Legals Clallam Co.

VW: ‘04 Passat GLX. AWD SW, 86K miles, original owner. EC $10,500/obo. 457-9999 VW: ‘70 Karmann Ghia. Project. $700. 681-2382 VW: ‘75 Super Beetle. Fuel injected, runs good, 30+ mpg, nice paint, good tires, new floor pan, Pioneer stereo, CD player. Price reduced! $2,895/obo. 775-9648

101

Legals Clallam Co.

STATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY

Notice of Application to Change the Point of Diversion of existing water rights TAKE NOTICE: Ronald and Carol Smith Trust of Sequim filed an application to change the pint of diversion of Water Right Certificate No. 993. The Certificate was originally granted under the name of A.W. Cays for 0.8 cubic feet per second from an unnamed stream located within Section 2 T. 30 N., R. 4 W.W.M. for the purpose of irrigation and domestic supply The intent of change application is to change the point of diversion approximately 50 feet from the original point of division within Section 2 T. 30 N., R. 4 W. for th purpose of irrigation. Protests of objections to approval of this application must include a detailed statement of the basis for objections; protests must be accompanied by a ($50) recording fee and filed with the Department of Ecology, at the address shown below, within thirty (30) days from the last date of publication. Department of Ecology Cashiering Section PO Box 47611 Olympia WA 98504-7611 Pub: April 24, May 1, 2011

File No.: 7261.23835 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, National Association fka The Bank of New York Trust Company, N.A. as successor to JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., as Trustee for Mortgage Asset-Backed Pass - Through Certificates, Series 2006-RP1 Grantee: Julie Herridge, as her separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 20051150204 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063024340150-1000, 063024-340150-2001 Abbreviated Legal: SESW 24-30-6 & PTN LTS 1 & 2, SP 18/26 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On May 13, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Parcel 1: That portion of the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter, Section 24, Township 30 North, Range 6 West, W.M. Clallam County, described as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner of said Subdivision; thence South along the East line thereof a distance of 330 feet; thence West parallel with the South line of said Subdivision to the West right of way line of Monroe Road and the True Point of Beginning of this description; thence continuing West parallel with the South line of said Subdivision a distance of 660 feet; thence South parallel with the East line of said Subdivision a distance of 330 feet; thence East parallel with the South line of said Subdivision a distance of 660 feet to the West right of way line of Monroe Road; thence North along said right of way line a distance of 330 feet to the True Point of Beginning. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Except that portion conveyed to Clallam County for Road purposes by instrument recorded March 30, 1995 under Auditor's File No. 720683; Parcel 2: That portion of Lots 1 and 2 of Short Plat recorded in Volume 18 of Short Plats, page 26 under Auditor's File No. 599988, lying North of the fence line delineated on the face of said Short Plat, as set forth in order on Summary Judgment Quieting Title Filed July 26, 2002 in Clallam County Superior Court Case No. 00-2-01029-2, Judgment No. 02-9-00811-7. Said Judgment was recorded August 5, 2002 under Auditor's File No. 2002 1089762. Except that portion of Lot 1 conveyed to Clallam County for road purposes by instrument recorded February 27, 1995 under Auditor's File No. 719138. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 2220 Monroe Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 01/25/05, recorded on 02/03/05, under Auditor's File No. 20051150204, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Troy Herridge and Julie Herridge, Husband and Wife, as Grantor, to Title Direct, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Homefield Financial, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A. f/k/a JPMorgan Chase Bank as Trustee FKA Bank One National Association as Trustee to The Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, National Association fka The Bank of New York Trust Company, N.A. as successor to JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A., as Trustee for Mortgage Asset-Backed Pass - Through Certificates, Series 2006-RP1, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2011-1262497. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 02/07/2011 Monthly Payments $83,911.52 Late Charges $3,348.48 Lender's Fees & Costs $2,627.74 Total Arrearage $89,887.74 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $200.00 Title Report $692.67 Recording Costs $28.00 Total Costs $920.67 Total Amount Due: $90,808.41 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $198,597.27, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 01/01/07, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on May 13, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 05/02/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 05/02/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 05/02/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Troy M. Herridge 2220 Monroe Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 Julie Herridge 2220 Monroe Road Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 04/25/07, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 04/26/07 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 02/07/2011 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Winston Khan (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7261.23835) 1002.70864-FEI Pub: April 10, May 1, 2011


E12

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2001 SUBARU FORESTER AWD

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PENINSULA

Jovi Deede Bellydancer and truck driver

Inside ■  To wait or not to wait is columnist’s question ■  Generations: Is infidelity in a marriage unforgivable? ■  Couple worry how marriage will change with new baby

Peninsula Daily News Sunday, May 1, 2011 Diane Urbani

de la

Paz/for Peninsula Woman


2

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, May 1, 2011

Wait or first date? Readers weigh in Tales from the Front

COLLEEN IS THE woman who admitted she and her husband had sex on their first date, which was 33 years and two children ago. Said Colleen: “I’m always amused when couples talk about ‘waiting.’ I just think about how much fun they’re missing. “Truth be told, there are a lot of one-night stands who are celebrating their 33rd wedding anniversary.” Here’s what you had to say . . .

abused after the guy took off in the morning. Assuming he even spent the night. You have the morals of an alley cat.

Rainn

Sadie

Your model has led to disaster far more often than it’s led to happiness. Show me one relationship that worked out, and I’ll show you 20 where the woman felt used and

Colleen had sex with a man on their first date but later married him and has remained married for 33 years. And she has “the morals of an alley cat”? Still, what worked for

Cheryl Lavin

May we help? Peninsula Woman, which appears Sundays in the Peninsula Daily News, welcomes items about coming North Olympic Peninsula events of women’s interest. Sending information is easy: ■ E-mail it to news@ peninsuladailynews.com in time to arrive 10 days before Friday publication. ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521 no later than 10 days before publication. ■ Mail it to Peninsula Woman, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 in time to

arrive 10 days before publication. ■ Hand-deliver it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 150 S. Fifth Ave., No. 2, Sequim, by 10 days before publication. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. Questions? Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz, who is editor of Peninsula Woman, can be reached at 360-417-3550 weekdays or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com.

Weddings, anniversaries

Anniversaries: Peninsula Woman publishes articles about couples celebrating their 25th or 50th wedding anniversary. For anniversaries of 50

years or longer, then-and-now photographs of the couple are accepted along with information. The photos will be returned. Details of the wedding, engagement or anniversary can be listed on a form available in person at any of the Peninsula Daily News offices (see above), or by calling 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, ext. 527, in Jefferson County and the West End.

Vera Nice to see some things don’t change. Women are still shamed for wanting sex and engaging in onenight stands, while the exact same behavior from men is accepted, if not outright condoned. This nonsense about “the morals of an alley cat” drives me insane with anger. Check your double standards, people. What happens in the bedroom between other consenting adults is no one’s business and in no way reflects on their character.

Thad

Yvonne

Somehow I doubt Colleen’s husband will ever write to an advice columnist justifying his collection of porn and complaining that his wife won’t have sex with him.

I wonder how many guys and girls waited a long time for sex and afterward said, “Boy, that was so not worth the wait!”

Elisha

Despite child support laws, women are primarily the ones left to deal with the consequences of indiscriminate sex. If, by this time, women have not figured this out and continue to walk into these situations and be used and tossed aside, well, don’t come crying to me when it’s all over and you feel used because it ain’t just a feeling.

It’s great that Colleen’s situation worked out well, but how many others did she and her husband have sex with on a first date before they found each other? Would she advocate the same process for her children finding mates? Probably not.

Ursula I made my guy wait for three months before we had sex. He said the wait was worth it. We’ve been married for 25 years.

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Colleen and her husband would not work for everyone, and that’s where she’s misguided. Those of us who chose to wait didn’t miss any fun. We just postponed it until we were sure we found the right person.

peninsuladailynews.com

Zelda

Gloria I find it interesting that people won’t walk through a restaurant and steal bites of food off of other

patrons’ plates because it’s disgusting, but they have no qualms about taking a random patron home and having sex with them.

Annabelle For every couple who waits until marriage and has a fantastic sex life, there’s a couple who waits and finds out that they’re sexually incompatible. Waiting is not intrinsically better or worse. People need to be in tune with what they want and need, communicate it respectfully to their partner and then make the best decision for themselves without judgment.

________ Cheryl Lavin compiles Tales from the Front at her home office in Arizona, where she writes a blog at www.talesfromthefront.com. Her column appears weekly in Peninsula Woman.

Couple worry baby will change marriage DEAR JOHN: MY husband and I are in our mid30s and expecting our first child. We’ve had a wonderful growing relationship these past three years. I have read that after the child is born, there is a lot of strain on a relationship, and I have been noticing our friends’ reactions to my pregnancy. Most of the women who are parents go all dewyeyed over the news and congratulate me. But about half the guys — especially the divorced ones — take my husband aside and warn him that life will never be the same again and that children are a strain on the relationship. Why do so many men seem to have had such a

Mars vs.

Venus John Gray

bad experience with fatherhood? How can my husband and I best nurture each other before, during and after the baby is born, so our relationship remains as good as it has been and continues to strengthen and grow? — Excited but Anxious in Wilson, N.C. Turn

to

Gray/7


Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, May 1, 2011

3

Queen of soul, king of retailers join forces Walmart exclusive seller of diva Franklin’s new album for month By Ben Sisario

The Associated Press

Bette Midler greets Aretha Franklin at Franklin’s 69th birthday party in New York last month.

We Were,” as well as the The New York Times classic gospel hymn “His Eye Is on the Sparrow” and Coming soon to Walmart a version of B.B. King’s near you: soul. “Sweet Sixteen.” Walmart’s stores and The bonus track is her websites will be the exclulive performance of “My sive retailer for Aretha Country, ’Tis of Thee” from Franklin’s next album, the inauguration of Presi“Aretha: A Woman Falling dent Obama in 2009. Out of Love,” for a month Franklin, 69, canceled a beginning Tuesday, the number of concert dates singer announced. After June 3, the album last year because of an illness she has not identified, will also be available digitally through iTunes, Ama- although in January she said that “the problem has zon and other stores. been resolved.” “Aretha” is Franklin’s The album announce38th studio album and the ment made no mention of first to be released on her own label, Aretha Records. her illness, but it did Franklin produced most include a little advice for Franklin’s female fans: of the album, which “OK, ladies, take a good includes modern standards look at the photo of me on like “Theme from a Summer Place” and “The Way this album; this is how

F

ranklin produced most of the album, which includes modern standards like “Theme from a Summer Place” and “The Way We Were,” as well as the classic gospel hymn “His Eye Is on the Sparrow” and a version of B.B. King’s “Sweet Sixteen.” you’re supposed to look when you’re a woman falling out of love. Don’t sit by the phone waiting for him to call you, girlfriend; I want you to listen very closely to the lyrics of the songs on this album and you’ll hear a few good tips. Go out and have a ball!”

DVDs, games can keep traveling kids entertained WE WILL BE traveling in the car quite a bit this summer. Are there new activities, books and games for kids ages 4 to 10 to do inside the car that are different and fun, yet educational?

Parent to Parent Jodie Lynn

From Jodie

Idaho parents We travel with four kids between the ages of 3 and 14. It is quite a challenge keeping this bunch entertained, especially since there are two teens and two younger kids. We try to encourage our older kids to come up with their own brainy ideas for the younger ones as well as for themselves. This works pretty well and gets their minds working on various

up with it gets to pick out a restaurant for the next day. It’s a healthy competition, and we are amazed at some of the entertainment they create. — Kel and Chuck R. in Boise, Idaho

strategies. We also use make-up-as-we-go games. Since we try our best to make the trip memorable, this is the only time we actually push the envelope a little more in rewarding the kids for extraordinary thinking outside the box brain power and imagination. Whichever game or activity is enjoyed the most for the day, whoever came

The new Thomas and Friends Playdate 3-DVD set is now available and has singalongs, “fun with numbers,” a character gallery and more. There’s also the new Barney Playdate Pack 3-DVD set. Both are creative, fun and educational. These might be perfect to have on hand for the younger kids. For the older ones, there are things like Don’t Quote

Me – Magnetic Travel Games. They allow the kids to play a game and still take a gander out the window without the frustration of losing their place or the game pieces flying everywhere. To keep everyone energized and pumped about the trip, including mom and dad, taking frequent breaks outside works wonders. This is a great time to break out some of the latest items created by Crayola like the washable color bubbles, wand set and bubble launcher. Everyone will have a huge laugh and good time regardless of age. There are also many kid-friendly applications for the iPhone, iPad, etc.;

just implement the parental controls to ensure a safe and healthy activity. Of course, there’s still the games you used to play with your own parents while on a road trip that can be updated or utilized just as they are. The key is to have as much fun as possible and don’t forget to set aside time to simply talk to each other.

Can you help? My 11-year-old daughter and 13-year-old son love to eat pure junk for breakfast, which they do when visiting their grandparents in the summer. I would love to suggest healthier meals, including

breakfast to my parents but don’t want them to feel like I am trying to be a know-it-all about what to feed the kids. At our house, we try to eat organic food. How is the best way to suggest this to their grandparents? Maybe by sharing some new ideas for organic food that is easy to cook or can be eaten raw. Can you suggest prepackaged items?

________ Jodie Lynn shares parenting tips through her weekly column. Write her at Parent to Parent, 2464 Taylor Road, Suite 131, Wildwood, MO 63040 or direct2 contact@parenttoparent.com via e-mail. Tips and questions can also be sent through the contact form at ParentToParent.com.


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Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, May 1, 2011

Two to every story

Deede finds balance with bellydancing, truck driving By Diane Urbani Diane Urbani

Jovi Deede has been a bellydancer for 15 years and a truck driver for 12.

de la

Paz (2)/for Peninsula Woman

for

de la

Peninsula Woman

Paz

PORT ANGELES — This spring, Jovi Deede is immersed in two vocations that have surprised, even baffled, her family. Bellydancing and truck-driving. About both, “They ask me, ‘Where did that come from?’” says Deede, a member of the Shula Azhar dance troupe and a driver for Lakeside Industries of Port Angeles. The dancing — which Deede will offer at 7:30 p.m. this Thursday and every first Thursday of the month at Wine on the Waterfront — began by happenstance. Deede, nee Jovi Rudder, went with her friend Summer Northern to a class in Sequim back in 1996. She was 19 and just along for the ride. “I was very shy,” says the woman who, these days, appears on stage as a whirling vision in veils and a bead-encrusted bra that shows off her blue belly tattoo.

her own skin. She became part of the North Olympic Beledi Club, a group named for a basic Middle Eastern drum rhythm. Members of Beledi later formed Shula Azhar (www.ShulaAzharbellydance.com), a six-woman troupe that will represent Port Angeles at next month’s Northwest Folklife Festival in Seattle. Dancing on stage, Deede says, feels fantastic, whether the audience is a crowd of rapt fans or a handful of people who keep talking among themselves. This performer doesn’t worry about numbers, nor about the occasional intoxicated person in the audience who starts cheering inappropriately.

‘Connect with the music’

“My goal is to do my best, have fun and connect with the music,” says Deede, 34, who has adopted the stage name Ajaya. “Every audience is different. . . . I want to take them on a journey, get them ‘I had no idea’ caught up in the music and the emotion.” Wine on the Waterfront has turned out “My whole life, I hadn’t been a dancer, to be an ideal venue for Shula Azhar, except in my living room. I had no idea,” Deede says. Deede adds, “that I had rhythm and The group has been performing there grace.” for several months now, and in addition to Yet unlike Northern, who later traded the locals who love seeing the dancers, bellydancing lessons for mountain biking “the tourists are surprised to find someand other activities, Deede kept going to thing like that happening here,” adds class. Andy Griffiths, WOW’s manager. “They With her instructor, Laura Sampericame to us with the idea, and we’re really Ferdig, she found inspiration and entree glad to have them.” into a whole new world of music. For Deede and her sister dancers, And over time, she learned to integrate music and movement, body and spirit. She belly­dancing is a time-honored art form, a mode of exercise and an affirmation of learned dances from Egypt, Turkey, feminine beauty in all its variations. Morocco and even Bollywood-style moves “It’s really awesome . . . owning your from India. And as Deede developed her skills, she felt increasingly comfortable in body, learning to love your body, no matter

Jovi D Water

what y In a the tee ever d classes sion. For ajayar Me Jerem joking “He do,” sh teachin sidera cation or my again? Mo have li spouse guilt fr instea “We their o ‘If you proble


Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, May 1, 2011

5

Wedding

Jenni and Ryan Halleran

Halleran-Schouten

Deede rfront dances wi th in Por t Ange the Shula les. Azhar troupe

your body type is.” addition to performing — something enage Jovi didn’t imagine she would do — Deede is teaching bellydancing s, also something she didn’t envi-

r information about classes, email raks@hotmail.com. eanwhile, her husband of 11 years, my Deede, is supportive of what she gly calls her “dance addiction.” e knows that it’s something I have to he says, adding that as practices, ing and performances take up conable time each week, “open communin really helps keep a happy medium, family starts saying, ‘You’re dancing ?’” ost of the women Deede dances with likewise worked out “issues with es,” as she puts it, “as far as feeling rom choosing to dance every week ad of spending that time with family. e know though that moms need own time too, and it’s pretty much, u want me sane, you won’t have a em with me dancing!’” Turn

to

Deede/6

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hris Tuc ay nig ht at W ker/for Peninsu la W ine on oman the

Catch a Shula Azhar performance THE SHULA AZHAR dancers of Port Angeles perform every first Thursday of the month — including this Thursday and June 2 — at Wine on the Waterfront, upstairs in The Landing mall, 115 E. Railroad Ave., Port Angeles. The music starts at 7:30 p.m., all ages are welcome and there’s no cover charge. For details, phone 360-5658466 or visit www.WaterfrontWine.com. Also, as in past years, Shula Azhar will grace the Juan de Fuca Festival of the Arts with a performance at 2 p.m. Saturday, May 28, outside the Vern Burton Community Center, 308 W. Fourth St., Port Angeles. To find out more about the festival, visit www.JFFA.org or phone 360-457-5411. For information about bellydancing classes with Jovi Deede, email ajayaraks@hotmail.com or contact Udjat Beads, 129 E. First St. in downtown Port Angeles at 360-417-5489. Many more details about Shula Azhar await too at www.ShulaAzharbellydance.com. Peninsula Woman

Jenni Lynn Schouten and Ryan James Halleran, both of Phoenix, were married March 5 at Anthem Golf & Country Club in Anthem, Ariz. Mark Culbertson officiated the ceremony. The bride is the daughter of James and Sherrie Schouten of Port Angeles. The groom is the son of Jay and Sheree Halleran of Bellevue. Kate Terrill, the bride’s sister, served as matron of honor, and bridesmaids were Mary Irwin, Taryn Halleran, Brittany Heneghan, Catherine Morrissey, Jill Lausch and Megan Griffith. Ben Seeger served as best man, and groomsmen were Jesse Schouten, Jeff Terrill, Eric Russell, Chris Durek, Colin Hutchinson and Jason Herzberg. The bride’s niece, Gracie Schouten, served as flower girl, and Henry Irwin was ringbearer. The ceremony was held outside with a University of Washington Huskies theme. The bride and groom wrote their own vows. Both bride and groom attended the University of Washington and the University of Idaho Law School. They work as attorneys in Phoenix. The coupled honeymooned at Sandals at Montego Bay, Jamaica. They live in Phoenix.

Achievement and success on the Peninsula.

Peninsula Woman Every Sunday in

Peninsula Daily News


6

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, May 1, 2011

Deede: Worked long hauls,

driving ‘doubles’ and ‘triples’ around Clallam County. Both Deede’s mother, Cheryl Richmond, and her And Deede, who has a 4-year-old son, Cyrus, and a Jovi Deede father, John Rudder, were 19-year-old stepdaughter, bellydancer and truck driver mystified when she told them she was going into Gabrielle, receives abundant truck driving. support from her husband. Freight Lines and started Deede adds. “But they were support“He is very proud,” she hauling triples. Altogether, So about 11 years ago, ive and never told me I says. “He knows how hard couldn’t do it,” she says, Shula Azhar has worked to their vehicles stretched 105 the couple quit long-haul, or “over the road” driving adding, “I figure my dad’s feet in length. get accepted” into Folklife. happy with my career That was “crazy,” Deede and went to work for HerDeede grew up in Port choice because I like my says now. “I’d never want to mann Brothers in Port Angeles, worked at the Bushwhacker restaurant as do it again, but it was good Angeles, where there were, job” and because it pays fortunately, two openings well and provides retirea teenager, then earned an experience.” ment benefits. Steering to prevent fish- at the same time. associate degree at PeninThey hauled wood chips This spring looks to be tailing, finding a place to sula College and was hired and other loads for mills in one that will give Deede a on as a pharmacy assistant park: Piloting a triple is Port Townsend, Everett, chance to use her diverse not for the nervous. at Jim’s Pharmacy. Tacoma and beyond. strengths. She hopes for “You learn to deal with lots of Lakeside jobs, of what you have,” in weather Truck-driving school Closer to home course, and she’s looking conditions, roads, traffic forward to dancing in not That job wasn’t a good and fatigue, she says. After four years, Deede one but two major festivals. fit for her, though. Then, As a driving team, Jovi wanted work that would Shula Azhar will perout of the blue, her sweetand Jeremy got along, leav- keep her closer to home, so form outdoors at the Juan heart, Jeremy Deede, said, ening the marathon drives she began stopping by de Fuca Festival of the Arts “Let’s go to truck-driving with their own brand of Lakeside Industries’ Port (JFFA.org) at 2 p.m. Saturschool.” humor. They got married in Angeles office every week. day, May 28, and then He, too, had been work- the midst of their long-haul For a while, it was “no, no travel to Seattle for a Suning in a job he found unsat- tenure. openings.” day, May 29, show at the isfying. So off they went to What does a truck Then, “finally, it was, Tacoma, where they earned driver do when he or she ‘You start on Monday,’” she famed Northwest Folklife festival. their Class A commercial gets sleepy? There’s one remembers. The latter will be in driver’s licenses. appropriate response, JerDeede has been with the Seattle Center’s Bagley Swift Transportation of emy believes. asphalt paving company Wright Theatre; the Troutdale, Ore., hired them “I’ll take a 15- to for seven years now. both — when Jovi was just 20-minute nap,” he says, “I’m home every night; I Folklife schedule will be 22. She and Jeremy drove adding that a driver must get to see beautiful scenery, released Monday at www. NWFolklife.org. all over the West together, learn to recognize quickly especially out west with “It’s really an honor,” on long hauls across Utah, the moment when it’s time places like Lake Crescent Deede said of the Memorial Oregon and California, at to pull over and rest. and the Hoh Rain Forest. first driving “doubles,” Job sites are always chang- Day weekend perforSome companies, howmances. Shula Azhar has ing, so I don’t get bored trucks with a sleeper and a ever, give their truckers danced at Folklife before, tight arrival deadlines, and just driving to the same trailer; then they went to sharing the stage with places every day. It’s a nice that makes the job difficult, work for Oak Harbor change of pace to be able to other top dance groups from around the region. get out of the truck someAnd as much as Deede times and do some raking, loves to dance, she also revshoveling or loading the truck myself with a loader els in a good performance by another troupe. or backhoe,” she says. Celebrating our 27th year “The power of it is aweAnd it’s rewarding to see the results of her work some,” she says. “It is sexy. It is beautiful, to see a in the Lakeside-paved roads and driveways woman who loves herself.” Continued from 5

Diane Urbani

de la

Paz/for Peninsula Woman

Jovi Deede, a bellydancer with the Shula Azhar troupe based in Port Angeles, is also a truck driver for Lakeside Industries.

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Generations

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Perspectives of three Peninsula women Photos

and interviews by

Dave Logan

This week’s question: Is infidelity in a marriage unforgivable?

Sunday, May 1, 2011

7

Gray: New baby can

strain a relationship

When she asserts her Continued from 2 seems to be like the classic “rubber band” instead of need to be alone, it is me. important that you act in Dear Anxious: We will be very close the manner you’d expect if Thanks for a wonderful and loving one day, but the that were your sentiment. question. I don’t think it’s a case of men having next day she will be distant In other words, don’t purfrom me, often saying, “I sue or judge her. a bad experience with just need to be by myself.” Just give her the fatherhood. I think it’s Am I doing something breathing room she needs men feeling the additional strain of trying to wrong or is this perfectly to work out her concerns. be a supportive husband normal? Should she need your help, — Now What? have the faith in her that and chronically telling in Santa Fe, N.M. she will let you know this themselves they are not measuring up to their — if and when that time Dear Now What: Both comes. wives’ expectations. In most cases, that’s men and women have a _______ more imagined on their masculine and feminine John Gray is the author of part than actually true. side. While most women Men Are From Mars, Women Are But your question have a tendency to talk From Venus. raises the important through their issues and If you have a question, write to issue that starting a problems, this is not the John in care of this newspaper or family is joyous but also norm for all women, includ- by e-mail at: comments@mars stressful. Smart couples ing your girlfriend. venusliving.com. share those feelings of joy and stress with each other. My wife and I raised three daughters. Were • Eyeliner there times of stress and strain? Absolutely. But through it all, we man• Brows aged to come back to the center and support each • Lip Color • Liner other. Lead with the love you have in your heart Janie Dicus, BSN for one another, and through the good days PERMANENT COSMETIC MAKE-UP and the not-so-good days, you’ll do just fine.

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“It’s not unforgivable. Nothing is unforgivable. But it is unacceptable. “I believe in being monogamous. If I make the commitment and say my vows, we are together to the end. You just have to work things out somehow. “I am recently married, not even a month ago.”

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“No, it’s not unforgivable. But it is a very hard situation to overcome. “The reason is that the person who has forgiven has to bear the burden of the past. You may have forgiven, but the past is still there. “It’s always tough. But you have to put it to rest and look forward. It’s a do-over, I believe.”

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“I would have to say no. It depends a lot on the circumstances. “You would have to consider if the infidelity was the first time or something that has been going on for months. “To me, marriage is forever. You just have to make it go. And it does take work. It takes give and take.”


8

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, May 1, 2011

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