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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS September 26, 2013 | 75¢

Port Angeles-Sequim-West End

City halting minor felony casework Council told PA cannot afford prosecution costs BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — As of next Tuesday, the City Attorney’s Office no longer will accept minor felony criminal cases, such as some property crimes and drug cases, that are referred from the Clallam County Prosecutor’s Office, the city’s chief financial officer said this week. Mark Nichols, chief deputy Clallam County prosecuting attorney, said Wednesday that Port Angeles declining to hear a case could potentially result in it not being prosecuted, though that would ultimately be up to the city. “The practical effect Olson is that there may not be a prosecution as to certain offenders,” Nichols said. Byron Olson told City Council members during a budget work session that “felony diversions” — low-level felony cases within the city limit that the county Prosecuting Attorney’s Office turns over to the city attorney to be handled as misdemeanors — are one of the main reasons the city’s criminal justice costs have increased by more than $200,000 since 2010. City Manager Dan McKeen has said in past budget workshops that the city’s general fund can no longer support rising criminal justice costs. Those costs, which include district court administrative costs and money to pay for public defenders, rose 21.6 percent from about $837,000 in 2011 to roughly $1.02 million last year.

Shrinking resources Nichols said city officials have met about these concerns with the Prosecutor’s Office, which is itself dealing with shrinking resources. “The county can identify with the dilemma facing the city,” Nichols said. Nichols said the city does have the ability to decline to hear diverted cases, just as the county can send them to the city in the first place. TURN

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PA utility bills rising? $17 monthly hike urged, but hearings slated first BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — The total utility bill for an average city ratepayer could rise slightly more than $17 a month if City Council members approve rate increases recommended by a city consultant. The decision-making process is just beginning, however, and residents will have at least two

chances to comment on proposed increases at council meetings in October and November before the council votes on changes to come into effect Jan. 1. Financial consultant FCS Group, based in Redmond, presented the results of a monthslong utility cost-of-service study to council members during a work session Tuesday night. Overall, the consultants rec-

ommended a 6.6 percent increase, or a $17.08 hike in the total monthly utility bill of an average city residential ratepayer. This would bring an average residential customer’s bill from $258.85 per month to $275.93, an increase of $204.94 per year. An average residential ratepayer gets weekly garbage pickup and yard waste collection, and uses 1,500 kilowatt hours of electricity, 450 cubic feet of water and more than 430 cubic feet of wastewater per month. Phil Lusk, the city’s deputy director of power and telecom-

munication systems, said the effect on an average commercial utility customer was not specifically determined. Proposed commercial utility rate percentage increases, however, are roughly the same except in the wastewater utility.

Electricity cost The biggest chunk of the recommended total utility bill increase comes from the proposed electric rate hike. On average, electricity rates are recommended to rise about $7 per month, an increase of roughly 6.5 percent. TURN

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How he softened a flap Local college prof’s lectures figure in Muslim controversy BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — Online lectures posted by a Peninsula College adjunct professor are credited with aiding in the conversion of a radical Muslim to a broader view, according to reports in a national media outlet. The Daily Beast, an Internet news source, said Sept. 17 that Ahmed Akkari, who helped incite protest against a series of satirical drawings of Mohammed published in a Danish newspaper, has recanted many of his violent Akkari positions and has said lectures by Peninsula College’s Wes Cecil of Port Townsend contributed to this conversion. Akkari, 35, is a Danish Muslim who led protests in 2005 against the JyllandsPosten newspaper, which had published 12 representations of Mohammed, whose image is sacred to Muslims. “But it was a cartoon by artist Kurt Westergaard depicting Muhammad with

CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula College Professor Wes Cecil’s online lectures were credited for an Islamic activist’s conversion to a more reasoned point of view. a bomb in his turban that would provoke a violent global crisis,” according to The Daily Beast. Protests led to violence in several countries and resulted in about 200 deaths, according to news reports. Akkari moved in 2008 to Greenland,

where he had time to reflect, according to The Daily Beast. When he re-emerged this year, he apologized to several of those he had protested against. TURN

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Dungeness River feted in style this weekend BY JOE SMILLIE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

DIANE URBANI

DE LA

PAZ/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Jamestown S’Klallam storyteller and elder Elaine Grinnell will discuss “Drums, Baskets and Stories of the Jamestown S’Klallam People” as part of the 14th Dungeness River Festival in Sequim this weekend.

SEQUIM –– The 14th annual Dungeness River Festival will celebrate the river and its role in the North Olympic Peninsula’s ecosystem for two days next weekend. With a theme “Think Downstream . . . Go Green!,” this year’s festival features music, nature walks, storytelling and special presentations. The festival will run from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday and Saturday with events in Railroad Bridge Park at the end of West

he festival is organized by the Dungeness River Audubon Center every year on the last weekend of September.

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Hendrickson Road. Admission is free. In conjunction with the festival, the Olympic Driftwood Sculptors organization will host its annual show from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday in the river center at the park, dis-

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playing art made of driftwood by area artisans. The festival is organized by staff and volunteers at the Dungeness River Audubon Center every year on the last full weekend of September to celebrate the river’s natural and cultural resources. Hundreds of students are expected to descend on the interactive exhibits on opening day, and special attractions are planned for adults as well. Good walking shoes and notebooks might be in order.

BUSINESS CLASSIFIED COMICS COMMENTARY/LETTERS DEAR ABBY DEATHS HOROSCOPE MOVIES NATION/WORLD

B6 B6 B5 A7 B5 A6 B5 A6 A3

PENINSULA POLL A2 PUZZLES/GAMES B4, B8 B1 SPORTS B12 WEATHER


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UpFront

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2013, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Group Ltd./Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Contents copyright © 2013, Peninsula Daily News MEMBER

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The Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Willie Nelson pulls out of four shows WILLIE NELSON HAS been forced to pull out of the Southern Ground Music & Food Festival and three other shows due to a shoulder injury. Nelson’s publicist said Wednesday that the country music star is under a doctor’s Nelson orders to rest his shoulder for a week, meaning he’ll miss shows in Carmel, Ind.; Charlotte, Mich.; Springfield, Ill.; and Saturday’s appearance at the festival hosted by Zac Brown in Nashville, Tenn. Nelson, 80, is expected to be on the road again in Louisville, Ky., on Oct. 15, the same day he releases his album “To All the Girls . . .”

Kicking it up a notch When Joseph GordonLevitt was 12 years old and shooting “Angels in the Outfield,” one of his co-stars, Tony Danza, asked him if he’d like to hang out during some down time. “No,” replied the boy, who had more serious plans. “I have to go follow the director around.” Danza broke into laughter telling the story because it’s that same

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

YES, IT’S

QUITE AN HONOR

“Weird Al” Yankovic takes a selfportrait at a supply closet at Rogers State University in Claremore, Okla., named in his honor in tribute to a gag in “UHF,” a movie that starred the top-selling comedy recording artist of all time and was filmed 25 years ago in Tulsa. ambitious youngster, now 32, who’s given him his latest movie job. Danza plays the father in “Don Jon,” Gordon-Levitt’s directorial debut. Which he also wrote. And stars in. “What can I say? He’s a guy with a strong vision, and real self-assuredness,” Danza said. “I’m really proud of the kid.” You can forgive Danza for calling his director a “kid.” Because despite his long resume, which includes working with some of Hollywood’s top filmmakers in movies like “Inception” and “The Dark Knight Rises” (Christopher Nolan) and “Lincoln” (Steven Spiel-

berg), Gordon-Levitt still looks in many ways like, well, a kid. Which is one reason Gordon-Levitt audiences may be surprised at the choice he made for his debut: a dark, edgy comedy about porn addiction that had to be carefully edited to avoid an NC-17 rating. Not only is “Don Jon” not a traditional romantic comedy, it suggests that those romantic comedies are just as addictive and destructive to real relationships as porn.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL TUESDAY’S QUESTION: Do you think a federal government shutdown should be risked to force changes in the Affordable Care Act, aka “Obamacare”? Yes

45.8%

No

50.5%

Undecided 3.7% Total votes cast: 1,136 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications

Passings By The Associated Press

LUCIANO VINCENZONI, 87, an urbane Italian screenwriter who worked with Billy Wilder, Dino De Laurentiis and other giants of film but to his dismay was best known for writing two spaghetti westerns starring a young Clint Eastwood, died Sunday in Rome. His death was reported by ANSA, the Italian news service. Mr. Vincenzoni contributed to about 70 films, chiefly as a screenwriter or script doctor. His humorous touch could be found in films like “Seduced and Abandoned,” which he made with Pietro Germi in 1964, and “The Best of Enemies,” which De Laurentiis, the producer, released in the United States in 1962. But to the general public, Mr. Vincenzoni was most associated with “For a Few Dollars More” and “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” two hugely successful Italian-made westerns directed by Sergio Leone that are now recognized as classics. The spaghetti western craze began with Mr. Leone’s film “A Fistful of Dollars,” which gave viewers a morally murky landscape and a taciturn “Man With

No Name” character played by Eastwood. Released in Italy in 1964 and in the United States in early 1967, the movie revitalized the western genre. Mr. Vincenzoni wrote the screenplay with Leone for the follow-up, “For a Few Dollars More,” imbuing it with humor and irony that the first film lacked. Eastwood even smiled. Mr. Vincenzoni was also a canny businessman. In his book Sergio Leone: Something to Do With Death, author Christopher Frayling relates an encounter between Mr. Vincenzoni and Hollywood executives from United Artists who had come to Italy to see “For a Few Dollars More,” which was breaking box-office records. They not only bought the overseas rights but also wanted to know about the

next film in the series. With the “tacit agreement” of his Italian partners, Mr. Vincenzoni told the author, “I began to invent things,” spinning out the idea for a movie on the fly, describing what would become “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.” Between the vision of Leone, the acting of Eastwood, the music of Ennio Morricone and the writing of Mr. Vincenzoni, said Jeffrey Richardson, the curator for Western history, popular culture and firearms at the Autry National Center in Los Angeles, “the package that these four contributors were able to put together radically transformed the genre” and in the 1960s “signified where America was at the time.”

The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

1938 (75 years ago) G.F. Christian, Port Townsend city clerk for 11 years and a longtime resident of Jefferson County, died Sept. 22. He was 72. Christian also was secretary of the Port Townsend Elks Lodge for 15 years and active in the Association of Washington Cities. He is survived by four children in Port Townsend: Carl Christian, Harvey Christian, Cora McKay and Iris Reamer.

down in 1957, and some of its operations were transferred to Rayonier’s Port Angeles mill.

1988 (25 years ago)

Most of Lincoln School’s buildings in Port Angeles are in good structural condition and could be fixed up for continued use, according to a report from a structural engineering firm hired by the school district. The old brick school at the corner of Eighth and C streets has been the object of neighborhood complaints that it is an eyesore. 1963 (50 years ago) It was built in the 1920s Looking for a few bricks, and closed in 1978 when an ax, hand tools, a steelan architectural review Seen Around frame building or a 10-ton showed that it wouldn’t be Peninsula snapshots bridge crane? worth rehabilitating. Laugh Lines These and almost everyFULL DOUBLE The School Board, which thing else you can think of has had the property for RAINBOW visible from OFFICIALS IN several Port Angeles points are going on the auction sale for 10 years with no WASHINGTON, D.C., block as Rayonier Inc. sells takers, will discuss the latat sundown Tuesday have proposed a 24-hour its pulp mill in Shelton. evening . . . est report and what to do waiting period before peoAuctioneers have put a with the unused school ple can get tattoos. WANTED! “Seen Around” value of $20 million on the complex this month. Or, as people who want items. Send them to PDN News goods up for sale. Buyers Old Lincoln School still tattoos put it, “You mean Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles are expected from through- is for sale. The asking price we gotta stay drunk for 24 WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or out the world. is $506,000 for the four hours?” email news@peninsuladailynews. buildings and 5.61 acres. The Shelton mill shut Jimmy Fallon com.

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS THURSDAY, Sept. 26, the 269th day of 2013. There are 96 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On Sept. 26, 1789, Thomas Jefferson was confirmed by the Senate to be the first United States secretary of state; John Jay, the first chief justice; and Edmund Randolph, the first attorney general. On this date: ■ In 1777, British troops occupied Philadelphia during the American Revolution. ■ In 1892, John Philip Sousa and his newly formed band performed publicly for the first time at the Stillman Music Hall in Plainfield, N.J.

■ In 1918, the Meuse-Argonne offensive, resulting in an Allied victory against the Germans, began during World War I. ■ In 1937, the radio drama “The Shadow,” starring Orson Welles, premiered on the Mutual Broadcasting System. ■ In 1952, philosopher George Santayana died in Rome at age 88. ■ In 1955, following word that President Dwight D. Eisenhower had suffered a heart attack, the New York Stock Exchange saw its worst price decline since 1929. ■ In 1960, the first debate between presidential nominees took place in Chicago as Democrat John F. Kennedy and Republican Richard M. Nixon faced off before

a national TV audience. ■ In 1962, Maury Wills of the Los Angeles Dodgers stole his 100th base during a 13-1 victory over the Houston Colt .45s. ■ In 1986, William H. Rehnquist was sworn in as the 16th chief justice of the United States, while Antonin Scalia joined the Supreme Court as its 103rd member. ■ In 1990, the Motion Picture Association of America announced it had created a new rating, NC-17, to replace the X rating. ■ In 1991, four men and four women began a two-year stay inside a sealed-off structure in Oracle, Ariz., called Biosphere 2. They emerged from the structure

on this date in 1993. ■ Ten years ago: The government issued a recall for Segway scooters, citing instances in which riders fell off when the batteries ran low. ■ Five years ago: Hollywood screen legend and philanthropist Paul Newman died in Westport, Conn., at age 83. Swiss pilot Yves Rossy leaped from a plane over Calais, France, and crossed the English Channel on a homemade jet-propelled wing in 13 minutes. ■ One year ago: A judge in Pennsylvania upheld perjury charges against two Penn State administrators in the Jerry Sandusky case.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, September 26, 2013 P A G E

A3 Briefly: Nation Benghazi probe was unbiased, new audit says WASHINGTON — A State Department audit found Wednesday that an investigation into last year’s deadly attack on a U.S. diplomatic post in Benghazi, Libya, was unbiased, countering claims from GOP members of Congress that it lacked independence. But the audit says weaknesses persist in how the State Department identifies threats overseas. The assessIssa ment by the department’s inspector general backs up the Benghazi review chaired by former Ambassador Thomas Pickering and former Joint Chiefs Chairman Adm. Mike Mullen, who were the subjects of a sharp examination from Republicans on the House oversight committee last week. A spokesman for Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., the oversight committee chairman, noted that the independence and effectiveness of the State Department inspector general’s office, too, has been the subject of bipartisan concern.

Gunman’s note WASHINGTON — Washington Navy Yard gunman Aaron Alexis left a note saying he was driven to kill by months of bombardment with extremely lowfrequency radio waves, the FBI said Wednesday in a disclosure that explains the phrase he

etched on his shotgun: “My ELF Weapon!” Alexis did not target particular individuals during the Sept. 16 attack in which he killed 12 people, and there is no indication the shooting stemmed from any workplace dispute, said Valerie Parlave, head of the FBI’s Washington field office. Instead, authorities said, his behavior in the weeks before the shooting and records later recovered from the hotel room where he was staying reveal a man increasingly in the throes of paranoia and delusions. Alexis, a 34-year-old former Navy reservist and computer technician for a defense contractor, used a valid badge to get into the Navy Yard with a sawed-off Remington shotgun he had purchased legally two days earlier.

Wanted teen arrested LAS VEGAS — A Las Vegasarea teenager who had been sought in the U.S. and along the Mexican border following the butcher knife slayings of his mother and younger brother last week was arrested Wednesday, sitting alone at an open-air food court near the Las Vegas Strip. Henderson, Nev., police said detectives got a tip that Adrian Navarro-Canales, 16, was seen in the same food court late Tuesday, no more than 9 miles from his suburban apartment where the bloody bodies of his mother and brother were found in the bathroom Friday. Navarro-Canales offered no resistance when he was arrested by Henderson police at about 10:30 a.m., police spokesman Keith Paul said in statement. A warrant issued Monday accused Navarro-Canales of killing his mother, Elvira CanalesGomez, and 9-year-old brother, Cesar Navarro. The Associated Press

Briefly: World

Talkathon ends where it began Anti-‘Obamacare’ filibuster lasts 21 hours; Senate likely to avert federal shutdown THE ASSOCIATED PRESS THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Filibuster or no, Sen. Ted Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, emerges from Cruz’s marathon speech on the Senate floor the Senate chamber after his overnight made one point: “Obamacare” had to go. crusade against the Affordable Care Act. But when the freshman Republican finally stopped talking Wednesday after 21 hours and Cruz actually joined every other senator in a 19 minutes, he was no closer to killing President 100-0 procedural vote to allow the measure to Barack Obama’s signature health care law. officially go before the Senate. The Senate promptly advanced legislation He said Republicans should rally against the required to avert a partial government shutmeasure in a vote scheduled Friday or Saturday down at midnight Monday and is expected to on whether to cut off a filibuster on the measure strip from that crucial bill the provision to itself, a vote that promises to give Democrats defund Obama’s law. controlling the chamber a procedural edge if Cruz is not successful in blocking them. Noon sitdown Since Tuesday afternoon, Cruz — with occaWeary after a day and night on his feet, Cruz sional remarks by Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, and simply sat down at noon EDT [9 a.m. PDT], the other GOP conservatives — controlled the Senate floor and railed against Obamacare. When predetermined time for the Senate to adjourn, he finally sat down, Cruz and his allies had as several of his colleagues applauded. talked for the fourth-longest Senate speech Senate Republicans and some House members congratulated the Texas freshman. since precise record-keeping began in 1900.

Low premiums, high deductibles looming ‘Obamacare’ worth it, says White House BY RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR

Iran has agreed to meet with six world powers today on the sidelines of the United NAIROBI, Kenya — Working near bodies crushed by rubble in Nations General Assembly a bullet-scarred, scorched mall, to try to Rouhani FBI agents began fingerprint, restart nuclear DNA and ballistic analysis negotiations that stalled in Wednesday to help determine April. the identities and nationalities “If there is political will on of victims and al-Shabab gunthe other side, which we think men who attacked the shopping there is, we are ready to talk,” center. President Hasan Rouhani told A gaping hole in the mall’s editors in New York. roof was caused by Kenyan soldiers who fired rocket-propelled grenades inside, knocking out a New island emerges support column, a government KARACHI, Pakistan — official said. Alongside the carnage of PakiThe official said the soldiers stan’s massive earthquake Tuesfired to distract a terrorist day came a new creation: a sniper so hostages could be small island of mud, stone and evacuated. bubbling gas pushed forth from The current death toll is 67 the seabed. and is likely to climb with Experts said the island was uncounted bodies remaining in formed by the massive movethe wreckage of the mall. ment of the Earth during the 7.7-magnitude quake that hit ‘Nothing to hide’ Pakistan’s Baluchistan province, UNITED NATIONS — Iran’s killing at least 285 people. The 250-foot-by-60-foot new president said Wednesday his country is ready to negotiate island appeared off the coast of Gwadar, a port about 330 miles and has “nothing to hide” as from Pakistan’s largest city of world powers prepare to revive Karachi. stalled talks over Tehran’s disputed nuclear activities. The Associated Press

FBI analyzing at nightmarish Nairobi scene

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

You might be pleased with the low monthly premium for one of the new health insurance plans under President Barack Obama’s overhaul. But the added expense of copayments and deductibles could burn a hole in your wallet. An independent analysis, released Wednesday on the heels of an administration report emphasizing affordable premiums, is helping to fill out the bottom line for consumers. The annual deductible for a midrange “silver” plan averaged $2,550 in a sample of six states studied by Avalere Health, or more than twice the typical deductible in employer plans.

How much you pay A deductible is the amount consumers must pay each year before their plan starts picking up the bills. Americans looking for a health plan in new state insurance markets that open next week will face a trade-off familiar to purchasers of automobile coverage: To keep your premiums manageable, you agree to pay a bigger chunk of the repair bill if you get in a crash. Except that unlike an auto accident, serious illness is often not a self-contained event.

Quick Read

ALSO . . .

Not same Healththe premium estimates vary

■ Columnist Mark Harvey on where to find help locally/B4

Average monthly premiums for a benchmark health care policy — known as a “silver” plan under the Affordable Care Act — for an individual, based on a federal analysis of data submitted by insurers. Wyoming Alaska Mississippi Connecticut Vermont Indiana Maine New Jersey Louisiana California North Carolina Arkansas Rhode Island Wisconsin Delaware New Hampshire South Dakota North Dakota Washington New York South Carolina Virginia Missouri West Virginia Florida U.S. average Ohio Alabama Georgia Montana Nebraska Michigan Colorado Texas Maryland Dist. of Columbia Nevada Iowa Illinois Pennsylvania Idaho New Mexico Oklahoma Utah Kansas Arizona Oregon Tennessee Minnesota

$516 474 448 436 413 403 403 385 374 373 369 366 366 361 360 360 357 353 352 349 339 335 334 331 328 328 321 318 317 316 312 306 305 305 299 297 297 287 286 286 285 282 266 266 260 252 250 245

“Consumers will need to balance lower monthly premiums against the potential for unpredictable, expensive out-of-pocket costs in plans with higher deductibles,” said Caroline Pearson, a vice president of the private market analysis firm. “There is a risk that patients could forgo needed care when faced with high up-front deductibles.”

White House response

192

NOTE: Hawaii, Kentucky and Massachusetts data not available. SOURCE: Department of Health and Human Services

AP

Avalere also found that the new plans will require patients to pay a hefty share of the cost — 40 percent on average — for certain pricey drugs, like the newer specialty medications used to treat intractable chronic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. On the other hand, preventive care will be free of charge to the patient.

Responding to the Avalere study, the Obama administration acknowledged the new plans aren’t as generous as employer coverage but said they nonetheless represent a big improvement over currently available individual policies, which can have gaps in coverage and even larger outof-pocket costs. Also on Wednesday, the administration unveiled premiums and plan choices for 36 states where the federal government is taking the lead to cover uninsured residents. Insurance markets that go live this Tuesday will offer subsidized private coverage to people who do not have health insurance on the job, including the uninsured and those who currently buy their own policies. Before new tax credits that work like a discount for most consumers, premiums for a midrange “silver” benchmark plan will average $328 a month nationally for an individual, the administration report found.

. . . more news to start your day

West: California raises its state minimum wage

Nation: Obama OK with not meeting Iran president

Nation: Gun group offering free weapons to Floridians

World: Foreigners apt targets, terror group says

CALLING IT A “matter of justice,” Gov. Jerry Brown put his signature on a bill that will hike California’s minimum wage to $10 an hour within three years, making it one of the highest rates in the nation. The legislation signed Wednesday at a ceremony in downtown Los Angeles will gradually raise the current minimum of $8 an hour to $9 on July 1, 2014, then to $10 on Jan. 1, 2016. [By comparison, the Washington state minimum wage currently is $9.14, and Oregon’s is $9.10.] Wednesday’s increase is the first for California’s minimum wage in six years.

THE WHITE HOUSE said President Barack Obama isn’t disappointed that he didn’t get to meet Iranian President Hasan Rouhani this week. Press secretary Jay Carney said Obama was and remains open to the possibility of an informal encounter with Iran’s new president at a future date. Carney said people shouldn’t overinterpret the fact that the Iranians decided against some type of meeting Tuesday when both presidents were at the United Nations for a meeting of its General Assembly. U.S. and Iranian leaders have not met in 36 years, since the Jimmy Carter administration.

A GUN GROUP is offering free shotguns to residents in Florida, billing it as a way for people to protect themselves against crime. Members of the Florida chapter of the Armed Citizen Project, which is based in Texas, began advertising the program on fliers in the Sunshine Gardens neighborhood near Orlando. The neighborhood is about 25 miles south of Sanford, where neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman killed Trayvon Martin. Ron Ritter, Armed Citizen Project of Florida president, said the donated guns will reach their new owners through dealers or gun shops.

AL-SHABAB, THE ARMED Somali Islamic extremist group that attacked a shopping mall in Kenya, said Wednesday that foreigners were a “legitimate target” and confirmed witness accounts that gunmen tried to let Muslims go free while killing or taking the others captive. At least 18 foreigners were killed, including six Britons and citizens from France, Canada, Trinidad, the Netherlands, Australia, Peru, India, Ghana, South Africa and China, when the militants entered the mall Saturday, slaughtering men, women and children with assault rifles and grenades, and taking non-Muslims hostage.


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 — (C)

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PA man Utilities: Funding Professor: charged in assault with auto Case status hearing Oct. 31, trial Dec. 9 BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

CONTINUED FROM A1 said inadequate funding for improvements could force That $7 per month is roughly future councils to impose even 42 percent of the total proposed higher rates. “I don’t know exactly what $17-per-month increase, said Craig Fulton, the city’s public to do about that, but I’m not works and utilities director, and comfortable with that at all,� is due mostly to an increase in Bruch said. the rate the city pays the Bonneville Power Administration. Wastewater, garbage

Maintenance, upgrades The consulting firm used data on the cost of running each of the city’s four major utilities to determine how much each rate would have to increase to pay for maintenance, operation and replacement. “The question of the city’s renewal and replacement of its infrastructure is a large part of the upcoming budget discussions,� Lusk said. Fulton said the recommended rates are a way for the city to partially recoup the costs of replacing utility infrastructure without drastically increasing the cost to ratepayers. “It’s kind of a balancing act of looking to the future and trying to support our present as well,� Fulton said.

Recommendations were made for wastewater, garbage and water. Wastewater rates for those using more than 430 cubic feet of water per month would increase by about $4.50, or about 6.7 percent, and by about 6.5 percent for residents using less than 430 cubic feet of water per month. Weekly garbage pickup service would increase $2.09 per month from $30.65 to $32.74, an increase of about 6.8 percent. Every-other-week garbage service could go from $19.75 to $20.35 per month, an increase of about 3 percent. “[The] every-other-week rate is trying to be incentivized,� Sanchez Virnoche told council members. “We’re making up the difference in the weekly rate.� Under the recommendations, residents using about 450 cubic feet of water per month would see a $1.99 increase, about a 5.5 percent increase. The city has contracted with FCS Group to pay a maximum of $145,876 for the cost of the service study, Lusk said. As of the end of August, the city had paid just more than $84,057 to the firm, Lusk added.

CONTINUED FROM A1

He told The Daily Beast that the writings of exiled Egyptian scholar Nasr Hamed Abu Zayd transformed him and recommended the work of Cecil, whose YouTube videos include disquisitions on Arabic literature, Karl Marx, Jacques Derrida and Simone de Beauvoir. Cecil, 47, who has worked as an adjunct professor at Peninsula College teaching English and philosophy for 17 years, has not had any personal contact with Akkari and first heard of the former radical’s change of heart from a reporter seeking a comment. “I started doing these public lectures a few years ago as a way to draw people into the college and began posting them on YouTube,� said Cecil, who holds a doctorate in English from Indiana University. “I have no idea how Akkari found me — probably through the magic of Google,� Cecil said. At present, 29 of the audio-only onehour lectures are available on YouTube and viewable at http://tinyurl.com/ PDN-Cecil-lectures, including examinations of individual philosophers and discussions of the language, literature and civilization of different cultures.

Videos

Cecil said he isn’t responsible for Akkari’s change of heart. “Most of the credit has to go to Akkari. He made the leap of deciding to ask questions about his own beliefs,� Cecil said. “Having the time to be in an isolated place and reduce external pressures can lead to a time of reflection and selfquestioning, and it takes a huge effort to make that change,� Cecil added. “Education always comes from the inside. You cannot educate from the outside in.�

Understand different cultures PORT ANGELES — A Port Angeles man police say Cecil said the first step toward backed his pickup truck peaceful coexistence with another couninto another man, sending try is to understand its culture. him into a nearby ditch, has He said the CIA lacked any station been charged with two felochiefs who spoke Arabic prior to the nies. 9/11 terrorism. Todd Edward Baker, 49, “It was a horrible situation that we pleaded not guilty Wedneswere so fundamentally ignorant of the day in Clallam County culture that we were trying to underSuperior Court to one count stand and observe,� he said. each of vehicular assault “If we are going to negotiate with and hit-and-run resulting Iran, we damn well better understand in an injury. Persian history if we want to be sucThe charges stem from cessful.� Baker allegedly backing his Such understanding of different truck on purpose into David viewpoints is also necessary domestiBauman, 49, of Port Angecally, Cecil said. Cecil lecture tonight les after the two left a wake “Half the country is convinced that Cecil will lecture today at 6 p.m. in anyone who voted for George Bush is for a friend at a home on Room D at the Old Schoolhouse in Fort either an idiot or venal, and the other South Alder Lane south of Worden State Park, beginning this half thinks that anyone who voted for U.S. Highway 101 on Those who can’t pay year’s series of free lectures on lan- Barack Obama is either an idiot or antiSept. 11. Angie Sanchez Virnoche, one guages and literature. Baker has maintained American,� he said. of the owners of FCS Group, The subject of tonight’s lecture is he did not see Bauman “But well-meaning, well-informed told council members the proRussian language, culture and civilizawhen he backed up his people voted for both, and we have a posed increases also are partion. truck, and Bauman has hard time conceptualizing that.� tially designed to cover resiOthers will be Oct. 17, Nov. 21, said he does not think Cecil said a politician’s strong ideoldents who are not able to pay Dec. 19, Jan. 16, Feb. 20, March 20, Baker did it on purpose. ogy can decrease their efficiency. some or all of their utility bills. April 17 and May 15. Bauman suffered a bro“Politicians aren’t supposed to have Deputy Mayor Brad Collins “My approach is to try to show the ken ankle, a head laceraideas,� he said. said he thought higher rates to great power and humanity that is resition and other injuries “If you believe in an idea, you won’t cover those who cannot pay dent in every great culture, going when the truck struck him negotiate, and if you won’t negotiate, could potentially create more through history to see what’s influand pushed him into a who can’t pay. enced them and where those influences you are not doing politics.� ditch, according to Clallam ________ ________ “Won’t we keep increasing have come from,� Cecil said. County Sheriff ’s Office the rates until nobody can pay?� “The raising of the questions and the Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can be Jefferson County Editor Charlie Bermant accounts. Collins asked. raising of the problems seemed to be can be reached at 360-385-2335 or cbermant@ reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5074, or Baker was released from Councilwoman Sissi Bruch at jschwartz@peninsuladailynews.com. very helpful to Akkari.� peninsuladailynews.com. the Clallam County jail on his own recognizance last Friday after turning himself in to the Sheriff’s Office the day before. He is next set to appear CONTINUED FROM A1 in Clallam County Superior Court on Oct. 31 for a case Staff in the City Attorstatus hearing. A preliminary jury trial ney’s Office started trackdate has been set for Dec. 9. ing how many criminal cases had been deferred from the county in the latDeputy account ter part of 2011, City AttorA Sheriff’s Office report ney Bill Bloor has said. gave this account: During that time, 59 Baker and Bauman were cases were deferred as misasked to leave the gather- demeanors and thereby ing at the Alder Lane home made the city’s responsibilbecause they were arguing. ity, Bloor said. As Bauman was standThe city handled 930 ing near where the drive- total criminal cases in 2011, way to the home and Alder according to figures from Lane met, Baker reversed the Attorney’s Office. his truck along Alder Lane THE ASSOCIATED PRESS In 2012, Bloor said the and diagonally across the city handled 128 deferred driveway until he hit Bau- cases, or 15 percent of the AVING A FIELD DAY man. total 838 criminal cases it Baker then got out of the worked through that year. Six mule deer pause in a harvested wheat field to look back at the cause of their run up truck, yelled at Bauman as Figures for 2013 were the hill near Prescott on Monday. he lay in a ditch on the not immediately available. south side of the driveway, then drove off.

Crime

H

________ Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula dailynews.com.

Send PDN to school! SUPPORT EDUCATION: When you go on vacation, donate the credit for your suspended copies to provide the PDN to schools. Phone 360-452-4507

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

River: Welcome ceremony, performance

CONTINUED FROM A1 District, at 3 p.m. At 11:30 a.m., the Five Friday highlights Acre School marimba band include a river walk led by Sound Waves will perform, Bob Boekelheide at 11 a.m.; and at 3 p.m., Aspire Acada presentation by James- emy dance and music stutown S’Klallam storyteller dents will demonstrate and elder Elaine Grinnell, their talents. On both Friday and Sat“Drums, Baskets and Stories of the Jamestown urday, nonprofits will offer S’Klallam People,� at interactive nature exhibits 2:30 p.m.; and a natural and activities. Exhibits will landscaping walk led by Joe demonstrate energy effiHoltrop, district manager of ciency, water conservation the Clallam Conservation and clean air measures.

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Also, festivalgoers can try their skills at “Animal Olympics� when they mimic a specific animal. For example, they can “Jump Like a Frog� or “Walk Like a Crab.� Food will include wraps, sandwiches, soup, tacos and the ever-popular fry bread. On Saturday, the Jamestown S’Klallam drummers and singers will lead a traditional welcome ceremony at 10 a.m., and the Young

Fiddlers will perform at 11 a.m. Saturday afternoon activities in the River Stage amphitheater will include Jazzercise and a drumming circle. At 2 p.m., Ken Wiersema will lead a walk onto the bridge and talk about how early engineers built the historic railroad bridge in 1915. Partners of the river center include the Jamestown

S’Klallam tribe and the Olympic Peninsula Audubon Society. For a complete schedule, visit www.DungenessRiver Center.org. For more information, phone the Dungeness River Audubon Center at 360681-4076.

_________ Sequim-Dungeness Valley Editor Joe Smillie can be reached at 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, or at jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2013

A5

Clallam planning a response for animals in emergencies BY ROB OLLIKAINEN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Clallam County emergency managers and volunteers are hashing out an animal disaster plan to ensure that pets and livestock don’t get overlooked in the event of an emergency. The three commissioners discussed a draft version of the “Animals in Disaster Response and Recovery Plan” at their work session Tuesday. “It’s been a big project,” said Priscilla Stockner, volunteer animals-in-disasters coordinator. “We’re three or four volunteers who have spent the good part of a year and a half developing what you see here.”

46-page draft The 46-page draft calls for a coordinated response for the evacuation, care and sheltering of animals in emergencies such as earthquakes, floods, winter storms and wildfires. Central to the effort will be the assembly of a “local animal response group” that consists of Clallam County emergency management, health and human services, animal control, Washington State University Extension, state Department of Agri-

culture, private veterinarians, the Clallam County Humane Society and others. The idea is to set up decentralized locations around the county — churches, fields or berms on farmlands — where pets and livestock could be taken and cared for in the wake of a disaster. “The cool thing about animal sheltering is that it’s a little different than people: You don’t need have to have a kitchen and a shower,” Clallam County Emergency Management Program Coordinator Jamye Wisecup told commissioners. “You can have a field.” Commissioners reviewed the draft along with a laminated map depicting vulnerable bridges in the county. “We should not be just courthouse-centric on the animal shelter and rescue,” Wisecup said after the briefing. “Our next step is to get the local animal-response group put together. These are sort of the captains of the ship.” After the group is assembled and trained, officials will identify supply-drop areas and temporary shelter sites. The final plan will be submitted for state approval

in January. It will become an appendix to the Clallam County Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan and used in a fullscale disaster exercise planned for March 2016, Wisecup said. Animal disaster preparedness is needed because human shelters don’t allow pets or livestock, and many people refuse to leave their animals unsupervised, according to the draft. Commissioner Jim McEntire recalled seeing images of animals being loaded onto helicopters during the recent floods in Colorado. “People don’t want to leave their animals,” McEntire said, adding that the draft is a “great start of a comprehensive thing.”

Public health

plan, Doherty suggested involving tribal biologists who track eagles and other wildlife and county residents who are trained to help seabirds during oil spills. “We certainly would want their input,” Stockner said. Stockner said she developed a similar animal disaster plan as director of animal control in Palm Beach County, Fla. A part-time veterinarian, Stockner returned to Snohomish County and worked on another animal disaster plan there. “If you recall in Katrina, not only did we not have supplies, we had no places [for animals],” Stockner said, referring to the 2005 hurricane that decimated New Orleans and other communities on the Gulf coast. “And we had chaos,” Stockner said. “And people with warm hearts and many with deep pockets wanted to come and help. “It was literally a disaster, as you’re well aware, up until probably through the first eight months after the hurricane.”

Animal disaster preparedness also can alleviate public health and safety risks caused by animals running loose and animal carcasses, according to the draft. Commissioner Mike Doherty suggested bringing the Clallam County public health officer and prosecut________ ing attorney on board to “chime in” about carcass Reporter Rob Ollikainen can disposal and liability. be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. Although wildlife is not 5072, or at rollikainen@peninsula included in the disaster dailynews.com.

On behalf of the owners Dan & Kelie Morrison and Jerry & Kim Payne

The countless hours that have been given by these wonderful people is the reason ESP puts on world class events.

WIPE

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Industrial pretreatment coordinator Frank Dick displays flushable wipes that made it through a test to see whether they would break down at the Westside Wasterwater Treatment Plant in Vancouver, Wash. Various bathroom wipes were specially dyed and then sent through the sewer system, but instead of dissolving, most wound up intact.

GRAND OLYMPICS CHORUS PRESENTS

Weather Girl Saturday, September 28 2 & 7 pm Sequim High School Aspire! TH(2013 4th place Region 13

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Sweet Adelines International Region 13, Sequim WA www.grandolympicschorus.org

The Jaybirds No Batteries Required Olympic Peninsula Men’s Chorus

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Would like to thank all of the amazing Volunteers that helped us make the Sprint Boat Races & the Run-a-Muck Mud Challenge course a huge success!

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tickets: Pacific Mist Books, 121 W. Washington Ave., Sequim

In honor of our volunteers we will be hosting a volunteer appreciation BBQ

We could not have done this without the support of our amazing community and the hard work and dedication of our volunteers.

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Please bring your favorite side dish or dessert & ESP will provide the meat and refreshments. We hope to see you there! www.extremesportspark.net | 2917 W. Edgewood Dr., Port Angeles, WA 98363

Saturday, September 28th 11:00 am - 6:00 pm

Adult art classes now forming. Catherine Mix, Pat Starr, Irene Loghry, Martha Rudersdorf

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$12 Adults $6 Children & Students Tuesday Reserved $12 or $6 Festival at the Door.

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Paulaner Oktoberfest Marzen Beer on Draught! Featuring an assortment of Uli’s German Brats, Sauerkraut, Potato Salad, Toga’s Soups and Pane d’Amore Rolls Uli’s sausages also available for take home! Sponsored by Air Flo Buy a brat and get entered in our Traeger Grill Giveaway!

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A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

United Way sets sights on $1 million fundraising goal

Briefly . . .

ciation barbecue from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. The Extreme Sports Park is located at 2917 W. Edgewood Drive. Volunteers should bring PENINSULA DAILY NEWS a favorite side dish or desSEQUIM — Olympic PORT ANGELES — sert, and the Extreme Theatre Arts will offer HalSports Park will provide the United Way of Clallam loween makeup lessons and meat and refreshments. County aims to raise costume design tips during $1 million to give to area the First Friday Artwalk on Sierra Club hike nonprofits during its 61st Friday, Oct. 4. annual fund drive. QUILCENE — A hike The event will be at the The drive, kicked off on OTA theater, 414 N. Sequim along the Silver Lakes Trail the Day of Caring on Sept. to celebrate Public Lands Ave., from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. 14, has the theme “We Are Day will be hosted by the United.” OTA’s expert makeup North Olympic Group of the Projects for the Day of artist/costume designer Caring, coordinated by Port Rosie Von Engel will share a Sierra Club on Wednesday. Beginning at 8 a.m. and Angeles City Councilman portfolio of makeup designs Patrick Downie, brought out she has done, and there will ending at 6 p.m., the hike will originate from the 209 volunteers at 11 sites be costumes on display. She will share her tricks Mount Townsend Trailhead across the county who near Quilcene. together donated 809 hours of the trade with attendees. The trail is 11 miles of volunteer service valued Visitors will enter and round trip with a 20 perat more than $16,000. exit through the dressing cent grade for the first room, and there will be signs 3 miles and 8 percent for Yearly mobilization posted to direct attendees. the last 2.5 miles. This key group of volunDepending on the group’s Elks meal benefit teers provides leadership interest and stamina, the and direction to the annual hike may be shortened. SEQUIM — A benefit campaign, recruits volunHikers will talk about breakfast will be hosted teers and gets the commuby the Sequim Elks Lodge, the Wild Olympics plan, as nity mobilized in raising much of the road to the 143 Port Williams Road, local funds that stay in the from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. trailhead goes along proposed wilderness and a por- community. Sunday. Soon, many United Way tion of the trail is in areas Menu items are waffles, being considered in the plan. volunteers will be wearing scrambled eggs, hashtheir Live United T-shirts Hikers interested in the browns, sausage links, fruit, and asking colleagues and outing should be in good juice, coffee and tea. physical shape to handle the community members to Cost is $8 per person. make an investment to steep grade and the rocky Proceeds support the change lives. terrain, and wear waterElks National Foundation. The campaign chairman proof boots that are in good this year is Buck Gieseke of condition. Volunteer event Integrity One Home MortAttendees should pack PORT ANGELES — The for different types of gages Inc. Extreme Sports Park, host “When we are actively weather and bring rain gear. of the recent sprint boat involved, we see firsthand To RSVP for the hike, races and the Run-A-Muck the difference we can make email bill.volmut@gmail. Obstacle Course Challenge, com. and become more than Peninsula Daily News donors; we become commuwill hold a volunteer appre-

Halloween aid offered by makeup artist

UNITED WAY

OF

CLALLAM COUNTY

Tammy Rux from Wells Fargo Bank, a United Way board member and the chair for the Sequim campaign, poses after volunteering at Gerhardt Park in Sequim on the Day of Caring. nity investors,” he said. The individual campaigns and the volunteers leading them as members of United Way’s Campaign Cabinet are: ■ Port Angeles Business campaigns will be guided by Amelia Andaleon of Andaleon & Associates. ■ The Port Angeles campaign will be led by Lisa Meyer of US Bank. ■ Tammy Rux from Wells Fargo Bank is chairing the Sequim campaign. ■ Julie Sell and Rich Newman are co-chairing the Olympic Medical Center Employees Combined

Fund Drive. ■ County Auditor Patty Rosand and Iva Burks, director of county Health and Human Services, will lead the Clallam County employee effort. ■ Sequim’s Brown Maloney of KONP Radio is chairing the Olympic Club leadership giving portion of the campaign. ■ Nina Pitts from Peninsula College is coordinating the Washington State Employees Combined Fund Drive. ■ Travis Berglund of First Federal is chairing the Corporate Gifts Committee.

■ Christi Baron of the city of Forks will champion the Forks campaign. ■ Dave Bingham from the Crescent School District will lead the Joyce campaign. ■ Patricia Hutson, Clallam Bay fire chief, will guide the Clallam Bay/Sekiu drive. United Way of Clallam County provides funding year-round to 23 local partner agencies and four Community Solutions Initiatives. For information about this year’s campaign or how to get involved, contact Jody Moss, director, or Scott Brandon of United Way at 360457-3011.

Banging the drum for those musical muses Slim picks and grins from 4 p.m. ■ On Friday at the by High John Country Fairmount Restaurant, 1127 W. U.S. Highway 101, Nelson with Dave and Rosalie SecRusty ord and the Luck of the and Draw Band have invited Duke will have Brian “Buck” Ellard, you mov- with a new CD release, to join in the fun from 6 p.m. ing to a to 8 p.m. country On Sunday, join the groove country jam from 5 p.m. from 5 p.m. to to 7:30 p.m. ■ On Tuesday at the 8 p.m. Port Angeles Senior On Saturday, the Center, 328 E. Seventh Jimmy Hoffman Band St., the Port Angeles Senior plays country rock and Swingers present Wally’s classic rock dance tunes Boys playing ballroom from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Port Angeles ■ On Saturday at Wine dance favorites from on the Waterfront, 115 E. 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. $5 ■ Today at the Junccover; first-timers free. Railroad Ave., Rowtion Roadhouse, 242701 anTree, composed of Mary U.S. Highway 101, ChesSequim and Blyn Tulin and Mike Saunnut Junction with Ches ders, plays Celtic roots on Ferguson, guitar; Kevin ■ On Friday at The fiddle, guitars and bouBriggs, guitar; Ron Oasis Bar & Grill, 301 E. zouki from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Washington St., the Old Daylo, flute; Paul Eye■ On Friday at Barhop Sidekicks will keep your stone, bass; and percusBrewing, 124 W. Railroad feet a-dancing and your sionist Zubrie Kamau Ave., a mix of Haywire will get you grooving from toes a-tapping to country and Soulshakers — Hay- classics from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. to midnight. shakers — with a unique On Friday, dance to the 8:30 p.m. flavor of country, classic Southern rock of Testify On Saturday, the Night from 8 p.m. to midnight. $5 rock and blues percolates Beats play 1950s and ’60s from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. cover. rock ’n’ roll from 8 p.m. to ■ On Saturday, hard All Points Charters & midnight. rock comes to the R Bar, Tours can get you there On Wednesday, the 132 W. First St., in the and back free of charge. Blue Hole Quintet plays form of three bands, Mech- light jazz for your listening Phone 360-775-9128 for anism, Distinction and a ride. and dancing enjoyment Inside Defiance, at 8 p.m. from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. On Sunday, Rachael, $3 cover. Mick and Barry play ■ Today at Wind Rose ■ On Friday at Next classic rock, country and Cellars, 143 W. WashingDoor Gastropub, 113 W. folk from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. ton St., Cort Armstrong ■ Today at Castaways First St., Port Angeles’ performs from 5:30 p.m. to super rock band SuperRestaurant and Night 7:30 p.m. Trees rocks at 10 p.m. Club, 1213 Marine Drive, On Friday, The Lonely On Sunday, Howly Jerry’s Country Jam hosted Hearts Club Band plays from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. On Saturday, Neil ELEVEN YEARS ARE up, and now we start on year 12 of Keeping Live Music Alive! That first column was fewer than 500 words, and I dare say I haven’t been below 1,500 words since. Of course, when I didn’t write a column, there weren’t any words. I’ll do my best not to have anymore columns like that. Both you and the venues/musicians deserve my full attention, and the venues/musicians deserve yours in order to Keep Live Music Alive.

LIVE MUSIC

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Usselman plays blues and rock from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ■ On Friday at Nourish Restaurant, 1345 S. Sequim Ave., Steve Grandinetti performs at 6 p.m. On Wednesday, Victor Reventlow hosts an open mic from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m., with sign-ups at 6 p.m. ■ On Friday at Stymie’s Bar & Grill at Cedars at Dungeness, 1965 Woodcock Road, R&B (Rachael and Barry) play mostly acoustic rock and Motown from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ■ On Friday in Club Seven lounge at 7 Cedars Casino, Blyn, dance for the first time to Sin City, a new Top 40 dance band, from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. On Saturday, country up to the mechanical bull from 6 p.m. to 1 a.m. and dance to Denny Secord Jr. and Haywire from 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., followed by Country Rock Association from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. On Friday in the Rainforest Bar, Joey James Dean goes solo from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. On Saturday, Locos Only play from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Port Townsend ■ On Friday at Sirens, 823 Water St., Sol Tribe from San Antonio and Tobago fuse blues, hip-hop and rock with reggae at 9 p.m. $5 cover. ■ On Friday at the Port Townsend Brewing

Death Notices Edna ‘Jean’ Folden March 6, 1938 — Sept. 23, 2013

Co., 330 Tenth St., the Dirty Beat Duo (db2) (Pete Lack and Jesse Watson) play house trance and funky dance music from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. On Sunday, Shady Grove plays the final summer gig at PT Brewing from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. ■ On Saturday at the Pourhouse, 2231 Washington St., Groove Merchants play in the beer garden from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■ Today at the Uptown Pub, 1016 Lawrence St., singer/songwriter Bill Price performs folk and blues from 9 p.m. On Friday, Pies on the Run play Western swing, bluegrass and country from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., and from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m., Todd Fisher and Friends play reggae, blues and rock ’n’ roll. ■ Today, Steve Grandinetti plays guitar at the Owl Sprit Cafe, 218 Polk St., from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■ On Monday, Chuck Easton plays guitar at Alchemy, 842 Washington St., from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

High notes ■ On Friday, singer Sylvia Herold will thump her mighty archtop guitar as she presents vintage songs from America’s Golden Era of Music in a concert at Key City Playhouse, 419 Washington St., Port Townsend, at 8 p.m. Herold will be joined by double bassist Chuck Ervin, and local favorite John Morton will sit in on clarinet for this sixth performance in the Summer Cabaret Series presented by Key City Pub-

lic Theatre and George Rezendes/Toolshed Soundlab. Tickets are $15 at www.keycitypublic theater.org and at the door as available. ■ On Saturday, Olympic Community Action Programs presents Freddy Pink in a benefit concert at the Guy Cole Convention Center, 202 N Blake Ave., Sequim, from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. The $60 ticket includes the show, drinks and appetizers. For details, phone 360-385-2571. ■ On Sunday, the Stardust Big Band will perform at the Sequim Prairie Grange, 290 Macleay Road, for your listening and dancing pleasure at 5:30 p.m. Cover is $5 single, $8 couple, students free with ID. ■ On Saturday, Cowboy Country Western Apparel & Tack, 923 E. First St., Port Angeles, celebrates its 20th anniversary, and Dave and Rosalie Secord will be strolling the aisles playing favorite folk and country tunes from noon to 2 p.m.

________ John Nelson is a self-styled music lover and compulsive night owl who believes in “KLMA — Keep Live Music Alive” on the North Olympic Peninsula. His column, Live Music, appears every Thursday. Are you performing in or promoting a live music gig? Contact John by phoning 360-565-1139 or emailing news@peninsuladaily news.com, with John Nelson in the subject line. And note: Nelson’s deadline is Monday at 5 p.m. preceding Thursday’s column. Also, check out “Nightlife,” a listing of entertainment at nightspots across the Peninsula, in Friday’s Peninsula Spotlight magazine.

Now Showing

Port Angeles resident Edna “Jean” Folden died of kidney failure at her home. She was 75. Services: Celebration of life at 1 p.m. Saturday at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 301 E. Lopez Ave., Port Angeles. ■ Deer Park Cinema, Port Angeles (360-452A reception will follow. Drennan-Ford Funeral Home, Port Angeles, is in 7176) charge of arrangements. “Blue Jasmine” (PG-13) www.drennanford.com

“The Family” (R) “Insidious: Chapter 2” (PG-13) Elleanor A. Partridge “Lee Daniels’ The Butler” (PG-13) Jan. 20, 1944 — Sept. 24, 2013 “Planes” (PG; animated) Port Angeles resident Elleanor A. Partridge died at her “Prisoners” (R)

Port Angeles home. She was 69. Services: None planned. She will be inurned in Spo- ■ Lincoln Theater, Port kane. Drennan-Ford Funeral Home, Port Angeles, is in Angeles (360-457-7997) charge of arrangements. “Despicable Me 2” (PG; www.drennanford.com animated)

“Elysium” (R) “Riddick” (R)

■ The Rose Theatre,

Port Townsend (360385-1089) “Fill the Void” (PG) “In a World” (R) “The Conjuring” (R)

■ Uptown Theatre, Port

Townsend (360-3853883) Closed for digital projector conversion.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, September 26, 2013 PAGE

A7

Obama’s U.N. speech: clueless PRESIDENT OABAMA’S SPEECH to the United Nations General Assembly in New York was flawed, displaying a type of moral equivalency that does not exist for America’s enemies. His claim that “the world Cal is more stable than it was five Thomas years ago” is demonstrably false. In Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria, Kenya, Congo, to name only a few, there are at least as many conflicts as in 2008 and far more now than when the United Nations was created. According to Themner, Lotta and Peter Wallensteen, in “Armed Conflict, 1946-2011,” Journal of Peace Research, there were fewer than 20 armed conflicts in 1946. Today there are more than 30. The president seemed to take at face value a “fatwa,” or

religious edict, issued by Iran’s supreme leader, Ali Khamenei, against the development of nuclear weapons. He said, “President Rouhani has just recently reiterated that the Islamic republic will never develop a nuclear weapon.” There are reportedly a halfdozen nuclear sites in Iran where uranium is being enriched. They are buried deep in the earth and have concrete walls several feet thick. The Iranians claim they’re developing electrical power for peaceful purposes. That’s not the profile of any power station with which I am familiar. Breaking news for the president: Our enemies lie by telling us what we want to hear while behaving duplicitously. The president barely mentioned the slaughter of 85 Pakistani Christians over the weekend. He didn’t mention at all the Muslim war against Coptic Christians in Egypt. Why dwell on unpleasant

realities when wishful thinking feels better? The president again dredged up the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians, repeating the “two-state solution” formula that the Palestinians pay lip service to, while preferring a onestate solution, absent Israel. President Obama seemed to again blame America for Muslim “hostility” because of U.S. involvement “in the Muslim world.” U.S. motivation for such involvement has been twofold: Strike at terrorists and reduce the threat they pose to the U.S. and its interests, and free people from political and religious oppression. One can debate whether those goals were sufficient to prompt U.S. “involvement,” but there can be no debate that America’s objectives were altruistic and rooted in self-preservation. As an example of how political and religious differences can be resolved, the president again pointed to Northern Ireland and its many decades of internal conflict.

Peninsula Voices Who’s a lemming? In reply to the Sept. 20 letter in Peninsula Voices, “The Bandwagon,” it is a fact that our food is full of poison if you look at recent cancer, diabetes and obesity rates. Missed is the fact that many aspects of American life are affected negatively by the corporate takeover of our government, resources and airwaves. Credit our U.S. Supreme Court for much of it. For the past 127 years, its decisions have fostered the idea of corporate personhood, with the recent Citizens United decision giving corporations speech and privacy rights. We now cannot regulate election speech and money

as we have in the past. They even struck down Montana’s popular 1912 Corrupt Practices Act that controlled big money in elections after rampant corruption tainted that state’s elections. There is no mention of corporate personhood rights in the Constitution. They have been bought one senator or representative at a time. These new “personhood rights” only help the biggest of corporations and billionaires to continue rigging elections, food regulations, energy policy and tax laws and to collect hundreds of billions in corporate welfare. Sorry, education, small business, labor, air, water, infrastructure.

OUR

While the Northern Ireland conflict pitted Protestants against Catholics, the central issue was loyalty to Britain versus a united Ireland. Religion helped fuel the fire, but it wasn’t the fire itself. Neither side claimed a divine mandate to wipe out the other. Apparently unbeknownst to the president, the peace process in Ireland embodies something the fight for peace in the Middle East does not -- a willingness by all sides to cooperate. Have we seen any real offers of cooperation from Iran? Afghanistan? Egypt? The president said America has been humbled by its foreign adventures. Humility and retreat are not a policy, unless we plan to surrender to Islamists. He didn’t articulate America’s foreign policy, because he doesn’t have one. Islamic fundamentalists can only be encouraged by this speech. They include Iran’s president, Hasan Rouhani, who wants to suddenly make nice with Presi-

dent Obama in large part to ease crushing economic sanctions. The last line of the president’s U.N. speech may have been the most fantastical of all: “ . . . we remain convinced that this community of nations can deliver a more peaceful, prosperous and just world to the next generation.” There is no “community of nations.” There are individual nations with individual interests. If the United Nations could bring peace and prosperity to the world, progress toward that goal should have been made by now. Instead, 68 years after its founding, wars and rumors of wars are increasing.

________ Cal Thomas is a Fox TV network commentator and syndicated news columnist. His column appears on this page every Thursday. He can be reached at tmseditors@tribune. com or by U.S. mail to Tribune Media Services, 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo, NY 14207.

READERS’ LETTERS, FAXES AND EMAIL

No help for you. Amending the Constitution is the only way to stop big money in elections. Go to www.MoveTo Amend.org to learn the truth about how to stop this stream of structural, legal corruption. The real lemmings are those who will not spend a minute of their time to sort the truth from the hogwash or stand up and fight for our democracy. [In the Sept. 20 letter, the writer, in reference to GMOs, or genetically modified organisms, referred to “liberal lemmings” who “jump on the first bandwagon that comes along.”] Something in the food? Samuel P. Woods, Sequim

World clock ticks on climate change LAST WEEK, FAR out in the Arctic Ocean, the Greenpeace vessel Arctic Sunrise approached a Russian oil-drilling platform and launched a nonviolent protest, with several protesters scaling the side of the platform. They wanted to draw Amy attention to a dangerous Goodman precedent being set. The platform, the Prirazlomnaya, owned by Russian gas giant Gazprom, is the first to begin oil production in the dangerous, ice-filled waters of the Arctic. The Russian government responded swiftly and with force, deploying special-forces soldiers, their faces masked by balaclavas, threatening the peaceful Greenpeace activists with automatic weapons, destroying their inflatable boats by slashing them, arresting 30 and towing the Greenpeace ship to the northern Russian port of Murmansk. At last report, the protesters faced a potential charge of piracy.

This protest is remarkable for the risks taken by the protesters, and by its sheer audacity. But it is by no means the sole protest lately against runaway fossil-fuel extraction and consumption. People are speaking up around the globe, demanding action to combat global warming. In North America, a broad coalition has been growing to stop the proposed Keystone XL pipeline, as well as to stop the exploitation of Alberta’s tar sands, which the pipeline is designed to carry. On Sept. 21, the last full day of summer in the Northern Hemisphere this year, thousands of people “drew the line” on Keystone XL at protest gatherings around the continent. In Nebraska, they actually built a barn on the route of the proposed pipeline, which locals fear will spill oil onto the fragile sandhills ecosystem and pollute the vital Ogallala Aquifer. On the same day, the International Women’s Earth and Climate Summit met in Suffern, N.Y. It was a gathering of women from around the world, all renowned in their own way for fighting for urgent action on climate change.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS JOHN C. BREWER PUBLISHER AND EDITOR 360-417-3500

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Among them was Melina Laboucan-Massimo, of the Cree indigenous nation, from northern Alberta. She described the impact of tar-sands extraction on her people: “The tar sands cover over 141,000 square kilometers, about the size of England and Wales combined, or the size of Florida. “The mines are larger than many large cities. “This region we call the northern lungs of the planet, the boreal deciduous forest, and it’s being deforested for the mining. “We suffered what might be the worst oil spill ever in Canada, with 4.5 million liters of oil spilled, which destroyed ancestral lands. We call what is happening cultural and environmental genocide.” The Keystone XL pipeline requires U.S. government approval, as it will cross the northern border from Canada on its way to the Gulf Coast. The approval process has been delayed, due to massive protests. After more than 1,250 people were arrested in front of the White House in 2011, in what was the largest act of civil disobedience in the U.S. in 30 years, President Barack Obama said he would delay the decision.

Since then, Friends of the Earth (FOE) has exposed a clear conflict of interest with the group hired by the U.S. State Department to conduct an environmental-impact study of Keystone XL. FOE found that Environmental Resources Management, a London-based consulting firm, covered up its business ties to TransCanada, the fossil-fuel corporation that will own Keystone XL. Likewise, another watchdog group, Oil Change International, just reported that “Michael Froman, the U.S. trade representative in charge of negotiating a variety of secretive ‘free trade’ agreements, is apparently siding with Big Oil in demanding that Europe weaken its climate laws.” Oil Change’s Steve Kretzmann explains, “Unless Europe weakens its climate laws, U.S. diesel exports, which will contain tar sands, will be less competitive.” Canadian environmental activist Tzeporah Berman also was at the women’s summit. She spoke about how the Canadian government, under conservative Prime Minister Stephen Harper, has silenced scientists in a desperate bid to stifle criticism of Keystone XL. She told me: “Last week in

NEWS DEPARTMENT Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 lleach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ LEE HORTON, sports editor; 360-417-3525 lhorton@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 durbanidelapaz@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim office: 147-B W. Washington St., 360-681-2390 JOE SMILLIE, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052 jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way, 360-385-2335 CHARLIE BERMANT, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550 cbermant@peninsuladailynews.com

Canada, we had hundreds of scientists hit the streets in their lab coats protesting the federal government because they can’t speak. “They are being muzzled, to the extent that the eminent journal Nature last year published an editorial saying it is time for Canada to set its scientists free.” James Hansen, the former director of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, wrote on Keystone XL, “If Canada proceeds, and we do nothing, it will be game over for the climate.” The climate casualties are mounting, from the thousandyear flood that devastated entire towns in Colorado, to northern India, where floods and landslides from one storm last June killed more than 5,700 people. The hope lies in the global grass-roots movement that is growing, demanding serious action to halt climate change before it is too late.

________ Amy Goodman hosts the radio and TV program “Democracy Now!” Her column appears every Thursday. Email Goodman at mail@democracynow.org or in care of Democracy Now!, 207 W. 25th St., Floor 11, New York, NY 10001.

HAVE YOUR SAY ■ PAUL GOTTLIEB, Commentary editor, 360-452-2345, ext. 5060 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


A8

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2013

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, September 26, 2013 SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, BUSINESS, WEATHER In this section

B Outdoors

It’s last chance for coast salmon FISHING SEASONS COME and go so quickly, don’t they? The salmon seasons on the Lee northern coast Horton came to a close Sunday. Doesn’t it seem like it was only a month ago that we were heralding the beginning of the saltwater fishing season with the combined halibut and salmon fisheries in Neah Bay and LaPush? Now, it’s over. If you call Big Salmon Resort (360-645-2374) in Neah Bay, you’ll hear a recording that says it is closed for the season. (But, call in Feb. 2014 to make reservations for the halibut season.) For me, this past summer was a blur. Things started happening in midMay, and haven’t stopped since. Maybe it was the same way for you, and you are lamenting never making it to the coast to catch some salmon. Well, you have one last chance in 2013. You might remember something called the LaPush late season. It begins Saturday and runs through Sunday, Oct. 13. That’s 15 days of coastal salmon fishing. And, as usual, along with the LaPush late season comes the Last Chance Salmon Derby. The annual event, co-sponsored by the Forks Chamber of Commerce, the Quileute tribe and the city of Forks, will be Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 5 and 6. That’s next weekend. (Yes, it’s almost October already. Wow.) Tickets for the two-day derby are $25, and are available now at the Quileute Marina, Swain’s General Store in Port Angeles, Forks Outfitters, Olympic Sporting Goods in Forks, Forks Chamber of Commerce and during the derby at the Quileute Marina. The derby includes separate divisions for chinook and coho. Cash prize is $500 for the largest chinook, $250 for the second largest and $100 for the third largest; and $500 for largest coho, $250 for second largest, and $100 for third largest. This salmon derby isn’t just for salmon, as there will be a $100 prize for largest bottomfish as well. There are also drawing prizes, for which all ticket holders are eligible. Drawing for prizes will take place on the dock in LaPush within an hour of the close of the derby on Sunday, Oct. 6. This is a family-friendly derby, and coffee, doughnuts and camaraderie are available in the Quileute Marina prior to and during the derby. Visit tinyurl.com/pdnLastChance or phone 360-374-2531 with any questions.

KEITH THORPE (2)/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Port Angeles’ Hailey Scott competes in the 200-yard individual medley during the Roughriders’ meet against Bainbridge at William Shore Memorial Pool in Port Angeles.

Riders fall to Spartans Port Angeles adds more state qualifiers at meet PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Haili Farnam of Port Angeles dives during a meet against Bainbridge.

Hawks finally have the D-line they’ve desired BY JOHN BOYLE THE [EVERETT] DAILY HERALD

The daily limit for the LaPush late season is two salmon. Wild coho must be released. The size minimum is 24 inches for chinook and 16 inches for coho. There are a sub-quotas of 50 chinook and 50 coho, and if they are reached, the season may close earlier than Oct. 13.

RENTON — The first time the Jacksonville Jaguars faced a third down against the Seahawks on Sunday, the play was a rather nondescript short pass that failed to pick up the first down. The official game stats listed the play as: “C. Henne pass short right to A. Sanders to JAX 27 for 5 yards.” Another more meaningful way to describe that play, however, might be to call it a preview of the pass rush the Seahawks were dreaming of when they signed Cliff Avril and Michael Bennett in the offseason. In Pete Carroll’s first two years as Seattle’s coach, the Seahawks’ pass rush consisted mostly of Chris Clemons and little else; that’s why Bruce Irvin was the team’s first-round pick last year.

The salmon seasons have closed, but the bottomfish fisheries are still in effect in LaPush and Neah Bay. The lingcod fishery runs through Saturday, Oct. 12, in Marine Area 3 (LaPush) and the portion of Marine Area 4 (Neah Bay) west of the Bonilla-Tatoosh Line. East of that line, the portion of Area 4 on the Strait of Juan de Fuca, the lingcod season ends Tuesday, Oct. 15.

________ Sports Editor Lee Horton appears here Thursdays and Fridays. He can be reached at 360-417-3525 or at lhorton@

Preps competition, the highest Port Angeles placer, with a score of 119.50. Teammates Izi Livesay took fourth (118.20) and Haili Farnam was fifth (100.10). The Riders placed first in five of the 12 events and outscored Bainbridge in four of the 12 events. Port Angeles’ (2-0, 2-1) next meet is today at Olympic.

Girls Soccer North Kitsap 3, Port Angeles 0 POULSBO — The Roughriders came up short on the road against the league-leading Vikings (6-0). North Kitsap has only allowed one goal this season, and its defense kept Port Angeles’ offense in check. The game was tight into the second half until North Kitsap’s Abbie Wright won the ball at midfield and netted a shot from 25 yards. The Vikings then added a late insurance goal. TURN

TO

PREPS/B3

Pass rush is just warming up

Late-season regulations

Or go bottomfishing

PORT ANGELES — Port Angeles lost to Bainbridge Island 114-72 in nonleague girls swimming and diving action at William Shore Memorial Pool. The Roughriders tallied two more state-qualifying swims during the meet with the class 3A Spartans. Jaine Macias qualified in the 200 freestyle with a time of 2:05.29. She finished second in the event. Port Angeles’ 400 freestyle relay team (Carter Juskevich, Macias, Brooke Sires, and Ashlee Reid) took first at Tuesday’s meet and also qualified for state with a time of 3:56.10.1 In addition, the Riders added three new individual district times: Hailey Scott in the 200 individual medley (2:38.64), Ashlee Reid in the 100 butterfly (1:11.06) and Hailey Scott in the 100 freestyle (1:02.82). The Port Angeles 200 medley relay team of Kylee Reid, Scott, Audra Perrizo and Ashlee Reid placed first at the meet, as did the 200 freestyle relay team of Juskevich, Megan McKenna, Scott and Sires. Lydia Corenelson finished third in the one-meter diving

Yet even with Irvin providing eight sacks last season, Next Game and Clemons turning Sunday in another vs. Texans strong year at Houston with 11 1/2 Time: 10 a.m. sacks, Carroll singled On TV: Ch. 13 out upgrading the pass rush the team’s biggest offseason priority. That led to the signing of Bennett and Avril.

Additions became crucial However, because Irvin is still serving a four-game suspension, and Clemons missed the first two games while recovering from knee surgery, Avril and Bennett weren’t luxury additions as much as they were desperately-needed parts of the defensive line. With Clemons back on the field Sunday, fans saw for the first time what Seattle’s pass rush could look like moving forward. TURN

TO

HAWKS/B3

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seattle Seahawks’ Cliff Avril attacks the Jacksonville Jaguars’ offensive line on Sunday.


B2

SportsRecreation

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2013

Today’s

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS PIC OF THE DAY

Today Girls Soccer: Sequim at Port Angeles, 6:45 p.m.; Elma at Forks, 7 p.m. Volleyball: Crescent at Port Townsend, 6:15 p.m.; Sequim at Port Angeles, 6:15 p.m.; Montesano at Forks, 7 p.m. Girls Swimming: Port Townsend at Sequim, 3:30 p.m. Boys Tennis: Chimacum at North Kitsap, 4 p.m.

Friday Football: Tenino at Forks (Homecoming), 7 p.m.; Olympic at Port Angeles, 7 p.m.; Sequim at North Kitsap, 7 p.m.; Chimacum at Cedar Park Christian at Juanita High School in Kirkland, 7 p.m. Girls Soccer: Chimacum at Cascade Christian, 4 p.m. Boys Tennis: Sequim at Olympic, 4 p.m.

Saturday Football: Clallam Bay at Quilcene, 1 p.m.; Rainier Christian at Crescent, 1 p.m.; Port Townsend at Bellevue Christian at Lake Washington High School (Kirkland), 5 p.m. Girls Soccer: Kingston at Port Townsend, 12:45 p.m.; Port Angeles at Bremerton, 12:45 p.m.; North Mason at Sequim, 12:45 p.m. Cross Country: Port Angeles at Bellevue Invite, 10 a.m.; Cross Country Invitational at Port Townsend Golf Club, 11:30 a.m. Volleyball: Clallam Bay at Taholah, 5:30 p.m. Men’s Soccer: Peninsula College at Chemeketa (Salem, Ore.), 2 p.m. Women’s Soccer: Peninsula College at Chemeketa (Salem, Ore.), noon.

National Soccer Coaches Association Junior College National Poll Prev. W-L-T 1. Paradise Valley CC 1 10-0-0 2. Iowa Western CC 2 6-1-0 3. Laramie County CC 3 8-1-0 4. Monroe Coll. (N.Y.) 6 6-0-0 5. Tyler JC 4 7-2-0 6. Butler CC 5 7-2-0 7. Monroe CC (N.Y.) 8 7-1-0 8. Eastern Florida CC 7 5-2-1 9. Navarro JC 10 5-2-0 10. Darton St. College 9 8-1-0 11. Ga. Perimeter Coll. NR 6-0-0 12. Lewis & Clark CC 16 9-0-0 13. Cape Fear CC 12 7-0-0 14. Peninsula College 18 5-2-0 15. St. Louis CC 11 6-3-1 16. Barton CC 15 6-2-0 17. Cisco JC 14 6-2-0 18. Coll. of S. Maryland 19 8-1-0 19. CC of Rhode Island NR 4-4-1 20. Chndler-Gilbrt CC NR 7-3-0

Football National Football League NATIONAL CONFERENCE West W L T Pct PF Seattle 3 0 0 1.000 86 St. Louis 1 2 0 .333 58 San Francisco 1 2 0 .333 44 Arizona 1 2 0 .333 56 East W L T Pct PF Dallas 2 1 0 .667 83 Philadelphia 1 2 0 .333 79 N.Y. Giants 0 3 0 .000 54 Washington 0 3 0 .000 67 South W L T Pct PF New Orleans 3 0 0 1.000 70 Carolina 1 2 0 .333 68 Atlanta 1 2 0 .333 71 Tampa Bay 0 3 0 .000 34

PA 27 86 84 79 PA 55 86 115 98 PA 38 36 74 57

Noon (47) GOLF Web.com, Tour Championship, Round 1, Site: The OSU Golf Club - Columbus, Ohio (Live) 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball WNBA, Indiana Fever vs. Atlanta Dream, Playoffs, Eastern Conference Final, Game 1, Site: Philips Arena - Atlanta (Live) 4:30 p.m. (26) ESPN Football NCAA, Virginia Tech vs. Georgia Tech (Live) 4:30 p.m. FS1 Football NCAA, Iowa State vs. Tulsa (Live) 5 p.m. NFL NET Football NFL, San Francisco 49ers vs. St. Louis Rams (Live) 6 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball WNBA, Phoenix Mercury vs. Minnesota Lynx, Playoffs, Western Conference Final, Game 1, Site: Target Center - Minneapolis, Minn. (Live) 7 p.m. (25) ROOT Football NCAA, Cal Poly vs. Portland State (Live) 7 p.m. PAC-12 NET Women’s Soccer NCAA, Washington State vs. Oregon (Live)

5:30 a.m. (47) GOLF Golf EPGA, Alfred Dunhill Championship, Round 2, Site: Old Course - St. Andrews, Scotland (Live)

Men’s National JC Poll

Women’s National JC Poll

Today

Friday

College Soccer National Soccer Coaches Association Junior College National Poll Prev. W-L-T 1. Tyler JC 1 6-0-0 2. Louisburg College 2 7-0-0 3. Iowa Western CC 3 9-0-0 4. Darton St. College 4 7-1-0 5. Yavapai College 5 9-0-1 6. San Jacinto College 7 5-1-0 7. Phoenix JC 8 9-0-0 8. E. Florida St. Coll. 12 6-1-0 9. Peninsula College 10 9-0-1 10. Spartanburg Meth. 13 8-1-0 11. Parkland College 11 5-0-2 12. Cincinnati St. Tech. 6 7-1-1 13. Monroe CC (N.Y.) 15 5-1-1 14. Ga. Perimeter Coll. 14 4-2-2 15. Coffeyville CC 19 8-1-0 16. Waubonsee CC 20 7-1-0 17. Arizona West. Coll. 17 7-3-1 18. Jefferson College 18 7-3-0 19. Illinois Cent. Coll. NR 7-2-0 20. Dakota Co. Tech. 9 8-1-1

SPORTS ON TV

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PASSING THE ROCK

EN ROUTE TO THE

CUP

Oracle Team USA passes Alcatraz Island during the 19th race of the America’s Cup sailing event against Emirates Team New Zealand on Wednesday in San Francisco. The U.S. retained the Auld Mug with one of the greatest comebacks in sports, twice coming back from seven-point deficits to win 9-8. North W L T Pct PF Chicago 3 0 0 1.000 95 Detroit 2 1 0 .667 82 Green Bay 1 2 0 .333 96 Minnesota 0 3 0 .000 81 AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF New England 3 0 0 1.000 59 Miami 3 0 0 1.000 74 N.Y. Jets 2 1 0 .667 55 Buffalo 1 2 0 .333 65 South W L T Pct PF Houston 2 1 0 .667 70 Indianapolis 2 1 0 .667 68 Tennessee 2 1 0 .667 60 Jacksonville 0 3 0 .000 28 North W L T Pct PF Cincinnati 2 1 0 .667 75 Baltimore 2 1 0 .667 71 Cleveland 1 2 0 .333 47 Pittsburgh 0 3 0 .000 42 West W L T Pct PF Denver 3 0 0 1.000 127 Kansas City 3 0 0 1.000 71 San Diego 1 2 0 .333 78 Oakland 1 2 0 .333 57

PA 74 69 88 96 PA 34 53 50 73 PA 82 48 56 92 PA 64 64 64 76 PA 71 34 81 67

Today San Francisco at St. Louis, 5:25 p.m. Sunday N.Y. Giants at Kansas City, 10 a.m. Seattle at Houston, 10 a.m. Baltimore at Buffalo, 10 a.m. Arizona at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m. Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. Cincinnati at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Chicago at Detroit, 10 a.m. Pittsburgh vs. Minnesota at London, 10 a.m. N.Y. Jets at Tennessee, 1:05 p.m. Washington at Oakland, 1:25 p.m. Dallas at San Diego, 1:25 p.m. Philadelphia at Denver, 1:25 p.m. New England at Atlanta, 5:30 p.m. Open: Carolina, Green Bay Monday Miami at New Orleans, 5:40 p.m.

Baseball Mariners 4, Royals 0 Tuesday’s Game Kansas City Seattle ab r hbi AGordn lf 4 0 1 0 BMiller ss

ab r hbi 4110

Bonifac 2b Hosmer 1b BButler dh S.Perez c Maxwll rf L.Cain cf Mostks 3b AEscor ss Totals

40 40 40 30 30 30 30 30 31 0

10 20 00 00 00 10 00 00 50

AAlmnt cf Seager 3b KMorls dh FGtrrz rf Smoak 1b MSndrs lf Zunino c Frnkln 2b Totals

4010 3000 4131 2100 3113 4010 4010 4010 32 4 9 4

Kansas City 000 000 000—0 Seattle 100 030 00x—4 E—A.Gordon (2), Moustakas (15). DP—Kansas City 1, Seattle 1. LOB—Kansas City 4, Seattle 8. 2B—Bonifacio (22), L.Cain (21), K.Morales (34). HR—Smoak (19). SB—Zunino (1). IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City B.Chen L,8-4 5 7 4 4 3 5 Dwyer 2 2 0 0 1 2 K.Herrera 1 0 0 0 0 2 Seattle Paxton W,3-0 7 4 0 0 0 10 Medina 1 0 0 0 0 1 Farquhar 1 1 0 0 0 0 Umpires—Home, Bill Miller; First, Gary Cederstrom; Second, Kerwin Danley; Third, Vic Carapazza. T—2:27. A—12,528 (47,476).

American League West Division W L x-Oakland 94 64 Texas 86 71 Los Angeles 77 80 Seattle 69 89 Houston 51 107 Central Division W L z-Detroit 92 66 Cleveland 87 70 Kansas City 83 74 Minnesota 66 91 Chicago 62 95 East Division W L x-Boston 95 63 Tampa Bay 88 69 New York 82 75 Baltimore 81 76 Toronto 72 85 z-clinched playoff berth x-clinched division

Pct GB .595 — .548 7½ .490 16½ .437 25 .323 43 Pct .582 .554 .529 .420 .395

GB — 4½ 8½ 25½ 29½

Pct .601 .561 .522 .516 .459

GB — 6½ 12½ 13½ 22½

Tuesday’s Games Cleveland 5, Chicago White Sox 4 Tampa Bay 7, N.Y. Yankees 0 Toronto 3, Baltimore 2, 10 innings

Texas 3, Houston 2 Detroit 4, Minnesota 2 Colorado 8, Boston 3 L.A. Angels 3, Oakland 0 Seattle 4, Kansas City 0 Wednesday’s Games Oakland at L.A. Angels, late. Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, late. Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees, late. Toronto at Baltimore, late. Houston at Texas, late. Detroit at Minnesota, late. Boston at Colorado, late. Kansas City at Seattle, late. Today’s Games Tampa Bay (Cobb 10-3) at N.Y. Yankees (Nova 9-5), 4:05 p.m. Toronto (Buehrle 12-9) at Baltimore (Mig. Gonzalez 10-8), 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Williams 9-10) at Texas (Garza 4-5), 5:05 p.m. Cleveland (McAllister 9-9) at Minnesota (A.Albers 2-4), 5:10 p.m. Kansas City (Guthrie 14-12) at Chicago White Sox (Rienzo 2-2), 5:10 p.m. Friday’s Games Boston at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Toronto, 4:07 p.m. Detroit at Miami, 4:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Texas, 5:05 p.m. Cleveland at Minnesota, 5:10 p.m. Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 5:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Houston, 5:10 p.m. Oakland at Seattle, 7:10 p.m.

National League West Division W L x-Los Angeles 91 66 Arizona 80 77 San Diego 73 84 San Francisco 72 85 Colorado 72 86 Central Division W L z-St. Louis 93 65 z-Pittsburgh 91 67 z-Cincinnati 90 68 Milwaukee 70 87 Chicago 65 93 East Division W L x-Atlanta 93 64 Washington 84 74 New York 72 85 Philadelphia 72 85 Miami 58 100 z-clinched playoff berth x-clinched division

Pct GB .580 — .510 11 .465 18 .459 19 .456 19½ Pct GB .589 — .576 2 .570 3 .446 22½ .411 28 Pct GB .592 — .532 9½ .459 21 .459 21 .367 35½

Tuesday’s Games Atlanta 3, Milwaukee 2 N.Y. Mets 4, Cincinnati 2 Philadelphia 2, Miami 1 Pittsburgh 8, Chicago Cubs 2 St. Louis 2, Washington 0 Colorado 8, Boston 3 Arizona 2, San Diego 1, 12 innings L.A. Dodgers 2, San Francisco 1 Wednesday’s Games N.Y. Mets at Cincinnati, 9:35 a.m. Washington at St. Louis, 10:45 a.m. Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 11:20 a.m. Milwaukee at Atlanta, 4:10 p.m. Philadelphia at Miami, 4:10 p.m. Boston at Colorado, 5:40 p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 7:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Francisco, 7:15 p.m. Today’s Games Arizona (Cahill 8-10) at San Diego (Erlin 3-3), 3:40 p.m. Milwaukee (Hellweg 1-4) at N.Y. Mets (Gee 12-10), 4:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Cloyd 2-6) at Atlanta (Hale 0-0), 4:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Volquez 9-12) at San Francisco (Lincecum 10-14), 7:15 p.m. Friday’s Games Detroit at Miami, 4:10 p.m. Milwaukee at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Chicago Cubs at St. Louis, 5:15 p.m. Washington at Arizona, 6:40 p.m. Colorado at L.A. Dodgers, 7:10 p.m. San Diego at San Francisco, 7:15 p.m.

Transactions Baseball American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Released 3B Wilson Betemit. Placed INF Manny Machado on the 60-day DL, retroactive to Tuesday. Selected the contract of OF Jason Pridie from Norfolk (IL). DETROIT TIGERS — Promoted manager of media relations Aileen Villarreal to director of media relations. NEW YORK YANKEES — Placed LHP CC Sabathia on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Saturday. Reinstated DH Travis Hafner from the 60-day DL. TAMPA BAY RAYS — Assigned RHP J.D. Martin outright to Durham (IL). National League CINCINNATI REDS — Released RHP Kyle Lotzkar. MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Assigned 1B Blake Lalli outright to Nashville (PCL). NEW YORK METS — Reinstated OF Jordany Valdespin from the restricted list and assigned him to Las Vegas (PCL). Minor Leagues EL PASO DIABLOS — Exercised the 2014 option on INF Jose G. Garcia. LINCOLN SALTDOGS — Released C Tyler Goodro and INF Brian Embery.

Zakuani prepared for any role Sounders needs down stretch BY DON RUIZ MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE

SEATTLE — Midfielder Steve Zakuani last played for the Seattle Sounders on April 20, when they finally broke into the win column against Colorado after an 0-3-2 start. The Sounders have gone 14-5-3 since then, but Zakuani has had to watch while sidelined with a sports hernia. “The team’s been on a great run,” Zakuani said Tuesday after practice. “I’m happy with what we’ve done. “As frustrating as it is to watch, it’s worse if the team is struggling and not winning. But they’ve

done well. “We’ve been winning, and that’s made it easier.” Zakuani returned to the Sounders’ 18-man roster Saturday at Los Angeles. He didn’t play in the 1-1 draw with the Galaxy because he still isn’t near to having the kind of fitness needed to play a full game. But Sounders coach Sigi Schmid does see a role for Zakuani as Seattle heads into its final six regular-season games — beginning Sunday when the Eastern Conference-leading New York Red Bulls visit CenturyLink Field. “We’re trying to keep him in a really good rhythm, trying to get his strength back so he’s ready for

more and more minutes,” Schmid said. “His ability right now to come off the bench and contribute 15 or 20 minutes — maybe more so — by the time we get into this weekend could be very significant for us.” Zakuani said he is up for any role. “If I have to be just on the 18 and not play, then it’s going to be just like it was on the weekend,” he said. “If it’s coming on at the end of the game, that’s fine. If it’s starting a game, that’s fine too. “It is the key part of the year now, and it’s a good time to get healthy. “I can only train hard and

leave the rest up to [the coaching staff].” Zakuani was the first overall pick in Major League Soccer’s 2009 SuperDraft, and the first draft pick in the Sounders’ MLS history. He justified that high selection with 14 goals and 10 assists over his first two seasons. However, six games — all starts — into the 2011 season, he suffered leg fractures on a reckless tackle by Colorado’s Brian Mullan. Zakuani missed more than a year in recovery before returning late last season, appearing in eight games, starting four and even scoring a goal. He started the first six games

this season but then suffered the sports hernia. Zakuani had surgery in early June and has been working his way back. “I can never look at it as a lost year,” he said. “What I can look at it is sometimes in life you get detours you didn’t plan for. I didn’t plan to come in injured. “I came in training camp pretty sharp, played the first few games of the year — I felt good — and then I suffered a muscle injury. “I still have some pain and minor things, but not enough to stop me from playing. “Whether it’s five, six games and then playoffs and all of that, there’s still enough time to come in and play.”


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2013

B3

Preps: Sequim faces PA in volleyball, soccer CONTINUED FROM B1 Riders coach Scott Moseley said that despite the game-long pressure, goalkeeper Hayley Baxley saved numerous shots and kept the Port Angeles in the match. Moseley chose Baxley and Karina Bohman as defensive players of the game. Carly Gouge earned transition player of the game for her aggressive midfield play. The Riders (1-4) host rival Sequim (1-4) tonight at Civic Field.

Bremerton 2, Sequim 1 SEQUIM — The Wolves fell to 1-4 with an Olympic League loss to the Knights. Vianey Cadenas scored Sequim’s only goal. Gabby Dubos and Giselle Bright scored for Bremerton. Sequim plays at Port Angeles tonight.

Olympic 3, Port Townsend 0 BREMERTON — The Redskins gave up goals in the seventh, 37th and 78th minutes to the Trojans (4-1), who are currently third in the Olympic League with a 4-1 record. Port Townsend coach Colin Foden was proud of his team’s defense. “It has become a point of pride for the defense to let in as few goals as possible despite overwhelming odds,” Foden said. “A couple of slips right at the end of each half turned a one-goal game into a three-goal defeat. “Nevertheless, it was a fine defensive performance.” The Redskins continue to be hampered by injuries and illness.

TAMPA, Fla. — Less than five seasons after declaring Josh Freeman was the future of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, the struggling franchise is tying its hopes to another rookie quarterback. Coach Greg Schiano benched Freeman in favor of untested Mike Glennon, two days after insisting the former first-round draft pick remained the starter because he gave the Bucs the best chance to win. On Wednesday, Schiano said several times Glennon now gives the Bucs the best chance to win. The coach said he changed his mind after meeting Tuesday with general manager Mark Dominik, and later discussing the situation with ownership — which signed off on the move. “This is a performancebased decision,” Schiano said after practice Wednesday. “We’re not getting the job done on the field.” The winless Bucs have lost their first three games, two on field goals in the closing seconds. Freeman has completed just 45.7 percent of his passes for 571 yards, two touchdowns and three interceptions.

Ex-Charger suicide

CLALLAM BAY — The Bruins defeated the Loggers 25-15, 24-26, 25-13, 31-29. “The younger players stepped up and finished game four,” Bruins coach Kelli Wilson said. “Wishkah never let up.” Clallam Bay served 80 percent as a team. Inga Erickson had five aces and Jennica Maines served 95 percent. “Team has greatly improved their serving percentages,” Wilson said. “Movement has also improved.”

Olympic 3, Port Townsend 1 BREMERTON — The Redskins played the Trojans tough in the final three sets on Tuesday. Olympic started with a 25-9 win in the first set. The Redskins then lost 26-24 in the second and fourth sets, and won the third set 25-17. Megan Juran had four kills and five aces for

DAVE LOGAN/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sequim’s Alexas Besand (45) tips the ball over the net against the Peninsula Seahawks, while teammates Emma LeBlanc, center, and Caitlin Stofferahn prepare for the return. Port Townsend. Megan Lee added 10 digs, Trisha Reeves had three kills, Amy Hemsley contributed five assists, Avery Selisch has a pair of kills and Baili Shaw finished with seven digs. The Redskins host Crescent today.

North Kitsap 3, Port Angeles 1 POULSBO — The Riders fell to the Vikings to fall to 1-3 on the season. “We played very well the majority of the time. They played with a lot of excitement in the first three sets,” Port Angeles coach Christine Halberg said. “We were ahead early in the games many times, but were unable to keep the lead.

“One of our goals was to improve our accuracy in serve receive and we did that. However, NK served very tough and consistently.” For the Riders, Maddy Hinrichs had 26 digs and five kills; Bailee Jones had nine kills, four blocks and served 12 for 13; Holli Williams had 22 assists, 12 digs, one block, one ace and served 7-7 Brittany Norberg finished with two aces while serving 12-14, and had seven digs, four kills and one block; Sarah Steinman contributed three kills and 14 digs; and Kendra Harvey had 22 digs, one kill and served 14-15. The Riders (1-3) host Sequim (3-2) tonight.

Sequim 3, Bremerton 0 SEQUIM — Sequim earned a convincing home win over winless Bremerton. The Wolves won in three sets 25-11, 25-17, 25-13. “Bremerton was struggling to keep the ball in play,” Sequim coach Jennie Webber Heilman said of Tuesday’s match. “We were serving well with 90 percent serving overall, with perfect serving from Emma [LeBlacc] with 17 for 17, Hannah {Hudson] 9 for 9, Lex [Alexas Besand] 8 for 8 and Vanessa [Martinez] 3 for 3. “Emily [Waller] was serving tough with 9 for 10 serves, and five were aces.” Besand closed out the match with three straight aces.

SEQUIM — The Wolves dominated the class 3A Seahawks 25-18, 25-16, 25-18. “We started a little slow in serve-receive, with Peninsula getting two aces right away, but then we only allowed two aces total for the match,” Sequim coach Jennie Webber Heilman said of Monday’s match. Hannah Hudson had a solid all-around game, leading the Wolves’ with 11 perfect passes and 12 digs. Alyse Armstrong, Caitlin Stofferahn and Emily Wallner combining for 13 aces. Stofferahn also played stout defense. “Caitlin was blocking well at the net, earning a season-high of five stuff blocks,” Webber Heilman said. “Our defense did not let many ball hit the ground. “And we served very well overall, with 92 percent serving, and Peninsula couldn’t deal with it.” “Alyse [Armstrong] and Emma [LeBlanc] set well, spreading out the offense. “Lex [Alexas Besand] was our leader on offense along with Alyse.”

Hawks: More rushers coming

inflicted gunshot wound, Cobb County police Sgt. Dana Pierce said. Oliver was a 2007 fourth-round supplemental draft pick from Georgia after he was ruled academically ineligible his senior year. He played four seasons with the Chargers; his best year was 2010, when he started eight games and had 62 tackles along with an interception. Oliver moved to the New Orleans Saints in 2011 but was released after training camp. He returned to San Diego for one more season.

CONTINUED FROM B1 player. He’s more than we thought he was. He’s got When Jacksonville faced more variety to his game, it third and long, Seattle’s comes out of just the tenacdefensive line, from left to ity and the motor that he right, was often Avril, Ben- has. “We’re real excited about nett, O’Brien Schofield and Clemons — essentially four it.” defensive ends, though Bennett has the size to play the Missing piece interior line as well. Carroll has been looking When Irvin returns, for an interior pass rusher expect to see him in a role similar to the one Schofield like Bennett for a while. The Seahawks hoped played Sunday. “That’s what we’re shoot- they had found that player ing for is to get those guys when they signed Jason Jones last year, and he was out there,” Carroll said. “We want to see all of the effective when healthy, but fast guys out there and see a knee injury derailed his where we could best situate season. Texan fined Bennett has so far looked HOUSTON — Houston them, and we’re learning. not only like that interior “OB [Schofield] had a outside linebacker Whitney really nice rush, standing rusher, but he also has Mercilus says he’s been up on the guard, you know, played significant snaps at fined $15,000 for a hit on end, which has been particBaltimore quarterback Joe and got clean coming ularly important with through.” Flacco. Perhaps no single player Clemons and Avril limited Mercilus was fined for a has been more important to by injuries. play where his helmet hit “For years, we’ve been Seattle’s defensive line the chin of Flacco. Mercilus looking for an inside presearly this season than Benwas given a penalty for ence in the pass rush,” Carroughing the passer on the nett, who has the versatility roll said of Bennett. to play as an inside rusher play. “I think that’s the best Baltimore won the game or at either end position. shot that we have right now. “He has demonstrated 30-9 to give Houston its that he can do a lot of stuff,” That’s not to mention the first loss of the season. other guys are doing well, Carroll said. Mercilus spoke after “If you looked at the dif- too, but he has really practice on Wednesday, and says he plans to appeal the ferent spots he lined up jumped out.” In New York, the Giants [Sunday], that was about fine. everywhere that you could have used similar all-defenput a D-lineman, and it’s sive-end front they call the Britt’s will catch just the way he comes off of NASCAR package, and NASHVILLE, Tenn. — the football and he attacks. while the Seahawks don’t Titans receiver Kenny “He’s a very effective yet have a catch name for Britt says he has a small crack in one of his ribs that won’t stop him from playing — or catching passes — against the New York Jets on Sunday. The fifth-year receiver THE ASSOCIATED PRESS events, highlighted by the went without a catch in slam dunk contest, on Satlast week’s 20-17 win over NEW YORK — Two the Chargers where he was sparkling arenas. One All- urday before the 64th Allsidelined during the gameStar game goes to Madison Star city. winning drive. The NBA is bringing its Square Garden on Sunday, Jake Locker threw five All-Star weekend back to Feb. 15. passes to Britt, but the “To have two brand-new receiver had a couple drops New York in 2015, and the buildings, in effect, is what Knicks and Nets are putand a couple penalties. ting aside a strengthening we have in support of New Britt said Wednesday that his confidence in him- rivalry on the court to share York City. It’s good for basketball. It’s good for the self has not been shaken at it. teams. It’s good for the Barclays Center in all. Brooklyn will host the Ris- NBA, and it’s great for the “All I have to do is put ing Stars Challenge on Fri- city,” Commissioner David my mind to it,” Britt said. day night and the skills Stern said. The Associated Press

that look — “The fast guys?” Carroll said — they have big hopes for what that kind of speed can do in passing situations. “We know that the fast guys are going to benefit from all of the activity we can get inside,” Carroll said. “The more attention that we can get them to focus on three inside guys, the space has worked to our advantage. “Avril and Clem, they were good and steady, and we will continue to work with those combinations. We like to keep mixing those around.” With Clemons just getting back, and with Irvin still serving a four-game suspension for violating the league’s policy on performance-enhancing drugs, and with Avril limited by injuries for much of camp, the Seahawks are just starting to figure out how this will all play out.

Best yet to come Carroll said he thinks it could take seven or eight weeks for this new-look pass rush to hit its stride, but what he does know is that if his defense stays relatively healthy, he’ll have a much-improved pass rush as the season goes on to add to a stout run defense and one of the league’s best

secondaries. “I feel like we’re just getting started,” Carroll said of the pass rush. “It really feels like we’re just warming up to what we can do. “This is a unique group, because we don’t have real big guys. We’re a very fast group and a couple of weeks from now we’re going to be flying, we’re going to be really fast when Bruce comes back. “When we put all of that together, we’re going to be in a mode still trying to find our way right now for a while. “I don’t feel like we have it nailed yet, but it’s exciting, it’s fun for us, we like it, and we want to pressure and want to keep the heat on the quarterback primarily. That’s the number one thing we need to do up front.” Through three games, the Seahawks have eight sacks, a middle-of-the-road total, but they’ve been getting better pressure than that number indicates, and those sack totals should start to improve with Clemons back and Irvin one game from returning.

________ The Daily Herald of Everett is a sister paper of the PDN. Sports writer and columnist John Boyle can be reached at jboyle@ heraldnet.com.

Knicks, Nets will share 2015 All-Star Weekend

LOST:

Hockey gear. In blue USA bag, between Port Angeles Roller Rink and Old Mill Road.

360-461-1207 722303

MARIETTA, Ga. — Former San Diego Chargers and University of Georgia defensive back Paul Oliver committed suicide at his Atlanta-area home, a medical examiner said Wednesday. The 29-year-old Oliver was found dead Tuesday night in Marietta, about 20 miles northwest of Atlanta, Cobb County Medical Examiner’s investigator Tim Weaver said. Oliver died of a self-

Sequim 3, Peninsula 0

Volleyball Clallam Bay 3, Wishkah Valley 1

NFL Briefing Bucs bench QB Freeman for rookie

Alyse Armstrong led the offense with eight kills, while Besand and Sydney Munn scored four each, and Kylee Salazar added three more. Webber Heilman credited Hudson and LeBlanc for being the Wolves’ defensive leaders of the match. “Emily [Wallner] went in as a setter in the second game for the first time and we still dominated the match,” Webber Heilman said. Next up for Sequim (3-2) is a road match against rival Port Angeles (1-3) tonight.

“Malia Henderson was spectacular in goal pulling off saves that defy description,” Foden said. “Everyone played well — they had to. “Anne Meek and Becca Stewart were rock solid. Terrific games from Lily Murock and Rose Gitelman who faced players with considerable pace.” Port Townsend (0-6) welcomed back Jewel Johnson, who was able to create a few shots on goal that went just wide of the net. The Redskins host Kingston (5-0) Saturday afternoon at Memorial Field.


3rdAge

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

B4

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2013

Local help before ‘Obamacare’ kicks in AND, FOR WHAT may be the last time . . . “Obamacare”! In the interests of full disclosure, this is going to be a rather boring column because it’s going to be all about ways/dates/time/places to get help with (or just deal with) Obamacare. I’m going to try to put everything I know about “help” and “access” in one column. Five days from today — this Tuesday, Oct. 1 — “open enrollment” begins, which means you can actually do this. If you do it before late December, your health insurance coverage, be it Medicaid or a Qualified Health Plan, will begin Jan. 1. If you do it after that (and you can, through March 31), your coverage will begin the first day of the following month, e.g., April 1 (unless you qualify for Medicaid, which can often have a threemonth retroactive start date), and you will have avoided the dreaded penalty. You are not required to have “help.” You can go directly to www. wahealthplanfinder.org and have

HELP LINE at it, or you could give it a Harvey shot, and if it gets too weird, you can go looking for help. You can also call the customer support center at 855923-4633 any weekday between 7:30 a.m. and 8 p.m., or you can email it at customer support@wahbexchange.org and get help. It’s all free. If you prefer face-to-face or more local help — it’s all free — here’s what you can do. You can call any of the numbers at the end of this column, and decent people will help you. In the West End, you can go to or call Forks Community Hospital, 530 Bogachiel Way, 360-374-6271. In the Port Angeles/Sequim area, you can call us at 360-4523221 or come into 411 W. Washington in Sequim (I’d call first). In Port Angeles, you can get

Mark

Birthday Missouri on Sept. 2, 1945, and watched Avon Miller of Port Angeles will celebrate his 90th birthday the signing of the treaty at an open house with family with Japan. and friends Sunday, Oct. 6. After leavHe was born in Port Angeles ing the Navy to Charles and Mary Miller on Oct. 1, 1923, and grew up in the in 1946, he attended Mr. Miller Beaver and Sappho logging classes at camps in the west end of Seattle Clallam County. Pacific College, worked as a Avon attended Beaver Elemerchant mariner, worked for mentary School and graduated Middleton Motor Parts and from Quillayute High School built a boat, and tried his hand (Forks) in 1941. at commercial fishing before Immediately after graduajoining his brother, Claude tion, he enlisted in the Navy, Miller, in Fairbanks, Alaska, where he served aboard various where they both worked for vessels in the Aleutian Islands Benson Montaigne. and the Pacific. This is where he met and During World War II, he married B. Geraldine Awe. was a signalman and part of They moved back to Port AngeAdm. William Halsey’s flag les in 1951. They have two chilallowance. dren together, Leslie and Scott. Avon worked for Aiken He was aboard the USS

Avon Miller

nobody will try to sell you anything because they don’t have anything to sell. They will help you navigate the “Healthplanfinder” and understand what it’s saying, what it wants you to do and what the various terms mean, but you will be The Decider. If you decide to go to one of these locations (or to any of the agencies listed above), you’ll want to know how much money you (and everyone who lives with you) make, last year’s tax filing status, Social Security numbers for everyone applying for insurance, dates of birth and, if you are a legal immigrant, bring the passport, alien or other immigration number. If anyone in your family currently has any kind of health insurance, bring that info, too. Remember, please, that you don’t have to do everything at once or decide everything at once. If you have a computer and Internet access, you might consider going to the Healthplanfinder at the address above and just “cruising it” — see what you see, what it says, what it seems to

help from Olympic Medical Center, 939 Caroline St., 360-417-7000; Volunteers in Medicine of the Olympics, 909 E. Georgiana St., 360-452-3078; or Planned Parenthood at 426 E. Eighth St., 800-2307526. In Jefferson County, things are a bit more specific. Ready? ■ Port Townsend Community Center, 620 Tyler St., 360385-9007 — On Oct. 3, 17 and 31; Nov. 7 and 21; and Dec. 5 and 19 from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. ■ Tri-Area Community Center, 10 West Valley Road, Chimacum, 360-732-4822 — On Oct. 10 and 24, Nov. 14 and Dec. 12 from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. ■ Quilcene Community Center, 294952 U.S. Highway 101, 360-765-3321 — On Oct. 23, Nov. 27 and Dec. 18 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. ■ Jefferson Healthcare, 834 Sheridan St., 360-385-2200 — Any weekday from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. ■ Jefferson Public Health, 615 Sheridan St., Port Townsend — Any Wednesday from 9 a.m. to noon or 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., or phone 360-385-9400 for an appointment. Remember, this is all free, and

want from you, etc. — then go looking for help, but if that doesn’t work for you, that’s fine. Take a breath. I just did. Look, for all the noise and the news and my incessant columns, this is not that complicated. And for many of us, it’s a huge opportunity to find health insurance, which for many of us means finding health care, so just do it. And if you start messing with it now, you can have some time to think and learn before we all get totally sideways with the holidays. Here are the two worst things you can do: a) nothing, and b) listen to rumors. Check it out for yourself, then decide for yourself and do what you think is best for you and yours. We can do this.

_________ Mark Harvey is director of Clallam/Jefferson Information & Assistance, which operates through the Olympic Area Agency on Aging. He can be reached at 360-452-3221 (Port Angeles-Sequim), 360-385-2552 (Jefferson County) or 360374-9496 (West End); or by emailing harvemb@dshs.wa.gov. The agency can be found on Facebook at Olympic Area Agency on Aging-Information & Assistance.

CORNER

Oldsmobile (now Ruddell Auto Mall) until 1955, when he started his own business. Avon’s construction company worked on various projects around the state, including water systems and fish hatcheries, the road to Hurricane Ridge and the tunnels when that road was built, and various projects for the national park and Indian Health Services. In 1965, Avon and Ted Simpson purchased the ski lift equipment at Hurricane Ridge from Larry and Tom Winters. Originally, they serviced the sunrise, bunny, intermediate and bowl slopes. In 1970, Avon aided in the organization of Olympic Ski Lifts Inc. This corporation sold shares to finance improvements, including adding the Poma lift.

Avon has four children, seven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

He assisted contractor Glen Brown with its installation. For several years, Avon continued as operations manager for Olympic Ski Lifts. In addition to skiing, he enjoyed years of hiking in the Olympics and fishing in the Strait of Juan de Fuca. In 1985, he married Mary Ann Davis and added her children, Vincent and Judy Davis, to the family. After his retirement from the construction business in 1991, he and Mary Ann made several trips across the United States to visit family and friends. Today, he spends most of his time having coffee and conversation with friends, working on projects in his woodworking shop and writing short stories about growing up in the logging camps at the West End during the 1930s.

________ Peninsula Daily News’ 3rdAge says “happy birthday” in its own way to North Olympic Peninsula residents 70 or older who will be celebrating a milestone. People celebrating a 70th, 75th, 80th or greater birthday can have their photos published free of charge in the weekly Birthday Corner. Along with the recent photo, please send the celebrant’s name, town of residence, a short biographical synopsis and news of any birthday celebration at least two weeks before the birthday to: Birthday Corner Peninsula Daily News P.O. Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Photos will be returned. The sender’s name and telephone number must accompany the information.

The New York Times Crossword Puzzle LETTERBOXES

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BY MIKE SELINKER / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

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ACROSS 1 Crew’s colleagues 5 Dojo needs 9 Classic sci-fi film billed as “a horror horde of crawland-crush giants” 13 “La-La” lead-in in a 1974 Al Green hit 16 Iberian wine city 18 “Vincent & ___” (film about the van Gogh brothers) 19 Rings of angels 21 What X-O-X lacks? 22 “Macbeth” king 23 Words on a fragile package 26 Irascible 27 “Mona Lisa,” e.g. 28 Thumbs-up 29 Harridan 30 Orchestra section 31 Mouthpiece for the head? 34 Jiffy 35 Not post37 Old piece 38 Little dog, for short 39 ___ Aviv 40 Strawberry blond sister of Barbie 43 Hindu “Mr.” 44 “Swans Reflecting Elephants” and others 46 1960s-’70s series starring Efrem Zimbalist Jr. 49 Oscar winner Hathaway 51 Material beyond the terrestrial plane, in medieval science

55 Hello or goodbye, maybe 57 PC key 59 First word in 104-Across 61 Cum ___ 62 ___ engr. 63 Like hit shows, often 67 Pitchforkwielding groups 69 Boo-boo 70 How to get a message out of the boxes 74 Van Morrison song “___ the Mystic” 75 Numerical prefix 76 “Only the Lonely” singer 77 Part of a wriggly field? 78 Foreordained 80 Understands 82 Maker of the Sorento 83 Gallivants, with “about” 85 Boo-boos 87 Pale 89 Like citrus fruits 92 Like video games, nowadays 94 ___ Lingus 96 Round Table assignments 99 Old PC monitor feature 102 Ernie’s instrument on “Sesame Street,” informally 103 Italy’s main broadcasting co. 104 TV channel with lots of bells and whistles 105 Take up, as a skirt 107 Rotary alternative 112 Covent Garden performance

114 Newspaper columnist, humorously 115 Grampa Simpson 116 Snockered 117 Anders Celsius and Greta Garbo, for two 118 DDT and others 121 “Is Anybody Goin’ to San ___” (#1 Charley Pride song) 122 Bullet, in poker 123 Cartoonist Wilson 124 Help illicitly 125 Alley flanker 126 Hide/hair link 127 Looking up 128 Chant at a bullfight 129 Satirical 1974 espionage film DOWN 1 With 97-Down, classic puzzle type 2 Like eyebrows 3 Ones getting the redcarpet treatment, say 4 “The Spiderwick Chronicles” co-author DiTerlizzi 5 Antarctic summit between peaks named for faith and charity 6 Words after “win by” or “hang by” 7 What lobsters and crabs have 8 Nursery purchase 9 Baltimore club, for short 10 Ethan of “Before Sunrise” 11 Giant Manning

12 Company that pioneered walkie-talkies 13 “___ Mater” (hymn) 14 African capital 15 Organic chemistry group 16 Lilac and lavender 17 Turns into mush 20 Oaf 24 Not ephemeral 25 All ChiSox home games are played on it 32 ___ Lee 33 Pro with books, for short 35 Slapstick prop 36 Play watcher 41 Motocross entry, for short 42 Pirate’s cargo 44 Frenzied as if possessed 45 East German secret police 47 Where a mattress goes 48 Shapes like squares 50 Country that has two oryxes on its coat of arms 52 Like much processed wheat 53 Roman magistrates 54 Push off 55 Food item named after an Austrian city 56 Film set on Pandora 58 Snarly dog 60 Recedes 62 Blackmail, e.g. 64 “Well, now!” 65 Beat 66 Uncle Pedro, e.g.

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110 Magazine to which Obama gave his first postelection interview in 2008 111 N.F.C. West player 112 Admit 113 Trifling 117 Wilts 119 “___ my destiny be Fustian” (Dickinson poem) 120 Was idle


Fun ’n’ Advice

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Dilbert

Red and Rover

by Lynn Johnston

by Brian Basset

[“Doonesbury” is on hiatus; please email your comments on this strip to pdncomics@gmail.com]

DEAR ABBY: I’m three months DEAR ABBY pregnant. Before I got pregnant, my husget access. band and I enjoyed having wine with Abigail Seek advice dinner or a margarita when we were Van Buren within the disabled out on the town. We didn’t drink to community (in perexcess but have enjoyed alcohol in son or online) from moderation. individuals who Obviously, I can’t drink anymore, have more experibut my husband carries on like nothence with dating ing has changed. I’m becoming than you do. resentful every time we go out to eat. They also can I asked him once if he’d quit help you navigate drinking until our baby arrives. He any physical barrilooked shocked and said, “Why? I’m ers that might prenot pregnant.” vent you from datI guess I feel left out because he’s ing, if that’s an issue. having fun. I want him to suffer with There’s a saying, “Seek and ye me, and this is really getting on my shall find,” and it applies in your sitnerves. Any advice? uation. I wish you the best of luck. Resentful in Tennessee Dear Abby: My husband’s much older sister has no problem calling to ask for money but never calls just to say hello or to see how he’s doing. This has been going on for almost 10 years. She’ll tell us she or her sons need it for bills or school expenses. He has talked to her about it, but nothing has changed. We both work hard, while she refuses to ask the children’s father for a cent. Should we continue to give her money because it may affect our nephews if we don’t? Aunt in the South

Dear Resentful: Yes. If you feel you are missing out on “fun” if you can’t drink, you have a potential alcohol problem. Tell your husband that when he drinks in front of you, it makes you crave alcohol, and ask again that he respect your feelings and not do it. A considerate husband and father-to-be should respect that you are doing the heavy lifting (literally) and help all he can.

Frank & Ernest

Garfield

Momma

by Bob and Tom Thaves

Dear Abby: I’m a 28-year-old man who was born disabled. I have not had a date in years. I’d like to date and have a girlfriend, but when women look at me, all they see is my wheelchair. I’m a good person, well-mannered, respectful, caring and compassionate. Any advice you can offer would be appreciated. Lonely in Illinois

by Mell Lazarus

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Develop good relationships with the people you work with or deal with often and you will find it much easier to get information and explore new possibilities. Information regarding an opportunity will come from an unexpected source. 4 stars

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Keep your money and possessions locked up safely where you aren’t tempted to give them away or pay for others. Keeping tabs on what everyone else does will help you size up your situation and keep you ahead of everyone around you. 3 stars

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Expand your interests. Make a point to engage in conversations that allow you to broaden your views regarding people from different cultural backgrounds. By understanding where others come from and how they think, you will make better choices. 2 stars

Dennis the Menace

by Hank Ketcham

_________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, the late Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

The Last Word in Astrology ❘ ARIES (March 21-April 19): Emotions can interfere with a discussion. A misunderstanding is apparent, and it’s best that you don’t take what’s said personally or retaliate in a negative way. An older, experienced individual will help you through troubled times. 2 stars

Rose is Rose

Dear Aunt: That you have tolerated this for 10 years tells me you and your husband are kindhearted and responsible people, and I respect that. However, fathers have a legal responsibility to support their children, and your sister-in-law should make sure it happens whether that involves hiring an attorney to help or applying for funds from the state to see her boys are taken care of. If you must give her money, give her enough for a consultation with an attorney because “Sissie” appears to have been using you.

Dear Lonely: I’m glad you wrote because it’s important that you not allow yourself to be isolated. Get out and participate in activities you enjoy that include likeminded people. While you may have been born disabled, I’m sure you have abilities and talents that would be welcomed if you choose to volunteer them. If you haven’t already, search the various online dating sites for both disabled and nondisabled individuals or contact a disability advocacy organization for guidance or to help you

by Jim Davis

B5

Mom-to-be resents hubby’s drinking

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2013

Pickles

by Brian Crane

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You can and should bring about positive changes, but make sure you are not doing so at someone else’s expense. Favors will be granted and help given if you go through the proper channels and are considerate of those affected by your decisions. 4 stars VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The information you discover will give you greater insight into the way others feel about you and what you do. An expression of affection, gratitude or even just a thank you will go a long way with regard to your relationships with others. 2 stars LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t be afraid to take on a few extra responsibilities. It will give others a chance to see you in action. Travel plans or pursuing information that can broaden your outlook will help you make important life changes. 5 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Alter your living arrangements. Looking at your options and the different locations you feel add to your growth and pursuits will help you make an unusual but positive decision. Love is highlighted and a lifestyle change is in order. 5 stars

The Family Circus

by Eugenia Last

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Go on an adventure, whether it’s to a distant land or an area of your community you have yet to explore. The individuals you meet and the information you gather will contribute to a better future. Strive to reach your comfort zone. 3 stars CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Take a close look at any job you currently do. Your expertise may not always be appreciated, but it will prevent mistakes. Avoid hasty decisions and unpredictable people. Let your gut feeling be your deciding factor. 3 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Don’t make personal or physical changes that might limit your ability to take part in something that can affect your financial situation. Concentrate more on the fine print and what you will get out of whatever you are being offered. 3 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Expand your interests and explore new possibilities. Relationships, your home and dealing with family matters will be successful as long as you use persuasion rather than force. Your degree of success will come from what you offer in return. 5 stars

by Bil and Jeff Keane


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, September 26, 2013 PAGE

B6

Postal Service seeks to up price of stamps to 49 cents

$ Briefly . . . Two-part homebuyers class slated

Real-time stock quotations at peninsuladailynews.com

Market watch

BY ANDREW MIGA SEQUIM — A twopart first-time-homebuyers class will be presented at the Quality Inn, 134 River Road, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday. The class is free, and refreshments will be served. Keynote speaker is Michele Adkisson of Eagle Home Mortgage. This class is sponsored by the Washington State Housing Finance Commission. To reserve a seat, phone 360-683-2688.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — It soon could cost 49 cents to mail a letter. The postal Board of Governors said Wednesday it wants to raise the price of a first-class stamp by 3 cents, citing the agency’s “precarious financial condition” and the uncertain prospects for postal overhaul legislation in Congress. “Of the options currently available to the Postal Service to align costs and revenues, increasing postage prices is a last resort that reflects extreme financial challenges,” board chairman Mickey Barnett wrote customers. The rate proposal must be approved by the independent Postal Regulatory Commission. If the commission accepts it, the increase would become effective Jan. 26. Under federal law, the post office cannot raise its prices more than the rate of inflation unless it gets approval from the commission. In seeking the increase, Barnett cited “extraordinary and exceptional circumstances which have contributed to continued financial losses” by the agency.

NEW YORK — Starbucks has filed a trademark application for the term “Fizzio” as it continues to test carbonated drinks. The Seattle-based coffee company said in the filing with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office that the trademark would be for machines that make beverages, as well as a variety of drinks, including soft drinks. Zack Hutson, a spokesman for Starbucks Corp., said Wednesday the filing is related to the company’s test of sodas in Atlanta and Austin, Texas. The company has been testing lemon ale, ginger ale and root beer.

attempt to address long-term structural problems. Barnett said the post office would reconsider its rate request if Congress passes legislation to put the agency’s finances back on track. But prospects in Congress are unclear. A bipartisan bill in the Senate would end Saturday mail delivery after one year and phase out door-todoor delivery for new customers. The agency said ending Saturday mail delivery would save $2 billion each year. But many lawmakers, along with postal worker unions, have resisted such changes.

Supports changes The Postal Service supports the proposed delivery changes. It also is seeking to reduce its $5.6 billion annual payment for future retiree health benefits. It missed two of those payments in 2012, one deferred from the previous year, and is expected to miss another at the end of this month, when its fiscal year ends.

Wal-Mart stock NEW YORK — WalMart, the world’s largest retailer, spooked the stock market Wednesday

-61.33 15,273.26 -7.16

Nasdaq composite

3,761.10 -4.65

Standard & Poor’s 500

1,692.77 -1.17

Russell 2000

1,073.51

NYSE diary Advanced:

1,537

Declined:

1,522

Unchanged: Volume:

110 3.1 b

Nasdaq diary

Starbucks ‘Fizzio’

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. Postal Service letter carrier Jamesa Euler delivers mail in Atlanta in February. The financially struggling Postal Service is seeking a 3-cent increase in the cost of mailing a letter.

Media and marketing businesses that rely on postal services say a big increase in rates could hurt them and lower postal volume and revenues. Rafe Morrissey, the Greeting Card Association’s vice president of postal Cost on all post affairs, said the rate increases were As part of the rate increase request, “no substitute for common-sense, the cost for each additional ounce of structural reforms,” and the group first-class mail would increase a hoped they would be rejected. penny, to 21 cents, while the price of mailing a postcard would rise by a $6 billion loss expected cent, to 34 cents. The cost to mail a The post office expects to lose letter to an international destination $6 billion this year and is seeking would jump 5 cents, to $1.15. Many consumers won’t feel the help from Congress to fix its finances. Barnett said the increases, if increase immediately. Forever stamps bought before an increase still would approved, would generate $2 billion cover first-class postage. The price of annually for his agency. The agency new forever stamps would be at the last raised postage rates Jan. 27, including a penny increase in the cost higher rate, if approved. The Postal Service also said it of first-class mail to 46 cents. The Postal Service unsuccessfully would request price increases totaling sought an emergency 5.6 percent rate 5.9 percent for bulk mail, periodicals increase in 2010, citing the recession. and package service rates, according The commission acknowledged that to a filing to be made with the comthe recession had hurt revenues but mission Thursday. said the rate request was more of an

Sept. 25, 2013

Dow Jones industrials

Advanced:

1,165

Declined:

1,307

Unchanged: Volume:

140 1.8 b

AP

afternoon. The Dow Jones industrial average was down 59 points, or 1.1 percent, to 15,276 as of 2:15 p.m. Eastern Time. Bloomberg News reported Wal-Mart was looking to order fewer products from its suppliers in the third and fourth quarters of this year. It’s the latest sign that WalMart’s sales have been slow.

Gold and silver Gold futures for December delivery rose $19.90, or 1.5 percent, to settle at $1,336.20 an ounce Wednesday. Silver for December delivery rose 30 cents, or 1.4 percent, to end at $21.89 an ounce. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

Peninsula MARKETPLACE Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

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SNEAK A PEEK PENINSULA DAILY NEWS s

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CHEV: ‘89 Pickup short bed, chrome rims, Tarp, automatic, ver y clean. $4,000/obo. (360)683-0979

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GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8 - 2 p. m . , 2 3 3 C e d a r Park Dr., behind C’est Si Bon. Rain or shine! Indoor sale! Years of accumulation, antiques, cast iron stove, humpback trunk with inserts, hobnail floor lamp, vintage Pioneer speakers, hand-wrought andirons, dolls, art, leather chair, tables, Sony HD TV with cabinet, and much more! New items on Saturday!

HOME for rent in Sequim: Avail. Oct. 1 2 br., 2 bath on 1 acre. Shop, carpor t, and garden. Non smoking. $950. (360)681-7764

MOVING Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8 a.m.-4 p.m., 3717 Park Knoll Drive. Lots of nice living room, office and bedroom furniture; kids clothing and toys; crafting supplies; and a huge selection of var ious household goods and G A R AG E S a l e : Fr i . - furnishings. YOU DON’T Sat., 9-3 p.m., 71 Falcon WANT TO MISS THIS Rd. Household items, SALE! clothing, children’s furniture and toys, tanning MOVING Sale: Fri.-Sat., bed, bicycles and much, 9-3 p.m., 141 Hucklebermuch more! ry Pl., take Cape George Rd. above Cape George G M C : ‘ 9 1 V a n d u r a Colony. Garden tools, Conv. van. 187K, some furniture, antiques, brass body damage, runs ex- bed in both full and twin, etc. Rain or shine! Sale cellent. $1,500/obo. (360)681-0258 is indoors! MERCURY: ‘00 Grand OFFICE ASSISTANT Marquis LS. 169K, runs 15hrs/week; $10/hour ; good. $1,500/obo. P.O. Box 1655; Port An(360)681-0258 geles, WA 98362.

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD:

ADOPT: Loving home to provide a lifetime of joy & oppor tunity for your baby. No age or racial concer ns. Expenses paid, Call 1-866-440-4220

LET’S TALK: Looking for a group of or individual conversation partners. I’m conversant on many levels, from chatting about the day to discussing the great philosophical questions. Looking for an Elliot Stabler. (360)683-8404.

CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR

CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

PISTOL: Stoeger American Eagle 9mm stainless steel Luger, mint condition, original case with instructions, spare magazine. $550. (360)797-1945 SEQUIM: Home for lease. 2 br., 2 bath, den, g a t e d c o m m , fe n c e d back yard, 1st and deposit. $1,200. (360)477-5417 WORK BENCHES Heavy Duty 2’ x 8’ benches. 2 wood top, 1 stainless steel top. $100, $75, $50. (360)460-4655 YARD Sale: Fr i.-Sat.Sun., 9-5 p.m., 1215 E. Front St. Tools, ladders, tires, new fragrance lamps/oil, books and more.

CHECK OUT OUR NEW CLASSIFIED WIZARD AT www.peninsula dailynews.com

SEEKING TO ADOPT Loving couple seeks to ADOPT an infant. We can offer your baby a lifetime of love, opportunity, and financial security. We will provide a happy home, sharing our interests in the outdoors, travel, music, and sports. Let us help support you with your adoption plan. Contact us at 206-920-1376, 877290-0543 or AndrewCorley@ outlook.com or our attorney at 206-728-5858, ask for Joan file #0376.

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3020 Found

5000900

E P I C G A R AG E S a l e : Par t II. Sat. 9-4, Sun. 10-3, 1905 E. 1st St., between Thurmans and Lincare. Prices reduced, new items added, sporting goods, kitchenware, large men’s clothing, cookbooks, much more. Sun. 50% off. Rain or shine.

ESTATE SALE Please join us on Sat., September 28th, at 7 5 5 W. Wa s h i n g t o n (Hollywood Video), Sequim, from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. for a HUGE estate sale. We will be offering for your consideration antique/collectible furniture, china, glassware, silverplate, BOOKS, jewelry, electronics, appliances, Te m p u r p e d i c queen bed (1 yr. old), SHABBY CHIC, ar t, Danish Modern, and our largest selection to date of lawn/garden, tools, FISHING, and so much more! See yo u t h e r e. . . P l e a s e bring non-perishable food items to donate to t h e S a l va t i o n A r my Soup Kitchen. Swallow’s Nest Antiques & Estate Sales www.swallowsnest antiques.weebly.com

3010 Announcements

3023 Lost

FOUND: Breast pump/ LOST: Cat. Gray, med. Nebulizer. P.A. hair, female, small, yel(360)460-5677 low/green eyes, lost up Blue Mountain Rd. FOUND: Cat. Big male (360)661-5185 Russian Blue, not neutered, Knapman Rd. in L O S T: C l u t c h . B l a ck Sequim. (360)681-4502. Coach clutch at Walmart in Sequim. Please call (360)670-3418

3023 Lost

LOST: Dogs. Shelties, gold/white female and LOST: Backpack. Red black/gray male. Carlsand black, off Hwy. 101 borg area. Please don’t near Lake Sutherland. chase. Call Joe (360)457-4042 (360)460-1967


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 3023 Lost LOST: Hockey Gear. In blue USA bag, between P.A. Roller Rink and Old Mill Rd. (360)461-1207. L O S T: Po c k e t K n i fe . Small, black handle, 3” long, possibly in Sequim area. REWARD. (360)582-3065 LOST: Raincoat. REI, Blue, petite size, in Sequim Costco. (206)937-1537

4070 Business Opportunities E S TA B L I S H E D c o n signment business for sale. Fabulous business opportunity to purchase a loved business with loyal customers and clients. Ebay oppor tunity and constant flow of new inventor y! Wanting to sell to continue my health career. Don’t let this chance to be a new bu s i n e s s ow n e r p a s s you by! $10,000. Call for details, Michele, (360)461-4799.

4026 Employment General Accounting Technician City of Port Angeles $3315-$3958 mo. plus benefits. AA degree or two years college in accounting or related field AND two years experience processing accounts payable, accounts receivable, payroll and other similar accounting work preferably in a public agency. For more information contact Human Resource s a t a g a t e s @ c i t yo f pa.us. Closes 10/4/13. COPA is an E.O.E. ADULT Care Home in Sequim needs a caregiver, easy care, afternoon s h i f t , 1 - 7 p. m . , y o u r choice of days. (360)683-9194 CAREGIVER needed, prefer CNA, HCA, but n o t n e c e s s a r y. C a l l Cherrie, (360)683-3348

CAREGIVERS NEEDED $100 hire bonus. Training available. Call Caregivers. P.A. 457-1644 Sequim 683-7377 P.T. 379-6659 CNA/RNA: Immediate openings, part/full-time, all shifts. Wright’s Home Care (360)457-9236.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 B7

4026 Employment 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 505 Rental Houses 505 Rental Houses Clallam County Clallam County General Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County AMAZING VIEWS Enjoy the most amazing views of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Victoria, Mount Baker, the San Juan Islands and magnificent sunrises and sunsets! This home has a fenced backyard, a fireplace in the living MAINTENANCE/ room and a woodstove REMODELING in the family room on the MANAGER lower level. No need to M u s t p o s s e s s t h e enter from the street, k n o w l e d g e a n d easy level access from ability to maintain the alley and the home and remodel the ho- is on the route of the tel to a 5 star level. Olympic Discovery Trail, Salary and benefits a pleasure for walking DOE. and biking. The main Apply in person level square footage is at 140 Del Guzzi Dr. 1656. The partial lower Port Angeles. level is 900. MLS#271511. $199,900. Helga Filler MAKE A DIFFERENCE! (360)457-0456 MAKE MONEY! WINDERMERE FT and Per Diem ResiPORT ANGELES dential Aides. Resume to: PBH, 118 E. 8th St., BEAUTIFUL Port Angeles, WA 98362 MOUNTAIN VIEW Details: http://peninsula One level, 2,934 sqft, 4 behavioral.org B r. , 2 . 5 b a t h , fa m i l y EOE room, and den. 760 sfattached garage, 1,440 sf OFFICE ASSISTANT 15hrs/week; $10/hour ; carport pus patio. Front P.O. Box 1655; Port An- and back decks. Shy 5 acres great for horse geles, WA 98362. proper ty or Lavender Fa r m w i t h B e d a n d POSITION Breakfast, fully fenced ANNOUNCEMENT Entry or lateral firefight- with chain link fence. Loer/paramedic. For more cated between Sequim info and application visit and Port Angeles. MLS#271434. $389,000. us at Clallamfire3.org. Jean Ryker (360)477-0950 SEQ. SCHOOL DIST. Windermere Seeking 2 full time occuReal Estate pational therapist, immeSequim East diate openings. (360)582-3261 CLALLAM BAY: 4.23 SHORT ORDER COOK acres, A-frame home, 5 Experienced. Apply in miles from Lake Ozette, person Tues.-Thurs. 8-2, country living with best fishing and hunting in 612 S. Lincoln St., P.A. the area and marketable timber. $90,000. Telecom Construction (360)963-2156 Foreman. Excavating Company looking for a working foreman with experience in all phases of Telecom Construction. Must have experience in trenching conduit, blowing fiber, pulling innerduct, p l a c e m e n t o f u t i l i t y FSBO $237,000 Open vaults, etc. Respon- plan triple wide 2300 sf, sibilities include: pre- 3 br., 2 bath, large bosurveying jobs, orga- nus room or 4th bedn i z i n g a n d w o r k i n g room. Mountain view on with crew to ensure 1.01 acres, close to Distimely completion of covery Trail, not in the work orders and re- Carlsborg Urban Growth sponsive to emergen- A r e a . C o v e r e d f r o n t cy call out situations. porch, large rear deck, Fax resume to 360- e x t r a l a r g e 2 8 x 3 6 866-8911 or email to (1008 sf) detached garshauna@ age and workshop. southbayinc.net (360)582-9782

FSBO: Mountain View Custom Home. 3 bdrm, 2.5 baths on 1 acre. Solid maple cabinetry throughout,propane cooking. In ground pressurized irrigation water, electric heat pump, fully insulated, heated shop with 220V service. RV parking, 12x16 outbuilding, many custom features. $299,000. Call to see (360)452-4347.

PERFECT OPPORTUNITY Million dollar “in your face” views of the Straits, Mt. Baker, San Juans. Partially finished home located atop an elevated building site. Enjoy the elevated Artist/Photography loft w/incredible views over the g a ra g e. T h e h o m e i s modern, architecturally designed for the view site and estimated to be 60-70% completed. MLS#272041. $286,000. Dave Sharman (360)683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

PRIVATE CITY LOCATION With views of the straits a n d m o u n t a i n s . Ve r y open floor plan with va u l t e d c e i l i n g s , ex posed beams, lots of windows and skylights. Extensive natural lighting makes the wood finished interior very light and bright. Beautiful fenced yard with huge evergreens, decorative concrete walls and patio for outdoor entertaining. G r e a t m o u n t a i n v i ew from master bedroom deck with hot tub. Attached double car por t and double garage. MLS#272034. $393,000. Quint Boe PRICE REDUCED! (360)457-0456 1 5 4 G u y Ke l l y R o a d : WINDERMERE Amazing location bePORT ANGELES tween Sequim & Por t Angeles! This beautiful PRIVATE LOCATION 3bd/2ba home on 1.24 For home on 3.9 acres acres is located on a w i t h p o n d a n d g r e a t quiet cul-de-sac and of- shop with finished living f e r s p l e n t y o f h o m e area and ¾ bath. Home based opportunities, RV h a s 3 b d r m s / 2 b a t h s parking/hookup, partially with 1,327 SF and deck fenced, workshop, pole for enjoying view of pond barn, extra storage and and mtns. Good deep lots of space for every- well and 3 bdrm septic. one! Within walking dis- Make an appointment tance to the N. Olympic with your Buyer’s agent Trail. to see this home. MLS#271772 $235,500 MLS#271157. $275,000. Tanya Kerr Diann Dickey 360.670.6776 John L. Scott WINDERMERE Real Estate SUNLAND 360.683.4131

IMMACULATE NORTHWEST CONTEMPORARY In Seamount Estates. Vaulted ceilings and lots of windows in the great r o o m . Wo o d s t ove i n family room. Recently updated: all new flooring of hardwood, tile, vinyl and carpeting. All new light fixtures, faucets and kitchen sink. Stainless steel appliances. Backyard is a private retreat with flagstone and river rock patio, easy maintenance landscaping, trex decking and underground sprinkler system. MLS#272042. $249,900. Chuck Turner 452-3333 PRICE REDUCTION PORT ANGELES This 1957 four bedroom REALTY home has raised four children and numerous grandchildren and is still INVESTMENT OR going strong. This full STARTER Conveniently located in basement they lived in Sequim, 3 bedrooms, 1 before the top was put ½ baths, separate family on the house. Some reroom (wood burning fp), modeling needs to be covered patio adjacent done but the price reto green house, raised flects that so if you’re garden beds and stor- looking for a home what age shed, 2 car garage a great saltwater view. with workbench and attic MLS#271674. $254,900. Dan Blevins access. (360)417-2805 MLS#542120/272033 COLDWELL BANKER $154,900 UPTOWN REALTY Deb Kahle (360)683-6880 PRIVATE SETTING IN WINDERMERE SUNLAND SUNLAND Sits on Quiet Cul-desac, 3 Br., 2 bath Over NEW LISTING 2,200 sf, fully fenced Beautifully Remodeled 4 with garden beds, heatbr., 3 bath home on 2.5 ed sunroom and covered city lots with outstanding deck, basement bonus views of the city and room. Straits! MLS#539322/271996 MLS#271995. $347,500. $259,000 Kimi Robertson Tyler Conkle 360.461.9788 (360)670-5978 JACE The Real Estate WINDERMERE Company SUNLAND

QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP In this custom home in Bell Hill neighborhood. Living rm, kitchen and master suite open onto wide trex deck with dist a n t wa t e r v i ew s a n d Happy Valley. Bamboo floors, vaulted ceilings, fireplace, concrete tile roofs, 3 bdrms 2 baths + den+ dining. 2008 SF p l u s b o nu s s p a c e o n lower level. Call your Buyer’s agent for an appointment. MLS#271157. $275,000. Diann Dickey John L. Scott Real Estate 360.683.4131

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

READY TO BUILD 3 PARCELS 1.85 Acres / ALL Utilities on Site, PUD water and electric / septic, 5- car garage – 1440 sf, 1200 s q u a r e fo o t m a c h i n e shop, unobstr ucted mountains views, ready for building your home. MLS#271903 $135,000 Team Thomsen (360)808-0979 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

CENTRAL P.A.: Charm- SEQUIM Home for Rent ing 3 Br., 1 ba, 2 car gar- 3 br., 2 bath. $1,100/mo. age, shop. $1,100 mo. (360)775-6171 or (360)670-5354 (360)460-2676 DISCO BAY: Waterfront, newly renovated 3 Br., 2 ba, 20 min. to Seq./P.T. $900. (360)460-2330.

SEQUIM: Newer 3 br., 2 bath, close to Carrie Blake park, low maint yd, quiet neighborhood,small pet neg. HOME for rent in Se- $1,200 mo., $500 dep. quim: Avail. Oct. 1 2 br., (360)460-6434. 2 bath on 1 acre. Shop, carpor t, and garden. 605 Apartments Non smoking. $950. (360)681-7764 Clallam County

REDUCED TO SELL NOW! This cozy craftsman offers many upgrades inc l u d i n g n ew f l o o r i n g , paint, doors, heaters, lighting + an updated kitchen and new bathroom, yet retaining the character and style with rich wood walls and built-in cabinets. Move in ready! $139,000 MLS#271709 Kathy Brown (360)417-2785 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. (360)417-2810 HOUSES/APT IN P.A. H 1 br 1 ba..............$500 A Studio ...................$500 A 1 br 1 ba ..............$525 A 2 br 1 ba ...............$575 H 2 br 1.5 ba ............$875 H 3 br 2 ba ...............$900 H 4 br 2 ba ...............$950 H 4 br 2 ba .............$1200 H 4 br 3 ba .............$1350 STORAGE UNITS $40/m-$100/m Complete List at: 1111 Caroline St., P.A.

VERY MOTIVATED Highland Estates 50+ Community. Great water views form this 3 bedroom/2 bath ADA accessible home. Features include master suite with huge walk in closet and walk-in bath tub, wide doors and halls with ramp into the garage. Cork floors are under the laminate floors excellent for wheel chair mobility. Underground sprinkler system for this easy care yard. Home owners dues include yard maintenance. Close to shopping and to town. MLS#263968. $199,000. Jean Irvine (360)417-2797 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

P.A.: 2 Br. 1 bath, carpor t, no pets. $740, dep. (360)457-7012.

CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, quiet, 2 Br., excellent references required. $700. (360)452-3540. P.A.: 1 Br., no pets/ smoking, view. $550. (360)457-1695

P. A . : 2 B r. , n o p e t s. $675 mo., 1st, last, dep. (360)670-9418

P.A.: Lg, 2 Br., 2 bath, appliances, patio, quiet. $750, dep. 452-5572.

P.A.: Studio apt., $550, $300 dep., util. incl., no pets. (360)457-6196.

P. A . : 3 b r. , 1 b a t h , S E Q : 2 r o o m S t u d i o, fenced yard.. $750, f/l/d. $595. Walk to shopping! (360)452-7530 tourfactory.com/367154 P.A.: 3 Br., 2 ba., gar. $1,100 mo. $1,100 se- S E QU I M : B e a u t i f u l 2 Br., great location. $700, curity. (360)417-0153. $700 dep. 809-3656. P.A.: 4 Br., 2 ba, fenced yard. $900, 1st, last, 620 Apartments dep. (360)452-7530.

Jefferson County

P.A.: 4 Br., 3 ba, view, 1 yr. lease. Small dog 35 lb. or less negotiable. $1,150 mo., $1,150 dep. Avail. now. 457-3099. P.A.: Clean, furnished 1 Br., 507 S. Pine, Amana W/D, etc. No smoking. $625. (360)452-2300.

308 For Sale Lots & Acreage

P.A.: Fantastic 2,500 sf 3 Br., 3 ba, 3 car gar., office, family room, rec room. $1,300, $1,000 dep. (360)460-7254.

REPOS

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com

20 acres parcels. $200 a month. No credit check! Call TLC 1-888-440-9824 Ref: BON

CENTRAL P.A.: 1 Br., 1 ba, no smoking/pets. $500. (360)457-9698.

P.T.: Fur nished, 1 br. apt. Avail. now! Are you tired of keeping track of all those monthly utilities bills? Relax, if you have your own phone the rest of your utilities are incl. in the $960/mo. rent! T h a t ’s r i g h t , e l e c t r i c, heat, water, sewer, highspeed internet and cable TV. Also incl. is private laundry, enterance, and parking. No pets/smoke. Jenny, (360)379-8282

683 Rooms to Rent Roomshares

SEQ: 3 Br., near schools RO O M M AT E n e e d e d : and shopping. $995 mo. tourfactory.com/1050525 P r i v a t e r o o m / b a t h , cable, lights, internet. SEQUIM: Home for $450. (360)504-2305. lease. 2 br., 2 bath, den, g a t e d c o m m , fe n c e d SEQUIM: Fur nished 1 back yard, 1st and de- Br. $380, plus electric. (360)417-9478. Email posit. $1,200. susanunpc@gmail.com (360)477-5417

TRUCK DRIVER: Looking for an experienced Class A dr iver. Home every night. Competitive wages, Health care, retirement, overtime. (360)452-2327

4080 Employment Wanted Correctional Officer 1 Permanent & On- Call positions available now at Clallam Bay Corrections Center Pay starts at $16.99 hr. Plus full benefits. Closes 09/30/13. Apply on-line: www.careers.wa.gov For further information please call Roxann at (360)963-3207. EOE.

AMBITIOUS, hard-working 33 year old family man desires pemanent full-time work. Experience as lineman, lands c a p i n g a n d fo r e s t r y work. An apprenticeship program would be desirable, also. Call Andy, (360)797-1094 HANDYMAN for Hire: Property maintenance, painting, dump runs, minor home repairs, house washing, etc. Free estimates. Available anytime. Call (360)582-6207

DENTAL HYGIENIST Full-time, available for busy family practice in uptown Port Townsend. Send resume to Clark Sturdivant, 608 Polk St., P o r t To w n s e n d , W A HANDY Woman for hire! 98368. Odd jobs, inside and out. (360)775-8426 FREE TRAINING - PeHOUSECLEANING ninsula College Composites Program. Pe- Professional, efficient, fa s t. My supplies or ninsula College is offering a tuition-free, yours, one time or ongo6 credit course starting ing. (360)582-7643. Sept. 24th. Advanced JUAREZ & SON’S Manufacturing 101 is a HANDYMAN SERVICES prerequisite for short and long-ter m com- Quality work at a reaposites courses and sonable price. Can hanfocuses on skills nec- dle a wide array of probessary in manufactur- lems and projects. Like ing settings. Informa- h o m e m a i n t e n a n c e , t i o n a l s e s s i o n a t cleaning, clean up, yard Clallam WorkSource maintenance, and etc. o n S e p t . 1 6 t h f r o m Give us a call office 2:00PM-3:00PM and 452-4939 or cell 6:00PM-7:00PM. Con- 253-737-7317. tact Maitland Peet at RUSSELL (360)417-6336 for ANYTHING more info. 775-4570 or 681-8582 FULL-TIME position for parts/sales/service counter. Motavatied, quick learner self-starter. Able to lift 50lbs, friendly outgoing, Tues-Sat. Busy par ts counter must be willing to take on multiple tasks. We are looking to hire train someone that’s interested in fulltime position that includes medical, retirement, vacation benefits. Apply in person at Port Angeles Power Equipment. pay d.o.e.

10008 for 4 weeks!

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105 Homes for Sale Clallam County

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Deadline: Tuesdays at Noon

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

To advertise call Holly at 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7714

04915

ABSOLUTELY STUNNING Almost 240 Ft. of Waterfront, Private and Secluded, Building Site Cleared, See San Juan’s and Dungeness Lighthouse, 15+ Acres of Privacy. MLS#545680/272083 $330,000 Team Schmidt Mike: 460-0331 Irene: 460-4040 WINDERMERE HIRING SUNLAND Busy medical practice seeks experienced ofAMAZING PROPERTY! fice/administrative manSpacious 5 BR Nor thager and a medical billwest Architecture home. ing specialist. Computer Tennis court, swimming proficiency: QuickBooks, pool, fire pit, hot tub, Microsoft office, employfa bu l o u s d e ck ! S p e c ment law, payroll, actacular mountain views. counting, business Partial salt water views. liabilities. Fax cover let1,656 sq. ft. barn with 5 ter, resume and referstalls, insulated room, ences to (360)681-6222. tack room, hay elevator and loft for hay storage. HOST POSITION: Full/ Bring your horses! Bring PT, must be avail. week- your family. Lots of room ends, apply in person at to play and grow. 5.50 Oak Table Cafe, Seq. Acres. MLS#264293/408874 KWA HOMECARE $430,000 Part/full-time Caregivers. Patty Brueckner Benefits, Flexible Hours. 460-6152 Call P.A. (360)452-2129 TOWN & COUNTRY Sequim (360)582-1647 P.T. (360)344-3497 P.A.: 2.5 acres, front half open field, back half THERAPY Clinic Posi- timbered, water share, tions: Openings in Se- nice location, southern q u i m p r i va t e h e a l t h exposure, adjacent 2.4 care: part time recep- a c r e s , n i c e m o b i l e tionist with computer home, covered decks, and phone skills;full new hot water heater, time COTA/L; OTR/L new entry flooring, new and/or PT. Upper ex- bathroom flooring, surtremity therapy experi- round tub. $150,000. (360)775-9996 or ence. (360)460-5968 pptc01@gmail.com.


Classified

B8 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2013

DOWN 1 Replenish a pint of ale, say 2 Thorny shrub 3 Jane Eyre’s charge 4 Free

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. CHERRIES JUBILEE Solution: 12 letters

T H S E R F E R D E T I N G I By Marti DuGuay-Carpenter

5 When sch. often starts 6 Plains home 7 Golden __: seniors 8 Classical Greek style 9 Stubborn one 10 They have strings attached 11 Boyfriend 12 Animal shelter 13 Under-the-sink joints 18 Modest acknowledgment of praise 19 Banks in fashion 24 Bill stamp 25 From the top 26 Hot spot 29 Pop 30 Compatriot 31 Roger who played Lord Marbury on “The West Wing” 32 BBs, e.g. 33 Spring tide counterpart 34 Hard-to-see pest 35 WWII command 36 “Dexter” network, in listings 37 Word with best or common

9/26/13 Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

R S E E T L L O R A N G E M R

R D E Z I L E M A R A C A U O

© 2013 Universal Uclick

E O T A U I M E E E R E E S T

H O V M R N O D K E R U W F S

C F K A F G N A A C Q A O S I

V A N I L L A M C I U S L B H

www.wonderword.com

T S E I P F L E L H E H R F C

S U G A R L M M C S E A A H S

E O K O E A O O M  I N T C E R

U G S T M A F A V A I S C R K T C I P E M E H E N D S T H S A U T Y U A ‫ګ‬ D ‫ګ‬ A C S A R ‫ګ‬ E W I U N ‫ګ‬ H R M J I Y R O S I K Y K

Join us on Facebook

9/26

Almonds, Amazed, Brandy, Cake, Caramelized, Cherry, Creamy, Dairy, Dish, Enjoy, Famous, Filling, Flame, Flare, Flavor, Food, Fruit, Guest, Heat, History, Homemade, Ice Cream, Ignited, Juicy, Kirsch, Lemon, Liqueur, Make, Mint, Orange, Pies, Queen, Recipe, Refresh, Rich, Rum, Sauce, Sauté, Savor, Sear, Simmer, Soft, Sugar, Sweet, Taste, Thick, Vanilla, Whisk, Zest Yesterday’s Answer: Brainstorm THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

PURUS ©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

NAGET (c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

40 “Don’t worry about me” 41 Huge production 42 Logician’s “E,” perhaps 47 Has to sell 48 Bullish beginning? 49 Chianti, in Chianti 51 Wipe out 52 “Eight Is Enough” actor Willie 53 Sound quality

1163 Commercial Rentals

6025 Building Materials

6050 Firearms & Ammunition

6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

EAST P.A.: 132 S. Bayview. Unit D 380 sf, 8’x8’ ove r h e a d d o o r, $ 1 6 0 m o. U n i t A 7 2 0 s f, 10’x7.5’ overhead door, man door, $310 mo. (360)477-8474

WINDOWS: Brown, aluminum, great for shop or gr e e n h o u s e, ( 2 ) 3 x 6 , (2) 4x6, (1) 4x8, (1) 3030. $200/obo. (360)681-8034 after 6

PISTOL: Stoeger American Eagle 9mm stainless steel Luger, mint condition, original case with instructions, spare magazine. $550. (360)797-1945

FIREWOOD: 16 ft. Alder logs delivered by dump truck to east Jefferson County. 5+ cords $575. Call 360-301-1931

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326

6035 Cemetery Plots

RELOADER: Lachmiller Super Jet shot shell .410 reloader, 3” with powder, BURIAL SITE: In Mt. etc. $85. (360)681-6022. SEQ: Commercial 3 of- Angeles Memorial Park. fice suite, Bell St., $895. REMINGTON: 700 $1,999. Save $500! tourfactory.com/1052188 25-06. Date of manufac(360)452-9611 S E Q U I M : 1 5 0 S. 5 t h BURIAL SPACES: (3) t u r e J a n 1 9 7 1 . Ve r y Ave., Boardwalk Square. adjoining burial spaces, good condition. Comes with Leupold scope and (360)683-3256 located in the Garden of see through mounts as Devotion, Mt. Angeles w e l l a s a s l i n g . N o 6005 Antiques & Memorial Park, P.A. trades, just cash. $550. (206)322-0665 (360)912-0163 Collectibles C A B I N E T S : H o o s i e r 6050 Firearms & kitchen cabinets, early Ammunition 1920s, excellent condition. $850/obo. MUZZLE LOADER: 50 (360)460-7274 cal., CVA, model Hunterbolt Magnum, inline, LONG DISTANCE stock/sling/case is camo, No Problem! complete box of ammo, Peninsula Classified p ow d e r, c l e a n i n g k i t , eve r y t h i n g yo u n e e d . 1-800-826-7714 $300. (360)457-8628.

Y S W D S I M M E R J U I C Y

6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

FIREWOOD: $179 delivered Sequim-P.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com

Place your ad with the only DAILY Classified Section on the Peninsula! PENINSULA CLA$$IFIED

FALL SPECIAL: +/- 4 cords seasoned wood plus wood spliter. $1,250 firm. (360)452-4254.

360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-8435

REAL FIREWOOD (360)460-3639

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6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

LOPI Endeavor Wood Stove for Sale: Tender ly fired, recently disassembled and cleaned, tubes replaced -- looking for a new home to heat. Includes 9 feet of stovepipe. New $2,500, yours only for $1,250. (360)477-3033

PARTUB

TIDOYD

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Print your answer here: Yesterday’s

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: BEACH ISSUE CUDDLE PASTRY Answer: The mom with four boys wanted a price break, so the barber — CUT HER A DEAL

6080 Home Furnishings

6100 Misc. Merchandise

6115 Sporting Goods

Library Furniture Book shelves, drawer bases, desk, matching Brazilian rosewood, European made. $1,100, partial priced accordingly. (360)681-0528.

MISC: Electric fireplace, remote, optional corner additional, $275. Trundle b e d w i t h m a t t r e s s e s, clean, 31x76”, $60. 2 end tables, $50 ea. (360)683-6135

MISC: China hutch, 1880s, $1,000. China hutch, small, 1920s, made in Germany, $250. Small Victor ian desk, chair, $160. Coffee table, 1950s, Duncan Phyfe, $30. Basket, Makah made, work of art, $1,500. (360)457-4277.

MISC: Frigidaire refrigerator, $20. Desks, $50 ea. (360)457-4838.

P O O L TA B L E : Ve r y good, 80 yr. old, slate, large, 3 piece, Brunswick, acessories, rack, balls, sticks, etc. $2,500 o r w i l l t ra d e fo r ve r y good golf cart. (360)504-2696

MISC: Sofas, $50-100. Recliner, $50. Pump-up salon chair, $50. Clean mattress set, $100. 6075 Heavy Kitchen chairs, $10. White wood desk, $30. Equipment Dining table, white, $30. Pool table, $100. Large SEMI END-DUMP TRAILER: 30’. Electric T V, $ 2 0 . DV D p l aye r, tar p system, excellent $10. (360)461-4084 condition. $6,500/obo. MOVING SALE: Dining (360)417-0153 room table, 3 leaves, 6 chairs, $200. Dining taSEMI END-DUMP TRAILER: 30’. Electric b l e w i t h 2 l e a ve s , 6 tar p system, excellent c h a i r s, l i g h t e d c h i n a cabinet, $450. Bistro tacondition. $6,500/obo. ble with 4 stools, $150. 2 (360)417-0153 bar stools, $75. Day bed WELL Drilling equip. with trundle, $200. Deeprock, new in box, (360)504-2581 $2,000. (360)437-0165.

CHINA CABINET: ‘82 Thomasville, bevelled glass doors on hutch with light oak drawers and cabinets, flawless carved detail, solid and sturdy woodwork, 64” x 83” x 19”. $350. (360)683-7016

1-866-247-2878

135114275

The mission of Customs and Border Protection (CBP), Office of Air and Marine (OAM), the world’s largest aviation and maritime law enforcement organization, is to protect the American people and the nation’s critical infrastructure through the coordinated use of integrated air and marine forces to detect, interdict and prevent acts of terrorism and the unlawful movement of people, illegal drugs and other contraband toward or across U.S. borders.

54 Workers’ backer 55 “But wait! There’s more!” company 56 Vandalized, Halloween-style 57 Comedy routines 58 Healthy berry 59 Cowpoke’s polite assent 63 Tolkien’s talking tree 64 IBM hardware 65 Ask too many questions

6080 Home Furnishings

Call 1-866-247-2878 to report suspicious activity on the water and along our coastline.

9/26/13

Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags

ACROSS 1 Ski area helpers 6 Finish line? 10 Equal to the task 14 “Live Free __”: New Hampshire motto 15 Some are easily bruised 16 Sound of laughter 17 RATS 20 “Friendly skies” co. 21 Garr of “Mr. Mom” 22 “My place or __?” 23 SHUCKS 27 Unspecified amount 28 One of the Seven Sisters schools 32 Joe’s sister in TV’s “Under the Dome” 35 Salinger girl 38 Soccer shout 39 DARN 43 Goat quote 44 Hurdle for a storied cow 45 Offers thanks, in a way 46 Decides one will 49 Itinerary word 50 SHOOT 57 Setting for “Beasts of the Southern Wild” 60 Cloudburst, e.g. 61 Seasonal drink 62 FUDGE 66 Item on a “honey-do” list 67 Time fraction: Abbr. 68 “Bad, Bad Leroy Brown” singer 69 Computerized city people 70 Former “Entertainment Tonight” coanchor 71 Ecclesiastical council

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

6100 Misc. Merchandise G O - C A R T: Fo r s a l e , runs good, $425. leave message, (360)452-7010 HOME BREW EQUIP All grain. Including 30 gal. brew pot, carboys, mills, etc. $1,000. (360)681-0988

CONTOUR CHAIR: Has electric heat, tilt and vi- M I S C : 5 l o g b o o m chains, $15 ea. Vintage bration, good condition. wicker doll buggy, $35. $275. (360)452-7940. John F. Kennedy child rocker, $25. DINING SET (360)681-4803 Table (extends to seat 1 2 ) , 6 c h a i r s, h u t c h , Heritage design by Drex- MISC: ‘99 Wilder ness 24’ trailer, $5,500. ‘05 el. $500. (360)681-0528. Honda CFR 80, like FURNITURE: Enclosed new, $1,300. ‘92 Calkins entertainment center, 6’ galv boat trailer, $350. H x 4 ’ W, $ 2 7 5 . O a k Propane ventless stove, bookshelf combo set, 3 $ 4 0 0 . L i v i n g s t o n 1 0 ’ p i e c e, 6 ’ 4 ” t a l l , $ 1 0 0 boat, $400. Suzuki ‘11 4 each or $275 for all. For- stroke 2 HP outboard, m a l d i n i n g t a bl e, 7 0 ” $800. (360)460-8514. with leaf, 6 chairs, $550. Oak desk with shelves, POOL TABLE: Oakdale, $125. Ever ything is in 8’, slate, solid oak, new. $900. Please call in eveexcellent condition. ning, (360)461-0311. (360)808-2678

6125 Tools

M I S C : Po w e r c h a i r / scooter, Aspire Quickie, MIi, great condition, new battery, $1,200. Ladies jacket, insulated leather, Mustang, medium, $75. (360)460-0546

WORK BENCHES Heavy Duty 2’ x 8’ benches. 2 wood top, 1 stainless steel top. $100, $75, $50. (360)460-4655

6105 Musical Instruments

6140 Wanted & Trades

PIANO: Milton, small BOOKS WANTED! We baby grand, with bench, love books, we’ll buy and all kinds of sheet yours. 457-9789. music. You move. $995 firm. (360)683-2705. WANTED TO BUY Salmon/bass plugs and S O U N D E q u i p m e n t : lures, P.A. Derby meM a ck i e b o a r d , $ 2 5 0 . morabilia (360)683-4791 Pe avey A m p, $ 1 5 0 . AKG mic, $170. Peavey mic, $75. Shure head 8120 Garage Sales m i c, $ 1 0 0 . DA K m i c, Jefferson County $15. Peavey Speakers, $100. Mic Stands, $35. MOVING Sale: Fri.-Sat., Cables, $8. 9-3 p.m., 141 Huckleber(360)531-3953 ry Pl., take Cape George Rd. above Cape George Garden tools, 6110 Spas/Hot Tub Colony. furniture, antiques, brass Supplies bed in both full and twin, etc. Rain or shine! Sale is indoors!

$1000 SPA

Must Sell, I bought a trailer & simply need room

8142 Garage Sales Sequim

Evening soaks are perfect with soft ext. surround lighting. Plus all the supplies! Works great! ‘99 Coleman 400 Spectrum Series Lowboy. Nice wood encasement. Solid cover. Custom 20 jet fiberglass spa accomadates 5 people. 7.5’ x 6.25’ x 2.8’ 360-649-2715. Kitsap.

END OF SUMMER BLOWOUT! Multi-family garage sale, nice things no longer needed! Wash/dryer set, twin mattress and frame, sporting goods, electronics, trendy clothes and apparel, kitchen and household goods, gard e n / t o o l s . Yo u d o n ’ t want to miss these deals. No early birds, free coffee. Sat., 8 a.m.-4 p.m., 317 N. Matriotti.

6115 Sporting Goods MISC: Mossberg 22 target rifle, $200. 50 cal black powder rifle, all accessories, $150. (360)452-3550

G A R AG E S a l e : Fr i . Sat., 9-3 p.m., 71 Falcon Rd. Household items, clothing, children’s furniture and toys, tanning bed, bicycles and much, much more!

GARAGE SALE ADS Call for details. 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714

Place your ad at peninsula dailynews.com

8142 Garage Sales Sequim ESTATE SALE Please join us on Sat., September 28th, at 7 5 5 W. Wa s h i n g t o n (Hollywood Video), Sequim, from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. for a HUGE estate sale. We will be offering for your consideration antique/collectible furniture, china, glassware, silverplate, BOOKS, jewelry, electronics, appliances, Te m p u r p e d i c queen bed (1 yr. old), SHABBY CHIC, ar t, Danish Moder n, and our largest selection to date of lawn/garden, tools, FISHING, and so much more! See yo u t h e r e. . . P l e a s e bring non-perishable food items to donate to t h e S a l va t i o n A r my Soup Kitchen. Swallow’s Nest Antiques & Estate Sales www.swallowsnest antiques.weebly.com

HUGE GARAGE Sale: Sat. only, 9-4 p.m., 1011 W. S p r u c e C o u r t , o f f Priest Rd. Little bit of eve r y t h i n g , f r o m a n tiques to tools, clothes, baby items, cookware, carved teak end tables, dishes, antique wooden sleds, furniture, dressers, Wii guitar and drum set, treadmill, wall decor, picknick tables, metal frame bed with twin mattress. Too much to list!

M U LT I - FA M I LY S a l e : Fri.-Sat., 8-5 p.m., 1648 W. H e n d r i ck s o n R d . , take Priest Rd. on east side of Walmart, turn left on Hendr ickson. Less than half a mile there’s a marker. Turn right and fo l l ow s i g n s. A n t i q u e window frames, quilts, ladies clothing from XSXL, some men’s clothing, china, kitchen misc., twin beds with like new mattresses and frames, bedding, and RV items.

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES? SHOP LOCAL peninsula dailynews.com

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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TRACTOR

TREE SERVICE MAINTENANCE LAWN CARE

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4 yards of Beauty Bark $125 (Includes delivery) -Call for sample-

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ALSO OFFERING: • Air duct cleaning • Floor Tile & Grout cleaning • Linoleum Cleaning

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B10

ClassifiedAutomotive

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2013

Car memory linked to battery Dear Doctor: My 2003 Nissan Maxima’s battery has no symptoms of problems whatsoever, but I’m thinking of getting a new battery because I don’t want any future problems. I’d like to change the battery myself. Is this possible? Are there any precautions I need to take? Do I need a backup system? Frank Dear Frank: Your vehicle’s computer will probably require power at all times. When changing a battery, make sure the ALDA connector is active; it’s located under the driver’s-side dash, the same place the emission test connector is. The reason for outside battery source is to not lose the vehicle’s memory.

Get pressure details Dear Doctor: My 2003 Toyota Echo’s climate control system acts oddly on a long trip. It stops cooling, and the air volume even seems to decrease. A small drip of water appears on the passenger side compartment, too. Any ideas? Rich Dear Rich: You need to have pressure information (both high and low pres-

THE AUTO DOC Junior Damato

sure), as well as know how much refrigerant is in the system. The only way to find out how much refrigerant is in the system is to vacuum out

the system. The next step is to recharge the system with the correct amount of refrigerant.

Tranny issues Dear Doctor: I purchased a 2014 Subaru Forester with the non-turbo engine and the new CVT transmission, which is definitely different. I notice what feels like a “rocking” sensation or slight hesitation as I accelerate, especially when accelerating slowly, like the transmission is maybe searching for the right gear or position. It’s not a problem now, but I’m concerned that it may get worse as time goes by and become a problem.

Should this be brought to the dealer’s attention? Nellie Dear Nellie: Yes, check with the dealer and have them road-test to make access and document any transmission problems you have right now.

Backup lights, camera Dear Doctor: I have a 2008 Chrysler Town & Country minivan with 48,000 miles. My problem is the reverse backup lights, along with the backup camera, do not work. I checked the fuse. It was burned out, so I replaced it. After I changed the fuse, the backup camera and the reverse backup lights worked for a day. After that, I blew two others fuses as soon as I put it in reverse. What’s going on? John Dear John: The first step is to look at a wire diagram and see what is on that circuit, besides the back-up lights and camera. The immediate fuse blowing means there is a dead short. You can do the simple things, such as disconnect the backup light bulbs and/ or the wires to the sockets. You can buy a subscrip-

8180 Garage Sales 7035 General Pets 9820 Motorhomes 9820 Motorhomes PA - Central MOVING Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8 a.m.-4 p.m., 3717 Park Knoll Drive. Lots of nice living room, office and bedroom furniture; kids clothing and toys; crafting supplies; and a huge selection of var ious household goods and furnishings. YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS THIS SALE!

P U P P Y: Fe m a l e B e r nese Mountain Dog, about 6 months old, tricolored. $995. (360)683-7001

9820 Motorhomes

8183 Garage Sales PA - East E P I C G A R AG E S a l e : Par t II. Sat. 9-4, Sun. 10-3, 1905 E. 1st St., between Thurmans and Lincare. Prices reduced, new items added, sporting goods, kitchenware, l a r g e m e n ’s c l o t h i n g , cookbooks, much more. Sun. 50% off. Rain or shine. GARAGE Sale: Fri.-Sat., 8 - 2 p. m . , 2 3 3 C e d a r Park Dr., behind C’est Si Bon. Rain or shine! Indoor sale! Years of accumulation, antiques, cast iron stove, humpback trunk with inserts, hobnail floor lamp, vintage Pioneer speakers, hand-wrought andirons, dolls, art, leather chair, tables, Sony HD TV with cabinet, and much more! New items on Saturday! YARD Sale: Fr i.-Sat.Sun., 9-5 p.m., 1215 E. Front St. Tools, ladders, tires, new fragrance lamps/oil, books and more.

7035 General Pets PUPPIES: Nor thwest Farm Terrier pups. Easy to train, eager to please, versatile, live long, active lives, easy-keepers. Great dogs! $400 includes papers, vaccinations, worming, flea & tick treatment. (360)928-3319 or sg1953@yahoo.com

MOTORHOME: 1990 UltraSport Escaper 20’ Chevy chasis, 350 engine. Fairly good cond i t i o n . M ove fo r c e s sell. Has new batteries, altenator and under 100K miles. Reduced price to $3,500/obo (due to soft spots on floor) Call John @ (360)477-9452

MOTORHOME: ‘94 32’ F l e e t wo o d C o r o n a d a . ‘454’ Chev engine, 67K mi., electric step, 7000 watt Oman generator, g o o d t i r e s , i n v e r t e r, queen walk-around bed, leveling jacks, 2 TVs, 2 lg. solar panels, 2 room A / C, b a ck u p c a m e ra , w i n d o w aw n i n g s , 1 8 ’ awning, outside shower, ss wheel covers, electric heated mirrors. $12,500 or best reasonable offer. (360)457-4896 MOTORHOME: ‘97 35’ Fleetwood Southwind, Class A, 27,500 original miles, dual roof AC, lg. s l i d e, Fo r d ‘ 4 6 0 ’ , hy draulic levelers, 2 TVs, rear camera, Onan generator, neutral interior, must see. $23,999. (360)452-4136

MOTOR HOME: ‘99 40’ Monaco Exec. Excellent cond., ‘450’ Cummins M11, Allison trans., lots of extras. $65,000/obo. (360)460-7200 MOTORHOME: ‘86 Ford Shasta Class C. 52K, MOTORHOME: Boundgood condition, recently er ‘93, 31’. 454 Banks purchased, not being Power Pack, 55k, extras. used, want to sell. $8,500. (206)920-0418. $5,900. (360)457-6434. MOTORHOME: Georgie MOTORHOME: ‘87 21’ boy Persuit. 25’, coach, Toyota Slumberqueen. ve r y c l e a n , ex c e l l e n t Low miles, 4 cyl., good condition, 39.7k, brand s h a p e . S a l e d u e t o new batter ies, walkhealth. $6,900/obo. around bed, trailer hitch, (360)452-7246 body straight. $14,750. (360)477-2007 MOTOR HOME: ‘88 38’ Beaver Motorcoach. Cat MOTORHOME: Rexhall 300 diesel, Allison trans, ‘ 0 2 R o s e a i r . 3 2 ’ , 2 53K mi., has everything slides, basement model, but slide-out. $27,000. hydraulic jacks, 12 cubic (360)477-1261 foot refrigerator with ice m a ke r, f i r e p l a c e, G M MOTORHOME: Winne- Motor. 47k miles, comes bego ‘93 Adventure. 34’, w i t h e v e r y t h i n g ! ex. cond., nonsmokers, $48,000/obo. 65k miles, 2 roof air, hy(360)452-6318. draulic levelers, Onan generator, microwave, Visit our website at ice maker/fridge, 4 burnwww.peninsula er stove, laminate floordailynews.com ing, lots of storage, very Or email us at livable. Possible trade classified@ for smaller pull trailer. peninsula $11,500. (360)565-6221. dailynews.com

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Car of the Week

tion to Alldata.com for one year for about $25 to download diagnostic info.

85,000-mile warranty Dear Doctor: I bought KUHMO tires for my 2010 Nissan Murano. They offered 85,000-mile road use and were competitive with price, but I should have been skeptical. The ride is rough, and I feel every bump. I’m stuck for 85,000 miles. Any thoughts for a better ride? Walt Dear Walt: I sell a lot of tires and various brands. I have never offered an 85,000-mile warranty tire. The tire would have to be made of indestructible hard rubber. Take a close look at the Michelin brand. It will cost more, but in my opinion, it’s worth the extra price, especially for SUVs and light trucks.

________ Junior Damato is an accredited Master Automobile Technician, radio host and writer for Motor Matters who also finds time to run his own seven-bay garage. Questions for the Auto Doc? Send them to Junior Damato, 3 Court Circle, Lakeville, MA 02347. Personal replies are not possible; questions are answered only in the column.

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers

9808 Campers & Canopies

2014 Mazda CX-5 BASE PRICE: $21,395 for Sport FWD with manual transmission; $22,795 for Sport FWD with automatic; $24,045 for Sport AWD; $24,815 for Touring FWD; $26,065 for Touring AWD; $27,820 for Grand Touring FWD; $29,070 for Grand Touring AWD. PRICE AS TESTED: $32,090. TYPE: Front-engine, all-wheel drive, five-passenger, compact, crossover sport utility vehicle ENGINE: 2.5-liter, double overhead cam, SkyActiv-G four cylinder with VVT. MILEAGE: 24 mpg (city), 30 mpg (highway). LENGTH: 179 inches. WHEELBASE: 106 inches. CURB WEIGHT: 3,532 pounds. BUILT IN: Japan. OPTIONS: Technology package (includes TomTom navigation system, high-intensity-discharge headlamps, advanced keyless entry) $1,625; Soul Red exterior paint $300; retractable cargo cover $200; rear bumper guard $100. DESTINATION CHARGE: $795. The Associated Press 9050 Marine Miscellaneous

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

CAMPER: Outdoorsman, bed, refrigerator, stove. $1,800. (360)417-9223

SOUTHWIND: ‘85 Class A. New brake booster, tires, and new fridge full of gas propane trip ready all lights work every system gone through over $3,000 just spent on system repairs health forces sale. Only 56,000 miles total on this vehicle. Only $6,000/obo. This is a must see and ready to go. 454 engine runs great Onan gen set has new star ter relay, w o r k s p e r fe c t l y. To w hitch both front and rear. Driver side door for easy access. Call and leave message if we don’t answer: (360)683-6575.

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers R O A D M A S T E R To w Dolly. Model RM440, excellent condition, good tires, self steering wheels,electric brakes for easy secure transport. 620 lbs. empty with max weight of towed vehicle 4,380 lbs. $1,400/obo. (360)912-0030 TRAVEL TRAILER Fleetwood ‘00, 26’, slide out, great cond., $9,500. (360)452-6677 T R AV E L Tr a i l e r w i t h Pick-up: Ford ‘88 F150 Pickup. $2,000 worth of new tires and rims. 1997 21’ Chateau travel trailer. Complete with A/C, refrigerator, queen size bed, bunk beds, microwave, stove. Will sell separately or as a unit. $8,000. (360)681-4224

TRUCK AND TRAILER 2007 27’ Chaparral traile r h o o ke d t o a 2 0 1 0 Ford F350 diesel 4x4 truck. Package $49,500 Trailer only $12,990 See website for more photos. Trailer stock #U30922B Truck stock#U30893 Price Ford Lincoln (360)457-3333 www.priceford.com

KAYAK: Hydrotech inflatable Kayak with paddles, manual and storage/carrying bag. Like new! Only used once! $160 Call (360)417-7685 weekdays

9050 Marine Miscellaneous 12.5’ ZODIAC with motor. 1998 Mark II C Zodiak, set up with a 30 HP Johnson jet. 12 gal. fuel t a n k , o a r s, a i r p u m p. Motor has just been to the shop for a complete check up and is ready to go fishing. Great setup for rivers or salt water. $3,500. Inquiries please call, (360)531-0402.

APOLLO: 17’ Classic 9802 5th Wheels Runabout. 140 hp OMC I / O, t ra i l e r, ex c e l l e n t 5 t h W H E E L : ‘ 0 3 3 2 ’ condition. $3,300. (360)683-0146 Thor. 3 sliders with slide toppers, rear kitchen, APOLLO CRUISER: 21’, wood cabinets, roomy new 165 OMC with heat and ready to roll or park. exchanger, recently serChimacum. $9,500. viced outdrive, custom (760)415-1075 trailer, new tires and 5TH WHEEL: Carriage brakes, pot puller, ex‘ 0 4 C a m e o . T h r e e tras. $3,600/obo. (360)582-0892 slides, center kitchen with island. King bed. BAYLINER 2859. Price Automatic HDTV Sat. on reduced from $26,000 to roof. In great condition, $ 2 0 , 0 0 0 . S e l l i n g b e this has been a non- cause of health. Engine smoking unit and no ani- ove r h a u l e d l a s t ye a r, mals. $19,250. Contact outdrive replaced 3 yrs via e-mail: ago, 10 hrs on 25 hp bjgarbarino@hot kicker. Great electronics mail.com or including radar, color (360)390-8692 fish finder, GPS char t plotter. Diesel heater, custom cabinets and master bed. Great boat for fishing. Electr ic downriggers, rods and gear. Comfortable weekend travel with stove, refrigerator, shower and head. Excellent condiFIFTH WHEEL: Forest tion. Call 327-3695. R i ve r ‘ 0 6 W i l d c a t . 2 7 FW, nonsmoker, rig for BAY L I N E R : ‘ 9 8 B o w boondocks, 4 solar pan- Rider. 19’, 3.0 MerCruisels, 4 6V golf cart deep er, freshwater cooling. cycle batteries, XPower $3,900/obo. inverter, 3000 plus 3600 (360)775-9653 Onan Generator, Hijacker Hitch. $18,500/obo. FIBERFORM: 17’, deep V with 65 hp Merc. Call Sonny, $2,000. (360)374-2069. (360)952-2038.

9050 Marine Miscellaneous

B OAT / M OTO R : 1 6 ’ Starcraft fiberglass 1960 runabout with 75 hp Johnson and trailer. Not a love boat, but runs like a champ. $1,600. But w a i t . T h e r e ’s m o r e ! 1991, 20 hp Merc fresh from the shop with rebuilt carb, new plugs, lotza zip. $1,400. (360)582-0723

S A I L B OAT: E r i ck s o n OLYMPIC: 17’ ‘84 88 2 6 ’ . P r o j e c t b o a t . Johnson and 8HP Mer- $3,500/obo, or trade. cury, both two stroke. EZ (360)477-7719 load trailer. $2,000. (360)452-3275 RACING SAILBOAT 28’ Star. Sails, genoa and trailer. $3,500. (360)963-2743

R OW / M o t o r / S a i l : 1 0 ’ BOATS: 14’ Livingston, molded hull boat. Elec. with Shorelander trailer, motor, galv. trailer, all $495. New, 10’ Walker like-new. $1,650. B ay, w i t h E Z L o a d e r, (360)681-8761 $995. (360)452-6677. RUNABOUT: ‘78 14’ CANOE: 18’ Wilkenson boat, ‘78 EZ Load trailer, cedar strip, made in Port 7 0 h p O / B M e r c u r y, Townsend. $750. good cond Must sell! (360)683-0146 $1,500. (360)928-1170.

SEA SWIRL: 18’ Sierra Cuddy Classic. 120 Johnson, 7.5 Honda kicker. galv. trailer, life jackets, 2 downriggers, ski pole, water skis, rope, canvas and many extras. $4,995/obo. Located in Sequim. (360)477-1011

D AV E S C A D D E N : 2 man pontoon boat, will take Class IV rapids. $1,000 cash. 808-0422.

S A I L B O AT : 1 5 ’ I a n Oughtred whilly, sailing/rowing, better than n e w, c o m p l e t e w i t h oars, trailer, many upHEWE: 17’ River Run- g r a d e d a c c e s s o r i e s . STERLING 1995 19’ ner. 115 Mercur y jet, $7,250/obo. C u d d y. T h i s fa bu l o u s new 5 hp Ricker, depth (360)774-6720 boat is clean and lots of sounder, GPS, lots of fun. It is powered by a extras. $7,950. SAILBOAT: 32’ Clipper, 1995 Mercruiser 3.0L in(360)452-2162 Yanmar diesel, wheel b o a r d e n g i n e a n d i s s t e e r i n g , f u r l i n g j i b, towed on a 1995 Calkins sleeps 4. $9,995. trailer. Contact Travis (360)457-8221 Scott (360)460-2741. KAYAK: $1,900. Cust o m b u i l t 1 6 ’ K ay a k . Newfound Boat Works E x p l o r e r. B e a u t i f u l sculptured cedar and basswood strip planked deck. A work of art. Paddled once, I have too many Kayaks! (360)774-0439 PORTLAND PUDGY ‘06 multi-function dinghy, unsinkable, double hulled, 7’8”x4’5”, can be used as life raft. $1,000. (360)437-0908

SAILBOAT: ‘69 Victory 21’. With trailor. $1,500. (360)509-4894

9817 Motorcycles

SAILBOAT: ‘81 25’ C&C with sails and new 8 hp engine, sleeps 4, toilet/sink. $3,500/obo. (360)808-7913

BMW: ‘99 K1200RS. D a k a r ye l l ow. 3 7 , 5 0 0 miles. Throttlemiester. BMW touring hard cases. Corbin saddle. BMW TIDE RUNNER: 18’, a f t e r m a r k e t a l a r m . great boat, good shape, $4,350. (425)508-7575. Goldspace@msn.com lots of extra goodies. $9,000/obo. 374-2646. DUCATI: ‘00 ST4. 16.7K SEA-DOO: ‘96 Speed- yellow, pristine, many s t e r . T w i n R o t e x . upgraes. $4,900. Bryan (360)681-8699 $5,000. (360)452-3213.

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 B11

Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks 9817 Motorcycles 9180 Classics & Collect. Others Others Others Others FORD: ‘62 Galaxie 500 Conver tible. Excellent, all original, ‘390’ V8, all p owe r, 6 9 , 7 0 0 m i l e s. $18,200. (360)683-3385, Rrobert169@Qwest.net HARLEY: ‘04 Davids o n N i g h t Tr a i n FXSTBi. 15300 miles. Extras! Can Deliver. Awesome bike! Brad (360)683-2273. Price reduced. $6,995. brad@stinton.com

LINCOLN: ‘50 Cosmo. Good body and interior, does not run. $4,000. (360)683-1260 MAZDA: ‘94 RX7. Twin t u r b o, l o t s o f p ow e r, many modifications, 59K, $14,000. Serious buyers only. 461-0847.

H A R L E Y: ‘ 0 6 1 2 0 0 Sportster, 7k miles, mint. PONTIAC: ‘78 Trans Am $6,900. (360)452-6677. Original silver, 400 motor, auto. $10,000. K AWA S A K I : ‘ 0 5 K X (360)457-6462 250F. Few aftermarket accessories, 2 stands, 9292 Automobiles set of tires. $2,300. (360)670-5321 Others

9740 Auto Service & Parts Chevy Ralley Wheels: 1st designs, 14’s. Complete caps & rings. Matched tires, fair tread. $250. Winter tires: 18’s, matched, used one season, Sequim to PA. $300 (360)683-7789.

9180 Automobiles Classics & Collect.

AUDI: ‘03 A4 Quattro. Low mi., runs and drives great, premium pkg. $6,500. (360)593-0481. CADILLAC ‘97 DEVILL 4.6 liter “Northstar” V8, auto, A/C, cruise, tilt, A M / F M / C A S S, p o w e r windows, locks dual power seats, full leather, alloy wheels, 114,000 miles, very very clean loc a l c a r, g a ra g e ke p t , SENIOR OWNED, NONSMOKER. Spotless “Autocheck” vehicle history report. $3,995. REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

CHEV: ‘79 Corvette L82. O r a n g e , T- t o p , 6 5 K miles. $6,000. Call for B U I C K : R a r e 1 9 7 7 details. (360)775-9996. Buick SkyHawk. 81k original miles on this one C H RY S L E R : ‘ 0 7 P T of a kind car. Excellent Cruiser. Excellent condimechanical with V6/Au- tion, low mi. $6,750. (360)775-5426 tomatic. See on-line ad for details. Need the garDODGE: ‘03 Caravan. age space. Clear title. Looks good. $3,500. $5K or best offer. (360)457-9162 (360)460-6162 FORD: ‘02 Taurus SE. CADILLAC: ‘78 Seville. 3.0 V6, auto, air, CD. Looks and runs like new, $3,995. (360)457-1893. always garaged, nonsmoker, gold, 76K mi. FORD: ‘94 Crown Vic$4,850. (360)928-9724. toria. New tires, good shape. $1,500. (360)928-9920 DAT S U N : ‘ 7 2 2 4 0 Z race car and trailer. Red, spare engines, trans., wheels, tires and more! $10,000. (360)385-5694

FORD: ‘96 Escort LX. 2 dr., needs work. $500. (360)452-2468 FORD: 98 Taurus SE. 4 dr, sedan. Top shape. $3,500. 683-5817. H O N DA : ‘ 1 1 C i v i c . 4 d o o r, 1 2 k m i l e s, l i ke new. $15,500. 461-5913.

F O R D : ‘ 3 2 R o a d s t e r. 540 all aluminum Hemi, The Blower Shop 871 blower, custom ever ything, the best money could buy. Serious inquiries only. $250,000/ obo. (360)582-1294.

HONDA: ‘93 Accord. My son hit the curb, bent sub frame and other front end damage. Dad wants garage back. Call mom and make a good offer. $800. (360)640-1050

JEEP: ‘96 Grand Chero- PONTIAC: ‘86 Fiero SE Coupe. Rare automatic. kee Laredo. Nice ride. Clear title. V6. Nice $2,000. (360)808-0565. shape. Black with gray L I N C O L N : ‘ 9 0 To w n interior. 171,500 miles. Sunroof. Good transmisCar. Call for details. $3,500. (360)683-9553. s i o n , ex c e l l e n t s p o r t tires. Power windows. MERCEDES: ‘79 240D Not a show car but a (diesel). 4 sp manual great driving fun sports trans., excellent condi- car. $2,000. (360)452-1049 tion mechanically and physically, extensive upS AT U RN: ‘01 CS1. 3 grades, work orders in my file. $4,980/obo. Call door, 79k, new clutch me for details. Alan at and brakes, 36 mpg. (360)461-0175, Port An- $3,400. (360)452-7370. geles. SCION: ‘08 XB HatchMERCURY: ‘00 Grand back. 42k, excellent conMarquis LS. 169K, runs dition. . $12,000. (360)928-3669 good. $1,500/obo. (360)681-0258 TOYOTA: ‘09 Prius. 47k, MINI COOPER: ‘07 Con- white, nav., leather, 5 vertible. Price reduced! CD change. $18,990. 1 (805)478-1696 Great car, no problems, fun and fast! 24K miles. TOYOTA ‘12 This is a twice reduced CAMRY SE price, and is firm, and if As the summer auto renstill in my possession tals begin their fall slow when this ad runs out, I down, Heckman Motors am just going to trade it will begin selling off a in! This a DARN GOOD large number of late DEAL!! $16,500. model vehicles from ren(360)477-8377 tal service. Over 35 vehicles to preview. Stop by MITSUBISHI ‘01 a n d c h e ck o u t t h e s e ENDEAVOR LS great deals. Locally 33.8 liter V6, auto, all owned and maintained. wheel drive, A/C, cruise, 21K miles, balance of tilt, AM/FM/CD, Bluefactor y warranty. Vin# tooth, power windows posted at dealership. and locks, keyless entry, Stock number: luggage rack, pr ivacy 12016104. glass, alloy wheels, only $20,550 32,000 miles, pearl Preview at: white, balance of factory heckmanmotors.com warranty, near new conHeckman Motors dition. $1,000. great val111 E. Front, P.A. ue. (360)912-3583 $16,995. REID & JOHNSON VOLKSWAGEN ‘00 MOTORS 457-9663 JETTA reidandjohnson.com 4 cyl, 5 speed, heated loaded leather seats, M U S TA N G : ‘ 8 5 G T 5 sunroof, seats 5, 92k Speed convertable. 302 miles. Lowest in house HO, loaded. $3,400/obo. financing rates! Buy (360)460-8610 here, pay here! $5,995 OLDS: ‘95 Silhouette. 7 cars under $6,000. 122K, 7 pass, runs good The Other Guys $1,500/obo. 457-6895. Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 PONTIAC ‘02 SUNFIRE theotherguys.com COUP Auto, 4 cyl, A/C, tilt, CD, A B S, s p o i l e r, c u s t o m VW: ‘78 Super Beetle wheels and tires, super c o n v e r t i b l e . R u n s clean, low miles, cus- g o o d , g o o d c o n d . , tomer service records, manual trans. $5,500. (360)683-8032 nice, sporty, economical auto. $5,950 9434 Pickup Trucks Preview at: heckmanmotors.com Others Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. CHEV: ‘89 Pickup short (360)912-3583 bed, chrome rims, Tarp, automatic, ver y clean. PONTIAC: 2001 Bonne- $4,000/obo. ville SSEi. Bose Stereo, (360)683-0979 H e a t e d Powe r S e a t s, K e y l e s s E n t r y, F o g CHEV: ‘91 1500. 4WD, Lights, Leather, new bat- ex t c a b, n e w m o t o r / tery and tires, A/C, Pow- trans $1,850. 460-6647. er Windows, plus much m o r e . O n l y 7 4 , 0 0 0 CHEV: ‘93 1500. 4x4, miles. 6,500. lumber rack, AM/FM CD. (360)452-4867 $3,000/obo. 461-0657.

CHEV: ‘98 1 ton flat bed TOYOTA: ‘00 Tacoma. dump. $6,800. 457-3120 V6, super charger and exhaust, 2 sets of or (360)808-1749. wheels and tires, 161K D O D G E : ‘ 0 6 R a m . mi. $10,000/obo. Manual, 59k miles, ex(360)683-8479, after 6 cellent cond., reg. cab. TOYOTA ‘02 TUNDRA $9,800. (360)477-6149. V8, automatic, 4 door, DODGE: ‘10 1/2 ton t ow r e a d y, c l e a n ! 1 0 white 4x4, 1 owner, days same as cash! Buy here, pay here! Lowest very good condition. in-house financing. $23,000 $10,995 (505)927-1248 7 cars under $6,000. The Other Guys DODGE: ‘92 Dakota Auto and Truck Center 4WD. $2,000/ obo. 360-417-3788 (360)797-1198 theotherguys.com FORD: ‘06 F-450 4X4 utility SCELZI. 11’ combo body with rack, 36,000 miles. $27,000. (360)531-1383 FORD: ‘74 1/2 ton. Shor tbed, 50k miles on rebuilt 390 motor, 4 speed manual, r uns strong, new upholstry and tires, etc. Some light body rust--good project truck. $2,500 firm. (360)477-2684.

9556 SUVs Others

9556 SUVs Others

CHRYSLER ‘05 PACIFICA AWD 3.5 liter V6, auto, all wheel drive, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/CD, power windows and locks, dual p owe r s e a t s, p r i va c y glass, power moonroof, alloy wheels, only 68,000 miles. 1-owner, spotless “Autocheck” vehicle history report. $9,495. REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com GMC: ‘94 Suburban 4x4. Auto trans, A/C, ‘350’, 247,900 mi, seats 8, great cond, well cared for. $1,999. Call (360)531-0854 G M C : ‘ 9 9 Yu ko n 4 x 4 . 173K mi., A/C not working, good shape. $2,000/ obo. (360)477-6501.

TOYOTA : ‘ 0 9 A c c e s s Cab. 48500 miles, 4X4, auto, SR5, TRD off road, 14mo/23k mi warranty, tow, new Michelins, back up alarm, bed liner, bug guard, never off road, charcoal int., located in FORD: ‘78 shor t bed. Sequim. $24,900. Ext. cab, 70K actual mi. JEEP: ‘11 Patriot with (301)788-2771 $1,200. (360)504-5664. CTV. Like new, 38.8K miles 2.4 L 16 valve, TOYOTA ‘11 TACOMA FORD: ‘84 Bronco. Re- DOUBLE CAB TRD 4X4 2 W D c o n t i n u o u s l y liable. $500. T h i s i s o n e b e a u t i f u l Va r i a bl e Tr a n s a x l e I I (360)808-0565 Toyota 4x4. Auto, V6, (smooth “shifting”), air FORD: ‘89 1/2 ton pick- f u l l p o w e r p a c k a g e , conditioning AM/FM/CD up. Real runner, 4.9 liter, s t e e r i n g w h e e l a u d i o trailer hitch, split rear straight 6, 5 sp, new controls, CD changer, seats, side airbags, 28 tires/radiator. $2,800/ brake assist, traction 30 MPG. $13,950. (360)385-0995 control, bed liner, tow obo. (360)504-2113. package and much, J E E P : ‘ 8 3 C J 7 . Ve r y much more. This TacoFORD: ‘89 4X4 Longbed. Auto/air, runs great. ma is as close to new as good cond., rebuilt title. one can find. Balance of $5,200. (360)379-1277. $2,000. 457-5948. factor y warranty. Only F O R D : ‘ 9 0 R a n g e r . 29k miles! Stock NumCanopy, recent tune up, ber: 117. 5 speed. $2,000. $29,950 452-2766 or 477-9580 Trades Welcome! Preview at: FORD: ‘96 F350 460 cid heckmanmotors.com 4x4 Crew Cab. 114k 5 Heckman Motors speed A/C, good tires, 111 E. Front, P.A. MAZDA: ‘10 CX-7. Silm a t c h i n g c a n o p y. (360)912-3583 ver metalic color, black $7,850 firm. Call TOYOTA: ‘93 2WD pick- l e a t h e r i n t e r i o r, 1 6 (360)477-6218 valve 4 cycle turboup. Canopy, runs good. FORD: ‘98 Ranger. 4 $3,450/obo. 452-5126. charged engine, 4WD. door, king cab, 4WD, auLots of bells and whisto, air, CD, new trans., T-TOP: Pickup cover, tles! Still under warranradiator, alternator, bat- Gem for extended cab, ty, 28k miles, like new. w h i t e , l i ke n ew, w a s $18,500/obo. tery. $5,500/obo. $1,000. Sell for $500. (360)683-8145 (360)710-7330 (360)477-2684 FORD: ‘99 F350 Crew TOYOTA: ‘04 4 RunCab, short bed, 7.3 die9556 SUVs n e r LT D. E x . c o n d . sel 4x4. $8,200/obo. One owner, leather, (360)683-9645 Others heated seats, navigaGMC: ‘86 Step side. V6, C H E V : ‘ 1 1 Tr ev e r s e . tion, towing package, runs great, rusty. $900. near new tires. Miles, Gray, great condition. (360)670-6160 133,500, mostly high$18,500. (605)214-0437 way. Mtce/svc records TOYOTA: ‘03 Tacoma. C H E V: ‘ 9 0 S i l va r a d o ava i l . , n o n - s m o ke r. 4WD, 125K mi. $14,000. Suburban, 8k miles on $12,500 firm. (360)808-2295 new engine, 4WD, cap(360)460-0060 tain seats in front, bench PLACE YOUR seats back. $4,500. Visit our website at AD ONLINE (360)681-7704 www.peninsula With our new dailynews.com Classified Wizard DODGE: ‘98 Durango. Or email us at you can see your 88k, trailer tow package, classified@ ad before it prints! a i r, p owe r s e a t s / w i n peninsula www.peninsula dows, 7 pass, loaded! dailynews.com dailynews.com $4,890. (360)452-2635.

9556 SUVs Others

NISSAN: ‘02 Pathfinder LE 4WD. 106k, automatic leather heated seats, sunroof, well maintained. $9,500. (360)683-1851.

TOYOTA ‘12 RAV 4 4WD AUTO As the summer auto rentals begin their fall slow down, Heckman Motors will begin selling off a large number of late model vehicles from rental service. Over 35 vehicles to preview. Stop by a n d c h e ck o u t t h e s e great deals. Locally owned and maintained. 31K mi. Vin# posted at dealership. Stock Number: 12274043. $22,950 Preview at: heckmanmotors.com SUBARU ‘10 FORESTHeckman Motors ER “X” PREMIUM 111 E. Front, P.A. Economical 2.5 liter 4(360)912-3583 cyl, auto, all wheel drive, traction control, ABS, A / C , c r u i s e , t i l t , 9730 Vans & Minivans AM/FM/CD, power winOthers dows, locks, and seat, power panorama moon- F O R D : ‘ 0 1 W i n d s t a r roof, side airbags, key- SEL. 144k, lots of new less entry, heated seats, par ts, looks and r uns privacy glass, luggage great. $3,995. (360)452-9002. rack, alloy wheels, only 39,000 miles, balance of factor y 5/60 warranty, F O R D : ‘ 9 7 A e r o s t a r. non-smoker, very very 160k, new bat., radiator, clean 1-owner corporate heater core, runs great. lease retur n, spotless $1,500. (360)452-6052. “Autocheck vehicle histor y repor t. Near new G M C : ‘ 9 1 Va n d u r a condition. Conv. van. 187K, some $19,995 body damage, runs exREID & JOHNSON cellent. $1,500/obo. MOTORS 457-9663 (360)681-0258 reidandjohnson.com NISSAN: ‘09 Murano SL FWD. Sport Utility 4-dr, 62,000 miles, AC, AT, cruise, tilt, leather seats, backup camera, AM/FM/ CD/XM with Bose sound system, dual power/ heated front seats, power windows and locks, keyless entry, tow pkg and more. Extra clean, n o n s m o ke r, ex c e l l e n t condition and well maintained. $20,500. Call (360)797-1715 or (208)891-5868

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County SEPA Notification: WA State Dept. of Natural Resources- U.S. Navy Easement

The Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR) issued a determination of non-significance (DNS) under the State Environmental Policy Act Rules (Chapter 197-11 WAC) for the following project proposed by the United States of America, acting by and through the Department of the Navy, Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Northwest: a proposed 55-year restrictive easement over stateowned aquatic bedlands, whose purpose is to buffer existing, adjacent military operation areas and ranges from incompatible development while also protecting clean water, eelgrass, shellfish, salmon habitat, and other important ecosystem services. The proposal includes the bedlands on the Jefferson County side of Hood Canal, beginning immediately south of the Hood Canal Bridge to Eldon, lying between a line 200 feet waterward of extreme low tide or the -18 foot mean low low water (MLLW) contour, whichever is closest to shore, and the -70 foot MLLW contour.

After review of a completed environmental checklist and other information on file with the agency, DNR has deter mined this proposal will not have a probable significant adverse impact on the environment. Copies of the DNS are available at no charge from DNR SEPA Center, at 360-902-1739 or sepacenter@dnr.wa.gov. The public is invited to comment on this DNS by submitting written comments no later than October 7, 2013. Pub: Sept. 26, 2013 Legal No. 515598

39883405

2008 SATURN VUE XE

2010 SUBARU FORESTER ‘X’ PREMIUM EDITION

2003 FORD ZX2 COUPE

2003 FORD E-250 EXTENDED CARGO VAN

3.5L V6, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, “ONSTAR” READY, KEYLESS, SIDE AIRBAGS, FOG LAMPS, ALLOYS, LUGGAGE RACK, PRIV GLASS, ONLY 45K MILES! BEAUTIFUL LOCAL SUV, NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS “AUTOCHECK” REPORT V.I.N.S POSTED AT

ECONOMICAL 2.5L 4 CYL, AUTO, ALL WHL DRIVE, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/ FM/CD, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & SEAT, PWR PANORAMA MOONROOF, HEATED SEATS, PRIV GLASS, LUGGAGE RACK, ALLOYS, TRAC CTRL, ABS, SIDE AIRBAGS, ONLY 39K MILES! VERY, VERY CLEAN 1 OWNER CORP LEASE RETURN, BAL OF FACT 5/60 WARR, SPOTLESS “AUTOCHECK” REPORT! V.I.N.S POSTED AT

VERY ECONOMICAL 2.0 DOHC 4 CYL, 5 SPD MAN, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD, ALLOYS, FOG LAMPS, REAR DECK SPOILER, VERY CLEAN LOCAL TRADE, SPOTLESS “AUTOCHECK” REPORT, BRIGHT RED, IDEAL COMMUTER OR STUDENT CAR! V.I.N.S POSTED AT

5.4L V8, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, KEYLESS, HD 3/4 TON CHASSIS, 8600LB GVW, VERY CLEAN 1 OWNER CORP LEASE RETURN, SPOTLESS “CARFAX” REPORT, HARD-TO-FIND EXTENDED BODY! V.I.N.S POSTED AT

Expires 10/24/13

Expires 10/24/13

Expires 10/24/13

$15,495

DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

$19,995

DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

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Race St., REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles MOTORS 457-9663

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2000 FORD F-150 XLT SUPERCAB 7700 4X4

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PRICE

HEAVY HALF-TON!

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Expires 10/24/13

$8,995

DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

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www.reidandjohnson.com

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CALL 457-4901

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Dealers, To Advertise Here: Call Vivian Hansen @ 360-452-2345 ext. 3058 TODAY for more information!


B12

WeatherWatch

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 Neah Bay 59/49

ellingham elli el e ling ng g 61/47

Olympic Peninsula TODAY Port Townsend 59/48

Port Angeles 61/48

Sequim Olympics Freeze level: 7,500 ft. 61/48

Forks 63/48

➥

Port Ludlow 62/47

Yesterday

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Forecast highs for Thursday, Sept. 26

➥

Aberdeen 63/47

Billings 52° | 45°

San Francisco 79° | 55°

First

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

Los Angeles 72° | 59°

Marine Weather

64/52 Lots of rainfall likely

62/52 Mostly cloudy skies

63/50 Gray day with rain possible

Washington TODAY

Strait of Juan de Fuca: W wind 10 kt becoming E in the afternoon. Wind waves 1 ft or less. Tonight, W wind 5 to 15 kt. Wind waves 2 ft or less. Ocean: NE wind 5 to 15 kt becoming NW in the afternoon. Wind waves 1 to 2 ft. NW swell 6 ft at 10 seconds. Tonight, NW wind 5 to 15 kt. Wind waves 1 to 2 ft. NW swell 5 ft at 9 seconds.

Miami 90° | 77°

Cold

CANADA

Seattle 63° | 45° Olympia 64° | 39°

Spokane 61° | 41°

Tacoma 63° | 41° Yakima 70° | 45°

Astoria 64° | 46° Š 2013 Wunderground.com

TODAY High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 6:23 a.m. 6.1’ 11:47 a.m. 3.7’ 5:46 p.m. 7.0’

TOMORROW High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 7:29 a.m. 5.9’ 12:50 a.m. 1.3’ 6:52 p.m. 6.8’ 12:53 p.m. 3.9’

Port Angeles

10:19 a.m. 6.1’ 7:28 p.m. 5.3’

2:02 a.m. 0.7’ 3:46 p.m. 5.3’

11:29 a.m. 6.1’ 8:28 p.m. 5.1’

3:01 a.m. 1.1’ 5:24 p.m. 5.1’

Port Townsend

11:56 a.m. 7.5’ 9:05 p.m. 6.6’

3:15 a.m. 0.8’ 4:59 p.m. 5.9’

1:06 p.m. 7.5’ 10:05 p.m. 6.3’

4:14 a.m. 1.2’ 6:37 p.m. 5.7’

Dungeness Bay* 11:02 a.m. 6.8’ 8:11 p.m. 5.9’

2:37 a.m. 0.7’ 4:21 p.m. 5.3’

12:12 p.m. 6.8’ 9:11 p.m. 5.7’

3:36 a.m. 1.1’ 5:59 p.m. 5.1’

LaPush

*To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

Warm Stationary

Pressure Low

High

Oct 11 Oct. 18

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise today Moonset today Hi 67 75 82 43 73 69 71 96 74 75 74 76 59 68 94 67

-0s

7:03 p.m. 7:08 a.m. 11:43 p.m. 2:26 p.m.

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

70s

80s 90s 100s 110s

Cartography Š Weather Underground / The Associated Press

Burlington, Vt. 63 Casper 76 Lo Prc Otlk Charleston, S.C. 81 Albany, N.Y. 41 Clr Charleston, W.Va. 74 Albuquerque 54 Clr Charlotte, N.C. 80 Amarillo 56 Clr Cheyenne 67 70 Anchorage 40 .41 Rain Chicago 75 Asheville 61 .48 Rain Cincinnati 67 Atlanta 65 .11 Rain Cleveland Atlantic City 45 PCldy Columbia, S.C. 79 Austin 63 Clr Columbus, Ohio 71 65 Baltimore 46 PCldy Concord, N.H. Billings 47 .01 Rain Dallas-Ft Worth 94 72 Birmingham 67 .02 Cldy Dayton 73 Bismarck 52 PCldy Denver Des Moines 74 Boise 45 .27 Rain 67 Boston 52 PCldy Detroit 71 Brownsville 73 Clr Duluth 86 Buffalo 43 Clr El Paso Evansville 83 Fairbanks 42 SATURDAY Fargo 75 Flagstaff 69 High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht Grand Rapids 70 58 8:36 a.m. 6.0’ 1:55 a.m. 1.5’ Great Falls 8:03 p.m. 6.7’ 2:08 p.m. 3.8’ Greensboro, N.C. 77 Hartford Spgfld 70 Helena 52 12:21 p.m. 6.2’ 4:06 a.m. 1.4’ Honolulu 85 9:42 p.m. 4.9’ 6:25 p.m. 4.8’ Houston 95 Indianapolis 77 1:58 p.m. 7.6’ 5:19 a.m. 1.5’ Jackson, Miss. 79 Jacksonville 83 11:19 p.m. 6.0’ 7:38 p.m. 5.3’ Juneau 54 Kansas City 70 1:04 p.m. 6.8’ 4:41 a.m. 1.4’ Key West 87 10:25 p.m. 5.4’ 7:00 p.m. 4.8’ Las Vegas 94 Little Rock 90

Nation/World

Victoria 61° | 45°

ORE.

Tides

Atlanta 75° | 59°

Full

-10s

61/51 Rainy start to weekend

New York 70° | 59°

Detroit 72° | 52°

Fronts

Sept 26 Oct 4

Cloudy

Washington D.C. 75° | 57°

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / Š Peninsula Daily News

TONIGHT

Low 48 Mostly cloudy

Chicago 73° | 55°

El Paso 88° | 64° Houston 95° | 73°

New

Pt. Cloudy

Minneapolis 79° | 57°

Denver 79° | 46°

Almanac Last

Sunny

Seattle 63° | 45°

*Reading taken in Nordland

Brinnon 65/45

The Lower 48:

National TODAY forecast Nation

Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 58 49 0.29 13.36 Forks 61 42 0.17 65.25 Seattle 64 51 0.08 20.96 Sequim 62 49 0.30 7.33 Hoquiam 59 43 0.01 36.94 Victoria 57 48 0.28 15.96 Port Townsend 58 48 0.25* 13.99

41 PCldy Los Angeles 54 Clr Louisville 68 Cldy Lubbock 54 Cldy Memphis 62 .07 Rain Miami Beach 43 Clr Midland-Odessa 51 Clr Milwaukee 58 Cldy Mpls-St Paul 45 PCldy Nashville 67 Rain New Orleans 49 Cldy New York City 38 PCldy Norfolk, Va. 61 Clr North Platte 50 Cldy Oklahoma City 47 Clr Omaha 56 .01 PCldy Orlando 48 PCldy Pendleton 48 Clr Philadelphia 62 Clr Phoenix 65 Cldy Pittsburgh 34 Cldy Portland, Maine 56 Clr Portland, Ore. MM Clr Providence 45 Clr Raleigh-Durham 42 .15 Rain Rapid City 55 Cldy Reno 41 Clr Richmond 40 .63 Rain Sacramento 75 .01 Cldy St Louis 67 Clr St Petersburg 57 PCldy Salt Lake City 70 2.14 Clr San Antonio 73 1.16 Rain San Diego 34 PCldy San Francisco 55 .02 Clr San Juan, P.R. 83 MM PCldy Santa Fe 76 Cldy St Ste Marie 61 Clr Shreveport

85 81 87 81 92 90 66 76 82 90 73 71 76 88 73 84 57 72 99 69 61 60 68 76 76 76 76 80 84 81 86 98 75 71 92 73 65 94

TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States: ■ 100 at Hondo, Texas ■ 28 at Gunnison County, Colo., Kremmling, Colo. GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or ’ feet

75 49 Clr 65 Cldy Sioux Falls 63 41 Clr 64 Cldy Syracuse 63 Clr Tampa 80 73 1.19 Rain 71 .53 PCldy Topeka 73 54 Clr 76 .01 Rain Tucson 98 68 Clr 59 Clr Tulsa 83 57 Clr 51 PCldy Washington, D.C. 75 54 PCldy 54 Clr Wichita 81 52 Clr 64 .52 Cldy Wilkes-Barre 69 40 PCldy 74 .28 PCldy Wilmington, Del. 72 46 PCldy 52 Clr ________ 53 PCldy 48 Clr Hi Lo Otlk 53 Clr 66 54 PCldy 51 Clr Auckland 94 62 Clr 74 .02 Rain Baghdad 76 52 Clr 44 .05 Cldy Beijing Berlin 57 40 Drizzle 52 PCldy Brussels 63 45 PCldy 73 Clr 87 68 Clr 45 PCldy Cairo 53 29 PCldy 42 PCldy Calgary 79 64 PCldy 50 .22 Cldy Guadalajara 88 79 Clr 46 PCldy Hong Kong 81 59 Clr 53 Cldy Jerusalem 87 64 Clr 54 Clr Johannesburg 89 62 Clr 49 Cldy Kabul 64 53 Fog/Cldy 50 PCldy London Mexico City 75 56 Ts 52 PCldy 66 47 Clr 66 Cldy Montreal 43 32 PCldy 75 1.31 Rain Moscow 91 79 Ts 54 Rain New Delhi Paris 75 59 Cldy 69 Clr PCldy 66 PCldy Rio de Janeiro 76 60 79 60 Clr 56 Clr Rome 72 54 Clr 79 .09 Clr Sydney 74 60 Clr 44 Clr Tokyo 42 Clr Toronto 68 49 Clr 63 Clr Vancouver 62 49 Clr

Briefly . . . PA book club moves up its next meeting PORT ANGELES — Due to unforeseen scheduling conflicts, the Port Angeles Library’s Man Up for the Book Club will now meet this Saturday. Jim Lynch’s novel Border Songs will be discussed at 5 p.m. Saturday. Print copies of the book are available at the library while supplies last. Preregistration for this program is not required; dropins are welcome. The Port Angeles Library is located at 2210 S. Peabody St. For more information, visit www.nols.org and click on “Events� and “Port Angeles,� or contact Lorrie Kovell at 360-417-8500, ext. 7750, or lkovell@nols.org.

Suggested donation for each class for nonmembers is $5 to cover materials. There is no charge for society members. RSVP for the classes to 360-417-5000. For more information, visit the Research Center from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays or visit www.olypen.com/ccgs.

Film screening PORT TOWNSEND — A screening of the new documentary “Blackfish� will be held at the Rose Theatre, 235 Taylor St., at 1 p.m. Saturday. “Blackfish� is described as a mesmerizing psychological thriller with a killer whale (orca) at its center.

The film tells the story of Tilikum, an Icelandic transient whale and his human victims as the backbone of a hypercritical investigation into the marine-park giant Sea World Entertainment. The event is co-sponsored by Puget Sound Express, the Rose Theatre and the Port Townsend Marine Science Center. Admission is $8 for adults, $7 for seniors and $6 for children. “The documentary ‘Blackfish’ helps us understand the social structure of whales and provides a glimmer into their complex society,� said Janine Boire, executive director for the marine center. “The movie challenges our view of humans and whales and how we

interact together.� Ken Balcomb, who’s featured throughout the film and is the executive director of the Center for Whale Research in Friday Harbor, will hold a question-andanswer session following the screening. Balcomb is a pioneer in photo-identification of cetaceans and is the founder of “Orca Survey� (1976), a study of Pacific Northwest Southern Resident killer whales. For more information, phone 360-385-5582, email info@ptmsc.org or visit www. ptmsc.org.

Sketching demo SEQUIM — The Museum & Arts Center in

the Sequim-Dungeness Valley will present a free botanical sketching demo with Sequim artist and author Iris Edey from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. The demo, held at the MAC Exhibit Center, 175 W. Cedar St., is free and open to the public, with donations appreciated and light refreshments provided. As part of the event, Edey will sign copies of her 2012 book Sketches, which features 180 botanical drawings, and the poetry books Still Shakin’ with Laughter and Lifelines, which she illustrated. All are available for purchase at the MAC. Additional free art demos at the MAC Exhibit

Center this fall include carving with Jamestown S’Klallam tribal artist Jeff Monson and beading with Florence Adams Monson. Both demos are being sponsored by the Jamestown S’Klallam tribe and held in conjunction with the Hall-Adams Family Exhibit currently on display at the MAC Exhibit Center. Visit www.macsequim. org for a complete list of upcoming demos at the MAC. Artists interested in conducting a demo are encouraged to contact MAC Exhibit Center manager Steph Ellyas at 360-6838110 or steph@macsequim. org. Peninsula Daily News

ADD SAVE w/M ITION AN A A FRO IL-IN R L $5/ga M V EBA l TE 9/26 ALS -10/ PAR 6

Walk for the poor PORT ANGELES — The annual Friends of the Poor Walk will be held along the Olympic Discovery Trail from noon to 3 p.m. Saturday. Registration opens at 11:45 a.m. the day of the race. This year, the route will start at the Hollywood Beach entrance to the Olympic Discovery Trail at City Pier and will go east with a turn around at the Francis Street Park area. The walk will raise funds for the St. Vincent de Paul Society to help those living in poverty in Port Angeles, Sequim and Port Townsend. The goal for Port Angeles this year is $3,500, all earmarked to shelter homeless families in the Port Angeles area. For more information or to register before the day of the walk, phone 360-4575804.

on EACH SINGLE GALLON or $20 on 5-GALLON BUCKETS of Paint or Stain! at Angeles Millwork & Hartnagel.

Applies to regular retail price of stock on hand. 5 gallon limit. Excludes primer. Valid Sept. 26-Oct. 6, 2013.

Parker Paint at Angeles Millwork & Hartnagel

Valspar Paint at Hartnagel Only ADD SAVE w/M ITION AN AL AI FRO L-IN RE $5/gal M B 9/26 CAB ATE -10/ OT 6

Genealogy event Messmer’s Stain at Angeles Millwork Only

Superdeck Stain at Angeles Millwork & Hartnagel

1601 S “C� St., Port Angeles 457-8581rangelesmillwork.com

*O'PSLTr5PMM'SFF

Penofin Stain at Angeles Millwork & Hartnagel

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Cabot Stain at Hartnagel Only

3111 E Highway 101, Port Angeles 452-8933 r hartnagels.com

*O'PSLTr5PMM'SFF

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39883464

PORT ANGELES — The Clallam County Genealogical Society will continue education classes during its regular last-Saturday-of-themonth open house from noon to 4 p.m. this Saturday. The event will be held at the society’s Research Center, 402 E. Lauridsen Blvd. Society members report that the classes are proving to be popular with the public. A beginners genealogy class is set for 12:30 p.m., with a Census workshop at 2 p.m.


PDN20130926C