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Mostly cloudy with scattered showers B12

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS March 7, 2013 | 75¢

Port Townsend-Jefferson County’s Daily Newspaper

Ecology, Post office supporters Jefferson turn out in Nordland joining on Neither rain nor sleet can mill case stop protest over hours

Port Townsend Paper seeking landfill permit BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — The state Department of Ecology has joined with the Jefferson County Public Health Department in recommending the denial of an inert-waste permit to the Port Townsend Paper Corp. “Ecology has joined the case on “Ecology our behalf,” said Jared Keefer, the intervened because county’s director of we believe it’s environmental important for the health and water quality. Port Townsend “They will be Paper Corp. to co-leads in the case, showing that monitor the ruling that the groundwater.” permit should not PETER LYON be inert is not just program manager the opinion of the county.” Said Peter Lyon, Ecology’s Waste 2 Resources Program resources manager, in an email: “We agree with the county’s assessment that such issues cannot be adequately addressed without correcting the landfill’s misclassification as inert.” Ecology filed a motion to intervene Feb. 20.

Pollutions Control Hearings Board The matter is scheduled to be addressed Aug. 20-21 by the Pollutions Control Hearings Board in the agency’s Tumwater office. “Ecology intervened because we believe it’s important for the Port Townsend Paper Corp. to monitor groundwater and to provide financial assurance for closure costs should the landfill ever cease operations,” Lyon wrote. “If the landfill were classified as a limited purpose landfill, as opposed to an inert landfill, the company would have to meet these criteria.” TURN

TO

BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

NORDLAND — More than 100 people turned out to protest a planned reduction in hours at the small community post office, urging the U.S. Postal Service to maintain the current schedule. “Cutting two hours a day here is a bad decision,” said Linda Goodman of Marrowstone Island. “It doesn’t save a lot of money and creates a hardship for a small community like ours.” Postal Service representatives Elizabeth Jenkins and Doreen Karoly spoke outside the store during a drizzle that thinned the crowd considerably by the end of the 75-minute presentation Tuesday.

CHARLIE BERMANT (2)/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sally Dern, center, speaks out against cutting back hours at the Nordland Post Office as about 100 supporters brave the rain. — including those in Joyce, Sekiu and LaPush on the North Olympic Peninsula — that will see daily retail counter-service hours cut by two to four hours a day. Nationwide, the change is to be completed by September 2014. Community meetings have been held at Joyce and LaPush. No meeting has been set in Sekiu.

Won’t be closed “We don’t want to shut down the Nordland office. I want to make that very, very clear,” Jenkins said. “We do want to reduce the window hours from eight hours to six hours” each day the office is open. While both Jenkins and the public repeatedly referred to a two-hour decrease, the actual lost time is 90 minutes, according to Postmaster Richard Tracer. The post office window is open now for 7½ hours each weekday. Under the new plan, it will be open for six hours during weekdays. Jenkins said the formal posting of reduced hours

Current hours

Postal Service representatives Elizabeth Jenkins, left, and Doreen Karoly address the crowd. could occur within a week. Once posted, the new hours would come into effect within 30 days, she said. In February, the Postal Service announced it would

discontinue Saturday home delivery in August because of rising costs and falling profits. The Nordland Post Office is among rural post offices

The Nordland Post Office is currently open from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and from 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, and from 9 a.m. to noon Saturdays. The new hours are to be from 9 a.m. to noon and from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, with Saturday hours unchanged. TURN

TO

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LANDFILL/A4

PT Film Fest whips out phones for fund drive Cellular campaign is ending tonight BY CHARLIE BERMANT PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT TOWNSEND — The Port Townsend Film Festival is conducting its first telephone fundraising drive. The phone drive, which is to raise money for a matching grant, began Tuesday evening and continues through today. In February, an anonymous donor pledged to match up to $10,000 of money raised during the entire fundraising campaign, which ends May 1. In contrast with the fancy phone banks used by large charities, the film festival version consists of up

to nine board members occupying parts of the downtown office while using their individual cellphones to make pitches. At the end of the phone drive’s first night, the total raised was $3,685, said Janette Force, executive director of the film festival.

Uses of funds Force said money raised during the campaign will go toward replacing a computer server that has been in use since 1994, sponsoring film programs throughout the year and defraying some of the CHARLIE BERMANT/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS festival’s expenses. Participating in the Port Townsend Film Festival telephone fundraising drive are, from TURN TO FESTIVAL/A4 left, Rocky Friedman, Jane Champion, Kathleen Kler, Keven Elliff and Linda Yakush. 14706106

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INSIDE TODAY’S PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 97th year, 57th issue — 2 sections, 20 pages

BUSINESS CLASSIFIED COMICS COMMENTARY/LETTERS DEAR ABBY DEATHS HOROSCOPE MOVIES NATION/WORLD

B4 B7 B6 A7 B6 A6 B6 A6 A3

PUZZLES/GAMES B5, B8 B5 3RD AGE B1 SPORTS B12 WEATHER


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UpFront

THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Tundra

The Samurai of Puzzles

By Chad Carpenter

Copyright © 2013, Michael Mepham Editorial Services

www.peninsuladailynews.com This is a QR (Quick Response) code taking the user to the North Olympic Peninsula’s No. 1 website* — peninsuladailynews.com. The QR code can be scanned with a smartphone or tablet equipped with an app available for free from numerous sources. QR codes appearing in news articles or advertisements in the PDN can instantly direct the smartphone user to additional information on the web. *Source: Quantcast Inc.

PORT ANGELES main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 General information: 360-452-2345 Toll-free from Jefferson County and West End: 800-826-7714 Fax: 360-417-3521 Lobby hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday ■ See Commentary page for names, telephone numbers and email addresses of key executives and contact people. SEQUIM news office: 360-681-2390 147-B W. Washington St. Sequim, WA 98382 JEFFERSON COUNTY news office: 360-385-2335 1939 E. Sims Way Port Townsend, WA 98368

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Newsroom, sports CONTACTS! To report news: 360-417-3531, or call one of our local offices: Sequim, 360-681-2390; Jefferson County/Port Townsend, 360-385-2335; West End/Forks, 800-826-7714 Sports desk/reporting a sports score: 360-417-3525 Letters to Editor: 360-417-3527 Club news, “Seen Around” items, subjects not listed above: 360-417-3527 To purchase PDN photos: www.peninsuladailynews.com, click on “Photo Gallery.” Permission to reprint or reuse articles: 360-417-3530 To locate a recent article: 360-417-3527

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS (ISSN 1050-7000, USPS No. 438.580), continuing the Port Angeles Evening News (founded April 10, 1916) and The Daily News, is a locally operated member of Black Press Group Ltd./Sound Publishing Inc., published each morning Sunday through Friday at 305 W. First St., Port Angeles, WA 98362. POSTMASTER: Periodicals postage paid at Port Angeles, WA. Send address changes to Circulation Department, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Contents copyright © 2013, Peninsula Daily News MEMBER

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The Associated Press

Newsmakers Celebrity scoop ■ By The Associated Press

‘Rhoda’ star has terminal brain cancer VALERIE HARPER, WHO played Rhoda Morgenstern on television’s “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” and its spinoff, “Rhoda,” has been diagnosed with terminal brain cancer. People magazine reported on its website Wednesday that the 73-year-old actress received Harper the news Jan. 15. Tests revealed she has leptomeningeal carcinomatosis, a rare condition that occurs when cancer cells spread into the fluid-filled membrane surrounding the brain. The report says Harper’s doctors have said she has as few as three months to live. “I don’t think of dying,” Harper told the magazine in a cover interview. “I think of being here now.” Harper’s character, Rhoda, was one of television’s most beloved characters during the 1970s, and the tart-tongued, self-deprecating Rhoda made Harper a star. She won three consecutive Emmys (1971-1973) as supporting actress on “Mary” plus another for outstanding lead actress

Playboy for Israelis Israelis can now read Playboy “for the articles.” A U.S. emigre, Daniel Pomerantz, on Tuesday launched the first Hebrew language edition of the popular men’s magazine. It features Israeli models and THE ASSOCIATED PRESS articles by Israeli writers. It’s not clear how well the magazine will be received in the Holy Land, where religious sensitivities simmer under the surface, and observant Jews and Muslims live by strict modesty rules. for “Rhoda,” which ran from 1974-1978. Harper began show business as a dancer in several Broadway musicals, and worked in summer stock and with the Second City improv group. “I was a dancer, but I was always a little overweight,” she once told The Associated Press. “I’d say, ‘Hello, I’m Val-

erie Harper, and I’m overweight.’ I’d say it quickly before they could.” Accordingly, she played Rhoda at first as a plump, wisecracking contrast to slender, winsome Mary Richards. But as “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” evolved, Rhoda trimmed down, and her own brand of beauty was acknowledged.

Passings

TUESDAY’S QUESTION: Do you see foreign trade as an opportunity for America through increased U.S. exports or a threat to America because of foreign imports? Opportunity

28.5%

Threat

25.3%

Both Neither

39.6% 4.0%

Undecided 2.6% Total votes cast: 871 Vote on today’s question at www.peninsuladailynews.com NOTE: The Peninsula Poll is unscientific and reflects the opinions of only those peninsuladailynews.com users who chose to participate. The results cannot be assumed to represent the opinions of all users or the public as a whole.

Setting it Straight

By The Associated Press

ROY BROWN JR., 96, a car designer for Ford Motor whose signature creation, the supposedly futuristic but ultimately ill-fated Edsel, became a synonym for bold, bad ideas not long after it was introduced in 1957, died Feb. 24 in Michigan. Even as the Edsel, his most notable work, fell far short of sales goals, lost hundreds of mil- Mr. Brown lions of dol- in 1998 lars, became an enduring punch line and prompted an overseas transfer for its designer, Mr. Brown remained satisfied with it. “I’m proud of the car,” he told The Sun-Sentinel of Florida in 1985. “There is not a bad line on the car.” Many initial assessments agreed. But early praise and anticipation soon gave way to public mockery. Many people felt the Edsel’s indulgences — in chrome, size and sheer steel bulk — seemed out of touch by the time it appeared on the market during an economic downturn.

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS PENINSULA POLL

Others said the car was hurt by excessive expectations. The Edsel was out of production by the end of 1959 and would sell a little more than half of the 200,000 cars Ford projected.

_________

the band’s popularity exploded following Mr. Lee’s rousing performance of the song “I’m Going Home” at Woodstock in 1969.

Corrections and clarifications The Peninsula Daily News strives at all times for accuracy and fairness in articles, headlines and photographs. To correct an error or to clarify a news story, phone Executive Editor Rex Wilson at 360-4173530 or email rex.wilson@peninsuladailynews.com.

Peninsula Lookback From the pages of the PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

state Legislature would acquire right of way and Ray Long escaped unhurt after a compressed- complete engineering at a cost of $392,000. air tank at his Port The project then would Townsend automobile be turned over to the repair shop exploded. National Park Service, Long fled the shop a few which would build the road moments before the blast for $2.024 million, after when he heard suspicious which the state would drop noises from the tank. the state Highway 111 Considerable damage route from Race Streetwas done to Long’s shop. Mount Angeles Road. There was no one else in Also part of the overall the vicinity of the exploimprovement program: a sion. 100-site campground at Heart o’ the Hills, sched1963 (50 years ago) Seen Around uled to open this summer, Peninsula snapshots A proposed 4-mile park- Doerr said. way from Mount Angeles OLDER LADY 1988 (25 years ago) Road to the start of the INTENTLY playing soli5-year-old Hurricane Ridge Derby Days will be back taire at one of the demonRoad at Heart o’ the Hills in Port Angeles this year, stration computers in a in Olympic National Park but the annual festival will Sequim big-box store . . . would have numerous be a week shorter. WANTED! “Seen Around” effects and benefits to the Derby Days will become items. Send them to PDN News North Olympic Peninsula, a three-day festival the Desk, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles park Superintendent John week before the Port AngeWA 98362; fax 360-417-3521; or Doerr said. les Salmon Derby instead email news@peninsuladailynews. A proposal before the of the usual 10-day schedcom.

ALVIN LEE, 68, a British rock guitarist and founder of the band Ten Years After, has died. A statement posted on Mr. Lee’s official website said he died Wednesday unexpectedly from complications following a routine surgical procedure. It was not immediately clear where Mr. Lee died. The Nottingham, England-born guitarist founded Ten Years After in 1967, and

1938 (75 years ago)

ule of events. The festival has been haunted by a vacuum in top leadership when the president and several board members resigned. With little momentum, Derby Days organizers fell behind on work to build a parade float, crown a Derby Days queen and raise funds. This year’s abbreviated Derby Days will run Aug. 26-28.

Laugh Lines NORTH KOREA ANNOUNCED that its tourism has steadily increased over the last 10 years. You can tell they’re trying to boost tourism with their new slogan: “North Korea: You’ll Never Want to Leave Because We Won’t Let You.” Jimmy Kimmel

Looking Back From the files of The Associated Press

TODAY IS THURSDAY, March 7, the 66th day of 2013. There are 299 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: ■ On March 7, 1965, a march by civil rights demonstrators was broken up violently at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., by state troopers and a sheriff’s posse in what came to be known as “Bloody Sunday.” On this date: ■ In 1850, in a three-hour speech to the U.S. Senate, Daniel Webster of Massachusetts endorsed the Compromise of 1850 as a means of preserving the Union. ■ In 1912, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen arrived in Hobart, Australia, where he dispatched tele-

grams announcing his success in leading the first expedition to the South Pole the previous December. ■ In 1926, the first successful trans-Atlantic radio-telephone conversations took place between New York and London. ■ In 1936, Adolf Hitler ordered his troops to march into the Rhineland, thereby breaking the Treaty of Versailles and the Locarno Pact. ■ In 1945, during World War II, U.S. forces crossed the Rhine River at Remagen, Germany, using the damaged but still usable Ludendorff Bridge. ■ In 1960, Jack Paar returned as host of NBC’s “Tonight Show” nearly a month after walking off in a censorship dispute with

the network. ■ In 1975, the U.S. Senate revised its filibuster rule, allowing 60 senators to limit debate in most cases, instead of the previously required two-thirds of senators present. ■ In 1994, the Supreme Court, in Campbell v. Acuff-Rose Music Inc., unanimously ruled that a parody that pokes fun at an original work can be considered “fair use” that doesn’t require permission from the copyright holder. The ruling concerned a parody of the song “Pretty Woman” by the rap group 2 Live Crew. ■ Ten years ago: Virtually every musical on Broadway shut down as musicians went on strike,

and actors and stagehands said they wouldn’t cross their picket lines; the walkout lasted four days. ■ Five years ago: On the heels of a gloomy report that 63,000 jobs were lost in February 2008, President George W. Bush said “it’s clear our economy has slowed” as he tried to reassure an anxious public that the long-term outlook was good. ■ One year ago: President Barack Obama, speaking at a Daimler truck plant in Mount Holly, N.C., made his most urgent appeal to date for the nation to wean itself from oil, calling it a “fuel of the past” and demanding that the United States broaden its approach to energy.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, March 7, 2013 PAGE

A3 Briefly: Nation Wyoming police hold 2 suspects in triple slaying

‘Snowquester’ in D.C.

HAGERSTOWN, Md. — A winter storm marched into the Mid-Atlantic region Wednesday and dumped more than a foot of snow in some places, knocking out power to nearly 200,000 CLARK, Wyo. — The sagehomes and businesses. brush flats along the MontanaVirginia Gov. Bob McDonnell Wyoming border make it easy to spot strangers passing along the told state agencies to let bumpy dirt roads. So it was per- employees work from home. The streets in the nation’s haps no surprise when authoricapital were also quiet. ties announced a quick arrest The storm dubbed the “snowfollowing the triple slaying of a quester” — after the wonky woman and her parents. Yet even with a pair of teen- “sequester” term for $85 billion in federal budget cuts — did litage suspects in custody, resitle immediate harm to D.C., dents remain on edge. much like the budget reductions “Something like this just doesn’t happen here,” said Clark that have started to take effect. resident Robert Bushman. Abortion veto override “We’re all pretty shaken up.” Stephen Hammer, 19, and LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — The Tanner Vanpelt, 18, told investi- Arkansas House on Wednesday gators they stole a trove of voted to override Democratic handguns from a gun store in Gov. Mike Beebe’s veto of a bill Cody last week, planning to flee that would ban most abortions to Colorado to sell the weapons, from the 12th week of pregauthorities said Wednesday. nancy onward, setting the stage On Saturday, they took a for a certain court challenge. roommate’s car to Clark to steal A day after the Republicanan Audi SUV from a family led state Senate voted to overfriend of one of the defendants, ride Beebe’s veto, the GOP-conaccording to court documents trolled House voted 56-33 to do and Park County Sheriff Scott the same. Only a simple majorSteward. ity was needed in each chamber. The teens allegedly told The vote comes less than a authorities that after the friend week after the Legislature overargued with them, they shot rode the governor’s veto of a bill and killed Ildiko Freitas, 40, banning most abortions starting Janos Volgyesi, 69, and Hildein the 20th week of pregnancy. gard Volgyesi, 70. Abortion rights proponents Steward credited neighborly already have said they’ll sue. vigilance with the quick arrests Beebe warned lawmakers in the case, which came just a that both measures are likely to few miles from the shooting fail in court. The Associated Press scene.

U.S. House OKs bill preventing shutdown GOP measure gives Defense flexibility on spending cuts THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The Republican-controlled House approved legislation Wednesday to prevent a government shutdown March 27 and blunt the impact of newly imposed spending cuts on the Defense Department. The 267-151 vote sent the measure to the Senate, where Democrats hope to give additional Cabinet agencies similar flexibility in implementing their shares of the $85 billion in spending cuts required to take effect by the end of the budget year. Republicans said the measure was needed to keep the government operating smoothly after current funding expires. Democrats who opposed the measure protested embedded spending cuts and criticized Republicans for refusing to

replace some of them with tax loophole closings. Ironically, the measure underscored joint efforts by the Barack Obama administration and congressional Republicans to ease the impact of short-term spending cuts that kicked in with dire White House warnings.

Next clash: Medicare At the same time, both are eager to pocket the full savings for deficit reduction as they pivot to a new clash over Medicare next week, when House Republicans and Senate Democrats are expected to unveil rival budgets. The overall size of the cuts in the no-shutdown spending bill remains in place: $85 billion in reductions through the end of the budget year Sept. 30, half from defense and half from domestic

programs as diverse as education, parks and payments to doctors treating Medicare patients. But the legislation drafted by House Republicans also gives the Pentagon and the Veterans Affairs Department flexibility to allocate cuts that no agency currently has. Senate Democrats seem likely to agree to the flexibility if it can be expanded to include other agencies, according to several officials who described closed-door talks that also involved the White House. Among the candidates are the departments of Homeland Security, Transportation, Justice and State. The move marks a reversal for President Obama and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., both of whom had spoken dismissively of Republican plans for flexibility. “The problem is when you’re cutting $85 billion in seven months, which represents over a 10 percent cut in the defense budget in seven months, there’s no smart way to do that,” the president said Feb. 26.

Briefly: World Peacekeepers being detained on Golan Heights UNITED NATIONS — A group of armed fighters linked to the Syrian opposition detained more than 20 U.N. peacekeepers Wednesday in the increasingly volatile zone separating Israeli and Syrian troops on the Golan Heights. The U.N. Security Council demanded their immediate and unconditional release. The capture of the peacekeepers marked a new escalation in the spillover of Syria’s civil war, now entering its third year. It followed the Feb. 25 announcement that a member of the peacekeeping force was unaccounted for. The U.N. said the peacekeeping member, who has not been identified, is still missing. Russia’s U.N. Ambassador Vitaly Churkin, the current Security Council president, said talks are under way between U.N. officials from the peacekeeping force, known as UNDOF, and the captors.

Conclave blackout VATICAN CITY — In the end, American-style transparency was no match for the Vatican’s obsession with secrecy. Cardinals attending closeddoor discussions ahead of the conclave to elect the next pope imposed a media blackout Wednesday, forcing the cancellation of the popular daily press

briefings by U.S. cardinals that had provided crucial insights into the deliberations. The official reason for the blackout was that some details of the secret discussions about the problems in the church appeared in the Italian newspaper La Stampa. But speculation mounted that the underlying aim of the blackout was to silence the Americans, who have been vocal in their calls for disclosure about allegations of corruption and dysfunction in the Holy See’s governance before they enter the conclave to elect a successor to Benedict XVI.

Real IRA member killed DUBLIN — Police said a member of an Irish Republican Army splinter group involved in a bloody feud with Dublin drug dealers was killed in an ambush outside a rural Irish pub. Peter Butterly was shot in the head and body Wednesday outside the Huntsman Inn near the village of Gormanston. Witnesses said Butterly had arrived for a meeting and was shot as he walked toward the car containing the gunman. Irish authorities have been seeking to convict Butterly for Real IRA activities since his 2010 arrest in connection with the discovery of an arms dump containing explosives, detonators, guns and ammunition. Police said they arrested four men inside the suspected getaway car, found a gun inside and arrested a fifth man nearby. The Associated Press

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A woman holds a newspaper with the headline in Spanish “He’s left us” as she watches Venezuela’s late President Hugo Chavez’s coffin pass by in Caracas on Wednesday.

Chavez’s coffin paraded as Venezuelans ready for vote THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

CARACAS, Venezuela — Weeping and shouting, a sea of Hugo Chavez’s supporters paraded his coffin through the streets of Caracas on Wednesday in an emotional outpouring that could help his deputy win an election and keep his self-styled socialist revolution alive. Hundreds of thousands of “Chavistas” marched behind a hearse carrying the remains of the flamboyant and outspoken president, draped in Venezuela’s blue, red and yellow national flag. Avenues resounded with chants of “Chavez lives! The fight goes on!” as supporters showered flowers onto the coffin and jostled

Quick Read

to touch it. Ending one of Latin America’s most remarkable populist rules, Chavez died on Tuesday at age 58 after a two-year battle with cancer that was first detected in his pelvis. His body will lie in state at a military academy until his state funeral on Friday. The future of Chavez’s socialist policies, which won him the adoration of poor Venezuelans but infuriated opponents who denounced him as a dictator, now rests on the shoulders of Vice President Nicolas Maduro, the man he tapped to succeed him. Maduro, a 50-year-old former bus driver and now interim president, will probably face Henrique

Capriles, the centrist opposition governor of Miranda state, in an election now due within weeks in the OPEC nation with the world’s largest oil reserves. One recent opinion poll gave Maduro a strong lead over Capriles, in part because he has received Chavez’s blessing as his heir apparent, and he is likely to benefit from the surge of emotion following the president’s death. Authorities said the vote would be called within 30 days, as stipulated by the constitution, but did not specify the date. The tall, mustachioed Maduro has long been a close ally of Chavez. He pledged to continue his legacy.

. . . more news to start your day

West: California nurse is on leave who denied CPR

Nation: Ga. airport worker turns in $7,000 in lost cash

Nation: New TSA rules on knives upset 9/11 kin

World: Ivory trade nations face threat of sanctions

RELATIVES OF LORRAINE Bayless, 87, who died after a nurse at her retirement home refused a 9-1-1 dispatcher’s pleas to perform CPR, said Bayless’ wishes were to die naturally. Bayless’ death last week at Glendale Gardens, a Bakersfield independent living facility, prompted outrage after a recording of the 7-minute 9-1-1 call was released. Brookdale Senior Living, which owns the facility, initially said its employee acted correctly by waiting for emergency personnel. But late Tuesday it said she misinterpreted the company’s guidelines and was now on voluntary leave while the case is investigated.

A PART-TIME PARKING deck worker at Atlanta’s airport said she never thought about keeping the envelope with $7,000 in cash she found on a curb outside the international terminal. Pamela North Holloway said she watched her supervisor count the money and call Atlanta police to pick it up. A police report showed the envelope contained 70 $100 bills. Police said an Alabama podiatrist who was on his way to Costa Rica called police to see if anyone had turned in the money. Police said he was able to identify specific writing on the envelope and how the money was wrapped.

SOME FAMILY MEMBERS of Sept. 11 terror victims are angry over new flight-safety rules that will permit small knives on planes. The head of the Transportation Security Administration said Tuesday that air passengers will now be allowed to carry folding knives with blades that are 2.36 inches or less. The rules go into effect next month. They will also permit souvenir baseball bats, golf clubs and other sports equipment. Two widows of 9/11 victims said small pocketknives can be just as lethal as the box cutters used by the terrorists. Box cutters are still banned.

TOP CONSERVATION GROUPS warned Wednesday that the illegal ivory trade is hastening the decline of Africa’s endangered elephant population and said they are ready to punish nations lax in fighting the problem. “Globally, illegal ivory trade activity has more than doubled since 2007 and is now over three times larger than it was in 1998,” said a report issued in Bangkok at a meeting of CITES, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species. CITES has put three African and five Asian nations on notice to come up with a plan of action for curbing the trade across and within their borders.


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THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 2013 — (J)

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Seawall part of PA bluff-stabilization talks the portion of bluff that holds back another pocket of buried waste, called the valley cell. “Remember, when we remove the seawall, we’re moving back into [an] imminent threat,” Bourque said. “That valley cell is staring right at us.” Bourque said the landfill project also will include placing logs and woody debris at the mouth of Dry Creek just west of the landfill to keep the creek from shifting to the point that it weakens the west bluff.

BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

PORT ANGELES — Immediate efforts to deal with a failing bluff abutting Port Angeles’ landfill will not include the removal of a seawall at its base, though the structure’s years may be numbered. Several members of the City Council and the public made clear during discussions on the city’s landfill bluff-stabilization project at Tuesday’s council meeting that they thought the 7-year-old concrete structure eventually should be torn out. “I guess the idea of a $1.4 million Band-Aid [to buttress the seawall] is really hard for me to accept,” City Councilwoman Brooke Nelson said.

Seawall removal

No action taken Council members took no action regarding the project at the meeting. Tom Bourque of Seattlebased engineering firm Herrera Environmental Consultants said the firm had gathered information about wave action and erosion at the bluff shoreline that would allow the city to consider more expensive options, such as removing the seawall, over the next two decades. “We’re trying to use that information to be able to protect the landfill for a long enough time during a [funding]-capacity-building time for the city,” Bourque said. Herrera has estimated that removing the entire

KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Exposed trash protrudes last June from the top of a bluff where erosion has undercut a portion of the former Port Angeles landfill. seawall would cost between $30 million and $44 million. The present landfill project, if approved, would fortify the ends of the seawall and remove roughly half of the accumulated waste in the section of city landfill most threatened by the failing 135-foot bluff. The project is intended to keep decades of accumulated city waste at the closed landfill at the west end of 18th Street from falling down that bluff into the Strait of Juan de Fuca. At the meeting, Bourque

said Herrera’s most recent cost estimates put the project’s price tag at $15.4 million. Roughly $14 million would be needed to move 265,000 cubic yards of garbage from west cell 304, the landfill section most in danger of falling into the Strait of Juan de Fuca, to a portion of the non-operating landfill farther south from the bluff, Bourque explained. “[This is] a managed pullback [of garbage],” Bourque said. “This is no doubt the most stable and least risk to the city.”

The remaining $1.4 million would go toward strengthening the ends of the existing seawall with large rocks and poured-concrete structures called Core-Locs. Along with Nelson, Councilman Max Mania also supported eventually removing the wall, though he wanted more information on the Core-Locs. “I favor taking the wall out, but I would want to know some sort of background on where the CoreLocs were used before,” Mania said. Support for seawall

removal also came from the public, with Darryl Wood, chairman of the Olympic Peninsula chapter of the Surfrider Foundation, and Port Angeles resident Jim Waddell, a civil engineer retired from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, urging the move. “First of all, I would say your seawall is a problem,” Waddell said. “It’s eventually going to have to go.” Bourque said seawall removal is a possibility in the long term but added that the wall is still buttressing

Nicole Harris, a Western Washington University student and nearshore intern with the city-based Coastal Watershed Institute, also supported seawall removal and said the landfill project should be considered in the larger framework of the Elwha River dams-removal and restoration project. She pledged the help of CWI and the Elwha Nearshore Consortium, a CWIcoordinated group of scientists studying the Elwha restoration, in monitoring how Elwha sediment will affect the shoreline and supported the creation of a technical advisory body that would provide input in this regard. City Public Works Director Glenn Cutler said the landfill issue will be discussed next at the city’s Utility Advisory Committee meeting at 3 p.m. Tuesday in the Jack Pittis Conference Room at City Hall, 321 E. Fifth St.

Landfill Postal: Cut based on workload Festival CONTINUED FROM A1 Calls requesting comment from the paper mill company Wednesday were not returned. Company representatives previously have argued that the regulations and processes have not changed, so the permit should be renewed. If the Pollution Control Hearings Board rules in the company’s favor, it will instruct Jefferson County to grant the permit. If the ruling is upheld, the denial of the permit will stand, though either side could ask the Superior Court for reconsideration. Until the ruling, the company will continue operation under the inert permit, Keefer said. Port Townsend Paper — the county’s largest private employer, with nearly 300 workers — requested in September an extension of its inert-waste permit, which had been in effect since 1989. The county health department said Oct. 17 that the company should be required to attain a more stringent limited-use permit. The mill appealed the decision Oct. 22, triggering a Nov. 27 review. Dr. Tom Locke, public health officer for Jefferson and Clallam counties, issued a denial of the appeal Dec. 3. The paper company filed its appeal to the Pollution Control Hearings Board in January.

________ Jefferson County Editor Charlie Bermant can be reached at 360385-2335 or at charlie.bermant@ peninsuladailynews.com.

CONTINUED FROM A1 kins said, adding that while the data gathered at The Postal Service dis- the meeting would be contributed a survey earlier sidered, the decision to cut that asked postal patrons back hours already was to choose from one of four made. “The option we would options: decrease daily hours, close the post office like, of course, is to leave it and provide services the way it is,” said Marrowthrough carriers, farm out stone resident Chip Hoins. “You look around here, the operation of the post office to a private contrac- and there are a lot of peotor or close the post office ple who can’t operate with and route service to that six-hour window of opportunity; they work another post office. Jenkins said 257 people eight, 10, 12 hours a day, responded to the survey in and it’s very difficult for Nordland, with 93 percent them to get here during of respondents favoring the those hours.” cutback in hours out of the Online sources choices offered. After the survey was Postal customers can distributed, residents compensate for the lost expressed disappointment hours with the use of online that the option to keep the sources, Jenkins said, addcurrent hours was not a ing that postage can be choice and collected signa- printed and mail delivery tures of more than 400 who scheduled on home comwant the hours to stay the puters. same. Said resident Lois That won’t happen, Jen- Twelves: “There are a lot of

people here who are in their 80s and 90s and find it very difficult to use a computer. “We have nothing to do but go to the post office for help,” she added. Several people asked Jenkins why the Postal Service would cut hours in Nordland when it is profitable.

Workload vs. revenue

Jefferson County Commissioner David Sullivan approached Jenkins after the meeting with an offer to assemble a citizen committee that could develop “a Nordland-specific solution” to the cuts. “There is room to do that. This is a very creative community, and they will work together to protect what they care about,” Sullivan said. “They care about this store,” he added. “It’s a critical part of this community that is a critical part of island life.” Sullivan said he offered to help Jenkins get people together, work out answers to people’s questions and come up with a solution. “I hope she gets back to me on this,” Sullivan said.

Jenkins said the decision to cut hours was based on workload rather than revenue. She could not supply specific workload statistics for the Nordland post office. “Like many businesses today, the post office is stressed,” Jenkins said. “There is not just one solution, and to keep via________ ble, we have decided to realign retail hours, and Jefferson County Editor Charlie Nordland is one place Bermant can be reached at 360where we have decided to 385-2335 or at charlie.bermant@ do this.” peninsuladailynews.com.

Mill stack razing delayed BY PAUL GOTTLIEB PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

KEITH THORPE/ PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

The chimney stack of the former PenPly mill in Port Angeles.

PORT ANGELES — Demolition of a 175-foot chimney stack that towers over the city has been delayed for two weeks. The project, set for March 25, has been moved to April 8 because of recent inclement weather and the lengthy time it is taking to prepare the stack for its demise, the Port of Port Angeles announced this week. Meanwhile, port officials

are continuing to make plans for a public event the day the stack comes down to commemorate the site’s long history as a mill, port Director of Engineering Chris Hartman said Wednesday.

Public event for blast “We are planning a public event for the actual blasting of the stack,” Hartman said. “We’re just looking for a safe public place to put people.”

CONTINUED FROM A1 “The festival does not pay for itself,” Force said. “No matter how many passes or standing-roomonly tickets we sell, we still need to pay for licensing screening fees, which can be really expensive.” Force explained the reason that the donor, like many large-amount contributors, will not be identified. “People who make a significant contribution want to stay anonymous, not because they are hounded by other fundraisers, but because they don’t want to disrespect those groups that they don’t support,” Force said.

New features Force said the film festival website at www.ptfilm fest.com contains several new features, including a short film by Jane Champion and interviews of the festival’s 2012 participants assembled and edited by Chimacum High School students. “When you watch these interviews, you see how important it can be to talk to the actual filmmakers,” Force said. Force said 126 films from 18 countries have been submitted for consideration at this year’s festival, which takes place from Sept. 20-22. For more information, visit the website or phone 360-379-1333.

They also are mulling placement of a permanent display, such as a kiosk or a piece of mill equipment — for instance, a 13-ton mill press that remains on the property, Hartman said. The chimney stack on the port-owned land at 439 Marine Drive will be torn down as part of the $1.6 million demolition of the former Peninsula Plywood site, ________ which closed in December Jefferson County Editor Charlie 2011 and which had been Bermant can be reached at 360named for the original mill 385-2335 or at charlie.bermant@ peninsuladailynews.com. built on the site in 1941.

Briefly . . . Bryan, is hearing matters in Alaska. Emily Langlie, U.S. Attorney’s Office spokeswoman, said the restitution hearing will be rescheduled for next week. A date and time have TACOMA — A restitunot been set. tion hearing for a Brinnon Johnston received a oneman charged with poaching year prison sentence in more than 100 trees from Olympic National Forest has December for the theft of 102 fir, cedar and maple been postponed. Reid B. Johnston, 41, was trees in the Rocky Brook area of the Dosewallips scheduled to appear in feddrainage between May 2009 eral court in Tacoma today, and January 2010. but the judge, Robert J.

Tree poaching restitution hearing delay

Bill to cut justices OLYMPIA — Still stinging from a Supreme Court ruling last week that overturned tax-increase constraints on the Legislature, three Republican senators have introduced a bill seeking to cut the high court by four justices. The measure, introduced Wednesday, would require a public meeting for the current nine justices to draw straws. The four that draw the shortest straws “shall be

terminated, and those judges shall not serve the remainder of their respective unexpired terms.” Any savings to the state would be used to fund basic education. That section is a reference to the court’s order that the Legislature is not fulfilling its constitutional duty to pay for education in the state. Republican Sen. Michael Baumgartner of Spokane insists it’s not a joke, saying that as the Legislature looks to make cuts in other areas

of state government, “why should the judiciary be exempt?”

Care home fined PUYALLUP — The state Department of Social and Health Services has fined the operator of an adult-care home in Puyallup for unsanitary conditions. The department said an inspector was overwhelmed by the odor of urine in August 2011 when visiting the South View Adult Care

home, where nine dogs were kept with three patients. The News Tribune reported that the fine could be waived if operator Wendy Bell installs new flooring. The Associated Press

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 2013

A5

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A6

PeninsulaNorthwest

THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sequim wastewater reuse plan gains foothold as diggers prep Excavation starts Friday

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BY JOE SMILLIE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM –– Workers from Kamin Excavation of Shelton have erected a silt fence around the northwest corner of the Water Reuse Demonstration Site north of Carrie Blake Park in preparation for starting a $273,790 project to use treated wastewater to recharge groundwater supplies. Excavators will start digging Friday, Dave Kamin, owner of Kamin Excavating, said Wednesday. The firm is digging holes to create an infiltration JOE SMILLIE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS basin facility at the park. Dave Kamin, owner of Kamin Construction, puts up silt fence at Sequim’s

Pipes, sewer water The basin will include underground pipes that will release reclaimed sewer water, treated to a Class A status, into the soil. Construction crews will work from 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. Pedestrian traffic

onstruction crews will work from 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. Pedestrian traffic will be limited around the construction area.

Department of Ecology. Overall, the project will increase the fish pond in the park by three times and will create 1.4 acres of basins for infiltration. Haines said the project is designed to show groundwater can be recharged at various spots in the city. It is also part of a plan to reuse the reclaimed wastewater to hold down the amount of irrigation water the city needs. Eventually, city officials Water Reuse Demonstration Site north of Carrie Blake Park. Kamin’s hope, reclaimed water will crews will build a basin and piping to infiltrate the city’s treated run alongside water and wastewater into the aquifer below. sewer lines so residents can will be limited around the through the soil into during construction, which use the wastewater for irrigroundwater. construction area. should be finished by the gation. ________ A monitoring well also end of June. The goal, according to city Public Works Director will be drilled to allow offiThe project is part of a Sequim-Dungeness Valley EdiPaul Haines, is to recharge cials to test the water. $1 million water reuse dem- tor Joe Smillie can be reached at Kamin said five or six onstration funded through 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, or at the aquifer by filtering excess reclaimed water workers will be employed a grant from the state jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com.

101 shut briefly for line snag PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM –– U.S. Highway 101 traffic was stopped in both directions for about a half-hour Wednesday morning after a delivery truck clipped a sagging power line while dropping off a shipment at a business on the highway. Eastbound traffic was delayed another 10 minutes as crews cleared the Clallam County Public Utility District power line from the road. No injuries or damages were reported, said Trooper Russ Winger, State Patrol spokesman. Michael Howe, the PUD’s executive communications coordinator, said the line was not transmitting electricity when it was struck and did not disrupt service. Contractors are posting new power lines and poles south of the current system to accommodate the state Department of Transportation’s widening of 101 between Kitchen-Dick and Shore roads. Crews currently are clearing ground off the highway’s south shoulder of the road in preparation for another travel lane.

Get into a sweat on the dance floor THE DAYS ARE getting longer and warmer, so you’ll want to prepare for the great outdoors. What better way to get in shape than to get out and dance, move to the groove, trip the light fantastic? In other words, succumb to your muse, be it jazz, country, rock or blues.

Port Angeles ■ Today at Castaways Restaurant and Night Club, 1213 Marine Drive, Jerry’s Country Jam is hosted by Classic Country with Terry Roszatycki, Jim Rosand and Jerry Robinson from 5 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. On Saturday, get in shape for spring and summer by dancing to the Jimmy Hoffman Band from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. ■ Today, kick off your weekend at the Junction Roadhouse, 242701 U.S. Highway 101, with multiinstrumentalist Ches Ferguson from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. On Friday, boogie down to Washington Blues Society-nominated Best Traditional Blues Set John “Scooch” Cugno and the Delta 88 Revival band from 8 p.m. to midnight. Cover. Call All Points Charters

■ On Saturday, Inside Defiance, This Ends Now and Mydlyfe, Cry& Tours John sys, Fluffy & D-ray at 360Nelson 775-9128 (MCFD) rock the Coo Coo Nest, 1017 E. First St., at or 360460-7131 10 p.m. ■ On Friday, Les Wamfor a free boldt and Olde Tyme ride out and back. Country play at the Fairmount Restaurant, 1127 On W. U.S. Highway 101, from Wednes6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. day, On Sunday, join the Jason country jam from 5 p.m. Mogi and Paul to 7:30 p.m. On Wednesday, Dave Stehr-Green entertain as and Rosalie Secord are on Deadwood Experiment the road to Lincoln City, from 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Ore., but the Luck of the ■ On Friday at Bar Draw Band has awardN9ne, 229 W. First St., 2Far (2nd Friday Art Rock) winning Wanda Bumgarner stepping in from presents the bluegrass of 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Special Loose Gravel, coming guests this week are Ma from Forks, at 8 p.m. $3 cover. Sarah Tucker is the and Pa Crockpot. ■ Every Tuesday at the artist in residence. Port Angeles Senior On Saturday, dance to Center, 328 E. Seventh Eureka with Classic Case members from 9 p.m. St., the Port Angeles Senior Swingers present Wally’s to 1 a.m. $3 cover. Boys playing ballroom ■ On Friday at the dance favorites from Barhop Brewery, 124 Railroad Ave., the Discov- 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. $5 cover; first-timers free. ery Bay Pirates will ■ On Friday and Saturregale you with Irish pub day at Dupuis Restausongs and sea chanteys rant, 256861 U.S. Highway from 9 p.m. to midnight. 101, Bob and Dave play ■ On Saturday at blues from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Elliott’s Antique Emporium, 135 E. First St., Forks Bruce and Roma, aka Hawaii Amor, sing from ■ On Friday, chase your 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. winter blues away by spending some time with Therapy Session in a free concert at Peninsula College’s Forks Extension site, 71 S. Forks Ave., at life at 3 p.m. Friday at the 7 p.m. Port Angeles Yacht Club, 1305 Marine Drive. Private Sequim and Blyn burial at Mount Angeles ■ On Friday at the Memorial Park in Port Oasis Bar and Grill, 301 Angeles. Olympic Cremation Association, Port Angeles, is in charge of arrangements.

LIVE MUSIC

Death Notices Emily J. Schoettler June 15, 1929 — Feb. 27, 2013

Port Angeles resident Emily J. Schoettler died of a stroke-related illness at Olympic Medical Center. She was 83. Services: Celebration of

Remembering a Lifetime ■ Death and Memorial Notice obituaries chronicle a deceased’s life, either in the family’s own words or as written by the PDN staff from information provided by survivors. These notices appear at a nominal cost according to the length of the obituary. Photos and ornamental insignia are welcome. Call 360-452-8435 Monday through Friday for information and assistance and to arrange publication. A convenient form to guide you is available at area mortuaries or by downloading at www. peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” ■ Death Notices, in which summary information about the deceased, including service information and mortuary, appears once at no charge. No biographical or family information or photo is included. A form for death notices appears at www. peninsuladailynews.com under “Obituary Forms.” For further information, call 360-417-3527.

E. Washington St., dance to the Dixieland jazz of the Dukes of Dabob at 5:30 p.m. On Saturday, the Olympic Express Big Band will put spring in your step from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. On Wednesday, Final Approach plays boomer music from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. ■ On Saturday at Wind Rose Cellars, 143 W. Washington St., Gerald Braude performs acoustic jazz from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■ It’s “All The Buzz” Wednesday at the Sequim Senior Activity Center, 921 E. Hammond St., with Victor hosting the open mic from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ■ Today in Club Seven lounge at 7 Cedars Casino, Blyn, it’s audition night, with three groups performing from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. All Points Charters & Tours is offering free transportation from Port Angeles and Sequim. (See Port Angeles entry for contact details.) On Friday, dance to the rock, pop and hip-hop of Sway from 8 p.m. to midnight. On Saturday, dance to the ’70s through today’s rock with Triple Shot from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. On Sunday, dance to and reminisce in a special Heart by Heart tribute to Seattle rockers Heart from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Port Townsend ■ Today at The Upstage, 923 Washington

Solution to Puzzle on B5

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St., premier slide guitarist Roy Rogers and the Delta Rhythm Kings stop by on their international tour at 7:30 p.m. $25 cover. On Friday, an International Women’s Day concert features Aimee Ringle and Aimee Kelley (The Aimees) and the Jenny Davis Trio and friends. $10 suggested donation. On Saturday, the Hawaiian Slack Key Guitar Festival features LT Smooth, Stephen Inglis, Bobby Moderow, Walter Keale and Paul Togioka at 7:30 p.m. $25 in advance. On Wednesday, genrejumping finger-style guitarist Brooks Robertson performs at 7:30 p.m. Phone 360-385-2216 for details and reservations. ■ On Friday at Sirens Pub, 823 Water St., catch JB and his reggae band, Groove Fiery, at 10 p.m. $5 cover. On Saturday, folk musician Robert Sarazin Blake performs elements of Celtic, modern punk rock, country and blues at 10 p.m. $7 cover. ■ On Friday at the Uptown Pub and Grill, 1016 Lawrence St., Meredith sings a set of soulful originals and covers from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■ Today, Steve Grandinetti plays guitar at the Owl Sprit Cafe, 218 Polk St., from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■ Today, classical guitarist Trevor Hanson plays at Ichikawa Japanese Cuisine, 1208 Water St., from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. ■ Every Monday, Trevor Hanson plays at Alchemy, 842 Washington St., from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ■ On Thursdays and Fridays, Steve Grandinetti plays and sings at the Northwest Maritime Center Cafe, 431 Water St., from noon till 2 p.m.

High notes ■ On Saturday, Locos Only opens for Massy Ferguson (the band, not the tractor) for the fifth annual Five Acre School Barn Dance fundraiser in the Big Barn Farm on Kitchen-Dick Road, Sequim, from 5 p.m. to 11 p.m. Ages 21 and older only. $15 cover. ■ On Saturday, Port Townsend’s Quimper Grange, 1219 Corona St., hosts the Second Saturday Contra Dance, featuring Wild Phil and the Buffalo Gals with caller Joe Michaels from 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. $6 cover; 3 to 18 years old, $3. ■ On Saturday, Washington Old Time Fiddlers District 15 meets at the Sequim Prairie Grange on Macleay Road. All-player jams begin at noon in the main and side rooms, and onstage performances begin at 2:30 p.m. Listeners, dancers and acoustic instrumentalists are welcome. Admission is by donation. For more information visit www.d15.wotfa.org. ■ On Tuesday, the Peninsula College Jazz Ensemble, directed by Peninsula College’s David P. Jones, performs its annual winter concert at 7 p.m. in the Maier Performance Hall, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., Port Angeles.

________ John Nelson is a self-styled music lover and compulsive night owl who believes in “KLMA — Keep Live Music Alive” on the North Olympic Peninsula. His column, Live Music, appears every Thursday. Are you performing in or promoting a live music gig? Contact John by phoning 360-565-1139 or emailing news@peninsuladaily news.com, with John Nelson in the subject line. And note: Nelson’s deadline is Monday at 5 p.m. preceding Thursday’s column. Also, check out “Nightlife,” a listing of entertainment at nightspots across the Peninsula, in Friday’s Peninsula Spotlight magazine.

Now Showing ■ Deer Park Cinema,

Port Angeles (360-4527176) “A Good Day to Die Hard” (R) “Identity Thief” (R) “Jack the Giant Slayer” (PG-13) “Safe Haven” (PG-13) “The Impossible” (PG-13)

■ Lincoln Theater, Port

Angeles (360-457-7997) “21 & Over” (R) “Snitch” (R)

“The Last Exorcism: Part II” (PG-13)

■ The Rose Theatre,

Port Townsend (360385-1089) “Amour” (PG-13) “Quartet” (PG-13)

■ Uptown Theatre, Port

Townsend (360-385-3883) “Jack the Giant Slayer” (PG-13)


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, March 7, 2013 PAGE

A7

Wasting away in Sequesterville THE BROADWAY MUSICAL “Annie” is enjoying another revival on Broadway. The show opened during Cal the Carter administration Thomas when America was in need of some optimism. “The sun’ll come out tomorrow,” sang Annie, and with the election of Ronald Reagan in 1980, for a while, it did. Now we’re back in “Hooverville,” the name given to shanty towns that popped up during the Great Depression. It isn’t that bad yet, though the Obama administration is forecasting gloom and doom if Republicans don’t cave on another tax increase. “We’d like to thank you Herbert Hoover for really showing us the way,” sang the fictional residents of “Hooverville” in “Annie.” Now, I think we need an updated song that reflects what this administration has given us

and so I offer these original lyrics is about delivering the House of Representatives to Democrats in to be sung to the tune of “Mar2014. garitaville.” The Washington Post last All together now: week exposed that strategy. “Obama, fresh off his NovemMillions on food stamps ber re-election,” writes the Post, Finding jobs? No chance Government spending has put “began almost at once executing plans to win back the House in us in hock 2014, which he and his advisers Taxing and spending believe will be crucial to the outWithout any ending If we go on like this we’ll all be come of his second term and to his legacy as president. in shock. “He is doing so by trying to articulate for the American elecWasting away today in new torate his own feelings — an Sequesterville Searching for some honest pols exasperation with an opposition party that blocks even the most in D.C. politically popular elements of Some people claim that just his agenda.” one party’s to blame Furloughing people from govBut I know the real problem is ernment jobs is part of the prowe. cess, but unnecessary. According to projections from Yes, the real problem is that too many of us send these politi- the Congressional Budget Office, tax revenue could hit $2.7 trillion cians from different parties to in 2013. Washington, only to then comGovernment doesn’t lack reveplain about the gridlock. nue. Government lacks restraint. It’s because too many of us On Monday, the first regular haven’t made up our minds what we want government to be, what workday under sequestration, federal agencies posted more we should expect from it and, than 400 job ads. more importantly, what we Homeland Security Secretary should expect from ourselves. The entire sequester scenario Janet Napolitano is predicting

Peninsula Voices dren, or just let them watch I must reply to the letter television because we’re to tired or uninterested? “Evil Movies” [Peninsula Are we involved in our Voices, March 3]. The First Amendment is children’s lives, or do we leave that up to others? No. 1 for a reason. People influence the Free speech is the bedmedia — be it movies, rock of our nation. Without games, print or other forms free speech we have nothing. No free press, to let us — with our dollars. What we buy determines what is know when the governon the market. ment is up to no good. Don’t blame the media No right to write letters for what’s available. Look to the editor that question in the mirror. decisions, policies and other If we don’t or won’t buy actions of those we elect to it, it won’t be produced; a represent us. simple but true fact of ecoThe First Amendment nomic life. isn’t the problem. Dennis R. Bertaud, The problem is lack of Sequim parental control over what we allow our children to Who cares? watch on TV, see at the movies, read in books and When I read the letter magazines or text, twitter [“Obama’s Secrets?”, Peninor do on a computer. sula Voices, March 6] concerning the “secrets” of the Do we read to our chil-

First Amendment

long lines at major airports due to anticipated furloughs. Yet, according to CNS News, the Transportation Security Administration spent $50 million late last month on new uniforms, some of which will be manufactured in Mexico. The government is not so broke that it can’t find $250 million in aid to send to Egypt. Jim McElhatton of The Washington Times discovered that federal purchasing records that show “the Environmental Protection Agency spent nearly $40,000 on a portrait of Administrator Lisa P. Jackson, while a painting of Air Force Secretary Michael B. Donley will cost $41,200. . . . “The price tag for a 3-by-4-foot oil portrait of Agriculture Department Secretary Thomas J. Vilsack: $22,500.” In a digital age when photographs can be made to look like oil paintings, the government could have saved a lot of money by taking a high-resolution picture of these “public servants,” or even better, asking them to pay for their own portraits. Voters had better pay attention to this stuff, otherwise liberal politicians will cause them

OUR READERS’

to fall for more lies. Remember the judge and jury in the musical “Chicago”? Shyster lawyer Billy Flynn explained how to win them over, singing: Give ’em the old razzle dazzle Razzle Dazzle ’em. Give ’em an act with lots of flash in it And the reaction will be passionate Give ’em the old hocus pocus Bead and feather ’em How can they see with sequins in their eyes? Razzle dazzle them and they’ll never catch wise. Thus ends this mixed musical metaphor tribute to the phoniness that consumes Washington, D.C., as we waste away in Sequesterville.

________ Cal Thomas is a Fox TV network commentator and syndicated newspaper columnist. His column appears every Thursday. Thomas can be reached at tmseditors@tribune.com or by U.S. mail to Tribune Media Services, 2225 Kenmore Ave., Suite 114, Buffalo, NY 14207.

LETTERS, FAXES AND EMAIL

president, I had but one question myself: Who cares? Surely there are more pressing matters in our lives than finding out how the president paid for his tuition at Harvard Law School. I am the first to admit that I thought about several of these questions (for all of two or three minutes) several years ago during the 2008 presidential campaign, but haven’t given any of them a second thought since then, and the letter writer should do the same. The sun will still rise and the world will still be revolving if some people stop obsessing about such trivial matters and get on with their lives. Alan Cummings, Port Angeles

Not enough droning on about drones YOU COULD SAY that a filibuster occurs when a senator drones on and on. The problem with the U.S. Senate was that there were too few senators speaking about Amy drones this week. Goodman President Obama’s controversial nomination of John Brennan as director of the Central Intelligence Agency was held up Wednesday afternoon by a Senate filibuster. The reason: Brennan’s role in targeted killings by drones, and President Obama’s presumed authority to kill U.S. citizens, without any due process, if they pose an “imminent threat.” The effort was led by tea party Republican Rand Paul of Kentucky, joined by several of his Republican colleagues. Among the Democrats, at the time of this writing, only Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon had joined in the genuine, old-fashioned “talking filibuster,” wherein the

activities of the Senate floor are held up by a senator’s speech. Members of Congress, tasked with oversight of intelligence and military matters, have repeatedly demanded the memoranda from the White House detailing the legal basis for the drone program, only to be repeatedly denied. The nomination of Brennan has opened up the debate, forcing the Obama administration to make nominal gestures of compliance. The answers so far have not satisfied Sen. Paul. Nearing hour six of his filibuster, Paul admitted: “I can’t ultimately stop the nomination, but what I can do is try to draw attention to this and try to get an answer . . . that would be something if we could get an answer from the president . . . if he would say explicitly that noncombatants in America won’t be killed by drones. “The reason it has to be answered is because our foreign drone strike program does kill noncombatants. “They may argue that they are conspiring or they may someday be combatants, but if that is the same standard that we are

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going to use in the United States, it is a far different country than I know about.” The issue of extrajudicial execution of U.S. citizens — Brennan whether on U.S. soil or elsewhere — is clearly vital. But also important is the U.S. government’s now-seemingly routine killing of civilians around the world, whether by drone strikes, night raids conducted by special operations forces or other lethal means. Paul’s filibuster followed a curious route, including references to Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, and quotes from noted progressive, constitutional attorney and Guardian columnist Glenn Greenwald and blogger Kevin Gosztala of Firedoglake. U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder sent a letter to Paul on Monday, writing: “It is possible, I suppose, to imagine an extraordinary circumstance in which it would be necessary and appropriate under

the Constitution and applicable laws of the United States for the president to authorize the military to use lethal force within the territory of the United States.” Holder noted that Paul’s question was “entirely hypothetical.” So, on the Senate floor, Paul brought up the case of two actual U.S. citizens killed by drone strikes, Anwar al-Awlaki and his son, Abdulrahman. Anwar al-Awlaki was killed by a U.S. drone strike in Yemen on Sept. 30, 2011. Two weeks later, also in Yemen, his 16-year-old son Abdulrahman, a Denver native, also was killed by a drone strike. Paul asked during his filibuster, “If you happen to be the son of a bad person, is that enough to kill you?” As Paul filibustered, Will Fitzgibbon wrote from the Bureau of Investigative Journalism in London: “Last month, we launched a new drones project: Naming the Dead. “The aim of this project is to identify as many of the more than 2,500 victims of U.S. drone strikes in Pakistan as possible. “Given we currently do not know the identities of 80 percent

NEWS DEPARTMENT Main office: 305 W. First St., P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362 ■ LEAH LEACH, managing editor/news, 360-417-3531 lleach@peninsuladailynews.com ■ MARGARET MCKENZIE, news editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5064 mmckenzie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ BRAD LABRIE, sports editor; 360-417-3525; blabrie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ DIANE URBANI DE LA PAZ, features editor; 360-452-2345, ext. 5062 durbanidelapaz@peninsuladailynews.com ■ General news information: 360-417-3527 From Jefferson County and West End, 800-826-7714, ext. 5250 Email: news@peninsuladailynews.com News fax: 360-417-3521 ■ Sequim office: 147-B W. Washington St., 360-681-2390 JOE SMILLIE, 360-681-2390, ext. 5052, jsmillie@peninsuladailynews.com ■ Port Townsend office: 1939 E. Sims Way., 360-385-2335 CHARLIE BERMANT, 360-385-2335, ext. 5550, cbermant@peninsuladailynews.com

of those killed, we believe this is a crucial and missing step to having a more transparent drones debate. . . . “With all the attention being recently paid to American citizens killed by drones and with the drone debate growing, we thought it would be a good time to remind ourselves of the individual human stories of drone victims — those we know about and those we don’t.” Obama and Brennan direct the drone strikes that are killing thousands of civilians. It doesn’t make us safer. It makes whole populations, from Yemen to Pakistan, hate us. Paul’s outrage with the president’s claimed right to kill U.S. citizens is entirely appropriate. That there is not more outrage at the thousands killed around the globe is shameful . . . and dangerous.

________ Amy Goodman hosts the radio and TV program “Democracy Now!” Her column appears every Thursday. Email Goodman at mail@ democracynow.org or in care of Democracy Now!, 207 W. 25th St., Floor 11, New York, NY 10001.

HAVE YOUR SAY ■ REX WILSON, executive editor, 360-417-3530 We encourage (1) letters to the editor of 250 words or fewer from readers on subjects of local interest, and (2) “Point of View” and “Teen Point of View” guest opinion columns of no more than 550 words that focus on local community lifestyle issues. Please — send us only one letter or column per month. Letters and guest columns published become the property of Peninsula Daily News, and it reserves the right to reject, condense or edit for clarity or when information stated as fact cannot be substantiated. Letters published in other newspapers, anonymous letters, personal attacks, letters advocating boycotts, letters to other people, mass mailings and commercial appeals are not published. Include your name, street address and — for verification purposes — day and evening telephone numbers. Email to letters@ peninsuladailynews.com, fax to 360-417-3521, or mail to Letters to the Editor, Peninsula Daily News, P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Sunday RANTS & RAVES 24-hour hotline: 360-417-3506


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PeninsulaNorthwest

THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 2013

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Big state job growth unlikely, officials say BY RACHEL LA CORTE THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OLYMPIA — New numbers released Wednesday show the state reportedly gained more than 24,000 jobs in January, but state officials believe that number is too high to be accurate. Economists with the state employment Security Department said it’s been more than 17 years since the state saw that significant of a gain in job growth in one month and that the preliminary numbers from the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics likely are to be revised. The average job growth for the state over the past year has been more than 5,000 a month, said Joe Elling, chief labor economist for the department. “The trend over the past year probably gives us a better idea of what’s happening in the job market,�

he said in a statement. But even if the numbers are ultimately revised down by 30 or 40 percent, “it still would be a healthy month,� Elling said later during a conference call. “I think the outlook remains pretty favorable for growth in the state economy,� he said. “I feel pretty good about the outlook for this year.� The job numbers were released Wednesday along with the unemployment rate, which was unchanged at 7.5 percent. The national unemployment rate for January was 7.9 percent. Numbers for Clallam and Jefferson counties are expected to be released Tuesday.

Government, leisure Industries that had the most gains in January, according to the report, included government, which added an estimated

5,500 jobs; leisure and hospitality, which added 4,600; and retail, which added 4,000. Professional and business services added 3,200 jobs, and construction added 2,300 jobs. Only one industry lost jobs in January, the privatesector education and health services industry, which saw a decrease of 1,500. KEITH THORPE/PENINSULA DAILY NEWS An estimated 261,000 people in Washington were A truck makes its way across the Lauridsen Boulevard bridge over unemployed and looking for Peabody Creek in Port Angeles on Wednesday as city officials consider work in January, including replacement of the structure. more than 151,000 who claimed unemployment benefits. More than 3,300 unemployed workers ran out of unemployment benefits last month. A total of 128,808 people have exhausted their benefits since extended benefits were activated in July 2008. the project application iniFor the full state report, tially was submitted to visit http://1.usa. Transportation. gov/1690BCr. “It was an error on [the part of] staff who put BY JEREMY SCHWARTZ $4.6 million. together the [funding] PENINSULA DAILY NEWS The city expects the proj- application,� Cutler said. ect will be in the range of The second involves the PORT ANGELES — The $5.2 million to $5.5 million need to replace the traffic city will spend an addi- once bid, Cutler said, signals at the intersection tional $134,217 on the Lau“[The 5.8 million] is a ridsen Boulevard bridge worst-case scenario,� Cutler of Race Street and Lauridsen Boulevard, west of the replacement project, slated said. bridge, because of necessary to begin later this year, design changes in the geombringing the city’s contribu- Summer construction etry of the bridge and the he limit will apply tion to the project up by Cutler said. Cutler said the city 13.1 percent, from just more throughout Darold than $1 million to about hopes to advertise the proj- intersection, Earlier designs called for Stenson’s threeect for bid this April or May, moving and reusing the $1.2 million. City Council members with construction starting existing traffic signals, he week trial, which is added. voted 6-0, with Councilman in early summer. scheduled to begin City Councilwoman Sissi Patrick Downie absent, on July 8. Tuesday to approve the Bruch asked what, if any, Design changes additional money, which the capital projects would see The third change will city will shift from a capital reduced funding if the counmotion to move the trial to construction projects fund cil approved the increase in add an additional sidewalk and a guardrail to the King County focused on a set aside for unexpected requested money. 2010 KOMO-TV interview expenses, City Public Works City Chief Financial northwest side of the interwith the widow of Frank Director Glenn Cutler said. Officer Byron Olson said section, Cutler explained, Hoerner, one of Stenson’s This year’s balance of the $134,217 was not set while the fourth calls for alleged victims. unassigned cash in this aside for any specific proj- additional Race Street surThe second motion fund is $192,000, Cutler ect. face work extending 250 focused on Benedict’s com- told the council. “We wouldn’t give up feet north and 100 feet ments to local media. The new city share is the any currently identified south. “It has been sort of a required 20 percent match projects,� Olson said. The driving surface of dynamic situation, and of the estimated total proj“This is one of the few the new bridge will be 18 recent developments have ect amount of $5.8 million, chances we have to leverage feet wider than the existing caused the defense to sup- which Cutler said is the top this money at basically one and will include a cenplement their initial memo- end of what the city expects four-to-one.� ter turn lane on the eastrandum with two supple- the project will be bid for, The majority of the cost bound side, two 12-footmental memoranda,� Taylor with contingency funds increases were in four sepa- wide vehicle lanes and two said. rate areas, Cutler explained. 5-foot-wide bike lanes. added. Taylor said he would ________ The first is design A federal grant, adminisallow Kelly to respond to tered through the state changes to make the bridge Reporter Jeremy Schwartz can the supplemental motions Department of Transporta- meet state stormwater be reached at 360-452-2345, ext. by the end of this week and tion, will supply the remain- requirements, design ele- 5074, or at jschwartz@peninsula issue a ruling early next ing 80 percent, about ments not included when dailynews.com. week. The judge set a May 17 filing deadline for pretrial motions and a May 31 deadline for responses. Another status hearing lowered to $1 for ages 8 and was scheduled for June 12. SARC to celebrate anniversary March 17 older, free for 7 and younger. Stenson is being held SARC is located at 610 without bail in the Clallam PENINSULA DAILY NEWS held from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. N. Fifth Ave. County jail. For more information, SEQUIM — A Commu- Sunday, March 17. ________ Admission prices will be phone 360-683-3344. nity Appreciation Day to Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be celebrate the 25th anniverreached at 360-452-2345, ext. 2 4 - H O U R C R I S I S L I N E 5072, or at rollikainen@peninsula sary of the Sequim Aquatic Recreation Center will be dailynews.com.

PA OKs more funds for boulevard plan City Council approves $134,217 for bridge-replacement project

Judge limits billable hours for co-defense 2 of 3 lawyers compensated for up to 300 hours BY ROB OLLIKAINEN PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

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Superior Court Administrator Lindy Clevenger told the Peninsula Daily News last month that Stenson’s lawyers had collected a combined $156,730 in attorneys fees and charged $18,577 for expert services as of Feb. 15. Taylor noted that he made his decision before Clallam County Sheriff Bill Benedict told the PDN and KONP radio last month that the triple-lawyer defense team was an unnecessary expense to county taxpayers. “Those comments by the sheriff were not a factor in the analysis of this issue but will have to be considered in analyzing the pending motion for a change of venue,� Taylor concluded in his ruling.

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PORT ANGELES — Two of Darold Stenson’s three attorneys will bill Clallam County taxpayers for no more than 300 hours beginning next month, a Superior Court judge has ruled. Stenson, 60, is a former death row inmate from Sequim who is charged with killing his wife and business partner in 1993. The state Supreme Court dismissed his 1994 conviction last May and remanded the case to Clallam County Superior Court for a new trial. Judge S. Brooke Taylor placed “reasonable limits� on Stenson’s three-lawyer defense team in a Tuesday ruling. “Mr. [Roger] Hunko will remain lead counsel, and it will be his responsibility to assign work to his co-counsel, with the understanding that the county will not be obligated to compensate the two additional counsel for services after March 31, 2013, which exceed a total of 300 hours between the two additional assigned counsel,� Taylor wrote. The limit will apply throughout the three-week trial, which is scheduled to begin July 8. Hunko, a death penaltycertified lawyer from Port Orchard, was appointed Stenson’s lead attorney last July. Seattle attorney Sherilyn Peterson, who represented Stenson in a 2008 challenge to the lethal injection method of execution, and Blake Kremer of University Place were appointed co-counsel in August. The death penalty was still on the table when the three lawyers were

appointed. They each receive $125 per hour p l u s expenses and travel costs. R e t i r e d Stenson Superior Court Judge Ken Williams questioned whether Stenson needed all three lawyers after Prosecuting Attorney Deb Kelly announced in December that she would not seek the death penalty. “I’ve given it a great deal of thought,� Taylor told Hunko and Kremer in a 40-minute status hearing Wednesday. “I’m not interested in hearing more argument on the issue.� Assigning the Clallam Public Defender was not an option because the same office defended Stenson in 1994.

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, March 7, 2013 SECTION

CLASSIFIEDS, COMICS, BUSINESS, WEATHER In this section

B Outdoors

Area 9 salmon limit decrease I NEVER GOT the sense that last fall’s salmon fishery on the North Olympic Peninsula side of Admiralty Inlet ever produced bigtime results. Apparently, the eastern por- Lee tion did much Horton better. The state Department of Fish and Wildlife announced that starting this week, the daily salmon limit on Admiralty Inlet (Marine Area 9) will decrease from two fish to one fish because the catch so far has exceeded expectations. According to the state’s preliminary estimates, anglers had kept or released 1,737 chinook in Marine Area 9 as of Feb. 24. “Fishing got off to a fast start last fall, boosting the number of fish kept or released to date,” state fish biologist Ryan Lothrop said. “After reviewing the catch estimates, it was clear we needed to take action to control the fishery’s impacts on stocks of concern.” Lothrop did say that the catch numbers in adjoining areas were below expected levels. Now is as good of a time as any for a quick review of the per-day salmon limits on the North Olympic Peninsula’s marine areas: ■ Marine Area 5 (Sekiu) — Daily limit: 1. Area closes: April 10. ■ Marine Area 6 (Eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca) — Daily limit: 2; release wild chinook. Area closes: April 10. ■ Marine Area 9 (Admiralty Inlet) — Daily limit: 1; release wild chinook. Area closes: April 15. ■ Marine Area 12 (Hood Canal) — Daily limit: 1; release wild chinook. Area closes: April 30. The coastal Marine Areas (3 and 4) remain closed.

Clam seasons trimmed The sport clam seasons have been shortened at two Jefferson County beaches. At Point Whitney Tidelands, the season has been reduced by two weeks because of a decrease in the clam population. The clam season starts Friday, March 15, and runs through Sunday, March 31. The Dosewallips State Park recreational clam season starts Monday, April 1, and ends Aug. 15. This is more than three months less than anticipated for 2013, due to an overharvest of the beach in 2012. The oyster seasons at both beaches are unaffected by these changes. Oysters can be harvested at Point Whitney Tidelands through June 30. At Dosewallips, oyster season is open year-round.

STEVE MULLENSKY/FOR PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Sequim senior middle blocker Haleigh Harrison (29) prepares to smack the ball as she helps lead the Wolves to Olympic League and West Central District championships. Harrison is headed to Western Washington University to play with a partial scholarship. “I’m happy to be playing at Western,” Harrison said.

Soprano, pianist, hitter Multitalented Harrison heads to W. Washington BY BRAD LABRIE PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — She’s a first soprano, an accomplished pianist and she has dreams of becoming a forensic scientist. Sequim senior Haleigh Harrison also is a three-sport athlete who was voted the top volleyball player in the Olympic League this past season. Harrison, a 5-foot-10 middle blocker, and her friend and teammate Taylor Balkan, a senior setter, helped spark the Wolves to the league championship with an undefeated record, the West Central District title

and the best 2A state showing in years, just a win away from placing. Besides ALSO . . . being a four■ Area year volleyball all-star letterman, forvolleyball mer yearplayers, round athlete coach/B3 Harrison also has three letters in basketball and three in track and field. Harrison did not go out for basketball this just-completed winter season and isn’t out for track this spring because she’s putting all her energy into year-

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round volleyball after receiving a partial-scholarship to play at Western Washington University. It was a tough decision for Harrison not to play basketball this year under first-year coach Evan Still. “The new coach is a friend of the family and I really wanted to play for him,” Harrison said. She also wanted to play one more season beside good friend Balkan. The pair played together for four years in volleyball and three seasons in basketball. But the athletic Harrison is focusing on volleyball full-time right now and is skipping basketball and track in order to take her volleyball game to a new level.

“I want to fulfill my dream of becoming one of the best [in volleyball],” she said. Harrison, a middle blocker in high school, will switch to outside hitter in college. At 5-10, Harrison is short for a middle blocker. “Haleigh plays taller,” Sequim coach Jennie WebberHeilman said. “She is very athletic, she can move very well across the net, and she is one of the quickest players at the net. “She’s also a very good jumper, a state-caliber high jumper.” The All-Peninsula MVP will be taking that quickness and athleticism to the outside, which has a different skill set than the middle, at Western Washington. TURN

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Deep Pac-12 tourney slated Huskies open vs. Ducks at KeyArena tonight at 8:30 BY TIM BOOTH THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Razor clam digs Speaking of clams, another round of approved razor clam digs begins today. The four-day dig includes four beaches, but again Kalaloch is not among the participating beaches. The best digging typically occurs an hour or two prior to low tide. The evening low tides and participating beaches for the upcoming digs are as follows: ■ Thursday: 3:06 p.m., +0.3 feet — Twin Harbors. ■ Friday, 4:01 p.m., 0.0 feet — Twin Harbors and Long Beach. ■ Saturday, 4:50 p.m., -0.2 feet — Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis and Mocrocks. ■ Sunday, 6:33 p.m., -0.2 feet — Twin Harbors, Long Beach, Copalis and Mocrocks. ■ Monday, 7:12 p.m., 0.0 feet — Twin Harbors.

All-Peninsula

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Washington’s Kristi Kingma in action against Stanford during an NCAA college basketball game Feb. 28 in Seattle. The Huskies open Pac-12 tournament play today while Stanford is the tourney favorite.

SEATTLE — For a change, talking about Pac-12 women’s basketball from a national perspective doesn’t stop after mentioning No. 4 Stanford. Right behind the Cardinal, and sharing the conference title this year, is rapidly improving and fifth-ranked California. Not too far back are No. 14 UCLA and the surprise of the season, No. 18 Colorado. Even recently downtrodden Washington is showing signs of resurgence and is on the verge of a 20-win season. While the top to bottom depth of the Pac-12 could still use improvement, the coaches see the league becoming stronger and receiving more worthy recognition. The depth of the conference will get a chance to showcase itself this week when the Pac-12 tournament moves out of Los Angeles and gets a four-day billing at KeyArena in Seattle. Stanford, California, UCLA and Colorado all received firstround byes. The tournament begins today with fifth-seeded Washington facing No. 12 Oregon; No. 6 Utah vs. No. 11 Arizona; No. 7 USC vs. No. 10 Oregon State and No. 8 Washington State vs. No. 9 Arizona State. “My hope this weekend and

Women’s Hoops moving forward is because of the television coverage and the timing of it, it’s going to help the NCAA selection committee. It will give us a good look,” Arizona State coach Charli Turner Thorne said. “A few years ago when we talked endlessly to have it or not, the biggest reason was to allow teams to get a few more wins that were on the bubble and showcase ourselves for seed in the NCAA tournament. “We’re really positioned well for that now with how things are structured.” As conference tournaments begin around the country, the Pac-12 is one of two — along with the SEC — with four teams ranked in the top 18 nationally. The last time the conference ended the season with four teams ranked in the final AP poll: 1981. Five times since 2001, the conference ended the season with just one ranked team, including Stanford last season. Colorado is clearly the surprise of the four ranked teams. Colorado was picked to finished ninth in the preseason conference poll. TURN

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B2

SportsRecreation

THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 2013

Today’s

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Latest sports headlines can be found at www. peninsuladailynews.com.

Scoreboard Calendar

Today

Go to “Nation/World” and click on “AP Sports”

SPORTS SHOT

Today Boys Golf: Sequim at Klahowya (Gold Mountain Golf Course in Bremerton), 2 p.m. Boys Golf: Sequim at Klahowya (Gold Mountain Golf Course in Bremerton), 2 p.m.

Friday No events scheduled

Saturday Boys Soccer: Port Angeles at Port Townsend in Andrew Palmer Classic match at Memorial Field, 12:45 p.m.; Kingston at Sequim, 12:45 p.m.

Area Sports Basketball Port Angeles Men’s League Playoffs Tuesday Gold Division First Round Langston Professional Services 49, 7 Cedars Casino 43 High Scorers Langston: Greg Glasser 19, Jon Eckhoff 11 7 Cedars: Danny Linde 20, Jordan Justus 12 Next Door Gastropub 93, Joshua’s Lounge 80 High Scorers Next Door: TJ McKinney 44, Cameron LeDuke 21 Joshua’s: George Blackcrow 22, CJ Heilman 13 Semifinals Wednesday Game Anytime Fitness (No. 2 seed) vs. Next Door Gastropub, late Today’s Game SkyRidge Golf Course (No. 1 seed) vs. Langston Professional Services

Basketball National Basketball Association WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio 47 14 .770 Memphis 39 19 .672 Houston 33 28 .541 Dallas 26 33 .441 New Orleans 21 40 .344 Northwest Division W L Pct Oklahoma City 44 16 .733 Denver 40 22 .645 Utah 32 28 .533 Portland 28 31 .475 Minnesota 20 37 .351 Pacific Division W L Pct L.A. Clippers 43 19 .694 Golden State 34 27 .557 L.A. Lakers 30 31 .492 Phoenix 21 39 .350 Sacramento 21 41 .339 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct New York 36 21 .632 Brooklyn 34 26 .567 Boston 32 27 .542 Philadelphia 23 36 .390 Toronto 23 38 .377 Southeast Division W L Pct Miami 44 14 .759 Atlanta 33 26 .559 Washington 19 39 .328 Orlando 17 44 .279 Charlotte 13 47 .217 Central Division W L Pct Indiana 38 22 .633 Chicago 34 26 .567 Milwaukee 30 28 .517 Detroit 23 39 .371 Cleveland 20 40 .333

GB — 6½ 14 20 26 GB — 5 12 15½ 22½ GB — 8½ 12½ 21 22 GB — 3½ 5 14 15 GB — 11½ 25 28½ 32 GB — 4 7 16 18

Tuesday’s Games Boston 109, Philadelphia 101 Oklahoma City 122, L.A. Lakers 105 Denver 120, Sacramento 113 Wednesday’s Games Utah at Cleveland, late Brooklyn at Charlotte, late Boston at Indiana, late Philadelphia at Atlanta, late New York at Detroit, late Orlando at Miami, late Portland at Memphis, late Washington at Minnesota, late L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, late Houston at Dallas, late Toronto at Phoenix, late Chicago at San Antonio, late Sacramento at Golden State, late Milwaukee at L.A. Clippers, late

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TAKING

EASY WAY BACK

Kidron Flynn carries a dropped dog to an Iditarod Air Force plane during the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race on Wednesday at Nikolai Airport in Nikolai, Alaska. See Story on bottom of page.

Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts Carolina 22 13 8 1 27 Tampa Bay 23 10 12 1 21 Winnipeg 22 10 11 1 21 Florida 23 7 11 5 19 Washington 21 9 11 1 19

Today’s Games Oklahoma City at New York, 5 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Denver, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Oklahoma City at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Indiana at Orlando, 4 p.m. Memphis at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m. Washington at Brooklyn, 4:30 p.m. Dallas at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Utah at Chicago, 5 p.m. Atlanta at Boston, 5 p.m. Philadelphia at Miami, 5 p.m. Portland at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Phoenix at Sacramento, 7 p.m. Houston at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Toronto at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m.

Hockey National Hockey League WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF Chicago 23 20 0 3 43 75 Detroit 23 11 8 4 26 63 St. Louis 22 11 9 2 24 64 Nashville 23 9 9 5 23 47 Columbus 23 7 12 4 18 53 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF Vancouver 22 11 6 5 27 63 Minnesota 22 11 9 2 24 52 Edmonton 22 8 9 5 21 54 Calgary 20 8 8 4 20 57 Colorado 21 8 9 4 20 51 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF Anaheim 21 15 3 3 33 75 Los Angeles 21 12 7 2 26 60 San Jose 21 11 6 4 26 50 Phoenix 22 11 8 3 25 67 Dallas 22 11 9 2 24 61 EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF Pittsburgh 23 15 8 0 30 81 New Jersey 23 10 8 5 25 56 N.Y. Rangers 21 11 8 2 24 55 Philadelphia 24 11 12 1 23 68 N.Y. Islanders 23 10 11 2 22 70 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF Montreal 23 14 5 4 32 71 Boston 20 14 3 3 31 60 Ottawa 23 12 7 4 28 52 Toronto 23 14 9 0 28 68 Buffalo 24 9 13 2 20 63

GA 44 60 67 59 69 GA 61 56 62 68 62 GA 60 52 46 63 63 GA 67 65 53 72 78 GA 59 46 44 57 77

GF 67 81 56 59 59

GA 62 73 68 83 62

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Tuesday’s Games Columbus 4, Edmonton 3, SO San Jose 3, Vancouver 2, SO Tampa Bay 5, New Jersey 2 N.Y. Islanders 6, Montreal 3 Washington 4, Boston 3, OT Carolina 4, Buffalo 3 N.Y. Rangers 4, Philadelphia 2 Florida 4, Winnipeg 1 Detroit 2, Colorado 1 Chicago 5, Minnesota 3 Los Angeles 6, St. Louis 4 Wednesday’s Games Ottawa at Toronto, late Colorado at Chicago, late San Jose at Calgary, late Phoenix at Anaheim, late Today’s Games Toronto at Boston, 4 p.m. Buffalo at New Jersey, 4 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Florida at Washington, 4 p.m. Montreal at Carolina, 4 p.m. Vancouver at Columbus, 4 p.m. Winnipeg at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Edmonton at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. St. Louis at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Dallas at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Ottawa at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. Winnipeg at Florida, 4:30 p.m. Edmonton at Nashville, 5 p.m. Chicago at Colorado, 6 p.m. Calgary at Anaheim, 7:30 p.m.

College Basketball Men’s Results Tuesday’s Major Scores FAR WEST UNLV 68, Boise St. 64 MIDWEST Akron 72, Miami (Ohio) 58 Ball St. 89, W. Michigan 85 Cent. Michigan 61, E. Michigan 59 Iowa 63, Illinois 55 Kansas St. 79, TCU 68 Kent St. 69, Bowling Green 61

Missouri 93, Arkansas 63 Notre Dame 66, St. John’s 40 Ohio St. 67, Indiana 58 Toledo 70, N. Illinois 46 SOUTHWEST Memphis 56, UTEP 54 EAST Marquette 60, Rutgers 54 Ohio 72, Buffalo 69 Providence 76, Seton Hall 66 SOUTH Boston College 68, Clemson 61 Duke 85, Virginia Tech 57 Marshall 88, Southern Miss. 84 Mississippi 87, Alabama 83 TOURNAMENT Big South Conference First Round Campbell 81, Presbyterian 73, OT Liberty 78, Coastal Carolina 61 Longwood 87, UNC Asheville 72 Winthrop 60, Radford 58, OT Horizon League First Round Green Bay 62, Milwaukee 46 Ill.-Chicago 82, Cleveland St. 59 Youngstown St. 62, Loyola of Chicago 60

Pac-12 Men’s Standings as of Tuesday Schools Conference Oregon 12-4 UCLA 12-4 California 12-5 Arizona 11-6 Colorado 9-7 USC 9-7 Arizona St. 9-8 Washington 8-8 Stanford 8-9 Oregon St. 3-13 Utah 3-13 Washington St. 2-14

SPORTS ON TV

Overall 23-6 22-7 20-9 23-6 19-9 14-15 20-10 16-13 17-13 13-16 11-17 11-18

Wednesday’s Games UCLA at Washington State, late Stanford at California, late USC at Washington, late Wednesday’s Games UCLA at Washington State, late Stanford at California, late USC at Washington, late Today’s Games Oregon State at Utah, 6 p.m., ESPNU Oregon at Colorado, 6 p.m., ESPN2 Saturday’s Games UCLA at Washington, 11 a.m., CBS Oregon at Utah, 11:30 a.m., PAC-12 NET-

11 a.m. (47) GOLF WGCCadillac Championship, Round 1, Site: Doral Golf Resort and Spa - Miami (Live) Noon Pac-12 NETWORK Women’s Basketball NCAA, USC vs. Oregon State (Live) 2:30 p.m. Pac-12 NETWORK Women’s Basketball NCAA, Utah vs. Arizona (Live) 4 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Kentucky vs. Georgia (Live) 4 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Virginia vs. Florida State (Live) 5 p.m. (31) TNT Basketball NBA, Oklahoma City Thunder vs. New York Knicks, Site: Madison Square Garden - New York City (Live) 6 p.m. Pac-12 NETWORK Women’s Basketball NCAA, Washington State vs. Arizona State (Live) 6 p.m. (26) ESPN Basketball NCAA, Wisconsin vs. Michigan State (Live) 6 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Oregon at Colorado (Live) 7:30 p.m. (31) TNT Basketball NBA, Los Angeles Clippers vs. Denver Nuggets, Site: Pepsi Center - Denver (Live) 8 p.m. (27) ESPN2 Basketball NCAA, Long Beach State vs. UC Davis (Live) 8:30 p.m. Pac-12 NETWORK Women’s Basketball NCAA, Washington vs. Oregon (Live)

WORK Arizona State at Arizona, 1:30 p.m., FSN Oregon State at Colorado, 1:30 p.m., PAC-12 NETWORK USC at Washington State, 3:30 p.m., PAC-12 NETWORK End of regular season

Baseball Brewers 7, Mariners 6 Wednesday’s Game Seattle ab r hbi ab r hbi Aoki rf 3 0 0 0 F.Gutierrez cf 3 1 1 1 J.Prince lf 1 1 1 0 F.Martinez cf 1 0 0 0 Segura ss 3 0 0 0 Ackley 2b 3111 Do.Murphy ss2 1 1 2 S.Romero 2b 2 0 0 0 R.Weeks 2b 3 1 3 0 Morse rf 2112 S.Gennett 2b 2 0 2 0 C.Peguero rf 1 0 1 0 K.Davis dh 3 1 2 2 K.Morales 1b 3 1 1 2 Halton ph-dh 2 0 1 1 Jacobs 1b 1000 L.Schafer cf 4 0 1 0 Bay lf 3010 N.Ramirez 1b1 0 0 0 Thames lf 1000 Crosby 3b 3 0 0 0 Ibanez dh 3010 B.Macias 3b 1 0 0 0 Zunino ph-dh 1 0 0 0 C.Gindl lf-rf 3 0 0 0 J.Montero c 3 0 0 0 K.Davis ph-rf 2 0 0 0 J.Hicks c 1000 H.Morris 1b 2 1 1 1 V.Catricala 3b 3 1 0 0 Garner cf 1 1 1 1 Ryan ss 2110 R.Diaz c 3 1 1 0 B.Miller ss 1000 D.Buller c 1 0 1 0 Totals 40 715 7 Totals 34 6 8 6 Milwaukee 012 000 310—7 Seattle 001 140 000—6 E_C.Gindl (1). DP_Milwaukee 1. LOB_Milwaukee 9, Seattle 5. 2B_S.Gennett (1), R.Diaz (1), F.Gutierrez (2). HR_K.Davis (2), H.Morris (1), Garner (1), Morse (2), K.Morales (2). SB_J. Prince (3), L.Schafer (2), R.Diaz (1). SF_Morse. IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee Fiers 31⁄3 3 2 2 1 3 2⁄3 0 D.Hand 0 0 0 0 J.Hellweg BS,1-1 1 3 4 4 1 1 Kintzler 1 1 0 0 0 1 A.Pena W,1-0 1 1 0 0 1 2 J.Bradley S,1-1 2 0 0 0 0 2 Seattle Beavan 3 6 3 3 0 3 Er.Ramirez 3 1 0 0 1 3 2⁄3 3 Kinney BS,1-1 3 3 1 0 Furbush L,0-1 11⁄3 3 1 1 0 2 Loe 1 2 0 0 0 2 HBP_by Loe (B.Macias). WP_Fiers, J.Hellweg, Kintzler, Er.Ramirez. Balk_A.Pena. T_3:12. A_4,842 (11,333). Milwaukee

Mushers welcome rest at Alaska wilderness villages THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Imagine standing on a sled behind a team of 16 dogs, traveling mile after desolate mile in the Alaska wilderness without any sign of other human life. All of a sudden, lights shine off in the distance, the first village to come into view in a very long time. Whether it’s a single cabin or a booming village of several hundred people, for mushers on the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race, the villages are not only checkpoints to eat, rest and recharge, but a chance to interact with someone other than their dogs. “There are no checkpoints that I dislike,” said defending cham-

Iditarod pion Dallas Seavey. “Every time you come around the corner and see the lights of a checkpoint approaching, it’s a great sight.” Four-time champion Martin Buser rested at the checkpoint in Rohn after a blistering fast 170mile run that had put him hours ahead of the other teams. Buser reached Rohn Monday and took his mandatory 24-hour rest there, watching other mushers arrive and leave, before he departed at 12:03 p.m. Tuesday. Buser’s layover put Aaron Burmeister in the lead Tuesday. He was the first in and out of

the Nikolai checkpoint 75 miles past Rohn, arriving at 8:11 a.m. and departing a little more than four hours later. Running second was last year’s Iditarod runnerup, Aliy Zirkle, who left Nikolai at 1:13 p.m. Tuesday. There are 26 checkpoints along the 1,000-mile trail from Anchorage to Nome, and for Zirkle, the reception that teams receive are truly Alaska events: Villagers welcome the dogs first. “And it’s an open-armed greeting, where they want to make sure all the dogs are OK, and they get straw for them and food for them,” said Zirkle, running her 13th Iditarod. “Then they say, ‘How are you doing, Aliy?’” There are two ghost towns that

serve as checkpoints along the trail, including the race’s namesake, the former mining village of Iditarod, which once boasted a population of 10,000 people.

Peopled ghost towns The ghost towns fill up with support staff during the race, but are empty the rest of the year. But other villages are just like small towns in the Lower 48. “They have schools, they have post offices, they have a runway,” race spokeswoman Erin McLarnon said. “They’re basically like any small town community except inaccessible,” she said of the state’s limited road system. “You can only get there by dog team, snowma-

chine or air.” The checkpoints serve a purpose. Veterinarians staff the checkpoints to examine the dogs, and race officials make sure the mushers are fit to continue. Mushers are required to take three mandatory rest periods during the race. They take one 24-hour layover any time during the race. They must take one eight-hour rest at a checkpoint along the Yukon River, and the other eighthour rest at White Mountain, 77 miles from the finish line in Nome. The village of Takotna is becoming a popular place for mushers to take the longer rest period. It comes 329 miles into the race, at a time when the dogs are ready for a break and mushers need a good meal.


SportsRecreation

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 2013

B3

All-Peninsula Volleyball Players were selected by area volleyball coaches and the sports staff of the Peninsula Daily News.

Haleigh Harrison

Lauren Thacker Casey Williams

Sammy Rae

Sequim (Senior) Hitter — MVP

Chimacum (Junior) Hitter

Forks (Senior) Hitter

Quilcene (Sophomore) Hitter

Olympic League MVP and three-time all-league first team. Had 73 aces, 431 kills, 86 blocks and 280 digs.

Nisqually League second-team honoree finished the season with 156 kills, 104 digs, 19 blocks, seven assists and 20 aces for the Cowboys.

Chosen as the SWL-Evergreen Division MVP. Led the Spartans to the postseason. Recognized by WIAA for work in classroom.

Sophomore multi-sport standout played a key role for the young and upand-coming Rangers squad.

Kendra Harvey

Megan Juran

Taylor Balkan

Abby McGuire

Port Angeles (Junior) Back Row

Port Townsend (Soph.) Back Row

Sequim (Senior) Setter

Port Townsend (Soph.) Setter

Helped Roughriders reach districts, where she had 44 digs, 45 serve receive passes, one assist and served 9 for 9 against White River.

Juran is one of the many young players that give the Redskins’ volleyball program high hopes for the future.

Named to the Olympic League first team for the third time in her career. Recorded 66 aces, 27 kills, 827 assists, 22 blocks and 264 digs.

Selected to the Olympic League second team. Finished season with 15 assists, 12 digs and six kills in win over rival Chimacum.

Rylleigh Zbaraschuk

Megan Lee

Sequim (Senior) Back Row

Sophomore was one of the top at her position in the Olympic League. Was a consistent server throughout the season.

Defensive specialist was 261 out of 281 on serves, with 39 aces, 33 kills 194 digs and 45 perfect passes.

Port Townsend (Soph.) Back Row

Hannah Hudson Jennie Sequim (Junior) Heilman-Webber Libero

Olympic League second-team honoree. Served 255 out of 298 and had 43 aces, 86 perfect passes, nine kills and 314 digs on the season.

Sequim Coach of the Year

Wolves made state after going undefeated in Olympic League play and winning league and district titles.

Honorable Mention: Jillian Raben (Forks); Maddy Hinrichs (Port Angeles); Alexas Besand (Sequim); Holli Williams (Port Angeles); Shannon Williams (Crescent); Codi Hallinan (Port Townsend); Alissa Shaw (Forks); Faye Chartraw (Neah Bay); Bailee Jones (Port Angeles); Cierra Moss (Neah Bay); Megan Dukek (Chimacum); Kelli Belford (Crescent); Megan Weller (Quilcene); Trish Reeves (Port Townsend); Sydney Christensen (Forks); Jandi Frantz (Crescent).

MVP: Multitalented Harrison heads to WWU CONTINUED FROM B1 transition hitter more,” Harrison said. layed the middle her Webber-Heilman not entire high school career, only is losing one of her top she has been playing out- players from the past four side hitter the past six years to graduation, but she months in club volleyball. also is losing one of her “You’re more of a blocker most coachable players. in the middle, but you pass “Haleigh is a very nice more on the outside, play person,” the coach said. more defense and you’re a “She is very, very, very

humble and a good athlete. She works hard, and she is such a hard worker she can hurt herself sometimes.” Harrison admits she needs to tone it down at times. “I do really get into volleyball sometimes, and really get overwhelmed and I don’t think about my

safety,” Harrison said. She did tweak her left knee late in the track season last year and didn’t go to state because of the injury. Her left leg is her jumping leg in high jump. She takes on life the same way she approaches volleyball workouts. Harrison took piano and

singing lessons most of her childhood, becoming the first soprano at Sequim High School on the select choir. She played the piano from age 6 until she took up sports in the eighth grade. “I still tinker with the piano sometimes,” she says. When she’s not playing

volleyball at Western Washington, Harrison will be majoring in chemistry and biology, and she wants to minor in music. She’s considering using the chemistry and biology to become a forensic scientist and possibly having a career in law enforcement.

Seahawks sign pro hoops player to contract BY ERIC D. WILLIAMS MCCLATCHY NEWS SERVICE

SEATTLE — Seattle Seahawks general manager John Schneider is taking a chance on a pro basketball player making the switch to tight end. First reported on the NFL’s website, Seattle plans to sign Darren Fells,

younger brother of New England tight end Daniel Fells, to a contract. The deal is expected to be made official today. According to the report, Fells, 26, worked out for Seattle at the team’s facility earlier this week, and the Seahawks were impressed enough to offer him a threeyear deal.

The 6-foot-7, 280-pound Fells spent last season playing professional basketball for Libertad Sunchales in Argentina. Fells has also played in Mexico, France, Finland and Belgium.

California, Irvine. He did not play football in college, but Fells was an all-state tight end at Fullerton (Calif.) High School.

Bold moves

The Seahawks have had some success with unconHigh school star ventional roster moves durFells played college bas- ing coach Pete Carroll and ketball at the University of Schneider’s tenure, includ-

ing signing reclamation projects in receiver Mike Williams and cornerback Brandon Browner. And Seattle also has had its share of hiccups, including the trade for running back LenDale White, signing receiver Terrell Owens and drafting athletic Jameson Konz in the seventh round of the 2010 draft.

Konz is currently a free agent. The addition of Fells gives Seattle 63 players under contract with a week to go before free agency begins. Seattle has four other tight ends on the roster — Zach Miller, Anthony McCoy, Sean McGrath and Cooper Helfet.

Women: NCAA seeding up for grabs Horton CONTINUED FROM B1 work, which regularly made games available on a “It’s always our goal to national platform. Combining that bump in be better than anyone thinks we would be. I knew how many games are being at the beginning of the sea- seen with the teams doing son there was no way we their part, and the end would finish ninth,” Colo- result is more national rado coach Linda Lappe attention on the Pac-12 said. than has been seen for quite “But I knew we had to some time. stay healthy and get our “We certainly had a view young players better and and a belief that Pac-12 acclimated to the college women’s basketball was game and that’s a huge rea- under leveraged and was son we were able to finished not getting the respect fourth.” nationally that it deserved,” Scott said. Extra exposure Along with separating Increasing exposure and itself from the men’s tourrecognition nationally for nament and getting out of Pac-12 women’s hoops was Los Angeles where there one of Larry Scott’s initia- was minimal interest, the tives when he took over as tournament was bumped up by a week, giving it preconference commissioner. A big help in increasing mier billing on the West that exposure was the Coast and more time for the development and launch NCAA selection committee this year of the Pac-12 Net- to look over team resumes.

Battle for No. 1 seed? There won’t be any debate about NCAA bids coming to Stanford, California, UCLA or Colorado. A Stanford-California matchup in the conference title game could determine a No. 1 seed in the NCAA tournament and which team gets to stay on the West Coast with the regional in Spokane. “We know we put ourselves in a pretty good position to get a really good seed in the NCAA tournament,” California coach Lindsay Gottlieb said. “We’re focused on winning the Pac-12 tournament, that’s important to us, and if that leads to a No. 1 seed it’s pretty incredible that we’re in that spot. “But that only comes if we play pretty good basketball this weekend.”

“It’s not like you have a No. 1 team and a No. 12 and there is a lot of space in between.”

CONTINUED FROM B1 No digging is allowed

STANFORD COACH TARA VANDERVEER before noon. Don’t forget that dayOn the competitive balance of the Pac-12 tournament..

Huskies aim for bid Washington could put itself back in the NCAA bubble discussion with a deep run, but a four-game losing streak to end the regular season likely ended the Huskies hopes of an atlarge bid. Then there is the rest of the field, none of which enter the tournament with more than eight conference victories and only Utah has a winning record. “It’s not like you have a No. 1 team and a No. 12 and there is a lot of space in between,” Stanford coach Tara VanDerveer said. “It’s compressed. There are a lot of good teams

in there.” Moving to Seattle puts the tournament in a women’s basketball hotbed, although just how strong the public response will be remains to be seen. The conference has partnered with Force 10 Hoops, the owners of the Seattle Storm, to operate the event. Coaches are thrilled to be playing where the games will be appreciated and not just an afterthought as they seemed to be in Los Angeles. “I’m confident that it’s going to be a lot better than it was in Los Angeles,” Scott said. “How big and how strong remains to be seen.”

light savings time begins Sunday. So, spring forward, my friends. If you don’t, you’ll miss an hour of prime digging. This dig will be the final evening dig of the season because the lowest tides start occurring in the morning. The first morning digs of 2013 are scheduled for Thursday, March 28, through Sunday, March 31, pending marine toxin tests, of course.

________ Outdoors columnist Lee Horton appears here Thursdays and Fridays. He can be reached at 360452-2345, ext. 5152 or at lhorton@ peninsuladailynews.com.


PENINSULA DAILY NEWS for Thursday, March 7, 2013 PAGE

B4 $ Briefly . . .

Winery gets four medals at contest

Holder: Still no decision on pot laws

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

SEQUIM — Wind Rose Cellars has received honors in the SavorNW wine competition. The Sequim winery, which makes Italian-style wine from Washington-grown grapes, entered four wines in the contest, and all were recognized. Wind Rose’s 2011 Volmut Dolcetto and 2010 Bravo Rosso each won a gold medal. The 2012 Rosato took silver and the 2012 Pinot Grigio a bronze. The Rosato and 2010 Bravo Rosso will be released to the public by the end of March. During March, Wind Rose, 143 W. Washington St., is celebrating Washington Wine Month with 10 percent off its selections. The winery is owned by David Volmut and his wife, Jennifer States. For more information, phone Volmut at 360-681-0690.

BRIAN’S SPORTING GOODS

DONATES

Brian Menkal of Brian’s Sporting Goods and More in Sequim presents Jake’s Crew volunteers Valerie Johnson, center, and Sharon Cone with a $750 donation. Jake’s Crew visits Seattle Children’s Hospital each month, handing out “Lids for Kids Hats” from Life is Good. The pair are starting their ninth year of visits to the hospital, spreading positive messages to young patients and their families. Brian’s Sporting Goods and More carries a full line of Life is Good products.

European Union slaps fine of $733 million on Microsoft Company broke browser pledge THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

AMSTERDAM — The European Union has fined Microsoft $733 million for breaking a pledge to offer personal computer users a choice of Internet browsers when they install the company’s flagship Windows operating system. The penalty imposed by the EU’s executive arm, the commission, is a first for Brussels: No company has ever failed to keep its end of a bargain with EU authorities before. In 2009, Microsoft Corp. struck a settlement with the commission to resolve disputes over the company’s abuse of the dominance of Windows, which had spanned more than a decade.

Option for Windows users Back then, the company agreed to pay $1.1 billion and promised to give Windows users the option of choosing another browser rather than having Microsoft’s Internet Explorer automatically installed on their machines. But Microsoft failed to stick to the deal for some 15 million installations of Windows 7 software in Europe from May 2011 until July 2012. The company admitted the failure last year, adding that it was a mistake.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

European Commissioner for Competition Joaquin Almunia at a news conference in Brussels on Wednesday. The commission’s top competition regulator, Joaquin Almunia, said at a press conference in Brussels on Wednesday that the fine reflected the size of the violation and the length of time it went on for. It also was intended to make an example of Microsoft and deter other companies from doing same thing. In theory, the commission could have fined Microsoft up to 10 percent of its global annual sales during the period the violation took place. “A failure to comply is a very serious infringement that must be sanc-

tioned accordingly,” Almunia said. Keith Hylton, a professor of law and antitrust specialist at Boston University, said the fine was “far in excess of any benefit Microsoft could have gotten from the error and vastly in excess of any harm to EU consumers, who are all aware of alternatives to Internet Explorer.” In all, Microsoft has now paid $2.8 billion in fines to the commission since 1998, when regulators opened their first investigations into the company after Sun Microsystems complained it had been denied access to technical documents. Over the years, the EU has broadened its investigation to include whether Microsoft had abused Window’s near-monopoly over the market for computer operating systems to corner other markets, including server software, streaming media software and Internet browsers. Anthony Sabino, an antitrust lawyer and professor at St. John’s University, said the commission was right to fine Microsoft for the latest lapse, but the size of the penalty seemed “disproportionate . . . perhaps even petty, given that Microsoft has paid its fines and yielded to all the demands of the EU.” “They have been slow to acknowledge that, while powerful, Microsoft is not invincible,” he said. Sabino added that Microsoft may be paying the price for its aggressiveness in the past in testing the limits of what regulators will tolerate.

WASHINGTON — Attorney General Eric Holder said the Obama administration still hasn’t decided on how the federal government will respond to the new legalmarijuana laws passed by voters in Washington and Colorado. Holder appeared Wednesday before the Senate Judiciary Commit- Holder tee and was asked about the issue by Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt. The attorney general reiterated what he has said recently — that a policy decision will be announced “relatively soon.” He also said he’s had good conversations with elected leaders from Washington and Colorado. The measures set up systems of state-licensed marijuana growers, processors and retail stores. But marijuana is illegal under federal law, and state laws can be struck down if they “frustrate the purpose” of federal law. The Justice Department could sue the states in an attempt to block the licensing schemes from taking effect.

Hanford waste HANFORD — Federal officials are looking to ship some 3 million gallons of radioactive waste from Eastern Washington to New Mexico, giving the government more flexibility to deal with leaking tanks at Hanford Nuclear Reservation, officials said Wednesday. The Department of Energy said its preferred plan would ultimately dispose of the waste in a massive repository — called the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant — near Carlsbad, N.M, where radioactive materials are buried in rooms excavated in vast salt beds nearly a half-mile underground. The federal proposal was quickly met with criticism from a New Mexico environmental group that said the state permit

Real-time stock quotations at peninsuladailynews.com

allowing the government to bury waste at the plant would not allow for shipments from Hanford, the nation’s most contaminated nuclear site.

Dow up again NEW YORK — After barreling through a record the day before, the Dow Jones industrial average meandered higher on Wednesday. The Dow edged up 42.47 points, or 0.3 percent, to close at 14,296.24. An encouraging jobmarket report helped nudge the stock market up and pushed bond prices lower.

GM exec at Toyota TOKYO — Toyota has tapped a former executive at rival General Motors to join its board, the first time in the Japanese automaker’s 76-year history it is appointing directors from outside the company. The appointment of Mark Hogan, effective April 1, underlines efforts at Toyota Motor Corp. to become more internationally minded as it recovers from difficult years, including a massive recall fiasco in the U.S.

Gold and silver Gold futures for April deliverty remained flat $1,574.90 an ounce on Wednesday. Silver for May delivery rose 20 cents, or 0.7 percent, to end at $28.80 an ounce. Peninsula Daily News and The Associated Press

Studies: Diabetic drivers face higher crash risk Low blood sugar can cause havoc BY LAURA GEGGEL THE NEW YORK TIMES

NEW YORK — Dan Fried, a 47-year-old videographer who has Type 1 diabetes, never made it to the diner to meet his brother. As he drove through New Jersey that night in November 2010, he said his blood sugar fell, and he became disoriented. He pulled his van to the side of the road, where state troopers, who had gotten a call about an erratic driver, found him slumped behind the wheel, barely coherent. Believing Fried to be intoxicated and seemingly uncooperative, the troopers tried to frisk and handcuff him. In the scuffle, he broke his wrist. He was wearing a bracelet that identified him as a diabetic. “I was very upset at the whole thing,” he said. Fried filed a lawsuit alleging civil rights violations. The state attorney general declined to comment on the pending litigation.

Visual disturbances Sudden bouts of low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, can lead to confusion, delayed reaction, visual disturbances or loss of consciousness.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Most people aren’t aware of the dangers of hypoglycemia and driving, a 2003 survey showed. Even in the absence of low blood sugar, people with diabetes may have impaired vision or nerve function in the feet, which can affect driving. Partly as a result, drivers with diabetes are 12 percent to 19 percent more likely than other drivers to have a car accident, studies show. A study of 202 people with diabetes who were taking insulin found that about 60 percent of participants never tested their blood glucose levels before driving. Most participants said they would stop driving if they began to feel symptoms of hypoglycemia, but it can be difficult to recognize

milder symptoms, such as blurry vision, sweating or feeling tired or irritable, said Dr. Daniel Lorber, director of endocrinology at New York Hospital Queens. “If it drops further, then you get into some severe thinking and judgment issues, and that’s what we’re concerned about,” he said.

‘Could pass out’ “You could pass out or have a seizure,” Lorber added. Awareness of the problem is surprisingly limited. A study in 2003 that surveyed people with diabetes in seven American and four European cit-

ies found that half of those with Type 1 and threefourths of those with Type 2 diabetes said their doctors had never told them about the dangers of hypoglycemia and Lorber driving. While most accidents related to diabetes complications happen to a small group of people with Type 1 diabetes, who need to take insulin, people with Type 2 diabetes also are at risk. An analysis of American insurance claims, published in November in the journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, focused on people with Type 2 diabetes who were taking a diabetes drug other than insulin. It found drivers younger than 65 who had been treated for hypoglycemia were 40 percent more likely to have had a motor vehicle accident than those who had not had hypoglycemic episodes. “Up until now, most people assumed that diabetes-related driving accidents were caused by insulin therapy,” said Dr. Brian Frier at the University of Edinburgh and an author of the study. They didn’t think “people on other therapies would cause an accident through hypoglycemia.” Frier noted that a class of diabetes drugs called sulfonylureas,

which stimulate the pancreas to release insulin, may be especially likely to trigger hypoglycemia, particularly longer-acting sulfonylureas like the drug glyburide. Shorter-acting drugs in this class, including glipizide and gliclazide, may be safer for drivers with diabetes, he said. Drivers at risk for hypoglycemia also “have a responsibility to make sure that their blood glucose level is not too low,” said Dr. Ned Kennedy of the Cleveland Clinic, who advised drivers with low blood sugar to eat something sugary and to wait 15 minutes and check again. “Just taking the time to do that could save them a lot of trouble and prevent them from being a danger to themselves or to other people” on the road, he said.

Blood glucose awareness Daniel Cox, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Virginia Health System, and his colleagues have developed a program called Blood Glucose Awareness Training, which teaches people to recognize the physical signs of low blood sugar. Cox also is enrolling patients in Diabetes Driving, a study that aims to identify other risks. The vast majority of accidents have nothing to do with diabetes, however, and Cox and other experts are wary of stigmatizing people with the disease.


3rdAge

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 2013

B5

Financial papers are from Mars, right? SINCE WE LAUNCHED 2013, we’ve all been talking, off and on, about elders and safety and respect and negotiation and a lot of other things. If you’ve been paying attention, you know what we’ve all been talking about. If you haven’t, I’m not about to put the rest of us into a coma by recapping everything, so just jump in and hope for the best (because hoping for the worst would be stupid).

‘Help’ from sidelines What a lot of this conversation has come down to is any elder’s right to live his/her own life and call his/her own shots, while a lot of the rest of us (i.e., people who care about them) are on the sidelines trying to “help.” “Why won’t he listen to me?” “How can I get her to accept the help that we’re glad to give?” “Doesn’t he know he’ll be better off?” “But I want her to be safe!” And we’ve even bumped into when we have to accept that nothing is all we can do. It has to do with freedom and personal responsibility, an independent choice; sometimes, it has to do with fear — fear that “they” will put me somewhere I don’t want to be if they know how much help I really need, which usually isn’t that much and is very rarely true. One of the life spheres for

the same thing. So do I. So what? Well, sometimes this financial which this Mark stuff can get pretty complicated. comes up — a Maybe an elder made an Harvey lot! — is money. investment along the way or Or just bought a product — or several — about anything that seemed like good, long-term that has anyplanning at the time, and in all thing to do likelihood, it was. with finances. But here we are, 15 or 40 Think about years later, and maybe we don’t it: In my world, have quite as much energy, or it is not uncom- maybe there are quite a few mon to need to more medications, or maybe we discuss . . . toi- have this or that condition or leting. diagnosis, or maybe we just forI’m sorry if that’s not exactly got about the darn thing. what you wanted to hear on a Then, something comes in the Thursday morning, but it’s true. mail, something that often is And my experience is that it’s utterly incomprehensible. “Universal life” policies are a often easier for folks to be forthgreat example. coming about toileting than Now, there’s nothing “wrong” money. with universal life policies — or illegal or unethical or whatever Money personal, secret — but they are “complicated” (at This is America, and money is least, for many of us). a very personal thing. So, you got one of these 25 Well, OK, so is toileting, but years ago, and over time, because that’s universal and the fact is you’re a human being who that we all know pretty much doesn’t do this stuff all day long, everything there is to know you’ve “simplified” it: about that. I pay money, get life insurance But money? Oh, no! That’s (in case I die) and at the same intensely personal and a secret. time am building up a nest egg There are a lot of reasons why in case I don’t die. it’s a secret, but we don’t have Well, kinda, but the point here enough space in this newspaper isn’t to dissect universal life polito climb all over that. cies; the point is to go back to the And I’ll bet you real good part where something incompremoney that if you stop and think hensible showed up in the mail, about it, you’ll realize that you do and you don’t really get what it

means (because it’s written in Martian), but you know what you decided to understand and remember 24.5 years ago, and you don’t really have the energy or inclination to devote a lot of energy and inclination to trying to figure it out, so you put it “over there.” And there it stays, until something happens — and “something” is almost never good. Look, I know people in their 30s, 40s and 50s who aren’t very good at this stuff.

HELP LINE

Leap into information So, what many of us do at a time like this is jump into it with both feet and try to figure it out or go find somebody who knows what the heck this incomprehensible thing means. OK, so why doesn’t someone in their 80s do the very same thing? You know why, and so do I. And so do they, so from here on, let me just talk to them (elders), OK? Look, most of us have helped other people, one way or another, most of our lives. Maybe it was a “little” thing, maybe it was a “BIG” thing, maybe it took an hour, and maybe it took weeks and months and years. We did that because a) we’re decent human beings, and b) somebody needed that help, and we were able to provide it.

And we usually remember those times fondly because what we did made us feel good about us. We helped — genuinely, sincerely — and then we moved on. Somebody was better off because of something we did. It’s one of the nicer aspects of being a human on Earth: helping. So, ask somebody for help with that utterly incomprehensible thing. I know that isn’t always easy to do because it can make us feel “less than,” “stupid,” “weak” — old. But none of that is true. We haven’t gotten to here on a solo flight, so nothing has really changed except our own willingness to be brave. To have the courage to ask for, and accept, help. You probably would have done it when you were 40, so why not now? Besides, most financial stuff really is written in Martian, and most of us flunked that in high school.

_________ Mark Harvey is director of Clallam/Jefferson Information & Assistance, which operates through the Olympic Area Agency on Aging. He can be reached at 360-452-3221 (Port Angeles-Sequim), 360-385-2552 (Jefferson County) or 360374-9496 (West End); or by emailing harvemb@dshs.wa.gov. The agency can be found on Facebook at Olympic Area Agency on Aging-Information & Assistance.

Briefly . . . Women’s club to hear talk on depression PORT ANGELES — The Port Angeles Christian Women’s Club will meet for a luncheon at the Port Angeles CrabHouse Restaurant, 221 N. Lincoln St., at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday. Guest speaker Betty Barnett will discuss “Hope in the Darkness of Depression.” Lynne Trerise will share her crafts, including needlework, stitchery and

other hobbies. Julie Peabody will sing at the event. The cost is $15. To RSVP, phone 360-4524343 or 360-457-8261.

Timothy chose to take the trip at age 63 just three years after surviving a massive stroke. The book is an account of her adventures, challenges and the people she met while pedaling 12,000 Book group meets miles from Southern CaliPORT ANGELES — fornia, across the South, up Megan Timothy’s 12,000 Miles for Hope’s Sake will be the Eastern seaboard, back discussed by the PALS book across the Midwest and the Pacific Northwest to her discussion group at the library, 2210 S. Peabody St., journey’s end in Northern California. at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Print copies of the book March 27. are available at the library In the book, Timothy while supplies last. recounts her solo bicycle It also can be purchased journey across the United from Port Book and News at States.

a 20 percent discount by mentioning PALS. Preregistration for this program is not required. Drop-ins are welcome. For more, visit www.nols. org or contact Lorrie Kovell at 360-417-8500, ext. 7750, or lkovell@nols.org.

aries by integrating functional exercise and sound nutritional planning. Dungeness Valley Health & Wellness Clinic is Sequim’s free clinic. The clinic, supported by more than 70 volunteers, provides basic urgent care and chronic health care services to uninsured community members. The Basic Urgent Care Clinic is open to patients Monday and Thursday evenings beginning at 5 p.m. Those interested in supporting the clinic can phone 360-582-0218. Peninsula Daily News

speak for an hour at Trinity United Methodist Church, 100 N. Blake St. Ways to increase mobility and range of motion as well as strength will be presented, along with how to improve the body’s function and start to relieve muscle and join pain. As a registered nurse working with post-operative orthopedic patients, Stratton developed a strong focus on alignment, building strength and the prevention of injuries. She said she likes to challenge and encourage her clients to surpass their physical and mental bound-

Corrective exercise SEQUIM — The Dungeness Valley Health & Wellness Clinic will present a free WOW! Working on Wellness program on corrective exercise at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday. Shelley Stratton, a certified personal trainer, will

The New York Times Crossword Puzzle SEVEN BLURBS FOR SEVEN BIOGRAPHIES BY SAMUEL A. DONALDSON / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

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48 “You don’t have to be a gardener to dig this book about Kerouac’s tools” 52 Long time follower? 53 Sight at a supermarket or golf course 54 Pack number 55 Indisposed 56 Relief 57 Anesthesiologists’ locales, for short 58 “Finally, we learn how one Jonas brother defined an entire generation” 63 Jaguar rival 66 Frozen dessert name 67 It could pave the way 68 Second most populous continent: Abbr. 69 On the safe side 70 Legal helpers, briefly 73 “Clinton’s a wellknown southpaw, so this exposé on his other-handed punches is an eyeopener” 78 “Really?” 79 Writer ___ Hubbard 80 Many an aria 81 Notable flop 82 Chicago lakefront attraction 84 Family head 86 Nasty ones

87 “Required reading for all ‘Purple Rain’ fans who think their idol is too goody-goody” 91 Night lights 92 Very often 93 Take the lion’s share of 94 Duffer’s hazard 97 Drives a getaway car, maybe 98 British submachine gun 99 Reach rival 101 Duffer’s org. 102 Like some calls 103 “A gripping narrative about one folk singer’s violent turn against Paul Simon” 106 It beats ace-high 107 Open quality 108 “___ Restaurant” 109 Bulb unit 110 Northeast nickname 111 Political symbol DOWN 1 When many bars close 2 Fruity sodas 3 Dry ones 4 Abbr. sometimes seen twice in a row 5 Trivial Pursuit category: Abbr. 6 French press remnants 7 Des ___ 8 Lodges 9 Certain frat boy

10 Completely remove 25 26 11 Put teeth into 12 Fine-tune 29 30 13 Christian name? 35 36 14 Bond, for one 15 Winter supply 39 40 usually stored outside 43 16 Start of Willa 48 Cather’s Great Plains trilogy 53 17 Give an anticorrosive 57 58 coating 66 18 Check out 21 Cigarette purchase 70 71 72 23 Reflex test site 28 Start of an 78 elimination process 82 83 30 Reserved to the maximum extent 87 32 Some bathroom crystals 91 33 “___ your mother” 97 34 Like tweets, by necessity 102 36 “Tombstone” role 37 Some fight finishes, 106 for short 38 ___-Z (classic car) 109 39 Retailer for Rover 40 Composer of the 52 An ending to beat “Gold and Silver” 56 Prefix with phobia waltz 58 Receiving stats 44 Falco of “Nurse 59 Calif.-to-Fla. hwy. Jackie” 45 Be all thumbs as a 60 Blemish 61 N.B.A. part: Abbr. writer? 62 In that case 46 Word with pay or page 63 Plastic casing for some pills 49 Pale 64 Donnybrook 50 Food Network host Guy 65 Fargo’s partner 51 Former “Idol” judge 66 “Nice and slow”

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89 “Wheel of Fortune” category 90 Din 95 Match 96 Stooge 98 Actor LaBeouf 99 Spirit ___ Louis 100 String tie 102 Avian call 103 File extension 104 Mens ___ 105 End: Fr.


B6

THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 2013

Dilbert

Garfield

DEAR ABBY: I am writing to you because I can share this anonymously. I am close to 60 years old, and I’m terrified of the dentist. Every time I pick up the phone to make an appointment, I get so anxious I feel like I’m going to die. Do you think I will be able to find a caring, compassionate and nonjudgmental dentist? Are they out there? Sometimes, I wish I could die instead of going to the dentist. Am I crazy? Mrs. Anxiety in the USA

by Lynn Johnston

by Bob and Tom Thaves

by Jim Davis

Best of Momma

Abigail Van Buren

by Mell Lazarus

The Last Word in Astrology ❘

by Hank Ketcham

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Observe what’s going on around you. Now is not the time to make a move or to let others know what you are contemplating. Take better care of your health and financial position. 3 stars

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Look for a deal VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. that compliments your tal22): Greater interaction with ents and utilizes your experilike-minded people will lead ence. A unique presentation to new friendships as well as will lead to high demand for opportunities to utilize your what you have to offer. skills and diversify what you Someone from your past will have to offer in unusual help you resurrect an old ways. Love is in the stars plan. 3 stars and a close connection will be enhanced. 5 stars AQUARIUS (Jan. GEMINI (May 21-June 20-Feb. 18): Speak boldly 20): Proceed with caution. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. and honestly. Honesty will Be careful not to offer too 22): Your changeable attiwin you favors and respect. much for too little. Someone tude will result in criticism Changing old habits will help will try to take advantage of from someone you feel the you improve your living your good nature, skill and need to please. Don’t let arrangements and lifestyle. knowledge. Do your own emotions cause you to over- Someone just as unique as thing and try not to depend react or take on something you will want to join forces. on anyone else. Deception is you don’t feel good about Believe in your ability. 3 stars apparent. 3 stars pursuing. You must do what’s best for you. 2 stars PISCES (Feb. 19-March CANCER (June 21-July 20): Get involved in a cause 22): A money deal will get SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. that will bring you in contact rid of debt. Invest in your 21): Make a difference to the with people who have the ideas. Turn a hobby into a people you care about most. potential to help you prosperous endeavor. Love Your charm, originality and advance. Taking the stage is on the rise, and enjoying intuitive insight will lead you and presenting what you the company of someone down a path that will intrigue have to offer will result in a who shares your dream will some while making others partnership with someone help make it come true. proud to be by your side. who compliments you. 3 stars Love is in the stars. 4 stars 4 stars

ZITS ❘ by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Change your direction or the way you live your life by capping your spending habits and pushing harder to make more money. Taking a second job or sizing down to cut your overhead will allow you to advance personally. 3 stars

by Eugenia Last

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You’ll be in control. Concentrate on what you want and go about getting it by offering what you can to people who have something to contribute in return. Business and personal partnerships will help you expand your interests. 5 stars

by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

Dennis the Menace

giving these children loving and responsible care, and that is gift enough.

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, the late Pauline Phillips. Letters can be mailed to Dear Abby, P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069 or via email by logging onto www.dearabby.com.

Dear Gifted Out: Yes. When the newest addition to the family arrives, give your employer a nice card. You should not be expected to come up with a gift. You already are

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Sit back and relax. Time is on your side. Letting your emotions take over and making impulsive moves will be to your detriment. Recycle old ideas. A new and diverse approach will lead to greater prosperity. 2 stars

Rose is Rose

DEAR ABBY

Dear Abby: During the first year of our marriage, my husband cheated on me with women from his past as well as new encounters. Dear Mrs. Anxiety: Let me put When I confronted him, he promit this way: If you’re crazy, you have a ised to stop. lot of company. He would then call and email Many people fear going to the these women, tell them I was checkdentist; however, there have been ing up on him, and he’d contact them improvements in the field since you were a child — including sedation for later. This has gone on for years. people who choose “not to be there” He swears he’s no longer cheating, while their dental problems are being and we have sought counseling — attended to. Good dental health is very impor- which I stopped because the counselor and I agreed that my husband tant to our overall health, so please didn’t think he had a problem. don’t put off any further making an When I confront him with my susappointment. Tell the person who is booking the picions, he insists that I am “driving him away” by accusing him. appointment what your needs are, He is very arrogant, and people and if that dentist can’t accommowho don’t know him believe he’s a date you, ask for a referral to one great guy and I am the problem. who can. I have considered revenge cheatDear Abby: I have been a nanny ing, but it goes against my morals. I think about divorcing him, but for four families over the past 10 years. I am now working for a family then I think — what if I am wrong? What if he really is being faithful? of five. I don’t make a lot of money, What should I do? I love him. but I enjoy what I do. Unsure in Texas My problem is all the gift-buying I feel required to do — such as on the Dear Unsure: I agree that children’s birthdays, Christmas and “revenge” cheating is not the solution the mom’s birth of more babies. to your problem. My employer is expecting yet Hire a private detective to get to another baby this summer, and her 3-year-old has another birthday com- the bottom of this. If you’re wrong, you need counseling up. I’m tired of the gift-buying and ing to resolve your insecurities. really can’t afford to do it anymore. However, if he’s cheating, you will When the new baby is born, I am know you haven’t been imagining tempted to just say “Congratulathings and can decide rationally if it’s tions!” in your best interests to continue Any suggestions? being married to a womanizer. Gifted Out ________

by Brian Crane

Frank & Ernest

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Trip to dentist sets lady’s teeth on edge

by Scott Adams

For Better or For Worse

Pickles

Fun ’n’ Advice

Doonesbury

by Garry Trudeau

The Family Circus

by Bil and Jeff Keane


Classified

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FOUND: Dog. Small, very friendly, no microchip, call to identify. W. BOYS & GIRLS CLUB Do what you love to do 4026 Employment I s h i r i n g Te e n R o o m 4th St., P.A. and MAKE MONEY at (360)417-1729 General Staff, Computer Room the same time! For a Coordinator in Sequim. free CD and more inforTo apply visit AIDES/RNA OR CNA mation, please call: 3023 Lost www.bgc-op.org Best wages, bonuses. 206-745-2135 gin Wright’s. 457-9236. LOST: Bracelet. Glass Are you energetic and hand blown beads and WHY PAY willing to work hard? charms. Great sentimental value. Port Angeles SHIPPING ON Are you looking for a High School. 681-3045. INTERNET career instead of L O S T: D o g . Po m e ra CRITICAL CARE RN “just a job”? PURCHASES? n i a n , yo u n g , m i s s i n g Rare day shift opportus i n c e M a r. 1 , n e a r nities! Great pay and Do you possess all Swains. (360)477-3679 benefits for skilled RN of the following skills? SHOP LOCAL or (360)504-2784. with ACLS and solid CCU experience. • Positive work ethic EMAIL US AT Apply online at • Ability to follow dipeninsula classified@peninsula www.olympic dailynews.com • rections dailynews.com medical.org Willingness to learn or email • Ability to show up nbuckner@ daily and on time. olympicmedical.org Then we want you Executive Director to join our team. Our new location has increased volume dramatically For Sequim’s Free Clinand we are setting new sales records each and ic. Responsible for dePrior sawmill or velopment and adminisproduction line every month. We are looking for well rounded sales tration. For further info experience is a plus! professionals that know the meaning of working go to www.sequimfree smarter not harder. Honesty, integrity, good clinic.org No phone Excellent wage calls. Deadline March and benefits package. communication skills and a great work ethic required! 29th. Six figure earning potential, weekly bonuses, 401K, Shift work required. medical, paid vacation, 5 day work week, a great work HAIRTRIX has an opening available. Come enenvironment, and a two month paid training program Apply in person joy a fun and upbeat atat Interfor Pacific guaranteeing up to $3000/mo for the right person. mosphere. Stylist or nail 243701 Hwy 101 W. Perfect for the professional looking for a career change. tech. (360)681-3749. Port Angeles Send resume to: EEO/Drug Free Peninsula Classified Workplace Employer NewCareer@PriceFord.com 360-452-8435

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4080 Employment Wanted ADEPT YARD CARE Weeding, mowing, etc. (360)452-2034 Affordable Lawn Maintenance (360)477-1805 DOUG DOES DECKS (360)670-6844 #DOUGLLC894B7

TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD: CALL: 452-8435 TOLL FREE: 1-800-826-7714 FAX: 417-3507 VISIT: WWW.PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM OR E-MAIL: CLASSIFIED@PENINSULADAILYNEWS.COM DEADLINES: Noon the weekday before publication. ADDRESS/HOURS: 305 West First Street/P.O. Box 1330, Port Angeles, WA 98362. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays CORRECTIONS AND CANCELLATIONS: Corrections--the newspaper accepts responsibility for errors only on the first day of publication. Please read your ad carefully and report any errors promptly. Cancellations--Please keep your cancellation number. Billing adjustments cannot be made without it.

FRUIT TREES, ORNAMENTALS, LAWNS Don’t allow just anyone to hack your trees. I also provide full lawn service 105 Homes for Sale a t c o m p e t i t i ve r a t e s, Clallam County semi-retired. Many long standing references. PA Absolutely Beautiful only local, 808-2146. Quality throughout this 3 HANDYMAN: Inside or Br., 2.5 bath home on outside work. Call Mi- 1.5 acres with close up mountain view in Merrill chael (360)681-5383. Estates. Large deIMMACULATE Auto De- tached shop with 1/2 tailing Mobile Service. bath and RV garage in(360)670-9414 cluded. $525,000 JUAREZ & SON’S HANMLS#263882/383184 DY M A N S E R V I C E S . Harriet Reyenga Quality work at a rea(360)460-8759 sonable price. Can hanWINDERMERE dle a wide array of probPORT ANGELES lems projects. Like home maintenance, cleaning, Beautiful 1.16 acre parclean up, yard mainte- cel close to both Por t nance, and etc. Give us Angeles and Sequim. a call office 452-4939 or Po w e r a n d Wa t e r i n cell 460-8248. street on O’Br ien Rd. M o u n t a i n v i ew s. C a l l Kelly’s House Cleaning Clarice for more informaN e e d h e l p w i t h yo u r tion on the property. house cleaning? Call me $84,000 or send an email, I can MLS#250671 do weekly, bi-weekly, or Clarice Arakawa monthly maintenance of (360)460-4741 your house. My name is WINDERMERE Kelly, I am licensed and PORT ANGELES have been cleaning h o u s e s fo r 3 + ye a r s. BEST DEAL IN THE 360-440-3118 or email PARK kellydakota1@gmail. This 1994 triplewide ofcom fers 1,948 Sf. of comfort with plenty of room for LAWN MOWING all your belongings. The Reasonable, ref., Mark. oversized lot is gracious452-3076 or 477-7349 ly landscaped. This home also comes with O U R L AW N S a r e a l - an attached greenhouse ready growing! Can you and workshop and a two believe it? Call Scott for car garage. A lot of living h o n e s t , d e p e n d a b l e for a low, low price. lawn care at your home $105,000 or business. Ground MLS#264140 Control Lawn Care Doc Reiss 360-797-5782 (360)457-0456 WINDERMERE QUALITY REFERRALS PORT ANGELES For any project. (360)775-0968 DOMINION TERRACE RUSSELL 55+ in Sequim, 1 Br. ANYTHING condo, stove, washer Call today 775-4570. and dryer, fridge, water view! A great place to live! $76,000. Yardwork & Oddjobs (360)683-5917 M o w i n g , Tr i m m i n g , Weeding, Roto-Tilling EASY TO BUILD and any other yardwor k or oddjob ser- 1 acre on quiet cul-dev i c e . E x p e r i e n c e d sac, near Dungeness Honest Dependable. River, enjoy the Olympic $40 per hr. includes 2 Discovery Trail, utilities are all to property. men. (360)461-7772. $86,000 ML#295752/262281 Young couple, early sixTanya Kerr ties. available for fall (360)683-6880 clean up, moss removal, WINDERMERE clean gutters and misc SUNLAND yard care. Excellent references. 360-457-1213 Place your ad at www.peninsula peninsula dailynews.com dailynews.com

5000900

MISC: Sealy boxspring, king, 1 year old, paid $250, asking $150. Decoritive glass dining table, 4 chairs, glass hutch to match, beuatiHANDYMAN: Inside or ful, $250/obo. outside work. Call Mi(360)681-8034 Car Carrier: ‘80 great chael (360)681-5383. shape must see. $1,000/ P.A.: 1,500 sf, 2 Br., 1 obo. (949)677-0791 or Kelly’s House Cleaning ba, W/D, WiFi/TV, fenN e e d h e l p w i t h yo u r ced, close to bus, high (760)920-5808. house cleaning? Call me school and college. $900 or send an email, I can mo. (360)460-3032. do weekly, bi-weekly, or monthly maintenance of P.A.: Dorm-style apartyour house. My name is ment room for rent, next Kelly, I am licensed and to college, access to have been cleaning k i t c h e n , b a t h r o o m , h o u s e s fo r 3 + ye a r s. s h a r e d l i v i n g s p a c e . CRITICAL CARE RN 360-440-3118 or email $325. (360)461-3098. Rare day shift opportukellydakota1@gmail. nities! Great pay and RIFLE: Armalite AR-15, com benefits for skilled RN F l a t t o p, h e av y b a r r e l LAWN MOWING with ACLS and solid w i t h h a n d l e, a s n ew. Reasonable, ref., Mark. Best offer over $2,000. CCU experience. 452-3076 or 477-7349 Apply online at (360)912-1672 www.olympic L I FA N : ‘ 0 9 M o n k e y SEQUIM: Room for rent, medical.org Bike. 110cc. $800/obo. $350, ref required. or email (949)677-0791 or (360)457-6779 nbuckner@ (760)920-5808 olympicmedical.org SUPER GIRLIE Sale: TERRACE RUMMAGE S a t . , 9 - 2 p . m . , 1 1 2 DOWNTOWN SEQUIM Sale: Fri., 8-2 p.m., 114 Grace Lane. Clothes, 2 l a r g e B r. , 1 . 5 b a , E a s t 6 t h , b a ck d o o r. s h o e s , L OT S o f n ew Sherwood Village condo, Sports stuff, lots of LP swimsuits, make up, art, records, 45s, post cards, jewelry and home decor. with new appliances! 1/2 shot glass collection, Indoor sale, no earlies, (360)681-0253 odds and ends. cash only please. E S TAT E S a l e : Fr i . S a t . , 8 - 2 p. m . , 1 3 1 Freshwater Bay Road. Lots of misc.

4026 Employment 4026 Employment General General

105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale Clallam County Clallam County EXCELLENT COMMERCIAL Excellent location, topography and views of Strait Juan De Fuca to the Nor th & Olympic Mountain to the South. Walking distance to Peninsula College, contiguous to Assisted Retirement home and Skilled Nursing care. Parcel is within the high density city’s Master Plan, zoni n g i s R M D. # 2 7 0 2 9 6 $695,000 Call JEAN for details $695,000 MLS#270296 JEAN (360)683-4844 Windermere Real Estate Sequim East GORGEOUS Custom home with exposed beams and great character throughout. 1 mile to Freshwater Bay boat launch with beach access. Huge kitchen opening into dining and living areas, hardwood flooring and free standi n g w o o d s t o v e . To o much to list. Great fenced backyard as well. Come See! $238,000 ML#270266/444971 Mark Macedo (360)477-9244 TOWN & COUNTRY “H” IS FOR HOME SWEET HOME Gorgeous 4.90 acres of par tially cleared land with nice 2 Br. mobile home. Peek-A-Boo Water and Magnificent Mountain View. Garage and Barn too! There is even a seasonal pond. This is a must see! $187,900 Call Patti Morris (360)461-9008 JACE The Real Estate Company METICULOUS HOME Quiet city living at its best, new paint and newer roof, vaulted ceilings and great floor plan, large fenced city lot with fruit trees, walking distance to stores. $164,900 ML#450963/270354 Team Schmidt (360)683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

Impressive view of the harbor, Strait of Juan de Fuca, and Victoria nighttime lights from this custom Terhune rambler. The interior boasts of b e a u t i f u l wo o d f l o o r s and a living room with vaulted ceiling & propane fireplace. 3 BR, 2 bath, and a den-office complete a comfortable floor plan. Modestly priced at $310,000 for a view that few homes offer at this price. $310,000 MLS#270353/450357 Michaelle Barnard (360)461-2153 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES

STAYCATION Buy this condo now and you can spend the summer tubing, jet skiing, water skiing, kayaking, boating and fishing on Lake Sutherland. This 2 bed, 2.5 bath Maple Grove Condo is located on the sunny side of the lake . Common areas include a fire pit, private dock with your own 26’ boat slip, paddle boats and a boat launch. $239,900 MLS# 270269 Terry Neske (360)477-5876 WINDERMERE PORT ANGELES

Write ads that get RESULTS Description Description Description Let your potential buyer get a mental picture of your item OR add a picture to your ad! Classified customers are smart consumers. The ones with money call the good ads first! 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 www.peninsula dailynews.com PENINSULA CLASSIFIED


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B8 THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 2013

DOWN 1 Jogging instrument? 2 Unwritten test 3 Roofer’s purchase 4 Hard water? 5 Going up against 6 Part for a singer 7 Oz visitor

By DAVID OUELLET HOW TO PLAY: All the words listed below appear in the puzzle –– horizontally, vertically, diagonally, even backward. Find them and CIRCLE THEIR LETTERS ONLY. DO NOT CIRCLE THE WORD. The leftover letters spell the Wonderword. JACK KLUGMAN (1922-2012) Solution: 8 letters

T A L E N T E D D O K A A D Y By Joel D. Lafargue

8 TiVo ancestor 9 So far 10 It precedes “Substituted Ball” in the Definitions section of the “Rules of Golf” 11 Pickled veggie 12 First family member 13 Tropicana Field team 18 Date-setting phrase 19 Rich relatives? 23 “Count __!” 24 Story-telling song 25 Handyman’s approx. 26 Shaggy’s pal, to Shaggy 27 Unsettled state 28 Not straight up 29 With money at stake 30 Violinist’s supply 31 Member of the Five College Consortium, familiarly 32 Swimmer’s need 33 Temper tantrum 38 World No. 1 tennis player between Martina and Monica

3/7/13 Wednesday’s Puzzle Solved

LOVELY VIEW COTTAGE! Well built craftsman cottage with Sequim Bay View! All the charm of yesterday with upgrades & amenities for comfort living today! 2 Br., Plus Loft, 2.5 bath, easy lowmaint living in secure community of high-end cottages with HOA amenities in Sequim! New price reflects sellers need to sell. Not a short sale! $274,900. OLS#262788 NWMLS#439932 Deborah or Rod Brokers Group Real Estate Professionals (360)808-3815

MOVE IN READY 3 Br., 2 bath, over 1,500 S f. , S. ex p o s u r e a n d mountain views, landscape recreated with garden space, adjacent to greenbelt, backyard shed and new roof. $178,500 ML#363705/263522 Patty Terhune (360)683-6880 WINDERMERE SUNLAND

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J E M I T H G I S N I L K A J 3/7

Adam, Army, Arts, Banyon, Ben, Boat, Boils, Buck, Canary, Casey, Clark, Couple, Crosby, Drama, Film, Follow, Golden, Grouchy, Gunsmoke, Hail Mafia, Herbie, Horses, Icon, Insight, Jacob, Jaklin, Jemi, Joachim, Jury, Justice, Madison, Odd, Oscar, Quincy, Racetrack, Randall, Ride, Split, Talented, Tchin, Terror, Thug, Tony, Twilight, Vince, Willie, Yellow, Zone Yesterday’s Answer: Funny

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

FARWD ©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

BOATO (c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

41 Abundant, plantwise 44 Tax shelter letters 47 Become pitiless 48 Ascribed, as blame 49 Old Testament queen 52 Mushroom piece 53 Club where “music and passion were always the fashion,” in song

Bright, cheerful and spacious home, custom upgrades, in quiet and convenient neighborhood. 2,600 sf, 3 Br, 2.75 bath, m a n u fa c t u r e d h o m e , open floor plan, vaulted ceilings, skylights, master suite and 2 car att a c h e d g a r a g e . Po r t Hadlock Heights. Photos and specifications by request. $138,800. FSBO. (360)531-2458

311 For Sale Manufactured Homes MOBILE for Sale in AZ. Quartzsite, AZ: 1 Br., 2 bath mobile in “Q Vista” development. Large lot with two out buildings, one with washer hookup, c ove r e d M ex i c a n t i l e patio, fenced yard and g a t e d d r i v e w a y. $59,500. (360)437-7706. P.A.: Single wide 2 Br., in all ages park. $3,000/ obo or possible trade for SUV/4x4. (360)808-0670

JAMES & ASSOCIATES INC. Property Mgmt. HOUSES/APT IN P.A. A 1 br 1 ba..............$475 H 1 br 1 ba..............$500 A 2 br 1.5 ba...........$695 H 2 br 1 ba..............$700 H 3 br 2 ba..............$880 H 2 br 1.5 ba bluff..$990 H 2 br 1.5 ba 5 ac.$1000 H 3+ br 1 ba lake..$1350 JOYCE H 2 br 1 ba..............$700 H 4 br 2 ba 5 ac....$1200 More Properties at www.jarentals.com

54 “Right on!” 55 Fries seasoning 56 Menu choice after an “oops” 57 Dancing blunder 58 Folksy Guthrie 59 Rostov rejection 61 Sox, in line scores 62 Boy toy? 63 Send packing 605 Apartments Clallam County Accepting applications for studio apts, $300. 1 Br., $450. Plus electric. Income limits apply. 360-457-7785

CENTRAL P.A.: Clean, quiet, 2 Br., excellent r e fe r e n c e s r e q u i r e d . $700. (360)452-3540. CLEAN P.A. UNIT Apt. 2 Br., W/D.......$650 (360)460-4089 www.mchughrents.com

DOWNTOWN SEQUIM P.A.: 1,500 sf, 2 Br., 1 2 l a r g e B r. , 1 . 5 b a , ba, W/D, WiFi/TV, fen- Sherwood Village condo, ced, close to bus, high with new appliances! (360)681-0253 school and college. $900 mo. (360)460-3032. P.A.: 1 Br., 2nd floor, P.A.: 2 Br., 1 ba, mobile $500/mo, $500 dep., first with addition, fruit trees, month prorated. (360)452-4409 fenced 1/2 ac. $700 mo. (360)504-2599 P.A.: Historic Washington Apartments at 519 S. Oak. 1 bedroom apartment available. Near park, centrally located. Properties by Landmark, Inc. (360)452-1326.

SEQUIM: Dbl. wide, 2 Br., 2 ba, 65+ park, remodeled throughout, easy care yard. $40,000. P.A.: 2 Br., 2 ba, gar., (360)683-9674 W/D, ref, new carpet and paint, 55+ comm, wheelSWEET BUNGALOW chair access, pets OK. 314 Real Estate for 3 Bedroom, 1 bath, 874 Sale - Other Areas $1,200. (360)461-1843. Sf., built in 1936, 0.48 P.A.: 2 Br., walk-in closacre, end of dead-end et, W/D, covered deck, st., large garage with patio, 2 car port/storage. workshop & loft, fenced No pets. Dep and ref. back yard, abuts a $795. (360)808-4476. greenbelt, concrete patio, greenhouse. P.A.: Dorm-style apart$135,000. MLS#270313. ment room for rent, next Team Thomsen to college, access to (360)417-2782 Custom 4,800 sf home k i t c h e n , b a t h r o o m , COLDWELL BANKER on 166 acres of excel- s h a r e d l i v i n g s p a c e . UPTOWN REALTY lent farm ground, many $325. (360)461-3098. This is an amazing price amenities includes heat- P.A.: Furnished 2 Br., 1 for a home with every- ed shop, located in East- ba, Feb. 22-June 3. See thing you want: 3 Br., 2 er n Oregon call for a www.pacr.biz $900 mo., bath home in Sequim complete brochure $450 wk. (360)461-4700 $795,000 with wood flooring, dou(541)568-4585 ble bathroom sinks, Properties by granite and tile counterLandmark. portangelest o p s , c o v e r e d f r o n t 505 Rental Houses landmark.com porch, low maintenance Clallam County SEQUIM: 1 Br., 1 ba on l a n d s c a p i n g , va u l t e d acreage. $650. ceilings, and plenty of (360)460-4294 square footage! $194,900 MLS#264205 WEST SIDE P.A. Thelma Durham Nice 3 Br., 1 bath, no (360)460-8222 smoking, no pets. WINDERMERE $850 mo., 1st, last, PORT ANGELES plus deposit. (360)582-7171 AVAILABLE NOW TRULY CAREFREE Large, 2 Br., 1 bath duLIVING We l l a p p o i n t e d o p e n plex in nice area. No 520 Rental Houses Jefferson County c o n c e p t , s i n g l e l eve l smoking, Garage opt. townhouse, gorgeous fp. $695. (360)457-9641. P.T.: Lg. 2 Br., 2 ba on and coffered ceilings, WANTED: Home. Wid- h o r s e a c r e a g e. $ 9 0 0 master suite with soakowed person needs low- mo., 1st, last, dep. i n g t u b a n d s h o w e r, rent home or land with (360)452-1010 weather protected 3 seautilities for trailer, nonsons room with fp. s m o ke r, h ave p e t s . $338,395 605 Apartments Needed A S A P. ML#442471/270226 Clallam County (360)775-8011. Terry Peterson (360)683-6880 PA L O A LTO, S E Q : 1 P.A.: 1 Br. lg. apt., waWINDERMERE Br. cabin, W/D $700, 1 ter view, quiet, clean. SUNLAND yr. lease. 683-4307. $615 mo. (206)200-7244

3/7/13

DRETNY

SUDSIC Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Print answer here: Yesterday’s

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: QUILT CLOUT PROVEN DONKEY Answer: If a penny came to life, it would become — “CENT-IENT”

1163 Commercial Rentals

6050 Firearms & Ammunition

6075 Heavy Equipment

6080 Home Furnishings

SPACE NEEDED Non-profit sports league seeking 10,000 sf space for practice and spor ting events, etc. Warehouse, shop, garage, hangar, empty storage area, etc. Any flat space sitting empty, give us a call! (206)890-8240

AMMO AND PRIMERS 30-06, $1 per round. 44 magnum, 50¢ per round. 30M 1 carbine, 50¢ per round. 45 caliber, 50¢ per round. 32 caliber, 50¢ per round. 7.62x39, 40¢ per round. 22 caliber, $30 box. (360)683-9899

GMC ‘99 C3500 HD 10’ DUMP TRUCK 7.4 liter V8, auto, dual rear wheels, heavy duty 1-ton chassis, 15,000 lb. G . V. W. , o n l y 8 7 , 0 0 0 miles, clean and reliable 1-owner corporate lease r e t u r n , n o n - s m o k e r, spotless “Autocheck” vehicle history report, runs and drive great. hurry! $8,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

MISC: La-Z-Boy Sectional couch, $300. Seal y, f u l l - s i ze m a t t r e s s, $75. Queen boxspring and mattress, $100. Recliners, $75. Loveseat, $50. Solid oak dining table, $100. (2) livingroom chairs, $100. (360)461-4084

GUNS: Remmington 760 pump, 30.06, with 4x scope, $350. Remming1170 Getaways ton 870, 12 ga, 3” mag, Vaction Rentals v e n t e d r i b, e x t r a f u l l choke tube, $300. Palm Desert, CA vaca(360)452-7823 tion rental. Call for rates. (360)460-3578 HANDGUN: New Beretta 9mm, semi-automatic, 6005 Antiques & (2) 13 round magazines, gun lock, very nice. Collectibles $600 (360)460-2689 ANTIQUE Button Collection: Most from 1800s- HANDGUNS: XDm 5.25 1 9 0 0 s e r a . M e t a l s , Comp 45 NIB complete glass, etc. $1,200. kit, $850. Browning (360)681-5205 after 12 Buckmark Micro, $350. noon for more info. S&W M&P 22, $300.

BEDROOM SET: 1940s Duncan Phyfe mahogony bedroom set. Sets of drawers, full-sized bed frame with footboard and P.A.: Upstairs 2 Br., 1 headboard, vanity with bath, remodeled. $650. mirror and stool. $450. 360-670-9418 (360)457-9060 or (360)461-3691. Properties by Landmark. portangelesSEWING MACHINE landmark.com Singer Featherweight, ‘52, accessories, works fine. $400/obo. 665 Rental (360)452-5003 Duplex/Multiplexes CENTRAL P.A.: 2 Br., 2 bath. Fireplace, garage. 6010 Appliances W / D. N o s m o k i n g o r pets. $800. 460-8797. RANGE: Electric P.A.: 2 Br., no smoke, Smooth-top Range. 30” no pets. $650. 1st, last E l e c t r i c S m o o t h - t o p Jenn Aire slide-in range. dep. (360)460-7235. Excellent condition. Convention oven and warm683 Rooms to Rent ing drawer. Black glass Roomshares with stainless accents. $650. (360)385-3342. SEQUIM: Room for rent, WASHER AND DRYER $350, ref required. LG Front Loading (360)457-6779 Tr o m m , 4 . 0 u l t r a c a with steam fresh 1163 Commercial pacity, cycle, red with pedistal Rentals drawers on bottom, 3 years new. $1000. PROPERTIES BY (360)452-1111 or LANDMARK (360)912-0225 452-1326

Ruger 10/22 rifle with 25-rd mag Red Dot & more, $450. Numerous conceal carry holsters. (360)477-0321 MISC: S&W 627-0, 357, 5 . 5 ” , s t a i n l e s s, ex t ra grips, holster, excellent condition, $800. Win M70 Sporter 338 mag, leupold 3x9, sling, case, excellent condition with 30 rounds ammo, $800. (360)582-9218 RIFLE: Armalite AR-15, F l a t t o p, h e av y b a r r e l w i t h h a n d l e, a s n ew. Best offer over $2,000. (360)912-1672 WANTED: Flint lock rifle. (360)457-7022

6055 Firewood, Fuel & Stoves

6080 Home Furnishings BEDROOM SET: King size bed with headboard (all bedding), 2 dressers (1 tall, 1 long), 2 night stands. $800/obo. (360)775-4301

S O FA : G r a y, d o u b l e lounge. $300. (360)452-4279

6100 Misc. Merchandise

MISC: Sealy boxspring, king, 1 year old, paid $250, asking $150. Decoritive glass dining table, 4 chairs, glass hutch to match, beuatiful, $250/obo. (360)681-8034

Harrison Sold His Ford In The Peninsula Classifieds. And you can sell your car in the Peninsula Classifieds even if you’re selling your Chevy and your name is Chase.

FIREPLACE: Propane freestanding, 30,000 BTU, convection blower, remote battery operated thermostat. $1,400. (360)417-3693 FIREWOOD: $179 delivered Sequim-P.A. True cord. 3 cord special for $499. Credit card accepted. 360-582-7910. www.portangeles firewood.com

6025 Building SEQUIM: 1,000/2,000 sf., across from the Post Materials Office, 151 and 153 Sunnyside, rent neg., CEDAR SIDING 6075 Heavy avail. May 1. Currant oc- Quality, dry, 1 x boards, Equipment c u p a n t Wa ve B r o a d - exterior siding and interiband. (360)683-6789. or panelling. 8’ and 10’ SEMI END-DUMP lengths, 4”-12” widths, SEQUIM: 500 sf office, $1,200 per 1000’. Will TRAILER: 30’. Electric Hwy. 101 frontage. $495 sell by board. Call for tar p system, excellent condition. $7,500. mo. (360)775-7146. prices. (360)452-7823. (360)417-0153 PLACE YOUR 6045 Farm Fencing Visit our website at AD ONLINE www.peninsula & Equipment With our new dailynews.com Classified Wizard Or email us at you can see your MISC: Fir boards 2” x 6” classified@ ad before it prints! x 10’, $4.50 ea. Fence peninsula www.peninsula posts, 4” x 6” x 8’, $6 ea. dailynews.com dailynews.com (360)452-7823

6A113352

WHY PAY SHIPPING ON INTERNET PURCHASES?

E K O M S N U G A O M S A A R

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

105 Homes for Sale 105 Homes for Sale 120 Homes for Sale 505 Rental Houses Clallam County Clallam County Clallam County Jefferson County INVESTORS! Well maintained duplex. Upper level includes 2 bedrooms, 1 bath with propane fireplace insert. Duplex has all permits, many upgrades and is energy efficient. Separ- OPEN HOUSE March ate utilities, and separ- 9 and 10, 1-3:00, 3182 ate parking areas. Ma- B l u e M o u n t a i n R d . ture landscaping with Luxury estate for sale. area for a garden. Beau- 4,400 sf. home with 5 tiful expansive views of Br., 5 bath, 19.6 acres the Strait of Juan De Fu- of forests, grasses and ca, Port Angeles Harbor, gardens. Built in 1997, shipping lanes, Victoria professional kitchen, B,C., Mt. Baker as well master suite with fireplace, hydrotherapy as the Olympics. tub & walk-in shower. $269,900. MLS#270364. NWMLS 40941 Jean Irvine (360)460-5601 COLDWELL BANKER PEACEFUL SETTING UPTOWN REALTY Down a private country lane, but close to town, JUST LISTED 234 E. Ahlvers, a great 3 this immaculate home bedroom on a large cor- on an acre, is a keeper! ner lot. Master bath in- W i t h 3 B r. , 2 . 5 b a t h , c l u d e s a wa l k - i n t u b. 2,017 Sf., beautiful garOther features include dens, a water feature, fenced back yard, 2 car decks, hot tub, gourmet garage and a fireplace kitchen, heat pump, skyw i t h i n s e r t . A s k yo u r lights & a basement with agent about Seller Con- 2 w o r k s h o p s / h o b b y rooms. cessions. ML#270348. $325,000. $165,000. ML#270366. KATHY LOVE Dave Ramey 452-3333 (360)417-2800 PORT ANGELES COLDWELL BANKER REALTY UPTOWN REALTY

J U S T I C E D I R Z R D R I

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ACROSS 1 Theme 6 Woody’s “Annie Hall” role 10 Slash mark? 14 NBC’s “Weekend Today” co-anchor Hill 15 Some parasites 16 Marching band instrument 17 See 60-Across 20 “Viva el matador!” 21 Has the stage 22 Winter airs 23 Plastic __ Band 24 Summoning gesture 26 See 60-Across 34 Big name in big banking 35 Nick-named actor 36 Miss Piggy, to Miss Piggy 37 Neglects to mention 39 Communication no one hears: Abbr. 40 Cabbage salads 42 At an angle: Abbr. 43 Leg bone 45 Applications 46 See 60-Across 50 “... to market, to buy __ pig ...” 51 Smudge on Santa’s suit 52 Snowman’s accessory 55 Hearing subject 57 Summer shade 60 Trio suggested by the answers to 17-, 26- and 46Across 64 Sword with a guarded tip 65 Kept 66 Shah’s fate 67 “Buddenbrooks” novelist 68 Wild about 69 Provide room for growth, perhaps

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PENINSULA DAILY NEWS 6100 Misc. Merchandise

6100 Misc. Merchandise

CARGO TRAILER Small, home crafted, 40� x 72� box, 1 piece galvanized steel floor, selfcontained 2 piece ramp, 1 piece steel-guard frame, and lights. Must see @ 43 E. Pheasant Lane, Sequim. $500. (360)683-1532

6115 Sporting Goods

MISC: Chest freezer, $100. Upright, $200. 3/4 size fridge, $75. (2) wood/cook stoves, $200 ea. Oak antique dresser, mirror, $100. New Anderson wood windows, misc. sizes, $40-$500. Evenings and weekends, (360)775-0911.

CHAINSAW: Stihl 15� excellent condition. $250 M OV I N G S A L E : B e d (360)320-7112, Sequim. room set, $300. Dining room set, $350. RefrigGOLF CART: ‘05 EZ- erator, $100. Love seat, GO Cart, electric, load- $75. Wicker chairs, $20 ed, CD player, aluminum ea. Lamps, $5-10 ea. w h e e l s , t u r n s i g n a l , Pictures, $5-$10. horn, new batteries, lift (360)437-0362 kit. $4,500. (360)461-0088. RING: Princess cut alG R I Z Z LY B E A R : 7 ’ most 1/4 carat diamond, chainsaw carved Alaska 1 4 k a r a t ye l l ow g o l d Grizzly Bear. This is a band, size 5.5. $450. beautiful chainsaw (360)374-9320 car ved bear. Nowdays you don’t see this type of SHED: 12x20 Timber carving, the attention of Iron built, insulated, on detail of the whole bear skids, door, 2 windows. is something to see. A $4,000/obo man who called himself (360)808-3329 “Buzz� carved it and we h ave h a d i t fo r m a ny y e a r s . I a m a s k i n g TICKETS: Professional $2,000 for the bear. Any Bull Riding Finals, Tacoquestions please contact ma Dome, March 9-10, 2 front row tickets for SatDavid Barnes 683-5796. urday and 2 second row tickets for Sunday. Place your ad at $408 for all peninsula (360)460-3391 dailynews.com

6140 Wanted & Trades

BUYING FIREARMS Any & All - Top $ Paid One or Entire Collection Including Estates Call (360)477-9659.

6125 Tools M I S C TO O L S : D e l ta/Rockwell 10� uni-saw, quanitity of accessories, $700. De Walt 10� industrual quality radial arm saw, fully restored to 1957 factory specs, $500. Grizzley G0604ZX jointer with spiral carbide cutter head, $400. Delta 10� compound miter saw, $50. Porter Cable p l u n g e r o u t e r, $ 1 5 0 . Grizzley G6049 14 or 15 gague pneumatic angle finish nailer, $75. (360)457-6134 SIDING EQUIPMENT (2) 24’ and (2) 12’ aluminum poles, 2 sleeves, 3 pump jacks, $1,200. (1) 24’ aluminum/wood plank, $300. (1) 24’ fiberglass ladder, $150. (1) 28’ aluminum ladder, $200. (360)460-5738.

6135 Yard & Garden

THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 2013 B9

8142 Garage Sales 8182 Garage Sales 7045 Tack, Feed & Sequim PA - West Supplies

BOOKS WANTED! We MISC: John Deere lawn love books, we’ll buy tractor, L110, 42� mowyours. 457-9789. ing deck, 317 operationRISSA’S now accepting al hours, like new in both w e d d i n g d r e s s e s fo r operation and appearance, $750. Metal dump consignment. 797-1109. car t, fits lawn tractor, W A N T E D : H o u s e . 3.5’ x 2.75’, $60. Scott 1,200-1,500 sf, single AcuGreen 3000 lawnlevel, yard, garage, 3 s p r e d e r, $ 2 5 . R y o b i Br., 1.5 bath, in PA city S 4 3 0 , 3 0 c c , 4 c y c l e limits. Buying with cash! s t r i n g t r i m m e r, $ 3 0 . Negotiable on all counts! Shop-vac, wet/dr y, 10 gal., with hose and at(360)808-9702. tachments, $35. WANTED: Radio tubes, (360)582-0932 HAM and antique radio estates, old phone equip. (503)999-2157. 8120 Garage Sales

E S TAT E S a l e : Fr i . S a t . , 8 - 2 p. m . , 1 3 1 Freshwater Bay Road. Lots of misc.

H AY F O R S A L E . 2 7x16 Interstate Cargo / Str ing bale, green, in Utility Trailer 2008 Black $3800 Excellent condiBarn. $9. tion, less than 300 miles (360)683-3655 on it! Call 360-928-0214

7035 General Pets 9820 Motorhomes

MOVING SALE for Guys a n d G a l s. H o u s e h o l d goods for the “Gals� furniture and lots of odds and ends - AND a garage full of “Guy� stuff RV supplies, tools, fishing and sporting goods. Fr i d ay a n d S a t u r d ay Jefferson County only - March 8, 9 - 9:00 WANTED TO BUY a.m. to 4:00 p.m. - Come Salmon/bass plugs and see for yourself - 415 lures, P.A. Derby me- MOVING Sale: Sat., 9-3 Dungeness Meadows. morabilia (360)683-4791 p.m., 364 Port Hadlock Heights, off Elkins Rd. 8180 Garage Sales NEED EXTRA b e h i n d J e f f. C o. Ja i l . PA - Central Fur niture, some tools CASH! and fishing gear, and TERRACE RUMMAGE lots more. Sale: Fri., 8-2 p.m., 114 Sell your E a s t 6 t h , b a ck d o o r. Treasures! 8142 Garage Sales Sports stuff, lots of LP records, 45s, post cards, Sequim 1/2 shot glass collection, 360-452-8435 1-800-826-7714 SUPER GIRLIE Sale: odds and ends. S a t . , 9 - 2 p. m . , 1 1 2 LONG DISTANCE www.peninsula Grace Lane. Clothes, No Problem! dailynews.com s h o e s , L OT S o f n ew swimsuits, make up, art, jewelry and home decor. Peninsula Classified PENINSULA 1-800-826-7714 Indoor sale, no earlies, CLASSIFIED cash only please.

FREE: Adult male rat, cage, food, and accessories, very friendly. (360)704-9407

9802 5th Wheels

5TH WHEEL: ‘89 Prowler Lynx 215. New raised a x l e s, 1 2 0 vo l t r e fe r, great shape, fully equipped, comes with hitch. $3,250. (360)460-6248, eves.

LAB PUPPIES $50. (360)670-5768. POMERANIANS: Purebred female puppies. $400/obo (662)347-4981 or (662)347-6922

9832 Tents & Travel Trailers

M OTO R H O M E : 1 9 8 9 Fleetwood Limited 37J. new 460 Ford Banks exhaust system, HYD leveling jacks, 2 tvs, nonsmoker, 5.5 Onan generator, driver and passenger side doors, oak cabinets, corian countertops, hardwood floors. $20,000. (360)417-0619

MOTOR HOME: ‘89 27’ Citation Supreme. Gas, 45K, 460 Ford engine, new tires and refrigeration unit. $4,000. PUPPY: Bernese Moun(360)460-3708 tain, male, 6 months, lively, loving, healthy needs close companion, MOTOR HOME: ‘90 34’ microchip, and shots, Bounder. 35,000 miles, beautiful markings. Of- gas ‘454’ Chev V8, good condition, needs work. fered at $1,500. $6,700/obo. 452-9611. (360)683-7001

9808 Campers & Canopies

CAMPER: 2002 Lance Camper Model 845 for short bed. Exclnt cond-used twice. Extended cabover w/queen-size bed. D i n e t t e c o nve r t s t o b e d . S h ow e r i s f u l l hght. Fresh water flush toilet. Blue int. $8795. (360)477-4778

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INC.

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Cash Struxness 360.477.0014 cell cashstruxness@gmail.com Strait View Window Cleaning LLC Biodegradable Cleaners Commercial @ Residential Licensed @ Bonded

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Removal of popcorn or acoustic ceilings & Water Damage & Smoke Damage Removal of wallpaper & Repair of cracks and holes & Texture to match

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YOUR LOCAL FULL-SERVICE DEALER & PARTS SOURCE Please call or visit our showrooms for lowest prices on

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Classified

B10 Thursday, March 7, 2013

Peninsula Daily News

2008 CHEVROLET TRAILBLAZER LS

2010 TOYOTA PRIUS

2005 CHEVROLET MALIBU

2010 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT

4X4 4.2L 6 CYL, AUTO, 4X4, AC, CRUISE, AM/FM/CD, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, KEYLESS, PRIV GLASS, ROOF RACK, TOW PKG, SIDE AIRBAGS, ALLOYS, ONLY 33K MILES! BEAUTIFUL 1 OWNER CORP LEASE RETURN, NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS “AUTOCHECK” REPORT, JUST REDUCEDV.I.N.S $1000! POSTED AT Expires 4/4/13

$15,995

DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

AWD GAS/ELECT HYBRID, VERY, VERY ECONOMICAL 1.8L 4 CYL, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD, KEYLESS ENTRY, SIDE AIRBAGS, ALLOYS, ONLY 35K MILES! VERY, VERY CLEAN 1 OWNER CORP LEASE RETURN, NON-SMOKER, BAL OF FACT 3/36, 5/60, 8/100 WARR, EPA RATED 51 CITY/48 HWY MPG! V.I.N.S POSTED AT

ECONOMICAL 2.4L 4 CYL, AUTO, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/ FM/CD, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & SEAT, KEYLESS ENTRY, PWR ADJ PEDALS, SIDE AIRBAGS, 76K MILES, VERY CLEAN LOCAL CAR, NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS “AUTOCHECK” REPORT, SENIOR-OWNED, EPA RATED 24 CITY/35 HWY MPG V.I.N.S POSTED AT

ECONOMICAL 2.4L 4 CYL, AUTO, AWD, AC, CRUISE, TILT, AM/FM/CD/SAT W/ BOSTON ACOUSTICS, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MOONROOF, PRIV GLASS, KEYLESS ENTRY, ROOF RACK, SIDE AIRBAGS, ONLY 35K MILES! BAL OF FACT 5/100 WARR, VERY, VERY CLEAN 1 OWNER CORP LEASE RETURN, NON-SMOKER, SPOTLESS “AUTOCHECK” REPORT, NEAR-NEW CONDITION! V.I.N.S POSTED AT

Expires 4/4/13

Expires 4/4/13

Expires 4/4/13

$19,995

DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

$7,995

DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

$16,495

DEALERSHIP. A NEGOTIABLE $50 DOCUMENT SERVICE FEE WILL BE CHARGED ON ALL TRANSACTIONS.

Race St., REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles MOTORS 457-9663

Race St., Race St., REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles MOTORS 457-9663 MOTORS 457-9663

2001 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT GLS SEDAN

1997 MAZDA PROTÉGÉ LX SEDAN

2004 CHEVROLET BLAZER 4X4

1997 SUBARU LEGACY OUTBACK AWD WGN

113K ORIG MILES! 1 OWNER! 1.8L TURBO 4 CYL, 5 SPD MAN, SILVER IN GOOD SHAPE W/BLACK CLOTH IN GREAT SHAPE! MOONROOF, HTD SEATS, CASS, SIDE AIRBAGS, TRAC CTRL, CRUISE, TILT, ALLOYS W/70+% MICHELIN RUBBER! 29+MPG! GREAT LITTLE PASSAT @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

121K ORIG MILES, 1.5L DOHC 4 CYL, AUTO, DK MET RED IN GREAT SHAPE W/TAN CLOTH IN GREAT COND! PWR WINDOWS, MIRRORS, ALPINE CD W/AUX INPUT, CRUISE, TILT, DUAL AIRBAGS, AC, 30 MPG! CLEAN LITTLE FUEL SIPPER @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

95K ORIG MILES! 4.3L VORTEC V6, AUTO, BLACK IN GREAT SHAPE W/BLACK CLOTH IN GREAT COND! SONY CD W/AUX, CRUISE, TILT, AC, PRIV GLASS, ROOF RACK, ALLOYS, REAL NICE LITTLE BLAZER @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

133K ORIG MILES! 2.5L FLAT 4 CYL, AUTO, LOADED! 2 TONE RED/GOLD IN GOOD SHAPE! BLACK LEATHER IN GOOD COND! JVC CD, AC, DUAL AIRBAGS, CRUISE, TILT, ROOF RACK, ALLOYS W/80% RUBBER! 2 OWNER! NICE LITTLE SUBIE @ OUR NO HAGGLE PRICE OF ONLY

Carpenter Auto Center

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681-5090

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681-5090

681-5090

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$5,995

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

www.reidandjohnson.com

$3,695

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

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$5,995

87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

Race St., REID & JOHNSON 1stPortat Angeles MOTORS 457-9663

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87 Dryke Rd. & Hwy 101 • Sequim, WA

2001 HYUNDAI ACCENT 2 DOOR HATCHBACK

2004 CHEVROLET ASTRO VAN

2006 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER TOURING ED.

PRICE REDUCED!

9,500 MILES!

AWD

4.3L VORTEC V6, AUTO, ALLOYS, PRIV GLASS, ROOF RACK, KEYLESS ENTRY, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, REAR DUTCH DRS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, ONLY 89K MILES! THIS IS YOUR CHANCE TO OWN ONE OF THE LAST OF THESE POPULAR ASTRO VANS THAT WERE EVER PRODUCED! ONE OF THE SAFEST PASSENGER VEHICLES ACCORDING TO THE IIHS!

2.4L 4 CYL, AUTO, GOOD TIRES, PRIV GLASS, KEYLESS ENTRY, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD, CENTER CONSOLE, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, THAT IS NOT A MISSPRINT! THIS PT CRUISER REALLY ONLY HAS 9,500 ORIG MILES! ONLY 1 PREV OWNER! CLEAN CARFAX! THIS CAR IS IN LIKE-NEW COND INSIDE & OUT! WHY PAY FOR NEW?

1.8L VVT-i 4 CYL, AUTO, ALLOYS, PWR WINDOWS, LOCKS & MIRRORS, CRUISE, TILT, AC, CD, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, ONLY 85K MILES! SPARKLING CLEAN INSIDE & OUT! LEGENDARY TOYOTA RELIABILITY! AWD FOR ALL WEATHER PERFORMANCE! THIS IS TOYOTA’S ANSWER TO THE SUBARU, AND IT’S A GOOD ONE! 31 MPG HWY RATED! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

1.5L 4 CYL, 5 SPD MAN , GOOD TIRES, JVC CD, DUAL FRT AIRBAGS, ONLY 91K MILES! EXCELLENT FUEL MILEAGE! THIS IS ONE FUN & ECONOMICAL LITTLE HATCHBACK! STOP BY GRAY MOTORS TODAY!

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

TRADES WELCOME • FINANCING AVAILABLE

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

www.graymotors.com CALL 457-4901 Since 1957 1-888-457-4901 1937 E. First, Port Angeles

1999 VOLVO V70 GLT

2008 TOYOTA RAV4

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$6,995

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GET A GREAT DEAL ON USED WHEELS FROM THESE AUTO SALES PROFESSIONALS

$9,995

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GREAT

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$3,995

GRAY MOTORS

53K

MILES! SWEET VOLVO WAGON! ONE OWNER!! 103K MILES, 2.4L ENGINE, NEW TIRES, HTD LEATHER SEATS, PWR SEATS, ROOF RACK, POWER EVERYTHING! ONBOARD INFO CTR, VERY CLEAN INSIDE & OUT AND DRIVES LIKE A DREAM!

$6,250

AUTOMATIC TRANS, POWER OPTIONS, REAR TINT, AWD, 63K MILES!

$14,950

LIKE-NEW INSIDE & OUT! 53K MILES, AUTO, NEW TIRES, ALL THE OPTIONS! BUILT-IN DVD SYS, KEYLESS ENTRY, SUNROOF, PWR EVERYTHING! AC, CRUISE, THIS IS THE NICEST, CLEANEST ELEMENT AROUND!

$16,550

Dealers, To Advertise Here: Call Michelle @ 360-452-2345 ext. 4060 TODAY for more information!

91190150

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS: No cancellations or corrections can be made on the day of publication. It is the Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or rescission of approval by Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc. The position, subject matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement are subject to approval of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., which reserves the right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time, before or after insertion. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., investigates statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmless Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., their officers, agents, and employees against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and losses resulting from the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for any damages resulting from error in or nonpublication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to, incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of the ad or the printing of one make-good insertion, at the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Neither Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., shall not be liable for errors in or non-publication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any court situated in King or Clallam County, Washington. Other terms and conditions, stated on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts, may apply. This service is not to be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Black Press Ltd./Sound Publishing, Inc., or others or to respond to subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.


ClassifiedAutomotive

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Dash cluster do-it-yourself fix Dear Doctor: I own a 2003 Dodge Dakota. The left-side lighting is burned out on the instrument panel for the tachometer and temperature gauges. In your opinion, is this a job I should attempt? Vincent Dear Vincent: Dash cluster removal is not complicated. Unlike in years past having to deal with a mechanical speedometer cable and brittle wire harness, today’s vehicles have one or two push-in plug connectors to unplug once you have the dash cluster pulled out enough to release the plug connector. The easiest way for you to remove the dash cluster is to start at Alldata.com for instructions. Some dash clusters have replacement bulbs; others have diode lights that need to be soldered in place by an electrical shop. Make sure you disconnect the battery and check with the Dodge dealer for replacement bulbs before removing the dash cluster. This will give you a heads-up if the dash cluster has bulbs or diodes. 9808 Campers & Canopies CAMPER: ‘91, 9’ Bigfoot. Very good condition. $2,750/obo. (360)385-3355

9050 Marine Miscellaneous BAYLINER: 1987 Capri 1750. GM 4 Cyl 3.0L engine with OMC stern drive. Runs great! Electronic ignition, Dual batteries, Hummingbird 587ci Fishfinder with GPS. More info on PDN online. $3,800/obo. (360)460-0460

THE AUTO DOC Junior Damato

Dear Doctor: I own a 2009 Jeep Wrangler with a pinging noise coming from the motor. At idle, there is no noise, but once I put the truck in first gear and let off the clutch from 800 to 2,000 rpms, I hear the pinging noise while under load. When I disengage the clutch, there is no noise. This happens for three minutes, then it’s gone. In the cold, the noise gets worse. What should I look for? John Dear John: You’ll need a mechanic’s stethoscope to locate the sound’s source. Electronic fuel injectors do make some ticking sounds, as well as a possible rocker arm sound. You can even try disconnecting the serpentine belt to determine if the sound disappears.

9817 Motorcycles H O N DA : ‘ 9 8 S h a d o w ACE Tourer. 1100 cu. cm motor, excellent condition, only 39K mi., one of the most reliable motorcycle engines ever made, newer professionally done midnight blue custom paint, roomy lockable fiberglass bags, custom leather seat, located near Por t Townsend. $3,500. Call Tom at (360)774-1232.

KAWASAKI: ‘06 Vulcan Nomad, Low Miles ( 4 5 7 5 ) L i ke N ew, Chrome on Black. $7,500. (360)683-7198 BAYLINER: 27’ Bucca- after 10am. neer 3500 obo or trade for ‘land yacht’ +6’ head- L I FA N : ‘ 0 9 M o n k e y r o o m ; 8 H P M e r c u r y Bike. 110cc. $800/obo. (949)677-0791 or longshaft recently ser(760)920-5808 viced: runs great!’ Main+jib sail; small rowing skiff. Many extras 9805 ATVs Call Rob to see (360)390-8497 YAMAHA ‘08 YFM700 BELLBOY: ‘78 24’ 20 RAPTOR KT Cruiser, 80 gal. fuel, Fuel injected, reverse, 30 gal. water, 1,750 watt fmf pipe. VIN#005856. i nve r t e r, 1 2 0 V s h o r e No credit checks! 20 mopower, 4 batteries, mi- torcycles and ATVs in crowave, refr igerator, stock! new depth finder, com$3,950 pass, GPS, VHF, dinRandy’s Auto Sales ette, new galley, new & Motorsports Wallas ceramic diesel 457-7272 stove/heater, auto leveling trim tabs, enclosed head, trailer with new 9740 Auto Service & Parts disc brakes, wheels and tires. $9,975/obo. Car Carrier: ‘80 great (360)683-9645 shape must see. $1,000/ C H R I S C R A F T : 2 6 ’ obo. (949)677-0791 or Cavalier with trailer, 350 (760)920-5808. MerCruiser inboard, Bow Thr uster, radar, GPS, 9742 Tires & sounder, toilet with ElecWheels tro Scan. $14,995. (360)775-0054 FOUR VW 16-inch 5EASTERN: ‘11 18’ cen- lug wheels and hubter console, premium caps. All four, $250. boat, like new, complete360-643-5050 ly equipped, 50 hp Yamaha, under 50 hrs. in warranty, Load-r ite 9180 Automobiles galv. trailer, many ex- Classics & Collect. tras, Downeast style. See easternboats.com BUICK: 1976 Skylark. $26,500. (360)477-6059 Rare, 2 door, V-6, stick. $1,850/obo. 460-8610. GLASTROM: 16’ open bow boat, 25 hp John- MERCEDES: ‘85 SL380. son, Calkin trailer. $950. Both tops, excellent con(360)385-3686 dition. $10,000/obo. (360)460-6764 OLYMPIC: 84 XL 18’. 3.8 OMC inboard, new S T U D E BA K E R : 1 9 5 0 9.9 Mercury kicker, E-Z S t a r l i g h t C o u p. C o m plete restoration, black Load $3,500.457-6448 cherry color, runs good, PONTOON BOAT: 10’ looks excellent. $11,000. (360)683-8810 ODC 1018, white water and still water, oars and wheel mount. $295/obo. 9292 Automobiles (360)912-1759

Others

SEASPORT: 24’ ExplorAUDI ‘95 90 SERIES er. Excellent condition. With sunroof, sport tires, $62,500/obo. 928-1300. leather int., runs great. $4397/obo. 477-3834.

9817 Motorcycles

CUSTOM ‘01 CHOPPER 80 cu in, Har ley evo, hardtail, lots of chrome, 11k miles. VIN#469245. Home of the 5 minute approval. Buy here, pay here! $6,950 Randy’s Auto Sales & Motorsports 457-7272 H O N DA ‘ 7 3 Tr a i l 9 0 : 1250 miles, ran when parked 6 years ago, one owner. $900. 271-0867. HONDA: ‘80 CB-900C. S i l ve r. $ 1 , 0 0 0 / o b o o r t r a d e fo r g u n s / s m a l l truck. (360)460-3756. HONDA ‘85 GOLDWING 04200 Aspencade, new tires, great shape! VIN#102307. In-house financing, competitive rates! We buy motorcycles and quads for cash! $3,250 Randy’s Auto Sales & Motorsports 457-7272 HONDA: ‘85 Goldwing Aspencade. 1200cc, black/chrome, exc. cond. $3,500/obo. 417-0153.

Pinging noise

CARS: VW ‘64 Bug, $3,950. Eagle ‘95 Talon TSI, $1,000. 477-3495.

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Transmission shifting Dear Doctor: I own a 2012 Hyundai Elantra with the new six-speed automatic transmission. I had no problems until the weather turned colder. Whenever the temperature is below 40 degrees, the engine revs an additional 1,000 to 2,000 rpm when shifting from 2nd to 3rd gear. It acts as though it’s in neutral. This happens only the first time it shifts from 2nd to 3rd. When I keep it in my garage or if I start it outside and let it idle for at least five minutes before driving, it shifts perfectly. The dealer checked all the codes and reset them. Everything was normal. What’s wrong? Joe Dear Joe: I just drove the 2013 Elantra four-cylinder with the six-speed automatic and did not notice any unusual transmission shifting — and the temperatures were below freezing for the duration of the test-drive. The automatic transmissions of today are programmed to help reduce emissions both under acceleration (by delaying the upshifting when the engine

THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 2013

Car of the Week

is cold) and when decelerating (by downshifting when coming to a stop or slowing down). If the first cold shift is annoying, then try slightly lifting your foot off the accelerator just as the transmission makes that first upshift.

Thoughts on Honda Dear Doctor: I’d like to consider buying a new 2013 Honda. Have you driven the Accord with the V-6? Jack Dear Jack: The 2013 Accord is a big improvement over its predecessor. It has a redesigned engine and fuel injection system. The four-cylinder has a CVT transmission, while our test car was V-6-powered through a six-speed automatic with quick, firm and great gear ratios. The 2013 is lighter and shorter than the 2012 yet has more interior room.

________ Junior Damato is an accredited Master Automobile Technician, radio host and writer for Motor Matters who also finds time to run his own seven-bay garage. Questions for the Auto Doc? Send them to Junior Damato, 3 Court Circle, Lakeville, MA 02347. Personal replies are not possible; questions are answered only in the column.

2013 Toyota Avalon Limited BASE PRICE: $30,990 for XLE; $33,195 for XLE Premium; $35,500 for XLE Touring; $39,650 for Limited. PRICE AS TESTED: $42,195. TYPE: Front engine, front-wheel-drive, five-passenger, mid-size sedan. ENGINE: 3.5-liter, double overhead cam V-6 with dual VVT-i. MILEAGE: 21 mpg (city), 31 mpg (highway). LENGTH: 195.2 inches. WHEELBASE: 111 inches. CURB WEIGHT: 3,500 pounds. BUILT IN: Georgetown, Ky. OPTIONS: Technology package (includes dynamic radar cruise control, automatic high beams, pre-collision system) $1,750. DESTINATION CHARGE: $795. The Associated Press

9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9292 Automobiles 9434 Pickup Trucks 9434 Pickup Trucks Others Others Others Others Others BMW ‘96 328i C o n ve r t i b l e , l e a t h e r, loaded, 92K miles, mint condition inside and out, one of a kind! $7,950 Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583

I S U Z U : ‘ 9 8 A m i g o. 5 speed, 4 cyl., new studded snow tires. $1,050/obo. (360)928-2142 or (325)450-7046

KIA: 2003 Rio. 5 spd, 4 cylinder, less then 40K miles. $5,500/obo. BMW: ‘97 Z3 Con(360)808-1303 vertible. 5 sp, cruise, air, MAZDA ‘97 MIATA heated seats, ABS, USB CONVERTIBLE stereo/CD player, lugg a g e r a ck , 1 8 3 K m i . 5 sp, power windows, nice, fun car to drive, $6,500. (360)460-2517. great fuel economy. CADILLAC ‘03 SE$4,950 VILLE STS 4DR Heckman Motors Northstar, V8, auto, A/C, 111 E. Front, P.A. tilt wheel, cruise, power (360)912-3583 windows, locks, mirrors, MERCEDES: ‘97 SL320. and dual power heated seats, leather interior, B o t h t o p s , g o l d / t a n . t r i p c o m p u t e r, B o s e $10,500. (360)683-7420. AM/FM/CD and cassette, 6 disc changer, MERCURY: ‘02 Sable. electronic, traction con- Auto star t, looks/runs trol, chrome wheels, re- good. $2,500. (360)460-0357 mote entry and more! VIN#112744 Expires 3/9/13 Only $6,995 Dave Barnier Auto Sales *We Finance In House* 452-6599 davebarnier.com

B11

TOYOTA ‘05 CAMRY LE Very economical 2.5 liter 4-cyl, auto, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/CD, power windows, locks and seat, k e y l e s s e n t r y, o n l y 46,000 miles, very very clean local car, spotless “Autocheck” vehicle history report, great mpg. $11,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com TOYOTA : ‘ 0 7 C o r o l l a CE. Great cond, 5sp man, 4cly, 61K mls. 461-5181 or 452-1032 TOYOTA ‘12 CAMRY Very economical 2.5 liter 4-cyl, auto, A/C, cruise, tilt, AM/FM/CD, bluetooth, power windows and locks, side airbags, only 15,000 miles, balance of factory 3/36 and 5 / 6 0 w a r r a n t y, n o n smoker, spotless “autocheck” vehicle histor y report, beautiful 1-owner, near new condition. $18,995 REID & JOHNSON MOTORS 457-9663 reidandjohnson.com

MINI COOPER ‘03 “S” 1.6L s/c, 6 speed, leather, skyroof, loaded. VIN# 062955. We finance everyone. “0” financing available, ask for details. $8,950 Randy’s Auto Sales & Motorsports CHEV: ‘70 Nova. High TOYOTA : ‘ 9 9 C a m r y 457-7272 performance 350. XLE. Great shape, all $5,000. (360)645-2275. options, 4 cyl. auto OD. NISSAN ‘10 $4,250. (360)460-1207. SENTRA SL CHRYSLER ‘02 CONAuto, leather, moonroof, CORDE LIMITED 4DR VW ‘00 PASSAT GLX V6, auto, A/C, tilt wheel, this one has it all! Only 4-MOTION WGN 28K miles. cruise, power windows, 120k orig mi, 2.8L V6, $15,450 locks, mirrors, and dual Tip-Tronic auto, loaded! Heckman Motors power heated seats, Gray ext in excel cond! 111 E. Front, P.A. leather interior, power Gray leather int in excel (360)912-3583 sunroof, AM/FM/CD and shape! Dual pwr htd cassette stacker, tr ip OLDSMOBILE ‘99 BRA- s e a t s , m o o n r o o f , c o m p u t e r, e l e c t r o n i c CD/Cass with Monsoon VADA AWD traction control, premium 4.3L Vor tec V6, auto, a u d i o, s i d e a i r b a g s , chrome wheels, remote loaded!! Dk met red ext wood trim, roof rack, alentry and more! in great shape! Black loys, Clean 2 owner CarVIN#251666 leather int in great cond! fax! VERY nice Passat Expires 3/9/13 Dual pwr seats, CD, cli- @ our No Haggle price Only $6,995 mate control, tinted win- of only Dave Barnier $6,995. dows, cruise, tilt, tow, Auto Sales roof rack, alloy wheels, Carpenter Auto Center *We Finance In House* l o c a l t ra d e ! S p o t l e s s 681-5090 452-6599 Carfax! Great little AWD davebarnier.com SUV @ our No Haggle VW: ‘67 Beetle. $7,500 firm. ‘73 Super Beetle, price of only FORD ‘03 $3,000/obo. 477-3725. $3,995! MUSTANG GT Carpenter Auto Center VW: ‘72 Super Beetle. Leather, loaded, low mi. 681-5090 Great shape. $3,200. Price reduced to (360)809-3656 $7,950 PONTIAC ‘06 G6 Heckman Motors GTP CPE 111 E. Front, P.A. V6, 6 speed, A/C, tilt 9434 Pickup Trucks (360)912-3583 wheel, cruise, power rinOthers G M C : ‘ 8 4 S 1 5 . 3 0 0 0 d ow s, l o ck s, m i r r o r s, CHEV ‘90 1 TON miles on new long block, seat, leather inter ior, DUALLY 4X4 p a i n t a n d b o d y ve r y h e a t e d s e a t s , p o w e r s u n r o o f , A M / F M / C D, 8 ’ d ump box, V8, 4 good. No rust. Mounted premium alloy wheels, speed with granny low, studs on wheels. $2,500/ remote entry and more! A/C, original 16k miles! obo. (360)670-6100. VIN#151869 The truck is like new! Expires 3/9/13 G M C : ‘ 9 8 S U V. 4 d r, $14,490 Only $7,995 4WD, new motor, extras. Heckman Motors Dave Barnier $4,000. (360)452-6611. 111 E. Front, P.A. Auto Sales (360)912-3583 HONDA ‘00 CIVIC LX *We Finance In House* SEDAN C H E V: 9 4 S i l ve r a d o. 452-6599 .6L 4 cylinder, 5 speed 1500 Ext Cab - Excellent davebarnier.com manual transmission, Condition! Runs and Subaru ‘02 Outback new tires, power windrives great, very clean! AWD Wagon dows, door locks, and $1,000 new tires, mirrors, cruise control, .5L 4 cylinder, 5 speed 158,000 miles, tow packtilt, air conditioning, ken- manual, alloy wheels, age, power windows and wood CD stereo, dual new tires, roof rack, key- locks, Nice interior. Call front airbags. Clean in- less entry, power win- 928-0214, $5,000/obo. side and out! Legendary dows, door locks, mirHonda reliability! Excel- rors, and drivers seat, C H E V: ‘ 9 5 3 5 0 0 H D. lent fuel economy! All h e a t e d s e a t s, c r u s i e 8 ’ x 1 5 ’ w o o d d e c k , the right options! Stop by control, tilt, air condition- 84,760 mi., GTX 10-30 ing, CD/cassette stereo, every 3,000 mi., original Gray Motors today! dual front airbags. great owner. $8,500. $5,995 (360)301-0050 condition inside and out! GRAY MOTORS Clean Carfax! Ready for 457-4901 the Northwest weather DODGE ‘05 RAM 1500 graymotors.com with heated seats and Hemi 5.7 L, quad cab, HONDA ‘09 ACCORD All Wheel Drive! Hard to 4 x 4 , 2 0 ” w h e e l s a n d EX-L f i n d 5 s p e e d m o d e l ! tires, leather, loaded, 1 Moonroof, alum. wheels, Powered by Subar u’s owner, must see. Price reduced l e a t h e r, o n l y 2 7 K m i . legendary flat-four boxer $16,495 Price reduced to: engine! Come see why Heckman Motors $16,750 these are a local favor111 E. Front, P.A. Heckman Motors ite! Stop by Gray Motors (360)912-3583 111 E. Front, P.A. today! (360)912-3583 $7,995 FORD: ‘05 F150. 4x4 GRAY MOTORS quad cab, automatic 5.4 HONDA ‘11 CIVIC 457-4901 L t , w i t h c h i p fo r i m 4 door Si, 16K mi., 197 graymotors.com proved milage, 121,000 hp, 2 liter VTEC 4 cyl, 6 sp manual trans, limited SUBARU: ‘03 Outback miles, leather interior, slip differential, alumi- Wgn. AWD, auto, 92k, power locks windows, and mirrors, heated and num pedal plates, moon mint! $7,500. 457-6420. power seats, with roof, 17” alloy wheels, rear spoiler, balance of TOYOTA: ‘01 Camry. 5 memory, center console s p , p o w e r w i n d o w s , and overhead console. factory warranty. 20” wheels, 10 ply tires, cruise, A/C, 178K. $21,450 tunnel cover with spray$3,995/obo. 460-6367. Heckman Motors bed-liner, and bed ex111 E. Front, P.A. TOYOTA ‘12 CAMRY tension, tinted windows, (360)912-3583 LE excellent condition. 15k mi., like new. LINCOLN ‘99 $15,700. (360)941-6373. $20,950 CONTINENTAL FORD: ‘01 Ranger XLT. Heckman Motors 161k, well maintained, 4WD, xtra cab, 4 liter, 111 E. Front, P.A. d r i v e s b e a u t i f u l l y. clean. $6,800. 460-1168. (360)912-3583 $2,900. (360)477-7775.

Dodge ‘08 Ram 1500 Quad Cab SLT Big Horn 4X4 4 . 7 L F l ex - F u e l V 8 , 5 speed automatic, 20 inch alloy wheels, keyless entry, power windows, door locks, mirrors, and drivers seat, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, CD Stereo, information center, dual f r o n t a i r b a g s . Ke l l ey Blue Book value of $21,124! Only 51,000 M i l e s ! C l e a n C a r fa x ! One Owner! Extra clean inside and out! All the right options at a price you can afford! Stop by Gray Motors today! $18,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com

FORD ‘96 F150 4X4 E x t r a c a b, a u t o, V 8 , nice, straight truck. $5,950 Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583 FORD: ‘99 Ranger. XLT Super Cab, 72K, 4L, V6, loaded, tire chains, Ultima bed box, garaged, no off road. $8,500/obo. (360)379-8755

9556 SUVs Others C H E V : ‘ 0 1 B l a z e r. 4WD, power windows, white, good cond. $3,300. (360)460-8155

D O D G E : ‘ 9 8 D a ko t a . 160K, 5.2L V8, great running truck. $4,500/ obo. (360)461-7210. FORD ‘00 F150 SUPER CAB XLT 4X4 4.6L Triton V8, automatic, alloy wheels, matching fiberglass canopy, bedliner, tow package, privacy glass, 4 opening doors, power windows, door locks, and mirrors, cruise control, tilt, air conditioning, CD stereo, dual front airbags. Kelley B l u e B o o k Va l u e o f $9,181! Good condition throughout! Runs and drives great! This is a whole lot of truck for the money! Stop by Gray Motors today! $6,995 GRAY MOTORS 457-4901 graymotors.com FORD ‘03 F150 4X4 Super Crew XLT. Tow pkg. Priced to sell. $10,950 Heckman Motors 111 E. Front, P.A. (360)912-3583 FORD ‘85 F-250 Superc a b : 4 x 4 , a u t o, 4 6 0 , $1,900/obo. 417-8250. FORD: ‘94 F-150 XLT. Low miles, runs good, looks good. $5,000. (360)452-6758 FORD: ‘94 Ranger XLT. Runs GREAT, 4.0 V6, automatic with overdrive, custom wheels, AM/FM, cruise control, tilt wheel. ext cab with two rear side seats, slider window in rear, 226,000 miles $2,700 or trade for travel trailer 18-25’ in good wo r k i n g o r d e r. L e ave message (360)452-2970 GMC: ‘81 1 ton dually camper special. ‘454’. $2,000/obo. 477-6098.

C H E V: ‘ 8 7 S u bu r b a n 4x4. ‘454’, needs some work, body great shape, m a ny ex t ra s. $ 1 , 0 0 0 / obo. (360)461-6970. C H E V : ‘ 9 6 B l a z e r. 4x4, 184K, fully loaded, clean, exc. condition. $4,000/obo. (360)460-8631 CHEVY ‘02 BLAZER LS 4X4 95k orig mi! 4.3L Vortec V6, auto, loaded! Pewter met ext in great shape! Black leather int in excel cond! Dual pwr seats, moon roof, CD, cruise, tilt, pri glass, roof rack, t o w, a l l oy s , C l e a n 1 owner Carfax! Extremely nice little Blazer @ our No Haggle price of only $5,995! Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090

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9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR CLALLAM COUNTY In re the Estate of J.D. Adams, Deceased. NO. 13-4-00072-5 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS RCW 11.40.030 The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the Court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of (1) thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1)(c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the Decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: February 28, 2013 Personal Representative: Douglas Stewart Adams Attorney for Personal Representative: Stephen C. Moriarty, WSBA #18810 Attorney for Personal Representative Address for mailing or service: PLATT IRWIN LAW FIRM 403 S. Peabody, Port Angeles, WA 98362 (360) 457-3327 Court of Probate Proceedings: Clallam County Superior Court Probate Cause Number: 13-4-00072-5 Pub: Feb. 28, March 7, 14, 2013 Legal No. 460071

9556 SUVs Others

9556 SUVs Others

CHRYSLER ‘06 PACIFICA AWD TOURING V6, auto, A/C, tilt wheel, cruise, power windows, locks, mirrors, tailgate, dual power seats, leathe r i n t e r i o r, t h i r d r ow seating, AM/FM/CD stacker, rear entertainm e n t c e n t e r, DV D, pwoer sunroof, privacy g l a s s, p r e m i u m a l l oy wheels, remote entr y and more! VIN#776805 Expires 3/9/13 Only $11,995 Dave Barnier Auto Sales *We Finance In House* 452-6599 davebarnier.com

SUBARU ‘01 FORESTER L AWD 109k orig mi! 2.5L flat 4 cyl, auto! Silver ext in great cond! Gray cloth int in great shape! Pwr windows, pwr locks, pwr mirrors, CD/Cass, c r u i s e, t i l t , A / C, r o o f r a ck , C l e a n 2 o w n e r Carfax!! Real clean little Subie @ our No Haggle price of only $6,995! Carpenter Auto Center 681-5090 TOYOTA: ‘86 4-Runner. 22 RE, runs good. $1,200/obo. 928-9716.

9730 Vans & Minivans

Others JEEP: ‘04 Grand Cherokee. L6, auto, full power, privacy windows, 88K mi C H E V ‘ 9 7 Va n : ( 7 ) pssngr, 45k mi on Jas$8,750. (360)460-0114. per engi, recent R&R radiator, trans rebuild, etc. LEXUS ‘01 RX300 AWD, leather, loaded, $3,1000/obo. 582-9179. luxury sport utility, very nice unit! FORD ‘09 E-150 CAR$9,750 GO VAN Heckman Motors 4.6 Liter V8, auto, A/C, 111 E. Front, P.A. cruise, tilt, power win(360)912-3583 dows and locks, keyless entry, power adj. mirrors, LEXUS ‘03 LX470 safety bulkhead, nice bin 4WD SPORT UTILITY package, exterior Full size luxur y SUV, chrome package, step leather, loaded, naviga- bumper, 69,000 miles, tion system, premium very, very clean 1-owner sound, low miles. corporate lease return, Price reduced to: non-smoker, spotless $21,950 “Autocheck” vehicle hisHeckman Motors tor y repor t, ser viced, 111 E. Front, P.A. safety checked, detailed (360)912-3583 and warranted. $13,495 MERCURY: ‘00 MountaREID & JOHNSON ineer. 2WD, V8, premiMOTORS 457-9663 um options, 21 mpg hwy reidandjohnson.com $3,300. (360)452-7266. SUZUKI: ‘87 Samurai 4x4. 48K drive mi., like new, original mint cond., new top, tires, clutch, rebuilt trans, CD, tape, Reese tow bar, superior snow travel. First $4,500 takes. (360)460-6979.

EMAIL US AT classified@peninsula dailynews.com

ISUZU: ‘00 16’ van. Diesel engine, 179,166 mi., runs great, auto tail lift. $7,000. Call Cookie at (360)385-6898, lv msg. VW: ‘88 Westfalia. Single owner, rebuilt, 15” wheels and tires, awning, tent, all reciepts, etc. Excellent condition! $15,995. (360)452-4890.

9931 Legal Notices 9931 Legal Notices Clallam County Clallam County SALE OF TIMBER BEAVER TAIL LOGGING UNIT QUINAULT RESERVATION, WASHINGTON SEALED BIDS, in duplicate, on forms provided, labeled “Proposal for the BEAVER TAIL Logging Unit,” addressed to the Superintendent, Taholah Agency, 1214 Aalis Street, Building “C”, P.O. Box 39, Taholah, Washington, 98587, will be received until 2:00 p.m. local time, Tuesday, April 16, 2013, for the purchase of timber on the Beaver Tail Logging Unit, Quinault Reservation, Washington. Bid opening will occur in the main conference room of the Quinault Division of Natural Resources (QDNR) building at Taholah, Washington. This logging unit contains approximately 193 acres to harvest with a total predetermined volume of 5,564 MBF of sawlogs including: 4730 MBF of western hemlock and other conifer sawlogs, 538 MBF of Sitka spruce sawlogs, 145 MBF of western redcedar sawlogs, 8 MBF of Douglas-fir sawlogs, and 143 MBF of red alder and other hardwood sawlogs; and an undetermined volume of cull and utility logs (all species). The above stated volumes are estimates and are not guaranteed. Each bidder must state the total purchase price that will be paid for timber on this unit. The minimum qualifying bid will not be advertised. Cull and utility logs (except western redcedar) are removable at the Purchaser’s option. No western redcedar salvage operations will be allowed. A deposit in the form of a certified check, cashier’s check, bank draft, or postal money order, payable to the Bureau of Indian Affairs, in the amount of For ty Five Thousand Dollars ($45,000.00) must accompany each sealed bid. The right to waive technical defects and to reject any and all bids is reserved. The deposit of the apparent high bidder, and of others who submit written requests to have their bid considered for acceptance, will be retained pending bid acceptance or rejection. All other deposits will be returned. The deposit of the successful bidder will be applied as part of the purchase price against timber cut on this unit only, or retained as partial liquidated damages if the bidder does not execute the contract and furnish a satisfactory bond in the amount of Seventy Three Thousand Dollars ($73,000.00) within thirty (30) days of bid acceptance. The BIA expressly reserves the right to recover any additional damages which may result from bidder’s failure to execute or perform under the terms of this bid offering. The performance bond, payments, and subsequent deposits (except deposit w/bid) shall be by electronic funds transfer or as designated by the Superintendent. Before bids are submitted, full information concerning the timber, conditions of the sale, and the submission of bids should be obtained from the Superintendent, Taholah Agency, 1214 Aalis St., Building “C”, P.O. Box 39, Taholah, Washington 98587. Dated this 21st day of February, 2013 at Taholah, Washington, Gregory K. Masten, Superintendent, Taholah Agency. Pub: Feb. 28, March 7, 2013 Legal No. 460069


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WeatherWatch

THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 2013 Neah Bay 45/30

Bellingham B ellin e n 50/35

Olympic Peninsula TODAY SHOWERS

SHOWERS

48/35

Forks 50/31

Olympics Snow level: 2,500 ft.

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48/35 Sequim 48/34

National forecast Nation TODAY

Yesterday

Port

S ER OW SH

Port Ludlow 50/37

PENINSULA DAILY NEWS

Statistics for the 24-hour period ending at noon yesterday. Hi Lo Rain YTD Port Angeles 48 41 0.20 2.23 Forks 47 33 0.08 24.33 Seattle 49 41 0.02 5.88 Sequim 52 40 0.10 1.90 Hoquiam 45 41 0.34 15.99 Victoria 46 39 0.13 7.21 Port Townsend 48 40 0.31* 4.50

Forecast highs for Thursday, March 7

â&#x17E;Ą

Aberdeen 50/34

Billings 54° | 28°

New

First

TEMPERATURE EXTREMES for the contiguous United States: Chicago 36° | 21°

Denver 59° | 37°

Los Angeles 61° | 55°

Low 35 Cloudy and showery

49/36 Mostly sunny; a few clouds

Marine Weather

SUNDAY

49/38 More sun than clouds

MONDAY

47/39 Cloudy, gray day

44/41 Mostly cloudy

Washington TODAY

Strait of Juan de Fuca: W wind 5 to 15 kt. Wind waves 1 or 2 ft. Chance of showers. Tonight, W wind 10 kt. Wind waves 1 ft.

Fronts

CANADA

Seattle 48° | 39° Olympia 48° | 37°

Spokane 45° | 34°

Tacoma 48° | 39° Yakima 55° | 30°

Astoria 48° | 41°

ORE.

Apr 2

Mar 11

Sunset today Sunrise tomorrow Moonrise tomorrow Moonset today

Š 2013 Wunderground.com

Albany, N.Y. Albuquerque Amarillo Anchorage Asheville Atlanta Atlantic City Austin Baltimore Billings Birmingham Bismarck Boise Boston Brownsville Buffalo

Hi 41 60 49 37 51 65 49 68 48 30 65 22 54 43 77 34

6:07 p.m. 6:40 a.m. 4:41 a.m. 1:47 p.m.

Lo Prc Otlk 28 Cldy 43 Cldy 30 Clr 23 Snow 27 .68 Snow 32 .13 Clr 27 .09 Rain 32 PCldy 33 .24 Snow 16 Cldy 33 .24 Cldy 2 Snow 37 Rain 36 .03 Clr 49 PCldy 25 Cldy

TODAY High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 8:11 a.m. 8.5â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 2:10 a.m. 3.7â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 9:44 p.m. 7.2â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 3:15 p.m. 0.3â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

TOMORROW High Tide Ht Low Tide Ht 9:20 a.m. 8.6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 3:23 a.m. 3.1â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 10:34 p.m. 7.8â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 4:11 p.m. 0.0â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

SATURDAY High Tide Ht Low Tide 10:20 a.m. 8.8â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 4:24 a.m. 11:17 p.m. 8.3â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 4:59 p.m.

Ht 2.3â&#x20AC;&#x2122; -0.2â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Port Angeles

12:17 a.m. 6.5â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 9:46 a.m. 6.2â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

5:01 a.m. 5.5â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 5:14 p.m. -0.2â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

12:59 a.m. 6.7â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 11:07 a.m. 6.2â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

6:08 am. 5.0â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 6:10 p.m. 0.0â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

1:34 a.m. 7.0â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 12:19 p.m. 6.2â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

6:59 a.m. 6:59 p.m.

4.2â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 0.3â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Port Townsend

1:54 a.m. 8.0â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 11:23 a.m. 7.6â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

6:14 a.m. 6.1â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 6:27 p.m. -0.2â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

2:36 a.m. 8.3â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 12:44 p.m. 7.6â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

7:21 a.m. 5.5â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 7:23 p.m. 0.0â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

3:11 a.m. 8.6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 1:56 p.m. 7.7â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

8:12 a.m. 8:12 p.m.

4.7â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 0.3â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Dungeness Bay*

1:00 a.m. 7.2â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 10:29 a.m. 6.8â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

5:36 a.m. 5.5â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 5:49 p.m. -0.2â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

1:42 a.m. 7.5â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 11:50 a.m. 6.8â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

6:43 a.m. 5.0â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 6:45 p.m. 0.0â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

2:17 a.m. 7.7â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 1:02 p.m. 6.9â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

7:34 a.m. 7:34 p.m.

4.2â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 0.3â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

LaPush

Warm Stationary

Pressure Low

High

Mar 19 Mar 27

Nation/World

Victoria 48° | 36°

Ocean: W wind to 10 kt. Wind waves 1 ft. W swell 6 ft at 16 seconds. Scattered showers. Tonight, N wind 10 kt. Wind waves 1 ft. W swell 6 ft at 16 seconds.

Tides

SATURDAY

â&#x2013;  -12 at Minot, N.D. Miami 72° | 52°

Cold

FRIDAY

â&#x2013;  82 at Imperial, Calif.. and Ocotillo Wells, Calif.

Atlanta 55° | 32°

El Paso 79° | 45° Houston 70° | 43°

Full

New York 43° | 36°

Detroit 37° | 28°

Washington D.C. 43° | 36°

Cartography by Keith Thorpe / Š Peninsula Daily News

TONIGHT

The Lower 48:

Cloudy

Minneapolis 34° | 14°

San Francisco 54° | 46°

Almanac Last

Pt. Cloudy

Seattle 48° | 39°

*Reading taken in Nordland

Brinnon 50/32

Sunny

*To correct for Sequim Bay, add 15 minutes for high tide, 21 minutes for low tide.

-10s

-0s

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

70s

80s 90s 100s 110s

Cartography Š Weather Underground / The Associated Press

Burlington, Vt. 36 Casper 44 Charleston, S.C. 66 Charleston, W.Va. 52 Charlotte, N.C. 57 Cheyenne 37 Chicago 32 Cincinnati 40 Cleveland 36 Columbia, S.C. 72 Columbus, Ohio 41 Concord, N.H. 42 Dallas-Ft Worth 58 Dayton 37 Denver 37 Des Moines 33 Detroit 36 Duluth 25 El Paso 64 Evansville 48 Fairbanks 27 Fargo 25 Flagstaff 53 Grand Rapids 33 Great Falls 30 Greensboro, N.C. 51 Hartford Spgfld 47 Helena 38 Honolulu 81 Houston 69 Indianapolis 36 Jackson, Miss. 66 Jacksonville 77 Juneau 37 Kansas City 35 Key West 75 Las Vegas 74 Little Rock 56

22 22 41 30 34 16 28 29 30 40 33 32 33 28 22 25 28 10 48 32 -3 18 27 27 20 34 31 25 71 41 27 38 43 20 22 60 57 32

.52 .37 .66 .61 .02 .77 .47 MM .26 .09 .01

.44

.52 .06

.08

Cldy Clr Clr Snow Cldy PCldy Snow Snow Snow Clr Snow Cldy PCldy Snow PCldy Cldy PCldy PCldy PCldy Cldy Cldy Cldy Clr Cldy Cldy Snow Cldy Cldy Clr Clr Cldy Clr Clr Clr PCldy Clr PCldy Clr

Los Angeles Louisville Lubbock Memphis Miami Beach Midland-Odessa Milwaukee Mpls-St Paul Nashville New Orleans New York City Norfolk, Va. North Platte Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Pendleton Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland, Maine Portland, Ore. Providence Raleigh-Durham Rapid City Reno Richmond Sacramento St Louis St Petersburg Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco San Juan, P.R. Santa Fe St Ste Marie Shreveport

65 48 54 61 75 57 32 30 56 76 49 48 41 50 30 77 48 49 81 44 44 46 47 50 32 62 50 59 37 69 45 69 60 56 80 55 33 63

GLOSSARY of abbreviations used on this page: Clr clear, sunny; PCldy partly cloudy; Cldy cloudy; Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; Prc precipitation; Otlk outlook; M data missing; Ht tidal height; YTD year to date; kt knots ft or â&#x20AC;&#x2122; feet

26 16 .01 52 Cldy Sioux Falls 31 .35 Cldy Syracuse 34 21 31 Cldy Tampa 71 53 .01 33 .41 PCldy Topeka 40 21 58 PCldy Tucson 79 56 34 Clr Tulsa 50 24 27 .40 Snow Washington, D.C. 53 34 .28 22 .15 Cldy Wichita 44 21 33 .60 Cldy Wilkes-Barre 41 30 46 Clr Wilmington, Del. 48 35 .12 38 Snow ________ 38 .79 Rain 13 Clr Hi Lo 27 Clr 78 59 23 Cldy Auckland 66 44 61 Clr Baghdad 69 33 35 .10 Rain Beijing Berlin 50 36 34 .02 Rain 54 46 58 Clr Brussels 75 59 32 .11 Snow Cairo 22 10 35 Clr Calgary 85 45 41 .17 Rain Guadalajara Hong Kong 85 45 32 Cldy 61 48 37 .42 Clr Jerusalem 80 59 9 PCldy Johannesburg 67 41 40 Snow Kabul London 50 44 35 1.18 Snow 79 49 49 .22 Rain Mexico City 31 26 31 .24 Cldy Montreal 32 12 56 .02 Clr Moscow New Delhi 86 59 33 Cldy 57 48 35 PCldy Paris 55 Cldy Rio de Janeiro 89 75 62 52 51 .20 Rain Rome 78 67 73 .01 Cldy Sydney 70 46 35 Cldy Tokyo 36 26 27 Cldy Toronto 37 PCldy Vancouver 48 36

Cldy Cldy Clr Clr Cldy Clr Snow Clr Rain Snow

Otlk Clr Clr PCldy Cldy Cldy PCldy Snow Clr Clr Clr Sh PCldy Cldy Clr Cldy Cldy Clr Cldy Ts Sh PCldy Clr Snow PCldy

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