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PEMBROKE COLLEGE RECORD

1959-60


MASTER MASTER RONALD BUCHANAN BUCHANAN MCCALL RONALD MCCALLUM, M.A. UM, M.A.

FELLOWS FELLOWS LIONEL EDGAR EDGAR SALT, LIONEL SALT,M.A., M.A.,

Emeritus. Emeritus.

DONALD GEORGE CECIL B, M.A., DONALD CECIL MACNAB MACNABB, M.A.,

and Lecturer Lecturer in in Philosophy. Philosophy. and

Vicegerent, Vicegerent, Senior Senior Tutor Tutor

SIR ROBERT ROBERT REYNOL DS MACINTO SH, M.A., SIR REYNOLDS MACINTOSH, M.A., D.M., Nuffield D.M., Nuffield Professor Professor

of Anaesthetics. Anaesthetics. of

CHARLES LESLIE Rawlinson and CHARLES LESLIEWRENN, WRENN,M.A., M.A., Rawlinson and Bosworth Bosworth Professor Professor

Anglo-Saxon. of Anglo-Saxon.

ROBERT FRANCIS N, M.A., ROBERT FRANCISVERE VEREHEUSTO HEUSTON, M.A., Lecturer in Jurisprudence. Jurisprudence. GEORGE RICHARD ICK BREDIN, GEORGE RICHARDFREDER FREDERICK BREDIN,M.A., M.A., Bursar. GODFREY WILLIAM GODFREY WILLIAMBOND, BOND,M.A., M.A., Dean and Lecturer in Classics. Classics. REV. , M.A., REV. COLIN COLINMORRIS MORRIS, M.A.,

History.

Chapla Chaplain Lecturerr in Modern in and Lecture

REV. T STANLEY DEIGHT ON, B.LITT., REV.HERBER HERBERT STANLEY DEIGHTON, B.LITT., M.A., M.A.,

Fellow.

Supernumerary Supernu merary

JOHN L O'BRIEN , B.Sc., JOHN RICHARD RICHARDPERCIVA PERCIVAL O'BRIEN, B.Sc., M.A., Lecturer in Natural M.A.,

Science. Science.

PIERS Y, M.A., PIERS GERALD GERALDMACKES MACKESY, M.A.,

Lecture Lecturer in Modern Modern History. History. r in

IRVINE G, M.A., IRVINEROBERT ROBERTBROWNIN BROWNING, M.A., Libraria Librarian and Lecturer Lecturer in in English English n and

Literatu re. Literature.

JOHN Lecturer in in Physical Physical Science. Science. JOHNWILKS, WILKs,M.A., M.A.,D.PHIL., D.PHIL., Lecturer ROBERT D BALDICK ResearchFellow Fellow , M.A., ROBERTANDRE ANDREEDOUAR EDOUARD BALDICK, M.A., D.PHIL., Research D.PHIL.,

in es. inModern ModernLanguag Languages.

MARK WHITING , M.A., MARKCROSBY CROSBY WHITING, M.A., Lecturer Lecturerin inChemist Chemistry. ry. FRANCIS ON, FRANCISWILKINS WILKINSON,

Chemist ry. Chemistry.

Albrigh t and Albright andWilson WilsonResearc Research Fellowin in h Fellow

ZBIGNIE W ANDRZE J PELCZYN SKI, M.A., ZBIGNIEW ANDRZEJ PELCZYNSKI, M.A., B. PHIL., Lecturer Lecturerinin B. PHIL.,

Political PoliticalStudies. Studies.


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HONORARY FELLOWS FELLOWS HONORARY VISCOUNT WILLIAM RICHARD VISCOUNT RICHARD MORRIS MORRIS NUFFIELD, NUFFIELD,M.A., M.A., HON. D.C.L., G.B.E. G.B.E. HON. SIR VINCENT VINCENT WILBERFORCE SIR WILBERFORCEBADDELEY, BADDELEY,M.A., M.A.,K.C.B. K.C.B. SIR ABRAHAM RAISMAN, SIR ABRAHAMJEREMY JEREMY RAISMAN, M.A., G.C.I.E.,K.C.S.I. K.C.S.I. M.A., G.C.I.E., HON. SIR DONALD LESLIE HON. LESLIE FINNEMORE, FINNEMORE, M.A. M.A. HON. JAMES HON. JAMES WILLIAM WILLIAMFULBRIGHT, FULBRIGHT,M.A., M.A.,HON. HON.D.C.L. D.C.L. CREED, SIR THOMAS THOMASPERCIVAL PERCIVAL CREED, M.A., K.B.E.,M.C., M.C., Q.C. Q.C. M.A., K.B.E., THOMAS MALCOLM MALCOLMKNOX, KNOX,M.A. M.A. PHILIP NICHOLAS PHILIP NICHOLASSETON SETONMANSERGH, MANSERGH, B.LITT.,M.A., M.A.,D.PHIL., D.PHIL., B.LITT., O.B.E. O.B.E.

ARTHUR LARSON, LEWIS ARTHUR LARSON,M.A., M.A.,D.C.L. D.C.L.

MASTER'S NOTES In December, 1959 the College heard with deep regret of the death of the Earl of Halifax, Chancellor of the University since 1933, and in that capacity Visitor of Pembroke College. We all join in our tribute to Lord Halifax's eminent virtues and to his long and distinguished tenure of the office of Chancellor. We remember with gratitude his personal visits to the College and the interest he always took in our affairs. The College has suffered a more intimate and wholly unexpected loss by the death of Charles Neville Ward-Perkin Ward-Perkins s at the age of forty-three. He was Vicegerent of the College, Tutor Tutor for for Admissions Admissions and and Lecturer Lecturer in in Economics. Economics. Mr. Mr. WardWardPerkins' Perkins' career career and and qualities qualities are are more more fully fully celebrated celebrated in in this this Record Record but but everyone everyone who who knew knew him him recognises recognises that that he he brought brought to to the the College College an an enthusiastic enthusiastic zeal zeal for for his his study study and and for for all all the the interests interests of of the the College. College. He He was was untiring untiring in in his his service service both both to to the the College College and and in in the the University University in in which which he he had had become become aa most most prominent prominent figure. figure. To To his his pupils pupils he he was was aa keen keen mentor, mentor, appreciative appreciative of of all all good good qualities qualities and and frank frank and and outspoken outspoken when when itit seemed seemed necessary. necessary. He He played played aa most most important important part part in in the the government government of of the the College College and and we we were were deeply deeply indebted indebted to to him him for for his his contricontri-


PEMBROKE COLLEGE COLLEGE PEMBROKE

55

bution which was always in favour of the more forceful and farreaching policies. The Fellows especially appreciated his brilliant work as tutor for admissions in which he showed a wide sympathy and understanding of the personalities of applicants. Never in this century has the College suffered so severe and unexpected a loss and we are all conscious of the deprivation. If he had remained at the College he would have served for another twenty-five years. Only those who knew him intimately as did his colleagues can realise what this deprivation means to us. The vacant office of Chancellor of the University has been filled after a contested election which aroused much public interest by the election of Mr. Harold Macmillan. The College welcomes this most eminent of British Statesmen to his high office and looks forward to some occasion when if his urgent public duties permit he may visit us. The election by members of Convocation brought a considerable number of M.A.'s to Oxford to exercise their constitutional right of choosing the Head of the University. The College was very glad to entertain those who troubled to come and vote and to meet them again. We must all hope that the next occasion on which a contest for the Chancellorship may take place is long ahead of us. The notion to which much publicity was given that there is something unworthy about having a contest for the office is not reasonable. At any time the number of very eminent Oxford alumni is so large that it is unreasonable to suppose that opinion in the University will be unanimous. That the Masters of Arts should be asked to decide the issues by their votes is entirely proper. fortunate in receiving During the past year the College has been fortunate several benefactions. Messrs. Albright and Wilson, the well-known chemical manufacturers, offered research fellowships to Pembroke and Worcester Colleges. The Fellow elected will research in one of the chemistry departments and will be permitted to teach for a certain number of hours. The College was very glad to accept this proposal and the Fellowship has been filled by the election of Dr. F. Wilkinson of Sheffield University who will come into residence in October 1960. With Dr. M. C. Whiting, who was elected two years ago, the College has now two Fellows in Chemistry. Mr. O'Brien is Fellow in Physiology and Biochemistry and Dr. Wilks in Physics. Science; we now have four, Ten years ago we had no Fellows in Science:


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Dr. Walter Walter Ramsdell, Ramsdell, who who died Dr. died in in 1947 1947 after after being being aa Fellow Fellow of the the College College for for fifty fifty years, years, left left by of by his his will will aa part part of of his his estate estate to to the College College subject subject to to aa life life interest. interest. This the This legacy legacy has has now now fallen fallen to us and is of the value of about £6,500. The late Mr. T. A. Wicks, formerly a commoner of the College and for most of his life a master at Monckton Coombe School left the residue of his estate to be equally divided between his old College and the school. This brings us the sum of £4,500. Mr. John Borough, M.A., barrister-at-law, one of our more senior members who matriculated at the College in 1887, has very generously made the College a gift of £20,000, for the general purposes of the College. All Pembroke men will want to join with us in thanking Mr. Borough for this most generous and welcome gift. In his speech at the Gaudy in June the Master was able to tell the company that in the academic year 1959 there were five Pembroke men placed in the First Class in the Final Honour Schools and also five university prizes. In Hilary Term 1960 three Pembroke men were placed in the First Class in Classical Moderations. One of them, Mr. E. L. Bowie, who had previously won a Craven " Scholarship has since been elected to a de Paravicini Scholarship.

In the Final Examinations this year our distinctions were not so numerous but Mr. G. Raisman was placed in the First Class in Physiology and had earlier won the Theodore Williams Prize in Anatomy and Mr. G. A. Brooker was placed in the First Class in Physics. At the end of Trinity Term 1960 the powers which the College had obtained by means of an order promoted by the Oxford City Council to close Beef Lane were at last exercised and temporary gates have been put up. Work is proceeding on the conversion of the remaining Pembroke Street Houses which will face on to the new new quadrangle. quadrangle. When When that that is is complete complete by by the the late late autumn autumn aa start start will will be be made made on on the the final final demolitions demolitions and and works works to to finish finish the the new new quadrangle. quadrangle. This This is is dealt dealt with with more more fully fully elsewhere elsewhere in in this this number number of of the the Record. Record.


PEMBROKE COLLEGE

7

C. N. WARD-PERKINS, 1917-1960

"The theatre of my actions is destroyed", said the old Roman on learning of the death of his friend. There were many in Oxford who could have repeated that on May the twenty-third on hearing of the death of Neville Ward-Perkins at the height of his powers. For more than a decade he had been the centre of an extraordinarily wide circle of friends within the University, who have already testified in "The Times" and elsewhere to the affection and respect in which they held him. Some dons gain fame by the influence which they obtain over their pupils, others by the learned works which they write, others again by their public activities outside the University. Neville Ward-Perkins was in another and rarer, but still important, category. He will be remembered for the influence which he had over his fellow dons. He was in many ways a remarkable mixture of the extrovert and the highly-strung. He combined in himself two qualities rarely found together — the intellectual grasp and penetration of the scholar, and the practical ability of the man of affairs. Quicker with his mind and tongue than most in a community which much admires such rapidity, he also had the rarer ability to translate ideas into action. The range of his activities was a legend. First of all came College and University affairs. I can recall endless discussions on domestic politics over the twelve years in which I knew him. The constant flow of fresh ideas, the scorn for the timid and unenterprising, were a wonderful stimulus after a day's work in contact with more mundane or pernickety minds. Fellow Wykehamists were sometimes shocked by his lack of gravitas; the slow-witted disliked being interrupted in their monologues by one who could begin half-a-dozen sentences at the same time; and the tidy were worried by having to move after him shutting doors or picking up proof-sheets, gramophone records, root vegetables, and documents marked "Confidential: For the Hebdomadal Council Only". For there were a dozen sides to his day — extra-mural studies; summer schools for business men (a very successful and characteristic venture); journalism; local politics (there was his famous attempt to solve the Road Problem: here even he had to admit defeat, after treading on more toes than he either intended or desired); and also (what no one who saw him in his own home can ever forget), the leadership of a devoted household,


8

PEMBROKE COLLEGE PEMBROKE COLLEGE

I do not mean by this to suggest that he neglected either either scholarscholaror his his pupils. pupils. He He had had read readexceptionally ship or exceptionallywidely widely in in economics, economics, politics, modem history and fiction — — though, though, well well as as II knew knewhim, him, hardly ever ever saw saw him him actually actually reading; I hardly reading;ititwas wasalways alwaysaawonder wondertoto me how and when he had digested the contents of his large library. library. (He bought books together with the other necessities of life, with with lavish hand). hand). He He left left behind behind him aa lavish work on on the the him some very solid work history of private banking, which it is hoped to publish. So far as his pupils went, he very wisely wisely avoided avoided the the temptation, temptation, which which sometimes assails tutors in small colleges, of confusing his functions with those of a coach. Undonnish in so many ways, in this he true don: don: he he did did not not talk talk about was a true about"getting "gettingfirsts". firsts".He Hewas was particularly good good with with the the idle, idle, the particularly the insolent, insolent, and and the the listless, listless, who who responded to his vigour and and lack lack of of pedantry. pedantry. "I'll "I'll give give him him aa piece of my my mind", mind", we weused usedto tohear hear at at the lunch-table when the name of some undergraduate undergraduate came came up, up, and and aagleam gleamwould would come come into the eye of the former lieutenant of artillery.

All this may All may suggest suggest the the academic academic empire builder. Nothing could be further from the truth. He was quite uninterested uninterested in in fame, or wealth, or position. He liked to see things happening around him him and and he he liked liked to see people happy. To these laudable around laudable objects he devoted his life. life. His His talent talent for inducing people to cooperate for some some common purpose would have been noticeable operate for anywhere; in aa community community of of people people as as odd and as independent as Oxford dons, it was remarkable. remarkable. It It stood stood out out prominently prominently in an individualistic and self-assertive society.

"He only, in a general honest thought And common good to all made one of them. His life was gentle, and the elements So mixed in him that Nature might stand up And say to all the world, 'This was a man'." R.F.V.H. R.F.V.H.


MR. C. N. WARD-PERKINS

(Photograph by courtesy of David Peters, Witney)


MR. H. J. TURNER

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PEMBROKE COLLEGE COLLEGE PEMBROKE

99

PAUL ROGNESS, ROGNESS, 1958-1960 1958-1960 PAUL Members of of the the College College were were deeply deeply grieved grieved to to hear hear of of the the death death Members of Paul Paul Rogness, Rogness, Rhodes Rhodes Scholar Scholar from from South South Dakota, Dakota, in in aa street street of accident in in the the United United States States on on his his return return after after completing completing his his accident came to Rogness Economics. course in Philosophy, Politics and course in Philosophy, Politics us from. Augustana College in South Dakota from which two eminent members of the College had graduated, Dr. Arthur Larson and Mr. Karl Solberg. He had during his two years of residence been an extremely popular member of the College, a keen student of his subject and one of our best oarsmen in the First Eight. He won the respect and affection of all who knew him and we looked forward to his having a distinguished career in his own country. His loss at so early an age is a sad diminution in the numbers of our American alumni who have contributed so much to the life of the College and of which Rogness was a fine example.

COLLEGE BUILDINGS After completing, in 1957, the reconstruction of the northwestern corner of its buildings, including the Weatherley Room together with the new snack-bar and Buttery offices, the College has turned its attention to the second phase of its building programme by making a start in adapting for occupation by undergraduates its premises across Beef Lane. Permission to close the Lane and include it within the College precincts having been obtained, largely through the support and good will of the City authorities, we started this part of our programme in 1958 by converting numbers 21 and 22 Pembroke The two houses are Street undergraduates. The eight undergraduates. for eight quarters for into quarters Street into south the south from the entrance an with now served by a single staircase with an entrance from now served by a single staircase stood formerly which doorway through a handsome XVIII century doorway which formerly stood century XVIII handsome a through the avoid the to avoid order to In order in properties. In Mildmay's properties. Lord Mildmay's of Lord one of in one installations plumbing installations extensive plumbing expense of extensive disfigurement of and disfigurement expense and basement. the basement. in the installed in showers been installed have been lavatories have and lavatories showers and

with way with similar way in aa similar deal in to deal Detailed made to been made have been plans have Detailed plans rooms provide rooms will provide These will numbers Street. These Pembroke Street. 20 Pembroke to 20 .16 to numbers .16 18 further 18 for aa further sets) for (some two-roomed sets) some two-roomed and some bed-sitters and (some bed-sitters


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PEMBROKE COLLEGE PEMBROKE COLLEGE

undergraduates as well as quarters for a resident Fellow and a large seminar. Work on these properties began in March of this year and the whole should be completed and in occupation by early November. In the meantime Beef Lane has been closed by temporary (and rather unsightly) barriers, but these will eventually give place to wrought-iron gates similar to those erected at the entrance to Christ Church Memorial Gardens. Direct access between the new quadrangle and the Chapel Quadrangle is being provided by opening an arched passage through the wall at the foot of the central staircase in the building which houses the Senior Common Room. This will leave us at the beginning of 1961 with one more phase of our programme to carry out â&#x20AC;&#x201D; namely the demolition of the cycle-shed, garages and out-buildings along the north side of Beef Lane, and the paving and lay-out of the quadrangle. If all goes well this final phase will be completed by the autumn of 1961, and Michaelmas Term of that year should see Pembroke provided with a handsome new precinct designed not to increase our total numbers but to enable many more of our undergraduates to spend a second year within the walls of the College.

THE MANCIPLE On 29th July, 1960, Mr. H. J. Turner celebrated his 66th birthday and retired from his post as Manciple after completing 41 years in the service of the College. He came to Pembroke as Kitchen Clerk in April 1919 at the age of 24 and was later moved to the Buttery. On the sudden illness of the Manciple (Mr. Gribble) in January 1932, he took over his duties and was confirmed in the post in October 1933. Since that time the office of Manciple, never a light one, has grown steadily in status and importance. After the comparative tranquility of the twenties and thirties the impact of wartime conditions followed by a period of unparalleled expansion in numbers and increasing complexity of administration placed an an ever ever growing growing burden of responsibility upon his shoulders. No No task task proved proved too too formidable formidable for for him him and and no no emergency emergency found found him him unprepared, unprepared,


PEMBROKE COLLEGE

11

The unfailing loyalty and devotion to the interests of the College which Pembroke has been fortunate enough to enjoy for so long in its staff was his in full measure. Meticulous as he was in the day to day running of the College the Manciple was perhaps at his best in organising its many functions. Whether great or small they received his close and undivided attention, and their unvarying success, leading up to the climax of his last and most signally enjoyable Gaudy, was due in great measure to his unfailing care and foresight. Mr. Turner takes into his retirement the gratitude and good wishes not only of the present "Master, Fellows and Scholars" but of all those who since the end of the First World War entered the College to which he gave a lifetime of devoted service. ADDITIONAL NOTES It is a pleasure to record that the Master has accepted the office of Pro-Vice-Chancellor on his nomination by the new ViceChancellor, Mr. A. L. P. Norrington, President of Trinity College. The following books were presented to the library: "Law and Opinion in the Twentieth Century", ed. Ginsberg and "1859: Entering An Age of Crisis" ed. Appleman by the Master; "The Life and Times of Frederick Lemaitre", "La Vie de J. K. Huysmans" and "The Concourts" by the author Robert Baldick; "Wellingtonian Studies", ed. Howard by Piers Mackesy; "Hindu Art and the Art of Anna Hyatt Huntingdon", by the author Professor Emile Schaub-Koch; "The Works of Thomas Lovell Beddoes" and "The Browning Box" by the author Professor H. W. Donner; "Last Years of the Isle of France" by the author J. R. M. D'Unienville; "An Economic Geography of the Commonwealth" by C. Moppet. SPORTING ACTIVITIES BOAT CLUB The year 1958-59 was a bad one for the Boat Club. None of its crews, except the IV were successful. The past year has seen a revival; all the representative crews have raced hard, and with success. Prestige within the college is high, and morale is excellent. 1958-59 (Captain: R. Huband; Secretary: A. V. Hughes). This year only the 1st IV distinguished itself; in June it won the JuniorSenior Fours (The Maiden Erlegh Challenge Cup) at Reading Regatta.


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1959-60 (Captain: A. V. Hughes; Secretary : D. P. R. Mackilligin). In the new system of Torpids the 1st Torpid went up on the last two evenings, both times excitingly pulling ahead of their rivals just opposite the Barge. The 1st VIII in Eights made two good bumps on the first two evenings. RUGBY CLUB 1958-59. Captain: G. D. M. Leslie; Secretary: N. Garland. 1959-60. Captain: G. C. Price; Secretary: J. M. Wright. Both years the 1st XV has remained in the middle of the Third Division of the League, and in Cuppers went out in the 1st Round. In 1958-59 D. Boyd appeared on a number of occasions for the Greyhounds. In 1959-60 J. M. Cruickshank appeared regularly for Oxford R.F.C. and also represented the County. FOOTBALL CLUB 1958-59. Captain: G. M. Taylor; Secretary: P. D. Toomey. The XI headed the 1st Division League in this season, winning all but one of its matches and in Cuppers reached the Semi-Final. The following were Centaurs: C. Beswick, G. M. Taylor, P. D. Toomey, G. Smith, R. Hayes, D. B. Keen, R. Ing and E. P. Brown also played. 1959-60. Captain: P. D. Toomey; Secretary: R. Ing. A weaker team than the previous year, finished the season in the middle of the 1st Division. The following were Centaurs: P. D. Toomey and R. Hayes. R. Ing and E. P. Brown also played. ATHLETICS 1958-59. Captain: M. Riegels; Secretary: J. Carden. In Relays we won promotion into Division I, with a very powerful team. In Field Events Cuppers we also were promoted to Division I. In Cuppers we won through to the Final, where St. Edmund Hall defeated us with something to spare. R. P. D. Van Rossum was captain of O.U.A.C., leading Oxford to victory over Cambridge at the White City. He was also reserve for the British Team at the Cardiff Empire Games.


PEMBROKE COLLEGE COLLEGE PEMBROKE

13 13

M. Riegels Riegels was was our our other other Blue, Blue, winning winning the the 440 440 yards yards event event at at M. the White White City, City, and and running running also also in in the the Low Low Hurdles. Hurdles. the Half Blue Blue for for the the Javelin, Javelin, and and J. J. C. C. Stromberg Stromberg J. Carden got his Half his for for the the High High Jump. Jump. J. J. Winch Winch ran at times during the season his for the the A.A.A. A.A.A. for M. R. Francis was elected a Centipede (High Hurdles). 1959-60. Captain: J. Carden; Secretary: J. A. Clark. We held our positions in the 1st Divisions, gained last year, and again went out in Cuppers to St. Edmund Hall in the QuarterFinals. Our Blues this year were J. Carden (Javelin) and M. R. Francis (Low Hurdles)). J. A. Clark was our Centipede.

CRICKET CLUB 1958-59. Captain: J. M. Taylor; Secretary: G. Jarrett. 1959-60. Captain: G. Jarrett; Secretary: M. P. Berry. In 1958-59 G. M. Taylor and G. Jarrett were Authentics, and in 1959-60 G. Jarrett and R. Ing also appeared for them. HOCKEY CLUB 1958-59. Captain: P. Revill; Secretary: R. Alder. 1959-60. Captain: R. Alder; Secretary: M. C. C. Skinner. Both years the XI had average success and remained in the Third Division (out of four) of a newly-formed League. In 1958-59 P. Revill and R. Alder appeared for the Occasionals, as did J. R. Ellis in 1959-60. LAWN LAWN TENNIS Ledger. P. Ledger. 1958-59. Captain: Secretary: P. Price; Secretary: G. Price; G. G. Captain: G. James. H. James. G. H. Secretary: G. 1959-60. Bartlett; Secretary: J. Bartlett; D. J. Captain: D. 1959-60. Captain:

Division of Division middle of the middle about the Both remained about has remained VI has 1st VI the 1st years the Both years III League. the League. in the III in for thus for and thus University, and the University, in the In No. 77 in was No. Jenkins was R. Jenkins 1958-59 R. In 1958-59 was He was team. He the team. make the the to make place to one place by one failed by just failed year just third year the third Secretary Penguins. the Penguins. of the Secretary of


14 14

PEMBROKE COLLEGE PEMBROKE COLLEGE

SQUASH SQUASH 1958-59. Captain: Captain: T. T. Fox; Fox; Secretary: 1958-59. Secretary: J. J. Mason. Mason.

1959-60. Captain: Captain: J. J. Mason; Mason; Secretary: 1959-60. Secretary: D. D. W. W. Eking. Eking. Average results results for for both both years. years. R. Average R. Jenkins Jenkins was was our our outstanding outstanding player in in 1958-59, 1958-59, not not dropping dropping a match. player

MISCELLANEOUS MISCELLANEOUS SWIMMING. K. Roberts has appeared for the University Swimming Team. LACROSSE. J. Carden was awarded his Half-Blue for the University Team (1959-60), appearing in the Varsity Match.

BASKETBALL. J. C. Stromberg is in the University Team (1959-60). SHOOTING. J. F. Melland is Secretary of the University Rifle Club (1959-60); G. Wall was awarded his Shooting Colours. BOXING. G. D. M. Leslie was awarded his Blue (1958-59) appearing in the Varsity Match. PLOUGHING. G. Wall was Captain of the University Ploughing Team (1959-60).

NEWLY-FORMED NEWLY-FORMED SOCIETIES SOCIETIES T. T. G. G. Duncan Duncan and and L. L. J. J. Pike Pike founded founded aa new new singing singing group group in in Michaelmas Michaelmas Term, Term, 1959, 1959, The The Pembroke Pembroke Consort, Consort, mainly mainly for for the the singing singing of of Mediaeval Mediaeval music. music. Composed Composed of of aa band band of of 15 15 to to 20 20 staunch staunch enthusiasts, enthusiasts, itit has has given given aa concert concert in in the the Chapel, Chapel, and and has has taken taken part part in in two two concerts concerts arranged arranged by by the the Music Music Society. Society.


PEMBROKE COLLEGE

15

THE JOHN PYM SOCIETY The foundation in Michaelmas Term 1959 of a college political and economic society filled a long felt need. Particularly appropriate was the name it finally took â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Pym is one of Pembroke's most famous (or notorious?) sons, but one quite unremembered in his old college, except for a small portrait once in the S.C.R. Feeling ran sufficiently high, however, for his name not to be adopted till a strong pro-Jeune group had been defeated â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jeune being the only Roundhead-Whig master in Pembroke's history before Mr.. McCallum, as the latter, who addressed the Society's first meeting on "Political Inventions", often likes to point out. OBITUARIES (1914) E. D. Butler (1955) J. G. Parsons (1919) J. R. Pattisson (1893) Rev. S. T. Ricketts (1958) P. Rogness (1901) H. M. Sanders (1955) R. P. Savidge (1937) S. C. A. Simpson (1910) C. B. Smith (1947) C. N. Ward-Parkins, Fellow (1900) A. T. Wicks


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Profile for Pembroke College, Oxford

Pembroke College Record (Oxford), 1959-1960  

Pembroke College Record (Oxford), 1959-1960  

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