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A last look back

201 0 Jeffe rson Cou nty

Jefferson’s Top 10 stories — plus state, nation/world Special Section

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New state laws focus on toxics Wider yield to emergency vehicles, too

furniture containing a toxic chemical flame-retardant. The new law is one of a handful that took effect New Year’s Day. Another law prohibits the use of lead wheel weights used to balance tires. State officials said about 40 metric tons of lead weights fall off By Phuong Le vehicles every year in Washington. and Rachel La Corte Lead fragments and dust from The Associated Press the weights contaminate soil and OLYMPIA — The state is ban- water, and pose hazards to aquatic ning the sale of televisions, com- life, they said. puters or residential upholstered Washington state was the first

Also . . . ■ New federal health insurance laws in effect/A6 ■ New Year’s brings some small federal tax breaks/A6 ■ Filing income tax early won’t mean an early refund/A6

in the nation to phase out the use of decaBDE, the flame retardant, which has been found in people and wildlife. “It’s really exciting to see this

very forward-thinking policy go into effect that will protect all of Washington residents,” said Erika Schreder, staff scientist with the Washington Toxics Coalition. She noted that the only two U.S. makers of deca and the largest importer of deca voluntarily agreed in late 2009 to stop producing and importing deca for most uses by 2012. “Action here at the state level can have national implications and change the whole way the industry does business,” Schreder said.

Deca, one of three main types of PBDEs, or polybrominated diphenyl ethers, is largely used in the black plastic casings of TVs. The makers of the other two forms — penta and octa — voluntarily agreed to stop making them by the end of 2004. Washington’s law required state officials to identify safer alternatives that would meet fire safety standards before the ban on deca could take effect. Turn

HAPPY NEW YEAR

to

Laws/A6

Jim Quandt of Port Townsend didn’t plunge, but he did get bussed by Miss Behaving, a saucy character who every year brings affection and cheer to the Nordland event.

Getting 2011 off to a rousing start By Julie McCormick

For Peninsula Daily News

A

sk anyone who jumped into chilly Mystery Bay water on a sunny but below-freezing New Year’s Day why they did it, and you get answers that make no sense to those who opt to stay dry and warm. “It’s fun,” said Amanda Roark, still dripping after her plunge Saturday into the water in Nordland on Marrowstone Island. “I saw my dad went in,” said Caullin McLarney, 8, the last of the 75 or so people to make the same dive off the same dock — and also the youngest this year. “I’ve done it every year since 2001,” said Marc Gordon, a bearded giant decked out in an equally large wedding dress for what he proclaimed is going to be his “honeymoon year.” Maybe it was because they were all so “artistic and crazy” — emphasis on the latter — like Karen Choyce asserted after deciding to forgo a planned chi-chi party in Seattle just to watch the goings-on in Nordland, along with about 300 other people. Turn

to

Julie McCormick (2)/for Peninsula Daily News

The wet and chilled depart for a dry-off, beer and chili while the dry and unplunged take their places on the

Plunge/A10 Nordland dock during Saturday’s annual New Year’s Day Polar Bear Plunge.

Dalzell applauded as she leaves post By Julie McCormick For Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — There was a surprise candidate for drug court graduation in Jefferson County Superior Court last week, and she had some surprising words for the roomful of wellwishers who came to congratulate the two announced grads. “Drug court is very near and dear to my heart because I come from a long line of alcoholics,” said departing county Prosecuting Attorney Juelie Dalzell on Thursday.

As the child of two parents who died of alcoholism, drug court “has been part of my recovery,” she said. “Each time one of you gets close to your family again, it heals a little part of me.” With that, Judge Craddock Verser read out Dalzell’s officially sanctioned “dismissal with prejudice” — the same document other grads got — and Dalzell’s days in drug court were over. By the end of the day, her 12 years as elected prosecutor also were over. Turn

to

New rules could affect biomass By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

Dave Boone

Retiring Prosecuting Attorney Juelie Dalzell

The federal government’s first greenhouse gas regulations, which took effect Saturday, have caused a stir among some biomass proponents who believe that woodto-energy projects should be exempt. Meanwhile, those opposed to the burning of wood waste for power applaud the new requirements. Biomass energy projects are planned on the North Olympic Peninsula at Nippon Paper Industries USA in Port Angeles and the Port Townsend Paper Corp. mill. Both burn wood waste now and expect to have upgraded facilities online sometime next year.

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UpFront

Sunday, January 2, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula Daily News

Dilbert

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Scott Adams

Copyright © 2011, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com ■ See box on Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and e-mail addresses of key executives and contact people.

PORT ANGELES main office and printing plant: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday SEQUIM office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim, WA 98382 Telephone: 360-681-2390 News telephone: 360-6812391 Fax: 360-681-2392 Office hours: 8 a.m.-noon, 12:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday JEFFERSON COUNTY office: 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend, WA 98368 News telephone: 360-385-2335 News fax: 360-385-3917 Advertising telephone: 360-385-1942

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Peninsula Daily News (ISSN 1050-7000), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Horvitz Newspapers, published each morning Sunday through Friday by Northwest Media (Washington) L.P. at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Member Audit Bureau of Circulations The Associated Press Contents copyright © 2011, Peninsula Daily News

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

Anthony owes $3.4 million in back taxes

No word if Anthony has settled up with the federal government or whether he has some kind of payback schedule. A rep for the “I Need to Know” singer was unavailJUST HOW MUCH able for comment. does crooner Marc It’s not the first time Anthony owe Uncle Sam? Anthony’s run afoul of the Accordtaxman. ing to E! In 2007, the singer paid News, Jen$2.5 million in back taxes nifer to federal and state governLopez’s ments for failing to file superstar returns on nearly husband is $15.5 million in income running a over a five-year period. tab with the Anthony And while he himself Internal wasn’t on the hook personRevenue Service to the ally, three of his corporate tune of $3.4 million in entities, including his tourunpaid taxes. ing company, did plead According to a New York guilty to various tax judgments and liens filing crimes. dating back to March 29, Anthony (under his real Kelly slams Palin name, Marco Antonio “What Not to Wear” coMuniz), was hit with a tax host and fashion expert lien on some property he Clinton Kelly didn’t hold owns in Long Island. back when he talked to But that’s not the only Joy Behar and PopEater time he’s failed to pay the columnist Rob Shuter on government its due. the subject of fellow TLC The Latin pop star also had a lien filed against the star Sarah Palin. According to Shuter, same piece of real estate in Kelly called “Sarah Palin’s December 2009, this one Alaska” an “eight-hour for $1.6 million, bringing info-commercial on my netthe total amount owed to work.” the IRS to a whopping “What bothers me most $3.4 million.

about her is her hypocrisy,” Kelly told Behar and Shuter. When further probed by Behar, Kelly Kelly continued, “Look at nature. Look at this beautiful Alaska. Look at how beautiful everything is. Let’s go Behar kill something because we need some meat in the refrigerator.” Shuter also reported Palin that Kelly isn’t the only TLC star who’s not thrilled to be sharing a network with Palin. Sources told the columnist that after spending days with the former governor to shoot an episode of “Alaska,” “Kate Plus 8” star Kate Gosselin “isn’t very fond of her either.”

Passings By The Associated Press

TOM VANDERGRIFF, 84, the former mayor of Arlington, Texas, who 40 years ago helped lure the Washington Senators baseball team to Texas, where they became the Rangers, died Thursday in Fort Worth. His death was confirmed by his son, Victor. Born in Carrollton, Texas, on Jan. 29, Mr. 1926, Mr. Vandergriff Vandergriff in 1970 moved to Arlington when he was 11. He was elected the city’s youngest mayor at age 25 in 1951 and soon helped attract a General Motors plant. He then welcomed another developer’s idea to build an amusement park for the plant’s employees. The park, Six Flags Over Texas, grew into one of the state’s top tourist attractions. Mr. Vandergriff worked for 13 years to bring a Major League Baseball team to Arlington. In 1965, he brought Dallas and Fort Worth officials together to help build a minor league stadium that was later expanded to accommodate the Senators when they relocated. He threw out the first pitch April 21, 1972, at the Rangers’ home opener. Mr. Vandergriff gave up the mayor’s office in 1977, served one term as a Democratic congressman and was a Republican judge in Tarrant County from 1991 until he retired in 2007. He was instrumental in the building of the Ball-

park in Arlington, which opened in 1994. The Rangers’ stadium now sits a few hundred yards from the $1.3 billion Cowboys Stadium, the year-old home of the Dallas Cowboys and site of the Super Bowl in February.

________

STEVE BOROS, 74, a former big league manager and infielder who later played a key behind-thescenes role in one of baseball’s most thrilling World Series moments, has died. Mr. Boros died Wednesday night in Deland, Fla., where he had spent his recent Mr. Boros years, the in 1983 Detroit Tigers said Thursday. The team said it didn’t have any other details on his death. Mr. Boros hit .245 with 26 home runs and 149 RBIs in parts of seven seasons with Detroit, the Chicago Cubs and Cincinnati. He managed the Oakland Athletics in 1983 and part of 1984, and guided the San Diego Padres in 1986.

Seen Around Peninsula snapshots

HUSBAND ARRIVING HOME from work to find a brand new tractor plus attachments and a big red bow waiting for him in the driveway . . . WANTED! “Seen Around” items. Send them to PDN News Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or e-mail news@peninsuladaily news.com.

Born in Michigan, Mr. Boros made his major league debut with Detroit in 1957 and mostly played third base. He hit three homers in a game in 1962 — no other Tigers player accomplished the feat until Bill Freehan in 1971. But it was his work as an advance scout for the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1988 that really showed off his baseball smarts. Mr. Boros was part of a scout team that filled out reports that fall on the Athletics, the Dodgers’ opponent in the World Series. Mr. Boros worked for more than four decades in baseball and coached for Kansas City, Montreal, the Dodgers and Baltimore. He spent the last nine years of his career in the

Did You Win? State lottery results

■  Friday’s Daily Game: 8-4-4 ■  Friday’s Keno: 09-1113-21-28-29-30-32-36-42-4955-59-65-69-70-73-77-78-80 ■  Friday’s Match 4: 03-11-15-16 ■  Friday’s Mega Millions: 10-12-13-35-56, Mega Ball: 9 ■  Saturday’s Daily Game: 0-8-4 ■  Saturday’s Hit 5: 02-04-17-18-37 ■  Saturday’s Keno: 07-08-17-23-26-29-30-31-3335-45-51-56-60-62-63-64-7273-77 ■  Saturday’s Lotto: 06-13-14-18-22-35 ■  Saturday’s Match 4: 12-15-18-20 ■  Saturday’s Powerball: 18-22-37-47-54, Powerball: 36, Power Play: 2

Peninsula Daily News PENINSULA POLL THURSDAY’S QUESTION: How optimistic are you about 2011?

Very optimistic 

Optimistic 

11.1% 19.5%

Somewhat optimistic 

35.5%

Pessimistic 

29.5%

Not sure  4.4% Total votes cast: 915

Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight Corrections and clarifications The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, contact Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-417-3530 or e-mail rex.wilson@peninsuladaily news.com.

Peninsula Lookback

From the pages of the Peninsula Daily News

1936 (75 years ago) The first baby of 1936 is a daughter for Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Burton of Route 1, Sequim. The girl was born at Port Angeles General Hospital at 1:15 a.m. New Year’s Day. A little girl born to Mr. and Mrs. Warren Weaver of Heckel’s Camp just missed the midnight gong by 15 minutes at Davidson and Hay Hospital. She was the last baby born in 1935.

1961 (50 years ago) Newspaper editors and the staff of The Associated Press across the state selected the Hood Canal Bridge pontoon damage and resultant construction delay as the state’s No. 2 story of 1960. Storms early in the year significantly damaged six pontoons that were awaiting installation of the new floating bridge, delaying the bridge’s construction and opening by at least a year. The No. 1 story of 1960 was the Nov. 8 election in which Gov. Albert D. Rosellini was re-elected but John F. Kennedy failed to

win the state’s nine electoral votes in the presidential race against Richard M. Nixon.

1986 (25 years ago) High winds whipped up the Strait of Juan de Fuca, giving Mother Nature a chance to do oil cleanup on her own. “The effects of the winds have been excellent,” said Bob Levine, the person in charge of the cleanup operation for ARCO Marine Inc. The oil was spilled from the tanker Arco Anchorage in Port Angeles Harbor on Dec. 21. The largest concentration of oil continues to be within Port Angeles Harbor. Meanwhile, ITT Rayonier has made a preliminary estimate of between $3 million and $4 million in lost revenue as the result of crude oil clinging to Rayonier’s timber in the harbor.

Laugh Lines A friend is someone who thinks you’re a good egg even though you’re slightly cracked. Your Monologue

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS SUNDAY, Jan. 2, the second day of 2011. There are 363 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■  On Jan. 2, 1811, Sen. Timothy Pickering, a Federalist from Massachusetts, became the first member of the U.S. Senate to be censured; the offense was improperly revealing the contents of an executive document. On this date: ■  In 1788, Georgia became the fourth state to ratify the U.S. Constitution. ■  In 1900, Secretary of State John Hay announced the “Open Door Policy” to facilitate trade with China. ■  In 1921, religious services were broadcast on radio for the first time as KDKA in Pittsburgh

aired the regular Sunday service of the city’s Calvary Episcopal Church. ■  In 1935, Bruno Hauptmann went on trial in Flemington, N.J., on charges of kidnapping and murdering the 20-month-old son of Charles and Anne Lindbergh. Hauptmann was later found guilty and executed. ■  In 1942, the Philippine capital of Manila was captured by Japanese forces during World War II. ■  In 1959, the Soviet Union launched its space probe Luna 1, the first manmade object to fly past the moon, its apparent intended target. ■  In 1960, Sen. John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts launched his successful bid for the presidency. ■  In 1971, 66 people were

killed in a pileup of spectators leaving a soccer match at Ibrox Stadium in Glasgow, Scotland. ■  In 1981, police in Sheffield, England, arrested Peter Sutcliffe, who confessed to being the serial killer known as the “Yorkshire Ripper” who had slain 13 women. ■  In 1991, Sharon Pratt (Dixon) was sworn in as mayor of Washington, D.C., becoming the first black woman to head a city of Washington’s size and prominence. ■  Ten years ago: Presidentelect George W. Bush tapped Democrat Norman Y. Mineta to be his secretary of transportation, Spencer Abraham to be secretary of energy and Linda Chavez to be secretary of labor. However, Chavez ended up withdrawing after it was disclosed she had

given money and shelter to an illegal immigrant who once did chores around Chavez’s house. Ships made the first legal and direct crossing between China and Taiwan in more than half a century. Former U.S. Attorney General and Secretary of State William P. Rogers died in Bethesda, Md., at age 87. ■  Five years ago: A methane gas explosion at the Sago Mine in West Virginia claimed the lives of 12 miners, but one miner, Randal McCloy Jr., was eventually rescued. ■  One year ago: President Barack Obama, in his weekly Internet and radio address, said an al-Qaida affiliate in Yemen apparently ordered the failed Christmas Day bombing plot against a U.S. airliner.


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, January 2, 2011

Second Front Page

Page

A3

Briefly: Nation Seven die of injuries from tornadoes KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Shaken residents spent New Year’s Day sifting through the wreckage wrought by tornadoes that touched down in several states on the last day of 2010, killing seven people in two states and injuring dozens of others. Six of the victims — three in Missouri and three in Arkansas — died Friday as tornadoes fueled by unusually warm air pummeled the South and Midwest. A seventh victim who was injured Friday near the Missouri town of Rolla died Saturday at a hospital in Columbia, said Bruce Southard, the chief of the Rolla Rural Fire Department. The woman, whose name wasn’t immediately released, was entertaining a friend, Alice Cox, 69, of Belle, Mo., in her trailer when the twister hit. Southard said nothing was left of the trailer except for the frame and that the twister scattered debris 40 to 50 yards from where the trailer had sat. The woman was found under a pile of debris, Southard said. “It’s like you set a bomb off in it,” Southard said in a phone interview. “It just annihilated it.”

112-year-old dies OCALA, Fla. — Florida’s oldest resident, a 112-year-old woman counted among the world’s 25 oldest people by a research group, has died. Onie Ponder of Ocala died Friday morning. Her son, Carswell Ponder, said his mother died after a brief bout with pneumonia. According to the Los Angeles-

based Gerontology Research Group, Onie Ponder had been the oldest person in Florida and one of the 25 oldest people in the Ponder world. She was born Sept. 3, 1898. She was asked about her secret for longevity at her birthday party in September. Ponder told the Ocala Star-Banner: “The good Lord had something to do with it. He treats me pretty well.” Carswell Ponder said his mother stayed active all her life and that she liked to read and listened to books on tape after her eyesight deteriorated.

17 hurt in rave LOS ANGELES – Authorities said 17 people were hospitalized after a New Year’s Eve rave at the Los Angeles Sports Arena that drew thousands of partyers and a heavy police presence. Fire Department spokesman Brian Humphrey said an additional 62 people were treated on site for a variety of minor injuries and illnesses. Several people were arrested on suspicion of drug possession. The Los Angeles Times reported that more than 26,000 people turned out for the annual electronic music festival Together As One. The event started at 5 p.m. Friday and ran until 2 a.m. Saturday. Raves were banned at the arena and the adjoining Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in June after the overdose death of a 15-year-old girl. Commissioners lifted the ban in November. The Associated Press

Briefly: World Passenger plane catches fire in Siberia

Brazil’s first female president. The 63-year-old career technocrat takes the MOSCOW — A Russian pashelm of Latin senger jet carrying 124 people America’s largcaught fire as it taxied down a est nation, Rousseff snowy runway in Siberia and which has then exploded Saturday, killing risen both financially and politithree people and injuring 43, cally on the world stage under including six who were badly outgoing leader Luiz Inacio Lula burned, officials said. da Silva. Most of the passengers and Silva leaves office as the crew were evacuated before the nation’s most popular president. explosion, though people on board Rousseff was his hand-chosen described a chaotic scene as the successor. burning plane filled with thick, Rousseff became Brazil’s black smoke and panicked pasleader Saturday after taking the sengers climbed over one another oath of office. to rush through flames to escape. She is challenged with mainEmergency services spokestaining the success Brazil has man Vadim Grebennikov said the seen under Silva. fire, which began in one of the engines as the plane taxied for ‘Nuclear holocaust’ takeoff, caused a powerful blast SEOUL, South Korea – North that destroyed the Tu-154 airKorea welcomed the new year craft and spread flames across Saturday with a call for better 1,000 square meters (11,000 ties with rival South Korea, square feet). warning that war “will bring Russian television showed nothing but a nuclear holocaust.” video taken with a mobile teleDespite calls in its annual phone of the burning plane, its New Year’s message for a Korean peninsula free of nuclear weapcenter a giant fireball. All that ons, the communist North, which remained afterward was the tail has conducted two nuclear tests section and part of a wing. since 2006, also said its military Grebennikov said 10 people were seriously injured, including is ready for “prompt, merciless and annihilatory action” against six who were badly burned and its enemies. four who suffered broken bones South Korea’s Unification or other trauma. Most of the Ministry, which handles relations other injured passengers sought with the North, said the editorial treatment for poisoning after carried in the official Korean inhaling toxic fumes. Central News Agency, even with its tough rhetoric, showed the Brazil’s new president North’s interest in resuming talks with the South. BRASILIA, Brazil — Dilma The Associated Press Rousseff has been sworn in as

The Associated Press

A Coptic protester, center left, prepares to hurl an object at riot police during clashes between Coptic youths and riot police, who opened fire with rubber bullets and tear gas, in the streets outside the Saints Church and a neighboring hospital in Alexandria, Egypt, on Saturday.

Christians, police clash after New Year’s bomb Suicide attack in Egypt leaves 21 dead; government blamed By Maggie Michael and Lee Keath The Associated Press

ALEXANDRIA, Egypt — Christians clashed with Egyptian police in the northern city of Alexandria on Saturday, furious over an apparent suicide bombing against worshippers leaving a New Year’s Mass at a church that killed at least 21 people. It was the worst violence against the country’s Christian minority in a decade. The Interior Ministry blamed “foreign elements,” and the Alexandria governor accused al-Qaida, pointing to the terror network’s branch in Iraq, which has carried out a string of attacks on Christians there and has threatened Egypt’s Coptic Orthodox Christian community as well. Egypt’s government has long insisted that the terror network does not have a significant presence in the country, and it has never been conclusively linked to any attacks here. If al-Qaida was involved, it raises the prospect of a serious new security threat within Egypt. President Barack Obama condemned “this barbaric and heinous act” and said those behind it must be brought to justice. The bombing, about a half hour after the stroke of the New Year,

stoked tensions that have grown in recent years between Egypt’s Christians and the Muslim majority. It was dramatically different from past attacks on Christians, which included shootings but not serious bombings, much less suicide attacks. Christians have increasingly blamed the government for not taking violence against them or antiChristian sentiment among Muslim hard-liners seriously. In the wake of the New Year’s bombing, they unleashed their rage at authorities. “Now it’s between Christians and the government, not between Muslims and Christians,” shrieked one Christian woman as several hundred young men clashed with helmeted riot police in the street outside the targeted church hours after the blast. As the rioters threw stones and bottles, police fired rubber bullets and tear gas to disperse them. Some of the protesters beat Muslim passers-by. Nearly 1,000 Christians were attending the midnight Mass at the Saints Church in the Mediterranean port of Alexandria, said Father Mena Adel, a priest at the church. The service had just ended, and some worshippers were leaving the building when the bomb went off about a half hour after midnight,

he said. “The last thing I heard was a powerful explosion, and then my ears went deaf,” Marco Boutros, a 17-year-old survivor, said from his hospital bed. “All I could see were body parts scattered all over — legs and bits of flesh.” Blood splattered the facade of the church, a painting of Jesus inside and a mosque across the street. The blast mangled at least six cars on the street, setting some ablaze. As bodies were taken away after daybreak, some in the congregation waved white sheets with the sign of the cross emblazoned on them with what appeared to be the victims’ blood. Health Ministry spokesman Abdel-Rahman Shahine said the death toll stood at 21, with 97 wounded, almost all Christians. Among the wounded were the three policemen and an officer guarding the church. The Interior Ministry said in a statement that it was likely the blast was detonated by a suicide bomber and that the attack probably involved “foreign elements.” Investigators were examining two heads found at the site on suspicion at least one was the bomber, the state news agency MENA reported. The last major terror attacks in Egypt were between 2004-2006, when bombings hit three tourist resorts in the Sinai peninsula, killing 125 people.

FAA: Lost contact with jet prompted Capitol evacuation By Sarah Brumfield The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — An airliner lost radio contact when a pilot inadvertently turned his radio to the wrong frequency, leading to the scrambling of fighter jets and the evacuation of the U.S. Capitol, federal officials said Saturday. Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Jim Peters said the agency is reviewing the “pilot readback error.” The loss of radio contact as the plane approached the nation’s capital also led officials to evacuate all House and Senate office buildings.

Quick Read

Piedmont Airlines flight 4352 from Hilton Head, S.C., was on course for Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport when it lost radio contact with air traffic controllers at a regional radar facility in Virginia for about 15 minutes, FAA officials said. F-16 fighter jets were scrambled from Andrews Air Force Base, but the airliner was able to reestablish radio contact and it landed at Reagan, said Stacey Knott, a spokeswoman for the North American Aerospace Defense Command. The evacuation order was issued around 1:30 p.m. and was

called off about a half-hour later when the plane landed. Salisbury, Md.-based Piedmont is a wholly owned subsidiary of US Airways. US Airways spokeswoman Tina Swail said the airline was working with local authorities to investigate the incident. The number of passengers on board wasn’t immediately known. The company’s website says it operates 44 de Havilland DHC-8 turboprop aircraft, which can carry between 37 and 80 passengers depending on the model type.

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Nation: Deputy, suspect dead in trailer park standoff

Nation: No ticket winner, so lottery up to $290 million

A RARE MINIATURE cow with markings similar to a panda bear was born on a farm in Campion in northern Colorado. The so-called “panda cow” born in Larimer County is thought to be one of only about 24 in the world. The (Loveland) Reporter-Herald reported that the male calf named Ben was born Friday morning. His mother is a Lowline Angus cow. Farmer Chris Jessen raises miniature cattle and also owns a miniature kangaroo on his hobby farm. The miniature panda cow is the result of genetic manipulation. The cow has a white face with black ovals around the eyes, giving it a panda-like appearance.

POLICE SAID TWO masked gunman accused of trying to rob a suburban Houston bank and take several people hostage are in jail with bail set at $13 million each. Pearland Police Lt. Onesmio Lopez said Saturday that 39-year-old Samuel Bonner and 29-year-old Raymond Johnson were being held in the Brazoria County Jail. Each man was charged with 13 counts of aggravated robbery — one count for each hostage taken — as well as for the robbery of the Chase Bank branch in Pearland, Lopez said. It was not immediately known whether the men had attorneys.

A SHERIFF’S DEPUTY investigating a report of gunfire at a trailer park was shot dead Saturday, and the shooting suspect was killed after a furious standoff with police, authorities said. A police officer was wounded. The slain deputy was married and was the mother of two children, Clark County Sheriff Gene Kelly said. He didn’t release the names of the deputy or the suspect killed in the standoff in Enon Beach, about 50 miles west of Columbus, Ohio. The deputy was shot as she tried to photograph a footprint, Kelly said. “This,” he said, “is the worst day of my entire law enforcement career.”

NOBODY HAD A ticket with all numbers in Friday’s multi-state Mega Millions lottery — played in Washington and 41 other jurisdictions — so the jackpot will rise to $290 million for Tuesday night’s drawing. If business is brisk in the 40 states and District of Columbia in which Mega Millions is played, the jackpot could rise to $300 million or beyond. To win, your ticket must hit the five numbers plus the Mega Ball sixth number. Those odds are one in 176 million, said Washington State Lottery officials. No one has picked the winning numbers for 15 straight drawings dating back to early November.


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, January 2, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Wounded eagle gets breath of fresh air By Jeff Chew

secluded sunny spot,” said Jaye Moore, center director. “Even when confined, eagles are much more comfortable psychologically outside than inside, and we saw an instant improvement in his alertness and mood once the sunlight hit his face and the fresh air filled his lungs.”

Peninsula Daily News

SEQUIM — A young bald eagle the Agnew-based Northwest Raptor & Wildlife Center rescued after the bird was shot and seriously wounded Dec. 15 has taken another step toward recovery — breathing fresh air and basking in sunlight. The bird was eating well and responding to stimuli after being placed in an outdoor cage, said Matthew Randazzo, wildlife center spokesman, on Friday. “We are happy to report that the wounded bald eagle was able to breathe fresh air and enjoy the sunlight for the first time in two weeks,” Randazzo said. After the juvenile male bald eagle’s wound had been cleaned, treated and

Eagle is ‘a fighter’ Northwest Raptor & Wildlife Center

A young bald eagle found shot Dec. 15 continues to recover. bandaged, it was decided he was strong enough to be placed in an outdoor cage during sunny weather. “We freshly rebandaged the wing and decided to try occasionally placing him outside in a wire cage in a

“He’s a fighter, and we’re hoping that being reminded of his ultimate goal — flying free in the wild — will encourage him to keep fighting. “It’s also important to make sure he stays acclimated to being outside to ensure he can fully rehabilitate,” Moore said. Randazzo said there is no way of knowing yet if the bird’s wing will heal natu-

rally enough to allow him to fly again. An X-ray must be taken of the fractured ulna bone in the left wing where a bullet fragment, possibly from a .22-caliber weapon, ripped into it. “Until then, we don’t know if it will require surgery yet,” Randazzo said, adding that surgery would prolong the recovery time for the eagle. Should an X-ray show that surgery is not needed, the bird would be moved from Greywolf Veterinary Hospital in Sequim to the center for rehabilitation. When the wounded eagle was reported floundering in a wet field near Beaver, Moore phoned Brian Fairbanks, a Fish & Wildlife officer based in Forks, who found the eagle and brought

Protection Act, according to U.S. Department of Fish & Wildlife. A first-offense violation of the act can result in a fine of $100,000, imprisonment for one year or both. Penalties increase for additional offenses, and a second violation of the act is a felony. Tips leading to the capture of the person who shot this eagle can be sent to the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife, which is investigating the case, at Search for shooter 877-933-9847 or matthew@ The search for the per- nwraptorcenter.com. To watch a video of the son who illegally shot the eagle in treatment, visit bald eagle continues. Bald eagles were http://tinyurl.com/olyeagle. removed from the federal ________ list of threatened and Sequim-Dungeness Valley Ediendangered species in 2007 tor Jeff Chew can be reached at but remain protected under 360-681-2391 or at jeff.chew@ the Bald and Golden Eagle peninsuladailynews.com.

it to the Sequim center the same day. Veterinarian Maya Bewig at Greywolf Veterinary Hospital cared for the bird. Being a young eagle — born last summer — the bird is fully brown and hasn’t reached full size. Bald eagles do not fully develop the distinctive white plumage on their heads and tails until the fourth year.

You’ve got to have glee PT teens take their songs on the road By Diane Urbani Paz

de la

Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — You’ve probably heard all about the “Glee” TV show ­— and while that fiction is well and good, glee PT is the real thing. Right after Thanksgiving, composer and jazz piano teacher Linda Dowdell got the job at Port Townsend High School: forming a choir or glee club. About 20 students showed up and started rehearsing — and next thing they knew, they were warming up the crowd for “The Nutcracker” at Seattle Center. Jennifer Nielsen, who teaches English and directs plays and musicals at the high school, alerted Dowdell to the fact the Pacific Northwest Ballet, presenter of “The Nutcracker,” offers student groups free tickets to performances in exchange for singing holiday songs in McCaw Hall’s grand

lobby pre-show. “I jumped at the offer, immediately rerouted our repertoire toward songs of the season that could be learned quickly, and we performed at last Wednesday’s matinee,” Dowdell said. That was Dec. 22; Dowdell also got the gleeful ones a gig at the holiday bazaar Dec. 18 and 19 at The Undertown, a coffeehouse at 211 Taylor St. in Port Townsend. Linda Dowdell The singers proved a hit at both venues, said their In Seattle to sing in the pre-show for “The Nutcracker” ballet at McCaw Hall are new Port leader, a veteran of musical Townsend glee club members, from left, Emily Reid, Teslin LeMaster, Karling Rutenbeck, Liz theater in New York City, Dennison, Emily Huntingford, Rose Burt, Leah Finch, John Reid, Taylor Mills and Paula Sorenson. Los Angeles and Seattle. productions — and is now skills began developing, as meets after school one or Bill Withers and some Beatrelishing her work with the well as ‘people skills.’” two times a week, put les favorites in order to Director’s experience Glee clubber Rose Burt, together a 25-minute holi- focus on the holiday-only glee teens. Dowdell, who moved to mandate” from the Pacific “They deserve great 18, is also delighting in the day program. Sequim last year, was music musical education and opportunity to be part of an And “in addition to sing- Northwest Ballet. director for, among other ensemble — something that ing, we have Taylor Mills on Burt, for her part, is putexperiences,” she said. groups, Mikhail Baryshnikhasn’t been available at French horn [on ‘White ting an encouraging word “They are the people who ov’s White Oak Dance ProjPort Townsend High. Christmas’], John Reid on out there to newcomers. ect and worked with the will be leading our state “You don’t have to be an and country in the near snare drum [for ‘Little Mark Morris Dance Group Adding dance experienced singer” to join future, so I say give them Drummer Boy’] and various in Belgium and New York. Shortly after she relo- great professional training She looks forward to students playing maracas the club, she said. “It’s more about having finger cymbals,” cated from Manhattan to in anything, especially the mixing in some dance moves and fun and learning what you Sequim, Dowdell co-directed international language of with the singing and per- Dowdell said. “We’ll begin rehearsing can do with your voice.” Port Townsend High’s pro- music. forming with the club in the “I had the good fortune new year. again in January, revisiting ________ duction of “Oliver!” and was co-creator and accompanist to be in a group like this Dowdell “is, like, really some nonholiday areas of Features Editor Diane Urbani for “Here’s to the Ladies!” at when I was in high school in legit. She knows what she’s our repertoire,” she added. de la Paz can be reached at 360New Jersey, and I imagine doing,” Burt added. “We had to put aside 417-3550 or at diane.urbani@ Key City Public Theatre. Dowdell reveled in those that’s where my arranging The glee club, which songs like ‘Lean On Me’ by peninsuladailynews.com.

PUD cool on automated meters Cost of update is prohibitive, district says

That works out to about $258 per meter. Howe said the cost is higher for PUD because its customers are spread out over a much larger area, and it would need more wireless devices per customer to relay meter readings back to the utility. “We would have to install more radio towers . . . you have got to build the communications infrastructure as well,” he said.

By Tom Callis

Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — While the city of Port Angeles has wholeheartedly embraced the move to socalled smart meters, the largest utility in Clallam County is remaining much more cool about the technology. The Clallam Public Utility District, which includes the county outside of the Port Angeles city limit, has put any serious consideration of making the switch on hold for likely three to five years, said spokesman Mike Howe. He said PUD is not making any plans to install automated meters, which can read water and electric-

D INNER

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

Devices around city John Elliott of Port Angeles, left, talks with Port The city plans to install Angeles Power Resources Manager Philip Lusk about nine devices around about a plan to replace the city’s old-style Port Angeles that will comelectric meters with newer meters at an municate with the meters. information table set up Saturday at the Port Along with relaying Angeles Farmers Market. ity use remotely and help control energy costs, partly because the technology is still fairly new. “It’s not always best to be the first mouse to the cheese,” Howe said.

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________ The city, on the other hand, will spend $4.9 milReporter Tom Callis can be lion to install about 19,000 reached at 360-417-3532 or at smart electrical and water tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. meters beginning in March. com.

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meter readings, the devices also will allow a utility to remotely lower energy use during times of the day when demand is at its highest for consenting customers. Puget Sound Energy customers in East Jefferson County have had automated meters since about 1999, but they only allow electrical and water use to be read remotely.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, January 2, 2011

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Baby girl first reported birth in 2011 By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

healthy and happy, John said. “My wife is doing amazing. She is still glowing,” he said. “I am a pretty proud dad, too. “I don’t know what words can capture the emotion involved,” he said. “You feel a new breath to life, that’s for sure.” Said Gautschi, the midwife: “She is a beautiful little girl, and it was a beautiful birth.” A nursing supervisor at Jefferson Healthcare hospital in Port Townsend said Eden was the earliest birth she had heard of so far in both home and hospital births throughout the North Olympic Peninsula.

A baby girl born in a Port Hadlock home is the first reported birth of a North Olympic Peninsula baby in 2011. Imri-Lael Holloway, 28, and John Holloway, 30, saw Eden Marie Holloway for the first time at 2:42 a.m. Saturday, according to midwife Carol Gautschi. The first baby born in a hospital on the Peninsula this year was also the first reported birth in Clallam County. Chance William Kemp was born to Katherine and Christopher Kemp of Port Angeles on New Year’s Day — and the baby’s mother’s birthday — at 10:58 a.m. at Olympic Medical Center. OMC birth

First child Eden is the first child for both the Holloways, John said. She was born weighing 7 pounds 3 ounces and was 20½ inches long The Holloways decided to have the baby at home, after hearing about home births from some of John’s co-workers, he said. “It was an amazing experience,” he said. “My wife was in labor for 23 hours and 45 minutes — and it was all natural, no drugs or anything like that.” Both mom and baby were

Chance Kemp’s birth follows a pattern set by his mother, Katherine. In addition to being born the same day of the year, Chance and Katherine also shared the same due date — Dec. 28 — and both were four days late, said husband and father Christopher. The night before her birthday on New Year’s Day, Katherine and Christopher rushed to OMC in Port Angeles. Katherine, 23, who was four days overdue with her second child, has an old hip injury. It was flaring up, said Christopher, 25.

Carol Gautschi

Eden Marie Holloway, the first baby reported born in 2011 on the North Olympic Peninsula, cuddles with her mother, Imri-Lael Holloway, moments after her 2:42 a.m. Saturday birth in Port Hadlock. At the hospital, they were told she also was in labor. “We came in at about 8 [p.m. Friday], and she was in a lot of pain,” Christopher said. “It was moving really slow, so in order to speed it up, they had to induce her.”

Briefly . . . PA Coast Guard helps in rescue LA CONNER — Two boaters who ran aground near Skagit Bay were rescued when a Coast Guard helicopter crew from Port Angeles hoisted them from the stranded skiff. The two boaters were in a 20-foot inflatable skiff when they ran aground at about 6 p.m. Thursday. The Skagit County Sheriff’s Office initially launched a crew to help at about 7 p.m., but because of the shallow water could not reach the pair, whose names were not released, the Coast Guard said in a prepared statement. The Sheriff’s Office had told the boaters to wait in the skiff until high tide so they could reach shore safely, but the two tried to wade to shore shortly thereafter, the Coast Guard said. Because they could not reach the shore, they returned to the skiff and were suffering the early stages of hypothermia, the Coast Guard said. The HH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew from Air Station/Sector Field Office Port Angeles was then called in to hoist the pair and take them to Skagit Regional Airport where they were treated by medics and taken back to their vehicles.

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At 1 p.m., Kristen Larson, Sensei, a teacher in the Diamond Sangha Teachers Circle, will give a Dharma Talk on Case #13 in The Wumen Kuan, koan collection, Te-shan: Bowls in Hand. “Come when you can; leave when you must,” is the motto of NO Sangha, which has been a Zen community in Port Angeles for 14 years. The house can be difficult to find. For directions, phone 360-452-5534 or e-mail NOSangha@aol. com.

Boy, then 14, was hit by car while on a crosswalk By Paige Dickerson Peninsula Daily News

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the Tualatin Valley Highway in Aloha, Ore., near Portland. Vehicles in three out of the four lanes of traffic stopped, according to reports by KGW-TV news at the time of the wreck. Cecilio Venegas of Gresham, Ore., moved out of his lane of traffic to pass the other cars as the children were crossing, and his Ford Taurus struck all three of them, KGW reported. He was cited for passing a stopped vehicle in a crosswalk. As a result of the wreck, the Oregon Transportation Commission added a pedestrian-activated traffic signal at the crosswalk in 2011, KATU-TV News reported. Construction of the signal, originally planned for 2012, was moved up after the wreck. Because the crosswalk is not at an intersection, there is no traffic light in that area. KATU reported that that area of the highway is in Oregon state’s top 5 percent for frequency of reported crashes. “George was in [the intensive care unit] for 10 days,” Johnson-Ramos said. Alysha was kept overnight and released with minor injuries. Because Venegas had only limited liability insurance and the children are insured through Oregon’s state insurance program, the family has racked up medical bills in the thousands, Johnson-Ramos said.

“The bills are still coming in,” she said. But beyond the bills for the life-saving surgeries, she has also been trying to find support for two surgeries that are considered cosmetic, so they won’t be covered at all. Costing in the tens of thousands — but she doesn’t know exactly how much — she hopes to one day help her son have dental work for his teeth, which were chipped during the wreck, and a facial surgery for some fractures in his skull, she said. “He is 15, and he is selfconscious about it,” she said. “But they are not considered necessary, so they won’t be paid for at all.” The facial surgery would correct a fracture just above his eyebrow, she said. The family had purchased a new car just two days before the wreck and had not yet signed the papers on the insurance, she said. “It was really, really bad timing because we found out that even though our car wasn’t involved, that if we had had insurance, our insurance would have helped out, too,” she said. Because of the multitude of surgeries — not to mention the cast he has worn on his left arm for nearly the whole year — George was not able to play sports this year, but he did help coach younger-age teams. “He was really glad that he got to do that,” JohnsonRamos said. Johnson-Ramos has set up an account at Wells Fargo under her son’s name, George Johnson. Any branch of the bank can accept donations in his name.

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remember the rest of my life.” Both baby and mother were healthy and in good condition Saturday and would likely be released to go home today, Christopher said. No babies had yet been born, and no mothers were in

Family wrestles with bills after son injured

PORTLAND, Ore. — In the new year, Jennifer Johnson-Ramos hopes her son won’t have to face the multitude of surgeries he had in 2010. Johnson-Ramos, her son, College aid info George Johnson, and her PORT ANGELES — daughter, Alysha Johnson, The Port Angeles High are all native to Port Angeles School guidance departbut moved to Portland, Ore., ment will host a College after the children and a Financial Aid Information friend were hit by a car while Night for parents of seniors crossing a street at a crossWednesday, Jan. 12. walk while visiting their Information will be pre- father there. sented at 6:30 p.m. in the Alysha, now 11, suffered high school library, 304 E. minor injuries in the Park Ave. Dec. 20, 2009, wreck, but Krista Francis, director George, now 15, was thrown of the Peninsula College into the windshield and has Financial Aid Office, will undergone so many surgertell about financial aid for ies that the family has lost two-year and four-year col- count. leges, including how to fill Both Alysha and George out the FAFSA — Free attended the Lower Elwha Application for Federal Klallam Headstart and Student Aid — form. Hamilton Elementary School Information will cover until they moved to Portland all colleges, not just aid at to be closer to the medical Peninsula College. specialists caring for George. Filling out the FAFSA Johnson-Ramos and the form is often a requirement children were visiting her for aid, or for loans, grants husband and their father, and scholarships from the Eleazar Ramos, when the federal government. children were hit. He “Parents will get an had found work in the Portoverview of financial aid Zen retreat land area, so the family and will be able to ask was splitting time between PORT ANGELES — NO questions regarding the the Port Angeles and Sangha plans a one-day FAFSA application which Zen retreat Saturday. is typically the gateway for Oregon homes. “They were going to get The retreat — or zazen- financial aid for any postsome ingredient we were kai — will be from 8 a.m. high school education,” to 3 p.m. at Murre Cottage, counselor Mike Nolan said. missing for cookies — I don’t 420 W. Third St., in Port “Schools encourage par- even remember what it was Angeles. ents and students to fill out — when it happened,” Johnson-Ramos said. Alternated zazen the FAFSA form as soon The three children were (seated meditation), kinhin after Jan. 1 as possible.” (walking meditation) and For more information on walking on a crosswalk on private, individual instruc- the form, visit www.fafsa. tion will be available. ed.gov. Silent coffee/tea breaks, The guidance office can and a vegetarian soup and be contacted at 360-452bread lunch will be offered. 0250. At 10 a.m., there will be Peninsula Daily News All Ages Welcome and The Associated Press a sutra (chanting) service. PORT ANGELES — The schedule for a city garbage and recycling facility on Blue Mountain Road has changed. The Blue Mountain Transfer Station at 1469 Blue Mountain Road will be open Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. The station will be open each day from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. It previously was open Monday, Wednesdays and Saturdays. The new schedule avoids conflicts with holidays that regularly fall on Mondays, said Teresa Pierce, Port Angeles city spokeswoman. The change began this month. The facility is operated by Waste Connections Inc. under contract with the city. For more information, phone the station’s information line at 360-4174875 or see the Recycling and Garbage Guide in the front of the DEX phone book.

0C700976

PORT ANGELES — A 20-year-old Port Angeles man has been sentenced to 60 months in prison for a series of thefts and 22 months for forgery. Aaron Mylan was sentenced Dec. 14 after he signed a document earlier that month saying he was not admitting guilt but that he agreed prosecutors had enough evidence to convict him. He was charged with three counts of forgery, one count of second-degree theft, four counts of residential burglary, trafficking in stolen property and delivery of a controlled substance. According to court documents, Mylan was charged with entering homes in the Sequim and Port Angeles area and stealing more than $14,000 worth of items from the eight homes over a time period stretching from December 2009 to March 2010. For those crimes — as well as the drug and trafficking charges — he was sentenced to 60 months in prison, with a restitution hearing set for March 1. The plea agreement also settled a forgery case in

which he was accused of writing four checks in the name of Robert Schmidt in March 2010 totalling $2,337.77 to Port Angeles and Sequim stores. For the forgery charges, he was sentenced to 22 months in prison, to be served concurrently with his other sentence, according to court documents.

Chance will be the little brother of Cody, 3, the couple’s oldest child. Chance was born weighing 7 pounds 12 ounces and 19¼ inches long, his father said. “It was pretty awesome, actually,” Christopher said. “It is something I will


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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, January 2, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

New tax law adds new, extends breaks Peninsula Daily News news services

WASHINTON — While much attention has been paid to the extension of Bush-era tax cuts in the massive tax package signed by President Barack Obama last month, Congress also tucked in other tax breaks and tweaks. And not everyone will benefit. The bill cuts the payroll tax so workers will get more in their paychecks next year, though some workers will see a bigger bump than others — and some won’t get any. The home improvement energy credit returns, but it’s stingier. Meanwhile, the federal estate tax is resurrected in a far more generous form. And a new feature was added to ease estate planning for married couples. Here’s the bottom line on some of the coming tax changes:

Payroll Tax Relief For next year only, the payroll tax taken out of your check for Social Security will be reduced by 2 percentage points. You’ll see 4.2 percent — instead of 6.2 percent — of the first $106,800 of earn-

ings going to Social Security. This will put an extra $2,136 in the paychecks of the highest earners. “It’s a way to get money into the hands of a lot of people,” said Mark Luscombe, principal tax analyst with CCH, an Illinois provider of tax information. But this tax break is skewed in favor of higherincome folks, said Roberton Williams, a senior fellow at the Tax Policy Center in Washington. In fact, low-income workers could end up paying more in taxes next year than this year. That’s because this tax cut replaces the Making Work Pay Credit, which reduced tax withholdings for two years so that workers got up to $400 more in their paychecks annually and up to $800 if they’re married. That means singles earning less than $20,000 and couples making under $40,000 will receive less from the payroll tax cut than they do from Making Work Pay, according to Williams. People earning more than that, though, are better off with the payroll tax cut.

For example, a couple earning $250,000 next year would get a payroll tax cut worth $4,272. They got nothing this year from Making Work Pay because they made too much to qualify. But if low-income workers feel a bit cheated, they won’t be the only ones. About 6 million people, made up of longtime federal employees and some state and local government workers, won’t get any payroll tax relief because they don’t participate in Social Security, Williams said.

Estate tax Members of Congress could not agree a year ago on how many millions of dollars the affluent should be able to shelter from the estate tax, so they let it lapse temporarily. Meanwhile, the estates of several billionaires who died this year, including New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner, escaped taxes. But with the estate tax set to return in 2011 with terms far less generous than before, a deal was worked out. For the next two years, an individual will be able to exempt up to $5 million from the federal estate tax,

with married couples able to shelter up to $10 million. The maximum tax rate on estates above that will be 35 percent. Congress also added a new feature to make estate planning easier for married couples. Traditionally, spouses have set up trusts and titled assets in a certain way to take full advantage of each partner’s exemption from federal estate taxes, said Kenneth Aneckstein, a Baltimore estate planning lawyer. But the new law eliminates this hassle. It does so by making the exemption “portable” between spouses after one dies. So if a husband dies next year without fully using his $5 million exemption, the unused portion can be transferred to his wife and used at her death along with her own exemption.

estate tax. But for some heirs, next year’s law could be more attractive. Traditionally, if you inherited appreciated stocks or other assets, the cost basis would be stepped up to the fair market at the time of the deceased’s death. This reduces or eliminates any capital gains taxes later when you sell the inheritance. But for this year only, there’s a cap on the amount of assets entitled to a stepup in basis. As an heir, you could end up having to pay capital gains taxes based on the original purchase price of the assets when selling them. And that could be steep. Next year’s estate tax eliminates the cap, which is why some might like that version of the law more. Billion-dollar estates such as Steinbrenner’s are better off under the 2010 law, while those under $5 million fare better under the 2011 law, said Williams of the Tax Policy Center. And those in between need to crunch the numbers to see which scenario is more beneficial, he said. You can still get a tax break for insulating your home, installing energy-

Choose your tax Congress also added another twist to the estate tax. If a person died this year, the estate can choose whether to follow the law for 2010 or 2011. You might think all would opt for this year’s law, when there is no

efficient windows or making other energy improvements. Congress revived this expiring credit, but next year, it’s only worth up to $500, or one-third the old maximum, Luscombe said. The credit is good for only one year, Luscombe said, and if you have taken advantage of the credit in the past and received a tax break worth at least $500, you won’t be able to do so again.

Alternative tax The Alternative Minimum Tax was created in the 1960s after a small number of rich people exploited deductions and avoided paying taxes. Nowadays, even middleincome taxpayers end up owing the tax because the AMT was never adjusted for inflation. Congress has applied short-term fixes to protect middle-income taxpayers. But the most recent patch expired last year. The new tax law raises the amount of income exempted from the AMT this year and next. The result: About 21 million households are spared from the AMT, according to CCH, the tax information provider.

IRS changes may delay refunds for early filers to handle the income-tax deductions extended by WASHINGTON — The the last-minute legislation tax law passed in Decem- — a process the agency ber by the lame-duck Con- said could take until late gress has already had one February. That means at least 9 result that is, well, lame. million early-bird filers Millions of taxpayers nationwide who typically who usually file their itemize the deductions on returns quickly to get an their income-tax returns early refund will have to will have to wait until the wait instead. Because the law passed system is ready before less than a month ago, the they can claim their Internal Revenue Service refunds, according to IRS estimates. is still scrambling to reprogram its computers “We are hoping for a Peninsula Daily News news services

mid-February fix,” IRS spokesman Dan Boone said, “but we want to allow plenty of time to make sure it is done correctly.” The tax agency is recalibrating its computers to handle a series of tax breaks that were scheduled to expire but were extended by the new law.

Sales tax deduction Among them are the deductions for state and local general sales taxes, which Washington state

taxpayers have to list as itemized deductions on Schedule A of their return. The delay will also affect those claiming the deduction of as much as $4,000 for college-education tuition and fees, or the educator-expense deduction of as much as $250 for out-of-pocket costs incurred by kindergarten-through-grade-12 teachers. More than two-thirds of the nearly 140 million Americans who file fed-

eral returns each year will not be affected by the delay, either because they take the standard IRS deduction or file later in the tax season anyway, Boone said. However, some people count on getting their annual tax refund early in the year, so any delay in the process can hurt, especially if the person is unemployed, behind on a mortgage or otherwise strapped for cash. The IRS said taxpayers

can minimize any confusion over the tax-law changes or extensions by filing electronically using commercial tax-preparation software or the e-file system available through the agency’s website, www.irs.gov. Tax-software vendors routinely provide customers with updates that reflect changes in the law. It is expected the software will be ready long before the IRS is ready to process returns.

Some health care provisions now on books Peninsula Daily News news services

WASHINGTON — The new year brought important changes to U.S. health insurance rules, as some provisions related to the new health care law take effect. The new rules are designed to help those caught in Medicare’s prescription-drug “doughnut hole,” offer seniors more preventive care and limit how much of customers’ money health insurance companies can keep for overhead and profit. They all went into effect Saturday. These provisions were not affected by a Dec. 13 federal court ruling in Virginia that declared another

piece of the new health care law — the requirement that all Americans buy health insurance — unconstitutional. The judge allowed implementation of the law to continue until a higher court rules on the issue.

New provisions What’s new includes: ■  A provision that limits what health insurers can do with the money their customers send in as premiums. The rule requires that insurers spend at least 80 percent of this money on the customers. The companies must either spend this money to pay insurance claims or use it for activities that improve

customers’ health. For policies that are sold to large groups instead of small companies and individuals, the number is even higher — 85 percent. The remaining 15 percent or 20 percent of the money can be used for company salaries, marketing and overhead, or kept as profit. Previously, there was no federal restriction on insurance companies’ spending. The federal government said some insurers kept 30 percent or 50 percent. Insurance companies said this could cause them to pare the services they offer or pull out of states where administrative costs are higher. State officials also worry

that the companies might cut the fees they pay to insurance brokers. That, they fear, would eliminate key middlemen who help individuals navigate a complicated insurance system. ■  A provision that provides prescription-drug discounts for seniors who find themselves in Medicare’s “doughnut hole.” The doughnut hole is a gap in the Medicare prescription-drug benefit passed in 2006. In 2010, for instance, Medicare paid for part of the cost of drugs, until the total cost of the drugs hit $2,830. After that, seniors were responsible for 100 percent of the cost of their drugs,

until they had spent $3,610 of their own money. That was the other side of the doughnut hole, and federal insurance kicked in again. This provision will give Medicare recipients stuck in the doughnut hole a 50 percent discount on the price of brand-name prescription drugs. Health care activists are worried that drugmakers will jack up their prices. In that case, customers would receive 50 percent off that higher number, which might not be much less than what they were paying before. ■  A provision giving seniors free screenings for cancer and other diseases. Nearly all Medicare ben-

eficiaries will be able to receive for free all “preventive services” screenings given an A or B rating by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. That could include mammograms, colorectal cancer screening, bone-mass measurement and nutritional counseling. Medicare will also provide one free “wellness visit” a year for patients who want a checkup. ■  Creation of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation. This new agency is aimed at slowing the rapid rise of health care costs. It is supposed to foster innovation in caring for patients and processing their payments and claims.

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Continued from A1 must change lanes if it’s safe to do so or slow down if A state fire safety com- they are unable to change mittee approved those alter- lanes or move over. natives in November 2008, triggering the ban Satur- ‘Emergency zone’ day. Now, that area is desigAnother law that took nated as an “emergency effect Saturday stiffens zone” under the new law fines for those who don’t give enough room to police, now in effect. The new law doubles the emergency workers and tow trucks that are pulled over fine for drivers who don’t on the side of the road with move over or slow down. The ticket increases from emergency lights activated. a base of $124 to $248, with additional speeding Builds on 2007 law charges. Drivers can also be The new law builds on a 2007 law that created a charged with endangering 200-foot buffer around an emergency worker and emergency vehicles that are could face possible jail time and a suspended license. stopped with lights on. Under that law, drivers Dan Coon, a Washington

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State Patrol spokesman, said there has been a significant increase in the number of collisions since the 2007 law took effect. He said the number of collisions where troopers were struck increased from 18 in 2007 to 30 in 2008, and there have been more than 20 accidents a year since then with troopers alone, not counting other emergency or tow vehicles. In September, a tow truck driver working on a disabled vehicle on the side of Interstate 5 was killed when an SUV crashed into him.

Drunken driving, bail Other laws that took effect Saturday: ■  A new law expands the category of drivers arrested for drunken driving who can apply for a special license to drive with an ignition-interlock device. The device tests for alcohol in their breath before the car will start. Under a 2008 law, only drivers arrested for drunken driving could apply for the device. Now, those who have been convicted of vehicular

homicide or vehicular assault due to DUI can also apply. Under the underlying law, a person with an interlock license would have the device on their car for either one, five or 10 years, depending on their record. The new law also requires that a driver with a device have no failed blows on starting their car for four consecutive months before the device can be removed. ■  A measure that requires a judge to personally set bail for people arrested on felony charges. It was one of several bills sparked by the fatal shootings of four Lakewood police officers in November 2009. Currently, several counties have a system, called “booking bail,” where a formula is used to set bail amounts if arrests are made on the weekends or a holiday. However, the law expires Aug. 1, and a bail practices workgroup that was created by the Legislature has recommended in a report to the Legislature that the law be allowed to lapse.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

(J) — Sunday, January 2, 2011

A7

Dalzell: Party

surprises her

Continued from A1 the job when he left it in 1998. The way she tells it, she The early-morning ceremony is always a party for hasn’t looked back since. “I love being a prosecudrug court grads with family, friends, former grads tor,” she said, “putting bad and counselors and sup- guys in jail. “It’s a good feeling knowporters from Safe Harbor ing you’re providing safety Recovery Center. This time, officials and for your community.” The job hasn’t been withstaffers from throughout the courthouse also gath- out its low points. Dalzell said she had “one ered to mark the occasion, bringing flowers, gifts, hugs argument” with former Sheriff Mike Brasfield that and praise. The fuss came as a sur- was unresolvable, and he prise for Dalzell, who’d ended up endorsing her asked her staff to do noth- opponent in the last election. She won anyway. ing special. Dalzell declined to run Off-the-cuff, she cracked, “I think being a prosecutor for a fourth term in Novemis as much fun as you can ber and endorsed Scott have with your clothes on” Rosekrans, who was a depand brought the house uty prosecutor in her office. Rosekrans won. down. Dalzell said her worst Dalzell, 63, hadn’t intended to run for office mistake as prosecutor when she graduated from resulted in an accused crimlaw school. Disillusioned by inal going free. “I was in the middle of a an internship with a big firm, she hadn’t even rape trial, and I asked one question too many, and it intended to practice law. “I hated it,” she recalled. ended in a mistrial,” she “It wasn’t about the truth. I said. The victim did not want didn’t know anything about criminal law. It wasn’t my to go through a second round of testimony, and life.” Dalzell found herself Dalzell had to drop the hunting desperately for case. Dalzell said she doesn’t work in Port Townsend regret her decision to charge after a divorce in 1988. For a while, she worked Rex E. Whipple, who was three jobs, including court then Chimacum High clerk, where “the salary was School’s principal, with possession of pornography miserable.” Then, she became a rather than with voyeursocial worker for Child Pro- ism, even though his 2006 tective Services and got conviction was reversed by some intense exposure to the state Court of Appeals child abuse and molestation in May 2008. Whipple was alleged to cases. “That’s when I decided I have taken photos and vidshould put my law degree to eos of a 15-year-old minor from outside her bedroom use,” she said. By 1994, she had become window at his former Port a deputy prosecutor in pros- Ludlow home. The Tacoma-based Diviecutor Mark Huth’s office and decided to take a run at sion II Court of Appeals

Julie McCormick/for Peninsula Daily News

Juelie Dalzell, newly retired from the Jefferson County prosecuting attorney position, takes Bob the pony out for a little exercise Saturday. Dalzell, an avid horsewoman, plans to increase her riding days from twice a month to three times a week to prepare for a cross-state trip in the spring. ruled in a 2-1 decision that the evidence against Whipple was insufficient to support the conviction on nine counts of possessing pornography, saying that to support such convictions, the law requires that a minor must be involved in a sex act intended to stimulate the viewer. In August 2008, Jefferson County Superior Court Judge Craddock Verser ruled that Whipple’s name should be removed from the county’s list of sexual offenders, his DNA samples should be removed from the state database, and his court fees should be refunded. Whipple already had served sentences of six months in jail and a year’s probation. Dalzell said that since then, the state Legislature has changed the law. The point upon which

the reversal hinged — whether or not the girl was aware of the photography when it was taking place — was modified to say that the victim doesn’t have to be aware of the photography, she said. “They call it the Whipple fix,” she said.

Dalzell, laughing. Dalzell said her plans for retirement include spending more time with her new husband, Jeff Chapman, her next-door neighbor for 27 years. Their friendship extends well back into the time when both were still married to other people, she Broke glass ceiling said, but blossomed into romance after Chapman, Dalzell said her proudest too, found himself single a accomplishment is the fact few years ago. that she, a woman, was elected prosecuting attor- After retirement ney. The two share a mutual “I love that I broke the glass ceiling,” she said, then interest in horses and horsethought it over and decided manship, and Dalzell also that honor should go to col- plans to beat the drum for league Barb Carr, the first an upcoming cross-state woman to become a proba- horseback event to raise tion officer in Jefferson funds for a pet cause. She’s on the board of the County. Carr, though, declined Clemente Program of Bard College, a tuition-free opporthe honor. “I cracked it; you tunity for local adults to broke it,” she said to earn six college credits in

philosophy, literature and history, and she’s enthusiastic. It was her first philosophy course that ignited her own interest in learning, Dalzell said. “I didn’t have any goals and took a philosophy course, and I was on fire,” she said. “It was liberating to know that you can be creative and have opinions.” Dalzell also plans to spend more time with her three grandsons by her daughter, Mimi Evans. “It’s the best,” she grinned. “It’s so much better than being a parent.”

________ Julie McCormick is a freelance writer and photographer living in Port Townsend. Phone her at 360-3854645 or e-mail juliemccormick10@ gmail.com.

Rules: Supporters want biomass to be exempt Continued from A1 Nippon plans a new boiler, while the Port Townsend mill intends to install a new steam generator. The new Environmental Protection Agency regulations, known as the “tailoring rule,” are intended to improve fuel efficiency among large emitters of Earth-warming gases. The rule targets facilities that emit more than 100,000 tons of greenhouse gases per year.

Carbon-neutral?

Not worried The environmental manager for Nippon Paper Industries USA in Port Angeles said he’s not worried about the new regulations. Paul Perlwitz said the mill on Marine Drive will fall under the new regulations but he expects that the plant’s plans for a new biomass boiler will easily meet EPA’s new requirements. “We don’t have any concerns,” Perlwitz said, adding that the new boiler will be far more efficient. “We think we already meet the requirements under the tailoring rule.” Nippon’s new boiler would produce steam to make telephone book paper and newsprint, and generate up to 20 megawatts of electrical power. The company then could sell credits for the electrical power. The state Department of Ecology granted the Port Townsend mill on Oct. 25 a “notice of construction” permit for its $55 million project, which would generate up to 24 megawatts of electrical power. A call for a request for comment from the Port Townsend mill was not returned. The company has a policy of not speaking

with the media. While the tailoring rule goes into effect today, the new regulations are being phased in by EPA. For Nippon, the regulations could go into effect in July if it has yet to receive an air emissions permit for its $71 million biomass energy project or at the end of 2011 when it renews its five-year general operating permit with the Olympic Region Clean Air Agency — or ORCAA, Perlwitz said.

Largest emitters The Port Angeles and Port Townsend mills are the largest emitters of greenhouse gases on the Peninsula and the only facilities in Clallam and Jefferson counties that exceed the 100,000-ton threshold, according to ORCAA and Ecology. Nippon in 2009 emitted 137,143 tons of carbon dioxide, according to ORCAA. The Port Townsend pulp mill emitted 151,661 tons of greenhouse gases in 2007, according to Ecology. Nippon will emit about 225,000 tons of carbon dioxide, a major source of green-

house gas, per year once its new biomass energy project goes online in 2012, Perlwitz said. It’s unknown how much emissions of greenhouse gases will change at the Port Townsend mill under its biomass energy project because Ecology did not require that to be reported in the project’s permit application.

Hinder industry? Tenny said the new regulations will hinder the growth of the biomass industry. His organization in December released a study that says the new regulations put biomass projects at risk of delays or being scratched completely through additional permit fees and having to comply with higher emission-control standards. “There’s only so much they can take,” Tenny said. As many as 134 projects will fall under the tailoring rule, Tenny said. He said he didn’t know how many may actually be delayed. Longview Fibre Paper and Packaging officials told

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It is also one of seven groups that were defeated last month in an appeal of a permit Nippon received for its new boiler from the city of Port Angeles, and which say they plan to appeal the Nippon project to the state pollution control board in the spring. The seven groups are Port Townsend AirWatchers, Olympic Forest Coalition, Olympic Environmental Council, No Biomass Burn of Seattle, the Center for Environmental Law and Policy of Spokane, the World Temperate Rainforest Network and the Cascade Chapter of the Sierra Club. The Center for Environmental Law and Policy of Spokane and the Cascade Chapter of the Sierra Club did not join the appeal of the Port Townsend mill’s facility.

But despite Tenny’s concerns, biomass projects may not have it so bad under the new regulations. EPA said in a Dec. 13 report on the new rules that permitting authorities can take the burning of biomass into account when determining whether a facility is in compliance. Also, EPA plans by May to decide whether separate ________ guidelines should apply to Reporter Tom Callis can be biomass projects. at 360-417-3532 or at Port Townsend Air reached tom.callis@peninsuladailynews. Watchers is one of five envi- com. ronmental groups appealing the permit for Port Townsend paper’s biomass energy project to the state Pollution Control Hearings Board.

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The Daily News in Longview last month that its biomass project may be delayed in order to ensure compliance with the new regulations. Tenny said the EPA should take note of the effects of the regulations on the biomass industry because delays with planned projects could make it harder for utilities to meet renewable-energy mandates.

07700688

Biomass facilities are affected by the new rules, although proponents among the forest industries say they should be excluded because they consider them to be “carbon-neutral.” David Tenny, National Alliance of Forest Owners president, said biomass burning, unlike the burning of fossil fuels, helps keep greenhouse gas emissions in check since it emits carbon that had been absorbed by trees. The burning of fossil fuels on the other hand, he said, resurrects greenhouse gas that would otherwise be kept underground. “If you consider just the nature of the carbon cycle . . . carbon that we’re using for energy was recently removed from the atmosphere,” Tenny said. Peninsula residents opposed to burning wood waste to produce energy say the EPA was right to place biomass facilities under the new regulations. Port Angeles resident Diana Somerville, a spokeswoman for environmental groups opposed to biomass projects on the Peninsula, and Gretchen Brewer of Port Townsend Air Watchers said burning of wood puts the carbon back into the atmosphere much faster than if it had been left to rot. “Basically, the carbon that’s emitted will be emitted over a short range of time into a localized place,” Brewer said. Slash from logging sites, a fuel source for biomass boilers, is sometimes disposed of by being burned on site in large piles. Biomass proponents say its better to burn it in a boiler than in the woods.

Brewer said she doesn’t think that slash burning happens often enough to make a difference, and added it would be better to chip all slash and spread it over a logging site to return nutrients to the soil. Tenny said it needs to be kept in mind that trees are not being cut down simply to burn. “Most of the time they are using materials that are byproducts anyway and you’re using them in a way that offsets the use of fossil fuels,” he said.


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, January 2, 2011

Commentary

Page

A8

Mr. WikiLeaks, let’s get real AS A NATION, we’re divided in almost every respect. Our citizens never hesitate Jen to take sides against one Lancaster another, whether it’s Democrats versus Republicans, Coke drinkers opposed to Pepsi enthusiasts or Yankee loyalists against Red Sox aficionados. We all know exactly what we love, and woe is you if you’re on the other side. Seriously, how many holiday meals this year were ruined when a guest professed passion for Palin in a Pelosi household? Or vice versa? And that’s not to mention the carnage stemming from post-dinner remote-control wars waged between families consisting of both Bears and Packers fans. When it comes to matters of pro sports, politics or palate, disparate sides claim their party, team and cola to be superior. There’s no middle ground or compromise . . . unless maybe you’re all willing to settle for an iced tea. (And even that can spark an

ugly North/South debate.) However, I’ll bet we as a country can all agree on one thing: that Julian Assange should please stick a cork in his WikiLeaks already. I mean, there’s a reason our leaders have national security-type discussions over diplomatic cable and not via a public Facebook page, so knock it off already, pal. No one wants to friend or follow covert info about Pakistan’s nuclear policy. I imagine this Assange guy fancies himself a modern-day Robin Hood or Bond villain, but he’s coming off more like Dr. Evil. Instead of wreaking havoc on this nation’s leadership with bombs or lasers (or sharks with fricking lasers), he’s going to stop them in their tracks with words. (Side note? Assange just signed a book deal for one miiiiiiiillion dollars. Coincidence? One wonders.) I guess I don’t understand his end game because in every article, Mr. WikiLeaks claims that having access to secret documents will ultimately help the American people. Really? If you’re so fired up to help us, dude, why not tell us what we really want to know? Julian — we hear you’ve got your sights on the banking industry, and believe me, no one’s

Speaking Out

sorry to see them skewered. Rampant greed and corruption at the executive level make an interesting bedtime read or action film starring Shia LaBeouf, but what we’re dying to find out is why it takes eight damn business days to clear an in-state check. When you get the answer, please tell the bank customer service reps so they’ll finally know, too. Seriously, sir, if you want to win us over, use your massive data-gathering skills to our benefit. Maybe you could crunch all the numbers and figure out an algorithm that reveals when lines are going to be quickest at the Department of Motor Vehicles. We’d love you for that! I mean, if you can access every snarky comment the Russians made about Hillary Clinton growing out her bangs, surely you could help shorten our wait times. As long as you’re spilling secrets, do us a favor and confirm what we’ve always suspected, like how the producers of “Lost” never actually planned for the show to run more than two seasons. Fill us in on which stars lied about having plastic surgery so we can stop speculating that maybe there’s just less gravita-

The Associated Press

Julian Assange greets the media outside the High Court in London on Dec. 16, after he was released on bail. tional pull in the 90210 ZIP code. Tell us exactly which 11 herbs and spices the Colonel uses, and in what amount. Instead of cursing your name at the dinner table, we’d raise our perfectly seasoned drumsticks in salute. And for the love of all that’s good and holy, can you please, please discover why the Kardashians are famous? If we knew, then maybe as a nation, we’d finally be able to stop them.

And that, Mr. Assange, is how you unite a country. Jen Lancaster is a humorist and the author of three books — Such a Pretty Fat, Pretty in Plaid and Bitter is the New Black. She is one of four columnists who appear here every Sunday. She can be reached at www. jennsylvania.com or at Tribune Media Services, Attn: Jen Lancaster, 435 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 1500, Chicago, IL 60611.

How much better or worse do you think the economy will get in 2011?

Doug Kozminski

Adrienne Duval

Bob Maland

Judy O’Rourke

Steve Forsell

Jordan Fickas

Mike Burnham

Robbin Wood

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“I think and I hope it will improve. But it’s not going to make any great leaps. We need to see gains in employment, as that is critical for 2011.”

“I like to look on the bright side. The huge increase in holiday spending leads me to believe the economy will get much better than a year ago.”

“It is going to get much worse because of the increased separation between the income classes. You can’t cure the economic ills without creating jobs.”

“It’ll probably get a little worse before it gets any better. It will eventually turn for the better when we change some of our spending habits.”

Retired PDN production worker Port Angeles

“I can’t wait to find out. I believe in Obama and that he has had a lot to clean up, and he’s got a lot of work ahead of him yet. I try to stay positive.”

“A lot worse. The job market just hasn’t gotten any better. Health care is going to drive small businesses out of business. I feel it’s going to be much worse.”

“I don’t think it’s going to get much better than it is. It’s going to get worse if gas prices keep going up. Higher prices affect us all. But I have hope and try to stay optimistic.”

“I have a feeling it’s going to get better. It’s going to take awhile, though. We need to do smarter budgeting with medical and Social Security to make it work.”

Interviews

Peninsula Voices ‘Amazing’ place Each year, my twins and I look forward to Operation Candy Cane. As usual, we stick the city’s [Port Angeles] insert on the refrigerator as a reminder to get our donations ready for the fire truck. This year, the night was darker than usual, and the rain was coming down. We could hear the truck sirens in the distance, and the excitement level inside the house rose as the sirens got ever closer. Even at the ripe old age of almost 11, my twins couldn’t contain their enthusiasm. Finally, we decided that it was time to go outside to the front walk and ready ourselves. As we stood there under the glow of the street lamp, we could see our neighbors exiting their homes as well.

One by one, each door opened, and out came our neighbors: tiny ones, teenage ones, moms, dads and seniors. For three city blocks, I could see them all converging on the sidewalk. The rain persisted, increasing its assault on our clothing. Strangely, this rain felt warm. As the truck rounded the corner, there were shrieks from the littlest ones and a “hooray” from the older kids. The lights on the truck were twice as bright as the year before, and the smiles were just as big from the volunteers. I looked around my amazing neighborhood and felt my chest swell with affection. There were so many people. I made a mental note to myself:

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This is why I am raising my children in Port Angeles — small-town values and big-hearted neighbors. Thank you, Port Angeles. Tricia Barrett, Port Angeles

such taxes. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled (Carcieri v. Salazar, 2009) that tribes recognized after 1934 are not able to have lands placed into trust. The Jamestown tribe was not officially recognized until 1981. Critical of tribe The casino is already The Jamestown under trust. S’Klallam tribe has Of questionable status announced plans for expanare other properties: the sion of their Blyn casino, Family Health Clinic in and they are to be commended for their successful Sequim, the Dungeness Golf Course and the Blyn enterprises. Longhouse, service station Included in the Dec. 15 Peninsula Daily News arti- and others. Note that the tribe cle [“$7.5 Million Addition admits to “trying to buy to 7 Cedars Casino. Blyn” [according to tribal 5,000-Square-Foot ExpanChairman Ron Allen]. sion Slated for Summer The issue here is that Finish”] is a summary of other tribal lands and busi- lands removed from the tax base can only increase nesses, which raises some the tax load on others, questions on state and while at the same time local taxation. Tribal lands held in U.S. increasing the need for infrastructure to support trust are not liable for

News Department Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ Leah Leach, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 ■ Roy Tanaka, news editor, 360-417-3539 ■ Brad LaBrie, sports editor; 360-417-3525 ■ Diane Urbani de la Paz, features editor; 360-417-3550 ■ General information: 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, Ext. 527 News fax: 360-417-3521 E-mail: news@peninsuladailynews.com Sequim office: 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2 (98382) ■ Jeff Chew, Sequim/Dungeness Valley editor, 360-681-2391; jeff.chew@peninsuladailynews.com Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way (98368) ■ Charlie Bermant, Jefferson County reporter, 360-385-2335; charlie.bermant@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Julie C. McCormick, contributing freelance reporter, 360-382-4645; juliemccormick10@gmail.com

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of 1934 that authorizes the Secretary of Interior to take land into trust for tribes. That word “now” is interpreted by the court to mean the secretary only has authority to take land into trust for tribes recognized in 1934. Fortunately for the Jamestown tribe, we were recognized by the federal government in numerous legal documents including the [1855] Point-No-Point Treaty. The writer raises questions about trust lands taking land off the state and We asked Ron Allen for local governments’ land tax a response. base. Here it is: We are governments In response to the issues recognized in the U.S. Conraised by the writer, the stitution and have the Supreme Court Carcieri same legal status as any decision is very disturbing for the tribes across Indian other governments, meaning that governments don’t Country. tax properties of other govIn our opinion, it misinernments. terpreted “one word” in the Turn to Voices/A9 Indian Reorganization Act the tribal businesses. Also, those properties not subject to taxes can offer unfair competition to similar local businesses. The recent election results clearly showed that taxes are already too high, so why should we be willing to allow any increase? If you agree, you should urge your local and state officials to oppose the placement of any Jamestown tribal land into trust. Joe Blanchard, Sequim

Have Your Say ■ Paul Gottlieb, weekend commentary editor, 360-417-3536 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. E-mail to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. RANTS & RAVES for the Sunday editions can be recorded on the Rants & Raves hot line at 360-417-3506 or sent to the above addresses and fax number.


Peninsula Daily News

CommentaryViewpoints

Peninsula Voices Continued from A8 plug-in. But do you think that’s We would note that our going to happen? tribe and businesses have a I think I’ll wait before I payroll of more than consider buying an all-elec$25 million that contribtric car to see what haputes significantly to the pens in this area. local economy and the local Al Dawson, governmental tax base. Sequim It more than offsets the perception of lost property Quiet vehicles taxes. Because I don’t live with We spend more than $25 million a year on local deafness or a hearing vendors, and we contribute impairment, I can’t fully annually to the local public appreciate the concern that hybrid and electric cars safety services including Clallam County sheriff and create with these same citizens (“Hybrid Cars Should fire districts. be Heard, Congress Says,” We built a $1.2 million facility for the Blyn station, Dec. 26 PDN.) But it seems to me that that would never have hapmaking cars louder, pened without our help. Other examples include thereby increasing the overall background noise the $10 million health levels in all our lives, is clinic that serves new putting a Band-Aid on Medicare and Medicaid patients that is a meaning- instead of really addressing the problem — that of how ful benefit to our commuour cities have been nity. designed with the car as priority and not people. Electric car How much safer, quieter Well, here we go again. and more pedestrianOn page A4 of the Dec. friendly would our cities be 30 PDN is the article if, a hundred years ago, city “Wilder Auto Center and transportation planInstalls Electric Charging ners had agreed to make Stations.” people the priority instead The article states: of cars? “These [charging staRichard Dandridge, tions] are designed specifiPort Townsend cally for the Leaf.” So, that must mean that Buying fluoride each electric car manufacThank you for the Dec. 30 turer will be coming out with PDN article regarding flutheir own charging station. oride foes possibly suing I can see it now — sevPort Angeles [“Fluoride eral charging stations set up in a row, each requiring Foes Mull Suing PA. Supreme Court Spurns a different electrical plugRethinking Of Earlier in depending on the car. Ruling”]. Now would be a good I recently asked a phartime for all the electric car macist if I could purchase a manufactures to come up with a universal electric bottle of fluoride.

Our readers’ letters, faxes

Townsend to which everyone on the North Olympic Peninsula who has read the book is invited. Rennebohm will be in Port Townsend at QUUF (2333 San Juan Ave.) at 2 p.m. Jan. 30. The event will include an “Author Reception and Remarks” to which those who have read his book and especially those who Winter Shelter have not read the book are Great article in the invited. Rennebohm will be Dec. 30 PDN about the sharing his evocative stogenerosity of all who make ries of those who desperthe Jefferson County Winately need psychiatric, psyter Shelter possible [“A chological and spiritual Team Of More Than 450. support. Volunteers Step Up to Help He will also share some Out at PT Winter Shelter”]. of his hard-won insights In this world, it is heartthat have helped move ening to know that behind folks into journeys of healthe worrying headlines, ing, care and recovery. people step up, goodness Judy Tough, exists — and help is offered Port Townsend to those who need the basics of life. In addition to the provi- ‘What gets me’ sions of shelter, warmth This is about a local, and food, the church volun- commonly used phrase that teers at the Winter Shelter irritates me every time I have gone one step further hear it. and participated in an Admittedly, where I interfaith “All Congregagrew up in the Midwest, tion Read,” learning about we had our own peculiar a specific population of peo- colloquialisms, such as ple who sometimes find “let’s go down by the river themselves homeless, those to fish,” or “let’s go down by who live with mental illthe park.” ness. A water fountain was a The book Souls in the “bubbler,” and a dog house Hands of a Tender God: was a “dog coop.” Stories of the Search for What gets me around Home and Healing on the here is, for example, when Streets by the Rev. Craig looking at a selection of Rennebohm is about his items in a store, the clerk experiences as he has will say, “These ones are reached out to Seattle’s nice,” or when referring to street people. something else will say Four book discussion “those ones.” groups at the end of Janu“These” and “those” are ary are offered at Quimper perfectly able to convey the Unitarian Universalist Fel- intended meaning of “these lowship (QUUF) in Port ones” and “those ones,”

The answer: “Yes, but you have to have a prescription from your doctor.” My question: How can it be illegal for me to purchase fluoride but legal for the City Council to provide it to me without a prescription? Thomas Utley, Port Angeles

Sunday, January 2, 2011

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and e-mail

which are redundancies. It is not just the young innocents who say this but bank tellers, business owners and others who have fallen into the habit but know better. This letter won’t change anybody’s speech; I’ll just have to go bonkers. Joe Raab, Sequim

professional expertise to understand. First, the WTC was, putting it mildly, a major crime scene. It was not secured and exhaustively processed for evidence. That would have included physical and chemical analysis of the support beams and debris, with a good photo record of each step. Instead, evidence was quickly removed and Walmart bus stop destroyed as “scrap.” I can’t believe that the Why? Who had what to [Clallam Transit] bus stop cover up? setup at the new Walmart Second, no steel-framed store in Port Angeles will buildings have ever colnot change. lapsed from fire before or What will it take for after 9/11 (http://tinyurl. them to change their posicom/2dscm2w). tion on this issue? Yet, WTC towers 1, 2 Will it take numerous and 7 fell into their own fatal pedestrian accidents footprints. at that intersection to force WTC 7 was not hit by a change in position on this an airplane and had only issue? scattered fires, yet it fell at I think not! nearly free-fall rates, as did Let’s lay off on the BS towers 1 and 2. and all the lame excuses If they fell from the fires and start focusing on a down, that would violate pedestrian-friendly soluphysical laws of motion tion to this issue. and could not happen from Elizabeth J. Burritt, the plane impacts or fires. Port Angeles Why, then, did they fall? Twenty nine structural/ Questions on 9/11 civil engineers cite eviOne-thousand-threedence for controlled demohundred-and-eighty-six tion of the WTC buildings verified architectural and (http://tinyurl.com engineering professionals /2fzywdu). have signed a petition Fire has never felled a demanding a truly indesteel-framed building. pendent investigation of Controlled demolition what actually happened on can, although it takes con9/11 at the World Trade siderable skill and time to Center (WTC) (www. do it “right.” ae911truth.org). Who had the skill, time Click on http://tinyurl. and opportunity to set it com/2dscm2w for why up? they so demand. Good question. Three of the many probLook for good answers. lems with the “official” 9/11 Peter Vanderhoof, story do not require Port Angeles

Peninsula Daily News Rants & Raves Compiled By Lee Zurcher Editor’s Note: Please submit your comments about public officials and comments about news stories as signed letters to the editor, not as anonymous rants and raves. Many thanks!

Rave of the Week THANK YOU TO the very kind man who came to my aid when, while biking, I was hit by a truck in Port Townsend at Route 20 and Joseph Miller Road. He not only helped me, but also took my bicycle to my home. I am very appreciative of his kindness.

. . . and other Raves THANKS TO ALL those who have put up Christmas decorations and lights. We enjoy seeing them all. Thanks for sharing, and Happy New Year. A HUGE RAVE to the Jamestown S’Klallam tribe for the awesome Christmas lights this year. They are spectacular! I HOPE EVERYONE got to see “Nutcracker” (Port Angeles) this year. Everyone deserves an Oscar for the music, the dancing and the sets. Thank you all so much. RAVES TO HARPIST Elizabeth Morgan Ellis and friends for a beautiful and

extremely enjoyable concert at Saint Andrew’s Episcopal Church (Port Angeles) on Dec. 26. Whether it’s free or by paid admission, please do it again. It was fantastic! HUGE RAVE TO the Jefferson County EMTs who took our mom to Virginia Mason Hospital. As her recent heart surgery was in Seattle, they made arrangements to take her there. They were here in a matter of minutes. She was so happy to be back where the doctors were familiar with her situation! Big rave and thanks!

Renee Bible-storyteller, Svetlio Hurd-cake walk, Santa, Soroptimist–Jet Set, staff, parents, 100 happy kids in new fleece vests. Food from Gordy’s, Domino’s, Drake’s, All About Pizza, Van Goes, Irwin Dental Center, Walmart, Port Angeles Food Bank, Toys for Tots, Clallam County Literacy Council. THANKS TO THE volunteer police for watching our home when we are away. You are appreciated and provide a terrific community service.

A HUGE RAVE for Kyle, who works for Murrey’s Olympic DisTO THE TWO young woman posal. in a van who on Dec. 22 very He comes down our road — I determinedly chased me down to don’t care if it’s rain, wind, sleet, let me know a package had fallen snow, whatever — and always out of my car on U.S. Highway has a smile on his face. 101 at Baker Street, Port AngeThank you, Kyle. I’ll always appreciate you. les. I live in Sequim, and I know I retrieved it, undamaged, it’s really hard. thanks to them. Happy holidays. And to the young man in the red car who stopped and asked I AM THANKFUL. Recently, me if I needed help. I had a trip by Olympic Ambulance to the emergency room. BIG RAVES TO my kind, A special thank-you and blessgenerous friends Vicki, Jay and ings to the caring nurses at Yvette for providing transportaSequim’s Olympic Blood Lab, the tion recently when my car had EMTs from Fire District No. 3 an unexpected flat. Also, much thanks to the folks and emergency room, Dr. Wallace, Rick and nurses for their excelat Les Schwab Tire Center in lent care. Port Angeles for quickly coming to my rescue and being amazIT WAS SO good and fun to ingly helpful, friendly and effilisten to KONP’s “An American cient in replacing the tire. Christmas.” You’ve won a loyal customer! We appreciated the good THANKS, VILLAGE! PORT programming. Angeles Boys & Girls Club A HAPPY BELLY rave to Christmas Party, Peninsula ColThe Salvation Army for the new lege men’s and women’s basketball teams, Charlie Ferris, cook, the new food and the new

atmosphere at its weekday lunches! Things are really looking up, and it’s a great place to go now! Thanks to all involved! God bless you!

smoke in there, either. They endanger the people who work there, and they endanger you. Please stop smoking in these places.

A HUGE RAVE and thankyou to Tyler & Guy Auto Body (Port Angeles) for their quick response and repair of my truck after it was spray-painted in the recent vandalism on the west side of town. You guys are great.

A RANT TO the local businesses in Port Angeles who put an ad in the paper to advertise their businesses and then never returned my calls. They lost my business.

Rant of the Week A BIG THANK-you to my neighbors for their Christmas gift: The sound of your woodchipper on Christmas Day in Port Angeles and again the following day on Sunday. Incredible!

. . . and other Rants TO OUR PRETENTIOUS local cafes, restaurants and sandwich shops that add such a heavy dose of gourmet seasonings and ingredients that the main flavor is lost. A salmon burger should taste like salmon. A turkey sandwich should be identifiable as turkey. Clam chowder should primarily taste of clams, not seasonings. YOU SHOULD NOT smoke. All of our other places in town do not smoke. But there are two places that let you smoke. And they should not be able to

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE lady driving a vehicle with a smashed-in right side and missing back window for driving from Port Angeles to Sequim without an accident. You were talking on the phone, applying makeup and fluffing your hair with both hands while driving at 60 mph. Well done. ________ (CLIP AND SAVE) To participate, call our Rants & Raves hotline at 360-417-3506 (works 24 hours a day), e-mail us at letters@peninsuladailynews.com or drop us a postcard, 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Keep comments brief — 50 words or less. And, please, no libel, no responses to letters to the editor or news stories; no personal attacks on individuals or on businesses identified by name; no thank you notes to your favorite restaurant, dry-cleaner, grandchild (we simply don’t have enough room for those); no inaccurate information or unverified rumors; no calls for boycotts; no political endorsements; no charity fund appeals; no commercial pitches. Also, only one rant or rave per writer. Don’t forget to tell us where things happen — Port Angeles, Chimacum, Sequim, etc.


A10

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, January 2, 2011 — (J)

Peninsula Daily News

Briefly . . . Museum, arts center to vote on board

free demonstration at the Wooden Boat Chandlery of the Northwest Maritime Center on Wednesday, Jan. 19. Bill Dengler, a Port Townsend expert in knot SEQUIM — Museum & tying will present “Knotting Arts Center in the SequimMatters — Decorative Knots Dungeness Valley members for Useful Gifts,” from noon will vote for four new board to 1:30 p.m. at the chandlery members and discuss setat 431 Water St. ting up public focus groups Knot-tying is an age-old at their annual meeting Sat- pastime for sailors spending urday, Jan. 15. months at sea. Decorative Those elected will be knotwork can be made into installed at the meeting that jewelry, coasters, place mats, begins at 1 p.m. at the Dun- glass holders and zipper langeness Schoolhouse, 2781 yards. Towne Road in Dungeness. Dengler will demonstrate The meeting is open to a variety of hitches and MAC members, as well as techniques, including the prospective members. popular Round Turks Head MAC members will have and Carrick Bend Mat. the opportunity to sign up to During the seminar, he participate in focus groups will teach participants the that will share comments on Flat Sennit knot so that the proposed MAC campus they can make a Zipper project. Lanyard to can take home Those focus groups will with them. be conducted at a later date. Dengler is a member of Additional topics to be the International Guild of addressed at the meeting Knot Tyers, based in Enginclude event announceland. ments, program updates and He has taught knot-tying committee and facility at Wooden Canoe Heritage reports. Association Northwest The schoolhouse is Chapter meetings, the Port wheelchair-accessible. Townsend Wooden Boat FesMembership forms will tival, Point Wilson Sail and be on hand at the meeting, Power Squadron classes, and are always available for and Boy Scout groups. download on the MAC webSeating is limited, so site, www.macsequim.org. advance registration is necessary through e-mailing Decorative knots chandlery@woodenboat.org or phoning 360-385-3628, PORT TOWNSEND — The art of typing decorative ext. 101. knots will be presented in a Peninsula Daily News

Jeff Chew/Peninsula Daily News

On

a clear day

...

Post-rain wind chill cleared the northern horizon off Three Crabs and the Strait of Juan de Fuca coastline Thursday morning, enough to get a spectacular view of Mount Baker, the shipping lanes and marine birds on the waterfront.

Plunge: About 70 people dip three times in PA Continued from A1 ary waters is akin to the high that runners experience “This event upstaged while pushing their bodies to everything in Seattle,” she the limit. Rose and his wife, Sue, said from the door of the have hosted the Polar Bear Nordland General Store. Somewhere across the Plunge from the dock across road, the irrepressible voice from their Nordland General of Miss Behaving proclaimed Store every year since 1994. He orders the keg every in characteristic falsetto, “It’s cold, it’s cold,” as she gave her year, provides the chili and pink-bewigged self a quick takes the plunge himself. “It’s hard to express the dry, her outrageous lips another coat of paint and a feeling,” he said, tilting his head and halting his stride passerby a big smooch. Asking who Miss Behav- across the floor of the boating is was as fruitless as ask- house on the shore side of the ing why people take the dock, 20 gallons of chili in a pot between his mitts. plunge. “Your endorphins are just Oh, everybody knows Kelly, they said. She’s Miss going crazy. You’re high afterwards.” Behaving. He smiled as the song on She answered to the name but refused to reveal her true the player near a low bar identity during her annual switched from “Come Go public appearance, when she With Me” to “Wild Thing.” He was surprised that so dresses in a pink tutu and favors those around her with few jumped in this year. “We had a lot more people big lipstick-smeared kisses. Finally, a voice of author- watching than jumping ity weighed in on the “why” today,” he said, adding that “cars were lined up as far as question. Tom Rose said it’s all you could see both ways. “It was a beautiful day. about endorphins, that the sudden plunge into the Janu“It probably was about

the easiest jump I’ve ever done.” In Port Angeles, about 70 people dipped three times into the harbor off Hollywood Beach. One of those, Mark Ostroot, was told he should wear a dry suit to stay warm, so he jumped in wearing a suit and tie. “It was the only ‘dry’ suit I had,” he said. Near Forks, 25 to 30 people dressed up in outrageous costumes and jumped into Lake Pleasant. Kevin Hinchen, who has participated in the Forksarea plunge since it began five years ago, wore a black nylon stocking over his face. “No one knew who I was, I think,” said the Forks City Council member. In Neah Bay, 16 people plunged into the Strait of Juan de Fuca, celebrating a decade of annual Polar Bear Dips founded by June Williams in the face of debilitating asthma. “I thought, ‘What do I have to lose?’” Williams said. “Ten years later, and I’m great.”

Commissioners to mull support of sales tax hike Peninsula Daily News

Eye on Jefferson PT City Council

Public utility district Jefferson County’s Public Utility District commissioners will review the 2011 budget and discuss a Northwest Open Access Network proposal when they meet Wednesday. Commissioners will meet at 5 p.m. at the PUD office at 230 Chimacum Road in Port Hadlock. The commissioners also will consider a manager and resource manager resolution.

Season's Greetings! Season's Greetings! Season's Greetings! & Best Wishes for & Best Wishes for & Best Wishes for 2011 a Prosperous a 2011 2011 aFromProsperous Prosperous the professionals at D.A. Davidson & Co.

From the professionals at D.A. Davidson & Co. Celebrating 50professionals years of collective service to Port Angeles From the at D.A. Davidson & Co. Celebrating 50 years of collective service to Port Angeles and the 2nd anniversary our new ce.Angeles Celebrating 50 years of collectiveofservice tooffi Port and the 2nd anniversary of our new office. and the 2nd anniversary of our new office.

115107889

The Port Townsend City Council will consider action on Community Block Grant projects when it meets Monday. The City Council will meet at 6:30 p.m. in chambers, 540 Water St. The council will hear public comment on projects for Habitat for Humanity infrastructure installation and Dove House before deliberating. The council also will hear reports from Tim Caldwell, chairman of the Jefferson County Residents for Transit, and from Port Townsend School District Superintendent Gene Laes. Both Transit and the public school district have tax measures on the Feb. 8 ballot. The school measure will ask voters to approve a fouryear replacement property tax levy that would produce $3.1 million the first year of collection in 2012 — or $1.23 for every $1,000 of assessed valuation, a total of $246 in taxes for a $200,000 home. Transit is requesting a 0.3 percent sales tax increase on the same ballot. City committee meetings at 250 Madison St. are: ■  Monday, 1 p.m. — Arts Commission, first-floor con-

ference room. ■  Wednesday, 4 p.m. — Parks, Recreation and Trees Advisory Board, secondfloor conference room. ■  Wednesday, 5 p.m. — Council Information & Technology Committee, first-floor conference room. ■  Thursday, 4:30 p.m. — Non-Motorized Transportation Advisory Board, firstfloor conference room.

115106990

The three Jefferson County commissioners will discuss a request to support a proposed sales tax hike for Jefferson Transit when they meet Monday. The discussion, and a possible hearing notice, is set for 10 a.m. in commissioners’ chambers at the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1825 Jefferson St., Port Townsend, after the meeting begins at 9 a.m. Tim Caldwell, chairman of the Jefferson County Residents for Transit, will address the commissioners. Jefferson Transit’s board, which is composed of the three commissioners and two Port Townsend City Council members, have placed a measure on the Feb. 8 special election ballot that asks voters to approve a 0.3 percent sales tax increase to sustain services. Commissioners also will issue a call for bids to supply liquid asphalt for 2011. The approximate contract amount, which is set aside in the county road budget, is $315,000. Bids will be accepted until 9:55 a.m. Monday, Jan. 24. During a 1:30 p.m. briefing with the county administrator, commissioners will discuss boards and committees, the state Department of Natural Resources Community Forest Trust and the agenda format and planning for 2011.

Julie McCormick/for Peninsula Daily News

Tom Rose delivers chili as promised to the plungers who took a dip off the dock across from the Nordland General Store on Marrowstone Island on Saturday.

Port Townsend schools The Port Townsend School Board and superintendent will conduct a retreat to discuss strategic planning Saturday. The meeting will be from 9 a.m. to noon in the Lincoln Building, 450 Fir St.

360-565-7500 or 877-779-4321 360-565-7500 or Angeles, 877-779-4321 917 East Front St., Port WA 98362 360-565-7500 or Angeles, 877-779-4321 917 East Front St., Port WA 98362 917 East Front St., Port Angeles, WA 98362

Let's Build a Brighter Future Let's Build a Brighter Let's Build a Brighter Future Future


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, January 2, 2011

Sports

S E CT I O N

B

SCOREBOARD Page B2

Rose Bowl

The Associated Press

TCU running back Ethan Grant (20) raises the Rose Bowl trophy after defeating Wisconsin on Saturday in Pasadena, Calif.

A win for the little guys By Greg Beacham

The Associated Press

PASADENA, Calif. — When Tank Carder leaped with perfect timing and swatted Wisconsin’s final pass to the turf, the TCU linebacker felt as if he got a boost from every player at every school that never even imagined playing in the Rose Bowl. Sure, these unbeaten Horned Frogs realized they couldn’t win the national title. They still celebrated their perfection on the hallowed Pasadena turf in the name of all the little guys outside the monolithic powers of major college football. Andy Dalton threw a touchdown pass and ran for a score, Carder batted down a 2-point conversion pass attempt with 2 minutes to play, and third-ranked TCU hung on to beat No. 4 Wisconsin 21-19 on Saturday. Bart Johnson caught an early TD pass and recovered a late onside kick for the Mountain West champion Horned Frogs (13-0), who followed up their second straight unbeaten regular season with their first BCS victory.

Right at home TCU is the first school from a non-automatic qualifying conference to play in the Rose Bowl since the advent of the BCS, and the Frogs were right at home. “All the critics don’t feel like the non-AQ teams should have a shot,” said Carder, the defensive MVP. “But I feel that TCU has proven that we can play with the best of them. Definitely taking this win back to Fort Worth. “I feel like we came in here and made a statement today.” Either Auburn or Oregon will win the national title after they meet in the BCS championship game in nine days. These ferocious Frogs proved they can play with anybody on college football’s biggest stages. “The way the system is, it didn’t give us the opportunity to play in the title game, but we did everything we were capable of doing,” said Dalton, who passed for 219 yards. “All we could do is control what we could control. I guess it’s just the way the system is, but in my time here at TCU, we never thought we would have a chance to play in the Rose Bowl, and we got that opportunity today, and got a big win.”

One loss in two years TCU lost last year’s Fiesta Bowl to Boise State by a touchdown, but that’s still the only loss of the past two seasons for the improbable power built deep in the heart of football-crazy Texas by coach Gary Patterson. The non-AQ schools improved to 5-2 in BCS bowls with the Frogs’ triumph — 4-1 vs. the leagues with automatic bids. Turn

to

Rose/B3

The Associated Press (2)

Tampa Bay linebacker Geno Hayes sacks Seattle’s Charlie Whitehurst last Sunday in Tampa, Fla. Whitehurst is the probable starter in tonight’s game, which is for the NFC West title.

Battle for the crown Seahawks can make playoffs with win today By Tim Booth

The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Congratulations, you are the best of the worst. Sounds like quite the prize, huh? That’ll be the honor bestowed upon either St. Louis or Seattle come tonight after the two meet to decide the NFC West division title, a primetime showcase of two teams fighting for one final playoff spot. It was the kind of finale the league hoped for when it introduced its flex scheduling program. Except this matchup has become the source of ridicule for critics, wrapping up a woeful season for the entire division that has renewed the debate over whether division champions should automatically receive playoff berths and home games. A win by the Rams (7-8) would send St. Louis to the postseason a year after winning just one game, and as the third 8-8 division champion in league history. A Seattle victory would bring about an even more dubious accomplishment: the first playoff team since the merger — sans the strike-shortened 1982 season — with a losing record, and the league’s first sub-.500 division champ. The Seahawks (6-9) may be playing for the title, and a footnote in NFL history, with backup quarterback Charlie Whitehurst

under center, t h o u g h there’s a chance veteran starter Matt Hassel- Next Game beck could return from Today a hip injury vs. Rams in time for at Qwest Field the game. Time: 5 p.m. E i t h e r On TV: Ch. 5 way the contest goes seems about right to settle this pillow fight of a division where the quartet of clubs has been outscored by a combined 322 points this season.

Better records NFC teams with better records like Tampa Bay, Green Bay and the New York Giants could find themselves done after Sunday as the Seahawks-Rams winner plays on. Add in the fact a potential 11or 12-win wild-card — most likely New Orleans — could be forced to play at St. Louis or Seattle in the first round of the playoffs and pundits have plenty of material to lob at the NFC Worst . . . er, West. It doesn’t matter, says Seattle safety Lawyer Milloy. The bottom line is “this is a playoff game right here.” In essence, that’s right. Just don’t expect them to send the game films to Canton. Turn

to

Hawks/B4

St. Louis quarterback Sam Bradford will try to lead the Rams over Seattle today to become the first No. 1 draft pick as a rookie to be the starting quarterback in the playoffs.

Ohio State tries to break SEC jinx Buckeyes take on Arkansas in Sugar Bowl The Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS — Even after Ohio State cornerback Chimdi Chekwa was told about the Buckeyes’ bowl futility against teams from the Southeastern Conference, he had a hard time believing it. “I think Ohio State has beaten the SEC in bowl games, if I’m not mistaken,” Chekwa said Friday, an incredulous look on his face. “It can’t be in all bowls. I’ll go on the computer and look that up, but there’s been a lot of bowl games and I feel like they won a couple of bowl games against SEC teams, or maybe they beat an SEC team in a regular game.” Well, the last part’s true. The Buckeyes have beaten

SEC teams during the regular season, most recently LSU in 1988. In bowl games, however, Ohio State is 0-9 against teams from the conference that has produced the past four national champions.

Title-game losses The streak includes losses to Florida and LSU in the BCS title games for the 2006 and 2007 seasons, and the longer it goes, the more the Buckeyes have to hear about it when they wind up meeting another SEC team in the postseason. This time it’s Arkansas in the Sugar Bowl on Tuesday night at 5:30 p.m. on ESPN. Ohio State will be trying to stop a trend of Big 10 teams losing bowl games as five of them went down Saturday. Northwestern lost 45-38 to Texas Tech in the TicketCity Bowl, Michigan State lost 49-7 to Alabama in the Capital One Bowl, Penn State lost 37-24 to

Florida in the Outback Bowl, Michigan lost 52-14 to Mississippi State in the Gator Bowl and Wisconsin lost 21-19 to TCU in the Rose Bowl. “I know personally I have lost three in a row against the SEC,” Ohio State coach Jim Tressel said. “I’m not tired of hearing about it. It’s a reminder to me of just how good the SEC is in football. We are playing another great one in Arkansas.” For their part, Arkansas players and coaches are trying not to make too much of the streak. None of them want to get caught talking about any kind of talent gap between the SEC and the Big Ten. That might be the motivation the Buckeyes need to avoid having to hear about being 0-10 the next time they meet an SEC team in a bowl game. “It’s nothing I take seriously because every team’s different every year,” Arkansas quarterback Ryan Mallett said.

“I don’t know what happened. I don’t know how to explain it.” Mallet only knows he doesn’t want this Arkansas team, the first from the school to go to a BCS bowl, to also be the first from the conference to lose to Ohio State in the postseason. “Definitely — I don’t want to help them end that streak,” said Mallett, a Michigan transfer who also acknowledged a bit of residual animosity toward the Wolverines’ archrivals. The first time Ohio State met an SEC team in the postseason was when Woody Hayes’ Buckeyes met Paul “Bear” Bryant’s Alabama Crimson Tide in the 1977 Sugar Bowl. Bama bashed the Buckeyes 35-6. Next in the streak came losses to Auburn in the 1989 Hall of Fame Bowl, and three Florida Citrus Bowl losses to Georgia in 1992, Alabama in 1994, and Tennessee in 1995. Turn

to

Sugar/B3


B2

SportsRecreation

Sunday, January 2, 2011

Today’s

Peninsula Daily News

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Area Sports

Today

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS SHOT

Bowling LAUREL LANES Mix-N-Match Men’s high game: Bob Gunn, 248; men’s high series: George Peabody Sr., 672. Women’s high game: Rita Berson, 204; women’s high series: Rita Berson, 670. Leading team: Cedars At Dungeness.

Basketball NBA Glance All Times PST WESTERN CONFERENCE Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Lakers 23 10 .697 — Phoenix 14 17 .452 8 Golden State 13 20 .394 10 L.A. Clippers 10 23 .303 13 Sacramento 6 23 .207 15 Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 29 4 .879 — Dallas 24 7 .774 4 New Orleans 20 14 .588 91⁄2 Houston 16 16 .500 121⁄2 Memphis 14 18 .438 141⁄2 Northwest Division W L Pct GB Utah 22 11 .667 — Oklahoma City 23 12 .657 — Denver 18 13 .581 3 Portland 17 16 .515 5 Minnesota 9 25 .265 131⁄2 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Boston 24 7 .774 — New York 18 14 .563 61⁄2 Philadelphia 13 20 .394 12 Toronto 11 21 .344 131⁄2 New Jersey 9 25 .265 161⁄2 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 26 9 .743 — Orlando 21 12 .636 4 Atlanta 21 14 .600 5 Charlotte 11 20 .355 13 1 Washington 8 24 .250 16 ⁄2 Central Division W L Pct GB Chicago 22 10 .688 — Indiana 14 17 .452 71⁄2 Milwaukee 12 18 .400 9 Detroit 11 22 .333 111⁄2 1 Cleveland 8 25 .242 14 ⁄2 Friday’s Games Chicago 90, New Jersey 81 New Orleans 83, Boston 81 Golden State 96, Charlotte 95 Indiana 95, Washington 86 Houston 114, Toronto 105 Oklahoma City 103, Atlanta 94 Phoenix 92, Detroit 75 L.A. Lakers 102, Philadelphia 98 Saturday’s Games Chicago 100, Cleveland 91 New Orleans 92, Washington 81 Miami 114, Golden State 107 Minnesota 103, New Jersey 88 San Antonio 101, Oklahoma City 74 Sacramento at Denver, late Memphis at Utah, late Dallas at Milwaukee, late Today’s Games Indiana at New York, 10 a.m. Atlanta at L.A. Clippers, 12:30 p.m. Boston at Toronto, 3 p.m. Dallas at Cleveland, 4 p.m. Houston at Portland, 6 p.m. Phoenix at Sacramento, 6 p.m. Memphis at L.A. Lakers, 6:30 p.m. Monday’s Games Miami at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Golden State at Orlando, 4 p.m. Minnesota at Boston, 4:30 p.m. Philadelphia at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Houston at Denver, 6 p.m. Detroit at Utah, 6 p.m.

College Basketball Major scores Saturday Men Far West BYU 93, Fresno Pacific 57 Hampton 77, Colorado St. 75 San Francisco 68, Dominican, Calif. 47 Southwest Arkansas St. 81, W. Kentucky 73 North Texas 80, Louisiana-Lafayette 63 SMU 82, Dallas Christian 49 Midwest Bowling Green 67, Saint Louis 61 Butler 76, Valparaiso 59 Cleveland St. 83, Ill.-Chicago 59 Creighton 73, Drake 57 Dayton 76, New Mexico 73, 2OT Evansville 64, Indiana St. 59 Loyola of Chicago 83, Youngstown St. 53 Marquette 79, West Virginia 74 Missouri St. 82, Illinois St. 71 S. Illinois 57, N. Iowa 55 W. Illinois 59, Purdue-Calumet 56 Wichita St. 79, Bradley 63 Wis.-Milwaukee 84, Detroit 81, OT Wright St. 67, Wis.-Green Bay 64 South Boston College 85, South Carolina 70 N.C. State 76, San Diego 54 East Georgetown 86, DePaul 75 St. John’s 67, Providence 65 Syracuse 70, Notre Dame 58 Women Far West Idaho St. 84, Montana Tech 51 Montana St. 79, Utah Valley 70 Nevada 57, BYU 53 Utah 73, Utah St. 61 Southwest Cent. Arkansas 87, Oklahoma Wesleyan 40 Louisiana-Lafayette 65, North Texas 54 Midwest Illinois St. 69, N. Iowa 60 Indiana St. 84, Bradley 68 Toledo 71, North Dakota 55 South Delaware St. 90, Wesley 58 Miami 91, Lipscomb 52 East Cornell 58, Ithaca 55 New Hampshire 88, Rhode Island 74, 3OT Syracuse 91, Ark.-Pine Bluff 56

The Associated Press

Going

out a winner

Florida head coach Urban Meyer puts his arm around his wife, Shelley, after Florida beat Penn State 37-24 in the Outback Bowl on Saturday in Tampa, Fla. It was Meyer’s final game for Florida after resigning a month ago.

NFL STANDINGS National Football Conference St. Louis Seattle San Francisco Arizona

W L 7 8 6 9 5 10 5 10

T PCT 0 .467 0 .400 0 .333 0 .333

HOME 5-3-0 4-3-0 4-3-0 4-4-0

z - Philadelphia NY Giants Washington Dallas

W L 10 5 9 6 6 9 5 10

T PCT 0 .667 0 .600 0 .400 0 .333

HOME 4-3-0 5-3-0 2-5-0 2-6-0

z - Chicago Green Bay Minnesota Detroit

W L 11 4 9 6 6 9 5 10

T PCT 0 .733 0 .600 0 .400 0 .333

HOME 5-3-0 6-1-0 4-4-0 3-4-0

x - Atlanta x - New Orleans Tampa Bay Carolina

W L 12 3 11 4 9 6 2 13

T PCT 0 .800 0 .733 0 .600 0 .133

HOME 6-1-0 5-2-0 4-4-0 2-6-0

NFC WEST ROAD DIV 2-5-0 3-2-0 2-6-0 3-2-0 1-7-0 3-2-0 1-6-0 1-4-0 NFC EAST ROAD DIV 6-2-0 4-1-0 4-3-0 2-3-0 4-4-0 2-3-0 3-4-0 2-3-0 NFC NORTH ROAD DIV 6-1-0 5-0-0 3-5-0 3-2-0 2-5-0 1-4-0 2-6-0 1-4-0 NFC SOUTH ROAD DIV 6-2-0 4-1-0 6-2-0 4-1-0 5-2-0 2-3-0 0-7-0 0-5-0

CONF 5-6-0 5-6-0 3-8-0 3-8-0

PF 283 294 267 282

PA 312 401 339 396

DIFF -29 -107 -72 -114

STRK Won 1 Lost 3 Lost 2 Won 1

CONF 7-4-0 7-4-0 4-7-0 3-8-0

PF 426 377 288 380

PA 363 333 360 423

DIFF +63 +44 -72 -43

STRK Lost 1 Lost 2 Won 1 Lost 1

CONF 8-3-0 7-4-0 5-6-0 4-7-0

PF 331 378 268 342

PA 276 237 328 356

DIFF +55 +141 -60 -14

STRK Won 2 Won 1 Won 1 Won 3

CONF 9-2-0 9-2-0 7-4-0 2-9-0

PF 383 371 318 186

PA 278 284 305 360

DIFF +105 +87 +13 -174

STRK Lost 1 Won 1 Won 1 Lost 1

W L 13 2 10 5 7 8 4 11

T PCT 0 .867 0 .667 0 .467 0 .267

HOME 7-0-0 4-3-0 1-7-0 2-6-0

x - Pittsburgh x - Baltimore Cleveland Cincinnati

W L 11 4 11 4 5 10 4 11

T PCT 0 .733 0 .733 0 .333 0 .267

HOME 5-3-0 6-1-0 3-4-0 3-5-0

Indianapolis Jacksonville Tennessee Houston

W L 9 6 8 7 6 9 5 10

T PCT 0 .600 0 .533 0 .400 0 .333

HOME 5-2-0 5-3-0 3-5-0 3-4-0

z - Kansas City San Diego Oakland Denver

W L 10 5 8 7 7 8 4 11

T PCT 0 .667 0 .533 0 .467 0 .267

HOME 7-0-0 6-2-0 5-3-0 3-4-0

AFC EAST ROAD DIV 6-2-0 4-1-0 6-2-0 3-2-0 6-1-0 2-3-0 2-5-0 1-4-0 AFC NORTH ROAD DIV 6-1-0 4-1-0 5-3-0 3-2-0 2-6-0 1-4-0 1-6-0 2-3-0 AFC SOUTH ROAD DIV 4-4-0 3-2-0 3-4-0 3-2-0 3-4-0 2-3-0 2-6-0 2-3-0 AFC WEST ROAD DIV 3-5-0 2-3-0 2-5-0 2-3-0 2-5-0 5-0-0 1-7-0 1-4-0

CONF 9-2-0 8-3-0 5-6-0 3-8-0

PF 480 329 266 276

PA 306 297 295 387

DIFF +174 +32 -29 -111

STRK Won 7 Lost 1 Lost 2 Lost 1

CONF 8-3-0 8-3-0 3-8-0 3-8-0

PF 317 344 262 315

PA 223 263 291 382

DIFF +94 +81 -29 -67

STRK Won 1 Won 3 Lost 3 Won 2

CONF 7-4-0 7-4-0 3-8-0 4-7-0

PF 412 336 336 356

PA 368 385 316 410

DIFF +44 -49 +20 -54

STRK Won 3 Lost 2 Lost 1 Lost 4

CONF 6-5-0 6-5-0 5-6-0 3-8-0

PF 356 408 379 316

PA 295 294 361 438

DIFF +61 +114 +18 -122

STRK Won 2 Lost 1 Lost 1 Won 1

* z - Clinched Division * y - Clinched Wild Card * x - Clinched Playoff Berth * * - Clinched Division and Home Field

Football NFL Schedules All Times PST Today Oakland at Kansas City, 10 a.m. Tampa Bay at New Orleans, 10 a.m. Miami at New England, 10 a.m. Minnesota at Detroit, 10 a.m. Carolina at Atlanta, 10 a.m. Pittsburgh at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Buffalo at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m. Cincinnati at Baltimore, 10 a.m. Arizona at San Francisco, 1:15 p.m. San Diego at Denver, 1:15 p.m. Chicago at Green Bay, 1:15 p.m. Jacksonville at Houston, 1:15 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Washington, 1:15 p.m. Dallas at Philadelphia, 1:15 p.m. Tennessee at Indianapolis, 1:15 p.m. St. Louis at Seattle, 5:20 p.m.

College Football The AP Top 25 Fared No. 1 Auburn (13-0) vs. No. 1 Oregon, BCS Championship, Jan. 10. No. 2 Oregon (12-0) vs. No. 2 Auburn, BCS Championship, Jan. 10. No. 3 TCU (13-0) beat No. 4 Wisconsin 21-19, Rose Bowl, Jan. 1. No. 4 Wisconsin (11-2) lost to No. 3 TCU 21-19, Rose Bowl, Jan. 1. No. 5 Stanford (11-1) vs. No. 12 Virginia Tech, Orange Bowl, Jan. 3.

No. 6 Ohio State (11-1) vs. vs. No. 8 Arkansas, Sugar Bowl, Jan. 4. No. 7 Michigan State (11-2) lost to No. 15 Alabama 49-7, Capital One Bowl, Jan. 1. No. 8 Arkansas (10-2) vs. No. 6 Ohio State, Sugar Bowl, Jan. 4. No. 9 Oklahoma beat No. 25 Connecticut 48-20, Fiesta Bowl, Jan. 1. No. 10 Boise State (12-1) beat No. 20 Utah 26-3, MAACO Bowl, Dec. 22. No. 11 LSU (10-2) vs. No. 18 Texas A&M, Cotton Bowl, Jan. 7. No. 12 Virginia Tech (11-2) vs. No. 5 Stanford, Orange Bowl, Jan. 3. No. 13 Nevada (12-1) vs. Boston College, Fight Hunger Bowl, Jan. 9. No. 14 Missouri (10-3) lost to Iowa 27-24, Insight Bowl, Dec. 28. No. 15 Alabama (10-3) beat No. 7 Michigan State 49-7, Capital One Bowl, Jan. 1. No. 16 Oklahoma State (11-2) beat Arizona 36-10, Alamo Bowl, Dec. 29. No. 17 Nebraska (10-4) lost to Washington 19-7, Holiday Bowl, Dec. 30. No. 18 Texas A&M (9-3) vs. No. 11 LSU, Cotton Bowl, Jan. 7. No. 19 South Carolina (9-5) lost to No. 23 Florida State 26-17, Chick-fil-A Bowl, Dec. 31. No. 20 Utah (10-3) lost to No. 10 Boise State 26-3, MAACO Bowl, Dec. 22. No. 21 Mississippi State (9-4) beat Michigan 52-14, Gator Bowl, Jan. 1. No. 22 West Virginia (9-4) lost to North Carolina State 23-7, Champs Sports Bowl, Dec. 28. No. 23 Florida State (10-4) beat No. 19 South Carolina 26-17, Chick-fil-A Bowl, Dec. 31. No. 24 Hawaii (10-4) lost to Tulsa 62-35, Hawaii Bowl, Dec. 24.

10 a.m. (13) KCPQ Football NFL, Tampa Bay Buccaneers vs. New Orleans Saints, Site: Louisiana Superdome - New Orleans, La. (Live) 10 a.m. (25) FSNW Basketball NCAA, Gonzaga vs. Wake Forest (Live) 10 a.m. (7) KIRO Football NFL, Pittsburgh Steelers vs. Cleveland Browns, Site: Cleveland Browns Stadium - Cleveland, Ohio (Live) 12:30 p.m. (25) FSNW Women’s Basketball NCAA, Stanford vs. California (Live) 1 p.m. (10) CITY Football NFL, Tennessee Titans vs. Indianapolis Colts, Site: Lucas Oil Stadium - Indianapolis (Live) 1 p.m. (13) KCPQ Football NFL, Chicago Bears vs. Green Bay Packers, Site: Lambeau Field - Green Bay, Wis. (Live) 1:15 p.m. (7) KIRO Football NFL, Tennessee Titans vs. Indianapolis Colts, Site: Lucas Oil Stadium - Indianapolis, IN (Live) 2:30 p.m. (25) FSNW Basketball NCAA, Louisiana State vs. Virginia (Live) 4:30 p.m. (25) FSNW Basketball NCAA, Miami vs. Duke (Live) 5:15 p.m. (5) KING Football NFL, St. Louis Rams vs. Seattle Seahawks, Site: Qwest Field - Seattle (Live) 7 p.m. (25) FSNW Basketball NCAA, Arizona vs. Oregon State (Live)

MUSIC CITY BOWL North Carolina 30, Tennessee 27 HOLIDAY BOWL Washington 19, Nebraska 7 Dec. 31 MEINEKE CAR CARE BOWL South Florida 31, Clemson 26 SUN BOWL Notre Dame 33, Miami 17 LIBERTY BOWL UCF 10, Georgia 6 CHICK-FIL-A-BOWL Florida St. 26, S. Carolina 17 Jan. 1 TICKETCITY BOWL Texas Tech 45, Northwestern 38 CAPITAL ONE BOWL Alabama 49, Michigan St. 7 OUTBACK BOWL Florida 37, Penn State 24 GATOR BOWL Mississippi St. 52, Michigan 14 ROSE BOWL TCU 21, Wisconsin 19 FIESTA BOWL Oklahoma 48, Connecticut 20 Monday DISCOVER ORANGE BOWL No. 4 Stanford vs. Virginia Tech, 11:30 a.m.

Hockey NHL Glance

American Football Conference ** - New England y - NY Jets Miami Buffalo

SPORTS ON TV

No. 9 Oklahoma beat No. 25 Connecticut 48-20, Fiesta Bowl, Jan. 1. College Bowls All Times PST Dec. 21 BEEF O’ BRADY’S BOWL Louisville 31, Southern Miss 28 Dec. 23 POINSETTIA BOWL San Diego State 35, Navy 14 Dec. 24 HAWAII BOWL Tulsa 62, Hawaii 35 Dec. 25 LITTLE CAESARS BOWL Florida International 34, Toledo 32 Dec. 26 INDEPENDENCE BOWL Air Force 14, Georgia Tech 7 Dec. 27 CHAMPS SPORTS BOWL Norh Carolina State 23, West Virgina 7 INSIGHT BOWL Iowa 27, Missouri 24 Dec. 28 MILITARY BOWL Maryland 51, East Carolina 20 TEXAS BOWL Illinois 38, Baylor 14 ALAMO BOWL Oklahoma State 36, Arizona 10 Dec. 29 ARMED FORCES BOWL Army 16, Southern Methodist 14 PINSTRIPE BOWL Syacruse 36, Kansas State 34

All Times PST WESTERN CONFERENCE Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 39 22 13 4 48 110 109 Los Angeles 37 22 14 1 45 113 91 San Jose 38 20 13 5 45 114 108 Anaheim 41 20 17 4 44 107 118 Phoenix 37 17 13 7 41 101 107 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 36 23 8 5 51 125 91 Colorado 38 20 13 5 45 131 123 Minnesota 37 17 15 5 39 92 107 Calgary 38 17 18 3 37 103 109 Edmonton 36 12 17 7 31 94 124 Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 38 24 9 5 53 131 107 St. Louis 37 20 12 5 45 99 100 Columbus 38 20 15 3 43 100 110 Chicago 39 20 16 3 43 123 113 Nashville 37 18 13 6 42 91 92 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 40 25 12 3 53 127 94 Philadelphia 38 23 10 5 51 128 102 N.Y. Rangers 39 22 14 3 47 119 100 N.Y. Islanders 36 11 19 6 28 84 118 New Jersey 38 10 26 2 22 68 122 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 37 20 11 6 46 108 84 Montreal 39 21 16 2 44 97 92 Ottawa 40 16 19 5 37 90 121 Buffalo 38 16 18 4 36 105 114 Toronto 37 14 19 4 32 89 111 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Tampa Bay 39 23 11 5 51 121 122 Washington 40 23 12 5 51 120 106 Atlanta 41 20 15 6 46 127 122 Carolina 37 18 15 4 40 108 111 Florida 35 16 17 2 34 95 92 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Saturday’s Games Buffalo 7, Boston 6, SO Toronto 5, Ottawa 1 Carolina 6, New Jersey 3 Tampa Bay 2, N.Y. Rangers 1, OT Washington 3, Pittsburgh 1 San Jose at Los Angeles, late Calgary at Edmonton, late Today’s Games Atlanta at Montreal, 10 a.m. N.Y. Rangers at Florida, 2 p.m. Philadelphia at Detroit, 2 p.m. Dallas at St. Louis, 3 p.m. Columbus at Nashville, 3 p.m. Phoenix at Minnesota, 3 p.m. Vancouver at Colorado, 5 p.m. Chicago at Anaheim, 5 p.m. Monday’s Games Boston at Toronto, 4 p.m. Florida at Carolina, 4 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Calgary, 6 p.m. Chicago at Los Angeles, 6 p.m. Vancouver at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.


SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, January 2, 2011

B3

Florida whips Penn State The Associated Press

The Associated Press

TCU wide receivers coach Rusty Burns, foreground, celebrates with his team as the Horned Frogs beat Wisconsin at the Rose Bowl on Saturday.

Rose: Little guys get the win Continued from B1 sooner than later,” Wisconsin coach Bret Bielema Fans can debate where said. “This game wasn’t TCU’s win in Pasadena ranks with Boise State’s decided on one play or two thrilling one-point win over plays. It was probably an Oklahoma in the 2007 accumulation of about 10 or Fiesta Bowl or Utah’s upset 12 plays that we failed to of Alabama in the 2009 execute, and they did.” Luke Shivers’ 1-yard TD Sugar Bowl, but the Frogs will always be the first run put TCU ahead 21-13 back-to-back BCS busters early in the third quarter, — even after they head to but neither team scored again until Wisconsin the Big East in 2012. “I’ve been saying for a mounted a 77-drive in the while that parity in college waning minutes. Ball rushed for a 4-yard football is here,” Patterson score with 2 minutes to play, said. “I got texts from every- and the Frogs expected the body across the nation, from Badgers to run for the conBoise State and schools all version behind their dominant line. over. But Wisconsin came out “Today we played for us, and for all the schools that in a spread, and Carder was blocked in a blitz attempt at wanted a chance.” Montee Ball rushed for the line — and he still bat132 yards and a late score ted down Scott Tolzien’s for the Big Ten co-champion throw. Jacob Pedersen was open Badgers (11-2), whose loss capped a nightmare New in the end zone, but the ball Year’s Day for their confer- never got close to the Wisconsin tight end. ence. Johnson easily grabbed The Big Ten went 0-5 in bowl games Saturday, Wisconsin’s onside kick, and including the Badgers loss TCU rushed for a final first to one of those teams Ohio down to kill the clock. “We know how much this State president Gordon Gee to everybody said didn’t deserve to play means for the national champion- involved,” Wisconsin defenship because they play oppo- sive end J.J. Watt said nents like “Little Sisters of through tears. “We work 365 days for the Poor.” “Hopefully the scar that this, and then we come out we’re going to take from this here and don’t execute.” Patterson stopped his game can get us back here

players from dumping a Gatorade bucket on him before time ran out, lecturing them with a smile on his face. When the final seconds ticked off, the Frogs ran about the field in a frenzy, eventually collecting near the TCU band and the quarter of the Rose Bowl stands filled with purple-clad fans. And eventually the Frogs doused their coach, too. Dalton went 15-for-23 and rushed for a first-quarter score, winning the game’s offensive MVP award. But the defense deserved the credit for hanging on when TCU couldn’t score in the game’s final 26 minutes. TCU’s defense led the nation in several categories this season, but critics said the Frogs hadn’t faced the likes of Wisconsin’s fearsome offensive line. The Badgers were dominant at times, particularly in a frenetic first quarter that featured 24 combined points, but TCU hung on against Wisconsin’s attack with guts, third-down stops — and plenty of Carder. With a litany of big plays that included a de-cleating sack of Tolzien to kill a third-quarter drive, Carder was the leader all game — and the hero on Wisconsin’s final snap. “We came up with a great

tip, and it’s like your life passes before your eyes,” Patterson said. “You can’t even really say what you think about.” Tolzien went 12-of-21 for 159 yards for the Badgers, and John Clay rushed for a first-quarter score. Wisconsin outgained the Frogs 385-301 and held the ball for all but three plays in the second quarter, but twice settled for field goals by Philip Welch, who also missed a 39-yard field goal attempt before halftime. Most of the Frogs stayed on the field after the trophy presentation to soak in another minute of the biggest achievement for TCU football since the national championship season in 1938 — the only other unbeaten campaign for the school that produced Davey O’Brien, “Slingin’ Sammy” Baugh and LaDainian Tomlinson. While O’Brien won the Heisman Trophy in 1938, Dalton has his own unbeaten season — and his third bowl MVP award. “We weren’t just playing for TCU. We were playing for all the non-AQ schools out there,” Dalton said. “It’s something we’ve worked so hard for, and to see all the hard work pay off and play an outstanding game against a great opponent in Wisconsin.”

Zags hold off Oklahoma State The Associated Press

SPOKANE — Gonzaga’s 20-point victory over Oklahoma State on Friday may have looked relatively easy, but coach Mark Few will assure you it was not. The 73-52 win was the 300th of Few’s 12-year career, all at Gonzaga, and he sweats them all. “They are so hard to come by,” Few said. “Only coaches know how hard they really are, every one of them.” Few is 300-78 at Gonzaga, the second-best winning percentage among active coaches after Roy Williams of North Carolina. Forward Elias Harris scored a season-high 22 points, and center Robert Sacre added 16 points and 15 rebounds for Gonzaga (9-5), which has won five in a row since an early December slump knocked it from the Top 25. Gonzaga is 4-0 against Oklahoma State. It was one of the best games of the season for Harris, a sophomore who is considered a pro prospect. “It was great to see him back attacking, like last year,” Few said. Marshall Moses led Oklahoma State (11-2) with 17 points. The Cowboys saw their seven-game winning streak broken in what was only their second game on an opponent’s home court this season.

They had not played since a Dec. 21 win over Stanford. “Ten days is way too many to take off,” Oklahoma State coach Travis Ford said. “We should have played a game like they did.” Gonzaga beat Lafayette on Wednesday. Jean-Paul Olukemi added 11 points for the Cowboys. Keiton Page, who came in averaging nearly 16 points per game, was held to two. Gonzaga’s inside tandem of Harris and Sacre dominated, giving the Bulldogs a 44-32 rebounding edge and a 32-22 lead in inside scoring. Sacre had his third double-double of the season and helped hold the Cowboys to 36.2 percent shooting. “That was the most physical team we’ve played,” Few said. “I’m proud of how we defended.” Ford said his team tried to rein in the Gonzaga big men. “It’s their inside game that makes them great,” Ford said. “We worked on limiting their touches close to the bucket, but their bigs do a great job of running the court.” Gonzaga’s leading scorer, Steven Gray, who has been slowed by a back injury the last three games, had 10 points and six assists in his best game since scoring 18 against Notre Dame.

The Associated Press

Oklahoma State’s Ray Penn (14) makes a pass in front of Gonzaga’s Kelly Olynyk (13) in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game on Friday in Spokane.

TAMPA, Fla. — Joe Paterno and Urban Meyer met at midfield for a postgame handshake and hug, the 84-year-old Penn State coach looking forward to next season, the 46-year-old Florida coach heading toward some time away from the game. Meyer closed out a highly successful six-year run that included a pair of national championships by leading the Gators back from a second-half deficit to beat JoePa’s Nittany Lions 37-24 in the Outback Bowl on Saturday. “I’m at full peace because I saw a bunch of smiles in that locker room,” said Meyer, who announced his resignation last month. “Locker rooms really aren’t very much fun when there’s a pain in your stomach and your chest and everything else. There was a lot of fun in there. A lot of fun.” Omarius Hines and Mike Gillislee ran for touchdowns, Chas Henry kicked three second-half field goals, and Ahmad Black sealed the win with an 80-yard interception return TD to help Florida (8-5) send Meyer out with a smile of his own. Meyer said he was stepping away from coaching because of health concerns and to spend more time with his family. As for Paterno, he — and his wife and Penn State officials — spent the week leading up to the game repeatedly shooting down rumors that the Outback Bowl could be his last. “He said, ’I love you kid,”’ Meyer said about his quick postgame meeting on the field with Paterno. “He’s the only one who calls me kid. And I love him too.” All week long, Meyer paid tribute to Paterno, the all-time bowl wins leader with 24. He continued to talk about admiration for the Hall of Famer during his postgame news conference. “He will go down as the greatest football coach in the history of the game. Every young coach, in my opinion, can take a lesson from him,” Meyer said. “If I ever start a coaching school, I’m going to make everybody do a book report on Joe Paterno, and say that’s the way you should act in coaching because

Outback Bowl that’s college football. “You just don’t want to lose that man or lose what college football is. That was college football out there today.” Paterno expects to be back for a 46th season with Penn State (7-6). At one point, he called the speculation about his future — including reports that he might be in poor health and had been hospitalized — “ridiculous.” He reiterated Friday that he has no plans to retire. Paterno hoped the Nittany Lions’ record 37th bowl trip under him would set a nice tone for next season. The six losses are the most Penn State’s had since going 4-7 in 2004, and the legendary coach is confident the team is headed in the right direction. “As I told them, keep their heads up. ... Go home and take it easy for a couple weeks, and then we’ll start thinking about all we’ll get done in spring football,” Paterno said. “We’re obviously way ahead of where we were at this stage a year ago.” Senior receiver Brett Brackett said none of the Nittany Lions brought up the subject of Paterno’s future after the game. “Nobody, but I’m sure it’s still on people’s minds,” Brackett said. “In my mind, there’s no doubt coach is the man. If coach coaches 20 more years, I won’t be surprised.” Meyer initially resigned in December 2009 only to change his mind the following day, returning for what turned out to be a disappointing year for a program he guided to national championships two of the past four seasons. He sent shockwaves through college football again on Dec. 8 when stepped down again. There have been indications that he could be headed for a broadcasting job. The Gators already have hired former Texas head coach-in-waiting Will Muschamp as Meyer’s replacement. He’ll inherit a talented team that on Saturday continued to make the type of mistakes that contributed to their worst record in six seasons under Meyer.

Sugar: Big 10 Continued from B1 Then there were back-toback Outback Bowl defeats to South Carolina in 2000 and 2001, followed by the two BCS title game losses. As the losses mounted, college football analysts began espousing the theory that team speed in the SEC, particularly on defense, is superior to that in the Big Ten. One person going out of his way to debunk that line of thinking this week is Arkansas offensive coordinator Garrick McGee, who spent four seasons in Big Ten country as an assistant coach at Northwestern. “The way you play fast is that you’re prepared and you understand what you’re going to do and how you want to attack, and you understand your opponent,” McGee said. “All of the talk about Ohio State not being fast, I don’t buy into that at all. There’s a game I coached where they had us 47-zip at halftime.” The most advantageous aspect of his experience against Ohio State, McGee added, is the credibility it gives him when he tells the Razorbacks to avoid overconfidence. “When there are people possibly trying to convince our kids that because Ohio State has lost to SEC teams in the past, that they’re not as fast or as talented, I can counter that,” McGee said. “That’s not true at all. This is going to be like the games we’ve played this season. It’s going to go down to the wire.”

Ohio State players say they don’t see the streak as any kind of weight on their backs. If anything, they’d like to meet SEC teams in bowls every year until they start beating them. “It’s kind of a motivational thing,” Buckeyes linebacker Ross Homan said. “We kind of look at it as: This is the present, the here and now. That was in the past. We can only control what we do in this game on Tuesday night.” Although they’ll be long gone, Ohio State players applauded recent announcements regarding agreements to play home-andhome series with Tennessee and Georgia. “You want to be on a big stage, you know? Why not play against the best in the nation?” Homan said. “It’s a great idea.” As for the task at hand, senior defensive end Cameron Heyward said finally beating an SEC team in the postseason could boost returning players’ confidence for next year, “and we get to shut that little streak up.” Heyward said he doubts the Buckeyes’ miserable past against the SEC will have any bearing on how they play Arkansas, but he understands the interest that Ohio State fans, and by extension, many Big Ten fans, have in seeing things change. “There’s a lot of great teams in the Big Ten and the SEC,” Heyward began, “but that’s what the bowl games are all about — show who the best conference is.”


B4

Sunday, January 2, 2011

SportsRecreation

Peninsula Daily News

Playoffs or not? That’s the question THE SEATTLE (because I’m not up for SEACHICKENS are like election): boo-hoo. a battered Yugo with two I know some fans are flat tires given one last rooting for the Seachickens chance to win the race. to lose today for 2011 draft And just before considerations the race, someone Brad (like being able steals the battery. LaBrie to draft Jake The SeachickLocker in the ens are limping to first round) but the finish line I’m rooting for with an embarthem to win. rassing 6-9 record If the Seawith three chickens lose straight blowout today, they go losses. out with a fourSeattle lost game losing 38-15 to Tampa streak, a yucky feeling in their Bay, the youngest stomachs for team in the NFL losing twice to with a second-year the up-and-comstarting quartering Rams, and they end the back, last week at Tampa; year with a lack of confi34-18 at home to Atlanta dence that does not bode two weeks ago when the well for a successful 2011 score wasn’t really that season. close because Charlie Whitehurst scored a meaningless late touchdown; Another week to play 40-21 to San Francisco on But if they win, well, at the road three weeks ago, least they won’t have the and we all know what a losing streak. disaster the 49ers have Plus they get at least been this year. But despite all that, the one more week of play that could be fun. Seachickens still have one And as they say, anylast shot at making the thing can happen in the playoffs. playoffs. All they have to do is As for a better draft beat the St. Louis Rams pick? (7-8) at Qwest Field I understand the argutonight. ment. If you win your division, and even if you lose in Better division record the first round of the playThat’s because both offs, you pick lower in the teams would have split draft than teams that fintheir season series and ished with better records Seattle would be 4-2 in the but didn’t happen to win division with a win and the their divisions. Rams would fall to 3-3. Which is only fair (on The game, the final one Carter’s fairness scale). of the regular NFL season, If you have a losing is featured nationwide this record and get to host a evening at 5 p.m. on Ch. 5 playoff game, non-playoff because, well, I don’t really teams with better records know why. should pick ahead of you in Maybe the NFL powers the draft. want their fans to really But what about snagappreciate it when two ging that quarterback who good teams are the feacould be gone by the time tured fare. you pick in the draft after Maybe they thought it winning your division? was bloopers night and the third or fourth interception Time for change thrown by Whitehurst/ The Seachickens do need Matt Hasselbeck, or Seata new young quarterback to tle’s 20th missed tackle of lead the team for years to the game would have fans laughing and rolling in the come. Hasselbeck doesn’t have aisles. Or maybe you can show the spark he used to have. Pete Carroll was betting games with Philadelphia, that Whitehurst would be New York Giants, Green Bay, Minnesota, New Eng- the quarterback answer but the former San Diego sigland or Pittsburgh only so nal-caller is not impressing many times on Sunday anyone so far. night. Is Locker the answer? The draft is always a Unfair practice gamble. You roll the dice Whatever the reason, a and hope for the best. lot of NFL fans across the Locker has the size, the country are upset that a arm and he seems to have team as inept as the Seathe maturity needed to be chickens, with a losing an NFL quarterback. record, has a shot at the But he has injury issues playoffs. and he seems to have taken At 7-9, the NFC West a step back from his outchampion Seachickens standing junior season. could host a wildcard team But all of this is acanext weekend if they beat demic because the Seathe youthful Rams today. chickens probably won’t win Some fans think that’s today anyway because they unfair. haven’t shown much heart But in the famous words or pride lately. of former President Jimmy But maybe we should be Carter, “Life is unfair.” a little more optimistic than For you youngsters, Carter was during his first President Carter made term. that statement as a snide There is a chance that remark to a reporter askSeattle will win today’s ing him about some injusgame and draft Locker. tice or another during his Maybe there really is a first term. Santa Claus. And for you budding Oh wait, I think Carter politicians out there, that is probably one of the reasons threw cold water on that idea, too. why Carter never got ________ elected to a second term. And for the NFL fans Sports Editor Brad ­LaBrie can be out there crying about reached at 360-417-3525 or at brad. unfairness, I say to them labrie@peninsuladailynews.com.

UW women fall to UCLA The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Crazy as it sounds, in the final minutes of a close game UCLA coach Nikki Caldwell was so unhappy with the Bruins lack of movement on offense, she started requiring a certain number of passes before a shot was taken. That’s how much confidence Caldwell has in her eighth-ranked Bruins. “They started playing with a little more poise and a little more patience and I think that, to me, is a key to this team maturing,”

Caldwell said. Rebekah Gardner came off the bench to hit a trio of 3-pointers and lead UCLA with 15 points, and the Bruins rallied from an eightpoint deficit early in the second half to hold off upsetminded Washington 60-48 on Friday. The Bruins (11-1, 1-0 Pac-10) opened Pac-10 play with an ugly victory that came with very little contribution from leading scorer Darxia Morris, who finished with just four points and sat much of the second half.

The Associated Press

Seattle wide receiver Ben Obomanu (87) beats Tampa Bay cornerback Ronde Barber (20) to score on a third-quarter two-point conversion Sunday in Tampa, Fla.

Hawks: Playing for West title Continued from B1 back selected No. 1 overall to ever start a playoff game Seattle hasn’t lost by less in his rookie season. “I think every situation than 15 points all season and has beaten just two you get in there with him teams with a winning record you see more and more of — Chicago and San Diego. the competitive nature,” St. Louis isn’t much bet- Rams coach Steve Spagter, with the Chargers the nuolo said. “He is a fierce only above-.500 team the competitor.” “I think the players have Rams have beaten. At least the Rams were rallied around him. They competitive, losing four have confidence in him. times by four points or less. That’s what you need in Only twice before has a your football team.” While Bradford is the division champ slid into the playoffs with an 8-8 record catalyst for St. Louis’ turn— the 1985 Cleveland around, the reversal goes Browns and 2008 San Diego beyond its QB. Running back Steven Chargers. And while it might seem Jackson has rushed for dubious for the Rams to almost 1,200 yards. potentially become the third member of that club, being Young receivers in this position is a remarkA ragtag group of mostly able accomplishment. journeymen receivers have Just a year ago, the made Bradford look great Rams were closing out the at times, and the Rams worst season in franchise defense is starting to show history, a 1-15 campaign of the type of bite expected woe that eventually landed when defensive guru SpagSt. Louis the opportunity to nuolo took over as head snatch Sam Bradford with coach before the 2009 seathe No. 1 pick of last April’s son. draft. So no matter what hapAnd while Bradford’s pens Sunday, or the overall production has slowed as mediocrity of what St. Louis the season has progressed, accomplished compared to a win Sunday will likely the rest of the NFC, the make him the first quarter- general belief is the Rams

are on the uptick, despite losing two of three entering the finale. “It’s been a roller coaster ride,” Jackson said. “You try to embrace what’s going on, you want to be happy but you don’t want to celebrate too much. “I kind of feel like I’m shell-shocked. But what we’re doing, what we’re coaching around here, I’m really happy about.” So if the Rams are believed to be ascending, then the Seahawks are impossible to decipher. Pete Carroll’s crew started 4-2 and followed by losing seven of nine, showing their vulnerability through key injuries that taxed the Seahawks lack of depth. Most troubling is Seattle’s inability to be competitive in all of its losses. With the exception of the third quarter on Dec. 5 against Carolina, there might not be a team playing worse over the last month of season than the Seahawks. And yet, they enter the final week with a chance at their first division title since 2007, after winning just nine combined games the

previous two seasons and undergoing a massive overhaul last January when Jim Mora was dismissed and Carroll was hired. “Some take it as pressure. I think it’s exciting,” Seattle linebacker Lofa Tatupu said. “That’s what you live for. We live to play in games like this. If not, like they say, you’re in the wrong business.” Carroll’s message this week was that Seattle’s slide for the last two months doesn’t matter, that it has no bearing on what takes place tonight. That might be easier to forget if the Seahawks weren’t so awful in recent weeks, dropping their last three by 19, 16 and 23 points. And now they’re potentially doing it with Whitehurst at quarterback, whose only other career start came in a 41-7 blowout loss to the Giants in November. “It’s what you’re going to do now with your opportunity, and here we have positioned ourselves, after all that it’s been,” Carroll said. “The story lines for this year are forgotten. It’s all about this game now.”

Huskies sweep Bruins, USC The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — The Washington Huskies completed a weekend in Southern California like they haven’t enjoyed for quite a while. Matthew Bryan-Amaning scored 21 points and Washington used a 27-10 run over both halves to beat UCLA 74-63 Friday, giving the Huskies their first Pac10 sweep in Los Angeles since 2006. Washington (10-3, 2-0) won at Pauley Pavilion for the first time in four years, also the last time the Huskies beat both of the LA schools and only their third sweep ever. They edged Southern California 73-67 in overtime on Wednesday. Washington’s win was a big hit among its large contingent of fans who traveled from San Diego after the Huskies’ victory over Nebraska in the Holiday Bowl on Thursday. They woofed their approval in the waning minutes. “Our fans were unbelievable tonight and against SC,” Washington coach Lorenzo Romar said. “We’ve never had that kind of support in LA.”

The Associated Press

Thomas sinks 17

Washington’s Isaiah Thomas, left, goes to the hoop as UCLA’s Malcolm Lee defends during the first half in Los Angeles on Friday.

Isaiah Thomas added 17 points and nine assists, and Bryan-Amaning had 10 rebounds. The win was especially sweet for seniors BryanAmaning, Justin Holiday and Venoy Overton, who had never won at Pauley. “I told the team the first person I’m going to call is Quincy Pondexter,” BryanAmaning said of the former Huskies star. “LA is going to be the hardest road trip for everyone in the conference.”

The Huskies swept a league road series to start the season for the first time since 1976, when they won at California and Stanford. “Especially with the football team winning, we knew we had to win it for them,” Thomas said. Reeves Nelson had 19 points and 10 rebounds, and Tyler Honeycutt and Malcolm Lee added 12 points each for the Bruins (9-5, 1-1), who saw their sixgame winning streak snapped.

Starting guard Lazeric Jones will need to wear a splint after injuring the middle finger on his right hand. He was limited to 16 minutes. “They’re a really good team. They just executed better than us. They had the weapons,” said Nelson, who took an elbow to his mouth from Aziz N’Diaye that loosened a front tooth. UCLA shot 35 percent from the floor and made 21 more trips to the free-throw

line than the Huskies, but couldn’t convert consistently down the stretch. “That was a very frustrating, disappointing loss,” UCLA coach Ben Howland said. “They really hurt us in transition. It seemed when we did turn it over, they scored.” After Washington’s dominant run gave the Huskies a 17-point lead early in the second half, UCLA rallied to get within four points three times.


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, January 2, 2011

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SECTION

Our Peninsula

BUSINESS, CLUBS, THINGS TO DO, DEAR ABBY In this section

THANK YOU!

Peninsula Home Fund hits $210,977.35 — and more donations coming in By John Brewer

Daily News’ 2010 “hand up, not a handout” Peninsula Home Fund. While that’s below the record Last-minute contributions total amount we received last are still coming in, but as of our year, $230,806.95, it’s a terrific last deposit at First Federal on amount, and it’s the second year Thursday, $210,977.35 from people and organizations in Jef- the fund, in its 21st year, has ferson and Clallam counties had gone over $200,000. been donated to the Peninsula Thank you, North Publisher and Editor Peninsula Daily News

This week we will tally the remainder of donations from our generous readers — and it $5 to $25,000 may approach or exceed last Donations last week ranged year’s total. from $5 (from a former Home Said Tim Hockett, executive Fund recipient) to $25,000 (from director of nonprofit OlyCAP — a husband and wife on behalf of Olympic Community Action a well-known company on the Programs, the No. 1 emergency North Olympic Peninsula that care agency in Jefferson and Clallam counties — which manasked to be anonymous).

Olympic Peninsula!

ages the fund for the PDN, screening applicants and disbursing the money: “We have all been expecting that, due to the economy, the Home Fund drive would likely fall far short of prior years. “But our community has surprised us again. Turn

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Karen Griffiths/for Peninsula Daily News

Ray Koehler says he is thankful for the Peninsula Daily News’ Peninsula Home Fund and OlyCAP caseworker Melissa Matheson, who helped him out of the freezing cold and into a warm, safe place to live.

Home Fund helps homeless man EDITOR’S NOTE — For 22 years, Peninsula Daily News readers in Jefferson and Clallam counties have supported the Peninsula Home Fund. This is the final article in a series on how the fund operates and who benefits from our readers’ generosity. By Karen Griffiths

For Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — Imagine yourself alone, aging, unable to work because of poor health — and homeless with no support system. At night you would huddle up within a makeshift shelter to get through harrowing hours of freezing temperatures, often as rain or snow fell. Your campsite is foul-smelling and partially hidden, a place of birds and rodents. Other men and women — citizens of the greatest country in the world who never ever expected to be homeless or hungry — are in the woods with you, lining their tents with cardboard, blankets, carpet remnants and tarps. A small propane camping grill, or a rusty wood stove, is the only thing giving off any warmth and is used for cooking an offering from the food bank. A drain pipe that pours a steady stream of dirty, icy runoff from a nearby bridge is where you shower . . . occasionally. Two months ago, Raymond Lee Koehler was bone-cold, thin, alone and feeling desperate as he arrived at the OlyCAP office Port Townsend. He had been living under bridges and in the woods for most of the year. Temperatures at night often dropped into the lower 30s and 20s.

“See those woods over there?” he said, gesturing to a patch of woods under a milky gray sky. “If you go to the third fir tree and turn left that’s where I am.” OlyCAP is the nonprofit Olympic Community Action Programs, the No. 1 emergency care agency in Jefferson and Clallam counties. It also screens the applicants for the Peninsula Daily News’ “hand up, not a handout” Peninsula Home Fund and distributes the funds.

would pick him and the tent up and fly him across the Strait of Juan de Fuca to Vancouver Island. In jest, she replied he’d be sent right back by the Canadians since he didn’t have a passport. “I owe Melissa and those folks a debt I can’t repay for getting me out of the cold and into a home,” says Ray. “They just bent over backward to help me.”

‘I’d be frozen to death’

Temporary home

At the Port Townsend OlyCAP office he was interviewed by caseworkers and received emergency services through the Home Fund. It put him into the OlyCAP system and was a crucial first step to getting him out of the brutal life he was living. “I’m so very grateful for the help,” says Ray, 59. “If it weren’t for the help I guarantee I’d be frozen to death in the woods.” OlyCAP workers gave him a donated tent and sleeping bag. He received Home Fund vouchers to stay at a campsite at Jefferson County Fairgrounds and get food, laundry services and small necessities. He says he was doing fine at the fairgrounds until the weekend of Nov. 19, when the weather turned nasty — up to 30 mph winds, freezing rain and then 6 inches of snow — and the tent collapsed on him during the night. In the morning’s frigid air, he trekked back to the OlyCAP office where caseworker Melissa Matheson said she an others were about to go check on him. She and her co-workers had just finished pooling together enough money to get Ray a motel room. Ray told Melissa the wind was blowing so hard he worried it

Since Port Townsend’s homeless shelter is only open during the winter, OlyCAP caseworker Genevieve Short used her connections to find a temporary home for Ray. Fortunately, the temporary housing has turned into a more stable residence while he awaits permanent housing through TBRA — the federally supported Tenant Based Rental Assistance program. He says his odyssey to homelessness began in 1997 when he divorced his wife. She got sole ownership of their restaurant. “It all spiraled down after that,” he said. Major heart surgery and other medical issues left him unable to work. By the time he was approved for Social Security disability income, the snowball of troubles and debt had grown huge. A year ago, he said, he left his Port Angeles apartment — where he had been for 16 years — after an argument with his landlord over past-due rent. Childless, with no family or close friends to stay with, he started living under bridges and in the lonely, freezing woods. Turn

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PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, January 2, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Thanks: Peninsula Home Fund never closes Continued from C1 the Peninsula Home Fund are fully IRS tax-deductible. ■  Peninsula Home Fund “Folks here understand contributions are often used that the need for neighbor in conjunction with money helping neighbor is more from other agencies, pressing than ever. “And so the donors to the enabling OlyCAP to stretch Peninsula Home Fund have the value of the contribution. extended their hands once ■ Money is usually dismore with unsurpassed gentributed in small amounts, erosity.” usually up to $150. ■ Assistance is limited to Final tally next Sunday one time in a 12-month A final total, and a final period. list of donors and donations, ■  Home Fund donors’ will be published in next personal information is kept Sunday’s PDN and at www. confidential. peninsuladailynews.com. The PDN does not rent, The $230,806.95 raised sell, give or otherwise share by the Peninsula Home your address or other inforFund in 2009 allowed Olymation with anyone, or CAP to help more than make any other use of it. 2,300 families, many with Many donors to the children, and individuals in Home Fund give their 2010. names, some perhaps hopThese are your neighbors ing to spur friends and colwith nowhere else to turn, leagues to donate, too. local people that OlyCAP Others, including some of wouldn’t have been able to the Peninsula’s most wellassist otherwise. known figures, prefer to The Peninsula Home remain anonymous. Fund — which began in While the vast majority 1989 — is carefully rationed of donations come from Jefevery year. ferson and Clallam counties, With heavy demand donors (usually former resiagain this year, only a few dents) in remote parts of the dollars are left from the state and as far away as 2009 campaign and will go Tokyo sent checks this year. with the new money right away to make sure no one Fund never closes falls through the cracks durWhile a final total, and ing the dark, winter days of January, the most demand- list of last-minute donors and donations, will be in ing time of the year. next Sunday’s PDN and www.peninsuladailynews. A narrow divide com, the Peninsula Home The distance is often Fund itself never closes. very short between those of Donations of any us with jobs and homes and amount are always welmedical care — and those come. Peninsula residents for Every gift will make a whom fate has dealt a much difference in a neighbor’s different reality. life. Peninsula Home Fund Donations postmarked workers said they heard after Dec. 31 will go toward heartbreaking stories this the 2011 campaign. year of unexpected poverty The holiday fund-raising and illness — and many campaign for the Home recipients were seeking help Fund begins every year on from the fund for the first Thanksgiving Day and time, often because a family runs through Dec. 31 member recently lost a job. Contributions collected Always showing respect before Thanksgiving gave and kindness to people who us a running start on the don’t always receive that in 2010 drive. their daily lives, Home Individuals, couples, Fund staff’s most important businesses and school goal is to get the individual groups contributed more or family through a crisis, than $15,1350 between and back on the path of selfJan. 1 and Nov. 24. sufficiency. Whenever possible, PenA better future insula Home Fund casemanagers work with each As in previous years, the individual or family to PDN did stories every develop a plan to become Wednesday and Sunday on financially stable — and how the Peninsula Home avoid a recurrence of the Fund works. emergency that prompted Despite the crime, tragedy, controversy and other aid from the fund. The fund is not set up to troubles that daily command our attention, the hand out money passively twice-weekly stories also — recipients play active showed there are countless roles in their own success, victories — large and small their own rehabilitation, — being won every day in their own empowerment, the lives of real people their own futures. from Port Townsend to That’s the “hand up, not Forks, from Quilcene and a handout” focus of the Brinnon to LaPush. Home Fund. Seemingly insurmountable personal demons have No deductions been overcome at a pivotal In addition: moment with the assis■  No money donated to tance of the Peninsula the Home Fund, not one Home Fund and OlyCAP’s penny, is used for adminisstaffers and volunteers. tration or other overhead. The Home Fund is a All costs are absorbed by chance for a better future the PDN and OlyCAP. for children, teens, families Your entire donation goes and the elderly — when — without any deductions there is nowhere else to — to help those who are fac- turn. ing times of crisis. It pays for hot meals for seniors, warm winter coats ■  All contributions to

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Mestayer, Sequim. ■  Jon Purnell and Sherrie Rogers, Port Angeles. ■  Robert and Virginia Bowling, Sequim. ■  Jeff and Donna Green, Sequim. In honor of our parents. ■  Stanley and Mary Lou Johann, Sequim. ■  John and Diana Anderson, Sequim. ■  Dee and Garry Kispert, Sequim. In honor of Dennis and Mimi Johnson. ■  Patsy Busby, Port Angeles. In memory of Wes Gooding. ■  Jack and Millie Lyon, Port Angeles. ■  Nancy and Ed Grier, Contributions so far Port Angeles. Here is a list of donors ■  Raymond and Peggy (as they asked to be desigVannausdle, Port Angeles. nated) whose contributions ■  Velma Johnson, Port were received between Dec. Angeles. In memory of 23 and Dec. 29 — thank Corky Johnson. you very much for mak■  Selma Cole, Port ing a difference in the Angeles. lives — and futures — of ■  Ricci Molenkamp, your neighbors: Sequim. ■  Russ Sieber, Port ■  Dale and LaRue Hadlock — $200. In Robirts, Sequim. In honor memory of Donald Krone. of our 59th wedding anni■  P.A. & Co. Hair versary. Salon, Port Angeles — ■  Penny Brewer, $100. Sequim. In remembrance of ■  JC and Pat S., my beloved David. Sequim — $200. Once ■  C.M. Engvall and E.P. again, I thank you for all Schoen, Sequim. you do for the local people ■  Gail and Scott Likwho are in need. 100 perbrank, Port Angeles. In cent with no other fees, etc., memory of Rufus, who is is truly amazing to me, greatly missed after 14 when you consider the big years of fun and compannational funds and their ionship. huge salaries paid to CEOs, ■  Timm and Cindy etc. May God bless you forKelly, Port Angeles. In ever. Good job. Well done. memory of Kris Fairbanks ■  Bobbie McMahon and and Tea Rose Beil. Jerry Spieckerman, Port ■  Chris Duff, Port Townsend— $250. Angeles. ■  Paul S. Hanway, ■  B. Stull, Port Sequim — $50. Townsend. In honor of ■  Ellen Gage, Port George Grams and Geri Angeles — $50. Ramsey. ■  Glenn and Beverly ■  Robert and Hayes Dawson, Port Angeles — Wasilewski, Port Angeles. $300. In memory of our parents. ■  Randy and Deana ■  Ethel Butler, Port Volker, Green Cove Springs Angeles. In memory of Har— $1,000. old Butler. ■  Colleen Ostrye, Port ■  Bud Critchfield, Angeles — $50. In memory Sequim. of Dale L. Hickson. I miss ■  Tom Bihn Inc., Port you still, my friend. Angeles. ■  Al and Lori Althoff, ■  Diane and David Sequim — $125 Bommer, Port Townsend. In ■  Donna Frazer, Port honor of Tom and Pat Angeles — $200. Moreland. ■  Sharon, Carlsborg — ■  Ed Bowlby and Mary $25. In memory of my Sue Brancato, Sequim. friend Julie’s father, Bill ■  Tom Schaafsma, Galagon. Sequim. In memory of ■  Tom Coville, Port Owen Sumerwell. Angeles — $30. ■  Christina and Brando ■  Clallam County Road Blore, Port Angeles. Department Employees, ■  Soeren and Connie Port Angeles — $200. Poulsen, Sequim. ■  J.H. Kelly and Crew ■  Norma Michels, at Nippon Paper IndusSequim. In memory of our tries, Longview — $500. beloved son, Chad M. ■  Peninsula Daily News Stanislaw. staff, Port Angeles, Sequim, ■  Gordon James, Sekiu. Port Townsend — $452. ■  Miggles Wallace and Ron Shannon, Sequim. Many thanks also to ■  Rex and Olga Wilson, Port Angeles. In memory of these donors (who Henry Acevedo, whom we’ll requested that the always miss. amount of their dona■  Don and Marilyn tion be kept private): Thomas, Sequim. We ■  Bryce Fish, Sequim. applaud the scope of your ■  Tom and Jan Kumprogram and firmly believe met, Sequim. in it. ■  Bob and Sherry Phil■  Harold and Shirley lips, Sequim. Van Riper, Sequim. ■  Jim Halvorsen, Port Angeles. ■  Kim Kay, Sequim. ■  Florence Chamberlain, Port Angeles. ■  Dorothea Coe, Port Continued from C1 Angeles. In memory of H.E. Coe. At times, he stayed in ■  Bero and Joyce emergency shelters for the homeless, but since the beds, which are on a first come first-serve basis and filled quickly (and most shelter’s doors don’t open until evening and then close in early morning), he fig-

819 Georgiana St., Suite B • Port Angeles • 360-452-2228

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ured it was easier to just stay outside where he was — rather than wait for hours and then be turned away. However, it was when staying in a shelter he found out there are programs which could have helped him to stay in his apartment. “I’d heard of Section 8

subsidized housing, but thought it only for families,” says Ray. “I had no idea single folks could get help.” Thanks to people who cared, Ray has now found his way off the streets, out of the dark, uncaring woods and into a modest home in a friendly neighborhood.

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HANDWRITING CAN BE hard to decipher at times. Please report any errors in this list to John Brewer, 360-417-3500 (there’s voicemail if he’s away) — or e-mail him at john.brewer@ peninsuladailynews.com. We’ll rerun the listing correctly. Our sincerest appreciation again to our donors.

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■  Port Angeles — $50. ■  Port Angeles — $100. ■  Sequim — $50. ■  Port Angeles — $20. ■  Sequim — $50. ■  Nordland — $50. ■  Sequim — $40. ■  Sequim — $50. ■  Sequim — $25. ■  Sequim — $210. In memory of Nan and Irene. ■  Sequim — $50. ■  Port Angeles — $500. In memory of Dennis Venzon. ■  Sequim — $100. ■  Port Angeles — $200. ■  Port Angeles — $150. In honor of Janice and Dan Blazer. ■  Port Angeles — $100. ■  Port Angeles — $600. ■  Port Angeles — $50. ■  Port Angeles — $200. ■  Sequim — $15. ■  Sequim — $50. ■  Port Angeles — $100. ■  Port Angeles — $150. ■  Sequim — $100. ■  Sequim — $200. ■  Port Angeles — $50. In honor of Golden Agers Club at the Port Angeles Senior Center. ■  Port Angeles — $500. ■  Sequim — $25. ■  Port Angeles — $35. ■  Sequim — $100. In memory of Harriette Adams. ■  Port Angeles — $100. ■  Sequim — $100. ■  Port Angeles — $200. ■  Port Townsend — $250. In loving memory of Don and Eileen Garling. ■  Port Townsend — $400. ■  Port Angeles — $500. In honor of those helping others. ■  Sequim — $100. ■  Sequim — $50. ■  Port Angeles — $25. In honor of Bud Kennedy. ■  Carlsborg — $100. ■  Sequim — $500. In honor of our family. ■  Port Angeles — $1,000. ■  Port Angeles — $25. ■  Port Townsend — $200. ■  Port Angeles — $50. ■  Port Angeles — $200. ■  Sequim — $500. ■  Port Angeles — $150. ■  Port Angeles — $1,000. In memory of our parents. ■  Port Angeles — $50. In memory of Bob and Chris Dalton. ■  Carlsborg — $300. In honor of friends and family. ■  Sequim — $300. In memory of Dennis Venzon.

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■  Peter and Judith Shepherd, Port Angeles. In memory of Susan L. Meyer. ■  John and Renee Jones, Sequim. ■  Bill and Bonnie Dyrness, Sequim. ■  Prudence and Mike Nathan, Port Angeles. ■  Peninsula Worldwide Church of God, Port Angeles. ■  Wayne and Vicky Murphy, Port Angeles. ■  Sue and Jason Mayo, Port Angeles. ■  J. Schumacher and K. Brevik, Port Townsend. In loving memory of Jay C. Brevik: a great man of gentle strength and a huge and generous heart. He is forever in our memories. ■  Birgit Moenig, Sequim. In memory of Sue Lahti. ■  Ruth Godfrey, Sequim. In memory of family and friends. ■  Virginia Smith, Port Ludlow. In memory of Karen Smith. ■  Bob and Mary Brodhan, Port Angeles. ■  Dale Cushman, Port Angeles. ■  Don Case and Joanne Peterson, Port Townsend. ■  Joan Walker, Sequim. ■  Amy and Carol DeQuoy, Sequim. In honor of Carol DeQuoy. ■  Jackson and Elizabeth Williams, Sequim. ■  Pat Gilbert, Port Angeles. In memory of Dorothy, Virginia, Vesta, Anne. ■  Steve Moore and Gigi Callaizakis, Port Townsend. In memory of Gus Callaizakis. ■  Richard and Annette Bertolina, Port Townsend. ■  Jack Dunham, Sequim. In honor of Jean Ernst. ■  Florence Marceau, Port Angeles. ■  David Martin, Sequim. ■  Jane Glass, Sequim. ■  Denny, Forks. In memory of Arthur Jesse Stark. ■  Patricia L. Nagle, Sequim. In memory of Nelson Briceno. ■  Carol and Tom Sinton, Port Angeles. In honor of Mary Sinton. ■  Kenneth A. Monds, Port Angeles. In memory of Jim and Mabel Monds. ■  Shaun Hubbard, Seattle. In honor of Tom and Robin Swanson. ■  James Symes, Sequim. ■  Josephine Soltis, Sequim. In memory of Mrs. Linda Henricksen. ■  Winifred Mayes, Sequim. ■  R.M. Schober, Sequim. ■  David W. Hepner, Port Angeles. In honor of William O. Hepner. ■  Jeanette and Henry Fischer, Sequim.

Fund: Focus is hand up

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C ERTIFIED H EARING

for kids, transportation, utility deposits, home repairs for the low income, needed eyeglasses and prescription drugs, dental work, safe, drug-free temporary housing . . . the list goes on and on. To apply for a grant from the fund, phone OlyCAP at 360-452-4726 (Clallam County) or 360-3852571 (Jefferson County). If you have any questions about the fund, contact me — John Brewer, Peninsula Daily News editor and publisher — at 360-417-3500. Or e-mail john.brewer@ peninsuladailynews.com.


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, January 2, 2011

C3

Birds go nuts for lard-oatmeal recipe VETERAN READERS OF this column are familiar with my mention of the “lard-oatmeal mixture.” Many have a copy of the recipe, but the number of recent requests for it indicates a column on the subject is called for. There is an interesting story behind the mixture. It wasn’t something I came up with, and it wasn’t found in any article I ran across. The mixture that attracts a wide variety of birds was discovered by Ken Short, a gentleman who is no longer with us, who developed the recipe and designed several feeders to hold it. When creating what is a simple mixture, he had two goals in mind: Birds need fat to provide energy and body heat; they also need protein in their diet. The lard provides the fat, and the rolled oats the protein. Ken put the recipe to the test by trying it out on his customers — the birds at his feeders. He not only mixed up what he thought they would like, but he also rendered out some beef fat or suet for them, too. Using one of his specially designed feeders, he placed the lard-oatmeal mixture in half the holes and rendered suet in the remaining ones. Then, he watched to see which would be eaten first. This sideby-side study was conducted during extremely cold weather, when temperatures dropped toward freezing. The birds recognized the melted suet first because that is what Ken had been feeding them. They immediately went to those holes but soon started on

Bird Watch the lard-oatmeal. Carson The rendered suet had set rock-hard during the cold weather. The lard-oatmeal hadn’t. It was easier to eat, and once the birds started on it, they continued to favor it, even after the temperatures warmed up. The holes with the rendered suet just sat there. If Ken hadn’t refilled the empty lard-oatmeal holes, the suet would no doubt have been eaten, but it was easy to see which food the birds preferred. The recipe: Use a ratio of about 1 pound lard to 1 quart rolled oats. Nothing is exact in this recipe and as you use it, you will probably modify it. I run the oats through the food processor because they absorb the melted lard more easily, and you can use more oats. I double or triple the recipe because the birds eat it up in no time. I use an electric frying pan because it holds a tripled recipe. Melt the lard on low heat. Once it is liquid, add the oats. (I stop adding oats when I can press the mixture down with a spatula and there is a “skin” of liquid lard on its surface. If you add too many oats, it crumbles more easily and can be difficult to put in certain containers.) When finished making a batch, let it cool until firm and

Joan

Paul Carson

A pileated woodpecker tries to eat some lard-oatmeal mixture from a feeder. place it in a storage container until you are ready to use it. A length of 4-by-4 with holes drilled in it makes a good feeder because the mixture can be firmly pushed into the holes. Hung from a tree limb or pole, the feeder’s action is almost nonstop. Birds seen on our lard-oatmeal feeders are: common bushtits; chickadees; nuthatches;

ruby-crowned and goldencrowned kinglets; Townsend’s warblers; orange-crowned warblers; downy, hairy and pileated woodpeckers; flickers; starlings; Steller’s jays; song sparrows; fox sparrows; and golden-crowned sparrows. Your birds will keep you busy in the kitchen if you introduce them to this mixture, but you will enjoy seeing more and more

species discover it. Right now, an empty container is sitting on my kitchen counter waiting for me to mix up another batch.

________ Joan Carson’s column appears every Sunday. Contact her at P.O. Box 532, Poulsbo, WA 98370, with a selfaddressed, stamped envelope for a reply. E-mail: joanpcarson@comcast.net.

Clubs and Organizations Port Angeles TOPS meetings There are four weekly meetings of TOPS groups in Port Angeles. TOPS 125 meets Wednesdays with weigh-in at 5:45 p.m., followed by a meeting at 7 p.m. at the Veterans Center, 216 S. Francis St., Port Angeles TOPS 1163 meets Wednesdays with weigh-in at 8:45 a.m. and a meeting at 10 a.m. at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 510 E. Park Ave. TOPS 1493 meets Wednesdays at 10 a.m., with weigh-in from 9:15 a.m. to 9:45 a.m., at Jace The Real Estate Co.’s meeting room, 330 E. First St. For further information, phone Pat Ferns at 360504-2143. TOPS 1296 meets Mondays with weigh-in at 10:30 a.m., followed by an 11 a.m. meeting, at 2531 E. Helm Drive; phone Carol Packer, 360-452-1790. For further information about all chapters, phone Maria Goss, area captain, at 360-275-2179.

Boys & Girls Club The Mount Angeles Unit of Boys & Girls Clubs of the Olympic Peninsula meets regularly weekdays from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. at 2620 S. Francis St. For information on membership, phone 360417-2831.

Dream Machines The Peninsula Dream Machines will meet today at 11 a.m. at Fairview Grange, 161 Lake Farm Road. For more information,

phone 360-452-3597.

VW club Strait Air Volksgruppe, a club for Volkswagen owners and enthusiasts, will meet today at noon at Joshua’s Restaurant, 113 DelGuzzi Drive. For more information, phone 360-452-5803.

Tennis club meets The Peninsula Tennis Club, a nonprofit Community Tennis Association, meets regularly for free community play at Erickson Park, Fourth and Race streets. The Peninsula Tennis Club promotes tennis play and supports improvements to tennis facilities in Clallam County. For information on club activities, visit the website at www.peninsulatennis club.com or phone 360-4602588.

PA Toastmasters The Port Angeles Toastmasters Club 25 meets Mondays from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Clallam Transit Office, 830 W. Lauridsen Blvd. For further information, phone Bill Thomas at 360460-1040 or Leilani Wood at 360-683-2655.

Fibromyalgia group The Fibromyalgia support group meets the first Monday of the month at 11:30 a.m. at the Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St. The support group is for those diagnosed with fibromyalgia and for family and friends to better understand the condition. For more information, phone Penny Brewer at 360-681-3045.

Adopt a Youth

The weekly Clubs and Organizations listing focuses on groups across the North Olympic Peninsula. There is no cost to have your club included. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the club’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. To submit your club’s news: ■ E-MAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ FAX: 360-417-3521 ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

Garden club board Port Angeles Garden Club board will meet at 1p.m. Monday at Bernice Cook’s home, 113 Ahlvers Road. For driving directions, phone 360-457-8964.

Fly fishers club Olympic Peninsula Fly Fishers club meets the first Monday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Loomis Log Cabin at Lincoln Park, off West Lauridsen Boulevard. The public is invited. For more information, phone Darlene Whitney at 360-457-2799.

Men’s chorus The Olympic Peninsula Men’s Chorus meets every Tuesday at 6 p.m. at the Monterra Community Center, in the Agnew area between Sequim and Port Angeles. Take Gunn Road to

Finn Hall Road. Turn left onto Finn Hall, turn right on Monterra Drive, and Monterra Community Center will be straight ahead. The chorus, a chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society, is open to any men who have an interest in music and singing. There are no requirements to read music, nor is solo singing a requirement to join the chorus. The chorus sings songs in four-part harmony in barbershop style and also other a cappella song styles. Visitors are welcome at any meeting. For more information, phone 360-681-7761.

German speakers A German conversation circle, der Stammtisch, for those who speak and understand German meets weekly Wednesdays, with time and location variable.

RV club meets Hurricane Ridge RV Club meets the first Wednesday of every month. This month, the group will meet for lunch at 11:30 a.m. followed by a noon meeting at Joshua’s Restaurant, 113 DelGuzzi Drive. RV owners or those interested in RVing are welcome. For more information, phone 360-683-3197 or 360-683-0120.

Mac users group The Straitmac Users Group will meet Wednesday at 7:15 p.m. in the Raymond Carver Room of the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St. This will be a beginner’s session, focusing on the most basic Macintosh operations. Refreshments will be served.

Soroptimists meet The Soroptimist International Port Angeles-Jet Set meets every Thursday at 7 a.m. at the Port Angeles Senior Center, Seventh and Peabody streets. The group’s mission and core purpose is to improve the lives of women and girls in local communities and throughout the world.

Christmas Tree Recycling in Port Angeles Recycle ME!

Sean

Christmas trees from residential customers will be collected for composting the week of January ��th. Trees also accepted at the Compost Facility at the Regional Transfer Station. �� minimum, cut into �’ lengths, no tinsel, flock or ornaments.

Weight loss Surgical Weight Loss Support Group meetings are Thursdays from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Terrace Apartments, 114 E. Sixth St., in the multipurpose room. There will be a broad spectrum of people, some beginning the process to get a gastric bypass and some who have already had surgery and are willing to help others acquire vital information on the process. Guest speakers will assist with information and a question-and-answer time. Turn

to

Clubs/C4

Confessions of a Restaurateur By Bushwhacker Bob

Sadie Rose This is my daughter, Sadie Rose. It’s hard to put into words the bond that can happen between a father and a daughter. Some of you dads know what I mean.

Sadie is blossoming into a beautiful person – inside and out. She’s taking classes at Peninsula College to become a Counselor/ Therapist, and she serves up lots of tasty food at the Bushwhacker. We celebrate her 26th birthday this month. I’m glad you were born Sadie, and so are a lot of other people.

If you have any questions about composting or recycling, please contact Helen Freilich at ��������

“Be kind to yourself and each other” ~ Bob G.

1527 East First Street

(360) 457-4113

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would like to support the sponsorship programs, e-mail Linda@adoption advocates.org.

Those wishing to volunteer in an atmosphere of support, friendship and fun are invited to join. For more information, visit the group’s website at www.sijetset.com.

There is nothing I wouldn’t do for her which can be a good thing or a bad thing.

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Sean, born Dec. 8, 2008, resides in China and has Down syndrome. He loves to play outside, and his favorite toy is blocks. Under the heartfelt care of the nannies, he has good life habits and follows a regular routine. He likes beautiful things and enjoys playing with a mirror. He is a very charming little boy. For more information on Sean or adoption in China, please e-mail Ky Bower at ky@adoptionadvocates.org or phone Adoption Advocates International at 360452-4777. Families interested in adoption must be approved by a licensed agency. If adoption is not an option for you but you

Submit your club news

Members discuss current events, movies, books, music, food, evolving and changing language, or other subjects. For more information, phone 360-457-0614 or 360-808-1522.

www.bushwhackerpa.com


C4

PeninsulaNorthwest

Sunday, January 2, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Wife can’t stand 2 of hubby’s friends DEAR ABBY: My husband, “Larry,” and I have been married three months. I adore him, his family and most of his friends. Two of them, however, I can barely tolerate. They show up at our house unannounced and stay for hours. Larry is too nice to say anything to them about these drop-in visits. They also make disparaging comments about their wives, complaining constantly about their “nagging” and their “faults.” One of them has repeatedly cheated on his wife. I don’t want my husband around these men who obviously don’t like their wives. I’m afraid what they say will “rub off” on him. I have explained the

tioning or just hanging out at my house. She and my wife have a reasons I Abigail good relationship. But Van Buren dislike his something has changed. friends, but Now, when we make he says I plans for a movie or dinner have nothor whatever, Carly makes ing to an excuse at the last minworry ute to break it. about. Dear Abby: I am a I asked her what’s going That longtime member of the on, but she won’t tell me. doesn’t U.S. Air Force who has My wife says it’s just her change the three college-age sons and age, but I don’t understand way I feel. a 13-year-old daughter, why I am the one who gets What can I do? “Carly.” cut out of her life. Worried Wife Their mother and I in Arkansas divorced eight years ago. Carly’s mother and I don’t have the best relaI’ve done everything I Dear Worried Wife: tionship, and she’s not can to stay a part of all Have a little patience and interested in discussing their lives. stop telling your husband these matters, but she says My sons and I get out you think his friends are a for an occasional round of Carly is “just being Carly.” threat to your marriage. Abby, am I worried golf or watch the game over Instead, schedule as about nothing? Is my wife dinner, but Carly and I much social time as you have reached a disconnect. right, or could there be can with other couples who another issue? We were close until have healthy relationships. early last summer — Still s Dad It shouldn’t take long swimming, shopping, vacain the U.S.A.F. for your husband to realize what sad sacks those two are. Not all friendships last forever. Sometimes, people outgrow them, and that’s what I’m hoping your husband will realize without you acting like his “keeper.”

dear abby

Dear Still a Dad: Stop panicking and listen to the women. Your little girl may have been Daddy’s girl until last summer — but she’s a teenager now. It’s normal for teens to disengage from their parents and develop interests of their own, so relax and don’t push. Let Carly know you’re there for her and eventually, she’ll start coming around again. What you have described is not unusual for girls her age. Dear Abby: Do you think it’s appropriate to ask for credit on articles I write for our company newsletter? I don’t think it’s fair to write an article for the HR department and not receive credit for it. It’s MY creation, and I’d

like to be recognized. Is this selfish, or is it a reasonable request? Unacknowledged in Madison, Ohio Dear Unacknowledgeded: It’s reasonable as long as other contributors also receive credit for their articles. In some — but not all — companies, that’s the case. You are certainly within your rights to make your preference known to whoever is publishing your newsletter. No one may have asked before.

_________ Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via e-mail by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C3

Woodworkers meet The Peninsula Woodworkers Club meets the first Thursday evening of every month. The club is composed of members interested in all phases of woodworking, furniture and cabinetmaking, wood-turning, carving, boat-building, instrumentmaking and construction. For location, which varies from month to month, phone Ed McKay at 360928-3331 or Gary Haubold at 360-452-4919.

MOPS meets Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) will meet Thursday from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Fairview Bible Church, 385 O’Brien Road. Refreshments and child care will be provided. For more information, phone 360-457-5905.

Soroptimists meet Soroptimist International Noon Club meets every Friday at noon at The Bushwhacker, 1527 E. First St. Soroptimist is an international organization with a focus on making a difference for women. Locally, the club supports the community though scholarships, Operation Uplift and other projects.

Nicotine group The Nicotine Anonymous Fellowship Group meets every Friday at 5 p.m. at Cedar Grove Counseling, 1020 Caroline St. For further information, phone 360-452-2443.

HOPE meets

Humorous OpenMinded Parent Educators, HOPE, is an inclusive group of home-schooling parents and children that meets Fridays. Time and location are PA Lions Club variable. The Port Angeles Lions All are welcome. Club will meet Thursday at For further information, phone Lisa Harvey-Boyd at noon at the Port Angeles 360-452-5525 or visit CrabHouse Restaurant, http://groups.yahoo.com/ 221 N. Lincoln St. group/HumerousOpenThe program will be mindedParentEducators. presented by Gary Baty, Port Angeles High School PA Peggers special-education teacher. Guests are welcome. The PA Peggers meet For information on the Fridays with a 5:30 p.m. Lions’ hearing aid and eye- check-in and a 6 p.m. start for games at the Eagles glass recycling program, Aerie, 110 S. Penn St. phone 360-417-6862.

Peninsula Births Olympic Medical Center

Woodley, Port Hadlock, a daughter, Dec. 22.

Jeanne and Loven Larson, Port Angeles, a son, Leyton Kristoff, 6 pounds 5 ounces, 10:13 p.m. Dec. 11. Nickole Marie Kroum and John James Larsen, Port Angeles, a daughter, Helen Joy, 9 pounds 2 ounces, 6:36 a.m. Dec. 21.

Harrison Memorial Hospital

At home Ray and Ann Marie Henninger, Sequim, a daughter, Gianna Caeli, 5 pounds 8 ounces, 10:56 p.m. Dec. 22.

Square dance club

M-F • 5-6 pm

452-6602

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Sequim and the Dungenes Valley Cooties meets Cooties meets the first Sunday of the month at 3 p.m. at the VFW Hall, 169 E. Washington St. For more information, phone the post at 360-6839546.

Chorus invitation The Grand Olympics Chorus invites women who enjoy singing to join the Sweet Adeline practice any Monday night at 6:30 p.m. at Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave. No formal training or experience needed. For more information, phone 360-683-0141 or, from Port Townsend, phone 360-385-4680.

Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1024 meets the first Friday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Veterans Center, 216 S. Francis St. For more information, phone David C. Schulz at 360-457-3604. The Clyde Rhodefer VFW Post 1024 Ladies Auxiliary also meets the first Friday of every month, and a potluck lunch is Sequim City Band served at noon, prior to the The Sequim City Band regular meeting. rehearses each Monday For the ladies auxiliary, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at phone Venay Money at Swisher Hall behind the 360-681-7085. bandstand at the James Center for the Performing Veterans for Peace Arts, 202 N. Blake Ave. For further information, Veterans for Peace, Tony phone 360-683-4896 or Van Renterghem chapter, visit the website at www. will meet Saturday at sequimcityband.org. 2:30 p.m. at Olympic Unitarian Universalist Fellowship Hall, 73 Howe Road, Bridge club off North Barr Road. The Sequim Duplicate All veterans of military Bridge Club meets every service, foreign or domestic, Monday and Friday at are eligible for full memnoon at the Masonic Tembership. ple, 700 S. Fifth Ave. Nonveterans are welThe club is affiliated comed as associate memwith the American Conbers. tract Bridge League, which Membership includes provides sanctions for stanveterans and nonveterans dard duplicate, unit and from Clallam and Jefferson championship games. counties. Play is open to the pubVFP works to support lic, with visitors welcome veterans and bring about at any time. peaceful solutions to interCoffee and refreshments national problems are offered at each game. For more information, For further information, phone David Jenkins at phone 360-691-4308; for 360-385-7612. partnership arrangement, phone 360-582-1289. The Port Angeles Coin Club will meet Saturday from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the Raymond Carver Room of the Port Angeles Library, 2210 S. Peabody St. For more information, phone 360-928-0239.

Happy Hour Locally Owned Franchise

VFW and auxiliary

Coin club meets

Phone information about at-home or out-of-town births to 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714.

Courtney and Chad

The weekly events are nine games played against nine different opponents. New members are welcome. The group is an American Cribbage Congress, Grass Roots Cribbage Club. The season runs from the first of September to the end of May. For additional information, phone Jim or Lisa Duff at 360-808-7129 or e-mail papeggers@hughes. net.

Strait Wheelers Square Dance Club meets the second and fourth Saturday of every month from 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Mount Pleasant Community Hall, 2432 Mount Pleasant Road. The cost is $5. For more information, phone 360-452-6974.

Food addicts meet Food Addicts In Recovery Anonymous meetings are Mondays at 2 p.m. and Thursdays at 7 p.m. at Calvary Chapel Sequim, 91 S. Boyce Road.

Garden club meets The Sequim Prairie Garden Club meets the first Monday of the month at 10:30 a.m. at the Pioneer Memorial Park Club House, 387 E. Washington St. This month, Marc Hilt, owner of Bambu-u, located in Chimacum, will discuss the history and many uses

for bamboo as well as for other tropical foliage. Lunch follows with Barb Blum, Donna Day and Marty Tipton providing dessert. The business meeting will be conducted at 12:30 p.m. The clubhouse and park grounds, owned and maintained by the club, are supported through the rental of the clubhouse. For information regarding rentals, phone 360-6837206. For membership information, phone 360-683-8693.

Vegetarian potluck The group meets to enjoy a monthly vegetarian/vegan potluck and program the first Monday of every month at 5:30 p.m. in the Community Services Center of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, 30 Sanford Lane. Those attending are asked to bring a favorite dish along with the recipe to share with the group. For more information or directions, phone Heather Reseck at 360-385-0150 or Walter Grant at 360-6831414.

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360-681-3868 • M-F 10-5:30; Sat. 10-5

Sequim Senior Softball Recreational Club meets Tuesdays and Thursdays at 9:30 a.m. at Carrie Blake Park (weather permitting) for practice and pickup games. All levels of players, men 55 years and older and women 50 years and older, are welcome to participate for good fun and exercise. For further information, phone John Zervos at 360-681-2587 or e-mail jazervos@gmail.com.

Marine pilots The Sequim Area U.S. Marine Corps Pilots monthly luncheon will be Tuesday at noon at 240 Sea Lawn Drive. All Marine Corps pilots are invited to attend. For more information and reservations, phone 360-681-3225.

Just Dolls meets

Now Showing ■  Deer Park Cinema,

Deathly Hallows: Part 1” (PG13) “Yogi Bear” (PG)

“The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader” (PG) “The Fighter” (R) “Little Fockers” (PG-13) “The Tourist” (PG-13) “Tron: Legacy” (PG)

■  The Rose Theatre,

■  Lincoln Theater, Port

■  Uptown Theater, Port

“Gulliver’s Travels” (PG) “Harry Potter and the

“Gulliver’s Travels” (PG)

Angeles (360-457-7997)

Cell 808-1694 582-9363

Senior softball

The Just Dolls of Washington Doll Club meets the first Tuesday evening of every month and is open to anyone interested in dolls Deaf Coffee House and/or bears. Club members conduct The Deaf Coffee House business and share dolls, will meet Monday from engage in community ser5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. in vice and organize an annual the Geneva Hall of Sequim doll show. Community Church, 960 N. New members are welFifth Ave. and Cape Hope come. Way. For further information This is bunco night, and and location, which varies there will be door prizes. from month to month, phone Participants are asked Dori Beachler at 360-683to help bring refreshments, 1006. and donations are appreciated. Toastmasters For more information, SKWIM Toastmasters e-mail sdch_2010@comcast. meets the first and third net. Tuesday of every month promptly at 7 p.m. at Blue French Club Sky Real Estate, 190 Priest The French Club invites Road. anyone who knows French Arrival at the meeting or would like to learn to is requested for 6:50 p.m. meet every week at the Guests are welcome. Sequim Bible Church, For more information, 847 N. Sequim Ave. phone the president and Beginners meet Tueschairman at 360-808-2088. days from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.; intermediates meet TuesOutriders meet days from 2 p.m. to The Olympic Peninsula 3:30 p.m.; and advanced meet Fridays for a reading Outriders, an organization of informal retired motorand conversation group cycle riders, meets Wednesfrom 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. For further information, days at 7:30 a.m. at The Mariners Cafe, 707 E. phone 360-681-0226. Washington St. No dues, no rules; just Bereavement friendship among retired The Sequim Bereaveriders. ment group meets TuesThe group has day rides days from 1:30 p.m. to and other rides throughout 3 p.m. at the Assured Hos- the year. pice office, 24 Lee Chatfield way. Turn to Clubs/C5

Port Angeles (360-4527176)

www.mikes-bikes.net Specialized

For further information, phone 360-582-3796.

Port Townsend (360385-1089) “True Grit” (PG-13) “The Fighter” (R)

Townsend (360-3853883)

peninsuladailynews.com


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, January 2, 2011

C5

Questions and answers for growers HAPPY NEW YEAR! A very happy, green, growing, weed-free, flowerful, fruit-abundant, prolific produce new (gardening) year! And it started for me on a fabulous note when the humongous amaryllis showed its first flower stalk and the razor clams displayed, in clear view, their telltale (actually their death-knell) dimples, and my mother, for the first time ever, got to capture, slay and devour the filet mignon of the shellfish world. And for my readers, let us start off on a fabulous note as well. To accomplish this and to begin to make good on my promise (resolution) to get more useful information sown into this column, I will kick the New Year off by scrounging around and digging up some reader’s questions. I have tried to follow your plan to rehabilitate my 720-square-foot grass area. I got a soil test and applied over 200 pounds of dolomite lime, but when seed is applied, should it be cast by hand or a spreader? Thank you. Dick Dick, congratulations! Nothing makes more sense

A growing concern Andrew

and helps guarantee success May better than a soil sample. It is the wisest, easiest, least costly and most cost-effective task we all can undertake, and not to do so often translates into a great waste of time, money, energy and overall plant health. Needing to apply 200 pounds of lime for a small 720-squarefoot area also means you have now (thanks to the exact recommendation of your soil test) adjusted your acidic soil, which is an inherent condition here on the Peninsula to a level conducive to great grass growth. As to your exact question, when overseeding lawns, I prefer, in fact insist, on a rotary spreader, not a drop spreader, which delivers an even application to the entire area. I most often use the ergonomic hand-held “whirly bird” type of spreader. With bare ground, I hand-

broadcast over the soil, then with a metal-tined leaf rake, I rake over the seed and soil, then broadcast over the top again lightly. I find it mostly feeds the birds or insects but lets enough seed remain and germinate for great results. I’m installing a new community drain field about an acre in size and would like to cover it with something other than grass that needs cutting. I’m thinking I might be able to do something that promotes native flowers and grass and demotes lawn grass. Do you have any suggestions, or do you know of any resources where I can get some ideas? My wife and I enjoy reading your column Sundays. Thanks, Dave Hello, Dave. Do I have any suggestions? Absolutely — and ironically, they involve grasses and, despite that, give you and your wife what you crave. The answer should be wildflowers or native grassland, prairie grasses and wildflowers. The reason is that grasses are the primary plant in a native wildflower field.

They act as a cover crop and for a variety or reasons are critical to the long-term success of a native setting. And Dave, here the word is “native.” Way too many off-theshelf wildflower mixes are not from here. In fact, a majority of wildflower mixes contain harmful, invasive or noxious weeds. So start by going to your favorite plant vendors and do computer research to find a reputable source of both indigenous grass seed and Northwest wildflower seed. Many times, the quest will end up with several seed sources and your own blend. Make sure to get a variety of flowers that bloom at different times of year. Also make sure to overseed them for two or three years — not doing so is the No. 1 source of consumer failure. And Dave, the lawn grass will be choked out, overgrown or comingled in — but please realize a soil test and a maintenance cut once or twice a year will be required. My crocuses are up at least an inch or so. What will happen there? Should they just be covered with dirt or replanted deeper

(doesn’t seem right with this amount of growth)? Thank you for your help, and keep up the good work! Very much enjoy it. Sincerely, Yvette. Dear Yvette, Most bulbs break out too early because they are planted too shallowly. On the Peninsula, people plant them much too early — our mild weather dictates a very late October/November, even December, planting, or your bulbs will emerge early. Crocuses are resilient and very cold-tolerant, and species crocuses are only a few weeks away from flowering naturally. Yes, after the bloom, I would add an inch of great garden soil, but for now, I would be very worried about newly hatching slugs and hungry mice destroying in a food feast your crocus blooms. Take pet-safe approaches to ward off both.

________ Andrew May is an ornamental horticulturist who dreams of having Clallam and Jefferson counties nationally recognized as “Flower Peninsula USA.” Send him questions c/o Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362, or e-mail news@peninsuladailynews.com (subject line: Andrew May).

Clubs and Organizations Continued from C4 take care of club business, the balance of the meeting time will be spent on memQuilters meet bers working on their wood The Sunbonnet Sue Quil- projects as the club prepares ters meets every Wednesday for its third annual winter at 9 a.m. at the Sequim show, to be held in February. Masonic Temple, 700 S. For information on Fifth Ave. upcoming driftwood sculpThe second Wednesday of ture classes, taught by certithe month is the business fied LuRon instructor Tuttie meeting. Peetz, phone 360-683-6860. At the close of the busiPrior to an available ness meeting, birthdays of class, prospective members the current month are celeare invited to attend a meetbrated with cakes and the ing the first Wednesday of gift of a fat quarter (an each month to pick up some 18-inch-by-22-inch piece of instruction from experienced fabric popular with quilters). club members. On the last Wednesday of For further information, the month, the guild meets visit the website at www. to work on community olympicdriftwoodsculptors. quilts. org, phone 360-681-2535 or Completed quilts are dis- e-mail info@olympic tributed to fire victims, Hab- driftwoodsculptors.org. itat for Humanity home recipients, foster children VFW auxiliary and other needy or worthy The Veterans of Foreign causes. Wars men’s auxiliary meets All meetings are open to the first Wednesday of the the public. month at 6 p.m. at the VFW For further information, Hall, 169 E. Washington St. phone Joan Mack at 360For more information, 681-0795. phone the post at 360-6839546. TOPS 1135 TOPS 1135 meets Wednesdays with weigh-in at 9:15 a.m. and a meeting at 10 a.m. at Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave. Visitors are welcome. For further information, phone Lynnette Baughman at 360-683-7178.

Driftwood artists

Olympic Minds Olympic Minds, The Institute of Noetic Sciences community group for Sequim and Port Angeles, meets the first three Thursdays of each month at 1 p.m. in the conference room of The Lodge at Sherwood Village, 660 Evergreen Farm Way. The meetings are free and open to the public. For more information, phone 360-681-8677.

PC genealogy

The Computer Genealogy Users Group will meet Friday at 1:30 p.m. at the A Spanish club, with con- Sequim Library, 630 N. versation and study for Sequim Ave. intermediate Spanish stuThose attending are dents, meets every Thursday asked to discuss problems at 2 p.m. at Prairie Springs and aims in family searches. Assisted Living, 680 W. PraiThere may be a surprise rie St. program. For further information, phone 360-681-0215.

Spanish club

PC users meet

The Sequim PC Users Group will meet Saturday Gamblers Anonymous at 10 a.m. in the computer meets Thursdays at lab, Room E-3, of Sequim 6:30 p.m. at Calvary Chapel High School, 601 N. Sequim, 91 S. Boyce Road. Sequim Ave. For further information, Reid Henry will demonphone 360-460-9662. strate new technologies made available to students Retired scientists in the Sequim High School Retired Scientists of CAD class. Sequim meets the first The demonstration will Thursday of every month at include design and model1:30 p.m. at the Sequim ing, “manufacturing” with Library meeting room, the laser engraver, net630 N. Sequim Ave. worked rendering and 3-D North Olympic Peninsula film making. residents with scientific In addition, there will training and background are be a discussion on learning invited to attend meetings. in a tech-oriented environThere are no dues or ment and how important other obligations. this is to a student’s education and to students of the Stamp society future. A suggested donation of Strait Stamp Society will $5 is requested from visimeet Thursday from 6 p.m. tors. to 8 p.m. at the Sequim For more information, Library, 630 N. Sequim Ave. including times and Gene Haugen will dismaps, visit the website cuss his stamp collection Driftwood and stamps he would like to at www.spcug.net or The Olympic Driftwood add to his collection. Sculptors will meet WednesThis will be followed a day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at show-and-tell by members the Sequim Prairie Grange, with unusual stamps, covers 290 Macleay Road. or other philatelic items. Visitors are welcome. The club has stamps and other philatelic After a short meeting to

Gamblers meet

e-mail spcug1@gmail.com.

Fiddlers play Washington Old Time Fiddlers play music the second Saturday of every month through May, with an all-players jam, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and a performance from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., at the Sequim Prairie Grange, 290 Macleay Road. The events are free and open to the public. Donations support scholarships. For more information, phone Hershel Lester at 360-417-6950 or e-mail handrlester@olypen.

TOPS meeting

FOFA meets Friends of Forks Animals monthly meetings are the first Wednesday of the month at 6:30 p.m. at the Forks Community Center, 91 Maple St. The public is welcome to attend. For further information, visit the FOFA website at www.friendsofforksanimals. org or phone the message line at 360-374-3332.

Port Townsend and Jefferson County Exchange group The North Olympic Exchange, a local currency group, will host an orientation to explain how this trading system works today at 5 p.m. at the Dundee Center, Hancock and 32nd streets, Port Townsend. For more information, phone Mike Dobkevich at 360-379-2627 or e-mail dobkevich1@msn.com.

TOPS in PT

Helping You Heal When the Unexpected Happens

360-582-3900

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Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim

1000 S. 5th Ave, Sequim AHCA/NCAL Quality Award Winner

TOPS 1393 meets Thursdays with weigh-in at 8:15 a.m. and a meeting at 9 a.m. at the Beacon Light Center, 1820 Irondale Road, Port Hadlock. For further information, phone Maria Goss, area captain, at 360-275-2179.

Soroptimists meet Soroptimist International of Port Townsend/Jefferson County, a professional businesswomen club, meets the first three Thursdays of the month at noon at Discovery View Retirement Apart-

ments, 1051 Hancock St., Port Townsend. For information on joining the organization, visit the website at www. soroptimistpt.org.

PT Lions Club The Port Townsend Lions Club meets the first Thursday of each month at 2 p.m. at Seaport Landing, 1201 Hancock St., Port Townsend. Lions provide assistance to the vision- and hearingimpaired members of the community as well as children removed from the home by Child Protective Services. Meetings are open to the public with no admission charge. For further information, phone 360-379-4686.

Rhody Os Dance The Rhody Os Dance Club holds dances every first and third Friday with rounds from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. and mainstream square dance from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. at the Gardiner Community Center, 980 Old Gardiner Road. There are also Tuesday night square dance lessons from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. For more information, phone 360-797-2106 or 360457-8620.

Food addicts Food Addicts in Recovery Anonymous, a support group, meets Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at First Baptist Church, 1202 Lawrence St., Port Townsend. For more information, phone 360-385-0318.

Castell Insurance 9 Medical Insurance 9 Medicare Solutions 9 Long Term Care 9 Life & Annuity Plans

426 E. Washington St., Sequim • (360) 683-9284 www.castellinsurance.com • info@castellinsurance.com

The Port Townsend Chapter of Take Off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS) meets every Monday at 5:30 p.m. at the Church of Christ, 230 A St., Port Townsend. NO DELIVERY FEE NO HAZMAT FEE

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The Port Townsend Camera Club meets the first Monday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Port Townsend Community Center, 620 Tyler St. Participants share and critique digital, print and slide photographs. Anyone interested may come for guest speakers, refreshments, photo contests, field trips, classes in all photography-related subjects and public showings of work with other club members.

Rakers Car Club, a 50-year-old organization, TOPS meeting meets the first Tuesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the TOPS 879 meets ThursHighway 20 Roadhouse, days with weigh-in at noon 2152 W. Sims Way, Port followed by a meeting at 1 p.m. at the Masonic Lodge, Townsend. People interested in old 130 W. Division St., Forks. cars and trucks are invited. For further information, There is a minimum age phone Maria Goss, area capof 21 to attend meetings. tain, at 360-275-2179.

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Camera club meets

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For further information, phone 360-385-1081.

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Peninsula Driftwood Artists will meet Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Trinity Methodist Church, 100 Blake Ave. The group is exclusively devoted to the LuRon method of driftwood artistry. Members are encouraged to bring their lunch and current driftwood project. There will be a work session following the business meeting. Prospective members are always welcome to attend. Sign-ups for LuRon method driftwood classes for late winter and spring are being taken. The club has four certified LuRon instructors: Twila Baukol, Sharon Curnett, Jenny Linth and Yolanda Proulx. For more information, visit the website at www. peninsuladriftwoodartists. org.

material available. Strait Stamp Society, a chapter of the American Philatelic Society and the Northwest Federation of Stamp Clubs, receives the latest news on new stamp releases, stamp shows and other related information to help collectors find and sell stamps. There are no dues, though donations are welcome. For more information, phone 360-683-6373.

360-385-6883 or Sequim 360-683-1881 265 Chimacum Rd., Port Hadlock Normal Hours: M–F 8-5 www.mountainpropane.com MOUNTP198306


C6

Sunday, January 2, 2011

PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

4 kids, 1 man killed in Redmond blaze By Donna Gordon Blankinship

The Associated Press

REDMOND — A mother could only watch in agony as her four young children and a man were killed by an intense apartment fire that broke out a few hours into the new year, her neighbors in the apartment complex said Saturday. Neighbor Jared Wilson said the 30-year-old woman was able to escape the twobedroom ground-floor apartment and stood outside as heavy smoke and flames engulfed her home. All four children were 10 or younger, fire officials said.

‘Couldn’t speak’ “She couldn’t speak — she was just hysterically screaming,” said Wilson, 27, who lives on the building’s third floor. A 32-year-old man in the same apartment also died, said police spokesman Officer Matt Peringer. The woman was taken to a hospital where she was reported in stable condition, said Fire Battalion Chief Ed Carolan. The names of the victims and the relationship between the man and woman were not immediately available. No other injuries were reported, and the residents of all 12 apartments in the three-story wooden building were evacuated and found temporary housing.

By midday, police and fire officials were still trying to determine if the structure was stable enough to allow investigators inside to look for a possible cause, Peringer said. Chris Champoux and his wife were sleeping in their apartment in the building across a driveway from the units that burned. “The heat actually woke my wife up,” he said. “It was an inferno — very horrific.” Crews from six fire departments responded, and investigators from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, the Washington State Patrol and a Seattle Fire Department canine arson detection unit were at the scene, though there were no immediate signs it was intentionally set, Peringer said.

Reported at 2:30 a.m. Carolan said the fire was reported around 2:30 a.m. at the Sammamish Ridge Apartments and quickly burned the two units above it. All three were heavily damaged, and the apartments next to them have smoke damage, he said. Wilson said only about 30 seconds elapsed from the time he first heard shouting until his apartment was surrounded by heavy smoke and he was forced to flee. As he ran down the stairwell, he saw the woman, whose children he had often seen

The Associated Press

Firefighters and investigators inspect the scene of an apartment fire that claimed the lives of five people in Redmond on Saturday. playing, screaming outside the building. Wilson said he and another resident grabbed a fire extinguisher and the two tried to enter the smoke-filled apartment. “At that point, the whole place just went up” and they were forced away by the flames.

Things to Do Today and Monday, Jan. 2-3, in: n Port Angeles n Sequim-Dungeness Valley n Port TownsendJefferson County n Forks-West End

Port Angeles Sunday PA Vintage Softball — Co-ed slow pitch for fun, fellowship and recreation. Phone Gordon Gardner at 360-4525973 or Ken Foster at 360-6830141 for information, including time of day and location.

“It’s tough thinking about the fact that she lost her whole family,” Wilson said The building is one of a complex of three-story buildings in a wooded area just northwest of downtown Redmond. It is about two miles north of the Microsoft

Volunteers in Medicine of the Olympics health clinic — 909 Georgiana St., noon to 5 p.m. Free for patients with no insurance or access to health care. For appointments, phone 360-457-4431.

Lions Breakfast — All-youcan-eat. Crescent Bay Lions First Step drop-in center Clubhouse, Holly Hill Road and state Highway 112, 8:30 a.m. — 325 E. Sixth St., 1 p.m. to 4 to 11 a.m. $6 adults, $3 chil- p.m. Free clothing and equipment closet, information and dren. referrals, play area, emergency Feiro Marine Life Center supplies, access to phones, — City Pier, noon to 4 p.m. computers, fax and copier. Admission by donation. Phone Phone 360-457-8355. 360-417-6254. General discussion group — Port Angeles Senior Center, Port Angeles Fine Arts 328 E. Seventh St., 1:30 p.m. to Center — “Art Is a Gift” show 4 p.m. No specified topic. Open and sale. 1203 E. Lauridsen to public. Blvd., 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. Free. The Answer for Youth — Show ends today. Phone 360- Drop-in outreach center for 457-3532. youth and young adults, providing essentials like clothes, food, Clallam County Historical Narcotics and Alcoholics AnonSociety History Tales — Ross ymous meetings, etc. 711 E. Crockford, an award-winning Second St., 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Canadian freelance writer, will discuss the history of Victoria, Mental health drop-in cenB.C. 2 p.m. Port Angeles City ter — The Horizon Center, 205 Council chambers, 321 E. Fifth E. Fifth St. , 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. St. Free. For those with mental disorders and looking for a place to Dance — Sons of Norway socialize, something to do or a Hall, 131 W. Fifth St., 6:30 p.m. hot meal. For more information, with 30 minutes of instruction, phone Rebecca Brown at 360followed by folk and ballroom 457-0431. dance. $2 members, $3 nonmembers. Refreshments at 9 Senior meal — Nutrition p.m. Phone 360-457-4081. program, Port Angeles Senior Center, 328 E. Seventh St., 4:30 p.m. Donation of $3 to $5 Monday per meal. Reservations recomOvereaters Anonymous — mended. Phone 360-457St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 8921. 510 E. Park Ave., 9 a.m. Phone 360-477-1858. Port Angeles Toastmasters Club 25 — Clallam Transit Walk-in vision clinic — Business Office, 830 W. LauridInformation for visually impaired sen Blvd., 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. and blind people, including Open to public. Phone Bill accessible technology display, Thomas at 360-460-4510 or library, Braille training and vari- Leilani Wood 360-683-2655. ous magnification aids. Vision Loss Center, Armory Square Bingo — Masonic Lodge, Mall, 228 W. First St., Suite N. 622 Lincoln St., 6:30 p.m. Phone 360-457-1383 for an Doors open at 4 p.m. Food, appointment or visit www. drinks and pull tabs available.

dent manager of the complex. She declined further comment. According to Sammamish Ridge’s website, it is managed by Pan Pacific Properties, a Seattle company that has nine apartment complexes in the Seattle area.

. . . planning your day on the North Olympic Peninsula

visionlossservices.org/vision. Guided walking tour — Historic downtown buildings, an old brothel and “Underground Port Angeles.” Chamber of Commerce, 121 E. Railroad Ave., 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 senior citizens and students, $6 ages 6 to 12. Children younger than 6, free. For reservations, phone 360-452-2363, ext. 0.

Corp. campus and about 12 miles east of Seattle. The buildings have smoke detectors but not sprinklers, which weren’t required when the complex was built in the mid-1980s, Peringer said. “It is an awful tragedy,” said Teresa Lunsford, resi-

Get in on the Things to Do The daily Things to Do calendar focuses on events open to the public. There is no cost for inclusion in both the print and online version at peninsuladailynews.com. Submissions must be received at least two weeks in advance of the event and contain the event’s name, location and address, times, cost if any, contact phone number and a brief description. Submitting items for Things to Do is easy: ■ E-MAIL: Send items to news@peninsuladailynews. com or via the “Calendar” link at peninsuladailynews. com. ■ U.S. MAIL: PDN News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ IN PERSON: At any of the PDN’s three news offices. Please see Page A2 for the address of the one nearest you in Port Angeles, Port Townsend and Sequim.

Dickson at comcast.net.

dianed52@ olypen.com or quilcene museum@embarqmail.com.

Women’s barbershop chorus — Singers sought for Grand Olympics Chorus of Sweet Adelines. Sequim Bible Church, 847 N. Sequim Ave., 6:30 p.m. Phone Wendy Foster at 360-683-0141.

Port Townsend and Jefferson County Today

Exercise classes — Sequim Community Church, 1000 N. Fifth Ave. Cardio-step, 9 a.m. to

Port Townsend Aero Museum — Jefferson County International Airport, 195 Airport Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $10 for adults, $9 for seniors, $6 for children ages 7-12. Free for children younger 10:15 a.m. Strength and toning than 6. Features vintage airclass, 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. craft and aviation art. Cost: $5 a person. Phone ShelChimacum Grange Farmley Haupt at 360-477-2409 or e-mail jhaupt6@wavecable. ers Market — 9572 Rhody Drive, Chimacum, 10 a.m. to 2 com. p.m. Senior Singles— Hiking Puget Sound Coast Artiland a walk, 9 a.m. Phone 360lery Museum — Fort Worden 797-1665 for location. State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free blood pressure Admission: $3 for adults, $1 for screening — Faith Lutheran children 6 to 12, free for chilChurch, 382 W. Cedar St., 9 dren 5 and younger. Exhibits a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone 360- interpret the Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound and the Strait 683-4803. of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360Sequim Duplicate Bridge 385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ — Masonic Lodge, 700 S. Fifth olypen.com. Ave., noon. Phone 360-681Jefferson County Histori4308 or partnership at 360- cal Museum and shop — 540 683-5635. Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for Women’s weight loss sup- children 3 to 12; free to historiport group — Dr. Leslie Van cal society members. Exhibits Romer’s office, 415 N. Sequim include “Jefferson County’s Ave. Maritime Heritage,” “James Swan and the Native AmeriFamily Caregivers support cans” and “The Chinese in group — Trinity United Meth- Early Port Townsend.” Phone odist Church, 100 Blake Ave., 1 360-385-1003 or visit www. p.m. to 3 p.m. Phone Carolyn jchsmuseum.org. Lindley at 360-417-8554. Commanding Officer’s Health clinic — Free medi- Quarters museum tour — cal services for uninsured or Fort Worden State Park, noon underinsured. Dungeness Val- to 4 p.m. $4 adults, free for ley Health & Wellness Clinic, children. Phone 360-385-1003. 777 N. Fifth Ave., Suite 109, 5 p.m. Phone 360-582-0218. Quilcene Historical Museum — 151 E. Columbia Sign language group — St., by appointment. Artifacts, “Deaf Coffee House,” portable documents, family histories building next to playground at and photos of Quilcene and Sequim Community Church, surrounding communities. New 950 N. Fifth Ave., 6 p.m. to 8 exhibits on Brinnon, military, p.m. Participants communicate millinery and Quilcene High using American sign language. School’s 100th anniversary. E-mail sdch_2010@comcast. Phone 360-765-0688, 360net, Gerilee Gustason at 765-3192 or 360-765-4848, or quilcenemuseum@ gerileeg@aol.com or Diane e-mail

the residence. The unidentified driver was flown to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle for treatment of burns. The Washington State Patrol said the male homeowner was in the house but escaped without injury. Troopers said the driver is being investigated for driving under the influence. They told the Skagit Valley Herald that the car might have been a Ford Mustang, but it was so

badly burned the make and to other hospitals. model were nearly unrecNeither police nor St. ognizable. John Medical Center officials would identify the 54-year-old woman or disPolice standoff cuss her condition. LONGVIEW — Capt. Robert Huhta told Longview police said an the Daily News that the hourlong standoff with an woman drove up to the armed woman outside a emergency room entrance hospital emergency room at about 7:15 p.m., called entrance ended when the 9-1-1 and threatened to woman shot herself in the harm herself. leg Friday night. Armed with a small The hospital was handgun, she remained in locked down during the her white car while officers standoff and diverted ambulances and patients tried to talk to her.

Phone 360-457-7377. Quilt Guild — Veterans Center, 216 S. Francis, 6:30 p.m. Bring own project or lend a hand with gratitude quilts for local veterans. Phone JoAnn Vickery at 360-461-0506.

Sequim and Dungeness Valley Today VFW breakfast — 169 E. Washington St., 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cost: $5 a person. Pittsburgh Steelers Fan Club — Watch the team with other black-and-gold fans at Stymie’s Bar & Grill at Cedars at Dungeness Golf Course, 1965 Woodcock Road, 10 a.m. Phone 360-775-8663. Adult Scrabble — The Buzz, 128 N. Sequim Ave., 1 p.m. Phone 360-681-2619. Trivia night — Oasis Sports Bar and Grill, 301 E. Washington St., 5:30 p.m. Phone 360582-3143.

Monday Vinyasa Yoga — 92 Plain Jane Lane, 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. Phone 206-321-1718 or visit www.sequimyoga.com. Walk aerobics — First Baptist Church of Sequim, 1323 Sequim-Dungeness Way, 8 a.m. Free. Phone 360-6832114.

English country dance — RoseWind Common House, 3131 Haines St., 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Lessons by Nan Evans of Portland. Music by Fred Nussbaum and friends. Followed by a potluck dinner. No street shoes or fragrances. Phone Dan Post at 360-554-0417 or e-mail dan.post@frandango. org.

Monday Cabin Fever Quilters — TriArea Community Center, 10 West Valley Road, Chimacum, 10 a.m. Open to public. Phone Laura Gipson at 360-3850441. Puget Sound Coast Artillery Museum — Fort Worden State Park, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $3 for adults; $1 for children 6 to 12; free for children 5 and younger. Exhibits interpret the Harbor Defenses of Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Phone 360385-0373 or e-mail artymus@ olypen.com. Jefferson County Historical Museum and shop — 540 Water St., 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission: $4 for adults; $1 for children 3 to 12; free to historical society members. Exhibits include “Jefferson County’s Maritime Heritage,” “James Swan and the Native Americans” and “The Chinese in Early Port Townsend.” Phone 360-385-1003 or visit www. jchsmuseum.org. Quilcene Historical Museum — 151 E. Columbia St., by appointment. Artifacts, documents, family histories and photos of Quilcene and surrounding communities. New exhibits on Brinnon, military, millinery and Quilcene High School’s 100th anniversary. Phone 360-765-0688, 360765-3192 or 360-765-4848, or e-mail quilcenemuseum@ olypen.com or quilcene museum@embarqmail.com. Silent war and violence protest — Women In Black, Adams and Water streets, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Overeaters Anonymous — St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 1032 Jefferson St., 5 p.m. Phone 360-385-6854.

Briefly: State Seattle bus collision kills one woman SEATTLE — Seattle police said a young woman was killed just after midnight New Year’s Day when her car collided head-on with a Metro Transit bus. Police said the woman was alone in the car that was traveling at high speed when it collided with the bus in south Seattle’s

Georgetown neighborhood. They said the woman, in her 20s, died instantly. One person aboard the bus suffered back pain and was taken to a hospital. The woman’s identity was not immediately available.

Propane tank fire SEDRO-WOOLLEY — Firefighters said a house near Sedro-Woolley exploded in flames Friday night after a car crashed into a propane tank at

Huhta said that shortly after 8 p.m., she stepped out of the vehicle and fired one shot into her leg. Hospital spokesman Randy Querin said the emergency room entrance is the only patient entrance at night. The Associated Press

How’s the fishing? Matt Schubert reports. Fridays in

Peninsula Daily News


PeninsulaNorthwest

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, January 2, 2011

C7

Felons turned down for medical pot By Jonathan Martin

The Seattle Times (Via The Associated Press)

SEATTLE — Several times a week for the past two years, felons on supervision have asked the Department of Corrections for special permission to use medical marijuana. Some of the requests, which are signed by doctors, are vague, listing just “chronic pain” as the reason for the drug. But others describe agony — anorexia from AIDS or chronic vomiting from chemotherapy. As regular as rain, the state DOC — Department of Corrections — has turned down nearly all of them. Out of 320 requests, seven people have gotten permission — a select group that includes a forger wasting away from AIDS and a white-haired grandmother named Kathy Parkins with fibromyalgia. Squeezed by conflicting duties of policing felons while not meddling with their medical treatment, the agency has been swept into the complex and ongoing debate about the state’s 12-year-old, voter-approved medical marijuana law. The pressure on the DOC to permit felons to use medical marijuana is likely to intensify as the medical pot industry flourishes and polls show public opinion increasingly favoring legalization. New patients are being authorized by the day, and dozens of new marijuana dispensaries are eager to serve them. The state is even getting in on the action, announcing earlier this month an attempt to tax medical marijuana retail sales. Advocates for medical pot estimate at least 100,000 patients statewide are approved for its use and about 5,000 people make their living off medicinal pot.

‘Authorization mills’? The lifeblood of the industry are the doctors’ notes recommending medical pot for specific patients. Possession of marijuana is still illegal, but a note provides a valid defense if a patient is criminally charged. A small but frustrated group of advocates, attorneys, physicians and patients says DOC is ignoring the state medical marijuana law by substituting its judgment for that of doctors who recommend the drug. The policy, they say, is ripe for a legal challenge, although none has been filed. DOC takes a jaundiced view toward many of those notes recommending medical marijuana. A vast majority of recommendations for DOC offenders come from just three or four clinics that are potfriendly “authorization mills,” according to the agency. “Frankly, most mainstream clinicians tend to gravitate toward traditional and conventional treatments, rather than marijuana,” said Dr. Steve Hammond, DOC’s chief doctor.

Doug Hiatt, a Seattle attorney who represents medical marijuana patients, said DOC “is playing doctor, and they’re doing a bad job of it. They’re messing around with sick people’s medications. It’s sickening.” For a decade after passage of the 1998 initiative, medical marijuana was a side issue at DOC. The law prohibits medicinal pot in prisons. Those on post-prison supervision found corrections officers sometimes ignored positive drug tests if the offender had a doctor’s recommendation. In 2008, the law was changed to expand the type of medical professionals who can recommend marijuana, and to clarify how much pot a patient can possess. That prompted a boom in clinics that authorize medical marijuana — and in requests from DOC offenders to use it. That has put DOC field officers in a bind: Do they uphold no-drug provisions in criminal sentences and prioritize a duty to help offenders stay clean? Or do they show mercy to sick offenders with doctors’ recommendations and follow the medical marijuana law? There’s one more concern: The oft-sued agency fears it could be liable if an offender on supervision were to hurt someone while high on DOC-approved pot. Scott Blonien, a DOC assistant secretary, laid out the quandary in an e-mail to other DOC managers in 2008.

Advanced AIDS? What if an offender with advanced AIDS who had a doctor’s note for medical marijuana tested positive for pot in a drug test? “This person’s possession and use is not against state law. Should DOC still violate this offender for action that our state Legislature recognized was necessary, for ‘humanitarian reasons?’” according to the e-mail, which was obtained by the advocacy group Cannabis Defense Coalition. “Do we really want to die on this hill?” After internal debate, DOC took a firm law-andorder line. Since July 2008, 320 offenders have requested waivers, which are reviewed by Hammond but subject to appeal within DOC. Waivers are not needed for prescriptions for Marinol, a synthetic form of THC — the active ingredient in marijuana — approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat nausea and appetite loss. Hammond has approved just one request; six others were OK’d on appeal. Blonien said the policy is the right balance between compassion and accountability, especially because most of the requests for waivers come from offenders with drug histories. “It is a very difficult position the department is in,” he said. “The public expects us to help these folks return to the community, and to protect the public. “It is just incongruent for

The Seattle Times

via

The Associated Press

Medical-marijuana user Kathy Parkins is under state Department of Corrections supervision because she was arrested for possessing pot in Arizona, which does not allow medical use of pot. She runs a business from her West Seattle house, supplying cannabis-laced baked goods to other legal users.

Medical marijuana rules The North Olympic Peninsula’s first medical marijuana outlet, Olympian Canna, is planning to open soon in Port Angeles. Police and city officials said they will allow it to operate as long the dispensary provides marijuana only to those who have been authorized to use it by a doctor. Medical marijuana rules: ■  Qualifying: A patient must suffer from a “terminal or debilitating medical condition,” such as cancer, HIV, multiple sclerosis, intractable pain or other illness defined by the state Medical Quality Assurance Commission. Depression and anxiety do not qualify.

■  Recommending: A clinician can recommend — but not prescribe — marijuana to a patient who has a qualifying condition. Six types of clinicians, including naturopaths and physician assistants, can make recommendations, which must be printed on tamperresistant paper. ■  Possession: Marijuana possession remains illegal, but a clinician’s recommendation provides an “affirmative defense” in court, meaning a patient can still be arrested but can use the recommendation form as a defense. Most prosecutors won’t charge patients with valid recommendations and a 60-day supply or less.

■  Supply: A qualifying patient can have a 60-day supply, defined as 24 ounces and 15 plants, but patients may exceed those limits with a proven medical need. ■  Dispensaries: State law prohibits dispensaries, but it allows patients to get marijuana from a “designated provider.” In the absence of clarity in the law, dispensaries have opened to act as providers. ■  Federal law: Marijuana is illegal under federal law, but the U.S. Justice Department has said it will not target users in compliance with state medical-marijuana laws. Sources: state Department of Health; ACLU of Washington

us to allow some to use marijuana when it led to the criminality in the first place.” Dr. Scott Havsy, a Tacoma physician, protested when DOC denied his patient’s use of marijuana to treat “intractable pain” from multiple herniated discs, a diagnosis included under the state law. “The Department of Corrections takes the statute and modifies it themselves,” said Havsy. “That is just wrong. They’re not following the law.” To get around the DOC, some offenders have quietly asked their sentencing judge to change the terms of supervision to allow medicinal marijuana. As the offenders’ requests have flowed in, Hammond and other DOC staff took note of a handful of doctors who signed one recommendation after another. Among the most prolific is Dr. Mohammad H. Said, a licensed physician in Ephrata. He said he has signed 20 notes for DOC patients, a small part of his estimated 8,000 authorizations since mid-2008. Said estimates that he has worked for 10 different clinics that specialize in

medical marijuana, Kathy Parkins must comply with just one special condition: Don’t drive while high. She’s fine with that. Parkins, a white-haired, 54-year-old grandmother, has been legally using marijuana for a decade to treat symptoms of fibromyalgia, which causes chronic joint and muscle pain. During a 2008 road trip in Arizona, a drug-sniffing dog at a Border Patrol checkpoint went nuts on her car. Officers found a quarterounce of pot, as well as cannabis-laced vinaigrette, peanut-butter cups, bubble bath, blackberry cookies, body lotion and vanilla cake. Five complaints Parkins had wrongly been told that Arizona allows The state Medical Qual- medical marijuana. ity Assurance Commission has investigated five com- Troubles continue plaints regarding medical professionals’ marijuana She pleaded guilty to recommendations, with one possession in April 2008 — currently open, which the her first criminal conviction agency wouldn’t discuss. — and was sentenced to 36 It has not yet sought to months of probation. discipline a clinician over She got her case transmedical pot, said Larry ferred back to Washington Berg, a staff attorney for but was in trouble within the commission. weeks: “We know if these cases She failed a DOC urine go to [disciplinary] action, test for pot, and officers conthey will be under large ducting a home visit found scrutiny,” said Berg. an authorized medical marAs one of seven people ijuana growing operation that DOC has approved for belonging to another tenant

not required and drop-ins are welcome. Upcoming titles include The Help by Kathryn Stockett on Jan. 26; Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert, Feb. 23; The Elegance of the Hedgehog by

Muriel Barbery, March 30; The Lacuna by Barbara Kingsolver, April 27; and The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien, May 25. Copies of each book are available at the library, and alternative formats such as

authorizing medical marijuana, spending 15 minutes or so with each patient. Patients pay about $150 for a recommendation. Said, who was disciplined by the Department of Health in 2008 for overprescribing narcotics, said he doesn’t use pot himself. But he said it has proved benefits, including providing more “domestic tranquillity” than alcohol. “Ninety percent of my patients have been taking marijuana on their own for a long time. They just come in to me to make it legal,” said Said, who ran for U.S. Senate in 2010 and governor in 2008.

in a house she rented. Parkins was jailed for a week, and a DOC officer tried to get her sent back to Arizona based on an inaccurate assertion that she had no family ties in Washington. DOC backed off as friends and advocates pressed her case to the governor. She got a DOC waiver last year and hasn’t been drug-tested for marijuana since. To be safe, she now carries notes from three doctors. She runs a business from her West Seattle house, supplying cannabis-laced baked goods and oils to four dispensaries. Most medical marijuana patients are truly sick, so DOC would risk little with a more liberal dose of mercy, she said. “These are not the normal criminal,” said Parkins. “They’re mostly housebound.” But DOC is sticking with its policy, said Anmarie Aylward, DOC’s community corrections director. “Until we hear more from taxpayers, I think we’re on the right road,” she said.

Briefly . . . PT center to host two workshops

Book discussions PORT ANGELES — Combat cabin fever this winter by joining the Reading PALS book discussion group at Port Angeles Library, which has announced titles for upcoming gathering. The group meets on the last Wednesday of the month from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Preregistration is

Death Notices Betty B. Earley Jan. 19, 1932 — Dec. 30, 2010

Betty B. Earley died in Port Angeles. She was 78. Services: Visitation will be from 3 to 8 p.m. Monday at Harper-Ridgeview Funeral Chapel, 105 W. Fourth St., Port Angeles. Memorial service at 1 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, 110 E. Seventh St., Port Angeles. Private burial will be at Mount Angeles Memorial Park, 45 Monroe Road.

large print, book on CD or downloadable print or audio books can be arranged. The Port Angeles Library is at 2210 S. Peabody St. For more information

on this and other programs, visit www. nols.org and click on “Events” and “Port Angeles,” or phone Lorrie Kovell at 360-417-8514 or e-mail her at lkovell@nols.org. Peninsula Daily News

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PORT TOWNSEND — The Port Townsend Marine Science Center will host two workshops in the Marine Exhibit classroom at Fort Worden State Park in the coming weeks. “Experiencing Seabirds” will be Saturday and “Experiencing Animal Behavior” will be Saturday, Jan. 22, both from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Ken Wilson, a naturalist with science degrees from Cornell and the University of Washington will lead both workshops. Part of each workshop will be held outside so participants should come dressed for the elements.

The admission fee for each workshop is $30 for the general public and $25 for Port Townsend Marine Science Center, Audubon Society or Burke Museum members. Science center volunteers can attend for free. For more information or to register, phone Wilson at 360-821-1101 or e-mail tadpoleranch@ gmail.com.


Peninsula Daily News for Sunday, January 2, 2011

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Politics & Environment

 $ Briefly . . . Fort Worden initiatives to be discussed PORT TOWNSEND — The Fort Worden Collaborative is an effort by public agencies, nonprofit organizations and private enterprise to promote conservation, creative learning and community development at the state park. It will take center stage at the Jefferson County Chamber of Commerce’s first luncheon meeting of the new year on Monday. Scheduled to speak are Scott Wilson, publisher of the Port Townsend Leader weekly newspaper and higher education collaborative member; Erin Fristad, director of Goddard College, discussing the college’s Fort Worden offerings; and Tom Keegan, Peninsula College president, on the community college’s operations at Fort Worden. Their talks, focusing on the education future of the state park, will be followed in two weeks by other collaborative representatives at the chamber’s Jan. 17 luncheon. Open to the public, Monday’s luncheon of the Jefferson County chamber, combining former chamber organizations in Port Townsend, Port Ludlow and the Tri-Area, begins at noon at the Port Townsend Elks Lodge, 555 Otto St. Lunch costs $12 for a full meal, $9 for soup and salad or $5 for dessert and beverage. Prices include tax.

Also, a morning meeting In addition, the Jefferson County chamber will hold a breakfast meeting Tuesday for its members and the public who find mornings more convenient or may not be able to attend the Monday luncheon. There will be business networking, an update on chamber activities and a featured speaker. Tuesday’s breakfast buffet, at $9 per person, will start at 7:45 a.m. at Pedro’s Fiesta Jalisco restaurant, 10893 Rhody Drive, in Port Hadlock. The chamber luncheon meetings are held weekly on Mondays. Breakfast meetings are held the first Tuesday of each month.

PA chamber awards PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Regional Chamber of Commerce will hand out its 2010 awards during this week’s luncheon meeting on Monday. Announced will be the President’s Award and Member Extraordinaire award, and departing officers and board members will be recognized. In addition, the 2011 board members and executive committee will be installed. Open to the public, Monday’s chamber lunch­eon begins at noon in the second-floor meeting room of the Port Angeles CrabHouse Restaurant at the Red Lion Hotel, 221 N. Lincoln St. The meeting will also feature chamber staff and visitor center volunteers introductions. Luncheon tickets are $13 and can be purchased from the meeting room cashier.

Real-time stock quotations now at peninsuladailynews.com

The Associated Press

Mike Vanatta stands in his Vero Beach, Fla. living room, with his toys. Vanatta, 61, is paying the price for being a baby boomer who enjoyed life without saving for the future. members of Port Angeles Citizens for Education, Steve Methner and Betsy Wharton. The citizens’ group advocates passage of the levy. Shelley Taylor, co-founder of Property Owners for Predictable Tax Now, is scheduled to talk against levy passage. Voters in the all-mail election will be asked to approve a fouryear levy that will supercede the current levy which expires in December. The levy fills the gap between state funding and the actual cost of operations and maintenance, school officials have said. Tuesday’s PABA breakfast meeting, open to the public, begins at 7:30 a.m. at Joshua’s Restaurant, 113 DelGuzzi Drive, Port Angeles. There is a $2.16 minimum charge by Joshua’s for those who do not order breakfast.

New construction firm SEQUIM — Alex’s Construction is now open for business. The business, owned and operated by Alex Davitadze, offers home repair, remodeling and handyman services. Some of the services offered include painting, tile finishing and finish carpentry. Davitadze has years of experience and describes the services offered by the business as affordable. References are available upon request. For more information about Alex’s Construction, phone 360912-1048.

KONP talk guests

PORT ANGELES — Here is this week’s schedule for the 1:05 p.m. to 2 p.m. local talk show segment on KONP radio at 1450 AM, 102.1 FM and on www. konp.com on the Internet outside the Port Angeles area. Station general manager Todd Ortloff hosts the Monday through Thursday segments, and Karen Hanan hosts “Art Beat” on Fridays. This week’s scheduled lineup: ■  Monday — Port Angeles City Manager Kent Myers. ■  Tuesday — Daryl TrowBusiness meeting set bridge, Dungeness Valley Health FORKS — Members of the & Wellness Clinic. Forks Chamber of Commerce In a separate segment, Dan will gather for a business meetKish, Institute for Energy ing as their weekly luncheon Research, on Obama adminisprogram on Wednesday. tration controls on oil and gas The chamber invites speakers drilling. to keynote other Wednesday lun■  Wednesday — To be cheon meetings. announced. But it reserves the first ■  Thursday — Chuck Wednesday of each month as a Stecker, president/founder of A business meeting for news, Chosen Generation and feature announcements and updates. speaker at the Olympic PeninThe meeting, open to the pub- sula Men’s Fellowship Conferlic, starts with no-host lunch at ence. noon at JT’s Sweet Stuffs, 80 N. In a separate segment, Mike Forks Ave. Howe, Clallam County Public Lunch costs $8; a bowl of Utilities District spokesman. soup; $4.75; and a cup of soup, ■  Friday — Port Angeles $4. Fine Arts Center Executive Phone Marcia Bingham, Director Jake Seniuk. chamber director, at 360-374In a separate segment, musi2531 for further information. cian Jason Mogi, artist Sage Parent and Art Walk represenSchool levy is topic tative Sarah Tucker on the Port Angeles Second Friday Art PORT ANGELES — SpeakWalk. ers for — and against — the Port Angeles School District levy on the Feb. 8 ballot will keynote ‘Business friendly’? this week’s breakfast meeting of OLYMPIA — Washington the Port Angeles Business Asso- stands strong in foreign exports ciation on Tuesday. and industrial spending on Port Angeles School District research and development, but Superintendent Jane Pryne continues to lag behind in some and Executive Director Busicategories such as classroom ness Operations Jim Schwob size, according to this year’s will offer information about the Washington State Economic financial status of the school Climate Study. district. Turn to Briefly/C14 Also scheduled to appear are

Time marches on: Boomers turning 65 Many find retirement still only a dream By Dave Carpenter The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Through a combination of procrastination and bad timing, many baby boomers are facing a personal finance disaster just as they’re hoping to retire. Starting New Year’s Day, more than 10,000 baby boomers a day began turning 65, a pattern that will continue for the next 19 years. The boomers, who in their youth revolutionized everything from music to race relations, are set to redefine retirement. But a generation that made its mark in the tumultuous 1960s now faces a crisis as it hits its own mid-60s. “The situation is extremely serious because baby boomers have not saved very effectively for retirement and are still retiring too early,” says Olivia Mitchell, director of the Boettner Center for Pensions and Retirement Research at the University of Pennsylvania. There are several reasons to be concerned: n The traditional pension plan is disappearing. In 1980, some 39 percent of private-sector workers had a pen-

Birthdays matter — and boomers cling to youth By Dan Barry

The New York Times

In keeping with a generation’s fascination with itself, the time has come to note the passing of another milestone: On New Year’s Day, the oldest members of the baby-boom generation turned 65, the age once linked to retirement, earlybird specials and gray Velcro shoes that go with everything. Although other generations, from the Greatest to the Millennial, may mutter that it’s time to get over yourselves, this birthday matters. According to the Pew Research Center, for the next 19 years, about 10,000 people “will cross that threshold” every day, and many, whether through exercise or Botox, have no intention of ceding to others what they consider rightfully theirs — youth. Turn

sion that guaranteed a steady payout during retirement. Today that number stands closer to 15 percent, according to the Employee Benefit Research Institute in Washington, D.C. n Reliance on stocks in retirement plans is greater than ever; 42 percent of those workers now have 401(k)s. But the past decade has been a

to

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lost one for stocks, with the Standard & Poor’s 500 index posting total returns of just 4 percent since the beginning of 2000. n Many retirees banked on their homes as their retirement fund. But the crash in housing prices has slashed almost a third of a typical home’s value. Turn

to

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The old year that fizzled; new year that rebounds? By David Leonhardt The New York Times

Washington — It was the year that the economy started to recover and then slid back into a slump — only to offer reason for renewed hope in the final weeks. When 2010 began, hiring and consumer spending were finally picking up. But then something changed in the spring — a combination of the debt troubles in Europe, the fading of stimulus spending and the usual caution by businesses and consumers after a financial crisis. By the summer, the unemployment rate was rising again, and Americans’ attitudes about the future were again souring. Making matters worse, many of the economy’s long-term problems also became more severe this year. Health care costs continued to rise faster than inflation, and the number of uninsured continued to grow.

The most recent climate data suggested 2010 would be the hottest or second-hottest year ever recorded; the 10 hottest have all occurred in the last 13 years, creating serious risks for the planet and its economy. The federal budget deficit ballooned further (though it should grow during an economic slump).

But good signs for 2011 The reasons for optimism about 2011 come from both Washington and the private sector. The Federal Reserve and Congress have finally taken more action to lift economic growth, and the latest data — on consumer spending and jobless claims, among other things — has been good. The housing market remains weak, but sales and prices are no longer plunging. On the longer-term issues, the recent work by President Obama’s bipartisan deficit commission suggested that Democrats and Repub-

licans might eventually find some common ground on the issue. And the health care overhaul passed in March — assuming it survives legal challenges — is likely to cut the number of uninsured sharply and to reduce cost growth modestly. The one issue that offers little reason for optimism is climate change. Among the big questions for 2011 are: n How severe will state and local budget crises turn out to be? n Will Europe’s debt troubles spread to Spain, Portugal or elsewhere? n Will Congress and the White House manage to focus on the long-run causes of the deficit — or instead cut federal spending immediately and jeopardize the recovery? n Will consumers continue to increase their spending and give businesses the confidence to hire?


BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, January 2, 2011

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New life given to lifeboat in PA yard Since the beginning of December, a shipboard lifeboat has been sitting on blocks in the Port Angeles Boatyard on Marine Drive. The international-orange-colored lifeboat had a malfunction in its two-cylinder diesel engine and had to be repaired. The engine was removed by Daniel Patrick and Wade Short of Schat Harding and taken to their Anacortes facility to assess the damage. It was determined that the engine had spun a bearing which required a complete teardown and rebuild. Daniel and Wade had the lifeboat in the water on Wednesday morning and spent a couple of hours puttering around Port Angeles Harbor, making certain that the mechanical systems were operating up to snuff. The life-saving craft will be returned to her davits on the 789-foot crude oil tanker, British Laurel, on Monday morning.

Holds 30 The lifeboat is built of fiberglass and is a touch over 21 feet in length. Bench seating around the inside perimeter allows for about 30 people, which is the stated load capacity. In the event personnel need to abandon ship, they climb aboard the lifeboat through one of two watertight hatches on either side of the boat. When the boat is loaded, the designated lifeboat operator lowers the craft into the water and releases her from the davit. Lifeboats on tankers must be fireproof and have a proven ability to survive a flaming oil or petroleum-product fire. Fire protection for these boats is provided by approved insulation and a sprinkler system comprised of piping installed atop the vessel through which water is pumped and sprayed to cool the surface of the lifeboat. Although this particular lifeboat is stowed in a boat davit from which it is released by an operator from within, some ships have freefall lifeboats. These are stowed at an acute downward angle in a sloping slipway, and when the holdback mechanism is released, the boat and her already terrified passengers fly through the air and drop into the water. Freefall lifeboats are necessarily heavier than the type that are suspended from davits because of the need to withstand the impact with the water.

On the hard Angelette, a 58-foot Delta that hails from Seward, Alaska, is sitting on blocks in the Commander Building at Platypus Marine’s plant on Marine Drive

On the waterfront in Port Angeles. Capt. CharSellars lie Crane, director of sales and marketing, said the fiberglass department, headed up by Verne Braghettia, is fabricating and installing a bulbous bow on the commercial fishing vessel.

David G.

Positive effect As we’ve said before, a bulbous bow is the torpedo-like protuberance at the bow of a ship that is just beneath the waterline. The presence of this bulb has a positive effect on how water flows around the hull of a ship and creates fuel savings in the range of 12 to 15 percent. Bulbous bows once were rarely seen on fishing vessels but are becoming more commonplace because of the everincreasing cost of fuel. Platypus developed a prototype of a bulbous bow about three years ago and since has installed nearly a dozen of them onto boats that fish in Alaskan waters. Capt. Charlie said Platypus personnel also will install a new anchor winch on the Angelette’s foredeck, replace a water storage tank and give the boat a new coat of paint.

David G. Sellars/Peninsula Daily News

This lifeboat with watertight doors is scheduled to go back aboard the oil tanker British Laurel on Monday after it was repaired in the Port Angeles Boatyard. The ship’s lifeboats can be seen attached to either side of the bridge in the photo below of the huge tanker escorted in San Francisco Bay.

Come and get it Eric Schneider, owner of Lee Shore Boats in Port Angeles, said the Bonner County Sheriff’s Office in Sandpoint, Idaho, will send a couple of deputies to his shop this week to pick up their new patrol boat. Eric said the 30-foot vessel, which is powered by twin 225-horsepower Honda outboards, will be used by the sheriff for lake patrol and search and rescue operations. Lee Shore is also working on a 26-foot pleasure boat for Bob and Cezanne Alexander of Beaver. Eric said Bob and Cezanne, who are well-regarded throughout the fly-fishing community, will use the boat as a platform from which they will hone their skills. Eric also said his company was recently awarded the contract to build a 22-foot work boat/tender for the RV Sikuliaq, a 260-foot research vessel that is under construction at Marinette Marine Corp. in Marinette, Wis. The vessel will be owned by

the National Science Foundation and operated by the University of Alaska-Fairbanks as part of the U.S. academic research fleet. The Sikuliaq will be operational in 2014 and based in Seward, Alaska, at the university’s Seward Marine Center.

Getting the right point Tesoro Petroleum on Monday bunkered Golden State, a 600foot petroleum products tanker. Prior to her departure from Port Angeles for San Francisco, she had to swing her compass.

Apparently there was new equipment installed on the bridge and the deviation between the magnetic compass and gyro had to be recalculated. In an age of global positioning systems and computer navigation, some may ask why a magnetic compass is still needed. The mechanical magnetic compass is a reliable backup every navigator needs to ensure that if the power fails, the computer crashes, batteries die, GPS fails, lightning strikes or streams of ions from a solar flare disrupt satellite communi-

cations, you will not be lost or stranded. The properly compensated magnetic compass is the most reliable source of heading information that, by most accounts, has been in use for over a thousand years. On Friday, Tesoro refueled Canpotexresurrection, a 580-foot, Panamanian-flagged cargo ship. On Saturday, Tesoro had it refueling barge alongside the 728-foot Foss Maritime cargo ship, Pioneer. And today, Tesoro will refuel the BP-owned British Laurel, which is in Port Angeles to pick up her lifeboat, and Overseas Long Beach, a 594-foot petroleum products carrier.

________ David G. Sellars is a Port Angeles resident and former Navy boatswain’s mate who enjoys boats and strolling the waterfront. Items involving boating, port activities and the North Olympic Peninsula waterfronts are always welcome. E-mail dgsellars@hotmail.com or phone him at 360-808-3202.

Milestone: Now redefining what ‘older’ means Continued from C8 on their front lawns, just as people born in 1946 wouldn’t This means that the 79 know what to make of one million baby boomers, about of Sky King’s successors, 26 percent of the U.S. popu- the hydrocephalic H.R. Puflation, will be redefining nstuf. what it means to be older For another thing, the and placing greater never-ending celebration of demands on the social the hippie contingent of safety net. boomers tends to overThey are living longer, shadow the Young Ameriworking longer and, cans for Freedom continresearchers say, nursing gent. some disappointment about After all, while some how their lives have turned boomers were trying to “levout. itate” the Pentagon to proThe self-aware, or self- test the Vietnam War, other absorbed, feel less self-ful- boomers were fighting in filled and thus are wracked that war. with self-pity. Steven Gillon, author of So, then, to those who Boomer Nation: The Largest once never trusted anyone and Richest Generation older than 30: Ever and How It Changed Raise that bowl of high- America, warns against fiber granola, antioxidant- generalizing about baby rich blueberries and skim boomers, especially when it milk and give yourself a concerns politics. Happy Birthday toast.

A sense of entitlement

Still, he says, the boomer generation, of which he is a member, clearly changed our world. Here’s a simple generalization of how: Previous generations were raised to speak only when spoken to and to endure in self-denying silence. Baby boomers were raised on the more nurturing, child-as-individual teachings of Dr. Benjamin Spock, and then placed under the spell of television, whose advertisers marketed their wares directly to children.

Idler of Emory University, indicates that the suicide rate for middle-age people, notably baby boomers without college degrees, rose from 1999 to 2005. Paul Taylor, executive

vice president of the Pew Center, summed up a recent survey of his generation this way: “We’re pretty glum.” This gloominess appears to be linked to the strug-

gling economy, the demands of middle age and a general sense of lofty goals not met by the generation that once sang of teaching the world to sing in perfect harmony and then buying it a Coke.

The Peninsula Daily News wants to congratulate North Olympic Peninsula businesses celebrating anniversaries in January. On Jan. 7th, we will publish a FREE ad listing the businesses who respond to this special event by Jan. 3rd. Is your business having an anniversary later this year? You can use this coupon now to let us know the date. Business Name _____________________________________________________________________ Address____________________________________________________________________________ City__________________ State________________ Type of Business________________________ Zip Telephone________________________________ What date is your anniversary?_______________________________________________________ Which anniversary is your business celebrating?______________________________________________ Please Mail or Bring to: Peninsula Daily News 305 W. 1st St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 Attn: ANNIVERSARY EVENT

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115105052

After the travails and absences of the Depression and World War II flattened the birthrate, the promise and prosperity of the postwar years created a sharp rise in births that lasted from 1946 until 1964, when the popularity of birth-control pills helped stem the tide. Ascribing personality traits to a bloc of 79 million people is a fool’s endeavor. For one thing, people born in 1964 wouldn’t know the once-ubiquitous television hero Sky King if he landed his trusty Songbird

Changed the world

Parents were cut out of the sale, except for the purchase of that coonskin cap or Barbie doll. “It created a sense of entitlement that had not existed before,” Gillon said. “We became more concerned with our own emotional well-being, whereas to older generations that was considered soft and fluffy.” The boomers may not have created rock ’n’ roll, but they capitalized on its potential to revolt against parents. And they may not have led the civil-rights movement, but they embraced it — at least, many did — and applied its principles to fighting for the rights of women and gay men and lesbians. They came to expect, even demand, freedom of choice; and options in life. About 13 percent of the population today is 65 or older; by 2030, when the last of the baby boomers turn 65, that rate will have grown to 18 percent. In addition to testing the sustainability of entitlement programs such as Social Security, this redefinition of old age also may include a pervading sense that life has been what technically might be called a “bummer.” A study by two sociologists, Julie Phillips of Rutgers University and Ellen


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BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Sunday, January 2, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Most boomers expect full Medicare aid By Ricardo Zaldivar The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — You paid your Medicare taxes all those years and want your money’s worth — full benefits after you retire. Nearly three out of five people say in a recent Associated PressGfK poll that they paid into the system so they deserve their full benefits — no cuts. But a newly updated financial analysis shows that what people paid into the system doesn’t come close to covering the full value of the medical care they can expect to receive as retirees. Consider an average-wage, two-earner couple together earning $89,000 a year. Upon retiring in 2011, they would have paid $114,000 in Medicare payroll taxes during their careers. But they can expect to receive medical services — from prescriptions to hospital care — worth $355,000, or about three times what they put in. The estimates by economists Eugene Steuerle and Stephanie Rennane of the Urban Institute think tank illustrate the huge disconnect between widely-held perceptions and the numbers behind Medicare’s shaky financing. Although Americans are worried about Medicare’s long-term solvency, few realize the size of the gap. “The fact that you put money

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newly updated financial analysis shows that what people paid into the Medicare system doesn’t come close to covering the full value of the medical care they can expect to receive as retirees.

into the system doesn’t mean it’s there waiting for you to collect,” said Steuerle. By comparison, Social Security taxes and expected benefits come closer to balancing out. The same hypothetical couple retiring in 2011 will have paid $614,000 in Social Security taxes, and can expect to collect $555,000 in benefits. They will have paid about 10 percent more into the system than they’re likely to get back.

Complicated finances Updated periodically, the Urban Institute estimates are part of an effort that Steuerle and others began several years ago to try to illustrate the complicated finances of Medicare and Social Security in a format the average taxpayer could grasp. The Washington-based institute is a public policy center that focuses heavily on budget and economic issues. Its analysis is accepted among

The Associated Press

Realtor Lynn Barlow of Canton, Ga., believes she and her husband, who have paid into the Medicare program their whole working lives, are entitled to collect benefits. At the same time, she’s willing to make some sacrifices to preserve the level of services. other policy experts in Washington, including economists in government. Many workers may believe their Medicare payroll taxes are going for their own insurance after they retiree, but the money is actually used to pay the bills of seniors currently on the program. That mistaken impression complicates the job for policymakers trying to build political support in coming months for dealing with deficits that could drag the economy back down. Health care costs are a major and unpredictable part of the government’s budget problems, and Medicare is in the middle. Recent debt reduction proposals have called for big changes to Medicare, making the belt-tightening in President Barack Obama’s health care law seem modest. Some plans call for phasing out the program, replacing it with a fixed payment to help future retirees buy a private plan of their choice.

Why the problem Peel back the layers, and there are several reasons why Medicare benefits and taxes are so out of line. First, the rapid rise in health care costs. A single woman who retired in

1980, after earning average wages throughout her career, could expect to receive medical care worth about $74,800 over the rest of her lifetime. A comparable woman retiring in 2010 can expect services worth $181,000. Those numbers are in 2010 dollars, adjusted for inflation so they can be compared directly. Another reason is that payroll taxes cover most, but not all, of Medicare’s costs. They are earmarked for the giant trust fund that pays for inpatient care. Outpatient doctor visits and prescription drugs are paid for with a mix of premiums collected from beneficiaries and money from the government’s general fund. Seniors pay only one-fourth of the costs of those benefits through their premiums. The system has worked for 45 years, with occasional fine tuning. But the retirement of the baby boomers, the first of whom become eligible for Medicare in 2011, threatens to push it over the edge. Medicare covers 46 millions seniors and disabled people now. When the last of the boomers reaches age 65 in about 20 years, Medicare will be covering more than 80 million people.

Your Medicare money’s worth MEDICARE TAXES paid over a lifetime at work don’t cover the value of expected benefits after retirement. Figures for a couple together earning $89,000 and retiring in 2011 compare Medicare and Social Security.

Medicare n Taxes: $114,000 n Benefits: $355,000

Social Security n Taxes: $614,000 n Benefits: $555,000 Urban Institute At the same time, the ratio of workers paying taxes to support the program will have plunged from 3.5 for each person receiving benefits currently, to 2.3. “With Medicare, we are all still making out like bandits, shoving all those costs to future generations,” said Steuerle. “At another level, we know that this system is totally unsustainable.”

Boomers: More than half ignored finances Continued from C8 sales executive for a turf company. And with savings of just Now 22 percent of homeowners, or nearly 11 mil- $5,000, he’s on a budget for lion people, owe more on the first time. In April, he will start their mortgage than their taking Social Security at home is worth. age 62. Many are boomers. “If I’d been smarter and planned and had the bucks, ‘If I’d been smarter’ I’d wait until 70,” says Michael Vanatta, 61, of Vanatta, who is divorced Vero Beach, Fla., is paying and rents an apartment. the price for being a boomer “It’s my fault. For years I who enjoyed life without was making plenty of money saving for the future. and spending plenty of He put a daughter money.” through college, but he also Vanatta is in the majorspent plenty of money on ity. indulgences like dining out Some 51 percent of early and the latest electronic boomer households, headed gadgets. by those ages 55 to 64, face Vanatta was laid off last a retirement with lower livJanuary from his ing standards, according to $100,000-a-year job as a a 2009 study by the Center

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for Retirement Research at Boston College. Too many boomers have ignored or underestimated the worsening outlook for their finances, says Jean Setzfand, director of financial security for AARP, the group that represents Americans older than age 50. By far the greatest shortcoming has been a failure to save. The personal savings rate — the amount of disposable income unspent — averaged close to 10 percent in the 1970s and ’80s. By late 2007, the rate had sunk to negative 1 percent. The recession has helped improve the savings rate — it’s now back above 5 percent. Yet typical boomers are still woefully short on retirement savings. Even those in their 50s and 60s with a 401(k) for at least six years had an average balance of less than $150,000 at the end of 2009, according to the EBRI.

More problems Signs of coming trouble are visible on several other fronts, too: n Mortgage Debt. Nearly two in three people age 55 to 64 had a mortgage in 2007, with a median debt of $85,000. n Social Security.

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Nearly 3 out of 4 people file to claim Social Security benefits as soon as they’re eligible at age 62. That locks them in at a much lower amount than they would get if they waited. The monthly checks are about 25 percent less if you retire at 62 instead of full retirement age, which is 66 for those born from 1943 to 1954. If you wait until 70, your check can be 75 to 80 percent more than at 62. So, a boomer who claimed a $1,200 monthly benefit in 2008 at age 62 could have received about $2,000 by holding off until 70. n Medical Costs. Health care expenses are soaring, and the availability of retiree benefits is declining. “People cannot fathom how much money will be needed to simply cover outof-pocket medical care costs,” says Mitchell of the University of Pennsylvania. A 55-year-old man with typical drug expenses needs to have about $187,000 just to cover future medical costs. That’s if he wants to be 90 percent certain to have enough money to supplement Medicare coverage in retirement, the EBRI said. Because of greater longevity, a 65-year-old woman would need even more to

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cover her health insurance premiums and out-of-pocket health expenses: an estimated $213,000. n Employment. Boomers both need and want to work longer than previous generations. But unemployment is near 10 percent, and many have lost their jobs. The average unemployment period for those 55 and older was 45 weeks in November. That’s 12 weeks longer than for younger job-seekers. It’s also more than double the 20-week period this group faced at the beginning of the recession in December 2007.

Other issues If financial neglect turns out to be many boomers’ undoing, challenging circumstances are stymieing others. Linda Reaves of Silver Spring, Md., never had much opportunity to save as a single mother raising two sons and a daughter. After holding a variety of positions over the years — hotel office manager, research analyst for a mortgage company, hospital mental health counselor — she was still living paycheck to paycheck. Then she was laid off in 2007 at the age of 57. She entered a training

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program to learn new skills, but all she has found since is a string of temporary jobs. In her daily quest for clerical or administrative work, she competes against much younger applicants. Reaves, who turns 60 this month, plans to work until she’s at least 70 and then wants to travel, even if she doesn’t know where the money will come from. “I just keep going. I don’t really worry about it,” she says. Add this all up, and there’s a “slow-burning” retirement crisis for boomers, says Anthony Webb, a research economist at the Center for Retirement Research. “If you have a crisis where the adverse consequences are immediately clear, then people understand that they have to do something,” Webb says. “When the consequences will be felt 20 or 30 years in the future, the temptation is that we kick the can down the road.” As a result, he believes many won’t change their behavior. For less affluent boomers, it won’t take that long to feel the pain of poor planning. Concerns about financial trouble will hang over many of those 65th birthday celebrations in 2011. Many seem to view their plight through rose-colored granny glasses. An AARP survey last month of boomers turning 65 next year found that they worry no more about money than they did at age 60 — before the recession or the collapse of home prices. But in an acknowledgement of reality, 40 percent said they plan to work “until I drop.”


BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, January 2, 2011

C11

$3-plus gas prices stir worries about recovery Peninsula Daily News news services

NEW YORK — For the first time in two years, the average gas price is higher than $3 a gallon, sucking money from drivers’ wallets and, experts worry, possibly hampering the economy’s rebound. The national average price for a gallon of regular, unleaded gasoline was $3.07 on Friday, according to AAA’s Fuel Gauge Report, the highest since October 2008. On the North Olympic Peninsula, current prices average $3.19 a gallon, up from $3.11 a month ago and $2.82 a year ago. The national average is 42 cents higher than a year ago, and prices aren’t likely to improve significantly anytime soon. Experts offered differing predictions as to how high gas could go, with at least one saying prices could hit $5 a gallon by the end of 2012. “Outrageous,” said Joe Tate, putting gas in his Buick at a Shell station in Charlotte, N.C. “It makes my head hurt.” The self-employed auto mechanic put only one gallon of regular gasoline in the car at a cost of $3.06.

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this time of year. The recent cold snap in the U.S. and Europe created more demand for heating oil, which lowers production of gasoline and raises its price. Oil is also trading above $90 a barrel for the first time since 2008, which experts say is driven by increased demand, a stagnant supply and speculative trading. He thought last year’s The weak dollar and an gas prices of about $2.50 a explosion of new automogallon were reasonable. biles in Asia are also behind “I can handle that,” Tate the rise. said. When asked what he Dampening effect would do if gas prices keep Rising fuel costs will rising, Tate shook his head. “I’ll be walking or taking hurt consumers’ disposable income and could dampen a the bus.” strong economic recovery next year, said retail consul$3.59 in California tant Britt Beemer, CEO of Tate has it easier than America’s Research Group. drivers on the West Coast, “You’ll be saying, ‘Last where gas prices topped year, I filled up my tank for $3.59 at some stations in $40. This year it’s costing San Francisco on Wednes- $60,’” Beemer said. day. “You really notice that “We’re going to have a $20. Gas prices are really more expensive start to going to have an impact.” 2011, for sure,” said Tom And even if Americans Crosby, a spokesman for don’t drive, they’re likely to AAA Carolinas. see higher fuel costs in “We expect prices to con- other places. tinue to be high and hover Pricier gasoline could around $3 a gallon.” drive up the cost of grocerSeveral factors are ies and other consumer behind the surge, which goods — which are univerexperts said are unusual for sally delivered by truck.

ohn Hofmeister, former Shell Oil president, has predicted gas will top $5 a gallon by the end of 2012 as supplies fall short of rising demand.

Purely discretionary purchases that consumers will be able to eliminate quickly will be hit the hardest this year, Beemer said. “The first thing they’ll cut out is they’ll go to fewer movies,” he said. “The second thing they’ll cut out is eating out at restaurants.”

$5 a gallon? Some experts think we’re in for higher-than-ever prices over the coming years. John Hofmeister, former Shell Oil president, has predicted gas will top $5 a gallon by the end of 2012 as supplies fall short of rising demand. He heads Citizens for Affordable Energy, a group that advocates for increased domestic energy production from all sources. Over the next year, prices likely won’t go too much higher than $3 a gallon, said James Williams, an analyst at Arkansas-based WTRG Economics. “The Saudis don’t really see it in their best interest for oil to hit $100 a barrel,” Williams said. “That would probably add another 25 cents a gallon to it. “That could easily push us into another recession.” The last time oil prices

The Associated Press

In San Francisco, where pump prices are higher because of city and California state taxes that are not applied in Washington state, a sign shows the prevailing prices on a recent day. surged above $100 a barrel, in 2008, the world economy crashed and oil prices tumbled from $145 a barrel to mid-$40s a barrel in under a year, Williams said. He predicts oil-producing countries will try to increase supply to keep prices under

$100 a barrel, to protect themselves from another price crash. “Every time you see a recession, you see a collapse in oil prices,” Williams said. “So, while high oil prices cause recessions, recessions then cause low oil prices.”

Electric cars get off to microscopic start But 50,000 on Chevy, Nissan waiting lists The Associated Press

DETROIT — This was the year General Motors Co. and Nissan made good on their promise to bring mass-produced electric cars to the market. But don’t count on seeing one in traffic soon. Sales so far have been microscopic, and they’re likely to stay that way for some time because of limited supplies. GM sold between 250 and 350 Chevy Volts this month. Nissan’s sales totaled fewer than 10 Leaf sedans in the past two weeks. Production for both is slowly ramping up. It will be well into 2012 before both the Volt and Leaf are available nationwide. And if you’re interested in buying one, you’ll need to get behind the 50,000 people already on waiting lists. It’s still unclear just how large the market for electric cars will be once those early adopters are supplied. The base sticker price is $40,280 for the Volt and $32,780 for the Leaf, much higher than most similarsized, gas-powered cars. If those prices rise, it could make them even more

A Chevy Volt is driven out of the showroom of a New Jersey dealership by its new owner.

The Associated Press (2)

The intake compartment of this Nissan Leaf in Seattle shows where it plugs in to an electrical outlet. Using a standard outlet, that takes 16 to 18 hours. Nissan Motor Co. recommends that Leaf owners install a 220/240-volt outlet in their homes so they can recharge in about seven hours. Japan-based Nissan initially sent only 10 Leafs to the U.S. and spokesman Charge after 100 miles David Reuter said a second The Leaf is the only all- shipment of around 90 cars electric car on the market. that arrived by cargo ship It can travel about 100 on Dec. 23 is on the way to miles on battery power before dealers. Nissan won’t give estineeding to be recharged. of a niche product than predicted. Buyers also are worried that advertised lease deals may not last, and a federal tax rebate of $7,500 could disappear if Congress decides battery-powered cars are no longer a priority.

mates on how many Leaf sedans it expects to sell in the U.S. next year, but says it has capacity to make 50,000 annually at a plant in Oppama, Japan. Those will be sold in Japan, the U.S. and Europe. The Volt goes about 40 miles on battery power alone before needing to be recharged. But it comes with a backup gas engine that GM says can extend its range to 375 miles as it kicks in to

New bank laws curb free checking Peninsula Daily News news services

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Some options: n  Sign up for direct deposit. n  Do more banking online. n  Use your debit card more; link with other accounts. n  And, maybe, switch to smaller banks or credit unions where free checking is more common, they advise.

n  They can set up direct deposit of their payroll checks. n  They can bank online or at ATMs and receive their bank statements electronically, not in paper form.

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n  Or they can keep an average $1,500 balance in the account. Your banking habits determine which account and waiver fits best. A student with no paycheck might opt for the e-banking account. But someone on a salary might do better with waivers for direct deposit. Ask your bank for help, so they can keep your business, experts say.

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$21,975. Hybrids made up 2.4 percent of U.S. sales this year and the category that includes hybrids and electric cars is expected to double to 4.8 percent by 2013, according to consumer web site Edmunds.com. But electric vehicles likely will be only a small part of this total, said Michelle Krebs, senior analyst at Edmunds, and she doubts they will be big money makers for the car companies.

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NEW YORK — The days of free checking accounts in America are waning. New laws that reduce overdraft fees and the rates that banks charge merchants are cutting deep into bank revenues, prompting many to add charges or extra conditions on their checking accounts. The portion of checking accounts offered by banks for “free” with no monthly service charge or minimum balance, fell from 76 percent last year to 65 percent this year, according to a new national study of big banks by Bankrate.com. That means customers will have to shop more carefully — and figure out what their financial needs and habits really are — to get checking-related services for free or at low cost, consumer advocates say.

ank of America now charges $8.95 per month for its basic checking accounts. But it waives that fee when account holders meet one of three conditions.

recharge the batteries on the fly. GM believes the backup generator will make it a hit with customers who worry about being stranded with a dead battery. The Volts are being assembled in Detroit. GM predicts it will sell 10,000 of them in 2011 and between 35,000 and 45,000 in 2012. By way of comparison, Chevrolet sold 187,250 Malibu sedans in the first 11 months of the year with sticker prices that start at

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C12

Sunday, January 2, 2011

BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Peninsula Daily News

Nurse gets oncology status with cancer.” Orth earned her PORT ANGELES — Kathryn Orth, nursing degree from a registered nurse at Olympic Medical University of Cancer Center, recently earned her Anchorage, Alaska, oncology nursing certification through in 2005 and has the Oncology Nursing Society. been a registered An oncology certified nurse is a spe- nurse with Olympic cialist in the cancer care field that pro- Medical Cancer vides support for patients undergoing Center since cancer treatments. December 2008. Orth All of the registered nurses at Olym“In working to pic Medical Cancer Center will be certi- acquire this certifified as such specialists within the next cation I have greatly expanded my year. knowledge in providing quality cancer To earn this advanced certification, care,” said Orth. Orth proved her knowledge of cancer “It is our job at Olympic Medical care by passing the oncology nursing Cancer Center to offer the best health certification exam. care possible to our patients and this To qualify to take the exam, Orth certification enhances my ability to do had to meet the eligibility requirethat.” ments of a minimum of 1,000 hours of The cancer center in Sequim houses oncology nursing care practice. radiation oncology and medical oncol“Kathryn is a wonderful asset, and I ogy under one roof. Services include radiation therapy, am proud to have her on our team,” chemotherapy, infusion services, hemasaid Kay C. Hobbs, advanced oncology certified nurse and nursing supervisor tology, dietary services, PET/CT and an onsite pharmacy, as well as a resource at Olympic Medical Cancer Center. “Kathryn’s achievement of the oncol- room for patients and their loved ones. For more information on Olympic ogy nursing certification proves her inMedical Cancer Center services, phone depth knowledge of the many issues 360-683-9895. involved in providing care for patients Peninsula Daily News

FCC plans new rules to curb cell phone bills Peninsula Daily News news services

WASHINGTON — It’s been dubbed cellphone “bill shock,” and it’s clear why: A woman returning from Haiti after the earthquake disaster was greeted with nearly $35,000 in text-messaging charges. An Orange County, Calif., man was socked with a $3,300 bill after checking e-mail on his smartphone during a cruise celebrating his wife’s recovery from breast cancer. Even Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak experienced it last year, unwittingly ringing up $7,000 in roaming fees on his iPhone during a three-hour drive through Germany’s countryside. “What are you talking about?!” Wozniak said when he learned of the charges from AT&T. Those anecdotes are extreme, but the Federal Communications Commission says one in every six cellphone users has endured “bill shock” of some magnitude. And the bill often is a whopper when it happens — $100 or more for twothirds of those who complained to the FCC in the first half of this year, and upward of $1,000 for 20 percent of that group.

The federal agency is poised to step in with new rules to help customers avoid unexpected bills after exceeding usage limits. Cellphone companies are crying foul, saying that they already offer customers tools to monitor their voice minutes and texts and that regulators shouldn’t dictate how they provide service.

Blame the customer “I do think consumers have a certain amount of personal responsibility to understand what service and what offerings they’ve signed up for,” said John Walls, a vice president at CTIA-The Wireless Association, a trade group. “Just like you and I need to know what kind of gas to put in your car, and if there are any questions you look at the manual, all those tools are available now” for cellphone users. He also said he doubts “bill shock” is as widespread as the FCC says. The proposed rules, which could be approved early next year, would require wireless carriers to send customers a voice or text alert when they are about to exceed their voice, data or text limits. A similar warning would come when a user is about to incur hefty international

roaming charges. That’s what happened to Wozniak during a trip to Germany last year for a “Segway Polo” tournament. The Apple legend was hit with $7,000 in roaming charges, even though he had signed up for a generous international usage plan. AT&T quickly reversed the charge, admitting a mistake. “I think they would’ve dealt nicely with anyone,” Wozniak said. But others have had to haggle for months to try to have charges reversed, and they’re not always successful. Kerfye Pierre returned home from Haiti in February after visiting her sister and helping with the relief effort. A T-Mobile representative had told her the carrier was extending courtesy cellphone usage to customers in the disaster-stricken country. But the offer didn’t extend to texts and data, which Pierre used to communicate with family at home because cell service was poor. The tab? $34,782. The FCC stepped in to help Pierre, and T-Mobile forgave most of the charges. Yet, as of last week, the carrier still said she owes $4,435.

The Associated Press

This house purchased by Bristol Palin in Arizona sold for $172,000.

Palin daughter’s move mystifies and pleases Peninsula Daily News news services

MARICOPA, Ariz. — The reasons behind Bristol Palin’s apparent move to this quiet, tree-lined community south of Phoenix remain unclear, but her new neighbors say they are ready to roll out the welcome mat. The 20-year-old daughter of Sarah Palin and thirdplace finisher on “Dancing with the Stars” quietly bought a five-bedroom, 3,900-square-foot home in the Cobblestones Farms neighborhood of Maricopa for $172,000 on Dec. 10. News of the purchase, which only surfaced in the last week, triggered media speculation over why the Alaska native would relocate to the lower 48 — including reports she planned to study journalism at Arizona State University in Phoenix. A Palin family spokesman did not respond to a request for comment on Bristol’s plans for the home, built in 2005 and featuring a three-car garage and landscaped backyard. Arizona State, meanwhile, dismissed the college reports. “Actually its a rumor. She’s neither enrolled nor has she applied to ASU at this time,” said Sharon Keeler, director of media relations at the university. Maricopa Vice Mayor Edward Farrell said he showed Bristol’s father, Todd Palin, around town in April but could shed little light on the reasons for the home purchase. “He never indicated anything. I got the feeling that maybe they were looking around for possibly a second home, maybe a winter

Bristol Palin 20-year-old buys house home, something to get out of the winter months in Alaska, just like the snowbirds do in the Midwest,” he said. “But never in my wildest dreams would I have thought that he was looking for somewhere for his daughter,” Farrell said. “When I saw that Bristol had bought, I started rehashing the visit and tour and thought, he never gave any signs of that.”

Mom to stay in Alaska? While Bristol has bought into the area, some Alaskans think it’s unlikely to herald a move to the Grand Canyon state by her mother, Sarah, who ran along side Arizona Republican John McCain in his failed tilt at the presidency in 2008. “She’s got a nice little spot right on Lake Lucille [in Wasilla, Alaska) — why would she sell it?” said Ivan Moore, an Anchorage, Alaska-based pollster and political consultant. Moore said the elder Palin, who is being watched as a possible GOP presidential candidate in 2012, has

money enough to keep her Alaska home and buy another in the Lower 48 should she choose. Originally a farming community about 40 minutes south of Phoenix, Maricopa was incorporated in 2003 during the housing boom. Its sprawling, planned subdivisions offered cheaper prices than the Phoenix valley, but were hit hard by the foreclosure crisis. The city noted about 45,000 residents last year, up from just over 1,000 in 2000. Bristol’s future neighbors in Cobblestone Farms, which features a small park with a little lake and date palms to frame the desert setting, were largely positive. Local drug store pharmacist Ronny Kassees and his wife Monika live five doors up the street from Palin’s new home in their own, slightly smaller house. The couple bought five years ago near the top of the market, and said they were “way underwater” with the mortgage, in a street that has seen a wave of foreclosures and several homes stand empty. “Their buying a house is a nice surprise, and we’re kind of hoping it may turn around the economy of Maricopa and the surrounding areas,” Kassees said. “I was a little shocked at first, but if she’s going to bring the property value up, that’s probably my best bet. “If it will stimulate the economy in Maricopa, then I am all for it,” he said. “If she wants, she can buy my house too. If she made me a fair offer, I might consider it.”

Billy the Kid won’t be pardoned, governor says By Sue Major Holmes

In one of his last official acts — or non-acts — before leaving office, New Mexico’s ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. governor refused to pardon — The rehabilitation of the Old West outlaw Friday Billy the Kid lies dead in for one of the many murthe dust. ders he committed before

The Associated Press

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he was gunned down in 1881. Gov. Bill Richardson cited ambiguity surrounding the pledge of a pardon 130 years ago as the reason. “I felt I could not rewrite history,” Richardson told The Associated Press, hours after announcing his decision on ABC’s “Good Morning America” on his last day in office. The prospect of a pardon for the notorious frontier figure drew international attention to New Mexico, centering on whether New Mexico territorial governor Lew Wallace promised Billy the Kid a pardon in return for testifying about killings he witnessed. Richardson concluded Wallace did make a deal, “but it’s uncertain why he did not keep his promise,” said the former U.N. ambassador and Democratic presidential candidate. He said he could not pardon Billy the Kid given that ambiguity and the fact he killed two deputies when he escaped in April 1881 from the Lincoln County jail,

The proposed pardon covered only the killing of Brady, and not the deaths of the deputies or any other killings. According to legend, Billy the Kid killed 21 people, although the New Mexico Tourism Department puts the total closer to nine. He was shot to death by Sheriff Pat Garrett in July 1881. Albuquerque attorney Randi McGinn, who petitioned for a pardon after studying the issue, said she won the battle in proving there was a promise but lost the war over the pardon. She said, however, she didn’t regret “one iota being Billy the Kid’s lawyer.”

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issues were more pressing. “There’s an awful lot of work to be taken care of for us to be wasting so much time on such a consideration,” the Republican said Tuesday.

where he was awaiting hanging for the 1878 killing of Sheriff William Brady. A pardon document was even drafted, “but in the end, I didn’t use it,” said Richardson, adding that he didn’t decide until Thursday night.

Billy the Kid Aka William Bonney Garrett’s grandson, J.P. Garrett, of Albuquerque, sent an e-mail to The Associated Press: “Yea!!! No pardon! Looks like it will be a great new year!!!!” Wallace’s great-grandson, William Wallace, of Westport, Conn., said Richardson “followed the correct, rational track in forgoing a pardon for a convicted murderer.” Both men had expressed outrage Richardson would even consider a pardon, arguing there was no proof one was ever offered. The historical record is unclear, Richardson said. His staff told him in August there are no written documents “pertaining in any way” to a pardon in the papers of the territorial governor, who served from 1878 to 1881. Richardson’s successor, Gov. Susana Martinez, who takes office Saturday, has said she won’t even consider a pardon because state

Richardson’s office set up a website in mid-December for public comments following McGinn’s petition. The survey that ended Sunday brought in 809 e-mails and letters from all over the world — 430 favoring a pardon and 379 opposed. McGinn argued Lew Wallace promised to pardon the Kid, also known as William Bonney. She said the Kid kept his end of the bargain, but the territorial governor did not. McGinn said Friday she was disappointed by Richardson’s decision but thrilled the pardon question sparked interest. She said she hoped people would come to New Mexico, see letters Billy the Kid wrote to Wallace, walk Lincoln’s single street and decide for themselves whether Billy the Kid was “the Robin Hood of the West or a notorious killer.” Richardson, who said he’s read countless books and seen numerous movies about the Kid, said the issue gave the state great exposure and prompted discussion over “one of those historical issues that deserves debate and hadn’t been tackled before.”


BusinessPoliticsEnvironment

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, January 2, 2011

C13

Airfare price increases likely to stay Other lines quickly match American’s $20 roundtrip rise Peninsula Daily News news services

NEW YORK — Wrapping up a year that featured a decent rebound in business and leisure travel, some large airlines are looking to squeeze a bit more money out of their clientele in 2011, this time by raising fares rather than fees. American Airlines just slapped an extra $20 on roundtrip flights after bumping them up by $10 last month, to be quickly matched by United Continental, Delta Air Lines and US Airways, according to FareCompare.com, a site that tracks price moves. So far, Frontier, JetBlue and Southwest Airlines have yet to follow suit. Rising fuel costs are driving some of the hikes, but relatively brisk demand and diminished capacity are also giving carriers leverage that they have not had since before the start of the global economic slowdown. Also, this is unlikely to be the last round. “Oil prices have gone up from $80 a barrel to nearly $100,” said Michael Boyd of Boyd Group International, an industry consultancy. “Next year, traffic may be flat at best and the demand is probably going to get a little weaker — so revenue per passenger has to go up.”

“Airlines have been especially successful in constraining capacity and increasing fares to create more sustainable financial stability.”

Christa Manning Amex Business Travel

In addition, “There is no new capacity online to speak of, and they can even pull it down more if the economy gets any worse,” Boyd said. “The other good news is that the industry is in a relatively strong position to handle a modesty downturn.” Graeme Wallace, chief technology officer at FareCompare, noted that “January-February is usually the lowest part of the year for domestic travel, and normally at this point in time, airlines are trying to roll out some sales.” But, he added, “If oil prices continue to rise, then we are probably [going to see] fares track them higher.” These latest increases follow a stretch that has seen both domestic and international tariffs on a steady upward trajectory, according to recent data from American Express Business Travel. The average domestic airfare paid in the third quarter was up 6

percent from the same quarter of 2009 and the average international one spiked 8 percent. While both are still below where they stood in the third quarters of 2007 and 2008, Amex said that is an indication that price increases have kept a steady pace as travel levels start to grow again.

Third quarter shift The third quarter brought “a distinct shift from a buyers’ market to a suppliers’ market, leading to higher prices across several travel categories including airfare,” said Christa Manning, director of expert insights research at Amex Business Travel. “Airlines have been especially successful in constraining capacity — and increasing fares to create more sustainable financial stability.” That comes on word this month from the Air Transport Association of America, an industry trade group, that passenger revenue jumped 14.5 percent in November alone, making it the 11th straight month of year-over-year growth. Miles flown by paying passengers were up 6.5 percent, while the average price to fly one mile rose 7.5 percent. “These revenue results give us confidence [for] the winter holiday season,” said James May, the group’s president and chief executive, in the announcement. “The relative strength of demand for traveling and shipping in international markets is especially encouraging.”

Expedia stops selling American Airlines tickets Expedia Inc. has stopped selling tickets on American Airlines flights, the latest twist in a simmering pricing dispute between American and travel websites. “Expedia has chosen to no longer offer American Airlines fares on its website,” American said in an statement posted on its website. “Customers looking to compare flights or fares online should visit other travel sites such as Kayak.com or Priceline.com for the most accurate and up-to-date information.” The Fort Worth, Texas-based airline has said that it would like to sell more tickets through its own website, as paying to have its flights listed on sites such as Expedia can be costly. Airlines have to pay a commission every time people search a particular flight, look up a fare or book a trip. American, which is owned by AMR Corp., also claims it can offer more personalized packages such as hotel and flight deals to fliers who purchase tickets directly from the airline. Expedia’s removal of American flights marks an escalation in a months-long dispute between the airline and various travel sites. Last month, American Airlines pulled its flights from travel website Orbitz, saying consumers could just as easily buy tickets from American’s website and “we won’t have to pay as much for it.” Last week, Expedia made American flights more difficult to find on its website, an apparent response to the airline’s decision to drop Orbitz. Expedia warned that it “cannot support efforts that we believe are fundamentally bad for travelers.” Experts have cautioned that while American might save money in commission fees, its sales will drop if its flights don’t appear on travel sites such as Orbitz and Expedia. About a third of Americans book their tickets on independent travel sites. Analysts have added that only smaller airlines such as Southwest Airlines Co. can get away with selling tickets exclusively on their own websites, as these airlines already have a reputation for offering cheap fares. Bellevue-based Expedia did not immediately respond to a message seeking comment Saturday. Peninsula Daily News news services

Amazon’s own reader tops its best-selling list Peninsula Daily News news services

SEATTLE — Amazon. com said that its Kindle is the best-selling item in company history. In a news release about holiday sales, the Seattlebased online giant said the Kindle, now in its third generation, has surpassed sales of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, the seventh and supposedly final book in the Harry Potter series. But you’ve got to take Amazon’s word for it — the company isn’t telling investors or anyone else how many Kindles have been sold. In a statement, Amazon founder Jeff Bezos suggested the Kindle is holding its own against Apple’s iPad and other tablet computing devices with color screens. “We’re seeing that many of the people who are buying Kindles also own an LCD tablet,” Bezos said. “Customers report using their LCD tablets for games, movies and web browsing and their Kindles for reading sessions.” Amazon provided lots of factoids in its holiday shopping recap: n  The company’s sales volume peaked on Nov. 29, when customers ordered more than 13.7 million items in all product categories, a record 158 items per second. On the same day, the company’s fulfillment network shipped 9 million items. n  Products were shipped to 178 countries, and more than 350,000 items were shipped overseas to U.S. military personnel.

The Associated Press

Amazon.com’s Kindle book reader. n  Amazon sold enough tire chains to outfit the entire population of Aspen, Breckenridge and Sun Valley, and enough jeans to stack them to the top of Mount Everest. n  Customers bought more Philips Norelco shavers during the holiday season than the average beard hairs on a man’s face. n  One of Amazon’s most remote shipments went to the hamlet of Grise Fiord north of the Arctic Circle in Canada.

Best-sellers Here are company’s bestselling items from Nov. 14 through Dec. 19, based on units ordered: n  Electronics — Kindle (Wi-Fi); Kindle 3G; and

Apple iPod touch 8GB. n  Toys — Scrabble Flash Cubes; Qwirkle Board Game; and LEGO Ultimate Building Set. n  Video Games and Hardware — Call of Duty: Black Ops; Just Dance 2; and Donkey Kong Country Returns. n  Sports & Outdoors — Zumba Fitness Total Body Transformation System DVD Set; Razor A Kick Scooter; and Power Balance Silicone Wristband. n  Movies — “Inception”; “The Blind Side”; and “Toy Story 3.” n  Kindle books — The Confession — A Novel by John Grisham; Decision Points by George Bush; and Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand.

n  Amazon MP3 — “My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy” by Kanye West; “The 99 Most Essential Christmas Masterpieces” (Amazon Exclusive) by various artists; and “Born Free” by Kid Rock. n  Watches — Timex Women’s Sports Digital Watch; Timex Kids’ My First Outdoor Black Fast Wrap Watch; and Casio Men’s G-Shock Classic Digital Watch. n  Beauty — Philosophy Limited Edition Hope in a Jar; Philosophy Peppermint Bark Duo; and Burt’s Bees Essential Body Kit. n  Home, Garden & Pets — Swarovski 2010 Annual Edition Crystal Snowflake Ornament; Cuisinart SmartStick 200-Watt Immersion Hand Blender; and Cuisinart 5-in-1 Griddler. n  Clothing & Accessories — Levi’s Men’s 501 Jean; Levi’s Men 550 Relaxed Fit Jean; and Levi’s Men’s 505 Regular Straight Fit Jean. n  Shoes and Handbags — UGG Australia Women’s Classic Short Boots; Red Large Vicky Giraffe Print Faux Leather Satchel Bag; and BEARPAW Women’s Eva 10-inch Boot. n  Health & Personal Care — Philips Norelco Men’s Shaving System; Omron Digital Pocket Pedometer; and Philips Sonicare Essence Power Toothbrush. n  Home Improvement — Black & Decker Ratcheting ReadyWrench; Striker Magnetic LED Light-Mine Flashlight; and Rockwell Jawhorse. n  Automotive Parts &

Bad gifts be gone, Amazon patent says Peninsula Daily News

SEATTLE — Undoubtedly, the Thread and Bobbin Sewing Kit that Aunt Mildred sent from Amazon.com for Christmas will never see a stitch. The Stallion Stable Music Box might have looked pretty on the computer screen, but under the tree’s flickering lights, it is frightful. The polka-dot nightgown has never been a good idea, even with free shipping. These gifts sent via some warehouse many miles away are not only unwanted, but also a multimillion-dollar headache: They have to be repacked, labeled, dropped off and shipped back to Amazon’s Island of Misfit Toys. Then a new present has to be packed, labeled and shipped again. Efficient, the process is not. Amazon is working on a solution that could revolutionize digital gift buying. The online retailer has quietly patented a way for people to return gifts before they receive them — or turn them into gift cards — and the patent documents even mention poor Aunt Mildred. Amazon’s innovation, which was not ready for this Christmas season, includes an option to “Convert all gifts from Aunt Mildred,” the patent says. “For example, the user may specify such a rule because the user believes that this potential sender has different tastes than the user.” In other words, the consumer could keep an online list of lousy gift-givers whose choices would be vetted before anything ships.

Accessories — Battery Tender Junior; Wagan Heated Seat Cushion; and Michelin Digital Programmable Tire Gauge. n  Baby — Baby Einstein Take Along Tunes; Cloud b Twilight Constellation Night Light, Turtle; and Baby Einstein Bendy Ball. n  Software — Anime Studio Debut 7; Manga Studio Debut 4; and Adobe Photoshop Elements 9.

Avoid sexual-enhancement drinks, FDA tells consumers news servics

building products that contain anabolic steroids or “steroid analogs,” which can cause liver injury and increase risks for heart attack, stroke and death; and sexual-enhancement products such as Rock Hard Extreme and Passion Coffee.

‘A drug product’ Sharfstein said the products are labeled poorly, so consumers do not know what they are buying. Dietary supplements, according to the FDA, are intended only as “an addition to a standard diet.” “If you have a drug product in it, it’s not a supplement,” said Judy Blatman, spokeswoman for the Council for Responsible Nutrition, an industry trade organization. “We’re extremely sup-

portive of the FDA’s actions to warn consumers about products that are masquerading as supplements. ... they’re illegal.” In an e-mail, FDA spokeswoman Siobhan DeLancey said the agency had found nearly 300 such “tainted products” among dietary supplements. She did not specify how many of those were sexualenhancement products. DeLancey also said the FDA had received reports of fatalities in people using illegal sexual-enhancement products. The FDA advised consumers to stop using Rock Hard Extreme and Passion Coffee immediately, and to throw them away. The agency encouraged people who had experienced side effects from either drink to notify their doctor.

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WASHINGTON — The Food and Drug Administration last week advised consumers not to buy or use two drinks sold as supplements for sexual enhancement. The products, Rock Hard Extreme and Passion Coffee, are sold on websites and possibly in retail outlets, the agency said. Laboratory analysis indicated both contain sulfoaildenafil, an active pharmaceutical ingredient similar to sildenafil, the active ingredient in Viagra. Sulfoaildenafil could interact with prescription medications that include nitrates, the FDA warned, lowering blood pressure to “dangerous levels.” Nitrate-containing drugs often are prescribed for men

with diabetes, high blood pressure or heart disease. The warning arrives two weeks after the FDA warned dietary-supplement makers that it would crack down on illegal supplements. “We want consumers to be aware that there are products masquerading as dietary supplements that pose significant dangers,” said FDA Principal Deputy Commissioner Joshua Sharfstein. Sharfstein said the FDA was concerned primarily with three types of supplements. One class is weight-loss products with active ingredients such as sibutramine, found in the drug Meridia, which was withdrawn from the market recently because of increased risk of heart attack and stroke. The other two are body-

n  Grocery — Coffee People Donut Shop K-Cups for Keurig Brewers; Vita Coco 100% Pure Coconut Water; and Numi Tea Bamboo Flowering Tea Gift Set. n  Wireless — Samsung Captivate Android Phone (AT&T); HTC Droid Incredible Android Phone (Verizon Wireless); and Motorola Droid X Android Phone (Verizon Wireless).

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WeatherNorthwest

Sunday, January 2, 2011

Peninsula Five-Day Forecast Today

TonighT

Monday

Tuesday

Yesterday

Wednesday

Low 23

40/26

41/32

45/35

45/35

Mostly cloudy and chilly.

Mainly clear and cold.

Partly sunny.

Partly sunny.

Cloudy with rain and snow possible.

Mostly cloudy with rain possible.

The Peninsula A ridge of high pressure will stretch from the Pacific Northwest southeastward through the Rockies today. This will bring largely dry weather despite a mostly cloudy sky. It will be chilly as well with temperatures in most places only topping out in the 30s. Neah Bay Port Skies will turn out mostly clear tonight and it will be cold. A 43/32 Townsend partly sunny and chilly day is in store for Monday as high Port Angeles 38/29 pressure will remain in places. Largely dry weather is 38/23 expected through Tuesday, then the next storm system Sequim will bring the chance for rain and snow by Wednesday.

New

Olympia 40/19

Jan 4

Everett 38/24

Seattle 37/21

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. © 2011

Spokane 16/-1

Marine Forecast

Tomorrow

Ht

Low Tide

Ht

High Tide Ht

9.0’ 7.3’ 7.6’ 7.2’ 9.1’ 8.7’ 8.6’ 8.2’

4:10 a.m. 5:04 p.m. 7:00 a.m. 7:19 p.m. 8:14 a.m. 8:33 p.m. 8:07 a.m. 8:26 p.m.

3.0’ -0.6’ 5.7’ -1.3’ 7.4’ -1.7’ 7.0’ -1.6’

11:03 a.m. ----3:15 a.m. 12:11 p.m. 5:00 a.m. 1:56 p.m. 4:21 a.m. 1:17 p.m.

COme see the

10:13 a.m. 11:51 p.m. Port Angeles 2:36 a.m. 11:22 a.m. Port Townsend 4:21 a.m. 1:07 p.m. Sequim Bay* 3:42 a.m. 12:28 p.m.

BEST OF the BEST

9.0’ --7.8’ 7.1’ 9.4’ 8.5’ 8.8’ 8.0’

Tuesday

Low Tide Ht 5:03 a.m. 5:50 p.m. 7:59 a.m. 7:59 p.m. 9:13 a.m. 9:13 p.m. 9:06 a.m. 9:06 p.m.

*To correct for Dungeness Bay subtract 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

3.0’ -0.7’ 5.5’ -1.3’ 7.2’ -1.7’ 6.8’ -1.6’

wilder You Can Count on us!

Low Tide Ht

12:37 a.m. 11:49 a.m. 3:51 a.m. 1:00 p.m. 5:36 a.m. 2:45 p.m. 4:57 a.m. 2:06 p.m.

5:53 a.m. 6:32 p.m. 8:49 a.m. 8:38 p.m. 10:03 a.m. 9:52 p.m. 9:56 a.m. 9:45 p.m.

2.9’ -0.6’ 5.4’ -1.2’ 7.0’ -1.5’ 6.6’ -1.4’

Best Auto Deale r

Jan 19

Jan 26

Bes Auto R t ep Finali air st

New York 47/32

Washington 50/28

Kansas City 36/17

Atlanta 56/31

Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice 0s

City Albuquerque Anchorage Astoria Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Bend Billings Bismarck Boise Boston Buffalo Charleston, SC Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Coeur d’Alene Corvallis Dallas Denver Des Moines Detroit Eugene Fairbanks Helena Honolulu Houston Juneau

Houston 61/38

Fronts Cold Warm

Miami 80/64

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are given for selected cities.

Stationary 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

National Cities Today Hi 30 37 46 56 46 50 30 27 16 32 46 32 68 36 25 34 18 42 52 38 28 30 40 11 18 81 61 39

Lo W 14 s 29 sn 25 pc 31 pc 23 c 23 c 12 pc 7c 5 sn 13 pc 29 c 21 sf 40 r 11 pc 17 s 19 s -1 pc 25 pc 32 s 8 pc 13 s 19 pc 25 pc 0 pc 3c 69 sh 38 s 33 sn

City Kansas City Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Miami Milwaukee Minneapolis Nashville New Orleans New York Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Palm Springs Philadelphia Phoenix Portland, OR Raleigh Reno Sacramento St. Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco Sioux Falls Sun Valley Washington, DC

Hi 36 49 45 56 80 24 8 42 56 47 43 24 78 58 47 54 40 60 36 49 36 26 60 59 51 18 18 50

Lo W 17 s 33 c 24 s 44 r 64 c 16 pc 7 pc 20 s 37 pc 32 c 22 s 9s 58 c 39 c 27 c 37 pc 22 pc 30 r 21 c 37 r 23 s 14 pc 33 s 49 c 42 r 7s 5c 28 c

National Extremes Yesterday (For the 48 contiguous states)

High: 81 at Crystal River, FL

Bes Oil Ch t an Finali ge st

Be salesp st erson Bil schlic l hting

Low: -32 at Jordan, MT

Be salesp st e Fin rson ellen D alist earinge r

115108087

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High Tide Ht 7.5’ 8.8’ 7.9’ 6.8’ 9.5’ 8.2’ 8.9’ 7.7’

Jan 12

Detroit 30/19

Chicago 25/17

El Paso 46/22

Last

City Hi Lo W Athens 55 51 sh Baghdad 58 39 s Beijing 33 18 pc Brussels 38 22 s Cairo 64 53 pc Calgary 26 14 pc Edmonton 25 8 sf Hong Kong 58 54 c Jerusalem 61 45 pc Johannesburg 78 56 t Kabul 59 24 s London 36 23 s Mexico City 74 41 pc Montreal 36 16 sf Moscow 27 17 sn New Delhi 71 37 s Paris 34 28 pc Rio de Janeiro 87 76 r Rome 52 43 pc Stockholm 27 16 sf Sydney 81 66 t Tokyo 50 36 pc Toronto 30 19 pc Vancouver 36 26 pc Weather (W): prcp-precipitation, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Mostly cloudy today. Wind from the northeast at 7-14 knots. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility clear. Mainly clear tonight. Wind northeast 7-14 knots. Wave heights 2 feet or less. Visibility clear. Partly sunny tomorrow. Wind eastnortheast 3-6 knots. Wave heights less than a foot. Visibility clear. Tuesday: Partly sunny. Wind south 3-6 knots. Wave heights less than a foot. Visibility clear.

LaPush

Full

World Cities Today

Yakima Kennewick 20/-1 21/6

Today

First

Denver 38/8

Minneapolis 8/7

Los Angeles 56/44

-10s -0s

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Table Location High Tide

San Francisco 51/42

Moon Phases

Port Ludlow 38/27

Shown is today’s weather.

Tide

Billings 27/7

Sunset today ................... 4:32 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow ............ 8:04 a.m. Moonrise today ................ 6:47 a.m. Moonset today ................. 3:04 p.m.

Bellingham 33/10 Aberdeen 45/29

Seattle 37/21

Sun & Moon

Victoria 40/26

39/28

National Forecast

Sunday, January 2, 2011

Statistics are for the 48-hour period ending at 4 p.m. yesterday High Low Prcp YTD P. Angeles 37 19 0.00 0.00 Forks 38 19 0.00 0.00 Seattle 40 26 0.00 0.00 Sequim 39 22 0.00 0.00 Hoquiam 40 28 0.00 0.00 Victoria 39 22 0.00 0.00 P. Townsend* 34 28 0.00 0.00 *Data from www.ptguide.com

Thursday

High 38

Forks 44/26

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 $ Briefly . . . Continued from C8 The economic snapshot was mandated by the state Legislature in 1996, in an effort to achieve a snapshot of Washington’s businessfriendly climate. Of the 33 updated benchmarks and economic indicators, the state improved in 14 cases, declined in 16 and did not change in three. Washington remains strong in several categories. The state had the nation’s cheapest electricity costs for businesses in 2009, thanks to the state’s hydroelectric dams. Based on a percentage of personal income, Washington ranked second in foreign exports in 2009, boosted by Boeing’s commercial airplane business. And Washington was ranked No. 4 in the nation for dollars per capita spent on industry research and development in 2007, the latest year available in that category. Washington industries spent $1,962 per person on R&D in 2007, trailing only Massachusetts, Connecticut and New Jersey. Washington ranked 25th, though, in university research and development spending per capita in 2007. Only seven states had higher unemployment insurance costs in 2008 than Washington. Another glaring shortfall is Washington’s student to teacher ratio in elementary and secondary public schools. Washington was ranked 46th, with an average of 19.1 students per teacher

Send us your business news

TACOMA — Pierce County sheriff’s detectives are trying to round up the thieves who followed UPS and FedEx trucks and stole deliveries in and around Gig Harbor over the Christmas holidays. Nearly a dozen victims reported packages being stolen. A 35-year-old woman has been taken into custody, and deputies said several stolen items were recovered from her vehicle and home. Other suspects are being sought, detectives said.

Do you have a business expansion planned, staffing change, new product line or something newsworthy? Are you starting a new business? The Peninsula Daily News is happy to mention news of your business in our daily Business Briefly column. Simply send in the information — including a phone number for us to get additional information, if necessary — to the PDN in any of the following methods: ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521. ■ Mail it to PDN news, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. ■ Bring it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 150 S. Fifth Ave., Suite 2, Sequim. ■ E-mail it to news@peninsuladailynews.com. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. For questions, or to get a Business Briefly form faxed or mailed to you, please call 360-417-3527 weekdays.

in 2006-2007. ‘ The national average was 15.5 students per teacher. Education funding is taking big hit because of the state’s multibillion-dollar revenue shortfall. For K-12, Gov. Chris Gregoire is proposing cutting programs aimed at reducing class size, giving bonuses to teachers and increasing capacity in allday kindergarten pro-

the merger —­such as the expense of rebranding the merged company and integrating the two companies’ infrastructure ­— from shareholders rather than through rates charged customers in Washington state.

Nation/World Oprah’s network

NEW YORK — Oprah Winfrey’s network has begun not with a bang but with redeclared purpose by the Queen of Daytime for her much-anticipated cablechannel venture. The Oprah Winfrey NetTelecom merger work, or OWN for short, OLYMPIA — State offi- launched Saturday at 9 a.m. cials have worked out a with a one-hour preview tentative settlement agree- special hosted by Winfrey. She provided a hearty ment with Qwest and Cenwrap-up of the live-yourturyLink setting condibest-life fare she will tions on their proposed curate across the network’s merger to moderate its impact on their 1.5 million schedule. A joint venture between customers in Washington. Harpo Inc. and Discovery The agreement among the two telecom companies, Communication, OWN is the Washington State Attor- replacing the Discovery ney General’s public counsel Health network. OWN will initially be available in and the staff of the Washmore than 80 million homes. ington Utilities and TransThe startup cost for the portation Commission, freezes rates for residential network, which was origicustomers and requires the nally announced three years aily ews ago, has ballooned to a merged company to spend at least $80 million building reported $189 million. In June, Winfrey ends its broadband network in grams. underserved areas of Wash- her wildly successful weekGregoire’s proposed bud- ington state. day syndicated show after get for 2011-2012 would Additionally, rates will be 25 years. suspend the voter-approved frozen for CenturyLink Euro in Estonia Student Achievement Pro- basic business customers gram, which was designed while rate increases for TALLINN, Estonia — to provide smaller class Qwest’s basic-rate business The Baltic state of Estonia sizes, extend learning time customers are restricted to has become the 17th Eurofor students and expand a $1 total increase over the pean Union member to professional development next three years, with a adopt the euro. for teachers. monthly maximum charge Estonia’s decision to The study is on the set at $30 a month. change from the Estonian to Web at http://www.erfc. Under the terms of the the joint European currency wa.gov/publications/ agreement, Qwest and Cen- is the final step in a two climateStudy.shtml. turyLink will collect costs of decade-long effort to inte-

Peninsula D

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2010 rainfall NO PRECIPITATION WAS recorded by AccuWeather for the 24-hour recording period on New Year’s Eve, so rainfall totals for 2010 are:   Port Angeles: 13.99   Forks: 136.36   Seattle: 46.99   Sequim: 10.08   Hoquiam: 74.21   Victoria: 36.53   Port Townsend: 16.56 AccuWeather Inc. and ptguide.com

grate its economy with Europe after it achieved independence in 1991. It is the first former Soviet republic to join the single currency club.

Nonferrous metals NEW YORK — Spot nonferrous metal prices Friday. Aluminum -$1.1108 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$4.3429 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper $4.4395 N.Y. Merc spot Fri. Lead - $2558.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $1.0985 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1410.25 Handy & Harman; $1421.10 troy oz., NY Merc spot Fri. Silver - $30.630 Handy & Harman; $30.910 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri. Platinum -$1748.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1773.30 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Fri.

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Chuck Turner

UPTOWN REALTY

Office: 452-3333 Toll Free: 1-800-453-9157 chuck@portangelesrealty.com www.portangelesrealty.com

(360) 457-0456 (360) 460-8759 harriet@olypen.com

477-5582

lynnmoreno@olypen.com

IMMACULATE SINGLE LEVEL

FARM HOUSE + 19 ACRES

Harriet Reyenga

Lynn Moreno

David A. Ramey

Office: (360) 417-2800 Toll Free: 1-800-292-2978 email: dave@isellforu.com

NEW YEAR, NEW HOME

HOME PLUS BUSINESS

11405811

Tim Riley

190 Priest Rd. 360-808-1712 PO Box 1060 edseds@olypen.com Sequim, WA 98382 360-683-3900 www.blueskysequim.com

Kelly Johnson

Realtor®, SRS, SFR

Cell: (360) 477-5876 kellyjohnson@olypen.com www.kellyjohnson.mywindermere.com

BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOME

HORSE PROPERTY

11405815

11405813

11405810

11405832

Situated on 5.03 acres overlooking the Elwha River Valley & awesome views of the Olympic Mt. Range and Strait of Juan de Fuca. Fish from your own 200’ of river frontage. This is a welcome retreat setting with gorgeous trees. Beautiful rock fireplace, oak flooring, vaulted ceiling, spacious kitchen and master BR suite. For the New Year find peace and contentment in this special home. MLS#252402 $499,000

Built in 2005 with a separate office/den. Exceptionally landscaped with a large deck and a private wooded backyard. Beautiful hardwood floors and a large gourmet kitchen. Three car garage and RV parking! $319,000 View at www.U-SAVEREALESTATE.com

Great water view, 2-story home at Diamond Pt. Currently the home has one bedroom plus a den & a large bonus room, but the septic permit is for three bedrooms and a quick conversion would make this home exactly that. Large covered patio on the sunny southern side for BBQs and a deck to relax on while you enjoy your water view. Beach access and boat launch make this home perfect for the outdoor enthusiast. Only $249,950 MLS#250328 Call Brody at 360.477.9665

Ed Sumpter

WRE/Port Angeles

EXQUISITE CUSTOM HOME

ALL ABOUT THE VIEW

(360) 808-1712

Please visit the photo gallery at www.windermere.com/tid306210

(360) 437-1011 Direct: (360) 301-2929 laura@olypen.com

Office: (360) 417-2783 Toll Free: 1-800-292-2978 Email: timriley@olypen.com

Established auto repair business (with large shop; everything you need to hit the ground running) PLUS 2,250 SF home - all on 2.3 acres on two separate parcels. Owner financing may be available. $649,000! Call Ed

Quality built home by Green Crow with a great floor plan. 3 bedrooms plus a den, 2 baths, 1,572 sq. ft. with an attached 2-car garage. Located just off Mt. Angeles Road in an area of fine homes. $229,900 ML#252158

WRE/Port Ludlow Laura Halady

UPTOWN REALTY

11405809

11405824

11405814

Located on S. Bagley Creek, this cute 2+ BR/1 BA home offers some great country living. The acreage is dividable so that can accommodate up to 7 more homes. $345,000 ML#251653. Ask for Tim.

Beautifully landscaped. Spacious living, 10’ ceilings, tall doors/windows. Gourmet kitchen, cherry cabinets, honed granite counters, wide planked cherry floors, breakfast bar & pantry. MLS#156557 $335,500.

Already equipped with 2,400 SF barn, 3 horse stalls, tack room, 3.45 acres of fenced & cross-fenced pasture. Another RV storage building is 1,600 SF w/separate hobby rooms. Beautiful 3 BR/2 BA home w/awesome covered porch. Close to town! Cannot be seen from the road. $350,000 ML#251565

®

UPTOWN REALTY VIVIAN LANDVIK, GRI

Brody Broker

761 N. Sequim Ave. Cell: 360-477-9665 email: Brodybroker@olypen.com

www.welcomehomesequim.com

WELL MAINTAINED

www.u-saverealestate.com

Office: (360) 417-2795 Home: (360) 457-5231 email: vivian@olypen.com

INCREDIBLE MOUNTAIN VIEWS

RENTAL INCOME

UPTOWN REALTY

Marc Thomsen, ABR, SRS Managing Broker

Office: (360) 417-2782 www.callmarc1st.com

JUST OVER 1 ACRE

D

E UC

D

RE

Great location close to the college for these 2 duplexes. Total 4 fully rented 1 bedroom units. Make your investments work for you. Many improvements made in the last 4 years. Only $279,000! ML#252471. Call Pili for more information.

Very private building site borders Olympic Discovery Trail. Great location in between Port Angeles and Sequim. Call Paul Beck. $64,500 MLS#251889

WRE/Port Angeles

Jennifer Felton

Strait, City lights, Victoria & Mt. Baker. Vaulted cedar tongue & groove ceilings, skylights, fireplace w/propane insert & two freestanding propane stoves, separate MABR. Large wood deck off family room. RV parking w/dump, water & electric. $397,000 ML#251615/109577 Call KAREN

WRE/Sequim-East

Karen Kilgore

477-5718 842 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 KarenK@olypen.com

0C405760

Office: (360) 457-1111 Cell: (360) 460-7652 rightguy@olypen.com

RURAL COMMERCIAL

FANTASTIC VIEWS

11405818

Dick Pilling

email: pili@olypen.com

11405833

UPTOWN REALTY

Enjoy a beautiful view of the Strait from this 4.7 acre parcel near the top of Benson Road. This would be the perfect spot for your dream water view home. Lot would lend itself well to a house plan with a walk-out basement. PUD power is in at road and Site Reg. on file with Clallam Co. Only $80,000 MLS#252443. Call Kimi to get map and directions to the property. 360-461-9788

(360) 461-0644 (360) 457-0456

Office: (360) 417-2799 Toll Free 1-800-292-2978

NEW LISTING!

11405817

Have you ever dreamed about living on a boat, a lakeside retreat or mountain top? Do you crave seclusion, saunas and relaxing dips in a hot tub? Looking for a place with city conveniences, elbow room and a quirky country feeling? THEN THIS IS THE HOME FOR YOU!!! NW Contemporary with solar design features. Open concept floor plan with many nooks and crannies. Vaulted wood ceilings, sauna, hot tub, professional grade shop and unbelievable privacy on nearly a half-acre of land. $223,900 ML#250920 Call Dick

PILI MEYER, ABR, CRS, GRI

(360)461-4116 rolandmiller@olypen.com

PAS BEST KEPT SECRET

WRE/Port Angeles Paul Beck

UPTOWN REALTY

Roland Miller

(360) 460-9513 800-786-1456 feltys@olypen.com

11405822

11405816

11405808

11405823

Manufactured home on .45 acres. Fully fenced yard, sunroom off back porch, 2-car detached garage, close to stores and bus line. New roof on both garage and home. $150,000 MLS#250465/ 34906 Call JENNIFER

Custom 4 BR/2.5 BA home on 0.49 acres with a fantastic mountain view. Very private location. Large kitchen plus a walk-in pantry and propane range. Large master bedroom. Oversized attached 2-car garage plus additional detached 2-car garage for your toys. $367,000 ML#252133/42186

This 1.17 acre parcel West of Carlsborg has a 6,200 SF building and separate 936 SF garage. Zoned for a wide variety of commercial uses. Located in an area of other, quality commercial buildings! $495,000 ML#252175

Mark N. McHugh REAL ESTATE Mark McHugh

Office: (360) 683-0660 Toll Free: 1-800-708-0660 Fax: (360) 683-2527 www.marknmchugh.com


D2

Classified

SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Peninsula Pe ninsula

MARKETPLACE

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Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY

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51 Homes 52 Manufacured Homes 53 Open House 54 Lots/Acreage 55 Farms/Ranches 57 Recreational 58 Commercial Publisher’s Notice The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to advertise any sale or rental of real estate with preference, limitation or discriminatory language based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, handicap or familial status. Also, local laws forbidding discrimination in real estate ads prohibit discrimination based on marital status, political ideology, sexual orientation or a renter’s qualification for subsidy support. The Peninsula Daily News will not knowingly accept any advertising which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Housing for the elderly may be exempt from the Fair Housing Act if specific criteria have been met.

51

Homes

3 bed, 1.75 bath, 1,096 sf on large corner lot. Large kitchen. Master bath newly remodeled with tile shower & granite countertop. Peek-a-boo water view & mountain view. 1 car attached garage, detached 30x24 shop with wood heat. Fenced backyard with large patio. Near college. $208,000 360-460-7503

Place your Ad With The New Classified Wizard Pick your ad package and rate that works for you. Type your ad how you would like it to read. See your ad before it runs exactly how it will publish. Add a border, graphic, picture, Yellow on Sunday

51

Homes

ALL ABOUT THE VIEW Great water view 2 story home at Diamond Pt. Currently the home has one Br. plus a den and a large bonus room, but the septic permit is for three bedrooms and a quick conversion would make this home exactly that. Large covered patio on the sunny southern side for barbecues, and a deck to relax on while you enjoy your water view. Beach acess and boat launch make this home perfect for the outdoor enthusiast. $249,950. ML250328 Brody Broker 360-477-9665 JACE The Real Estate Company BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOME Situated on 5.03 acres overlooking the Elwha River Valley and awesome views of the Olympic Mt Range and Juan de Fuca Strait. Fish from your own 200’ of river frontage. This is a welcome retreat setting with gorgeous trees. Beautiful rock fireplace. Oak flooring. Vaulted ceiling. Spacious kitchen. Master Br. suite. For the New Year find peace and contentment in this special home. $499,000. ML252402. Vivian Landvik 417-2795 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

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TIPS Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range. Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond. Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic. Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out. You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

Harrison Sold His Ford In The Peninsula Classifieds. And you can sell your car in the Peninsula Classifieds even if you’re selling your Chevy and your name is Chase.

6A113352

COTTAGE HOME Central Port Angeles location. Nice lot, 1 Br., 1.5 bath. Detached 2 car garage on paved alley. 450 sf basement area not counted in County record, includes half bath, laundry area and bonus room. $95,000. ML251947/127418. Shawnee Hathway Ochs 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. DOUBLE YOUR PLEASURE This large 3 Br. rambler graces a double corner lot. Back yard is all fenced and enjoys a sunny southern patio. Soft colors greet you, cove moldings add flare. New floor to ceiling gas fireplace. 4th bedroom or nice office and a double plus garage. $210,000. ML251932. Chuck Turner 452-3333 PORT ANGELES REALTY EXQUISITE CUSTOM HOME Built in 2005 with a separate office/den. Exceptionally landscaped with a large deck and a private wooded backyard. Beautiful hardwood floors and a large gourmet kitchen. Three car garage and RV parking! $319,000 Jim Hardie U-$ave Real Estate 775-7146 FANTASTIC VIEWS Strait, City lights, Victoria and Mount Baker. Vaulted cedar tongue and groove ceilings, skylights, fireplace with propane insert and two free standing propane stoves, separated master Br. Large wood deck off family room. RV parking with dump, water and electric. $397,000. ML251615. Karen Kilgore 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

classified@peninsuladailynews.com

GET A LOT FOR THE PRICE With a little “elbow grease” this will be a great home. It’s move-in liveable now. Set on .8 acre with attached 2-car garage, 1-car carport and 2-bay RV pole barn and fenced back yard, there’s plenty of room for all your cars and “toys”. $169,000. ML252445. Carolyn and Robert Dodds 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

51

Homes

HOME PLUS BUSINESS Established auto repair business (with large shop everything you need to hit the ground running) PLUS 2,250 sf home, all on 2.3 acres on two separate parcels. Owner financing may be available. $649,000. Ed Sumpter Blue Sky Real Estate Sequim 683-3900, 808-1712 HORSE PROPERTY Already equipped with 2,400 sf barn, 3 horse stalls, tack room, 3.45 acres of fenced and crossfenced pasture. Another RV storage building is 1,600 sf with separate hobby rooms. Beautiful 3Br., 2 bath home with awesome covered porch, cannot be seen from the road. Close to town! $350,000. ML251565. Marc Thomsen 417-2782 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY IMMACULATE SINGLE LEVEL Beautifully landscaped. Spacious living, 10’ ceilings, tall doors/windows. Gourmet kitchen, cherry cabinets, honed granite counters, wide planked cherry floors, breakfast bar and pantry. $335,500. ML156557. Laura Halady 360-437-1011 Windermere Port Ludlow INCREDIBLE MOUNTAIN VIEWS Custom 4 Br., 2.5 bath home on 0.49 acres with a fantastic mountain view. Very private location. Large kitchen plus a walk-in pantry and propane range. Large master Br. Oversized attached 2 car garage plus additional detached 2 car garage for your toys $367,000 ML252133/42186 Roland Miller 461-4116 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY Located steps away from trails at Lincoln Park, schools nearby. New vinyl. Updated master bath. Newer carpet on stairs and upper level. Room for RV parking in back alley. $169,000 ML252431/161445 Clarice Arakawa 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. P.A.’S BEST KEPT SECRET Have you ever dreamed about living on a boat, a lakeside retreat or mountain top? Do you crave seclusion, saunas and relaxing dips in a hot tub? Looking for a place with city conveniences, elbow room and a quirky country feeling? Then this is the home for you. NW Contemporary with solar design features. Open concept floor plan with many nooks and crannies. Vaulted wood ceilings, sauna, hot tub, professional grade shop and unbelievable privacy on nearly a half-acre of land. $223,900. ML250920. Dick Pilling 460-7652 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

Visit our website at www.peninsula dailynews.com Or email us at classified@ peninsula dailynews.com

51

Homes

NEW YEAR, NEW HOME Quality built home by Green Crow with a great floor plan. 3 Br., plus a den, 2 baths, 1,572 sf with an attached 2 car garage. Located just off of Mt. Angeles road in an area of fine homes. $229,900. ML252158. Kelly Johnson 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A. RENTAL PROPERTY Great location close to the college for these 2 duplexes. Total 4 fully rented, 1 bedroom units. Make your investments work for you. Many improvements made in the last 4 years. $279,000. ML252471. Pili Meyer 417-2799 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY SPLIT LEVEL HOME Enjoy a leisurely stroll thru neighborhood and wooded areas. 3 Br., 2.25 bath, multistory, recently painted exterior and reroofed in 2008. Open style kitchen with island bar. Dining area and master Br. have access to wood deck. Living room wired for surround sound and has wood stove for cozy winter evenings. $267,500. ML252072. Chuck Murphy and Lori Tracey 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East STUNNING MOUNTAIN VIEW Wonderful custom 3 Br., 2.5 bath home boasts hardwood floors, a large entertaining kitchen with walk-in pantry and a spacious rec/bonus room. The master bedroom’s vaulted ceiling is uniquely designed with interesting lines and a sky light which adds charm to this special room. His and hers must have walk-in closets. On 7.35 acres $475,000 ML252447/162636 Lynn Moreno 477-5582 COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY WANT TO BUY home in Monterra community. 681-8536. WELL MAINTAINED Manufactured home on .45 acres. Fully fenced yard, sunroom off back porch, 2 car detached garage close to stores and bus line. New roof on both garage and home. $150,000. ML250465/34906. Jennifer Felton 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

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Lots/ Acreage

BEAUTIFUL PASTORAL PROPERTY With partial mountain view. Level building site with covered year-round Agnew Creek. PUD water, power and septic already installed. Conveniently located between Sequim and Port Angeles in an area of nice homes. $99,900. ML125075. Dianna Erickson 683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East

Lots/ Acreage

JUST OVER 1 ACRE Very private building site boarders Olympic Discovery Trail. Great location in between Port Angeles and Sequim. $64,500. ML251889. Paul Beck 457-0456 WINDERMERE P.A.

PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE With our new Classified Wizard you can see your ad before it prints! www.peninsula dailynews.com

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Lots/ Acreage

LOW IMPACT DEVELOPMENT 4 Lots to choose from in this “Built Green” residential sub division. All utilities and Infrastructure are in. All you need are your house plans. $48,000 ea. ML252455. Harriet Reyenga 460-8759 WINDERMERE P.A. LONG DISTANCE No Problem! Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

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RING. . . RING. . . Yes it’s a NEW YEAR and time to start thinking about a location for your dream home. This 2.6 acre water and mountain view parcel at the top of Benson Hill should be on the top of your list. $149,000. ML242340. David Ramey 417-2800 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

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Lots/ Acreage

NEW LISTING! Enjoy a beautiful view of the Strait of Juan De Fuca from this 4.7 acre parcel near the top of Benson Road. This would be the perfect spot for your dream water view home. Lot would lend itself well to a house plan with a walk out basement. PUD power is in road and Site Registration is on file with Clallam County. $80,000. ML252443 Kimi Robertson 360-461-9788 JACE The Real Estate Company

Lots/ Acreage

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02864

PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

110 YEAR OLD VICTORIAN Totally modernized and insulated, but renovated to preserve it’s historical architecture. Call for list of all upgrades. Cute 1 Br. bungalow in back is fully renovated and rented out. $249,000. ML252483 Michaelle Barnard 461-2153 WINDERMERE P.A.

FARM HOUSE Plus 19 acres located on S. Bagley Creek, this cute 2+ Br., 1 bath home offers some great country living. The acreage is dividable so that can accommodate up to 7 more homes. $345,000. ML251653. Tim Riley 417-2783 COLDWELL BANKER UPTOWN REALTY

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Homes

Monday - Friday 8AM - 5PM


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Classified 64

SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011

Houses

Properties by Landmark. portangeleslandmark.com SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1.5 ba carport, fenced, gar. $775. 683-1530. 61 Apartments Furnished 62 Apartments Unfurnished 63 Duplexes 64 Houses 65 Share Rental/Rooms 66 Spaces RV/Mobile 67 Vacation 68 Commercial Space

62

Apartments Unfurnished

64

Houses

SEQUIM: 3 Br., 2 bath, fenced, in town, $500 deposit. $1,100. 683-1695.

65

Share Rentals/ Rooms

P.A.: Room $450 mo, util. and cable incl. No pets. 460-4408 West PA: 3 Br., 1 ba on quiet street. Lg fenced yd. 1st, last & dep. Pets OK. $800/mo. Call Chris 206-383-1407.

SEQUIM: Room/bath, kitchen, no pets/ smoking, close to town. $500 mo. 683-4250 after 5 p.m. www.peninsula dailynews.com

65

Share Rentals/ Rooms

WANTED: Room to Rent. Quiet female looking for long-term room to rent Sequim/surrounding areas. Service dog well-trained. No drug use! 360-477-8368. tessnmolly@yahoo.co m

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Commercial Space

PROPERTIES BY LANDMARK 452-1326 Peninsula Classified 360-452-8435

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D3

Storage Space

NEW YEARS MOVE IN SPECIAL! Need some extra space? Remodeling? Or just need room to get a little more organized? Call for our amazing MOVE IN special! On site security, family owned! Call Joyce Self Storage today. 360-928-2560 Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

CENTRAL P.A. Clean, quiet, 2 Br. in well managed complex. Excellent ref req. $700. 452-3540. Nice apt., $625. Needs paint. Make a deal. 417-6638. NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS Hilltop Ridge Apts. 1914 S. Pine, P.A. 457-5322 P.A.: 1 Br., nice, no pets/smoke. 1st/last dep. $395. 452-1234 P.A.: Central, newer 2 Br., DW, W/D, no smoke/pets. $650. Lease, credit check. 360-796-3560 P.A.: Quiet and clean. 1 Br. $540. 206-200-7244

63

Duplexes

P.A.: 2 Br. senior cottage, all utilities incl. except phone, W/D, housekeeping and dining services avail upon request. Inquire at Park View Villas, corner of 8th and G St., P.A. 452-7222 for showing. SEQUIM: 2 Br., 1 ba. $725, dep and credit check 360-385-5857

64

Houses

3 Br., 1.5 bth, new carpet/paint. LR w/fireplace insert. Two car garage. Hot tub. $1125 First, last, dep. Non-smk/pets. Contact (206)8983252 Address: 1527 W. 10th. 3 Br., 2 bath, O’Brien Rd. Pets ok. Possible horse. $900 + dep. 360-461-7428 A Furnished 3 Br., 2 bath VIEW Home in Port Townsend. Remodeled & Upgraded. $1,400. Also for sale @ $399,900 MLS# 96766 24 Hr FREE Recorded Info 1-888-873-5447 ext. 400 CENTRAL P.A.: Country in city, 2 Br., updated, nice house. $800 or $825. References, deposits. Drive by 415 Valley and call 460-7652. Clean, furnished 1 Br. trailer with tip out, near beach, util. incl. $650. 928-3006. DIAMOND PT: 2 Br., 2 bath. $695. 360-681-0140

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSES IN P.A. H 1 br 1 ba......$500 A 1 br 1 ba......$500 A 2 br 2 ba......$650 H 2 br 1 ba......$700 H 2 br 2 ba......$750 A 3 br 1.5 ba...$925 H 3 br 2 ba....$1100 HOUSES IN SEQUIM H 1 br 1 ba.......$800 H 2 br 1 ba.......$900 H 3 br 1 ba.....$1100

360-417-2810

P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, newly remodeled, no pets/ smoking. $600 mo., $600 dep. 460-5290. P.A.: 2 Br., no smoking/pets, vicinity of Civic Field. $750. 457-4023 P.A.: 3 Bd/2 ba, 1838 W. 12th. No smoke. $875. 360-301-0875. P.A.: 3 Br., 2 bath, garage, nice area, $1,100. 452-1395. P.A.: 3 Br., 3 bath. Upscale, location, 2 car garage, yard, energy efficient. No smoking, no pets. $950. 360-452-9458. P.A.: 4 Br, 1.5 ba, no smoking. $1,000 mo, $1,000 sec. 417-0153 P.A.: Nice, furnished. 1 Br. $900. Call for details. 461-9684.

SEQUIM: 3 BR, 1 BA, 2 car garage, W/D. $900/mo. 1st & last month+ $1000 dep, Credit check. 253-709-9458

New Medical Office

97315731

space available in Sequim! 500-3000 SF available. Prices starting at $1.20/SF/month. Call Brody Broker 360.477.9665

Andrew and Robin Kirsch, free-standing woodstove, 641 S. Still Road, $3,000. Gilbert C. Olson, fire sprinkler, 2423 Mora Road, $1,500. Rob Johnston, detached garage, 650 Lotzgesell Road, $19,488. Rachelle Kinkead, heat pump, 841 Rivera Drive, $5,554. Stephen and Carmen B. Ragsdale, detached shop/workshop, 63 Guiles Road, $63,780. James and Diane Sallee, heat pump, 70 Evergreen Loop, $7,241. Terry McCartney joint trust, facade sign, 257151 U.S. Highway 101, $1,000. Dennis and Jennifer Taylor, add dormer to studio over garage, 96 Tayberry Lane, $10,000. Gloria Randolph Smith, single family dwelling with attached garage being placed on existing foundation and 100-gallon above-ground propane tank, 468 Sandhagen Road, $310,681. Edward P. Telenick Jr., wood stove, 470 Sherbourne Road, $3,000.

Port Angeles Sarwan Daljit and Amarjit Seera, kitchen addition, 918 Joshua St., $16,320. Herbert W. and Karla A. Swagerty, demolition, 612 S. Oak St., $0. Leanna L. Tanner, residential remodel, baseboard heater, 2611 S. Race St., $18,200. Timothy C. Stone, heat pump, 1020 D St., $4,829. David P. Olson, heat pump, 501 W. 13th St., $4,312. Carl Haarstad, sun room, 316 N. Race St., $6,900. Joanne Ellen Riverstone, heat pump, 429 W. Sixth St., $5,748. Peter L. Chase, kitchen and laundry area remodel, 1026 E. Fifth St., $2,600. Edwin L. Jaquins, re-roof, 1529 W. Eighth St., $4,568. Lane-Fontaine LLC, plumbing permit, 1727 E. Fourth St., $30,000. Charles L. Larsen, woodburning stove, 540 W. Seventh St., $1,700.

Sequim Union Community LLC, illuminated cabinet sign, 990 E. Washington St., building C, $2,800. Public Hospital District No. 2, relocation of temporary modular building, 844 N. Fifth Ave., $75,000.

Jefferson County Scott Baker, add interior walls to existing garage, 144 Sycamore St., $900. Claudia Robbins, add woodstove and bathroom to existing garage, 11 trader Lane, $23,813. Lee Adams, new woodstove, 161 Tog Road, $0. Betty Faulkner, swap-out 120-gallon propane tank, 151 Dog Leg Road, $0. Bradford Hart, addition to existing garage, 193 Cameron Road, $13,000. Stephen Marinkovich, new detached garage, 261 Bay Way, $111,366. Biao Wang, stairs to the beach, 991 Griffiths Point Road, $15,000. Juliet Parfrey, pole garage, 925 W. Egg & I Road, $25,618. Brian Hall, single family residence with attached garage, 796 Lords Lake Loop Road, $92,365.

Department reports Area building departments report a total of 32 building permits issued from Dec. 20-24 with a total valuation of $880,062: Port Angeles, 11 at $95,177; Sequim, 2 at $77,800; Clallam County, 10 at $425,244; Port Townsend, 0 at $0; Jefferson County, 9 at $282,062.

115101517

More Properties at www.jarentals.com

Clallam County

The Last Word in Astrology BY EUGENIA LAST

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Jump into the new year feet first. Throw all your cards on the table. A move or trip will pay off and lead to an interesting new beginning. Don’t let the red tape you face discourage you from moving forward. 5 stars TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Stop laboring over responsibilities that don’t belong to you. Take care of your own well-being. A personal or business partnership will help eliminate your stress and teach you how to care, share and work as a team player. 3 stars GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If picking up additional information will help you expand, now is the time to sign up for whatever course or apprenticeship might be required. Don’t rely on a partnership for the wrong reason. Make sure all can live up to the promises made. 3 stars CANCER (June 21-July 22): Make changes that will brighten your world. Take your future into your own hands. Look at the possibilities and do your research carefully. Don’t give up one thing until you have something to put in its place. 3 stars

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Invest in your future. Don’t waste time traveling when you can take care of most matters via email or phone. You may be faced with added responsibility or low vitality but don’t let that stand in your way. 5 stars

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): You’ve been through plenty of ups and downs and are an old pro when it comes to sizing up a situation and making it work to your advantage. Your intuition regarding your personal life is accurate, so don’t hesitate to take action. 3 stars

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Make whatever adjustments are needed to set up shop and make extra cash. Altering your surroundings by making it more user friendly and techno savvy will be a saving grace. In time, your insight will be recognized by someone who didn’t share your vision. 2 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19): Don’t hold back when you know you are right. Standing up for your principles will make people listen. Love is in the stars and revealing your intentions for the upcoming year will enhance the relationship you care about most. 3 stars

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t try to fix what doesn’t need fixing. Leave well enough alone and focus more on how you can improve your skills, your health and your well-being. Problems at home due to minor mishaps can be avoided. 4 stars SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Gravitate toward people you find inspiring. Working alongside someone will give you a better sense of your own talent, skills, knowledge and experience. Produce and present without hesitation. 3 stars

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18): Whether you already have a job or you are looking, it is time to make an upward move financially by putting your skills to work for you. A service you have to offer will be in demand and, if you present and promote it properly, you will be victorious. 4 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Emotions will hinder your ability to get things done. Don’t let anyone back you into a corner or play mind games with you. An offer you make to someone you fancy can help to enhance your lifestyle financially and personally. 2 stars


D4

Classified

SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SUNLAND

PORT ANGELES

sequimproperty.com/sunland (360) 683-6880 1-800-359-8823

portangeles.com (360) 457-0456 1-800-786-1456

SEQUIM-EAST

PORT LUDLOW

realestate-sequim.com (360) 683-4844 1-800-431-0661

windermereportludlow.com (360) 437-1011 1-800-848-6650

Come See Us For

Or Shop Online at...

The Best in Peninsula Real Estate

www.sequimandportangeles.com

LINCOLN PARK AREA

110 YR. OLD VICTORIAN

UNIQUE INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

SUNLAND WATER VIEW CONDO

WRE/SunLand

Carol, Managing Broker Nelson, Broker Cell: (360) 670-9418

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 477-0654 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland

11405819

• Extremely Affordable • Newer Subdivision • Large Bonus Room • City Water & Sewer ML#233158/28193985 $225,000 Visit www.kimbower.mywindermere.com

WRE/SunLand

www.sequimteamtopper.com

GET A LOT FOR THE PRICE

with partial mountain view. Level building site with covered year-round Agnew Creek. PUD water, power & septic already installed. Conveniently located between Sequim & Port Angeles in an area of nice homes. $99,900 ML#251905/125075 Call DIANNA

WRE/Sequim-East

Dianna Erickson 842 E. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 Cell: 461-2383 ladydi@olypen.com

SPLIT LEVEL HOME

11405830

11405821

11405820

Main Office: 360-683-4844 cell: 360-460-9248 cdodds@olypen.com www.sequimaccess.net

11405837

11405836

11405835

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 460-4040 www.sequimproperty.com/sunland teamschmidt@olypen.com

WRE/Sequim-East

BEAUTIFUL PASTORAL PROPERTY

Kim Bower

Irene Schmidt

Carolyn & Robert Dodds

137 Fairway Drive, Sequim 1-800-359-8823 • (360) 683-6880 Cell: (360) 918-3199 www.listingnumber.com/swt8

OWNER FINANCING AVAILABLE

WRE/SunLand

With a little “elbow grease” this will be a great home. It’s move-in livable now. Set on .8 acre with attached 2-car garage, 1car carport & 2-bay RV pole barn & fenced backyard, there’s plenty of room for all your cars & “toys”. $169,000 ML#252445/162290 Call the DODDS

Deb Kahle

Broker Cell: (360) 460-4794 shawnee@olypen.com shawnee.mywindermere.com

• 3 Bedroom, 1.75 Bath Condo • Heat Pump & Wood Burning Fireplace • Wraparound Deck • Enjoy SunLand Amenities ML#252064/135857 $175,000

• 5+ Dividable Acres • Income Producing • Zoning Allows 3-5 Home Sites Per Acre • City Water & Sewer Adjacent to Property • Mt. Baker, Protection Island & Marine Views ML#251263/86066 $232,500 www.sequimlandandhomes.com

WRE/SunLand

Shawnee Hathaway-Ochs

MICHAELLE BARNARD (360) 461-2153 Email: mlee@olypen.com

(360) 460-4741 (360) 457-0456

11405834

WRE/Port Angeles

WRE/Port Angeles

CLARICE ARAKAWA

• Wonderful Dungeness Meadows Community • Close to Town • Quiet and Peaceful • Enclosed Patio off Master • Amenities: Pool, Clubhouse, Golf Course ML#251727/116759 $219,000 www.debkahle.mywindermere.com

Central Port Angeles location. Nice lot, 1 BR/1.5 BA, detached 2-car garage on paved alley. 450 SF basement area not counted in County record includes half bath, laundry area and bonus room. $95,000 ML#251947/127418.

Totally modernized & insulated, but renovated to preserve it’s historical architecture. Call for list of all upgrades. Cut 1 BR bungalow in back is fully renovated & rented out. Call Michaelle 461-2153 $249,000 ML#252483/16409

WRE/Port Angeles

11405826

11405827

11405828

Located steps away from trails at Lincoln Park, schools nearby. New vinyl. Updated master bath. Newer carpet on stairs and upper level. Room for RV parking in back alley. Call Clarice for details. $169,000 MLS#252431/ 161445

OWNER WILLING TO CARRY

COTTAGE HOME

Enjoy a leisurely stroll thru neighborhood & wooded areas. 3 BR/2.25 BA, multi-story, recently painted exterior & reroofed in 2008. Open style kitchen w/island bar. Dining area & MABR have access to wood deck. Living room wired for surround sound & has wood stove for cozy winter evenings. Call CHUCK or LORI ML#252072/137289 $267,500

WRE/Sequim-East LORI TRACEY CHUCK MURPHY (360)550-6042 (360)808-0873 www.sequimhomesandrealestate.com

Making money is easy with a Peninsula Classified garage sale ad. Gather your items, call Peninsula Classified to place your ad, and go! We make it easy to reach thousands of potential shoppers with one simple call. We’ll even give you a garage sale kit complete with everything you need for a successful sale. Say as much as you want* for 2 days

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*15 line maximum


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011

D5

Peninsula Pe ninsula

MARKETPLACE

Reach The North Olympic Peninsula & The World

IN PRINT & ONLINE

Place Your Ad Online 24/7 with Photos & Video PLACE ADS FOR PRINT AND WEB:

Visit | www.peninsulamarketplace.com Office Hours

Call | 360.452.8435 | 800.826.7714 | FAX 360.417.3507 IN PERSON: PORT ANGELES: 305 W. 1ST ST. | SEQUIM: 150 S. 5TH AVE #2 | PORT TOWNSEND: 1939 E. SIMS WAY

SNEAK A PEEK •

T O DAY ’ S H O T T E S T N E W C L A S S I F I E D S !

Lost and Found

MISSING: Motorcycle. 1996 Yamaha Dual Sport, white/ blue, P.A. $100 reward. 477-7430.

CLALLAM COUNTY

22

Community Notes

WANTED: Rides from Sequim to P.A. some Sun./hol. Call Lynn at 360-683-1943

22 Community Notes 23 Lost and Found 24 Personals

22

Community Notes

FOUND: Keys. On green elastic key chain, Bushwacker Restaurant, P.A. 457-4113

Always include the price for your item. You will get better results if people know that your item is in their price range.

LOST: Gold single speed mountain bike on 12/27, somewhere between Joyce Access and Carlsborg Rd. 360-477-2788

www.peninsula dailynews.com

Make sure your information is clear and includes details that make the reader want to respond.

Highlight your ad in Yellow on Sunday to help it stand out. You are a reader, so make sure the ad looks appealing and is clear to you. PENINSULA CLASSIFIED

STOLEN ATV 63 year old disabled man Had his 2002 orange Honda Rancher stolen from 203 Dan Kelly Rd., P.A. on Thurs., Dec. 2. If you know somebody who got a new orange ATV around Christmas, please call the P.A. Police or 457-5647. Reward for info leading to an arrest and conviction of persons involved.

ACCOUNTING ASSISTANT 2 F/T, benefits. Prepares accounts payable checks, prints accounts payable reports, assists with payroll, collection calls, and filing. Must be organized, able to meet deadlines, perform in a fast paced work environment, able to multi-task. Requires strong attention to detail, work independently. Fax resume to Caregivers 360-457-7186 or email to accounting2@caregiversonline.com City of Sequim is seeking qualified professionals for the following positions: Engineer Engineering Tech II WRF Electronics Tech PW Admin Asst II Accounting Asst III Finance Project Manager Details at: http://www.ci.sequim. wa.us. Send cover letter, resume and job application to Kathy Brown-HR Manager, 152 West Cedar St., Sequim, WA 98363, or email kbrown@ ci.sequim.wa.us EOE CLALLAM COUNTY PROPERTY & EVIDENCE MANAGER, SHERIFF’S DEPT (to establish an Employment Eligibility List) $19.43 to $23.67/ hour, full-time (40 hrs/wk), benefited, retirement and union-eligible. This position is job-share eligible. Closes Jan. 12, 2011, at 4:30 PM. A completed Clallam County application packet is required for all positions. Resume in lieu of application not accepted. Faxed or emailed applications not accepted. Application and complete job announcement packet available online at http:// www.clallam.net/em ployment/, in front of Human Resources at 223 E. 4th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362, and through the Clallam County Jobs Line (360) 417-2528. Drug Free Workplace. EOE

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD:

Clinical Manager, RN Two years Home Health Case management experience , with managerial/supervisory experience in home health. RN required, BSN or related field preferred. We offer competitive salaries, excellent benefits, while working with a friendly and professional staff. Apply: nbuckner@olympicm edical.org or online at www.olympicmedical.org EOE DELIVERY DRIVER Drive our truck approx. 30 hrs. per week in the summer months and 20 hours per week in the winter. Must be available Saturday mornings. Must be able to lift heavy bundles. Must have drivers license, insurance and good driving record. $10 per hour Send resume to: Peninsula Daily News Advertising Operations Mgr. PO Box 1330 Port Angeles, WA 98362 or email susan.stoneman@ peninsuladaily news.com or fill out application at 305 West First, Port Angeles No phone calls please

Energy Analyst City of Port Angeles $4377-$5192 w/benefits. Position is F/T, grant-funded and will be evaluated after 3 yrs. to determine if employment will continue. Educ: BA/BS or equiv in energy mgmt., physical sciences, engineering or related field; or equiv combination of educ and exp. Exp: 3 yrs or more in energy efficiency or work in the construction trades involving interpretation of building codes. Closes 1/31/11. To apply go to www.cityofpa.us or call Human Resources 360-4174510. COPA is an EOE

Due to continued expansion and growth, urgently require LPNs, NACs and NARs. Competitive wages and benefits. 408 W. Washington Sequim. 360-683-7047 office@ discovery-mc.com GOODWILL PORT TOWNSEND NOW HIRING Assistant Manager and Keyholder. Please submit resume and cover letter to: 602 Howard Street, Pt Townsend, WA 98368. LABORER: License/ transportation needed. 683-9619 or 452-0840.

CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507

VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR

E-MAIL:

CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: 4:00 the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

Join our team. Make a difference.

Nippon Paper Industries is currently interviewing for a Senior Project Engineer. Job Requirements: •Requires 7-10 years of Engineering experience in Petrochemicals, Utilities and/or Power Generation. Requires a BS degree in Engineering (Mechanical, Electrical, Civil or Equivalent) and registration as a Professional Engineer •Ability to effectively communicate verbally and in writing with all levels of the Mill organization is essential. •Experience in the pulp and paper field is a plus We offer competitive salaries and an excellent benefits package. Must meet minimum job requirements for consideration. Please send resume with cover letter specifying position applying for, as well as salary requirements to: HR Representative NPI USA PO Box 271 Port Angeles, WA 98362 AA/EOE No Phone Calls Please

Current openings include:

Human Resources Recruiter/ Employee Relations Radiology Director Clinic Medical Assistant Home Health Physical Therapist Surgical Services RN Visit: www.jeffersonhealthcare.org or call our jobline at

360-385-2200 x2022 for all current openings.

COMPETITIVE SALARY & BENEFIT PACKAGES For more information - call 360-385-2200 x2085

Jefferson Healthcare - Human Resources

Peninsula Classified 1-800-826-7714

834 Sheridan, Port Townsend, WA 98368

Sequim

The Sequim Police Department is accepting applications from Sequim/Clallam County residents interested in becoming a

Health & Rehabilitation

Application deadline is January 15th, 2011 Minimum Qualifications: • Sequim/Clallam County resident • No felony convictions • Good character and standing in the community • Ability to pass a drug screening • Ability to pass a background investigation Applications are available at: Sequim Police Department 609 W. Washington Street, #16 Sequim, WA 98382 www.ci.sequim.wa.us/police

Maintenance Asst. • CNA Dietary Mgr. • Activity Asst.

RESERVE POLICE OFFICER

0C5106532

Since readers often scan, include a catchy headline and/or a photo or graphic.

LOST: Large gold nugget on long gold chain. Possibly one month ago. Reward. 457-1329

CAREGIVERS Needed for in-home care. Experience preferred. Salary DOE and license. Call 681-6206

31 Help Wanted 32 Independent Agents 33 Employment Info 34 Work Wanted 35 Schools/Instruction

31

Help Wanted

AIDES/RNA OR CNA Best wages, bonuses. Wright’s. 457-9236.

CAREGIVERS: Hiring, P.A., Sequim, P.T. Paid Training. Benefits. 360-457-1644.

Help Wanted

31

115108031

TIPS

LOST: Dog. 7 mo old black lab/chow mix. Pure black. Missing from Hwy 112 and Nordstrom, Camp Hayden area. Reward. 477-7013.

Help Wanted

0C5107198

PRENATAL YOGA Feel a sense of support and community with other pregnant women as you increase flexibility, strength, circulation and balance. A regular yoga practice can help to reduce swelling, insomnia, back and leg pain commonly associated with pregnancy. The class is safe for all three trimesters. 8-week class for expecting moms begins Sunday, Jan. 9. For more information or to register, please e-mail Jennifer Veneklasen at jennven@hotmail.c om or phone 360775-8746. Space is limited.

Compose your Classified Ad on

23

Lost and Found

31

5000900

Energy Analyst City of Port Angeles PROPERTY & $4377-$5192 w/beneEVIDENCE fits. Position is F/T, MANAGER, grant-funded and will Nippon Paper IndusSHERIFF’S DEPT be evaluated after 3 tries is currently (to establish an yrs. to determine if interviewing for a Employment employment will Senior Project EngiEligibility List) continue. Educ: neer. $19.43 to $23.67/ BA/BS or equiv in hour, full-time (40 energy mgmt., physi- Job Requirements: hrs/wk), benefited, cal sciences, engi- •Requires 7-10 years retirement and neering or related of Engineering union-eligible. This field; or equiv combiexperience in position is job-share nation of educ and Petrochemicals, eligible. Closes Jan. exp. Exp: 3 yrs or Utilities and/or 12, 2011, at 4:30 PM. more in energy effiPower Generation. A completed Clallam ciency or work in the Requires a BS County application construction trades degree in Engineerpacket is required for involving interpretaing (Mechanical, all positions. tion of building Electrical, Civil or Resume in lieu of codes. Closes Equivalent) and regapplication not 1/31/11. To apply go istration as a Proaccepted. Faxed or to www.cityofpa.us fessional Engineer emailed applications or call Human •Ability to effectively not accepted. Appli- Resources 360-417communicate vercation and complete 4510. COPA is an bally and in writing job announcement EOE with all levels of the packet available Mill organization is Nice apt., $625. online at http:// essential. Needs paint. Make a •Experience in the www.clallam.net/em ployment/, in front of deal. 417-6638. pulp and paper field Human Resources at is a plus PLYMOUTH: ‘76 Vol223 E. 4th St., Port We offer competitive Angeles, WA 98362, arie. 4-door, 76k salaries and an and through the Clal- miles, slant 6, runs excellent benefits and looks good. lam County Jobs package. Must $1,300/obo. Line (360) 417-2528. meet minimum job 460-8271 Drug Free Workplace. requirements for EOE consideration. SHOTGUN: BRNO. Please send CORNER LOVESEAT: 12 gauge, SxS, side resume with cover Beige, dark brown lock, $550. 681-0814 letter specifying trim, down pillows, position applying matching chair, TREADMILL: Cadefor, as well as salary nce model 1005, $250. 582-0605. requirements to: almost like new. GOODWILL $200. 683-2082. HR Representative PORT TOWNSEND NPI USA TREES ARE IN NOW HIRING PO Box 271 Assistant Manager Fruit and ornamental, Port Angeles, WA and Keyholder. and blueberry bush98362 Please submit es and cypress. G&G resume and cover Farms, off Taylor AA/EOE No Phone letter to: 602 Howard Cutoff Rd., Sequim. Calls Please 683-8809 Street, Pt Townsend, WA 98368. WANT TO BUY home WANTED: Woodstove www.peninsula in Monterra commu- under $300. Please dailynews.com nity. 681-8536. call 457-5209.

23

Monday - Friday 8AM - 5PM

NOW HIRING

Benefits • Top Wages 650 W. Hemlock, Sequim, WA

360-582-2400

www.extendicareus.com/jobs.aspx EOE

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmles Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., nor Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Northwest Media (Washington), L.P. Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., and Horvitz Newspapers, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Northwest Media (Washington), L.P., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


D6

Classified

SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sunday Crossword

1/2/11

128 Paddle-wheel craft

17 Goat’s friend? 18 Boating on the briny DOWN 19 Set of questions 1 Hammett canine 24 “It couldn’t be 2 Believed, to worse!” Tweety 29 Barrie baddie 3 Smooch in the 32 “Dilbert” intern shadows 34 Phone on stage, 4 Aggressive e.g. pinballer 36 Recital 5 It might mean highlights “I’m hungry!” 37 Dreads sporter 6 Hero’s 38 Richard’s counterpart in birthplace? the 1956 7 Narcissus election snubbed her 8 “The Nutcracker 39 Girl leader? 41 German border __” river 9 1959-’60 42 Meet, as a heavyweight challenge champ 44 Beatnik’s “Got Johansson it” 10 Recital rebuke 45 Wrest 11 Totally 48 Record holder? 12 “Grace Before 49 Slide show Meat” essayist effect 13 Some bar shots 51 Coal channel 14 Climbed 54 Smooth and 15 Shots soft 16 Mozart’s birthplace, now: 56 Hillary helper 57 Actor Grant Abbr.

59 __ volente: God willing 62 Sculptor’s tool 64 Indians, on scoreboards 65 Ginseng, for one 67 Sexy sleepwear 69 With 105Across, “GoodFellas” Oscar winner 70 Open for Christmas 71 Short 72 Ices, maybe 73 A scandal often ruins one 74 Aboriginal Walkman? 77 Success/failure metaphor 78 Central 79 Jeremy and friends, in “Zits” comics 82 Yemen’s capital 84 It’s heard a lot in Los Angeles 85 Buckeye State 88 Three, in 84Down

90 How a youngster might watch a parade, with “on” 91 End in __ 93 Apollo’s instrument 95 Movers with motors 96 Uncomplicated type of question 97 “Great” feature of Jupiter 100 Quit 102 Quimby in Beverly Cleary books 104 Hammett hero 106 Play groups 108 Texter’s output: Abbr. 109 Ginseng, for one 111 Christmas classic opening 112 Wild harangue 114 Muscle twitches 116 Suffix with confer 117 Colorful worker? 119 Of no value, in Normandy 121 Hamburg article 122 Dr. of hip-hop

HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. SIKHISM

E C N E S E R P I N M O U Y E

C C P R U A K I R P A N D Q C

Solution: 6 letters

N O N E N L U O S K I O U E I

E N Y A T E N N A O B A C N V

© 2011 Universal Uclick

D S T U R S D R N M L N E Y R

N C I S D E A O O J E M C B E

E I N E H M L C O I O A B Y S

C O R S A A I O C W R R U T A

www.wonderword.com

S U E S R A N S T C I A N S L

N S T O M N I P O T E N C E V

A N E R A N R M I G U R U N A

R E V C M A E S H T U R T O T

T S O O Y D H I S T O R Y H I

A S L A H K A R M A G N A K O

Join us on Facebook

C A R E I N C A R N A T I O N 1/1

Body, British, Care, Caste, Comb, Consciousness, Crosses, Democracy, Dharma, Equal, Eternity, Guru, History, Honesty, Kanga, Kara, Karma, Kaur, Khalsa, Kirpan, Kundalini, Love, Naam, Omnipotence, Omnipresence, Omniscience, Pray, Reincarnation, Salvation, Service, Soul, Tolerance, Transcendence, Truth, Uncut, Union, Women, Wooden Friday’s Answer: Return THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

HILTE ©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

SLARN QUOPEA

PORTHY

A: A

©2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Friday’s

Solution on D7

NEW BIBLE Jumble Books Go To: http://www.tyndale.com/jumble/

by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

-

“E-LITERATURE” 99 __ Trophy: By JOHN LAMPKIN biennial European golf ACROSS event 1 Risked 100 From head to 8 Orderly type? foot 14 Take a __: 101 The “0” in “4 5 attempt 0,” on a 20 Like the movie scoreboard “Airplane!” 103 Ruhr valley city 21 Hardly religious 105 See 69-Down 22 Vacation choice 107 Intro for John? 23 Specific item in 108 Malaprop or a sleepwear Miniver collection? 110 Turnover, e.g. 25 Bridal trails 113 Hops-drying 26 Rat tail? kilns 27 Robert who 115 Advanced played Roderigo teaching deg. in Welles’s 118 Part of ASAP “Othello” 120 Fabric softener 28 Royal pain delivered 30 Back muscle, overseas? for short 123 Adopt the 31 Jacob’s first naturist wife philosophy 33 City west of 124 Consecrate, in a Mesa way 35 Complicated 125 Architectural 37 Indy car’s lack molding 40 Plated, in a way 126 Fashioned 43 Kyoto ties 127 Dictators’ 46 Question underlings 47 How a rock band’s equipment damage was blamed? 49 Logging channel 50 Retriever’s retrieval 52 Store charge, often 53 Mil. base stores 54 More than just nodded 55 Pianist John 56 Jazz trumpeter’s nickname 58 Fixed up 60 Jazz trumpeter’s nickname 61 Per se 63 Bite response 66 Fax forerunner 68 Amazonian oddsmaker? 72 Niblick, nowadays 75 Stuttgart title 76 Writes John a letter? 80 Thurman of film 81 Ejects, as lava 83 Hairy herd 86 Feast 87 Kathy of country 89 Pro __ 92 N.T. book attributed to Paul 93 Second lady after Tipper 94 Certain hip-hop dancer 95 Dressing room sprite? 98 Author Kesey

By DAVID OUELLET

(Answers Monday) DOUGH VOYAGE AUBURN Jumbles: BULLY Answer: A nice feeling, but you’ll never get it — YOUNGER

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Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

ANSWER TO TODAY’S PUZZLE

73

General Merchandise

FIREWOOD: Seasoned fir. Full cord. $195. 452-6106 MISC: Ladies dresser, excellent shape, big mirror, black lacquer with gold trim, 6 drawers and middle cupboard with shelf, $125/obo. 10” table saw, $25. 683-9829. MISC: Metal bunk bed, $100. 3’x6’x8” bookshelf, $80. File cabinet $10. Foosball table, $25. 12’ trampoline, $50. 360-477-0351 MISC: Regency, wood burning stove, gold door and 5.5’ piping, excellent shape, $1,200/obo. Sanio 24” TV w/stand, $75/obo. Mini fridge, brand new, $75. 360-461-2894 SEASONED FIREWOOD $170 cord. 360-670-1163

31

Help Wanted

PERSONAL SERVICE ASSISTANT The residents at Laurel Park are looking for an energetic, reliable person to join their care team. Seeking full/parttime applicants to provide care services. 1-2 years experience preferred. Please apply in person at 1133 E. Park Ave., Port Angeles. 360-452-7201 RESIDENTIAL AIDES FULL-TIME OR ON-CALL Assist chronically mentally ill adults in daily living skills, cooking, and housekeeping. Req h.s./GED, exp pref’d. $10.13-$11.05/hr, DOE. FT w/benes, or add $1.hr for on-call work. Resume to: PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Details at www.pcmhc.org EOE RESIDENTIAL STAFF For new Maloney Heights 28-unit residence for chronically homeless: º Site Coordinator, Bachelor’s degr with 3-5 yrs. relevant exper. $29$31K, DOE. º Residential Aides, Assist w/daily living skills, cooking & housekeeping. Req h.s./GED; exper pref’d. $10.13-$11.05 hr., DOE. Both posns FT w/benes. resume to PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. Details at www.pcmhc.org EOE

31

Help Wanted

Veterinary Kennel and Grooming Assistant Part-time fast paced position. Resume and cover letter to: PO Box 339 Sequim, WA 98382 Wellness coaches needed. Control your hours and your income. Full training provided. For details call Debby at 452-5575

34

Work Wanted

For hire mature Christian man, in Sequim/ P.A. area. $65 per day, 6 hours. 360-683-9499 PROFESSIONAL COMPUTER REPAIR HelperTek.com. We offer courteous, professional computer repair and other IT related services at an affordable price. Visit us at helpertek.com or contact us 775-2525 helpdesk@ helpertek.com

Sewing. I Sew 4U Hemming, curtains, alterations, any project. Don't wait! Call me today! Patti Kuth, 417-5576 isew4u.goods.officelive.com I'm Sew Happy!

SWITCHBOARD/ RECEPTIONIST/ GENERAL CLERICAL Peninsula Community mental Health Center seeks versatile and mature team player for busy front office. Must have excellent interpersonal and customer svc skills and be able to type and use gen off equip. Recent exper in health care office is a plus. F.T. w/benefits. Some eve hrs. $10.50-$11.00/hr start, DOQ. Resume to: PCMHC, 118 E. 8th St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. www.pcmhc.org EOE TAX PREPARER CPA or EA with active license for Tax Season. Sequim. Call Kathryn at 681-2325 WELDER & FITTER. Opening for a selfmotivated, productive welder with mechanical skills. Must be proficient with TIG & MIG, experience in gas welding small pipe a plus. Full-time position with benefits. Email resume to hr@imspacific.com fax to 360-385-3410 or mail to: P.O. Box 2028, Port Townsend, WA 98368

Furniture

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Large, very sturdy, light colored oak. Plenty of room for a large television with two big storage drawers underneath, plus a side cabinet with three shelves and glass-front door. $175/obo. 360-775-8746 ENTERTAINMENT CENTER Pine armoire style. Priced reduced. $75. 808-1767. LOVE SEAT: Blue fabric, over stuffed, great shape. $200/ obo. 681-3299. Oak Entertainment Center. 3 years old, 7’x6’, TV stand, 2 towers, bridge, lots of storage. $200/obo. 775-5840. SET: Large, dark wood matching dresser with mirror, armoire, and night stand. $700 all. 360-457-8464 SOFA: Like new. $500/obo. 670-5948.

73

General Merchandise

CHRISTMAS TIME Beautiful coat, leather and suede. $100/ obo. Call Debbie at 360-452-6034 COMFORTER SET Barney twin, with sheets, good shape. $15. 452-9693, eves. DRESSES: 3 nice prom dresses size small, like new worn once, call for description. $30 each. 452-9693 or 360-417-3504

ROOFER: Experienced, valid license, own transportation, wage DOE. 683-9619/452-0840 SARC is now accepting applications for the part time evening custodian. Please pick up application 610 N. 5th Ave., Sequim. 683-3344 ext 11 for more info.

72

71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79

Appliances Furniture General Merchandise Home Electronics Musical Sporting Goods Bargain Box Garage Sales Wanted to Buy

71

Appliances

APPLIANCES AVAILABLE. Whirlpool side-by-side fridge, white, with water hookup, $300. GE convection oven with glass top, works great, $200. Kenmore washer and dryer set, they work great, super capacity, heavy duty, $300. 461-3164 pl lv msg. Hot water heater. GE, 50 gal., HYBRID. Brand new in box. $1,200. 683-7990. evermore@olypen.co m

72

Furniture

COFFEE TABLES: 2 blonde finish coffee tables, 1 large, $40 and 1 small $30, very good condition. 681-4429 CORNER LOVESEAT: Beige, dark brown trim, down pillows, matching chair, $250. 582-0605. DINING TABLE: 4x6, maple top, white legs, excellent condition. $150/obo. 360-344-3577 DINING TABLE: With 4 chairs, blonde finish nice set. $140. 681-4429

ESTATE ITEMS: Pacesaver power scooter, like new, $750. 20s rocker $200, matching 20s chair $100. 3 dressers $45 each. 20s vanity with round mirror $175. 50s dresser with rectangle mirror $125. 50s kitchen table $50. Computer desk set $100. Metal office desk $50. 457-4837.

Seasoned firewood. Hemlock fir or alder. Split & delivered. Full $170. Half cord $100. 360-670-1163. Ten cords fir firewood $165 ea or trade for truck/big saw. Cut, split, delivered. FULL cords, not dry. came from big trees, nice, straight grain and lots of dense heartwood. will haul to west side or P.T. for extra. 670-5655. UTILITY TRAILER Heavy duty tandem axle trailer, all steel, 4’x8’, 5’ drop down ramp, front tongue storage, new tires with spare, 2’ sideboards. $1,750/obo. In Sequim. 206-940-1849

75

Musical

VIOLIN: Becker 3/4, with case. $350. 360-452-3402

76

Sporting Goods

KAYAK: Riot 10’. Bought for $1,100, asking $700/obo. Call for details. 683-4042 SHOTGUN: BRNO. 12 gauge, SxS, side lock, $550. 681-0814 TREADMILL: Cadence model 1005, almost like new. $200. 683-2082.

79

Wanted To Buy

BOOKS WANTED! We love books, we’ll buy yours. 457-9789 WANTED: Reloading equip. presses, dies, scales and misc. 360-457-0814 WANTED: STERLING SILVER Any cond. Coins, pre 1965. 360-452-8092. WANTED: Wheelchair elevator for Dodge van. 452-2615. WANTED: Woodstove under $300. Please call 457-5209.

82

Pets

AKC Pembroke Welsch Corgi. 1 yr old neut. male. $450. 681-2486 Christmas Chihuahuas. Purebred Chihuahuas cute and friendly 11 weeks old one male one female. Shots wormed and paper trained. $200-$300. 360-670-3906 FREE: To good home. Healthy senior house cat with all supplies. Gray short haired, female, spayed, declawed, friendly and affectionate. Needs senior home to share love. Cell 808-1694. 582-9363.

GEM STONES: Faceted amethyst, $8$12 per carat, many stones. Custom cut opals, $50-$200 per carat, many stones. Rubies from $50 a carat. Sapphires from $75 per carat. 670-3110 HP Mini Case and portable mouse with 4 GB flash drive. $25. Open but never used. 452-6439. MISC: ‘95 F150 4x4, parts, $500. Cont. Gem Topper, cost $1,600, sell $500. 3 Husqvarna chainsaws, $300-$500. Leister plastic heat welder, $200. 48 Jeepster tranny, 3 sp with electric O/D, $500. 461-8060. MISC: Bird cage, 6’x 4’x30”. $200. Parrot play stand, $50. Recumbent Schwinn exercise bike, $175. 452-9302

81 82 83 84 85

Food/Produce Pets Farm Animals Horses/Tack Farm Equipment

81

Food Produce

TREES ARE IN Fruit and ornamental, and blueberry bushes and cypress. G&G Farms, off Taylor Cutoff Rd., Sequim. 683-8809

82

GN 33’ FLAT-BED EQ TRAILER. $4,490. Like-new, 25ft deck includes 5’ pop-up beavertail for a flat deck, 5’ loading ramps with storage. 14,000 lbs. GVWR. MSRP $7,990. 808-5636 b6942@hotmail.com SEMI-END DUMP ‘85 Freightliner, Cummins 400BC, 24 yard end dump, excellent condition. $35,000/ obo. 417-0153.

94

Motorcycles

HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘02 883 Hugger. 6K, like new, maroon. $4,800. 457-4020.

HONDA: ‘03 150 CRF. Lots of BBR, bored to 175. $1,500. 928-9423 or 670-5282.

Marine

FREE: To good home. Male Bengal cat. Neutered, good indoor/outdoor, not with other cats. 928-3625

A Captains License No CG exams. Jan. 10 Capt. Sanders 360-385-4852 www.usmaritime.us

HONDA: ‘95 Z50 mini bike. Runs good. $600/obo. 681-8023. HONDA: ‘95 Z50 mini bike. Runs good. $600/obo. 681-8023.

IN TIME FOR CHRISTMAS Really nice male Lab puppies. Just had 2nd shots, 10 wks. old. $125. 417-0808.

BOSTON WHALER Offshore 27 (1991), well equipped for ocean fishing, dual 225 hp Optimax engines (400-500 hrs.), 12” Raymarine chart plotter displaying radar, GPS, digital fish finder; Yamaha electric start and tilt kicker, dual electric downriggers, aluminum trailer, moored Neah Bay last 3 yrs., now stored West Bay Boat Sequim. $27,500. Garry at 683-7176

KITTEN: Female Minx/Snowshoe mix. $100. 681-3838. LHASA APSO: Christmas Puppies! Ready to go, Tuxedo and Parties, 2 litters to choose from, 5 girls, 5 boys. $300-350. 477-8349 LHASAPOOS: 2 black females, $300 ea. 477-8349 PUPPIES: (2) male Pit Bull mix. 7 mo old, $50 each. Only serious inquiries, To good home only. 360-463-1699 PUPPIES: AKC Registered Mini-Schnauzer puppies. Born 08/14/2010. First shots, dew claws removed, tails docked. 2 males and 1 female left from litter. $350. Call 360-460-7119 PUPPIES: Black Lab, champion sired, AKC registered, great blood lines, 3 left, 11 wks. old. $350. 912-2785 PUPPY: Female Chihuahua, 9 months old, very good dog, paper trained, to good home only. $100 cash. 4529888, leave message. PUPPY: Jack RussellSchipperke mix, 8 wks., pad trained. $125. 457-6608. Training Classes Jan. 11. Greywolf Vet. 683-2106.

83

Farm Animals

BULL: 8 mo. $550. 683-2304.

85

Farm Equipment

MISC: Tractor, Kubota L210, 2WD, 21 hp, diesel, 265 orig. hrs, exc. shape, $2,850. 60” brush hog mower, $485. 360-681-4256

91 Aircraft 92 Heavy Equipment/Truck 93 Marine 94 Motorcycles/Snowmobiles 95 Recreational Vehicles 96 Parts/Accessories 97 Four Wheel Drive 98 Trucks/Vans 99 Cars

92

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

Pets

Adorable Chihuahua Puppies. These playful adorable pups are 8 weeks old and ready for a loving home. Guaranteed to melt your heart. $350. Please leave a message. 461-4115. BIRDS: (2) male cockatiels, $100 both. (1) green cheeked conure, 5 yrs old, hand trained, $150. 360-565-0105

Heavy Equipment/ Trucks

HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade GL 1200. Black and chrome, like new condition, always garaged. $4,000. 417-0153.

EXERCISER: Tony Little’s Gazelle Free Style. $50. 928-9617 or 360-460-9224. FIREWOOD: $175 delivered SequimP.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $489. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com

92

SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011

FORD: ‘64 Ford 350. Dump Truck. Truck runs great! Recent upgrades such as: Rebuilt 312Y-Block, New Clutch, Battery & Hydraulic Brakes. 2 Speed Browning Manual High & Low Transmission Alternator Conversion Scale weight is 4,470 Gross weight 10k $1,900/obo. Please contact Mark at 850- 890-2783.

93

GLASPLY: ‘86 15’ Runabout. Exc. cond. $3,000. 360-461-0157

GLASTRON: ‘08 GT 185 Bowrider $16,500. Must see. Like brand new. 67hrs of fresh water only use on Vortec V6 with Volvo Penta outdrive. Excellent package. Stereo and depth finder. Will throw in lots of extras so ready for tubing and skiing. Great family package. 360-461-0813.

Job loss forces bottom price. Must sell to pay loan. 1979 Fiberform 26' Baja Flybridge Galvanized EZ-Loader trailer (1999 dual axle) Chevy 350 engine with rebuilt Rochester Quadrajet 280 Volvo outdrive. $2,500. 360-504-2298 PST In Port Angeles. LIVINGSTON: Model 12-T Resort. Seats, 2 motors, console, galvanized trailer. $6,800. 681-8761. MALIBU: ‘96 Response. 514 hrs., heater, shower, custom Bimini top. $11,500/ obo. 928-9461. RARE PANGA 26’ BOAT FISHERMAN’S DREAM Magic Tilt Trailer & essentials for this beautiful ride. New floor & engines overhauled. 2 bimini tops, custom boat cover, gps, radio, etc. In Sequim. $18,500/obo. 707-277-0480

94

Motorcycles

APOLLO: ‘07 Orion 110. Exc. cond., some riding gear. $1,000. 683-8558. HARLEY: ‘05 Soft Tail Deluxe. Glacier white, vivid black, 2,000 mi. 1450 ST1 EFI, bags, chrome foot boards, sport rack, back rest, lots of chrome, much gear included garaged. $17,500. 460-0895. HONDA: ‘02 VTX 1800 R. Candy apple red, excellent condition, garaged, 13K miles, new tires, custom seat by Richs, saddle bags, windshield, road guards, Cargo box. Aux lights, sissy seat with back, many extras. $8500/OBO. 360-797-1254

JPM: ‘09 Raptor Cruiser. Under 1,500 mi., gray and silver, dual exhaust, dual front disc brakes, water cooled, chain drive, saddle bags, exc. condition! $2,195. 360-390-8287 KAWASAKI: ‘03 KLX 400. Very clean. Low miles. $2,500/obo. 461-7210 KAWASAKI: ‘09 Ninja EX250. 300 mi., bright green new helmet, visor, can email pics. 1 owner. $4,000. 477-6973. QUAD: ‘06 Eton 150. Low hrs. good condition. Daughter’s quad. $1,800/obo. 461-7210 QUAD: ‘06 Suzuki Quad Sport Z250. Like new. $2,600 firm. 360-452-3213. RHINO: ‘09 Yamaha 700. Fuel injected. Great condition. Low miles. $9,500/obo. 417-3177

SUZUKI: ‘05 Boulevard (S50). Very nice, well maintained. Gray, saddlebag hardware, great bike for smaller people. 14K miles. Garage stored. $3,500/obo. 460-0012 or jbgoode1017@hotmail .com SUZUKI: ‘98 Maurder. 800cc, 1 owner, FMC, D&H pipes, custom seat, cruise, sissy bar, billett mirrors, 15K. Great entry cruiser. $2,500. 360-457-6510 URAL: ‘03 Wolfe. 1,000 mi. $3,200. 460-0895

YAMAHA: ‘03 YZ85. Runs great, son outgrown, $800. 360-457-0913 or 360-461-9054

YAMAHA: ‘05 660 Raptor. Comes with paddle tires mounted on extra wheels. New chain and sprockets, New graphics and seat cover, new batt, new clutch, pro circuit T4 muffler. $2,800. Contact Justin 461 6282.

95

Recreational Vehicles

‘03 Newmar Dutch Star. 40’, 3 slides, 6 speed Allison Trans. micro/conv. oven, 3 burner cooktop, sliding shelf pantry, 2 Sony flatscreen TVs, Sony AM/FM/CD, VCR, Sat. Dome, computer/printer table, light oak interior, washer/dryer hookup, 6 kw generator, leveling system, solar battery charger, low mileage (22k), gently used, non smokers. $117,000. 360-683-3887

95

Recreational Vehicles

5TH WHEEL: ‘89 26’ Alpenlite DL. With hitch, loaded. $4,000. 452-3402. 5TH WHEEL: ‘96 30’ Snowbird. 1 slide, like new condition. $10,000. 452-2929. CAMPER: 8’. $200/ obo. 683-2426. CAMPER: ‘96 8.5’ Coachman. Hydraulic jacks, gas and elec. fridge, gas range, heater, hot water, and self contained. Clean inside and out. $2,200/obo. 360-417-6781 CAMPER: Hydraulic jacks, gas and electric fridge, gas range and heater. Clean. $600/obo. 477-6098. MOTOR HOME: ‘05 Winnebago Journey 39K. 27,000 mi., loaded, 3-sides, 350 Cat diesel, 6.5 Onan generator. $115,000. 460-0895 MOTOR HOME: ‘92 23’ Itasca. 30K, good condition. $11,500. 452-2162. MOTOR HOME: ‘92 37’ Infinity. Beautiful country coach. Home on wheels. Immaculate inside and out. Great home for snow birds or for travel. Has all the bells and whistles. Must see to appreciate. $40,000/obo. 460-1071 MOTOR HOME: ‘93 30’ Monterey. Loaded $8,900. 797-1625 MOTOR HOME: ‘94 28’ Minnie Winnie. Class C, good shape. $10,000. 457-8912, 670-3970

MOTOR HOME: ‘98 26’ Tioga Class C. Gen., A/C, kept in garage, V10. $14,000. 457-7097. MOTOR HOME: ‘98 30’ class C, Itasca Spirit. Ford V10, 35K miles, 14’ slide, sleeps 6, alum frame, new brakes/tires, serviced, ready to roll. $18,500. 452-2148 TENT TRAILER: ‘07 8’ Rockwood. Very clean. $5,000. 360-452-5512 TRAILER: ‘05 Tahoe Transport Toy Hauler. 24’. Good condition. 4K Onan generator. $17,000. 417-3177. TRAILER: ‘06 Jayco S6S. ULTRALIGHT. Slideout, Equal-i-zer hitch. Great! $13,900. 683-7444. TRAILER: ‘82 19’ Terry Taurus. $500. 360-681-0561 WANTED: Later model truck camper. Cash. 360-770-2410

96

Parts/ Accessories

FREE PICK UP Unwanted cars and trucks in area. State licensed and bonded auto wrecker. A&G Import Auto Inc 800-248-5552 TIRES/WHEELS: (4) Michelin all season (snow/mud) low miles, one season, 225/60/18, Dodge Charger wheels, 18” caps, lug nuts, polished. $400 ea. 683-7789

97

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV ‘04 K2500H SILVERADO CREW CAB 4X4 5.6 liter Vortex V8, automatic, dual exhaust, lifted, alloy wheels, 35” tires, brush guard, bed liner, running boards, tow package, power windows, locks, and mirrors, CD stereo, cruise control, tilt, air. Kelley Blue Book Value of $22,370! Sparkling clean inside and out! Nice big lift! Stop by Gray Motors today and Save some bucks on your next truck! $18,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

97

D7

4 Wheel Drive

CHEV ‘99 SUBURBAN SPORT UTILITY4X4 5.7 liter (350) Vortex V8, automatic, alloy wheels, privacy glass, tow package, power windows, locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, leather seats, keyless entry, CD and cassette stereo, cruise control, tilt, air, rear air, dual front air bags. Kelley Blue Book value of $7,485! Good strong runner! Straight and clean! Perfect winter rig for the whole family! $4,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com CHEV: ‘70 3/4 Ton. $850. 360-434-4056.

CHEV: ‘85 S10. 4x4, king cab, auto, canopy. Straight, dependable, clean. PS, PB, A/C, tilt, CC, AM/FM/cassette. New shocks, battery, tires. 2.8 V6. Runs great! No rust. Drive anywhere. $3,300. 360-452-7439 CHEV: ‘86 Suburban. Good condition. 3rd seat, extra full set wheels. Nice white paint exterior, tan interior. $2,500/ obo. 360-374-6409.

CHEV: ‘90 Suburban 4 WD 2500. Low miles, auto, good tires, straight body 4WD, V8, clean inter, no rips, tow pkg runs great. Heavy bumper w/winch. $3,500. Forks 360-374-9512. DODGE: ‘02 Ram 1500. 85K miles, lifted, canopy, 5.9 V8, new tires. $12,000. 477-5556

FORD: ‘06 Expedition XLT. This expedition is in nearly new condition and has only 60,000 miles with lots of options. $16,500. Please call Sunday through Thursday. 360-460-6213 FORD: ‘87 Super Cab manual, 4x4 and Eaton rear end. $1,000. Call after 11 a.m. 457-1457. FORD: ‘88 F250 111K mi., 4x4. $3,000/obo. 808-5605 GMC ‘04 YUKON XL K1500 AWD SLT. 74K original miles. 5.3 liter V8 engine, auto, fully loaded, moon roof, Bose premium audio system, CD changer, dual power heated seats, OnStar, DVD entertainment system, silver metallic exterior, gray leather interior, One very clean, well optioned SUV at $19,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 GMC: ‘97 Suburban. ‘454’ 4WD, 3rd seat, tow pkg., new tires, MP3/CD 4 speaker stereo, AC front and rear, power seats, cruise control, 189K mi. All systems work well. $4,200. 461-6460

HONDA: ‘01 Passport. 79K mi., V6, auto, tinted windows, cd/am/fm, ac, airbags, runs well, good cond., new trans. from Midway, silver. $5,400/obo. 360477-1072 msg. or email: sjones.interest@gma il.com.

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78289849

085093109

• Kitchen and Bath Updates and Remodels • Additions, Garages, Framing and Siding • Finish Carpentry, Cabinets, Trim, Doors, etc. • Tile: Floors, Showers, Walls and Countertops • Concrete Driveways, Walks and Retaining Walls • Drywall: New, Repair, Painting and Texture • Creative Help with Design and Layout • Small Jobs, OK

Done Right Home Repair

REPAIR/REMODEL

LAWN CARE

Carruthers Construction

360-460-0147

Licensed

(360) 477-1805 Every Home Needs “A Finished Touch”

AIR DUCT CLEANING

Licensed & Insured #CARRUC*907KJ

457-6582 (360) 808-0439 (360)

0B5104177

Lic#BOBDADT966K5

CLEARVS9010W

TIME TO PRUNE

Moss Prevention

Gutter Cleaning & Services

Interior/Exterior Painting & Pressure Washing

FALL/WINTER

No Job Too Small

From Curb To Roof

FOX

085091454

360-670-1350

Roof & Gutter Cleaning

0A5101705

+ will meet or beat We most estimates

93313234

#LUNDFF*962K7

76289935

452-0755 775-6473

-Painting -Limbing/Pruning -Free Estimates -Yard/Debris Removal -View Enhancement -Gutter Cleaning -Moss Removal -Windfall Cleanup -Light Replacement

C allahans Landscape Maintenance

HOME REPAIR

GUTTER

0C5105031

Chad Lund

Pressure Washing

085092331

www.LundFencing.com

Specializing in: Field Mowing, Rototilling, Landscaping. Lawn Prep, Back Hoe, Drain Works, etc., Post Holes, Box Scraper, Small Dump Truck, Small Tree and Shrub Removal

Clearview Services 40’ Bucket Truck

PAINTING

72289360

Specializing in; Custom Cedar, Vinyl Chain Link

Small jobs is what I do!

PRUNING

115107491

SERVICE DIRECTORY

It’s a terrific way to reach a whole new market for anything you might want to sell. www.peninsuladailynews.com 61246807

For details on how your ad can be on the internet call: 360-452-8435 or 1-800-826-7724


Classified

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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4 Wheel Drive

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Pickups/Vans

FORD: ‘97 F150. 5.4, new tires, trans, batt. Clean. $6,500/obo. 360-681-2643 GMC: ‘97 4WD. Runs good, 140K mi. $3,000. 683-4401. JEEP ‘02 LIBERTY 4x4, auto, 3.7 liter. The Original Buy Here Pay Here! 90 Days Same as Cash. Lowest in house financing guaranteed! $8,495 The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 KIA ‘04 SORENTO 4x4, 5 speed, red. 2 to choose from! Military discounts! Flexible payment plans! The Original Buy Here Pay Here! 90 Days Same as Cash. Lowest in house financing guaranteed! $8,995 The Other Guys Auto and Truck Center 360-417-3788 NISSAN: ‘08 Frontier King Cab. V6 4x4, 24K mi., silver ext. matching canopy, bedliner, auto windows-locks, remote ent, cruise, CD, oversize tires, below KBB val of $20,425. Records avail., no accidents. Very clean. $18,600. Call 360-670-1400

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Pickups/Vans

ACURA ‘01 3.5 RL 89K original miles. One owner, 3.5 liter V6. Auto, fully loaded, dual power seats, CD changer, Bose sound system, silver exterior, black leather interior, moon roof, This Acura literally looks new inside and out. A ton of car at $10,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

CHEV: ‘38 Pickup. All original, garaged, needs rear end. $15,000. Only serious buyers please. 457-3990, 775-1139

CHEV: ‘84 S10 pickup. Excel. rebuilt motor. Good body. Needs paint job. $1,845. 360-6835682, 541-980-5210. CHEV: ‘91 S-10. Runs $800 461-6246

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Legals Jefferson Co.

DODGE ‘05 DAKOTA QUAD CAB ST 4X4, 83K original miles, auto, 3.7 liter V6, air, tinted windows, cruise, CD player, tilt steering wheel, silver exterior, gray cloth interior, tow package. Spotless Carfax. One clean reliable truck at $10,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

FORD: ‘02 E150. Cargo van, only 33K miles, great truck. $5,900. 457-0655.

Pickups/Vans

FORD: ‘90 F250. Ext. cab, long box, 48,660 mi., new HD service brakes, set up for 5th wheel, excellent condition. $5,500. 796-4929. FORD: ‘95 F150 XLE Ext cab, 8’ bed w/lockable lid, 66k, auto w/o/d, full power, 351 Winsor tow pkg, always garaged, very very clean, below book @ $6,000. 683-8133.

FORD: Step Van. One of a Kind, Endless Possibilities, Solid. 40k on a thrifty Cummins diesel; great tires; new battery; no rust. Food truck? Contractor? RV conversion? Only $4,000/obo. 360-820-2157

FORD: ‘70 heavy duty 3/4 ton. Runs great, new tow pkg. $900/ obo. 417-3959. FORD: ‘78 F350. Super cab, trailer special, 460 C6, 3 speed auto. Call for added features. Best offer over $2,000. 360-302-0844 FORD: ‘79 Flatbed. Runs good. $2,000/ obo. 683-0940. FORD: ‘87 Econoline. New wheels/tires, very clean. $1,200 firm. 683-8249.

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Legals Jefferson Co.

MAGIC RAINBOW HAPPY BUS 1973 Volkswagon Transporter $1,500/obo Not Camper Style Runs, Some Rust. Call: 360-797-3951 www.peninsula dailynews.com

104

Legals Jefferson Co.

Jefferson County Request for Proposal Public Defender Services Jefferson County is seeking the services of professional public defense attorneys to provide legal representation to indigent defendants beginning March 1, 2011 for the years 2011, 2012 and 2013. Proposing firms or associations shall provide the full array of public defense services including: adult felony, juvenile and family court offender matters, and adult misdemeanor. Proposals shall be in the form of a written response as outlined in the Request for Proposal packet, and be inclusive of the cost of investigations, professional and other insurances, administration and reporting. Successful submissions shall be based on the Washington State Bar Association Standards for Public Defense Services as adopted by Jefferson County Ordinance 04-0323-09, and meet the terms and conditions as put forth in the County’s standard contract, which are part of the Request for Proposal packet. Persons, firms or associations wishing to submit a proposal may download an RFP packet from the County’s website, www.co.jefferson.wa.us, or pick one up from the Jefferson County Administrator Office, 1820 Jefferson Street, Port Townsend, WA 98368, 360-385-9100. Proposals must be received by 4:30 p.m., Friday, January 28, 2011. Pub.: Jan. 2, 2011

File No.: 7021.27301 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bank of America, N.A. Grantee: Scott C. Perkins and Kelli A. Perkins, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 702243014 Abbreviated Legal: S 1/2 SW SE SW 24-27-2W Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 14, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson Street in the City of Port Townsend, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Jefferson, State of Washington: The South 1/2 of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4, Section 24, Township 27 North, Range 2 West, W.M., in Jefferson County, Washington. Situate in the County of Jefferson, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 671 Clay Banks Road Quilcene, WA 98376 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/14/08, recorded on 03/19/08, under Auditor's File No. 532273, records of Jefferson County, Washington, from Scott C. Perkins and Kelli A. Perkins, husband and wife, as Grantor, to PRLAP, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Bank of America, N.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/06/10 Monthly Payments $12,554.36 Late Charges $483.18 Lender's Fees & Costs $640.48 Total Arrearage $13,678.02 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $826.01 Statutory Mailings $57.36 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,692.37 Total Amount Due: $15,370.39 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $268,982.02, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 14, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 01/03/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 01/03/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 01/03/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Scott C. Perkins 671 Claybanks Road Quilcene, WA 98376 Kelli A. Perkins 671 Claybanks Road Quilcene, WA 98376 Scott C. Perkins P.O. Box 212 Quilcene, WA 98376 Kelli A. Perkins P.O. Box 212 Quilcene, WA 98376 Scott C. Perkins 10083 Old Olympic Highway Sequim, WA 98382 Kelli A. Perkins 10083 Old Olympic Highway Sequim, WA 98382 Scott C. Perkins P.O. Box 536 Quilcene, WA 98376 Kelli A. Perkins P.O. Box 536 Quilcene, WA 98376 Scott C. Perkins 770 Nelson Road Forks, WA 98331 Kelli A. Perkins 770 Nelson Road Forks, WA 98331 Scott C. Perkins 721 Blakely Boulevard Sequim, WA 98382-8183 Kelli A. Perkins 721 Blakely Boulevard Sequim, WA 983828183 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 07/20/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 07/21/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/06/10 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 5861900. (TS# 7021.27301) 1002.163661-FEI Pub: Dec. 12, 2010, Jan. 2, 2011

98

Pickups/Vans

FORD: ‘99 Ranger. 5 speed, 2.5 liter, 4 cylinder, 120K, very good condition. In Port Townsend. $3,250. 302-0839. PLUMBING VAN: ‘02 Ford, job site ready, plus extra plumbing parts, 28K orginial mi. $20,000/obo. 360-385-2773

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Cars

ACURA ‘92 LEGEND L SEDAN 3.2 liter V6, auto, dark Gray exterior, black leather interior, moon roof, non-smoker, 2 owner car. Spotless Carfax. One really clean fully loaded affordable luxury sedan at $3,695

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

ANOTHER AWESOME CAR FOR SALE! FORD: ‘56 2 door post. Close to original, excellent condition, 2 tone paint green and white, Manual 3 speed, 6 cyl. $8,500/obo. Call Joe. 360-6833408 or 360-4611619. BMW: ‘94 530i. V8 5 spd. $3,500. 425-753-1666 BMW: ‘96 328i. 180K mi., new tranny, runs great, needs some body work. $2,200/ obo. 206-272-0220. BUICK ‘03 LESABRE Custom, economical 3.8 liter V6, auto, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/CD, power windows, locks and seat, keyless entry, 65,000 miles, very clean local trade, non-smoker, spotless Carfax report. $7,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com BUICK: ‘97 LaSabre. Excellent codntion, 1 owner. $4,700. 683-6051 after 4 p.m. BUICK: ‘99 Regal. Leather interior, moon roof, good condition. $2,800. 457-9038

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Cars

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Cars

CADILLAC ‘98 DEVILLE SEDAN 78K original miles! 4.6 liter Northstar V8, auto, fully loaded, leather, 2 owner senior local trade-in, non-smoker, blue exterior, blue interior, fantastic condition throughout. Runs and drives like new. A whole lot of car for $4,995

CHEV: ‘72 Vega GT 350 4-bolt main, 335 hp, 350 trans, B&M built, 25K since mods, ‘71 Vega wagon parts car too. $7,500/obo. 774-0915

CADILLAC: ‘66 Sedan Deville. All original, 63K mi. $3,800. 360-775-5327

CHEV: ‘99 Monte Carlo. 84K mi. $2,000. 461-6758.

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

CADILLAC: ‘91 Sedan Deville. Good condition, loaded. $900/obo. 457-3425. CHEV ‘89 BLAZER 5.7 liter V8, auto, 4x4, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM and cassette, power windows and locks, tow package, ralley wheels, running boards, 122,000 miles, very clean and reliable trade in. $3,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com CHEV: ‘00 Camaro. V6, red, T-tops. $5,000. 775-1821 CHEV: ’70 Chevelle. Big block wagon, new paint, tires, more. $5,500/obo. No reasonable offer refused. 417-1896. CHEV: ‘75 Corvette Stingray. Must sell, 350, matching #s, 149k original miles, rebuilt turbo, 400 tran, rebuilt rear end, all new suspension, front and rear sway bar, turbo hood and stock hood. $6,500 or make offer. 670-1440

CHEV: ‘76 Suburban. 454, 143K, runs good. $800/obo. 360-681-2427 CHEV: ‘88 Camaro. Project car, running, licensed, with ‘90 Camaro parts car. $1,200/obo. 928-3863

DODGE ‘10 GRAND CARAVAN 3.3 liter V6, auto, dual air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/CD, power windows and locks, keyless entry, 7-passenger with stow and go seating, privacy glass, alloy wheels, only 2,000 miles, balance of factory warranty. Very very clean 1-owner corporate lease return, nonsmoker, spotless Carfax report. Truely like new, save thousands over new! $19,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com FORD ‘07 FOCUS ZX3 HATCHBACK 2.0 liter DOHC 4 Cyl., automatic, power windows, locks, and mirrors, 6 CD/MP3 stereo, cruise control, tilt, air, dual front and side impact air bags. Kelley Blue Book value of $9,320! Sparkling clean inside and out! Only 52,000 Miles! Stop by Gray Motors today! $7,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

CA$H

FOR YOUR CAR If you have a good car or truck, paid for or not, see us!

REID & JOHNSON

095098073

CHEV: ‘47 pickup. 5 window, 80% restored. Illness forces sale. $6,000/obo. 457-7097

CHEV: ‘98 S-10 LS. Ext cab 4.3 V6. Chip Foose wheels, much more, see online ad. $5,900/obo. Call 360-452-9876

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SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011

1ST AT RACE ST. PORT ANGELES

MOTORS 457-9663

WWWREIDANDJOHNSONCOMsMJ OLYPENCOM

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Legals Clallam Co.

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Legals Clallam Co.

File No.: 7763.27650 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, NA as Trustee for Wamu Mortgage Pass through Certificates Series 2005-PR2 Trust Grantee: David R. Hills, a single man and Lynn C. Dunning, a single woman each as their separate estates. Tax Parcel ID No.: 033031-440180 Abbreviated Legal: Tct. 18, Svy 1/135, SE 31-30-3W Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 14, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Tract 18 of "Happy Valley Tracts" Survey, as recorded in Volume 1 of Surveys, Page 135, under Clallam County Recording No. 446737, being a portion of the Southeast Quarter of Section 31, Township 30 North, Range 3 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 153 Bonneville Lane Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 02/09/05, recorded on 02/16/05, under Auditor's File No. 2005 1150937, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Lynn C. Dunning, an unmarried woman and David R. Hills, an unmarried man, each as her and his separate estate, as Grantor, to Olympic Peninsula Title Co, a Washington Corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, a Washington corporation, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by JP Morgan Chase bank, NA successor in interest to Washington Mutual Bank fka Washington Mutual Bank FA to Wells Fargo Bank, NA as Trustee for Wamu Mortgage Pass through Certificates Series 2005-PR2 Trust, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1257552. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/12/2010 Monthly Payments $12,801.11 Late Charges $464.52 Lender's Fees & Costs $42.00 Total Arrearage $13,307.63 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $925.73 Statutory Mailings $29.12 Recording Costs $30.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,779.85 Total Amount Due: $15,087.48 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $327,222.41, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 03/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 14, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 01/03/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 01/03/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 01/03/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Lynn C. Dunning 153 Bonneville Lane Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Lynn C. Dunning 153 Bonneville Lane Sequim, WA 98382 David R. Hills 153 Bonneville Lane Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of David R. Hills 153 Bonneville Lane Sequim, WA 98382 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 09/09/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 09/09/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/12/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7763.27650) 1002.169553-FEI Pub: Dec. 12, 2010, Jan. 2, 2011

Cars

Classic Olds. 78' Olds Cutlass Supreme Brougham. 86,000 miles, V8, sunroof, garage kept. few minor parking lot dings. Excellent condition. Runs well. 1 owner. interior in excellent condition. $11,000/obo. 360-683-9770 FORD: ‘01 Explorer Sport. 2WD, 5 sp, 126K, good cond. $3,000. 928-9430.

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Legals Clallam Co.

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Cars

FORD: 1929 Model “A�. Roadster, 10 footer. $17,500 firm. 681-5403

FORD: ‘92 Mustang Convertible. Awesome care for sale! White with white top, 85,000 original miles. $3,800/obo. Call Joe at: 360-683-3408 or 360-461-1619.

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Legals Clallam Co.

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D9

Cars

FORD: ‘67 Mustang. Built V8, auto, $3,600 firm. 452-6053

HYUNDAI: ‘86 Excel. 4 door hatchback Only 55,000 miles, new exhaust, excellent gas mileage, runs great, in good shape. Only 2 owners (in family). $2,500/obo. 457-4866

101

Legals Clallam Co.

Housing Authority of the County of Clallam Request for Proposals Project-Based Section 8 Vouchers The Housing Authority of the County of Clallam (HACC) is soliciting proposals from housing providers who are interested in receiving Section 8 Project-Based Voucher (PBV) subsidy for their existing rental housing units. The area of operation for the Authority is the contiguous area of Clallam and Jefferson Counties. Section 8 PBV is a program established by the Department of Housing and Urban Development and administered by HACC, which provides rental assistance to landlords on behalf of low-income people. HACC will enter into a contract with the successful landlord of this request for proposals to guarantee rental assistance, which will be paid to the landlord on behalf of qualified tenants for the term of the contract. Rental assistance will remain with the unit for the term of the contract. The term of the contract shall be for a period of up to 15 years with an exclusive right by HACC to extend for additional five-year periods. Rental assistance payments, as provided by HACC will be established by the Department of Housing and Urban Development based on market rate comparable units. Respondents may propose all or a portion of units in a development for PBV assistance. However, in a multi-family building (five or more units) no more than 25 percent of the units may receive PBV assistance unless the PBV units proposed are specifically made available for: 1. Elderly Households (head of household or spouse 62 or older); or 2. Disabled Households (head or spouse disabled); or 3. Households receiving supportive services. To qualify, a household must have at least one member receiving at least one qualifying supportive service (See Exhibit 4). This selection process will generally favor projects which meet one of the above categories with the lowest incomes. Priority will be given to projects which provide services appropriate to the needs of the individual or family as part of the design. At least five (5) of the vouchers shall be project-based in Jefferson County, subject to eligible proposals. MAXIMUM SECTION 8 VOUCHERS AVAILABLE FOR THIS PROJECT IS TWENTY (20) Complete details regarding this Request for Proposals, including application and program requirements, rating process and federal program requirements are contained in the HACC’s Project-Based Section 8 Voucher Selection Policy which may be obtained at www.hacchousing.org/Opportunitiespage.html Only applications submitted in response to this notice will be considered. Proposals must be received at the HACC administrative office at the address listed below no later than 4:00 p.m. on February 8, 2011. Housing Authority of the County of Clallam RFP – Project-Based Section 8 Voucher 2603 South Francis Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Pub: Dec. 26, 2010, Jan. 2, 9, 2011 File No.: 7763.26368 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Bank of America, National Association as successor by merger to LaSalle Bank NA as trustee for WMALT 2007-OA5 Grantee: James Jeremy Copeland, as his separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 043001249070 Abbreviated Legal: Lt 4 SP 18/2 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 14, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 4 of Gange Short Plat recorded August 31, 1978 in Volume 18 of Short Plats on Page 2 under Auditor's File No. 595137, being a portion of the Southeast quarter of the Northwest quarter of Section 1, Township 30 North, Range 1 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. More accurately described as: Lot 4 of Gange Short Plat recorded August 31, 1978 in Volume 18 of Short Plats on Page 2 under Auditor's File No. 595137, being a portion of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 1, Township 30 North, Range 4 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 1401 Towne Road Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 02/20/07, recorded on 02/26/07, under Auditor's File No. 2007-1196752, records of Clallam County, Washington, from James Jeremy Copeland, a single man now and since March 17, 2006 as his separate estate, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for MortgageIt, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for MortgageIt, Inc. its successors and assigns to Bank of America, National Association as successor by merger to LaSalle Bank NA as trustee for WMALT 2007-OA5, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1257107. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/05/2010 Monthly Payments $13,018.40 Late Charges $560.85 Lender's Fees & Costs $1,597.51 Total Arrearage $15,176.76 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $202.50 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $0.00 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $0.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $231.50 Total Amount Due: $15,408.26 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $212,754.98, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 06/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 14, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 01/03/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 01/03/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 01/03/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS James Jeremy Copeland 1401 Towne Road Sequim, WA 98382 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of James Jeremy Copeland 1401 Towne Road Sequim, WA 98382 James Jeremy Copeland 111 New Haven Lane Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of James Jeremy Copeland 111 New Haven Lane Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 03/04/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 03/04/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/05/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Chris Ashcraft (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7763.26368) 1002.148552-FEI Pub: Dec. 12, 2010, Jan. 2, 2011


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SUNDAY, JANUARY 2, 2011

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FORD: ‘92 Crown Victoria. Runs and looks great, 83K. $2,800/ obo. 683-2542.

MAZDA: ‘08 Miata GT. Black/tan, 6 sp, 8,800 mi., like new. $18,900. 452-5387.

HONDA: ‘85 Civic Station Wagon. Needs work. $500/ obo. 360-477-0702.

MERCEDES BENZ ‘97 C230. 122K, executive use only, very clean. $3,750/ obo. 582-1292.

MERCURY ‘08 SABLE PREMIER 3.5 liter V6, auto, all wheel drive, air, cruise, tilt, AM/FM /CD changer, power windows, locks and seat, power moonroof, full leather, heated seats, kekyless entry, back up sensors, alloy wheels, fog lamps, only 31,000 miles, balance of factory 3/36 and 5/60 warranty. Beautiful 1owner factory lease return, non-smoker, spotless Carfax report. $18,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

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LINCOLN: ‘90 Towncar. Nearly $4,000 spent on car in last 2 years. $1,700. Bill at 360-582-3727 MAZDA: ‘07 3. 5 sp., low hwy mi., charcoal/black interior, Thule roof rack, GPS, call for questions/test drive. $11,000/obo. 206-375-5204

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MERCEDES: SLK 230 Kompressor. Hard top power convertible, loaded, priced to sell. $8,995. 582-9966 MERCURY: ‘00 Sable LS Wagon. 3rd seat, leather interior, sunroof, alloy wheels, new tires. $4,000/ obo. 360-460-0385. MERCURY: ‘07 Mountaineer. AWD, 4L V6, loaded, 7 passenger, tow pkg., excellent condition, 53K, $21,000+ KBB. $18,000. 530-4120854 or 683-4062. MERCURY: ‘91 Pacer. 140K mi., runs, looks good. $795. 681-8828 MERCURY: ‘97 Mystique. Needs tranny. $500/obo. 417-2130.

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REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS ARCHITECTURAL/ENGINEERING CONSULTING SERVICES CLALLAM COUNTY PARKS, FAIR & FACILITIES DEPARTMENT The Clallam County Parks, Fair & Facilities Department will accept Statements of Qualifications and Letters of Interest from Architectural and Engineering firms for the following work for the year 2011: 1. Architectural: Building construction and remodel projects consisting of re-roofs; building alterations/additions; ADA upgrades/improvements; fire alarm upgrades; office remodels; floor covering; painting; parks and fairgrounds facility and grounds improvements; park and site planning; feasibility studies and other associated work to be determined. 2. Engineering: Parking lot design; drainage and storm water design; water system improvements; septic, lift station and drain-field design; HVAC system improvements; building access control and security upgrades and design (e.g., control equipment/video/ camera/recording surveillance systems); structural analysis/design; surveying, other parks and fairgrounds facility and grounds related improvement projects; environmental analysis/mitigation and permitting; utilities design; building energy analysis/assessment; feasibility studies and other associated work to be determined; . Analysis of existing conditions, As-built documentation, design, budgeting, permitting, bid documentation, specifications and construction administration are required. Interested Firms shall submit a full statement of their qualifications with a Letter of Intent and examples of specific projects of similar scope of work by 4:30 p.m. January 28, 2011 to: Clallam County Parks, Fair & Facilities Department 223 East 4th St., Suite 7 Port Angeles, WA 98362-3015 Attn: Joel G. Winborn, Director PH: 360.417.2429 EMAIL: jwinborn@co.clallam.wa.us Do not include fee schedules. Firms shall include staff profiles of those who will be directly involved and responsible for Design, Construction Documentation and Construction Administration. The selected firm(s) must be able to begin work upon notice by February of 2011. Approved this 21st day of December, 2010. Board of Clallam County Commissioners Howard V. Doherty, Jr., Chair

Attest: Trish Holden, Clerk of the Board, CMC Pub: Dec. 26, 2010, Jan. 2, 2011

File No.: 7763.27715 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. successor in interest to Washington Mutual Bank f/k/a Washington Mutual Bank, FA Grantee: Jeffrey A. Hoffmaster and Bonnie J. Hoffmaster, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 083023140005-1000 & 083023-140007 & 083023-140005-2001 Abbreviated Legal: E 1/2 SWSENE, 23-30-08 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On February 4, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: East half of the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 23, Township 20 North, Range 8 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. More Accurately Described As: Parcel A: East half of the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 23, Township 20 North, Range 8 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in Clallam County, State of Washington. Parcel B: A 60 feet easement for ingress, egress and utilities over the existing road and over and across the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter in Section 23, Township 30, Range 8 West, W.M., Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 4527 & 4529 Eden Valley Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 06/21/06, recorded on 06/26/06, under Auditor's File No. 2006 1182868, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Jeffrey A. Hoffmaster and, Bonnie J. Hoffmaster, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Olympic Peninsula Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, F.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/27/2010 Monthly Payments $40,350.06 Late Charges $1,613.88 Lender's Fees & Costs $38.85 Total Arrearage $42,002.79 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $859.61 Statutory Mailings $29.12 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,697.73 Total Amount Due: $43,700.52 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $299,644.98, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 04/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on February 4, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 01/24/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 01/24/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 01/24/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Jeffrey A. Hoffmaster 4527 Eden Valley Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 Bonnie J. Hoffmaster 4527 Eden Valley Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 Jeffrey A. Hoffmaster 4529 Eden Valley Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 Bonnie J. Hoffmaster 4529 Eden Valley Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 09/03/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 09/04/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USAForeclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/27/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7763.27715) 1002.168994-FEI Pub: Jan. 2, 23, 2011

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NASH: ‘50 Statesman. Needs work, runs great, extra engine and tranny. Must sell. $3,995 or make offer. 681-0717 NISSAN: ‘97 Sentra. 103,648 miles. $3,500. 457-3636. OLDS: ‘90. Runs great. Looks great. $1,200. 460-1183. PLYMOUTH: ‘76 Volarie. 4-door, 76k miles, slant 6, runs and looks good. $1,300/obo. 460-8271 PLYMOUTH: ‘76 Volarie. 4-door, 76k miles, slant 6, runs and looks good. $1,300/obo. 460-8271 PONTIAC: ‘’04 Grand Prix. Low mi., 52K, very clean, must see. $8,000/obo. 457-9332 PORSCHE: ‘72 914. Good condition, engine rebuilt. $5,800. 683-7965. SAAB: ‘94 900si. Must see. $900/obo. 452-5909 SUBARU ‘00 OUTBACK WAGON Limited AWD. 99K original miles. 2.5 liter 4 cylinder engine. Auto, metallic black and gold exterior, black leather interior. Power drivers seat, dual moon roofs, multi CD changer, heated seats, fully loaded, spotless Carfax. One very, very clean well loaded Subaru at $8,995

Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

SUBARU: ‘08 Legacy $15,250. Economical 2.5I liter 4-Cyc, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/ CD, Power Windows, Locks, Keyless Entry, Alloy Wheels, 34,250 miles, Balance of 5/60 Factory Warranty, Spotless Carfax Report, Non-Smoker, Spolier and Bug Gard. Great Condition! Call Mike at 360-460-0959 TOYOTA: ‘01 Camry XLE. 98K mi., very good condition, service up to date, 2 new tires. $7,000. 452-2929 VW: ‘71 Camper. Good cond. $2,500. 360-820-0339

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SOLICITATION FOR BIDS

Sarge’s Place 260 Ash Avenue (Peterson Building) Forks, Washington North Olympic Region Veteran’s Housing Authority (NORVHA) Box 1453 Forks, WA 98362 BIDS DUE AT THE PETERSON BUILDING 260 Ash Avenue, Forks WA By no later than 2:00 p.m. on 1 February 2011 Notice is hereby given that the NORVHA is soliciting sealed for bids for the renovation to the existing Peterson Building. Successful bidder will be required to contract with NORVHA to undertake all necessary work pursuant to the plans and specifications associated with the project. Bids are due at the Peterson Building, 260 Ash Avenue, Forks, Washington no later than 2:00 P.M. on 1 February 2011. The President of NORVHA, or her designate, shall open the bids immediately following this deadline for submission of all bids. The public may attend the bid opening. All bids must include all applicable bond costs and insurance in the final bid amount. The City of Forks Building Permit application and permit fees will be paid by the Owner. Copies of the bidding documents may be obtained from In Graphic Detail, 577 West Washington Street, Suite B, Sequim, WA 98382, 360-582-0002. Any questions regarding this project shall be directed to the Architect’s office; Jerry Schlie Design, Inc., 360-327-3380. There will be an on-site pre-bid conference at 3:00 P.M. 11 January 2011 on the site. The site conference will be mandatory for fire sprinkler bidders and General Contractors. The purpose of the pre-bid conference is to allow prospective bidders the opportunity to obtain clarifications prior to submission of bids. A bid bond of 5% either in the form of a bid surety bond or a bid surety in the form of a cashiers check or certified check naming NORVHA as the payee/beneficiary must accompany each bid. NO BID SHALL BE CONSIDERED RESPONSIVE THAT DOES NOT HAVE A BID BOND OR BID SURETY ATTACHED. Faxed bids and/or surety bonds shall not be accepted. All work performed on the project will be subject to the prevailing State and Federal wage rates. As such, the successful bidder shall be required to document compliance with state prevailing wage laws prior to release of final retainage. NORVHA notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color or national origin in consideration for an award. NORVHA reserves the right to reject any bids not accompanied by bid security or data required by the bidding document, or if the bid in any way is incomplete or irregular; however, NORVHA reserves the right to waive any informalities or irregularities in the proposals received. Award of bid will be dependent on available funding and could be the cause for rejection of all bids. Pub.: Jan. 2, 2011

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File No.: 7021.26255 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP FKA Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP Grantee: Jeffrey R. Kissler, as his separate estate Tax Parcel ID No.: 063000-530985 Abbreviated Legal: Lt 18, Blk 9 PCSS 1/5 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 14, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 18, Block 9, Puget Sound Cooperative Colony's Subdivision of the Townsite of Port Angeles, Clallam County Washington, according to the Plat thereof recorded in Volume 1 of Plats, Page 5, Records of said County. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 310 North Ennis Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 01/11/08, recorded on 01/15/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1214894, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Jeffrey R. Kissler, a single individual, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP FKA Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1247688. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/07/2010 Monthly Payments $13,209.30 Late Charges $494.28 Lender's Fees & Costs $0.00 Total Arrearage $13,703.58 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $537.66 Statutory Mailings $19.12 Recording Costs $29.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,380.78 Total Amount Due: $15,084.36 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $113,171.00, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 09/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 14, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 01/03/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 01/03/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 01/03/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Jeffrey R. Kissler 310 North Ennis Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Jeffrey R. Kissler 310 North Ennis Street Port Angeles, WA 98362 Jeffrey R. Kissler 3922 Rucker Avenue Apt 3 Everett, WA 98201-4848 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Jeffrey R. Kissler 3922 Rucker Avenue Apt 3 Everett, WA 98201-4848 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 01/13/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 01/13/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/07/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7021.26255) 1002.143490-FEI Pub: Dec. 12, 2010, Jan. 2, 2011

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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File No.: 7763.27692 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association successor in interest to Washington Mutual Bank fka Washington Mutual Bank, FA Grantee: Frank A. Munn and Laure A. Munn, husband and wife Tax Parcel ID No.: 033020630142 Abbreviated Legal: Lt 8 Blk 1 Sun Valley Park First Addn 8/50 Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On January 14, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 8, Block 1, Sun Valley Park First Addition to the City of Sequim, according to the Plat thereof recorded in Volume 8 of Plats, Page 50, Records of Clallam County, Washington. Situate in the County of Clallam, State of Washington. Commonly known as: 411 Haller Avenue Sequim, WA 98382 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 03/24/08, recorded on 03/27/08, under Auditor's File No. 2008-1218464, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Frank A. Munn and Laurie A. Munn, husband and wife as joint tenants, as Grantor, to Clallam Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA successor in interest to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 10/06/10 Monthly Payments $7,328.58 Late Charges $201.40 Lender's Fees & Costs $80.56 Total Arrearage $7,610.54 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $725.00 Title Report $693.95 Statutory Mailings $29.12 Recording Costs $0.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,518.07 Total Amount Due: $9,128.61 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $199,765.31, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 04/01/10, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on January 14, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 01/03/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 01/03/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 01/03/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Frank A. Munn 411 Haller Avenue Sequim, WA 98382 Laurie A. Munn 411 Haller Avenue Sequim, WA 98382 Frank A. Munn 24 Via El Toro Thousand Oaks, CA 91320 Laurie A. Munn 24 Via El Toro Thousand Oaks, CA 91320 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 08/26/10, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 08/26/10 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 10/06/10 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 5861900. (TS# 7763.27692) 1002.168100-FEI Pub: Dec. 12, 2010, Jan. 2, 2011 File No.: 7069.24912 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC Grantee: Page Blanton, as his separate estate Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2007-1214042 Original NTS Auditor File No. 20101250245 Tax Parcel ID No.: 063001-580010 Abbreviated Legal: Lt 1 Samara Woods Div 1 9/75 Amended Notice of Trustee's Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On February 4, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Clallam County Courthouse, 223 East 4th Street in the City of Port Angeles, State of Washington, the Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property "Property", situated in the County(ies) of Clallam, State of Washington: Lot 1 of Samara Woods Division 1, as recorded in Volume 9 of Plats, Pages 75 and 76, Records of Clallam County, Washington. Commonly known as: 2329 West 14th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 12/18/07 and recorded on 12/27/07, under Auditor's File No. 20071214042, records of Clallam County, Washington, from Page Blanton, an unmarried man, as Grantor, to Old Republic Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation "Obligation" in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. to Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor's File No. 2010-1247167. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property's full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor's or Borrower's default on the Obligation. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 12/28/2010 Monthly Payments $21,960.87 Late Charges $843.00 Lender's Fees & Costs $3,135.22 Total Arrearage $25,939.09 Trustee's Expenses (Itemization) Trustee's Fee $508.00 Title Report $0.00 Statutory Mailings $63.00 Recording Costs $127.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $500.00 Total Costs $1,268.00 Total Amount Due: $27,207.09 Other known defaults are as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $139,962.44, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 04/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on February 4, 2011. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 01/24/11 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the close of the Trustee's business on 01/24/11 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee's fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 01/24/11 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Page Blanton 2329 West 14th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Page Blanton 2329 West 14th Street Port Angeles, WA 98363 Page Blanton P.O. Box 2661 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Page Blanton P.O. Box 2661 Port Angeles, WA 98362 by both first class and either certified mail, return receipt requested on 12/10/09, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 12/11/09 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all foreclosure costs and trustee's fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor, and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor, of all their right, title and interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee's sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee's Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com EFFECTIVE: 12/28/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 5861900. (TS# 7069.24912) 1002.140318-FEI Pub: Jan. 2, 23, 2011


PENINSULA

Meredith Parker Neah Bay ambassador

Inside ■  Explaining death to children can be tough ■  What are Peninsula women’s hopes for 2011? ■  Reconnecting on Facebook — good or bad idea?

Peninsula Daily News

Sunday, January 2, 2011 Diane Urbani

de la

Paz/for Peninsula Woman


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Sunday, January 2, 2011

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Death tough subject to explain to kids WE JUST FOUND out that our children’s greatgrandmother has been diagnosed with cancer and only has six to 12 months to live. What is the best way to explain the situation to our 8-year-old twins?

Missouri parent My stepchildren’s favorite aunt recently found out she was dying of cancer. This is an individual whom they adore and visit on a weekly basis. She loves them as if they are her own children, and everyone is shocked at this devastating news. She has requested that they come over to see her a couple of times a week, at least until she gets too

Parent to Parent Jodie Lynn weak to keep her positive attitude intact. She also has asked the family not to tell them about the situation. We feel that the only right thing to do is to follow through with her wishes and allow her to handle the explanation of her position within her own time and place. Thus, we have not shared anything with the kids, ages, 7 to 9.

May we help? Peninsula Woman, which appears Sundays in the Peninsula Daily News, welcomes items about coming North Olympic Peninsula events of women’s interest. Sending information is easy: ■ E-mail it to news@ peninsuladailynews.com in time to arrive 10 days before Friday publication. ■ Fax it to 360-417-3521 no later than 10 days before publication. ■ Mail it to Peninsula Woman, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 in time to

arrive 10 days before publication. ■ Hand-deliver it to any of our news offices at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles; 1939 E. Sims Way, Port Townsend; or 150 S. Fifth Ave., No. 2, Sequim, by 10 days before publication. Photos are always welcome. If you’re e-mailing a photo, be sure it is at least 150 dots per inch resolution. Questions? Features Editor Diane Urbani de la Paz, who is editor of Peninsula Woman, can be reached at 360-417-3550 weekdays or at diane.urbani@ peninsuladailynews.com.

If not, within a reasonable amount of time, be straightforward and ask her how she would like the twins to know about the situation. Some individuals don’t want anything to change, especially with kids. Of course, out of respect and love, we all want to honor a dying relative’s final wishes as closely as possible, but since you are dealing with children, as From Jodie the parent, you also need Once their great-grand- to decide what makes the most sense emotionally for mother has fully accepted the outcome of her progno- them. In the meantime, if you ses and is comfortable talking about it, maybe she will feel comfortable talking about the death of a family determine how and when pet, or similar situation of she would like to handle a friend’s or relative’s pet the details of it to your that has previously died, 8-year-old twins.

Since she has been a huge part of their life ever since their births, we feel she will do what she feels is best and have decided to give her the privacy and space that she needs with our children. It’s a huge undertaking, but we are confident she will handle things in the best way for them and for herself. — P. W. in Ladue, Mo.

perhaps this might prepare them a tad easier for the explanation of their greatgrandmother. There’s also a wide array of wonderful books and even movies in helping to explain death. It’s not an easy process to share with children, but hopefully the outcome might not be quite so devastating if they are better prepared ahead of time. For now, allow them to see her as much as she would like and enjoy what time there is left.

Can you help? My mother-in-law insists on getting a report on our 4-year-old’s pre-kindergarten’s academic and classroom behavior by call-

Clallam County Corey Patrick Carlucci, 23, and Stephanie Anna Dewey, 26; both of Port Angeles. Luther Allen Lewis of Forks and Sharon A. Swier of Sequim; both 62. Jessica Anne Spencer, 22, and Wesley Ryon Larson, 31; both of Port Angeles. Kui Shing Leung, 20, and Shao Yi Qin, 23; both of Port Angeles.

From the professionals at D.A. Davidson & Co. Celebrating 50professionals years of collective service to Port Angeles From the at D.A. Davidson & Co. Celebrating 50 years of collective service to Port Angeles and the 2nd anniversary our new ce.Angeles Celebrating 50 years of collectiveofservice tooffi Port and the 2nd anniversary of our new office. and the 2nd anniversary of our new office.

Details of the wedding, engagement or anniversary can be listed on a form available in person at any of the Peninsula Daily News offices (see above), or by calling 360-417-3527 or 800-826-7714, ext. 527, in Jefferson County and the West End.

115107889

Anniversaries: Peninsula Woman publishes articles about couples celebrating their 25th or 50th wedding anniversary. For anniversaries of 50

years or longer, then-and-now photographs of the couple are accepted along with information. The photos will be returned.

360-565-7500 or 877-779-4321 360-565-7500 or Angeles, 877-779-4321 917 East Front St., Port WA 98362 360-565-7500 or Angeles, 877-779-4321 917 East Front St., Port WA 98362 917 East Front St., Port Angeles, WA 98362

Let's Build a Brighter Future Let's Build a Brighter Let's Build a Brighter Future Future

________ Jodie Lynn shares parenting tips through her weekly column. Write her at Parent to Parent, 2464 Taylor Road, Suite 131, Wildwood, MO 63040 or direct2 contact@parenttoparent.com via e-mail. Tips and questions can also be sent through the contact form at ParentToParent.com.

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Season's Greetings! Season's Greetings! Season's Greetings! & Best Wishes for & Best Wishes for & Best Wishes for 2011 a Prosperous a 2011 2011 aFromProsperous Prosperous the professionals at D.A. Davidson & Co.

Weddings, anniversaries Weddings and engagements: Nuptial announcements about North Olympic Peninsula residents appear Sundays in Peninsula Woman. Please submit wedding information within two months following the wedding ceremony. Photos will be returned.

ing the teacher weekly. Since our daughter’s teacher is very busy, she has asked all parents to wait until parent/teacher conferences to ask questions, which seems fair to us. However, their grandmother thinks the request does not apply to her. What’s the best way to handle this delicate situation?

Jefferson County Graham Douglas Simons, 47, and Judith Ray Makela, 54; both of Quilcene. Madison Josie Wrinkle, 22, of Port Ludlow, and Michael Elton Clevenger, 32, of Chimacum. Lillian Nicole Gulden, 29, and Ralph Israel Petty, 22; both of Port Townsend.


Generations Peninsula Woman

Sunday, January 2, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

Peninsula women share their thoughts Photos

and interviews by

Dave Logan

“I hope that I’m still alive for all of 2011. We need to see our fellow citizens get back to work and come together for a better living for all. I think it’s terrible some of the cuts our governor has suggested. We need the support for the elderly, children’s education and good affordable health care. And because I can’t keep driving forever, I’m also planning a move to Quilcene to be nearer [to] my son.”

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THIS WEEK BRINGS another “Generations” question, asked of three local woman of varying ages. We inquired this time about women’s hopes for the new year, with an eye toward what their responses tell us about the differences — and similarities — among North Olympic Peninsula women’s points of view. Peninsula Woman

This week’s question: What is your fondest hope for 2011?

“To see the economy turn around and the job market come back. I wish there wasn’t going to be the cuts in the school system that I hear about in our state. I’m a teacher and want to continue, of course. Also, I wish people would understand the real meaning of Christmas and not having to have multiple presents under the tree. And not feeling guilty about not being able to buy a lot of those presents. They need to make more memories with their family.” Ann Dutcher, 52 substitute teacher Forks

Patricia Archer, 87 retired store greeter and Realtor Sequim

“[To] see myself finishing the college program I’m in. I’m studying to be a medical assistant. My husband is a veteran and really needs more help and success in his studies in college, too. Also, I’m excited to see my baby turn 2. I would like to see more people do volunteering as I’m a part of the Salvation Army and their annual bell ringing. You know, giving brings out the best in all of us.” Jessica Nichols, 21 student Port Angeles

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Sunday, January 2, 2011

Peninsula Woman

Capturing time

Peninsula Daily News

Parker promotes Neah Bay through photographs, work for Makah tribe

By Diane Urbani for

de la

Peninsula Woman

Paz

T

his is a rare place with its own identity. As small towns across the country become ever more homogenized, Neah Bay stands apart, remote and rich in a living traditional culture. Meredith Parker, a daughter of the Makah tribe who has spent her life building up this community’s resources, recently introduced Neah Bay to the world via a revamping of its Internet presence: Diane Urbani de la P www.NeahBayWA.com plus a Facebook.com page. And to compleMeredith Parker, right, pauses in the midst of a recent day of shopping with her m ment those online ventures, she’s put together an old-fashioned, Flinn, at Bella Rosa in Port Angeles. hard-copy package: 12 images of her favorite moments. The Neah Bay Washington 2011 calendar almost sings from the 2010, Pa “I can’t imagine living the cham shelves where it is displayed. It’s a year’s worth of sights and activi- anywhere else,” says the Where to get the calendar mother of two. a team ties, chosen from some 20,000 photos Parker has taken over decades. 56-year-old She wanted her bring up armed w THE NEAH BAY Washington 2011 calendar is availHer camera, it’s clear, loves the Pacific Ocean, Neah Bay’s beaches, her sons Jonathan Heilment of able in Port Angeles at Odyssey Books & Gifts, 114 W. man, now 26, and C.J. Busines birds, surfers and children as much as Parker does. Front St., Olympic Stationers, 122 E. Front St., and PrinMeredith Parker filled her Neah Bay Washington 2011 calendar with her favorite images of local life, including the bald eagles celebrated in Neah Bay’s springtime Eagle Festival. Diane Urbani

de la

Paz/for Peninsula Woman

Heilman, 24, here where they would know their Makah heritage. Now that they’re grown and working — the elder as a commercial fisherman year-round out of Neah Bay, the younger in Edmonds at a furniture company — Parker continues to promote the health and wealth of her community. During the 1970s, Parker got two kinds of education: one working at the Ozette village archeological site as laboratory manager, and the other in the form of a liberal arts degree from the Evergreen

cess Valiant Coffee-Best of the Peninsula, 110 N. Laurel St. and in Neah Bay at the Makah Cultural and Research Center museum, Linda’s Wood-Fired Kitchen, Pat’s Place and Washburn’s, all on Bayview Avenue. Peninsula Woman

State College, where “they taught me I could learn anywhere.” After graduation, she set out across the United States, visiting people she had gotten to know at the Ozette dig, shooting photographs all the way. That was the beginning of Parker’s self-directed photographic training. She’s been capturing Neah

Bay’s singular beauty since. She created the 2011 calendar as a gift to her community, and a portion of proceeds benefits two of her favorite organizations: the Makah Cultural and Research Center, which opened its museum doors in 1979, and the Neah Bay Chamber of Commerce, now into its fifth year. Through the fall of

— to rei NeahBa itinerar director and “Fe pages.

Neah B

She a sign a to the to Neah B rants an listed. The s painted shade o has acro black sy tribe.


Peninsula Woman

Paz/for Peninsula Woman

mother, Matilda

arker, president of mber, worked with of designers — with a U.S. Departf Agriculture Rural ss Enterprise grant invigorate www. ayWa.com with trip ries, a services ry and “What to Do” estivals and Events”

Bay welcome

also helped create at the eastern entry own, on which Bay’s shops, restaund lodging are

sign, Parker says, is d in the light brown of cedar bark, and oss its top a long, ymbol of the Makah

Sunday, January 2, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

5

At right, brown pelicans and Heermann’s gulls cover the sands at Neah Bay — and grace Meredith Parker’s Neah Bay Washington 2011 calendar.

Meredith Parker

With this shape, the sign shows how “we’re all in the same canoe,” she notes. Parker is also president of the Makah Cultural and Research Center board and vice president of the Potlatch Fund (www.Potlatch Fund.org), which promotes philanthropy in Northwest Indian country. She serves on several other boards including that of the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary and the Peninsula’s PEAK leadership program; she organizes annual blood drives in Neah Bay and sits on the Makah tribal elections board, where one of her goals is a voting age of 18 instead of the current 21.

Makah Forestry Alongside her volunteer work, Parker devoted 35 years to the Makah Forestry Enterprise; she retired as CEO in 2007 after 35 years. Today, she is the owner and operator of Ozett Associates, a cultural

and natural resources consulting firm. One of her clients, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, has hired her to produce a video about the past 100 years of Native American forestry. Hearing a list of her activities, and then learning that she has an extended family of more than 200, many of which come to Neah Bay for the holidays, can make a visitor dizzy. But Parker is not a woman with an energy shortage. She found her place to recharge a long time ago.

Below, surfers converge on Neah Bay for the Hobuck Hoedown in October, one of the events photographer Meredith Parker celebrates in her new calendar.

It’s a shot of teeming Heermann’s gulls, studded with a few big pelicans, standing on the sand. During the winter, she replaces some of her beachgoing with gatherings: potlatches and projects with other volunteers.

Nurture

For Parker, this is how to make the most of the season: “Nurture relationships; build alliPlace to recharge ances,” while working with a “Walking along the local organization. beach, I can connect with The chamber, the my past and think about Makah museum and other my future . . . I go to Tsooyas and Hobuck regularly,” groups place great value on volunteers, Parker adds. she says. “The community takes “I’m a beach bum,” she care of you,” so joining a adds with a smile. local nonprofit is one way, “I like being amongst the birds,” as she was when she says, to focus your she took September’s photo energy in a positive direcfor her Neah Bay calendar. tion.

Meredith Parker

Greg Colfax, a Makah master carver and the coowner of Linda’s WoodFired Kitchen in Neah Bay, credits Parker for her clear vision when developing programs to promote local business and culture. “She has a mind that

not only inquires, but acquires,” Colfax said. “She loves reading the small details of things, and she can assemble new thoughts and new ideas from that type of study.” Turn

to

Parker/7


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Sunday, January 2, 2011

Peninsula Woman

Peninsula Daily News

Wife objects to fight, makeup sex routine DEAR JOHN: I’VE been married to “Andy” for four years. While I know I have much to be thankful for, there is one difference that we can’t seem to move beyond: Andy believes that the only way to truly put a John Gray disagreement behind you is to have “make-up sex.” For example, when we have a spat over a spendI don’t like this idea one ing decision and later bit, but he says that the resolve our differences, argument is not over until we’re supposed to seal it we’ve been intimate. with more than just a kiss. I have two questions:

Mars vs.

Venus

Keepsakes for sale Purchase a PDN photo — on T-shirts, drink mugs or just the photo itself. www.peninsuladailynews.com Click on “Photo Gallery”

One: is he right about this? And two: how can I get him to change his mind about make-up sex? — Rather Smoke a Peace Pipe in Jonesboro, Ga. Dear Peace Pipe: Andy no doubt finds that intimacy after an argument feels really good. The problem is that when this becomes a regular behavioral pattern, the line between fighting and making love can blur. That line blurs because it ties together the rush of an argument and the rush of passion, increasing the chance that Andy is going to see disagreements as having an erotic aspect, which is not good for the long-term health of your relationship.

As to the second part of your question, remember the old expression, “it takes two to tango.” I suspect that you were a willing partner in this arguing followed by lovemaking ritual. You can break the cycle by choosing not to participate. Sure, he’ll be grumpy about it at first but lead him in a new direction. You’ll see that men are always willing to follow when intimacy is the final destination. You just need to put him — and yourself — on a different path.

Sister-in-law bummer Dear John: My wife’s sister just went through a divorce. In the hope of cheering her up, my wife invites her over to our house every Sunday for

dinner and to do other things with us, such as going shopping at the mall. I understand that her sister is pretty dispirited about the breakup, but she’s also unpleasant to be around. I get this feeling that she resents our happy marriage particularly because her marriage ended badly. I don’t want to upset my wife, but it’s becoming really difficult for me to be around her sister this much. How can I tell my wife without upsetting her? — Sister-in-Law Burnout in St. Louis

Nevertheless, for the sake of your relationship, your wife needs to know your feelings. Eventually, they will bubble up to the surface anyway. And when your feelings do come to the surface, having been suppressed for too long, they may come out in the form of anger and frustration. So before that happens, sit down with your wife and tell her in a loving way how you feel. You may be surprised to hear that she has many of the same feelings.

Dear Burnout: Not every conversation we need to have with our life partner is an easy one. And this discussion is indeed going to be a difficult one.

John Gray is the author of Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus. If you have a question, write to John in care of this newspaper or by e-mail at: comments@ marsvenusliving.com.

________

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Peninsula Woman

Sunday, January 2, 2011

Peninsula Daily News

7

Facebook reconnects good, bad and ill FACEBOOK — THE BEST invention since the Clapper or the devil’s favorite device? Today, we hear both sides of the argument.

Susan I’d been searching for my best friend for nearly 20 years, ever since a misunderstanding led to an estrangement. Even though I found a city listed for him on the Internet — the last city I had an address for him — I figured it was old news because he was in the Marine Corps, and he couldn’t possibly still be stationed in the same town for so long. A few days after I joined Facebook in 2009, I typed

Cheryl Lavin

Tales from the Front

his name into the search, and there was a guy with the same name on the opposite side of the country. The picture with the profile looked enough like him that I messaged him, and it was him. He’d been looking for me, too, all these years, but with my very common maiden name and him not knowing my married name, it was futile. The first time I ever

used a webcam was to see him — “live and in person” — and it made me cry. I’d missed him so much over the years. We have the kind of friendship where we can finish each other’s sentences. It turns out we lived within miles of each other in 2003-2004 and never knew it because he only had a cell phone, and they’re not listed in the phone book. He was never a romantic interest (I was dating his best friend), but I always thought he was cute. He was the love of my life in a different way. I got to stop and see him last summer while on a family vacation. My kids got to see their “Uncle

Parker: Hard questions Continued from 5

Bethany An old junior high school friend looked me up on Facebook. We chatted and caught up. Turns out we were both single and began dating. It turned out to be the worst mistake of my life. By the end of the relationship, I’d been belittled, verbally abused and pushed around. I had holes kicked in my walls and had become alienated from friends and family. It turns out my boyfriend was mentally ill. I ended it, but the breakup took two months. I looked up his criminal record. It turns out he had

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up a few times for about a year. We both kind of ended it because we wanted more but knew it couldn’t happen. We were both married. I don’t regret what we shared. We gave each other what we needed at the time. But in the future, I’ll use Facebook as a communication tool only.

________

I found a lot of old friends and made new ones on Facebook. And it’s a great way to keep up with friends and family. You can also get into trouble, however. I “friended” a guy I went to high school with. We chatted, flirted, complimented each other. Then we texted and finally met

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venerable Makah Days festival takes place in August, and the relatively new Hobuck Hoedown surfing celebration comes in October. That event was a smashing success last year, with surf kayakers, standup paddlers and long-board surfers converging on the waves here. “In Neah Bay, things are hopping,” Parker says. “You can’t be bored. People are active and hanging together.”

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Janine Bowechop, director of the Makah Cultural and Research Center, added that Parker is known for questioning the set way of doing things. As president of the center’s board of trustees, “she always asks the hard questions, and expects detailed information in a way that makes the organization stronger,” Bowechop said. “She’ll challenge you in a way that helps you improve what you do, though not in an intimidating way.” Parker “keeps me on my toes. I like that there is that careful attention . . . she really sets high standards for herself and for the tribe.” Parker, added Bowechop, is a member who shows her commitment to be both a witness and a representative for the Makah people.

And she doesn’t miss an opportunity to invite people across the Peninsula to Neah Bay’s 2011 festivals. In April, the Makah tribe will host its third annual Eagle Festival, with an art fair, guest presenters and other events revolving around the iconic bird. And then, Parker says, “the eagles show up,” providing photogenic moments as they pair off and prepare to nest. As reflected on the pages of her calendar, the

Nico,” and I have Facebook to thank for all of it.

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Sunday, January 2, 2011

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Jefferson County 2010

Sunday, January 2, 2011 PeninSula daily newS

a look at the top local, state and national stories that shaped 2010


2

Sunday, January 2, 2011 — (J)

Year in Review — 2010

Special commemorative section of the Peninsula Daily News

The Top 10 of 2010 in Jefferson County 1

A new ferry — at last. For a while, it seemed as though the new state ferry, MV Chetzemoka, would never begin service between Port Townsend and Whidbey Island. The $79.4 million addition to the state fleet was supposed to start the run to the renamed landing of Coupeville (Keystone) in August, but delays in sea trials held up its inaugural for more than two months. When Gov. Chris Gregoire on Nov. 14 finally christened the 64-car ferry named after Port Townsend’s favorite Klallam chief, talk and rumors about the first new state ferry in more than a decade were rampant. To quell the talk, Washington State Ferries immediately issued a fact sheet to “set the record straight” about the Chetzemoka, its final cost and such features as its 1 percent list when unloaded. (The list is deliberate “to maximize” the number of trucks/oversize vehicles the vessel can carry). But what the agency cannot Gov. Chris Gregoire officially quell is the fear that the Chetzemoka’s companion ferry, months — the MV Salish now under conjust under struction, will be diverted to San 118 years. Juan Islands duty instead of the “You are promised Port Townsend route worse than an during busy summer months. animal,” said That is an issue likely to Susan Cook, a become a political football in childhood 2011. friend of Janice Yarr, to More than a century in Pierce during Pierce prison. Michael J. Pierce his courtroom killed Pat and Janice Yarr sentencing hearing. “You are an before burning down their home evil monster. . . . near Lake Leland in March 2009. “I wish you the slowest, most That’s what a Jefferson County painful death you can imagine. Superior Court jury of nine You will rot in hell.” women and three men determined During her statement, Cook after a two-week trial last March. turned around and looked Pierce With Pierce’s combined convic- in the eye. tion of murder, arson, burglary, She said an unrepentant firearm possession and theft, he Pierce returned her stare “with a is now imprisoned for 1,415 snarl on his lips.”

2

On the cover Hall of Mosses in the Hoh Rain Forest, West Jefferson County. Photo by Trisha McMahon/ Peninsula Daily News

3

Late relief for county government. Jefferson County commissioners Dec. 13 approved a budget of $52,752,238, made up of $15,636,049 for the general fund and the remaining $37,116,189 in other funds. Getting to that point was a

century — for the PUD to acquire PSE’s lines, substations and other infrastructure through which the Bonne­ville juice will flow. PUD officials said entering into the binding obligation with BPA means that the PUD qualifies for the federal agency’s lowest power rates, known as Tier 1, beginning in three years, or about June 30, 2013. The agreement is expected to provide electricity at a lower cost than what is offered to customers by PSE.

5

christens the MV Chetzemoka lengthy and arduous route that required voter approval of a 0.3-cent sales tax increase to raise enough revenues to keep county government Morley intact — particularly in the law enforcement areas. The tax measure on the Nov. 2 ballot was politically charged, especially when the county’s Republican chair, Ron Gregory, filed a complaint with the state’s political watchdog agency that County Administrator Philip Morley advocated passage too much when he spoke in the community about the measure. Morley countered that he only was informing voters of the measure and the ramifications of either passage or defeat. In 2011, other cash-strapped Jefferson County agencies will be asking voters for tax increases in February. The Port Townsend and the

Clearing the air about Port Townsend Paper. The 82-year-old paper mill took steps in 2010 to improve its emissions quality as well as its financial position — with a coalition of environmental groups watching every step of the way. In April, the state Department Chris Tucker/Peninsula Daily News of Ecology reissued an air operatferry on Nov. 14. ing permit for Port Townsend Paper’s kraft mill after a threeChimacum school districts will year public comment and reviask voters to renew maintenance sion process that involved an and operations property tax appeal of the application. levies, a four-year levy in Port The mill then revealed plans Townsend and a three-year levy for a $55 million project to install in Chimacum. a steam turbine and upgrade its And Jefferson Transit is power boiler to burn biomass, requesting a 0.3 percent sales tax aka forest slash or hog fuel, to increase, which if passed would produce 24 megawatts of electricraise the Jefferson County sales ity. tax to 9 percent — the highest on The state Department of Ecolthe Peninsula. ogy in October gave permission for the cogeneration project, Power to the PUD. By which the environmental groups September, it appeared almost immediately appealed. that the Jefferson County Port Townsend Paper and Public Utility District would Nippon Paper Industries USA in become the first public utility Port Angeles — both mills with agency in the state since 1949 to roots in the Crown Zellerbach buy out a private utility’s paper empire — are coincidenelectrical franchise. tally seeking approval to upgrade The PUD inked an agreement their biomass cogenerators. with Bonneville Power Administration, assuring the Roundabouts and other utility of a wholesale source of projects. Port Townsend power. continued a series of public The agency earlier in the year works projects in 2010 that entered into an agreement with affected just about everyone who Puget Sound Energy — which lives and works in the Key City. has provided electricity to East Jefferson County since the 19th Turn to Jefferson/3

4

6


Year in Review — 2010

Special commemorative section of the Peninsula Daily News

(J) — Sunday, January 2, 2011

3

The Top 10 of 2010 in Jefferson County/

continued

Chief among the work was the $7.1 million Upper Sims Way project that added widening, landscaping, sidewalks — and two controversial roundabouts, or traffic circles, at Sims’ intersections with Howard and Thomas streets. Businesses in the area groused about the lost customers during the monthslong construction project, but they say they are getting used to the new traffic lifestyle and landscaping. In the historic district, Port Townsend is working on a facelift involving new pavement on Madison Street, sidewalks on Water Street and refurbishing of the old police station next to Pope Marine Park. The new year will bring added work downtown. This month, Water Street will be closed as construction centers at the intersection of Water and Madison streets. When the work is finished, the 19th century downtown will Charlie Bermant/Peninsula Daily News have new features above and below ground for the 21st cenConstruction continues in April on one of two roundabouts built on Upper Sims Way in tury. Port Townsend.

7

Moratorium at Mystery Bay. Jefferson County commissioners approved a second moratorium on any new boat mooring buoys in Mystery Bay for the second half of 2010 in an effort to manage protection of the shellfish-rich bay at Marrowstone Island. The moratorium is part of an agreement with the state Department of Ecology, Department of Natural Resources and Department of Health to protect and maintain commercial shellfish growing along Mystery Bay’s shores on Marrowstone Island. That’s the reason behind a plan to reduce the number of boats mooring in the area. The collaborative agreement among government agencies, tribes, shellfish growers and local residents was reached in late March. Nature provided a moratorium of its own in July and August when the state Department of Health closed Mystery Bay and other shorelines in East Jefferson County to recreational shellfish harvesting after test

results showed high levels of biotoxins. In addition to Mystery Bay, affected were shorelines of Admiralty Inlet, Kilisut Harbor, Discovery Bay, Mats Mats Bay, Port Ludlow, Fort Flagler, Fort Townsend, Chimacum Beach and Port Hadlock.

8

Prosecutorial change. For the first time in 12 years, Juelie Dalzell isn’t Jefferson County prosecuting attorney — a decision not to seek re-election she reached last spring. Her chief deputy, Scott Rosekrans, steps in as the county’s top prosecutor following a contentious political campaign against Port Townsend Dalzell activist attorney Paul Richmond in the fall. The 2011 Prosecuting Attorney’s Office Rosekrans inherits

will be leaner, the victim of budget cuts that will keep him from filling the job of chief deputy prosecutor that Rosekrans once held. Rosekrans Crimes will be prosecuted, he said, but in these critical budget times “the criminals have an edge.” Dalzell, meanwhile, hasn’t ruled out running for public office in the future. But in the meantime, she has committed to volunteer “wherever Scott needs me” — specifically for the intermittent coroner duties the job requires.

9

“I’m almost 70, for God’s sake.” In an unexpected, after-midnight appearance on the House floor in Olympia on April 13, Lynn Kessler — an Olympic Peninsula legislator for 18 years — announced candidly

Tharinger, one of 21 new members of the state House, will serve concurrently on the Clallam Board of County CommissionTharinger ers. He joins state Sen. Tim Sheldon, D-Potlatch, a Mason County commissioner, as the only other legislator serving simultaneously in state and county government. Their county assignments are full-time; the Legislature is scheduled to adjourn in April. Kessler, meanwhile, retires to her Hoquiam home and says she’ll keep busy with early childhood learning programs. She wants to be able to help show parents what they can to give their children a head start in their education, she said.

10

A sad legacy. For many years, Judy Ann Cates, office manager for D.B.R. RV Park on U.S. Highthat she was way 101 in Gardiner fought for a retiring from left-turn lane on the busy highthe House. way onto the park’s driveway. Kessler’s On March 1, Cates was departure stopped on the highway, waiting from the 24th to make the left turn. District seat, Cates’ 2002 Saturn four-door from which sedan was clipped on its right she served as rear end by a vehicle behind it, majority spinning the car into the westKessler leader for bound lane. more than a It was then struck from decade, set off a round of cambehind by an oncoming vehicle, paigning that was eventually leaving it a crumpled heap in the won in November by a Clallam County commissioner, Steve Tha- middle of the highway. Cates was pronounced dead at ringer, a fellow Democrat. the scene. Kevin Van De Wege easily Shocked and saddened resiheld onto the other House seat dents of the park were inspired for a third term, meaning that two Democrats from Sequim are by Cates’ sacrifice. Through an auction and other going to Olympia. fundraisers, they garnered When the 2011 Legislature convenes next week — Van De $30,000 to pay for a state Wege begins his term elevated to Department of Transportation House majority whip, the No. 4 left-turn lane on Highway 101, Democratic position — constituaided by state Rep. Kevin Van De ents in Clallam and Jefferson Wege, D-Sequim. counties and the top half of Nearby, there’s a memorial Grays Harbor County will experi- garden in Cates’ name not far ence something new. from the park’s recreation center.


4

Year in Review — 2010

Sunday, January 2, 2011 — (J)

Special commemorative section of the Peninsula Daily News

The Top 10 of 2010 in Clallam County

1

Deadly encounter in Olympic National Park. Bob Boardman, well-known on the North Olympic Peninsula as a musician, boat-builder and registered nurse, was also an experienced hiker in the Olympics. On Oct. 16, Boardman and two others, including his wife, hiked the Switchback Trail on Klahhane Ridge in Olympic National Park when they spied a

group of mountain goats — familiar, longhair highmountain animals more closely related to antelopes than goats. One of those goats fixed its attention on Boardman, 63. The hiker lured the goat away by walking from the group, diverting its attention. The beast, fixated on Boardman, suddenly gored him. Olympic National Park

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officials and others know of no other time that a mountain goat — a species introduced into the Olympics early in the 20th century — was dangerous or even aggressive in the park . Boardman, who was severely bleeding, was airlifted by the U.S. Coast Guard to the hospital in Port Angeles, but to no avail.


Year in Review — 2010

Special commemorative section of the Peninsula Daily News

(J) — Sunday, January 2, 2011

5

The Top 10 of 2010 in Clallam County/

continued

A team of rangers found the goat and shot it to death; a subsequent necropsy found it not Boardman to be diseased, so the reason for the only animal-caused death in the 72-year history of Olympic National Park will remain a mystery. “[Boardman] spent his last minutes putting himself between the goat and everyone else,” said a friend, Margaret Bangs, a Port Angeles private-practice physician. “Boardman’s last act on this Earth was to protect others, even though he knew he was in grave danger.”

2

The case of the missing money. A total of $617,467 is missing from the Clallam County treasury over a five-year period. A former employee of the Treasurer’s Office enters 2011 facing trial for the apparent embezzlement and possibly a 20-year prison sentence. Catherine Betts, a former cashier, allegedly stole the funds — all real estate

3

Coast Guard helicopter snags power line, crashes near LaPush. A four-man crew taking a newly refurbished Coast Guard helicopter

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4

Work begins to remove the Elwha River dams. After more than 30 years of discussion, sometimes heated, and funding for the removal of the two Elwha dams, preliminary work begin last fall that will lead toward dam dismantling in earnest this year. That initial work consisted of an 18-foot drawdown of Lake Mills behind Glines Canyon Dam to allow for construction of a diversion channel. Back in April, the wraps came off two water treatment plants for the city of Port Angeles and Lower Elwha Klallam tribe that will keep taps clear when tons of sediment runs down the river as the Glines Canyon and Elwha dams are dismantled. And symbolic of the $351 million federal project — a Montana construction

company won the $26.9 million contract to dismantle the dams — blue and gold souvenir buttons proclaiming “Last Dam Summer” began appearing throughout the North Olympic Peninsula. Since then, a logo for the Elwha River restoration project designed by Port Angeles graphic artist Laurel Black is showing up on merchandise and in store windows. The motto: “Natural Wonders Never Cease.”

5

New faces at Sequim City Hall. First-year Sequim City Manager Steve Burkett hired a new public

works director, fired a police chief and hired a new one, then let a planning Burkett director go. A new marketing and communications director position was created to promote and sell Sequim as a place to visit, live, work and do business. Burkett, who doesn’t hesitate to say he wants to get a lot done quickly, indeed did so in 2010. That helped him win a glowing early November review from Sequim City Council, which continued his $120,000-a-year contract. Turn

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along the coast from Oregon to Alaska took a right turn up the mouth of the Quillayute River on a sunny July 7 day — for reasons still not revealed. The MH-60T Jayhawk crashed after it snagged the Coast Guard’s wires that powered warning lights strung across the mouth of the river to James Island. Three of the four crewmen were killed: Lt. Sean D. Krueger, 33, of Seymour, Conn.; Aircraft Maintenance Technician 1st Class Adam C. Hoke, 40, of Great Falls, Mont.; and Aircraft Maintenance Technician 2nd Class Brett Banks, 33, of Rock Springs, Wyo. Miraculously, the fourth crewman, Lt. Lance D. Leone of Ventura, Calif., survived the crash with a broken leg and arm. Hundreds gathered for separate memorial services in LaPush and Sitka as Coast Guard officials investigated the reason why the helicopter entered the river’s mouth and snared the wires. A report is still to be issued After more than 50 years, the wires won’t be replaced. A diesel-generator on James Island powers the warning lights.

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excise tax revenues — by manipulating and destroying paper and computer records, according to Betts her accusers. The sheer amount of the six-figure loss — insurance is recovering all but about $20,000 of the funds — and how it could have gone undetected for so long was the principal issue in the November election during which Treasurer Judith Scott sought re-election. A challenger with no treasury experience, attorney and county planner Selinda Barkhuis, defeated Scott and takes office this month. The whereabouts of the money is still a mystery, state prosecutors say. There are more than 60,000 documents connected with Betts’ trial that prosecutors and defense lawyers are poring over before trial can start.


6

Year in Review — 2010

Sunday, January 2, 2011 — (J)

Special commemorative section of the Peninsula Daily News

The Top 10 of 2010 in Clallam County/

continued

Burkett cited his two major achievements as hiring veteran Police Chief Bill Dickinson — following a high-profile force-out of Bob Spinks earlier in the year — and City Engineer Paul Haines as part of his new management team. In yet another major administrative change, Burkett and the planning director for eight years, Dennis Lefevre, agreed to a mutual disassociation in late October. Burkett is looking to hiring for that key position early this year. Joe Irvin moved up from

6

“I’m almost 70, for God’s sake.” In an unexpected, aftermidnight appearance on the House floor in Olympia on April 13, Lynn Kessler — an Olympic Peninsula legislator for 18 years — announced candidly that she was retiring from

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Cogeneration power. Nippon Paper Industries USA unveiled ambitious plans in 2010 to build a $71 million plant that would burn biomass — the official term for what forest workers call slash or hog fuel — to generate 20 megawatts of electricity.

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Clallam Board of County Commissioners. He joins state Sen. Tim Sheldon, D-Potlatch, a Mason County commissioner, as the only other legislator serving simultaneously in state and county government. Their county assignments are full-time; the Legislature is scheduled to adjourn in April. Kessler, meanwhile, retires to her Hoquiam home and says she’ll keep busy with early childhood learning programs.

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115105432

Years

House seat for a third term, meaning that two Democrats from Sequim are going to Olympia. When the 2011 Legislature convenes next week — Van De Wege begins his term elevated to House majority whip, the No. 4 Democratic position — constituents in Clallam and Jefferson counties and the top half of Grays Harbor County will experience something new. Tharinger, one of 21 new members of the state House, will serve concurrently on the

ESTABLISHED 1936

PETTIT OIL COMPANY

LAW FIRM

Years

the House. Kessler’s departure from the 24th District seat, from which she served as majority Van De Wege leader for more than a decade, set off a round of campaigning that was eventually won in November by a Clallam County commissioner, Steve Tharinger, a fellow Democrat. Kevin Van De Wege easily held onto the other

ESTABLISHED 1935

ESTABLISHED 1922

ESTABLISHED 1922

Years

associate planner to interim Sequim planning director. Burkett, who leads a city staff of 73, sees no layoffs in 2011, but can’t predict beyond that, citing an uncertain economy.


Year in Review — 2010

Special commemorative section of the Peninsula Daily News

7

(J) — Sunday, January 2, 2011

The Top 10 of 2010 in Clallam County/

continued

The mill that began 90 years ago as Washington Pulp and Paper Corp. with a small cogen­erator sees the new boiler as essential to the future of the paper mill (which among its products is the newsprint that you are now holding). But seven environmental groups say they plan to oppose the project — and a similar cogen-eration plant proposed for the Port Townsend Paper Corp. mill — over air quality and forest concerns. Nippon won Port Angeles City Council ratification

ESTABLISHED 1960

of a shoreline development permit in early December, but that permit is only one of many hurdles the mill must scale. The big ones looming in 2011: Permits from the Olympic Region Clean Air Agency and state Pollution Control Hearings Board.

8

Rebirth on Marine Drive. The mill founded in 1941 as Peninsula Plywood began producing under the name Peninsula Plywood again in March, completing a lengthy process to find

ESTABLISHED 1963

ESTABLISHED 1960

Thank you Davis Sand & Gravel

1123 E. First • Port Angeles Thank you for your support! W e look forward to serving you in the future!

Serving... since 1968

Peninsula Children’s Clinic Inc.

Arlene Thomas at

  

CUSTOM DRAPERIES & UPHOLSTERY work done in our own workrooms FREE ESTIMATES

Now seeing patients in Sequim also.

Years

Years

Years

ESTABLISHED 1971

ESTABLISHED 1971

360-457-3211 • 1-800-953-3211 FAX 360-457-6566 1325 E. 1st St. • Port Angeles

Proudly serving the community for

40 Years

Thanks to all our loyal customers

Happy New Year!!

40 Years

115107074

457-8578

Clallam/8

457-3430

115106811

Years

119 N. Sequim Ave., Sequim

902 Caroline St. Port Angeles, WA 98362

115106790

457-7304

to

Angeles Chiropractic Clinic Helping People Live Healthier more Productive Lives!

24 Employees = 270 Years of Service!

115105435

43 Years

ESTABLISHED 1970

ESTABLISHED 1969

105 N. Francis St 115105788

Years Years

115106950

1080 S. Forks Ave., Forks Your Hosts: Jan & Norm Bagby Happy New Year!

www.nti4u.com

Turn

115104951

452-9206

Engineering & Surveying 717 S. Peabody St. Port Angeles

part of a shopping block developed by Brown Maloney, owner of Olympic View Properties and the weekly Sequim Gazette newspaper next door. Port Angeles commercial properties, meanwhile, continued to languish in 2010 — especially the department store building at the corner of First and Oak streets that has remained empty longer than ever in its 60-plus year history as home to Gottschalks, La­monts Apparel and Peoples.

ESTABLISHED 1968

115107077

Crestwood Convalescent Center

Northwestern Territories Inc.

46 Years

a month ago, planting themselves between Costco Wholesale and The Home Depot this year. The Holiday Inn Express, near the end of East Washington Street, opened 77 rooms and 2,600 square feet of conference space in April and later added the city’s first commercial solar array atop its roof to power partially the conference center with the sun’s energy. In the center of the city, a 5,000-square-foot retail structure was gutted to build five new store spaces,

ESTABLISHED 1967

115106966

ESTABLISHED 1968

48 Years

9

Building continues in Sequim. Sequim and the Dungeness Valley continued their growth spurt during 2010, seemingly defying the Great Recession. Big-box retailers Ross Dress for Less and Grocery Outlet broke ground about

(360)452-8491 115107236

115104966

ESTABLISHED 1968

Years

2011 with about 125 employees, a rebuilt control room and a loaded log deck as a symbol to many on the North Olympic Peninsula of a resource-based industry that continues to defy naysayers.

ESTABLISHED 1965

We Deliver 457-5056

for shopping locally! 115104950

Years

funding and concessions to restart a mill shuttered in 2008. PenPly, led mainly Renshaw by the unwavering strength of President John Renshaw, endured a rocky first year that saw a May 15 control room fire temporarily disrupting the boilers and the Oct. 1 layoff of 35 workers because of lagging market conditions. Still, the mill goes into


8

Year in Review — 2010

Sunday, January 2, 2011 — (J)

Special commemorative section of the Peninsula Daily News

The Top 10 of 2010 in Clallam County/

continued

One giant-sized exception marked Port Angeles’ shaky commercial scene: A 130,000-square-foot Walmart Supercenter opened in eastern Port Angeles in late October. But lest anyone thinks Sequim was left off the Walmart wagon, the retailing giant announced about a week later that the Sequim store will be enlarged into a matching Super­center this year.

10

A matter of life, death and pants. Fewer than two years ago, Darold

ESTABLISHED 1972

ESTABLISHED 1972

Golden Crafts

Shop

112C S. Lincoln St. Port Angeles 457-0509 Serving the North Olympic Peninsula Since 1972

Ked-Ter

Residential Commercial Remodel

683-4295

683-9719 since 1972

360•374•2524

360-582-3900

Providing Charity in the West End since 1975

36 Years

WILDER AUTO & RV TOYOTA • HONDA • NISSAN VOLKSWAGEN • JEEP • SCION

4410 S. AIRPORT ROAD PORT ANGELES “Best Wishes for the New Year to all our friends & customers.”

Years

H appy N ew Year to all our Loyal C ustom ers!

452-3888 1-800-927-9395 w w w.w ilderauto.com

You can count on us!

Years

115106788

Serving Our Community for

Years

ESTABLISHED 1977

ESTABLISHED 1977

115104961

Years

(360) 457-0482

115106791

Olympic Rehabilitation of Sequim

115107081

Years

PORT TOWNSEND

Angeles Concrete

Forks Elks Lodge #2524

115104979

115106874

38 Years

Serving the North Olympic Peninsula Since 1974 115105423

The Finest in Auto Parts Service!

360-457-1139

Years

PORT ANGELES

(360) 457-0482 SEQUIM

115104939

FORKS

ATTORNEYS AT LAW

Years

LAND TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY (360) 683-7281

683-6812

ESTABLISHED 1975

ESTABLISHED 1975

JOHNSON RUTZ & TASSIE PLLC 360-374-6065

Years

ESTABLISHED 1973

349 A W. WASHINGTON SEQUIM, WA 98382

Sequim 683-8003 Your Naturally Good Food Market and Nursery 115105439

Years

Clallam County Sheriff’s Office

FRED’S HOBBIES & GUNS

261461 Hwy 101

1423 Ward Rd, Sequim

Photo taken during the 1994 investigation into the case that sent Drold Ray Stenson to death row shows a Clallam County sheriff’s detective wearing the jeans Stenson allegedly wore the night his wife and business partner were killed southwest of Sequim.

ESTABLISHED 1973

Construction, Inc.

ESTABLISHED 1974

Whiteheads Auto Parts, Inc.

The photograph is of significance, say Stenson’s lawyers, because it shows the jeans’ front right pocket turned inside out and the detective not wearing gloves. The pocket could have been contaminated, they say. Those DNA tests could determine Stenson’s fate. For now, he is with six other death row inmates at the Walla Walla penitentiary. If Stenson’s death penalty stands, he can choose lethal injection or death by hanging.

ESTABLISHED 1972

115107126

ESTABLISHED 1973

that was in the chamber of a .357-caliber revolver used in the murders. That test could produce evidence on who hand-loaded the weapon. But the more intriguing evidence review involves a pair of pants Stenson allegedly wore the night of the killings. A Clallam County sheriff’s detective sergeant in 1994 put on the jeans and photographed at the request of a contracted forensic examiner to see whether blood could have gotten on them from Stenson kneeling by the victims.

ESTABLISHED 1972 have a

115104978

115105763

Years

Ray Stenson was on death row and within hours of execution for killing his wife and his business Stenson partner at Stenson’s exotic bird farm southwest of Sequim. Stenson enters the new year with the possibility that he might not face the death penalty over irregularities in evidence. One reason is a DNA test on a hollow-point bullet


Year in Review — 2010

Special commemorative section of the Peninsula Daily News

9

(J) — Sunday, January 2, 2011

Also news in Clallam County in 2010

Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News

West End

landmarks go up in flames

Two spectacular West End fires during 2010: The office and front section of the Indian Valley Motel on U.S. Highway 101 about 10 miles west of Port Angeles were destroyed Feb. 27, and the defunct Olympic Theatre, Forks’ former cinema, burned early Sept. 22.

ESTABLISHED 1979

ESTABLISHED 1978

KIRSCH ELECTRIC, INC.

Happy New Year!

ESTABLISHED 1982

Hoch Construction

Baskin Robbins 452-7777

Dennis L. Wilcox, D.V.M., M.S. Andi R. Thomson, D.V.M. Alex Nowacki, D.V.M. Christina Wagner D.V.M.

Thanks to all our loyal customers.

Happy New Year!

452-6566

Thanks to all our customers. Hereʼs hoping you all have a safe and happy New Year! Larry & Sandra Christiansen

29 Years

Happy New Year!

Years

115105425

Years

P.O. Box 2242, Port Angeles

115107299

0C5106792

Years

Happy New Year!

115105783

Would Like to Thank Our Community for Your Support

Years

802 E. Washington Sequim 683-7261

160 DelGuzzi Drive Port Angeles (360) 452-7686

115105437

Years

ESTABLISHED 1982

ESTABLISHED 1981

ESTABLISHED 1980

1611 E. Front St. Port Angeles

115107235

Sequim: 360-683-6819 Port Angeles: 360-452-5377

Lonnie Archibald/for Peninsula Daily News


10

Year in Review — 2010

Sunday, January 2, 2011 — (J)

Special commemorative section of the Peninsula Daily News

The Top 10 of 2010 in Washington Washington state’s worsening budget woes were voted The Associated Press’ top story of 2010 by the state’s newspaper editors, including those with the Peninsula Daily News. Here are the top state stories:

1

State budget cuts get deeper. As 2010 began, Gov. Chris Gregoire and the Democrat-controlled Legislature were facing down a $2.6 billion hole in the two-year budget that runs through mid-2011. By the time lawmakers went home in April, the gap had grown to $2.8 billion, a hole Democrats hoped to fill with about

$755 million in spending cuts and a raft of tax increases aimed at businesses Gregoire and consumers of all kinds. By the end of the year, the problem had grown still worse after voters rejected the Legislature’s tax increases on candy, gum and soda pop along with the separate proposal to impose an income tax on the state’s highest earners. Even after a special session of the Legislature cut about $590 million more

earlier this month, the state is still short $1.1 billion through June. Meanwhile, a $4.6 billion hole looms for the next two-year budget.

2

Take that, Mr. Gates: The initiative campaign to impose an income tax targeting the state’s richest citizens was supported by prominent advocates of tax reform, including Bill Gates Sr. Supporters said Initiative 1098 would have raised about $2 billion per year for education and health programs.

1920-2010

The Associated Press

Sen. Joe Zarelli, left, R-Ridgefield, talks with Sen. Don Benton, R-Vancouver, during an emergency legislative session in Olympia on Turn to State/11 Dec. 11 designed to enact deep budget cuts.

90 YEARS

December 14, 2010 marked the 90th anniversary of making paper in Port Angeles at what is now the Nippon Paper Industries USA mill. For 90 years, our mill has been a part of the community and we have grown and prospered together. As a large employer in Port Angeles, we purchase most of our goods and services locally, and we take our role in Port Angeles and Clallam County very seriously. NPI USA is committed to responsible stewardship of the environment and seeks to maintain a balance among our economic, environmental and social responsibilities. Our environmental policy reflects our dedication to continual improvement of the mill’s environmental performance in all aspects of our business. For decades we have made our product from recycled newspapers, old telephone books, residual chips from local sawmills, and on occasion wood chips from pulp logs (lower quality logs that the sawmills don’t want to run). We have supplied paper for millions of newspapers (including this one) and telephone books to virtually all corners of the world. We have had thousands of employees walk through our doors, each with their own stories to tell. Some area families have had three or four different generations support their families by working here or being a supplier to our mill. Ground was broken and construction of the original mill started in February of 1920, with the guidance and backing of Isidore and Harold Zellerbach. “The Washington Pulp and Paper Company” produced its very first saleable product at this site on December 14th of that same year. Over the years, The Washington Pulp and Paper Company became known as the Crown Zellerbach, which lasted for several decades until Crown became part of the James River Corporation in the 1980s. James River, in turn, sold the mill to Daishowa in 1988. Daishowa and Nippon Paper Industries of Japan merged in 2003.

And so our story continues, with more chapters yet to be written, we feel privileged and honored to have shared our 90th anniverary with all of you.

0C5106924

Last year, we celebrated 90 years of continuous paper-making here. We remain proud of what we do, and of our association with the city and citizens of Port Angeles and Clallam County. It is with the same pride that we recently announced the next chapter of our story ... our project to construct a new biomass boiler and a 20 megawatt co-generation facility. This new facility, when completed and on-line in 2011, will add much needed permanent and construction jobs to our region, improve the financial viability of the mill, reduce air emissions, replace older equipment, and generate 20 megawatts of green electricity using underutilized renewable resources. This project represents a capital investment in the mill (and the community) of $71 million.


Special commemorative section of the Peninsula Daily News

Year in Review — 2010

(J) — Sunday, January 2, 2011

11

The Top 10 of 2010 in Washington state/

continued

But despite the support of Gates Sr. and other prominent figures, 64 percent of voters said no. Some business leaders argued that the tax would drive away top talent and other opponents warned that lawmakers might eventually expand the tax to cover everyone.

3 The Associated Press

Sen. Patty Murray, left, shakes hands during her Election Night victory party Nov. 2. With her are fellow Democrats Sen. Maria Cantwell, second from right, and Gov. Chris Gregoire, right.

Rossi’s third strike? Democratic U.S. Sen. Patty Murray’s victory in her bid for a fourth term Rossi handed Republican Dino Rossi, a former state senator, his third loss in a bid for statewide office. Although Rossi’s candidacy drew millions of dollars from out-

side groups, Murray’s strength in the Democratic stronghold of King County overwhelmed Rossi’s support elsewhere in the state.

4

Planes, boats and automobiles. The dramatic capture of Colton HarrisMoore, the alleged “barefoot bandit” Harris-Moore from Camano Island, ranked fourth. Harris-Moore, 19 now, is accused of leading authorities on a cat-and-mouse game in pilfered cars, boats and small planes after escaping a halfway house south of Seattle in 2008. Turn

ESTABLISHED 1980

2972 OLD OLYMPIC HIGHWAY 360-457-3842

From left to right: Cindy Birdsall, Melissa Tilley, Ashley Angevine, Dr. Sharon Jensen, Dr. Meg Gordon, Dr. Nicole Burton, Katie Mulholland & Molly Dickson.

115105768

www.bluemountainvet.com

LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SERVING PETS AND THEIR FAMILIES FOR…

to

State/12


12

Year in Review — 2010

Sunday, January 2, 2011 — (J)

Special commemorative section of the Peninsula Daily News

The Top 10 of 2010 in Washington state/

continued

This year he made a daring cross-country dash that ended in July after he allegedly stole a plane in Indiana, crash-landed it in the Bahamas and was captured by Bahamian police at gunpoint in a stolen boat.

5

A short-lived tax. Part of the Legislature’s attempt to balance the budget, the taxes on candy, soda and bottled water, last spring, died in the November election. More than 60 percent of voters opposed the taxes after a group representing big soft-drink companies poured millions into the campaign.

6

Deadly explosion in Anacortes. An explosion and fire killed seven people at the Tesoro refinery in Anacortes last April. The tragedy later drew a record $2.39 million fine from state regulators, who found it could have been prevented if the company had tested its equipment properly and followed other safety regulations. The company also faces a criminal investigation by the U.S. Environment Protection Agency.

7

Joblessness in Washington. The state’s stubbornly high unemployment rate continues into 2011.

The state jobless rate stood at 9.2 percent in November, lower than the national rate, but scarcely changed from the 9.3 percent unemployment rate last January.

8

Soldiers from Fort Lewis on trial. U.S. soldiers based at LewisMcChord Base south of Tacoma are accused of killing Afghan civilians for sport. Military courts-martial for the Fort Lewis-based soldiers are expected to continue into 2011. In all, a dozen 5th Stryker brigade soldiers were accused of crimes in Afghanistan. Five are charged with murder and conspiracy in the deaths of three Afghan civilians.

9

(Tie) Two initiatives on the November ballot. The dueling attempts to privatize the state’s liquor Eyman distributions system, both of which failed, and anti-tax activist Tim Eyman’s successful bid to restore strict limits on the Legislature’s power to raise taxes

ESTABLISHED 1983

ESTABLISHED 1983

KOMO-TV

Flames erupt from a portion of the Tesoro refinery following an explosion last April in which seven were killed. and fees complete the Top 10 list. Both liquor initiatives would have dismantled the state liquor board’s monopoly on hard liquor distribution and sales, costing

ESTABLISHED 1983

ESTABLISHED 1983

John A. Raske Insurance Agency

302 Kemp St. • Port Angeles

452-2727 Happy Holidays!

452-3336

Port Angeles Antiques and Collectibles

The Trading Post 114 W. 1st St., Port Angeles

Years

Rainbow

Sweepers, Inc. 452-1621

for RV Travelers, situated along a peaceful creek, within walking distance to shops and ferries.

To All Our Vietnam & Other Veterans: WELCOME HOME!

Years

PEABODY CREEK RV PARK Quiet, clean, complete facilities

Peabody Creek RV Park 127 S. Lincoln, PA 457-7092 • 800-392-2361

27 Years

115107131

Best Wishes To All in 2011 115105429

Years

115104971

Years

MARION’S

NOW Located @

308 E. 8th St., Port Angeles

ESTABLISHED 1984

ESTABLISHED 1986

Elegant Glassware • Furniture Jewelry • Estate Services

115106804

Years

723 E. Front St. Port Angeles

ture’s options in balancing the budget in 2011. Which sets the stage for the state’s continuing budget problems to probably weigh into the Top 10 stories of 2011.

115105428

ALLWEHC150KU

115107082

Wishing happy holidays to all our loyal patrons

the state millions of dollars a year. Eyman’s initiative, which restored a limit voters had approved several times before, severely restricts the Legisla-


Year in Review — 2010

Special commemorative section of the Peninsula Daily News

(J) — Sunday, January 2, 2011

13

The Top 10 of 2010 in the nation, world The massive Gulf of Mexico oil spill, triggered by a deadly blast at a rig used by BP, was the top news story of 2010, followed by the divisive health care overhaul, according to The Associated Press’ annual poll of U.S. editors and news directors, including Executive Editor Rex Wilson of the Peninsula Daily News. Here are 2010’s top 10 stories, in order:

1

More deadly disaster for the Gulf region: The April 20 explosion at a BP-leased rig killed 11 workers and unleashed a deep-sea spill that ultimately spewed at least 170 million gallons of crude into the Gulf. Consequences included devastation for fishing and tourism industries, a huge and costly cleanup effort, a management change at BP, and creation of a $20 billion fund to pay for damages.

A brown pelican copes with oily goo last June 3 on the beach at East Grand Terre Island, La.

2

Health care for all? After bitter political wrangling, President Barack Obama was able to sign into law one of his major campaign promises — a $1 trillion health care overhaul intended to expand coverage to more Americans. But Republicans used public misgivings about parts of the plan as a springboard for election gains. Turn

to

The Associated Press (2)

Nation/World/14 The Deepwater Horizon oil rig burns unabated in the Gulf of Mexico last April 21.

EST. EST. 1959 1959

ESTABLISHED 1996

YEARS

We thank you for shopping locally for your kitchen, equipment and supply needs. 51 Dryke Rd., Sequim

Years

115106957

115107097

Always open 365 days a year 6am - 11pm! 3010 E. HWY. 101, PORT ANGELES

Thank you for 52 years to all of our very loyal customers who continue to make our family owned business a success!

Best Wishes in 2011


14

Year in Review — 2010

Sunday, January 2, 2011 — (J)

Special commemorative section of the Peninsula Daily News

The Top 10 of 2010 in the nation/world/

continued

In addition, the overhaul faced a welter of lawsuits challenging its constitutionality.

3

Democrats lose advantage: President Obama called it a “shellacking” — a Nov. 2 election in which the Republicans surged to a majority in the House of Representatives, and gained more governor’s offices and legislative majorities. The Democrats were able to hang on to their edge in the Senate, leaving the U.S. with at least two years of divided government.

ESTABLISHED 1985

4

Looking up from the recession depths: Economists said the deepest recession since the Great Depression was over, and consumers began to spend more near year-end. But the unemployment rate stayed well above 9 percent, and home prices were weighed down by foreclosures and sluggish demand.

5

Haiti rocked by quake and its aftermath: Already the Western Hemisphere’s most destitute nation, Haiti was shattered by an earthquake on Jan. 12 that killed at least 230,000 and left millions homeless.

Crucial reconstruction projects were slow to get started; disease and political instability added to the woes.

6

Take tea and see: Though it lacked the trappings of traditional political organizations, the tea party movement had a profound impact on the 2010 election. It influenced the stances of Republican leaders and enabling some maverick challengers to oust GOP establishment candidates in the primaries.

ESTABLISHED 1985

ESTABLISHED 1985

ESTABLISHED 1986

1-800-759-1861 Our Staff Can’t Wait To Save You Money In The New Year! Visit us online

www.insureNW247.com

452-4955

The Biggest Little Gift Shop on the Waterfront

LANDMARK, INC. 330 E. 1st St., Ste 1

Years

582-1600

Years

KRISTIN J. TUCKER 452-9749 New Office Location Downtown Port Angeles

Years

115106892

Years

A special thank you to our loyal customers. Have a happy and prosperous 2011!

115104977

Years

®

1520 E. Front St., Port Angeles

Happy New Year to all our friends and customers through the years.

Doing property management

since 1986

452-7902

452-4222

755 W. Washington Sequim

ESTABLISHED 1988

®

124 S. Albert, Port Angeles

1210 E. Front Street Port Angeles

115107123

115105784

Years

ESTABLISHED 1988

115105445

115104962

Years

To our valued customers...Thank you for your patronage over the past 25 years. We look forward to many more. Have a safe and prosperous New Year.

PROPERTIES BY

115107117

Thank you to everyone for your support! I look forward to serving you in the future.

Years Years

115106869

Armory Square Mall

Serving the Gutter Needs of the North Olympic Peninsula for

101 E. Front St., Port Angeles

ESTABLISHED 1987

Port Angeles 452-1326

115105440

The Olympic Peninsula’s Art Museum pafac.org 457-3532

Years

ESTABLISHED 1986

Port Angeles Fine Arts Center & Webster’s Woods Art Park

John Miller 457-8885

115106962

Years

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

ESTABLISHED 1986

ESTABLISHED 1986

Years

The

452-2207

819 S. LINCOLN PORT ANGELES

115105774

115105776

Years

452-6549 1-800-462-8593 124 W. Railroad Ave.

ESTABLISHED 1986

ESTABLISHED 1986

ACCURATE GUTTER SERVICE

AUTO • HOME • COMMERCIAL

328 N. Gales St., Suite B., Port Angeles

The Associated Press

Chilean President Sebastian Pinera, front right, hugs rescued miner Florencio Avalos after Avalos was rescued Turn to Nation/World/15 from the collapsed San Jose mine with 32 other miners.


Year in Review — 2010

Special commemorative section of the Peninsula Daily News

15

(J) — Sunday, January 2, 2011

The Top 10 of 2010 in the nation/world/

continued

7

A miracle in Chile: In a year of disasters and squabbles, this was a miraculous feel-good story. Trapped nearly a half-mile underground for 69 days after an Aug. 5 mine collapse, 33 Chilean miners were freed one-by-one while an entranced global audience watched on television.

8

U.S. ending involvement in Iraq: U.S. forces formally ended their combat role and looked ahead to planned withdrawal. But Iraqis endured months of bitter political haggling after an election that failed to heal SunniShiite divisions.

ESTABLISHED 1988

Insurance Services, Inc.

835 E. 2nd St. Port Angeles 452-5820

Lower Elwha Child Care Center

Wishing you a Merry Christmas & Happy New Year

683-4285

Website: www.camaraderiecellars.com

Years

“We Make House Calls” 360 452-5278

• NO START SPECIALIST • Tune Ups • Brakes • Starters Alternators • Fuel Pumps • Water Pumps Timing Belts • Heater Cores • Trailer Wiring Electrical & Computer Diagnosis & Repair Your Home, Office or Roadside Service

Years

115104960

20 Years

Celebrating 19 years of Great Winemaking! 334 Benson Road, Port Angeles, WA 98363 (360) 417-3564 Sharing the Best Things in Life

Years

ESTABLISHED 1993

115107115

Thanks to all our Loyal Customers! Happy New Year! 115106871

Years

115105451

115107072

115105764

21 Years

WATER CONDITIONING & BOTTLED WATER

360-452-5326 • 360-683-9820 Toll Free 1-888-331-4477 PO Box 2636 Port Angeles, WA 98362 Wishing all a Happy New Year! 115105443

Private charters * Explorer Series

Years

115106880

242751 Hwy. 101 W.

609 W. Washington Sequim • 681-0820

ESTABLISHED 1992

ESTABLISHED 1991

(360)417-1861

452-8088

Years

James W. Paulsen Steve R. Paulsen

Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sales & Service you can count on

015067135

(360)457-0794

Monday - Saturday 10-6 Sunday 12-5

Best wishes for the New Year

Your Fast Ferry to Victoria BC

* 4-Day Puget Sound Heritage Adventures * Floating Classroom Cruises for All Ages

Karen’s Sequim Sewing Center

Since 1990!

115107114

115107080

115105773

138 W. Railroad • Port Angeles

260 Monroe Road Port Angeles www.drennanford.com

ESTABLISHED 1991

Port Angeles Victoria BC

Cars • Boats • Trains Planes and more...

ESTABLISHED 1990

ESTABLISHED 1990

Drennan-Ford Funeral Home & Crematory

A Big Thank You to our Guests for 21 Great Years! Happy New Year!

21 Years

The Associated Press

ESTABLISHED 1990

on the water

ESTABLISHED 1990

ESTABLISHED 1990

President Barack Obama presents the Medal of Honor to Staff Sgt. Salvatore Giunta, who rescued two members of his squad in October 2007 while fighting in the war in Afghanistan. The presentation at the White House in Washington, D.C., was made in November.

115 E. Railroad Ave. • 452-2700

Open to ALL Infants, Toddlers, Preschool & After School children. Subsidies Accepted, Free MealsUSDA Food Program. Rebecca Parker, Director

Years

Intense fighting pushed the Taliban out of some longtime strongholds, but the militants remained resilient, and Afghanistan remained beset by corruption and ineffectual government.

ESTABLISHED 1990

322 Stratton Rd. Port Angeles 360-452-3562 Website: www.elwha.org

Your Independent Agency wishing everyone a Happy New Year!

Years

10

Troop escalation in Afghanistan: After months of deliberation, President Obama ordered a troop surge in a major bid to turn the tide of the nearly 10-year-old war.

ESTABLISHED 1989

Reetz

Years

9

A leak that can’t be easily sealed: First came the online postings of a huge batch of U.S. military documents from Iraq and Afghanistan. Then WikiLeaks started releasing a cache of classified State Department diplomatic cables, creating embarrassment for Washington in its dealings with other nations.


16

Year in Review — 2010

Sunday, January 2, 2011 — (J)

Special commemorative section of the Peninsula Daily News

Ten (un)forgettable quotes from 2010 Christine O’Donnell’s TV ad declaration — “I’m not a witch” — during her U.S. Senate campaign tied for this year’s best quote with a BP executive’s (see below), says a Yale University librarian. O’Donnell’s quote is cited by Fred Shapiro, associate librarian at Yale Law School, who released his fifth annual list of the most notable quotations of the year. Other notable quotes of 2010:  “I’d like my life back,” the lament made in May by BP’s CEO Tony Hayward after the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history.

ESTABLISHED 1993

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 “If you touch my junk, I’m gonna have you arrested.” Airline passenger John Tyner, remark to Transportation Security Administration worker at San Diego’s Lindbergh Field airport, Nov. 13.

 “You’re telling me that the separation of church and state is found in the First Amendment?” O’Donnell, Delaware senatorial debate, Oct. 19.

 “I hope that’s not where we’re going, but you know, if this Congress keeps going the way it is, people are really looking toward those Second Amendment remedies. They’re saying: My goodness, what can we do to turn this country around?” Sharron Angle, radio interview in January.

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 “They should never have put me with that woman. . . . She was just a sort of bigoted woman who said she used to be Labour.” Gordon Brown, comments about a voter he met while campaigning for British general election, April 28.

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Years

O’Donnell

 “Don’t retreat. Instead — reload!” Sarah Palin, Tweet, March 23.


Year in Review — 2010

Special commemorative section of the Peninsula Daily News

17

(J) — Sunday, January 2, 2011

Passings: They left us during 2010 Here is a roll call of the famous, infamous and notable who died in 2010. (Cause of death cited for younger people if available.)

JANUARY Freya von Moltke, 98. Prominent member of the anti-Nazi resistance in Germany during World War II. Jan. 1. Tsutomu Yamaguchi, 93. The only person recognized as a survivor of both the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings at end of World War II. Jan. 4. Jean Biden, 92. Mother of Vice President Joe Biden. Jan 8. Eric Rohmer, 89. French New Wave director known for “Claire’s

Knee” and other films tracing the intracacies of romantic relationships. Jan. 11. Teddy Pendergrass, 59. R&B singer who was one of the most successful figures in music until a car crash left him in a wheelchair. Jan. 13. Colon cancer. Glenn W. Bell Jr., 86. Entrepreneur best known as the founder of the Taco Bell chain. Jan. 16. Erich Segal, 72. Author of best-selling novel “Love Story” about a young couple dealing with love and bereavement. Jan. 17. Jean Simmons, 80. Actress whose ethereal screen presence and starring roles with Hollywood’s top actors made her widely admired. Jan 22. J.D. Salinger, 91. Legendary author, youth hero and fugitive

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Fess Parker, 85. TV’s Davy Crockett and Daniel Boone. March 18. Jerome York, 71. Financial wizard credited with turning around Chrysler and IBM. March 18. Robert Culp, 79. Actor who teamed with Bill Cosby in the racially groundbreaking TV series “I Spy” and was Bob in the critically acclaimed sex comedy “Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice.” March 24. Johnny Maestro, 70. Performed the 1958 doo-wop hit “16 Candles” with The Crests and enjoyed a decades-long career with The Brooklyn Bridge. March 24.

ESTABLISHED 1998

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Years

MARCH Evaristo Porras, 62. Former high-flying Medellin cartel drug trafficker associated with Pablo Escobar in the 1980s. March 3. Heart attack. Corey Haim, 38. Teen talent who started working in TV commercials at 10 and was a bigscreen heartthrob at 15. March 10. Pneumonia. Peter Graves, 83. Tall, stalwart actor whose calm and intelligent demeanor was a good fit to the intrigue of TV’s “Mission: Impossible” as well as the satire of the “Airplane” films. March 14.

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posts in three Republican administrations and some of the U.S. military’s top jobs. Feb. 20.

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funnel millions of dollars in weapons to Afghan rebels who fought off the Soviet Union. Feb. 10. Alexander McQueen, 40. British fashion designer known for his daring and edgy style. Feb. 11. Suicide. Doug Fieger, 57. Leader of the power pop band The Knack who co-wrote and sang on the 1979 hit, “My Sharona.” Feb. 14. Cancer. Kathryn Grayson, 88. star of popular MGM musicals of the 1940s and ’50s such as “Anchors Aweigh,” ‘’Show Boat” and “Kiss Me Kate.” Feb. 17. John Babcock, 109. The oldest Canadian veteran of World War I. Feb. 18. Alexander Haig, 85. Soldier and statesman who held high

ESTABLISHED 1997

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Years

Frances Reid, 95. Played matriarch Alice Horton on “Days of Our Lives” for four decades. Feb. 3. U.S. Rep. John Murtha, 77. De facto voice of veterans on Capitol Hill and later an outspoken and influential critic of the Iraq War. Feb. 8. Complications from gallbladder surgery. Albert M. Kligman, 93. Dermatologist whose research led to discoveries including the acne and wrinkle drug Retin-A. Feb. 9. U.S. Rep. Charlie Wilson, 76. Texan who worked tenaciously to

ALLSTATE

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from fame whose “The Catcher in the Rye” shocked and inspired a world he increasingly shunned. Jan. 27.


18

Year in Review — 2010

Sunday, January 2, 2011 — (J)

Passings Jaime Escalante, 79. Transformed a tough east Los Angeles high school by motivating students to master advanced math, became one of the most famous teachers in the U.S. and inspired the movie “Stand and Deliver.” March 30. Morris Jeppson, 87. Weapons test officer aboard the Enola Gay who helped arm the atomic bomb dropped over Hiroshima. March 30.

APRIL Corin Redgrave, 70. Actor in dozens of plays, television shows and movies including “A Man for all Seasons” and “Four Weddings and a Funeral.” Brother of Vanessa and Lynn Redgrave. April 6. Wilma Mankiller, 64. First female leader of the Cherokee Nation, from 1985 to 1995. April 6.

ESTABLISHED 2000

Lech Kaczynski, 60. An anticommunist activist who became Polish president. He died with other officials in a plane crash in Russia. April 10. Dixie Carter, 70. Star of the television series “Designing Women” who had roles in a host of other television shows. April 10. Benjamin L. Hooks, 85. An attorney and pastor who became the South’s first black state trial court judge since Reconstruction and then led the flagging NAACP in a strong rebound. April 15. Dorothy Height, 98. The leading female voice of the 1960s civil rights movement and a key participant in historic marches with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. April 20. Keli McGregor, 48. President of baseball’s Colorado Rockies and a former NFL football player. April 20. Found dead in hotel room of natural causes. Juan Antonio Samaranch, 89. A former Spanish diplomat and shrewd dealmaker whose 21-year

ESTABLISHED 2000

term as president of the International Olympic Committee was marked by unprecedented growth of the games. April 21. Elizabeth Post, 89. Etiquette expert and author of books and magazine columns. April 24.

MAY Lynn Redgrave, 67. Actress who became a 1960s sensation as the free-thinking title character in “Georgy Girl.” May 2. Breast cancer. Dave Fisher, 69. Lead singer of the Highwaymen, the popular 1960s folk group. May 7. Bone marrow disease. Lena Horne, 92. Jazz singer known for signature song “Stormy Weather” and for her triumph over bigotry that allowed her to entertain white audiences but not socialize with them. May 9. John Shepherd-Barron, 89. Scotsman credited with inventing the world’s first automatic cash

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Don Coryell, 85. Innovative pro and college coach whose Air Coryell offense produced some of the most dynamic passing attacks in football history. July 1. Frank Colacurcio Sr., 93. Organized crime figure who built a strip club empire across 10 Western states. July 2. Mohammed Oudeh, 73. Key planner of the 1972 Munich Olympics attack that killed 11 Israeli athletes. July 3. Dr. Robert Butler, 83. Pulitzer Prize-winning expert on aging who coined the phrase “ageism.” July 4.

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shot-blocker from Sudan who spent 10 seasons in the NBA and was dedicated to humanitarian work in Africa. June 19. Sen. Robert C. Byrd, 92. Rose from an impoverished childhood in West Virginia’s coal country to become the longest-serving senator in U.S. history. June 28.

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Rue McClanahan, 76. Emmywinning actress who brought the sexually liberated Southern belle Blanche Devereaux to life on the hit TV series “The Golden Girls.” June 3. John Wooden, 99. Built college basketball’s greatest dynasty at UCLA and became one of the most revered coaches ever. June 4. Jack Harrison, 97. Survivor of the Great Escape plot by Allied prisoners in a German prison in World War II. June 4. Jimmy Dean, 81. Country music legend for his smash hit about a workingman hero, “Big Bad John,” and an entrepreneur known for his sausage brand. June 13. Manute Bol, 47. Lithe 7-foot-7

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the 1980s and ’90s; helped restore them to some of their hit-making glory. May 30. Cancer.

FITNESS WEST

FRAME CENTER

Thanks for the last 11 wonderful years. Looking forward to serving you in the New Year!

machine. May 15. Ronnie James Dio, 67. Singer whose soaring vocals and poetic lyrics broke new ground in heavy metal music. May 16. Stomach cancer. Hank Jones, 91. Jazz pianist and composer who played with some of the biggest names in American jazz including singer Ella Fitzgerald. May 16. Art Linkletter, 97. Known on American television for his interviews with children and ordinary people. May 26. Gary Coleman, 42. Adorable, pint-sized child star of the 1970s TV sitcom “Diff’rent Strokes” who spent the rest of his life struggling on Hollywood’s D-list. May 28. Brain hemorrhage. Dennis Hopper, 74. Hollywood actor whose memorable career included “Rebel without a Cause,” “Easy Rider” and “Blue Velvet.” May 29. Prostate cancer. Ali-Ollie Woodson, 58. Led the Motown quintet the Temptations in

ESTABLISHED 2001

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Karon’s

360-565-0308

Special commemorative section of the Peninsula Daily News


Year in Review — 2010

Special commemorative section of the Peninsula Daily News Tuli Kupferberg, 86. Founding member of the 1960s underground rock group the Fugs. July 12. George Steinbrenner, 80. Rebuilt New York Yankees dynasty over more than three decades of owning the franchise. July 13. Vernon Baker, 90. Belatedly received Medal of Honor for World War II valor after being denied the award because he was black. July 13. David Warren, 85. Inventor of “black box” flight data recorder. July 19. Daniel Schorr, 93. Journalist who covered the Cold War and found himself on President Richard Nixon’s “enemies list.” July 23. Erich Steidtmann, 95. Former Nazi SS officer suspected of being involved in World War II massacres; was never convicted. July 25.

AUGUST

Paul Conrad, 86. Political cartoonist who won the Pulitzer Prize three times for his stark, powerful visuals that poked fun at politicians and presidents. Sept. 4. Jefferson Thomas, 67. One of nine black students to integrate a Little Rock high school in American’s first major battle over school segregation. Sept. 5. Pancreatic cancer. Israel Tal, 86. Decorated war hero and creator of Israel’s renowned “Merkava” tank, in Rehovot, Israel. Sept. 8. Juan Mari Bras, 82. Elder statesman of Puerto Rico’s independence movement who gave up his U.S. citizenship in an act that inspired hundreds of other activists. Sept. 10. Kevin McCarthy, 96. Actor who played the frantic doctor trying to save his friends and neighbors in the science-fiction movie classic “Invasion of the Body Snatchers.” Sept. 11. John “Jack” Goeken, 80. Founder of telecommunications giant MCI and father of air-toground telephone communications. Sept. 16. Eddie Fisher, 82. Pop singer who crooned love tunes in the 1950s but whose life was overshadowed by drug use, gambling and failed marriages to actresses Elizabeth Taylor and Debbie Reynolds. Sept. 22. Gloria Stuart, 100. The 1930s Hollywood beauty who gave up acting for 30 years and later became the oldest Academy Award acting nominee as the spunky survivor in “Titanic.” Sept. 26. Arthur Penn, 88. A mythmaker and myth-breaker who, in directing such film classics as “Bonnie and Clyde” and “Little Big

OCTOBER Albertina Walker, 81. Grammywinning singer from Chicago known as the “Queen of Gospel.” Oct. 8. Joan Sutherland, 83. Acclaimed opera singer whose voice stretched more than three octaves. Oct. 10. Georges Mathe, 88. Performed the world’s first bone marrow transplant in 1959. Oct. 15. Barbara Billingsley, 94. Played the mother of Beaver and Wally in “Leave it to Beaver.” Oct. 16. Tom Bosley, 83. Actor best known for his role on “Happy Days.” Oct. 19. Lung cancer. Bob Guccione, 79. Publisher of the adult magazine Penthouse. Oct. 20. Lung cancer. Robert Katz, 77. American writer and historian, whose reconstruction of an infamous Nazi massacre in Rome sparked a trial over whether he defamed the pope. Oct. 20. Cancer surgery. James F. Neal, 81. Attorney who prosecuted Jimmy Hoffa, key Watergate figures, and defended Elvis Presley’s doctor and the Exxon Corp. after the Alaska oil spill. Oct. 21. Alexander Anderson Jr., 90. TV cartoon artist who created Rocky the flying squirrel, Bullwinkle the moose and Dudley DoRight the Canadian mountie. Oct. 22. Joseph Stein, 98. Turned a Yiddish short story into “Fiddler on the Roof.” Oct. 24. Sheik Saqr bin Mohammed Al Qasimi, 90. Ruler in the United

ESTABLISHED 2007

ESTABLISHED 2006

Arab Emirates federation and one of the world’s longest-reigning monarchs. Oct. 27.

NOVEMBER Viktor Chernomyrdin, 72. Served as Russia’s prime minister in the turbulent 1990s as the country was throwing off communism. Nov. 3. Sparky Anderson, 76. Legendary baseball manager who led the Cincinnati Reds to back-toback World Series championships. Nov. 4. Dave Niehaus, 75, broadcaster for the Seattle Mariners from team’s inception whose work placed him in baseball’s Hall of Fame. Nov. 10 Henryk Mikolaj Gorecki, 76. Polish composer famous for his “Symphony of Sorrowful Songs.” Nov. 12. Ingrid Pitt, 73. Survived a Nazi concentration camp to become an acclaimed British movie actress. Nov. 23. Leslie Nielsen, 84. Actor who starred in comedies such as “Airplane” and “The Naked Gun.” Nov. 28. David F. Nolan, 66. Co-founder of the Libertarian Party. Nov. 28. John D’Agostino Sr., 81. His work in comic books ranged from Archie and Jughead to the Incredible Hulk and G.I. Joe. Nov. 28. Samuel T. Cohen, 89. Neutron bomb inventor. Nov. 28. Stephen J. Solarz, 70. Former New York congressman who in 1986 revealed the extravagance of Philippine first lady Imelda Marcos, including her 3,000 pairs of shoes. Nov. 29.

92. Human rights activist who helped found Uruguay’s organization of relatives of people who disappeared during South America’s “dirty wars.” Dec. 5. Elizabeth Edwards, 61. Closely advised her husband John Edwards in two bids for the presidency and advocated for health care even as her marriage publicly crumbled. Dec. 7. Cancer. Dov Shilansky, 86. Holocaust survivor and former speaker of the Israeli parliament. Dec. 9. John du Pont, 72. Chemical fortune heir who killed an Olympic gold medal-winning wrestler at his palatial estate. Dec. 9. James Moody, 85. Jazz saxophonist who recorded more than 50 solo albums. Dec. 9. Mark Madoff, 46. Son of disgraced financier Bernard Madoff. Dec. 11. Suicide. Richard Holbrooke, 69. U.S. diplomat who wrote part of the Pentagon Papers and was the architect of the 1995 Bosnia

ESTABLISHED 2004

ESTABLISHED 2004

The Cat’s Pajamas

A Bed and Breakfast for Cats, Inc.

318 Howe Road Port Angeles, WA 98362

360-565-1077 www.catspjsbnb.com

Happy New Year!

DECEMBER Ron Santo, 70. Former Chicago Cubs third baseman and broadcaster. Dec. 2. Complications of bladder cancer. Maria Esther Gatti de Islas,

7 Years

ESTABLISHED 2007

ESTABLISHED 2007

peace plan. Dec. 13. Bob Feller, 92. Teenage pitching sensation, World War II hero and outspoken Hall of Famer. Dec. 15. Blake Edwards, 88. Director and writer known for clever dialogue, poignance and occasional belly-laugh sight gags in “Breakfast at Tiffany’s,” ‘’10” and the “Pink Panther” farces. Dec. 15. Steve Landesberg, 74. Actor noted for his role on the long-running sitcom “Barney Miller.” Dec. 20. Carlos Andres Perez, 88. Former Venezuelan president who died in exile in Miami. Dec. 25. Teena Marie, 54. A singer with funky hits “Lovergirl” and “Square Biz” in the 1980s. Dec. 26. Natural causes. Alfred E. Kahn, 93. A Cornell University economist best known as the chief architect and promoter of deregulating the nation’s airlines in the Carter administration. Dec. 27.

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Years

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SEPTEMBER

Man,” refashioned movies. Sept. 28. Tony Curtis, 85. Defiantly worked to mold himself from a 1950s heartthrob to a respected actor in such films as “Some Like It Hot.” First Port Townsend Film Festival honored guest. Sept. 29.

115106868

Reginald Levy, 88. British pilot praised for his cool-headed bravery during a 1972 hijacking by Palestinian mi1itants. Aug. 1. Patricia Neal, 84, the willowy, husky-voiced actress who won an Academy Award in 1963 for “Hud” and then survived several strokes to continue acting. Aug. 8. Ted Stevens, 86. The longest serving Republican in the U.S. Senate; funneled billions of dollars to his remote state of Alaska. Aug. 9. Plane crash. David L. Wolper, 82. Hollywood impressario whose landmark 1987 television miniseries “Roots” engrossed the U.S. Aug. 10. Dan Rostenkowski, 82. Former Illinois congressman who wielded enormous power on Capitol Hill for more than 30 years. Aug. 11. Edwin Newman, 91. NBC News correspondent for more than three decades who battled linguistic pretense and clutter in his best-

sellers “Strictly Speaking” and “A Civil Tongue.” Aug. 13.

19

(J) — Sunday, January 2, 2011

ESTABLISHED 2007

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683-4321

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Years

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Years

Thank you for 4 great years on the Peninsula!

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20

Sunday, January 2, 2011 — (J)

Year in Review — 2010

Special commemorative section of the Peninsula Daily News

631 STRATTON RD, PORT ANGELES, WA 360-452-3005

115106931


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