Page 1

TIMBERLINE A DVENTURES 2010


2010 A D V E N T U R E P L A N N E R Timberline’s program for 2010 is comprised of a diverse collection of cycling, hiking and combined cycling/hiking adventure opportunities. Programs are grouped according to content in this brochure. Cycling tours are described on pages 7-30; and hiking programs, pages 31-46. Combined cycling and hiking adventures appear in the cycling section of the brochure. “Biker/Hiker,” “Classic,” and “Adventure”

2010 S C H E D U L E ODYSSEY SERIES

designations reflect the inclusion of dedicated hiking opportunities as components of those programs. Consult individual tour descriptions for tour prices, what’s included in those prices, assembly locations, and other logistical information. Applicable discounts, tour departure and conclusion times, registration guidelines and other procedural issues are discussed on page 47. 

FAL L COL OR TOU RS

CYCLING ADVENTURES I N L A N D E M P I R E (p. 23) G R E A T C A N Y ON S OF T H E S O U T H W E S T (pgs. 17-18) Aug 20-29: Columbia/Kootenay Classic

(p. 8)

May 2-8: White Mountains of Arizona June 5-Aug. 1: Odyssey 2010: Sea-To-Shining-Sea/Neah Bay, WA, to Bar Harbor, ME (New) June 13-19: Bryce/Zion Biker/Hiker September 17-26: Canyon Country Classic O N T A N A A GI C L A C I E R A R K D A H O (pgs. 9-10) Oct 3-9: White Mountains of Arizona July 4 - 10: Glacier Park/Waterton Lakes Adventure October 10-16: Bryce/Zion Biker/Hiker July 24-Aug 1: Bitterroot/Sawtooth Rambler August 8-14: Glacier Park/Waterton Lakes Adventure E W E XI CO S AN D O F N CHA NTM E NT Aug. 19-29: Montana Magic May 23-29: Northern New Mexico Alpiner (pgs 19-20) E L L O W S T O N E O U N T R Y (pgs. 11-12) August 28-Sept 5: New Mexico Rambler September 24-Oct 3: Northern New Mexico Classic July 24-31: Grand Tetons & The Winds of Wyoming August 7-14: Yellowstone Country Adventure August 15-21: Beartooth/Big Horns Biker/Hiker A C I F I C O R T H W E S T (pgs. 21-23)

M

M

/G

P /I

N M

Y

’ L

E

C

P

C A NA D I A N ROCKIES

N

S A N J U A N I S L A N D S / O L Y M P I C S / N O R T H C A S C A D E S (p. 21)

(pgs. 13-14)

July 11-17: Canadian Rocky Mountain Alpiner July 24-Aug 1: Canadian Rocky Mountain Rambler August 6-15: Classic Canada August 22-28: Canadian Rocky Mountain Alpiner

July 10-18: Sea-to-Sky 2010: Olympics/Gulfs/San Juan Islands July 22-30: Volcanoes of the Cascades/North (New)

C O L O RA DO HI G H - C O U N T RY GO L D

O REGO N C OA ST /C AS C ADE S

(pgs. 22-23)

July 11-17: Northwest Passage June 20-25: San Juans of Colorado (pgs. 15-16) August 1-8: Volcanoes of the Cascades/South (New) July 18-23: Colorado Rocky Mountain High August 14-22: Rogue River Rambler August 29-Sept 3: San Juans of Colorado ) Sept 5-11: Northwest Passage September 12-17: Colorado Rocky Mountain High September 26-Oct. 1: Vines & Vistas: Colorado’s Western Slope (New)

C A L I F O R N I A D R E A M I N ’ (p. 24) May 16-22: California Dreamin’/The Central Coast Sept. 26-Oct 2: Classic California

THE HEARTLAND

(pgs. 25-29)

April 18-23: Texas Hill Country May 9-14: Kentucky Bluegrass Country June 20-July 1: Dakota Dreamin’ July 25-31: Wisconsin’s Door County August 8-14: Leelanau/Mackinac Explorer September 12-17: Black Hills of South Dakota September 26 – Oct.1: Katy Trail October 10-15: Kentucky Bluegrass Country October 24-29: Texas Hill Country

A P P A L A C H I A N H I G H L A N D S (pgs. 29-30) May 17-22: Blue Ridge of North Carolina May 29-June 5: Great Allegheny Passage/C & O Historical Trail: Pittsburgh to D.C. (New) Oct 2-9: Great Allegheny Passage C & O Historical Trail: Pittsburgh to D.C. (New) Oct 18-23: The Blue Ridge of North Carolina

HIKING ADVENTURES

ODYSSEY SERIES

(p. 32)

September 5-15: Odyssey 2010: The Cotswolds of Great Britain

H A W A I I (p. 33)

October 3-8: Bryce/Zion October 11-16: Grand Canyon: Rim-to-River-to Rim October 26-31: Grand Canyon/Havasupai

HIGH SIERR A /C ALIF ORNIA CA SC AD ES

Feb 14-19: Kauai: Waimea Canyon & The Na Pali Coast (pgs. 37-39) Feb 21-26: Hawaii:Volcanoes & The Kona Coast Feb 14-19: Joshua Tree & Anza Borrego (New) 2011: February 21-26: Death Valley Feb 20-25: Kauai: Waimea Canyon & The Na Pali Coast June 27-July 2: Yosemite Feb 27-Mar 4: Hawaii: Volcanoes and the Kona Coast Aug. 29-Sept. 3: Lassen Volcanoes National Park September 5-10: Yosemite O UTH WE ST AN YO NS A ND OLO R O UNTR Y September 12-17: Sequoia/Kings Canyon March 1-6: Big Bend National Park (pgs. 34-37) March 7-8: Big Bend Extender: Carlsbad Caverns A C I F I C O R T H W E S T (pgs. 40-42) & Guadalupe National Parks (New) May 10-15: Rogue River Wilderness April 19-24: Grand Canyon/Havasupai June 13-18: Columbia River Gorge May 9-14: Canyonlands/Arches July 25-30: Olympic National Park May 23-28: Grand Canyon: Rim-to-River-to-Rim Aug 2-7: Sun Valley/Sawtooths of Idaho June 6-11: Bryce/Zion August 8-13: Alaska: The Kenai September 12-17: Grand Canyon: Rim-to-River-to-Rim August 15-20: Mt. Rainier National Park (New) Sept 26-Oct 1: Capitol Reef and the Sept 26-Oct 1: Rogue River Wilderness Grand Staircase

S

:C

C

C

P

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES 7975 E. Harvard #J Denver, Colorado 80231

N

www.timbertours.com E-mail: timber@earthnet.net

CANADIAN ROCKY MOUNTAIN SERIES (pgs. 43-44)

July 18-23: Glacier/Revelstoke National Parks Aug 15-20: Banff & Kootenay National Parks August 29-Sept 3: Yoho

R O C K Y M O U N T A I N M A G I C (pgs. 44-46) June 20-25: Northern New Mexico & The Great Sand Dunes July 18-23: Yellowstone/Grand Tetons July 25-30: Glacier/ Waterton Lakes August 22-27: Glacier/Waterton Lakes August 22-27: Beartooths Aug 29 – Sept 3: Yellowstone/Grand Tetons September 12-17: Rocky Mountain National Park Sept 19-24: Northern New Mexico & The Great Sand Dunes

T H E G R E A T N O R T H W O O D S (p. 46) Sept 19-24: The Superior Trail

(800) 417-2453 or (303) 368-4418 Fax: (303)368-1651


TO U R I N G W I T H T I M B E R L I N E For whatever reason, it has become customary for us to take a moment, and always on page 3 of what is about to become our newest catalog, to share a few of our own reflections upon the past as well as our hopes and dreams for the future. This adventure began for us almost 29 years ago as the product of our own bike ride across the continent. For us, it was an incredibly memorable experience, one never to be forgotten and likely never to be repeated. The euphoric hangover from that ride propelled us to launch our little “ma and pa” enterprise that we called, in those days, Timberline Bicycle Tours. When you do a seriously long bike ride, expect to become infected. You have the bug and it is with you forever. In the beginning, it was Ramblers (9-day rides), followed by Classics (10-day sorties), always well beyond the parameters of everyone else’s 6 day, 5 night formats. And then came the Odysseys—rides from Missoula to Jasper, Seattle to San Francisco, Chicago to Chicago around

Lake Michigan, Lewis & Clark in 2004 from Wood River, IL, to Astoria, OR, and Chasing the Great Divide in 2007, 40 days and almost 150,000-feet of vertical, criss-crossing the Continental Divide from the Mexican Border to Jasper, AB. Even our hikers have shared our affliction as we continue to hike the full length of England’s magnificent 105-mile Cotswold Way But for us, all of these ultra adventures notwithstanding, the truly ultra, ultra adventure remained. Sooner or later, we knew that Timberline, as an organization, needed to ride across the North American Continent. In the season ahead, once and for all (and never again!), we’ll do it in the context of Odyssey 2010: Sea-to-Shining-Sea. In so many ways that extend well beyond Sea-to-Shining-Sea, we believe the coming season well may be our most exciting year to date. We’ve taken last year’s Odyssey, Volcanoes of the Cascades, and created two new back-to-back rides in the Pacific Northwest—Volcanoes North and South. We’ll also tour western Colorado’s amazing wine country and challenge two of the great climbs in the west—the Grand Mesa and Colorado National Monument—in the context of Vines and Vistas. New Hikes also have been created in Joshua Tree, Mt. Rainier and Guadalupe National Parks, and we’ll hike England’s Cotswold Way one final time. As we look to the future, our philosophy that has evolved over the past quarter-century remains unchanged. It has always been, and always will be, our hope that the content of our programs and the experiences that all of you share with us will define who and what we are as an organization. We cling to the belief that our audience is one that loves to cycle and hike as much as we do and that they plan their cycling and hiking vacations to do those sort of things. For all of these reasons, we’re content to permit our programs and the experiences that we share to speak for us, and we’ll trust to your judgment as to whether or not ours is a program for you.

2010



TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES

The content of our programs provides only a portion of our profile as an organization. From Day 1 to the present, we always have been and always will be Carol and Dick, “ma and pa,” along with our kids, both real and presumptive (our family of tour leaders) until they outgrow us. It’s us you’re talking to on the phone during the off-season; and it’s us out there on the road and trail cycling and hiking with you—whining with you in the headwinds, the rain, and, yes, in the snow, and sharing the joy, exhilaration and utter sense of accomplishment that is a part of every aspect of our program. In other words, don’t ever look to us to boast about how many computers we have accumulated in our office, or how many reservationists and specialists we have added to our staff—it’s just not going to happen here and it never will be the means by which we measure our success. For us, we’ll only measure our success by the quality of your experience that you’ve shared with us. For better or worse, that’s who we are. We’re cyclists and hikers to the core. We’re also westerners, first and last; the West today, as in the past and as it will be in the future, is our primary focus, even if we push the eastern boundary a bit at times. And we truly believe that you’ve never really experienced an area until you’ve experienced the joy and pride of doing so as the product of your own power and spirit. The cyclist and hiker alike, not only sees the breathtaking beauty of a region; each also feels the land, senses the crispness of the air, the sound of rushing waters, the scent of alpine flora. The West is our home and we feel that this land is special—its undulating terrain, its majestic grandeur, the challenge of its mountains and the incomparable peace and solitude of its isolated valleys. Accept our invitation to share with us the beauty of this land and the incomparable experiences and excitement in the season ahead.  Carol & Dick Gottsegen

CONTENTS

2010 Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Touring With Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Cycling Timberline Country, Hiking Timberline Country . . . . . . . . . .4 Accommodations, Meals, Support Van/ Support on Tour, Tour Assembly . . . 5-6 Cycling Adventures: Odyssey 2010: Sea-to-Shining-Sea . . .8 Montana Magic/ Glacier Park/Idaho . . . . . . . . . . . . .9-10 Yellowstone Country . . . . . . . . . . . .11-12 Canadian Rockies . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13-14

Colorado High Country Gold . . . . . .15-16 Great Canyons of the Southwest . . .17-18 New Mexicoʼs Land of Enchantment . . . . . . . . .19-20 Pacific Northwest . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21-23 California Dreaminʼ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 The Heartland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25-29 Appalachian Highlands . . . . . . . . . .29-30 Custom Touring With Timberline . . . . . .30 Hiking Adventures . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31-46 Odyssey Series for Hikers . . . . . . . . . .32 General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47

3


CYCLING TIMBERLINE COUNTRY If you’re planning your first Timberline cycling adventure, we suspect that you may have questions concerning terrain and level of difficulty. Obviously, “Timberline Country” is not flat. We have our share of hills and we promise that you’ll have ample opportunity to do some climbing with us regardless of which tour you select. But then why else would you even consider a western bike tour were it not for our corrugated topography! When you cycle in the Rockies, Sierra or Cascades in particular, you can expect to be involved in climbs that are longer than those that you may have experienced in other parts of the country. But most importantly, the grades that you will encounter in the mountain ranges of the west, though longer, are more gradual than those of the hilly regions of New England and Appalachian areas, and significantly more moderate than the mountainous regions of Europe. A word about the altitude factor that is a common concern of those considering their first western cycletour. Acute Mountain Sickness, a significant reaction caused by rapid ascents and prolonged presence above 8,000 feet is not an issue. Many of our tours rarely exceed 8,000 feet in elevation and, even in Colorado where we’ll climb to 10,000 feet and beyond, rapid descents soon return us to lower elevations. At worst, cyclists at the highest altitudes may find themselves huffing and puffing in a climb, more than they would ordinarily anticipate given that level of activity. The almost universal experience during the course of a tour will be a marked and noticeable decline in the effect of altitude upon respiration. In other words, much of the anxiety over altitude is unwarranted. Most importantly however, you are contemplating a tour, not a competitive endurance event. As you read our various tour descriptions, you’ll note the absence of any labels indicating level of difficulty. Ratings are omitted by design because we believe that such labels are inherently subjective and misleading. Tour descriptions and total mileages for

each tour provide helpful indicators as to that tour’s level of challenge. But the best insight into a particular tour’s content and its suitability for you or your group can be obtained by contacting us so that we can discuss your interests and experience personally and directly with you. Make no mistake, cycling “Timberline Country” certainly is not an effortless activity and our cycling adventures are athletic experiences by design. But if you are a reasonably active individual, it certainly is “do-able,” and by do-able we mean enjoyable within the context of a leisurely vacation experience. In return for that effort, you will share in what well may be the most rewarding and memorable cycling experience that you ever will encounter. 

HIKING TIMBERLINE COUNTRY

Hiking has been a part of Timberline’s program from our earliest beginnings when a day’s trek was an eagerly anticipated alternate activity on a layover day on our first bicycle tour through Rocky Mountain National Park. As our program has evolved over the years, combined Biker/Hiker tours have been developed throughout our territory. Seventeen years ago, we introduced our first “pure hiking” program in the Grand

4

Canyon. For the season ahead, we’ll offer no less than 31 separate and distinct itineraries as the components of a program that truly defines the concept of Adventure Hiking. A few words about the nature of our programs may be helpful. Each of the hiking tours is an inn-to-inn program—in other words, all overnights will be in the magnificent national park lodges or inns that are distinct to the areas that we have selected for these programs. To the extent that overnights have been planned for certain backcountry lodges, such as Phantom Ranch in the Grand Canyon, Havasupai Lodge in Supai Village and Shadow Lake Lodge in Banff National Park, all of which are accessible only by foot, hikers will need to carry a light daypack for personal articles and clothing necessary for a one- or two-night stay. If a “hike” is distinguished from a “walk” by its degree of difficulty as to distance and terrain, our programs for the coming season conservatively should be considered “hikes.” Our daily distances will range between 6 and 14 miles, though generally averaging 8-10 miles per day. Nor will we shy away from hills—our tradition at Timberline is the spectacular alpine experiences that have distinguished our cycling programs over the years and that have become the hallmark of our hiking adventures. Most importantly, the same philosophy that has governed our cycling program also applies to our hikes. The emphasis will be upon hiking at one’s own pace—no time schedules, no concern about keeping up with anyone. The mood and tone of the entire experience is leisurely and as low-key and laid back as possible—sort of like a vacation. Each of our hikes has been chosen with a single objective in mind: to provide a never-to-be-forgotten experience in an area of extraordinary natural beauty. Our hikes planned for the coming season are those types of adventures. 

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES



2010


AC C O M M O DA T I O N S Our cycling and hiking days are exciting and exhilarating, but we believe that your evenings on tour will be equally memorable. We have arranged lodging along the way that will enhance your appreciation and enjoyment of the region through which we tour. We’ll overnight in several of the historic inns that we encounter along our many routes and spend other evenings in the excellent accommodations offered by a variety of inns and mountain lodges that are marked by the characteristic warmth and hospitality of the West. Many of these lodges offer swimming pools, hot tubs, saunas and other amenities necessary to soothe any lingering memories of that day’s mountain ascent.

We consider our meals on tour to be an integral and essential aspect of our overall touring experience. We may joke about quantity—we’re often thankful for the next day’s climb to burn away some of the previous evening’s calories. But we never joke about quality and our meals will always rank highly among your fondest recollections of a Timberline tour. The tour package cost includes all breakfasts and dinners for cycling programs, and all meals including lunches for Hiking Adventures. A varied menu is available at all meals to accommodate virtually every dietary preference and need. Although we provide lunches on hikes, (cafés and groceries are few and far between in the backcountry), we do not do so for cycling tours. Our touring philosophy encourages cyclists to ride at their own pace, without the need to be at a certain place at a certain time for lunch. Instead, at our morning meetings, we’ll point out the various lunch alternatives, which may include restaurants, groceries and some thoughts on special sites for a secluded picnic along that particular day’s route. 

SU PPORT VA N /SU PPO RT ON TOU R

A special word is in order concerning the lodging that has come to characterize a Timberline tour through our national parks. We believe that an essential feature of a visit to a national park is the experience of spending overnights in the magnificent hotels and lodges that constitute an integral element in the lore and fascination of these regions. For example, in Yellowstone and Grand Teton, we’ll overnight in the Old Faithful Inn and the Jackson Lake Lodge. In Glacier, our overnights include the Lake McDonald and Glacier Park Lodges, and Many Glacier and Prince of Wales Hotels. In Mesa Verde, it’s the beautiful Far View Lodge; in Olympic, the Khalaloch and Sol Duc lodges. Standard lodging accommodations are included in the cost of all tours for every night on tour. Not included in the cost of the tour package is lodging for the nights prior to, and following the conclusion of the tour. We can arrange lodging for you for those evenings upon request. Standard accommodations consist of two persons per room with your choice of one large bed (generally queen or kingsized), or two separate beds. For participants traveling solo, we’ll pair singles of the same sex as roommates. If we are unable to do so, there is no single surcharge. Single occupancy rooms, though, are available at an additional cost. 

All cycling tours will be supported by a motor vehicle (sagwagon), specially equipped to carry as many as 16 bicycles, 15 passengers and a trailer for luggage. The vehicle will transport cyclists’ luggage to each overnight destination and will accompany the group on the road each day to provide assistance and support, including a ride for any weary traveller. We encourage everyone to cycle at his or her own pace and we anticipate that our groups will spread out along the route during the course of the day. Each cyclist can rely upon contact by our van at approximate 1- to-11/2-hour intervals. Another leader is on the road with the group. Both road and van leaders are equipped with tools and first aid equipment to deal with most situations that potentially may arise in the course of a day’s ride. The van, particularly, is equipped with a wide range of tools and spare parts, sufficient to ensure that most mechanical problems are nothing more than a minor annoyance and not a traumatic catastrophe. The van will be utilized for trailhead shuttles and transport of luggage for hiking programs, but obviously will not accompany the group on the trail during each day’s hike. Two Timberline leaders will hike with the group, not only to provide any assistance that may be needed along the way, but also to offer interpretive substance that hopefully will enhance each hiker’s enjoyment and appreciation of the experience. 

ME A LS In our many years of cycling and hiking throughout the West, we’ve discovered the secret that motivates our guests to commit their vacations to the wonders of human-powered travel. Few pursuits in life offer the opportunity, and the need to consume enormous quantities of food with impunity as do cycling and hiking. We at Timberline are not about to squander such an extraordinary opportunity.

2010



TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES

5


TOU R AS SE MB L Y /VA N SH U T TL E S All tour assembly locations are clearly indicated in each tour description and all are served by commercial airlines and other forms of public transportation. Timberline can provide transfers to and from airports at all tour assembly locations. Pick-up times and logistics vary for each tour; details relating to transfer procedures will be included in post-registration information packets. Certain locations may not be as economically attractive as other nearby locations. For example, airfares to Calgary, Las Vegas and Salt Lake are far more attractive without additional connections beyond those points to Banff, Cedar City and Moab. In these instances, shuttle service provided either by Timberline van or commercial carrier, will be available at designated times. Timberline shuttles are without additional cost; commercial shuttle costs are set by the carrier and are the sole responsibility of those using that shuttle. Contact Timberline’s office for details concerning shuttle times and costs. All cycling tours will depart early-morning on the day of departure and return late-afternoon of the tour’s final day. Participants are urged to plan their arrival at tour assembly locations for cycling tours not later than the day prior to departure date. All cycling tours will be preceded by an orientation dinner the evening prior to departure. Hiking programs assemble early-morning of the day of departure and conclude by lateafternoon of the tour’s final day. Participants should schedule their arrival at assembly locations by early-morning of the departure date, or, of course, anytime during the day prior to departure. Although lodging for the nights prior to tour departure and following the tour’s conclusion are not included in the tour package cost, we can arrange accommodations upon request. Because the logistical issues vary for each program, we urge contact with our office prior to finalizing travel plans. 

PR E - TO U R PR EP A R A T IO N / O R IE N TA T I O N Upon receipt of your registration, we will send a full packet of information, including suggestions concerning recommended clothing and other gear, comments about the weather you might expect on tour, some tips on physical conditioning, along with additional information about the tour, airport transfers, van shuttles, pre- and post-tour lodging confirmations, and our pre-tour orientation dinner. Although all departure dates are as listed for each tour, the Timberline cycling experience actually begins the evening prior to departure with a pre-tour orientation dinner. In addition to energizing you with ample calories for the trip ahead, we’ll use this time to check out equipment, fill you in on what’s planned, answer any questions and just have a good time. These orientation gatherings will precede all tours in the location in which that tour assembles. Our initial dinner on the departure date for all hiking programs will include an orientation session for these groups. 

LEA D ERS H IP Without a doubt, we believe our tour leaders are the heart and soul of Timberline. These very special men and women are chosen by Timberline, not only for their obvious love of cycling and hiking and the outdoors, but also because of their caring manner, competence and enthusiasm, and their desire to share some extraordinary experiences with a wide variety of people and personalities over the course of a season. At least 70 percent of our staff are returnees from prior seasons, and several have been a part of the Timberline family since our earliest days. Two leaders will be assigned to each group. In addition to extensive cyclotouring and hiking experience, each leader will have completed a leadership training course and will have received certification in first aid and CPR. Our bicycle tour leaders are competent bicycle mechanics and will be equipped to assist with repairs and maintenance. 

GR O U P SI Z E A ND C O MP O SI T I O N Cycling groups will range in size between 8 and 15 participants, while Hiking Adventures will be limited to a maximum of 12. Participants should be 15 years of age or older, unless traveling with a parent or other responsible adult. The majority of tour participants fall within the 30-70 age range and significantly more over the age of 50 than under the age of 30, clearly reflecting the wonderful reality of cycling and hiking as lifelong recreational activities. We also have always believed that the diversity of a group is an important ingredient that enriches each individual’s enjoyment of an adventure experience, and our groups typically are comprised of a reasonably even mix of singles and couples, males and females. Information about composition of a specific group can be obtained by contacting our office. 

6

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES



2010


CYCLING ADVENTURES Perhaps to a fault, we forever are searching for new adventures—cycling opportunities that are exceptional and unique, and define us an organization. We hope that our commitment to adventure is apparent throughout our program, but nowhere is that commitment more apparent then in our Odyssey Series. In the season ahead, we’ve planned our greatest adventure—Odyssey 2010: Sea-toShining-Sea, 58 days, 3,900 miles, from Neah Bay at the northwestern tip of Washington’s Olympic Peninsula to Bar Harbor, ME. Sea-to-Shining-Sea is one of four new cycling programs planned for 2010. Last year’s 17-day Odyssey, Volcanoes of the Cascades, has been reincarnated as Volcanoes North (9 days) and Volcanoes South (8 days), and scheduled in a manner so that they can be linked. A new tour also has been planned for Colorado. Vines & Vistas is everything that you would hope to find in a Colorado bike tour, including our first engagement with the awesome Grand Mesa of western Colorado combined with a visit to Colorado’s surprising wine country. In the pages that follow, all of our cycling programs are described. They vary in content and level of difficulty from the mellow Katy Trail to the ultimate cross-continental Sea-to-Shining Sea. But, most importantly, all programs share a common feature—each has been designed as a cycling vacation for those who love to cycle, enjoy the outdoors, and are open and eager for adventure. 


ODYSSEY SERIES

ODY SSEY 201 0:

SEA -TO- SHINING -SEA

Date: (58 days, 57 nights) June 5-Aug 1 Assembly Point: Seattle, WA (airline service to Seattle; Timberline van shuttle to Neah Bay prior to tour and from Bar Harbor, to Portland, ME, following tour) Tour Cost: $16,000 (includes all lodging, all breakfasts and dinners, van shuttles from Seattle to Neah Bay prior to tour and from Bar Harbor to Portland, ME, following tour, park entrance fees, support van, leaders tour maps & narrative materials) In retrospect, when we launched our Odyssey Series 12 years ago with a ride from Missoula, MT, to Jasper, AB, and in subsequent years — circumnavigated Lake Michigan from Chicago — toured Atlantic Canada (Nova Scotia, Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island) — rode the Pacific Coast from Seattle to San Francisco — replicated the Lewis & Clark Expedition from Wood River, IL, to Astoria, OR — chased the Continental Divide from the Mexican Border to Jasper, AB we knew that at some point, we would be compelled to ride our bikes across the North American Continent. Because that is the dream of every touring cyclist, and the window of opportunity will not be there forever. And so, in the year ahead, in the context of Odyssey 2010, the time has come to ride from Sea to Shining Sea. From the northwesterly-most point in the lower 48 at Neah Bay, WA, to Bar Harbor, ME, we’ll

8

ride just shy of 4,000 miles across the North American Continent in a 58-day life-defining (forgive a bit of hyperbole?), but, for sure, a never-to-be-forgotten adventure of a lifetime. We’ve chosen a route that is neither the shortest nor the easiest of the alternatives out there to cross the continent. But the scenic quality, along with the quality of cycling and utter absence of urban chaos from beginning to end of our route, are without equal among those many alternative choices. Grab a map and trace our course through Washington on remarkable State Highway 20, Glacier Park and Montana’s Highline, the wild beauty of northern North Dakota, the lake country of Minnesota and Wisconsin, Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and Mackinac Island, the rolling rural countryside of Ontario, Stratford’s Shakespearian Festival, a touch of French Quebec and a layover day to cross the St. Lawrence and play tourist in Montreal, New York’s Lake Champlain, northern Vermont and New Hampshire, our lobster feast in Belfast, ME, preceding our heroic ride into beautiful Bar Harbor, and a tour of Acadia National Park on our final day— this is the essence of Odyssey 2010. And, more than anything, we hope that we’ve conveyed our commitment that this is definitely not a “put-your-head-down-

and-crank-out-the-miles” experience. As we’ve done with past odysseys, for those unable to commit to the full 58-day ride, participation in Sea-to-Shining-Sea is possible in three segments of unequal duration (segments have been determined by transportation issues): Segment 1: (Neah Bay, WA, to Brainerd, MN) June 5-July 1 Segment 2: (Brainerd, MN, to Stratford, ON) July 2-July 16 Segment 3: (Stratford, ON, to Bar Harbor, ME) July 17-Aug 1 Contact us for details relative to participation in selected segments. Group size will be limited to a maximum of 24 participants, who will be supported by two 15-passenger vans and four Timberline leaders. As though there remained any doubt, we could ramble on forever as we attempt to detail all of the “nuts and bolts” of Odyssey 2010. The better choice, if we’ve whetted your appetite, would be to contact us by phone or e-mail and we’ll fill in the gaps, including a day-byday itinerary. Most of all, know that we hope to share with at least some of you still reading this, what we expect will be among the great adventures of our lives.

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES



2010


MONTANA MAGIC/GLACIER PARK/IDAHO Nobody—and we mean NOBODY—does Montana like Timberline. We all do some variation of a grand loop of Glacier and Waterton Parks; our Glacier Park Alpiner has been an exciting bedrock constituent of our program for the past 23 years, and was reconstituted in 2009 as our new Glacier Park/Waterton Lakes Adventure. But early in our love affair with Big Sky Country, we learned that the

GLA CIE R PAR K/W AT E RTO N LA K ES ADV EN T URE

Dates: (7 days, 6 nights; Sun-Sat) July 4-10; Aug. 8-14 Assembly Point: Whitefish (airline service to Kalispell; Timberline van transfers to and from airport) Tour Cost: $2,395 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, park entrance fees, support van, transfers, leaders, tour maps & narratives) What’s the best way to experience Glacier—on a bicycle cycling the roads of the frontcountry, or on foot, hiking the trails of the vast backcountry? But why choose? Each offers an insight unlike that of the other and the two are incredibly compatible and complementary. In the context of our reconstructed Glacier Park/Waterton Lakes Adventure, we’ll experience the magnificence of Glacier/Waterton in a manner unsurpassed by anything that we’ve done in the parks in the past. We’ll continue to cycle the grand loop of both parks and add hiking days in Many Glacier and Waterton, where we believe the best of the region’s day hiking can be found. An integral part of Glacier’s landscape is water—countless waterfalls, glacial lakes, raging whitewater rivers and the deep gorges they have carved, and we’ll see it all—on bike, on foot, and in the context of a rafting segment on the Middle Fork of the Flathead River.

2010



fascination of this region as a premier, if not the premier, cycling destination extends well beyond the parameters of these national parks. We, as cyclists, believe that adventure opportunities presented by our Montana Magic, Bitterroot/Sawtooth Rambler and Glacier/Waterton Lakes Adventure are dramatic expressions of the magic that is Montana. 

The Glacier Park/Waterton Lakes Adventure assembles in Whitefish and we’ll head for Glacier early-morning of Day 1. Before long, Glacier’s snowclad peaks are visible as we enter the park at West Glacier and ultimately ride along the shores of Lake McDonald to our overnight at the Lake McDonald Lodge. The logistics of this first day present some intriguing mid-day options while we await the 4 p.m. opening of the road to Lake McDonald for cyclists. Among those choices are a half-day of whitewater rafting on the Flathead River and a great cycling option along the beautiful quiet road toward the Polebridge region of Glacier. With that relatively gentle first day behind us, it’s on to one of the most exciting cyclotouring experiences to be found in North America—the challenge of spectacular Going-to-the-Sun Highway and its summit at Logan Pass (6,640'). How can we describe the experience of Going-to-the-Sun? The awesome glacial snowfields, tumbling waterfalls, the Hanging Gardens, the spectacular vistas that unfold at every switchback as we climb higher and higher. We promise some sweat, but the incredible scenic setting is well worth it. As a reward for that effort, we can look forward to a long downhill to St. Mary and then on to Many Glacier on the Park’s wild eastern slope. We’ll spend the next two evenings in the historic Many Glacier Hotel, set magnificently on the shores of Swiftcurrent Lake in the shadow of Grinnell Glacier. Day 3 is dedicated to hiking in the Many Glacier area (9 miles). On Day 4, we’ll cross the border into Canada for a visit to Waterton Park. We’ll spend two nights at the Waterton Lakes Resort adjacent to the lake in the townsite. Two of the absolute best day hikes in all of

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES

Canada—Crypt Lake and Carthew-Alderson—are located in Waterton and we’ll choose between them for our second hiking day (11 miles). We’ll return to Montana on Day 5—one of the most intriguing days that we offer on any tour. We’ll climb from the Waterton Valley, trace the course of the Belly River and ride in the shadow of mystical Chief Mountain. We’ll continue along the sparsely travelled eastern perimeter of Glacier beyond St. Mary Lake to the Triple Divide, separating waters that flow to the Atlantic, Pacific and Hudson Bay. Our last climb on this very special day crests Looking Glass Hill with its breathtaking vista of Two Medicine Lakes. And what a way to end this day—an exhilarating 8-mile descent into East Glacier where we’ll spend our final night at the grand Glacier Park Lodge. It’s back on the road early-morning of Day 7 for a relatively gentle return to the Continental Divide atop Marias Pass. From Marias, we’ll descend along the Middle Fork of the Flathead through the southern tip of Glacier and the gorge through which we rafted on Day 1. We’ll ride to West Glacier and van shuttle back to Whitefish, where our program concludes. Total cycling mileage – 282 Total hiking mileage – 20

BITTERROOT/SAWTOOTH RAMBLER

Date: (9 days, 8 nights; Sat-Sun) July 24- Aug. 1 Assembly Point: Missoula (airline service to Missoula; Timberline van transfers to and from transportation terminals)(Note that tour originates in Missoula and terminates in Boise. Van shuttle return to Missoula will be available on Aug. 2 for those who need to return to Missoula) Tour Cost: $2,795 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, support van, transfers, leaders, tour maps & narratives)

The rugged alpine summits of the Bitterroots and Sawtooths, the gentle beauty of the Bitterroot and Salmon River Valleys, the surreal setting of Redfish Lake, the excitement of Sun Valley and the challenge of Lost Trail and Galena summits—the Bitterroot/ Sawtooth is western bicycle touring at its best. We’ll gather in Missoula and ride in the shadow of the Bitterroots through the Bitterroot Valley to Darby, where we’ll spend our first evening. We’ll climb Lost Trail Pass (6,995') the following morning in the heart of the Bitterroots and then descend into Idaho’s Salmon River Valley and an overnight at the Stagecoach Inn in Salmon. On Day 3, we’ll begin to trace the magnificent Salmon to its source near the Galena Summit. We’ll

9


ride the Salmon River Scenic Byway to Challis and then enter the Sawtooth National Recreation Area the following day. We’ll follow the Salmon through Stanley to beautiful Redfish Lake, nestled at the base of the rugged Sawtooths. We’ll spend the night at the historic Redfish Lake Lodge, whose sandy beach and temperate, astonishingly clear water demands a plunge and swim after the day’s ride. A spectacular climb to the Galena Summit (8,701') and the headwaters of the Salmon highlights Day 5. A long descent follows along the Wood River to the exciting resort village of Sun Valley where two nights and a layover day are planned. We’ll spend both of those nights at the Tyrolean Lodge, with its inviting outdoor pool and hot tub. A number of non-cycling activities are available on the layover day, including hiking in the Sawtooths or a day of whitewater rafting on the Salmon. Count on a visit to the famous Sun Valley Lodge for dinner. We’ll retrace our route through the Sawtooths for our second evening at Stanley and then ride to the Banner Summit and on into the rugged wilderness setting of Payette Canyon along the wild Middle Fork of the Payette River. We’ll spend a final night in Garden Valley and then continue along the Payette to the new Boise Greenbelt that follows the Boise River into the heart of Boise where our adventure concludes. Total Mileage – 540

MON T A N A M A G I C

Date: (11 days, 10 nights; Thurs-Sun) Aug. 19-29 Assembly Point: Missoula, MT (airline service to Missoula; Timberline van transfers to and from airport) Tour Cost: $3,295 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, park entrance fees, support van, transfers, leaders, tour maps & narratives) If your image of the West is one of majestic snowcapped mountains, crystalline glacial lakes, cascading streams, secluded valleys, and a vastness that will expand the spirit and soul of all who behold it, the Big Sky Country of Montana is the embodiment of all that is special about the West. We believe that Montana

Magic is an eloquent expression of the magical allure of Montana. Montana Magic assembles in Missoula and we’ll trace the Clark Fork and Blackfoot Rivers east to Lincoln on Day 1. Following an overnight in Lincoln, we’ll climb to the Continental Divide at Flesher Pass (6,130’) and then descend to the Missouri River at Helena, Montana’s capital and a town with a rich western heritage. On Day 3, we’ll trace the Missouri to it’s source at Three Forks, where the Madison, Gallatin and Jefferson Rivers join to form the great river. We’ll spend the evening in Three Forks, enjoy a spectacular dinner at the Headwaters Café and somehow squeeze in a visit to Wheat Montana, one of the great bakeries of the western world. On Day 4, we’ll begin to trace Clark’s exploration of the Yellowstone Country after he and Lewis separated during the return journey. We’ll visit the Missouri Headwaters Monument near Three Forks, ride through the beautiful rolling countryside of the Gallatin Valley to Bozeman and then climb mellow Bozeman Pass to Livingston, gateway to the Paradise Valley and our overnight at the Yellowstone Inn. Every day on this tour is exceptional, but Day 5 cries for special mention. We’ll ride south from Livingston and quickly cross the Yellowstone River to ride the quiet, beautiful Eastside Highway as it traces the course of the Yellowstone toward its source in the park. We’ll spend the day cycling the full length of the Paradise Valley, dwarfed by the towering snowclad Absarokas to the east and Gallatins to the west. We’ll enter Yellowstone through Gardiner, ride along the Gardner River, pause at the 45th Parallel for a soak in the river pools that capture the hot waters pouring from the Mammoth Terrace Hot Springs, and finally climb to Mammoth where we’ll spend the evening at the Mammoth Hotel. We’ll do some different things on Day 6 to maximize our ability to tour much of the northern section of Yellowstone (and comply with NPS cycling restrictions). We’ll van shuttle from Mammoth to Tower Falls, hike to the base of the falls (2 miles), shuttle up Dunraven Pass and then hike to the summit of Mt. Washburn (10,243'), among the park’s tallest peaks (6 miles). It’s then on to Canyon and a visit to the magnificent Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. A short drive across the park leads to Norris Geyser

Basin, the park’s most extensive area of thermal activity. We will ultimately make it to West Yellowstone, where we’ll spend the night at the Stagecoach Hotel to conclude this non-cycling, but totally active and extraordinary day. Early morning of Day 7, we’ll ride west from Yellowstone along the Madison River through beautiful Madison Canyon. The massive Madison Canyon earthquake of 1959 profoundly altered the appearance of portions of the Yellowstone Country. On our way to Ennis we’ll visit the Earthquake Interpretive Center and ride the shores of Quake Lake, a creation of that cataclysmic event. We’ll climb from Ennis the following morning and then descend into the historic mining town of Virginia City. The downhill continues as we approach the Beaverhead River enroute to our overnight in Dillon. A “hole” was the term used by early settlers to designate a valley, and much of our next two days belong to the magnificence of Montana’s Big Hole. The Big Hole, ringed by the Pioneer Mountains to the east and the Bitterroots to the west, is the heart of Montana’s cattle country. Two moderate passes, Badger (6,760') and Big Hole (7,360'), mark our journey to Jackson and an overnight at the Jackson Hot Springs Lodge with the promise of a long, leisurely soak in the natural hot springs at the lodge. A side trip to Bannack State Park, site of Montana’s first territorial capital, is a great option on this day. Day 10 is one of the most rewarding days in our total program. Following a short ride to Wisdom, we’ll turn west toward the towering Bitterroots. Shortly before entering the Beaverhead Forest, we’ll visit the Big Hole Battlefield National Monument, site in 1877 of one of the major conflicts between the government and Chief Joseph and the Nez Perce. From the battlefield, we’ll begin a long moderate climb to the Continental Divide atop Chief Joseph Pass (7,264'), followed by a rapid descent to Lost Trail Pass astride the Montana/Idaho border. The downhill continues into the Bitterroot Valley to Hamilton, nestled in the heart of the valley in the shadow of the magnificent snowclad Bitterroot peaks. We’ll spend our final evening in Hamilton and then continue downstream along the Bitterroot River the following morning to Missoula. Total cycling mileage – 784 Total hiking mileage – 8


YE L L O W S T O N E C O U N T R Y From our earliest days, the Yellowstone Country, and particularly Yellowstone Park, was one of our most cherished cycling destinations. For so many years, our 7-day Yellowstone Alpiner that embraced the entire Grand Loop through Grand Teton and Yellowstone was an anchor in our ever-expanding cycling program. That all changed when the Park Service ordered the exclusion of bicycle touring groups from significant sections of the park. During the ensuing period, we loaded and unloaded bicycles and bicyclists on and off of our support van to shuttle through the crazy-quilt

pattern of restricted roadways. Last season, we concluded that a quality bicycling experience no longer was realistically attainable within the confines of the Grand Loop, and we dramatically reconstituted our programs with an increased emphasis on the extraordinary opportunities available in the greater Yellowstone Country beyond national park boundaries. In 2009, two new programs—Grand Tetons & The Winds of Wyoming and Yellowstone Country Adventure—joined Beartooth /Big Horns. And now, as we approach the 2010 season, we believe that we have reignited the excitement of cycling in the Yellowstone Country. 

YE L LO W S TO N E CO U N TR Y AD V EN T U R E

Date: (8 days, 7 nights; Sat-Sat) Aug. 7-14 Assembly Point: Bozeman, MT (airline service to Bozeman; Timberline transfers to and from airport) Tour Cost: $2,595 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, support van, leaders, transfers, tour maps & narratives)

GRA ND TE T ONS & T HE WI N D S OF W Y OM IN G

Dates: (8 days, 7 nights; Sat-Sat) July 24-31 Assembly Point: Jackson Hole (airline service to Jackson; Timberline van transfers to and from airport) Tour Cost: $2,595 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, park entrance fees, support van, transfers, leaders, tour maps & narratives) Grand Teton National Park and the southeastern quadrant of Yellowstone combined with the BridgerTeton National Forest and the magnificent Wind River Range to the south and east of the parks provide the breathtaking backdrop for this Yellowstone Country cycling adventure. We’ll assemble in Jackson and ride beneath the spires of the Tetons into Grand Teton Park on Day 1. We’re headed to Jackson Lake on this day where we’ll spend our first two overnights at the Jackson Lake Lodge. Day 2 may be a layover day, not to be mistaken for a rest day. We’re hiking to Lake Solitude on this day (14 miles) for what we at Timberline consider to be the absolute best day hike in our entire program. We’ll ride from Jackson Lake on Day 3 and then

2010



climb from the lake’s shoreline to the Snake River and on into Yellowstone. We’ll spend the night at the Lake Yellowstone Hotel on the shores of this high-country jewel and then ride to the East Entrance by way of Sylvan Pass (8,530') on Day 4. From the east gate, we’ll descend along the Shoshone River through Shoshone Canyon to Cody and arrive early enough to visit the incredible Buffalo Bill Western Museum. Early morning of Day 5, we’ll ride from Cody into the heart of the Big Horn Basin to Thermopolis, home to the world’s largest mineral hot springs. It’s on to Lander on Day 6. the southern gateway to the Winds and Bridger-Teton Wilderness. Early that morning, on our way to Lander, we’ll ride through the magnificent Wind River Canyon. We’ll trace the course of the Wind River much of the following day as we skirt the eastern flank of the Winds to Dubois, where we’ll spend our final evening. Beautiful Togwotee Pass (9,668’) awaits on our final day as we climb moderately through the Bridger-Teton Forest to Togwotee’s summit atop the Continental Divide. That first view of the jagged spires of the Tetons as we descend from Togwotee is a view for the ages. We’ll return to Grand Teton Park at Moran and then van shuttle back to Jackson. Total cycling mileage—480 Total hiking mileage—14

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES

In our minds, at least, no other region that we claim as “Timberline Country” quite captures and expresses the essence of all that is special about the west as does the Yellowstone Country embracing the park’s northern and western perimeters. The Absarokas to the north, and Gallatin and Madison Ranges to the west, the mighty Yellowstone, Madison and Gallatin Rivers that have carved their indelible signatures upon this landscape—these are but some of the elements that constitute the Yellowstone Country that will be the focus of our new Yellowstone Country Adventure. Yellowstone Country assembles in Bozeman and we’ll ride east from town on Day 1 for an earlymorning encounter with Bozeman Pass (5,712'). We’ll join the Yellowstone River in Livingston and follow its course upstream through the beautiful Paradise Valley to Chico and an evening at the Chico Hot Springs Lodge. We’ll continue southward through the valley on Day 2 as we ride beneath the towering spires of the Absarokas to the east and Gallatins to the west. We’ll pause at the 45th Parallel and hike the short path along the Gardner River for a soak in the hot springs in pools built by the Park Service to capture the steaming pour-off from the Terrace Hot Springs above Mammoth. We’ll continue into Yellowstone and on to Mammoth and spend the evening at the Mammoth Hotel. We’ll do some different things on Day 3 to maximize our ability to tour much of the northern section of Yellowstone (and comply with NPS cycling restrictions). We’ll van shuttle from Mammoth to Tower Falls, hike to the base of the falls (2 miles), shuttle up Dunraven Pass and then hike to the summit of Mt. Washburn (10,243'), among the park’s tallest peaks (6 miles). It’s then on to Canyon and a visit to the magnificent Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. We’ll spend this night at Canyon and then it’s back on the

11


bikes the following morning as we ride through the Hayden Valley. with it’s vast bison herd, we’ll skirt the shore of shimmering Lake Yellowstone to West Thumb and then climb from the lake to the Continental Divide atop Craig Pass (8,262'). From Craig’s summit, it’s downhill to Old Faithful and an overnight at the Old Faithful Inn. We’ll tour the geyser basin at Old Faithful, including an obligatory visit to the famous old geyser itself. Day 5, we’ll become the ultimate bicycle tourists as we tour Biscuit and Midway Geyser Basins, Fountain Lake Drive, Fountain Paint Pots and Firehole Canyon before turning to the west along the Madison River to West Yellowstone and an overnight at the Stagecoach Inn. Early morning of Day 6, we’ll ride from West Yellowstone through beautiful Madison Canyon. The massive Madison earthquake of 1959 profoundly altered the appearance of portion of the Yellowstone Country. On our way to Ennis, we’ll visit the Earthquake Interpretive Center and ride the shores of Quake Lake, a creation of that cataclysmic event. We’ll climb from Ennis the following morning and then descend into the historic 19th-century mining town of Virginia City. We’ll follow the Jefferson River north from Twin Bridges as it flows toward it’s union with the Madison and Gallatin at Three Forks. We’ll spend the evening at Three Forks, enjoy a spectacular final dinner at the Headwaters Café and somehow squeeze in a visit to Wheat Montana, one of the great bakeries of the Western World. Early on our final morning, we’ll visit the Missouri Headwaters Monument at the actual confluence, and then ride on to Bozeman where our tour concludes. Total cycling mileage – 320 Total hiking mileage – 21

BE A RTO OT H/B IG HORN S BIK ER /HIK ER

Date: (7 days, 6 nights; Sun-Sat) Aug. 15-21 Assembly Point: Billings (Laurel) (airline service to Billings; Timberline van transfers to Laurel prior to tour and from Ranchester to Billings following tour) Tour Cost: $2,195 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, support van, leaders, transfers, tour maps & narratives) The sign is somewhat weathered, the words slightly faded and difficult to read, but the message is such that the excitement builds. Out there on the fringe of the Big Horn Basin, under the biggest, bluest sky that the Big Sky Country of Montana can offer, we’re about to enter Beartooth Country. That sign confirms that we’re headed for Beartooth Highway—“the most beautiful highway in America.” Hyperbole? Chamber of Commerce rubbish? If anything, when we’re climbing Beartooth, you’ll believe that the late Charles Kuralt’s words were grossly understated. Timberline’s legacy since its inception has always included spectacular alpine ascents among the highlights of its tours. Trail Ridge, Loveland,

12

Slumgullion, Independence, Red Mountain, Wolf Creek—the mighty Colorado passes that carry us to timberline and beyond—they pale in comparison to the absolute challenge and awesome beauty of Beartooth. Our tour assembles in Laurel, MT, just west of Billings and we’ll ride toward the mighty Beartooths on Day 1. Our destination this day is Red Lodge and the magical Rock Creek Resort at the gateway to Custer National Forest and the Beartooth road. We’ll pause at Red Lodge on Day 2 and hike to beautiful Timberline Lake, nestled in a glacial cirque at timberline with phenomenal views of the towering snowclad Beartooth peaks (9 miles). We’ll spend a second evening at Rock Creek, awaiting our engagement the following morning with Beartooth. We could go on and on about the Beartooth experience—it is the absolute best! No matter what and where you’ve cycled in the past, and notwithstanding what lies ahead, Beartooth is without equal. The climb begins as soon as you leave the breakfast table. Twenty-five miles later as you crest the 10,947' summit, with a sense that you are the highest creature on Earth, you’ll agree that the thrill of alpine cycling is the climb, and not the descent. The Alpine Lodge in Cooke City is our home for the next two nights. The Northeast Entrance of Yellowstone is only a few miles west of Cooke City and we’re headed into this quiet sector of the park on Day 4 for one of the park’s best hiking opportunities. We’ll trace the course of Pebble Creek as it meanders through beautiful meadows ablaze with an incredible array of wildflowers. We’re ultimately headed for Bliss Pass (9,500') with it’s magnificent views of the Lamar Valley (10 miles). For those who prefer a cycling option in Yellowstone on this day, a ride through the Lamar Valley to thundering Tower Falls is an intriguing choice. In so many ways, Day 5 eloquently illustrates all that is so extraordinary about cycling in the Rocky Mountain West. Chief Joseph Highway provides the link between Cooke City and Cody—in other words

this is the sole choice for those traveling between these two towns. The good news for us is that not many folks have much need to make this trek on any given day and that translates into one of the greatest cycling days you will ever experience. We’ll begin with a plunge to the brink of the Clark Fork Gorge, ascend the switchbacks above the gorge to awesome Dead Indian Summit, and then it’s downhill into the Big Horn Basin and on into Cody. We’ll arrive in Cody early enough for a visit to the renowned Buffalo Bill Western Museum and perhaps even experience a western rodeo that evening. As we ride the Big Horn Basin on Day 6, the mighty Big Horns, at first barely visible on the eastern horizon, are an ever-present reminder that the final day of this adventure will be anything but anticlimactic. We’ll spend a final evening at the Kedesh Guest Ranch at the gateway to Shell Canyon and then begin our climb into this ruggedly beautiful canyon the following morning. We’ll visit Shell Falls and our climb continues to the summit of Granite Pass (9,033'). And then, what better way to conclude this week-long adventure than with an incredible 18-mile downhill to Ranchester, and a final van shuttle return to Billings. Total cycling mileage – 320 Total hiking mileage – 21

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES



2010


C A N A D I A N ROC K I E S We’ve never been to Europe; we’ve never experienced the Alps, Pyrenees, or Dolomites. But not even in our wildest fantasy can we envision anything that exceeds the overpowering magnificence of the Canadian Rockies. For so many reasons, Canada’s Rockies are recognized as one of the world’s premier cycling destinations. Surrounded by lush forests and towering, massive snowclad peaks, the cyclist, for the most part, rides the surprisingly gentle Icefields Parkway through the chain of valleys between the parallel ranges of the Rockies. The Icefields Parkway is an integral component of both our Canadian Rocky Mountain Alpiner and Rambler tours. Unique to our program, however,

is the marriage of the Parkway with the exciting Golden Triangle that embraces the extension of the Rockies into British Columbia and the adjacent Columbia River Valley. It is this combination of the Parkway and Golden Triangle —the best of road cycling in the Canadian Rockies—that has created the dynamic aura that Timberline’s program in Canada has enjoyed over the years. In addition to the Alpiner and Rambler programs, we’ll again offer Classic Canada, the extraordinary 10-day adventure that unites the Rockies with the majestic Purcells and Selkirks, and magnificent lake country of British Columbia to the west.  It’s then downhill to Saskatchewan River Crossing and an overnight at The Crossing Resort We’re headed for the Icefields early-morning of Day 6. We’ll climb imposing Sunwapta Pass, hike beyond treeline along magnificent Parker Ridge at Sunwapta’s summit before continuing to the Icefields Center at the foot of Athabasca Glacier. From the Icefields, we’ll descend along the course of the Sunwapta River to Sunwapta Falls for an overnight in the warm, gracious setting of the Sunwapta Falls Resort. A short, leisurely ride to Jasper, including a visit to Athabasca Falls, is planned for Day 7, providing an opportunity to explore Jasper prior to our return to Banff and Calgary. Total mileage – 345

CA N A D I A N ROCK Y MOU N T A I N RAMBLE R

CA N A D I A N RO CKY MOU N T A I N ALPINER

Dates: (7 days, 6 nights; Sun-Sat) July 11-17; Aug. 22-28 Assembly Point: Banff (airline service to Calgary; Timberline van shuttle from Calgary to Banff prior to tour, and from Jasper to Banff and Calgary following tour) (Note that bus and commercial shuttles offer additional service between Calgary and Banff) Tour Cost: $2,295 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, support van, round-trip Timberline van shuttles from Calgary to Banff prior to tour and from Jasper to Banff and Calgary following tour, leaders, tour maps & narratives) The Icefields Parkway and Golden Triangle—the marriage of these two regions translates into the most expansive and exciting bicycle tour in the Canadian Rockies. Johnston and Marble Canyons, Banff, Kootenay, Yoho and Jasper National Parks, Radium Hot Springs, the Columbia River Valley, Kicking Horse Pass, Lake Louise, the Columbia Icefields, Athabasca Falls, Jasper—this is the heart of the Canadian Rockies that constitutes our Canadian Rocky Mountain Alpiner. Our tour assembles in Banff and we’ll ride the

2010



quiet, gentle Bow Parkway as it follows the Bow River to Johnston Canyon. A leisurely first day affords ample opportunity for the short hikes to the falls in both Johnston and Marble Canyons. We’ll ride on beyond the Continental Divide into Kootenay Park and British Columbia and spend our first overnight at the historic Kootenay Park Lodge. Day 2 is a scenic delight as we continue through Kootenay Park, tracing the course of the Vermillion and Kootenay Rivers as they carve their course through the rugged Rockies. A final climb to the crest of Sinclair Pass precedes a thrilling 7-mile descent into Radium Hot Springs, whose name suggests the treat that awaits us at the end of this special day. From Radium, it’s on to Golden on Day 3. We’ll trace the course of the Columbia River with the towering Rockies to our east and the beautiful Purcells and Selkirks to the west. On Day 4, it’s back over the Great Divide by way of Kicking Horse Pass (5,338') as we return to Banff National Park. We’ll overnight at Lake Louise at charming Deer Lodge and visit not only the lake for which the village is named, but also incomparable Moraine Lake for dinner at the Moraine Lake Lodge. Our tour continues northward along the Icefields Parkway. On Day 5, as we climb gently to the Bow Summit, we’ll view Hector Lake and Crowfoot Glacier, ride the shoreline of Bow Lake, and visit beautiful Peyto Lake perched atop the Bow Summit.

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES

Date: (9 days, 8 nights; Sat-Sun) July 24-Aug. 1 Assembly Point: Banff (airline service to Calgary; Timberline van shuttle from Calgary to Banff prior to tour, and from Jasper to Banff and Calgary following tour) (Note that bus and commercial shuttles offer additional service between Calgary and Banff) Tour Cost: $3,095 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, support van, round-trip Timberline van shuttles from Calgary to Banff prior to tour and from Jasper to Banff and Calgary following tour, leaders, tour maps & narratives) From its earliest days, the Canadian Rocky Mountain Rambler has consistently ranked among our most popular programs, and understandably so. Consider the many cycling groups that offer some sort of Canadian Rockies experience as an indicator of the allure of this region. As a cyclist, you will always feel that you just can’t get enough exposure to this remarkable part of our world. That was the reality 23 years ago that inspired the creation of our Icefields Alpiner—the combination of the Golden Triangle with the traditional Icefields Parkway, the absolute best of cycling in the Canadian Rockies. One year later, the opportunity to incorporate a day of hiking above Moraine Lake in the Lake Louise area and an evening and additional time to explore Jasper was irresistible. From that point forward, our

13


9-day Rambler endures as the ultimate Canadian Rockies cycling adventure. The initial four days of the Rambler follows the Alpiner itinerary, although the added day in Lake Louise on Day 5 presents the inviting opportunity to explore several options along the way to Lake Louise on Day 4. Among those options are a relatively short detour to Natural Bridge and Emerald Lake, and a breathtaking climb to Takakkaw Falls, one of the highest waterfalls in Canada. Day 5 is a layover day in Lake Louise, with some of the best hiking opportunities in the Canadian Rockies. Among the choices is spectacular Sentinel Pass, rising above timberline overlooking beautiful Moraine Lake and the stunning Valley of the Ten Peaks. Following our second night at Deer Lodge in Lake Louise, we’ll head for the Icefields Parkway and a magnificent ride to Saskatchewan Crossing. We’ll climb gently to the Bow Summit, the highest point on the Parkway. Along the way, we’ll visit Hector Lake, Crowfoot Glacier and Bow Lake, all before lunch at Num-ti-jah Lodge. At the Bow Summit lies Peyto Lake, the crown jewel of Canadian high-alpine lakes. It’s then downhill to the Saskatchewan River and our overnight at The Crossing. We’ll continue along the Parkway on Day 7 to the Columbia Icefields and then descend in the shadow of the stark peaks of the Endless Chain to Sunwapta Resort. The Rambler’s expanded itinerary suggests several options worth exploring on our way to Jasper the following day, including Athabasca Falls and the meadows atop Mount Edith Cavell. We’ll overnight in Jasper at the Lobstick Lodge, ride to Pyramid and Patricia Lakes overlooking the Jasper townsite the following morning, and then on to the famous Jasper Park Lodge for a memorable brunch. Mid-afternoon, we’ll van shuttle back to Calgary. Total Mileage – 365

CL A SS IC CA N A DA

Date: (10 days, 9 nights; Fri-Sun) Aug. 6-15 Assembly Point: Lake Louise (airline service to Calgary; Timberline van shuttle between Calgary and Lake Louise prior to, and following tour) (Note that bus and commercial shuttles offer additional service between Calgary and Lake Louise) Tour Cost: $3,195 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, support van, round-trip Timberline shuttles between Calgary and Lake Louise prior to and following tour, leaders, tour maps & narratives) Banff, Lake Louise, the Columbia Icefields, Jasper—these are the place names that symbolize the allure of the Canadian Rockies. Timberline for years has toured this Rocky Mountain Front in the context of our Canadian Rocky Mountain Alpiner and Rambler programs. But the magnificence of Alpine Canada sprawls westward well beyond the Great Divide into the heart of British Columbia. The rugged Purcells and Selkirks, the serene beauty of the great Columbia/ Kootenay River system and the valleys through which these

14

waters flow, fiord-like lake country that is everywhere—these are a few of the ingredients of an extraordinary and unique cycling adventure. We believe that Classic Canada is adventure cycling at its best. In the course of 10 days, we’ll experience the almost indescribable beauty of Lake Louise, challenge the Great Divide twice as well as the many summits that we’ll encounter in the Purcells and Selkirks, trace the course of the Columbia, ride the shores of Kootenay and Arrow Lakes and the quaint ferries that cross those waters, explore no less than five of Canada’s Rocky Mountain parks, and luxuriate in the natural hot springs at Radium, Ainsworth and Nakusp. Classic Canada assembles in Lake Louise and we’ll climb to nearby Moraine Lake on Day 1. The hiking opportunities at Moraine Lake are extraordinary and our Day 1 mileage is intentionally light. The lure of incredible Sentinel Pass is irresistible

and we’re hiking to that summit before riding on to Storm Mountain Lodge. Our first encounter with the Great Divide occurs on Day 2 at the crest of Vermillion Pass. We’ll cross into British Columbia and Kootenay Park and descend along the Vermillion and Kootenay Rivers. We’ll climb Sinclair Pass that afternoon as a prelude to a 7-mile descent into Radium and a welcome soak in the hot springs. We’ll follow the Columbia south of Radium to the Bavarian-like village of Kimberly, Canada’s highest city at 3,630' nestled in the heart of the Purcells. We’ll enjoy an incomparable dinner at Chef Bernard’s that evening and then it’s on to Cranbrook and Creston on Day 4 and an overnight near the shore of Kootenay Lake. We’ll trace the Kootenay shoreline the next morning to Crawford Bay and board the ferry for the crossing to Balfour. Following an overnight at the Ainsworth Hot Springs Lodge, we’ll ride to Kaslo and into the Slocan Valley to New Denver and Nakusp on the shores of Upper Arrow Lake. We’ll spend the night in Kuskanax Lodge in Nakusp. Mid-morning of Day 7, we’ll board our second ferry at Galena Bay as we cross Upper Arrow Lake and rejoin the mighty Columbia as we approach Revelstoke and an overnight at the historic Regent Inn. Our climb through the Selkirks begins as we leave the breakfast table on Day 8. We’ll cycle through Mt. Revelstoke and Glacier National Parks and spend the evening atop Rogers Pass at the Glacier Park Lodge. A long descent is our reward on Day 9 as we ride to Golden and a final overnight in the picturesque townsite at the confluence of the Kicking Horse and Columbia Rivers. Our final day is anything but anticlimactic. We’ll trace the Kicking Horse through Yoho Park to its source among the high peaks near the Great Divide at Kicking Horse Pass as we return to Lake Louise. And for those who want more on this final day, a climb to spectacular Takakkaw Falls, one of Canada’s highest falls, is an intriguing option. Total mileage – 610


CO L O R A D O H I G H - CO U N T R Y G O L D Colorado is our home and without a doubt we have a bias. In the course of the 28 years that we’ve been exploring the West, from Alaska south through the Canadian Rockies, to the shores of the Pacific, through the deserts of the southwest, Colorado, in our hearts, is the best. Everything that we do is measured against the utter thrill of cycling in the San Juans in southwestern Colorado or climbing to the other-worldly summit of Trail Ridge in Rocky Mountain National Park. In the season ahead, our Colorado programs will reflect our pride and

passion for our home state. This year’s San Juans of Colorado retains all of the substance of its 7-day predecessor, including Durango, Mesa Verde, Telluride, Ouray and Silverton. Colorado Rocky Mountain High is a cyclist’s fantasy that offers the greatest concentration of high country adventure to be found in our entire program. New for 2010 is Vines and Vistas: Colorado’s Western Slope, which combines Colorado’s surprising wine country with the awesome challenges of the Colorado Monument and Grand Mesa. 

COL OR A DO ROCKY MOU N T A I N H I G H

Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) July 18-23; Sept. 12-17 Assembly Point: Gunnison (airline service to Gunnison or Denver; Timberline van shuttle between Denver and Gunnison prior to and following tour) Tour Cost: $1,995 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, support van, shuttles between Denver and Gunnison, leaders, tour maps & narratives)

SA N JUA N S OF COLOR A DO

Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) June 20-25; Aug. 29-Sept. 3 Assembly Point: Durango (airline service to Durango; timberline van transfers to and from airport) Tour Cost: $2,095 (includes lodging, breakfasts and dinners, park entrance fees, support van, transfers, leaders, tour maps & narratives) Extravagant rhetoric is unavoidable as we consider our San Juans program—there is just no other way to describe the awesome and singular beauty of Colorado’s San Juans Range. Their jagged, snowclad peaks rise dramatically from the valleys and their lush stands of evergreen and aspen are reminders of the snowfalls that can isolate this alpine region during the depths of winter. And, as though this array of natural beauty needs further enhancement, both dates are timed to capture the peak of wildflower bloom in June and the beginnings of fall color change in the San Juans high country. The San Juans of Colorado assembles in Durango and we’ll ride westward early morning of Day 1 to Mesa Verde National Park. National Park

2010



Service regulations require that we not cycle within the park and we’ll van shuttle to the high mesa setting of the beautiful Far View Lodge, where we’ll overnight. We’ll spend the remainder of that first day and the morning of Day 2 exploring the ancient Anasazi ruins of Mesa Verde. We’ll van shuttle from the park mid-day of Day 2, and it’s back on our bikes to Dolores and an overnight at the Dolores Mountain Inn. Along the way, we’ll visit the fascinating Anasazi Cultural Center north of Cortez. We’re headed for the heart of the San Juans early-morning of Day 3. We’ll tour the old mining towns of Stoner and Rico and then begin a moderate ascent up Lizard Head Pass (10,222') on our way to the magical mountain paradise that is Telluride. Following our overnight at the Viking Lodge, we’ll ride from Telluride along the San Miguel River, climb the Dallas Divide and ride on to charming Ouray. We’re up and out early Day 5 as we challenge imposing Red Mountain Pass (11,008') in the context of one of North America’s classic alpine experiences. From Red Mountain’s summit, it’s downhill to the quaint 19th-century mining camp of Silverton and our final evening at the historic Wyman Hotel, a restored Victorian masterpiece. Our final day includes ascents of Molas and Coal Bank Passes and a long downhill for our return to Durango. Total mileage – 266

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES

Believe it or not, the least significant criteria that we consider as we develop our new programs is whether or not that program will “sell.” If saleability was the controlling criteria, we likely wouldn’t be sitting here writing about Colorado Rocky Mountain High. For us, it’s all about content. If our wild ideas coalesce into something that we absolutely can’t wait to be a part of in the season ahead, we then feel that we’ve created something that has to become a part of our program. Colorado is our home and in our utter arrogance, we believe that we know every “nook and cranny” in this state. Who, other than Coloradans, has heard of Taylor Canyon, Taylor Park, the Collegiates, Poncha Pass and South Park, Slumgullion Pass or Lake City? None rise to the level of familiarity as do Vail, Breckenridge, Aspen and Telluride. But make no mistake, these relatively obscure, off-the-beatenpath locations become the components of an incredible cycling experience for anyone who craves a high-alpine cycling adventure to remember. Colorado Rocky Mountain High assembles in Gunnison on Colorado’s Western Slope in the heart of the Gunnison River Valley. We’ll ride north out of the valley on Day 1 to exciting Crested Butte, one of Colorado’s many historic 19th-century mining camps that has been transformed into a modern-day, worldclass ski resort. We’ll arrive early enough to hike near the historic ghost town of Gothic that afternoon. We’re headed back to Gunnison the following morning, but yesterday’s 30-mile warm-up becomes a 72-mile adventure as we turn up Taylor Canyon and trace the 16-mile course of the beautiful Taylor River to it’s source among the high peaks that surround Taylor Park. For us, we’re coming back to Taylor Park following an absence of more than 15 years, to an area that we have always thought of as one of the most beautiful locations we have ever experienced. At some point, we’ll have to turn around, descend through Taylor Canyon and on to

15


Gunnison, where we’ll spend the evening. We’ll ride east from Gunnison on Day 3, gradually gaining elevation on our approach to Monarch Pass. Our climb up Monarch gets serious at Sargents and continues for the next 10 miles, ultimately cresting at the Continental Divide (11,312'). It’s then downhill along the South Fork of the Arkansas River to Salida, where we’ll spend the evening. Early morning of Day 4, we’ll climb moderately from the Arkansas River Valley to Poncha Pass (9,010') and then drop into the San Luis Valley. We’ll ride the tablelands of this high mountain valley toward the Eastern San Juans and on to South Fork, where we’ll spend the evening. Day 5 is yet another illustration of the joys of cycling in Colorado. We’ll climb gently along the Rio Grande River to Creede and on to the headwaters of this great river. One can’t help but notice the absence of any meaningful motor vehicle traffic as our climb continues to the Continental Divide at Spring Creek Pass (10,901'). Not much reason for travel between South Fork and Lake City, but who’s complaining? Our climb ultimately crests at Slumgullion Pass (11,361') and then it’s downhill, and we mean downhill, all the way into Lake City, where we’ll spend our final night and enjoy a memorable dinner at the Alpine Moose. We’ll then trace the Lake Fork of the Gunnison River from Lake City to Blue Mesa Lake on our final day as we return to Gunnison. Total mileage – 388

16

VIN ES AN D VIST AS : C O L O R A D O ’ S W ES T E R N S LO P E

Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) Sept. 26-Oct. 1 Assembly Point: Grand Junction (airline service to Grand Junction, or airline to Denver, Timberline van shuttle to Grand Junction prior to tour and from Dotsero to Denver following tour) Tour Cost: $1,995 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, van shuttles from Denver to Grand Junction prior to tour and from Dotsero to Denver following tour, park entrance fees, support van, leaders, tour maps & narratives) In the course of our 28-year journey, we’ve built a cycling program predicated on the inclusion of just about every meaningful mountain range in the western U.S. and Canada. We’ve always believed that the legendary mountain passes of the west—Trail Ridge, Beartooth, Going-to-the-Sun, Loveland, St. Helens and Rainier (Chinook), to name a few—were meant to be challenged and conquered by bike. As Coloradans, though, we’ve not lost sight of our perennial avoidance of what well may be the “mother” of all climbs. Dominating the limitless skyscape of western Colorado looms the massive Grand Mesa, the world’s largest mesa. Situated just to the east of Grand Junction between the Colorado and Gunnison Rivers, encompassing almost 500 square miles of wooded timberland and more than 100 crystalline lakes, the Grand Mesa truly is western Colorado’s premier playground. Much of the mesa sits above 10,000 feet in elevation, reaching a maximum of 11,327’ at Crater Peak, clearing towering above the surrounding Grand Valley. We’ve explained away our avoidance of the Grand Mesa under the pretense that it just didn’t fit within the parameters of a full program. But, along comes Colorado’s exploding wine country finally penetrating the dense barrier of our consciousness, and so, in 2010, stripped of all excuses, we’re about to challenge the mighty mesa. Truth be told, we’ve inexcusably overlooked Colorado’s wine country for too long. The vast majority of Colorado’s vineyards are concentrated in the Grand Valley and Orchard Mesa between Grand Junction and Palisade, and in the valley of the North Fork of the Gunnison River near Hotchkiss and Paonia. In all, Colorado is home to more than 80 wineries and the highest altitude vineyards in the U.S. The cool desert

nights and hot, sunny days, the composition of the region’s soil and the accessibility of water are a few of the factors contributing to the productivity and growth of the wine culture in western Colorado. The region has received two highly coveted, federally mandated American Viticultural Area (AVA) designations deemed essential for conveying quality. Those designations were assigned to the Grand Valley surrounding Grand Junction and Palisade, and the West Elks region along the North Fork of the Gunnison. In the course of this new 6-day adventure, we’ll tour both AVA regions, climb the Grand Mesa that links the two areas, and throw in visits to the Colorado National Monument and a ride along the Colorado River bike trail through Glenwood Canyon before we’re finished. We’ll assemble in Grand Junction (we’ll provide a van shuttle from the Denver airport) and ride into the Colorado Monument early morning of Day 1. We’ll climb to the monument’s summit along historic Rim Rock Drive in what will be a worthy tune-up for the Grand Mesa. We’ll spend much of the day exploring the park’s stunning red rock formations, including a hike to the sandstone grotto of Devil’s Kitchen. We’ll ride to Palisade later in the afternoon and spend our first of two overnights at the Wine Country Inn. Day 2 will be devoted to a tour of the many vineyards of the Grand Valley and Orchard Mesa. Early morning of Day 3, the Mesa awaits and we’ll climb from the Colorado River along the Grand Mesa Scenic Byway to its crest, some 6,000 feet above the valley floor. The views of the San Juans to the south are incredible as we begin our descent to Cedaredge, where we’ll spend the night. We’ll explore the vineyards and wineries along the West Elks Loop on Day 4 and then ride to Paonia and an overnight at the historic Bross Hotel. Day 5, we’ll continue upstream along the North Fork of the Gunnison to the summit of McClure Pass (8,755’), and then plunge into the Crystal River Valley and our final overnight in Redstone at the historic Redstone Inn. We’ll continue downstream along the Crystal River on our final morning, with grand views of imposing Mt. Sopris much of the way. We’ll join the Roaring Fork bike trail at Carbondale as it follows the Roaring Fork to its confluence with the Colorado in Glenwood Springs. The Roaring Fork Trail joins the Colorado River Trail as it parallels the river through incomparable Glenwood Canyon. The trail ends at the canyon’s east portal near Dotsero, where we’ll load up and van shuttle back to Denver. Total mileage – 280

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES



2010


GREAT CANYONS The rugged beauty of the Colorado Plateau; the countless windsculpted hoodoos of Bryce and the massive sandstone temples of Zion; sheer slickrock canyon walls; the incredible vastness of the Grand Canyon itself; the pinks and purples, the reds and golds that overwhelm the senses; the contrasting alpine aura of towering peaks that wear a mantle of snow year-round—this is the fascination of the Great Canyons region of the Southwest. We’ll again visit Bryce and Zion National Parks in southwestern Utah in the context of a 7-day Biker/Hiker that includes full hiking days

WH I T E MOU N T AI N S OF ARIZO NA

Dates (7 days, 6 nights; Sun-Sat) May 2-8; Oct. 3-9 Assembly Point: Phoenix/Camp Verde (airline service to Phoenix; Timberline van shuttle from Phoenix to Camp Verde prior to tour and from Globe to Phoenix following tour) Tour Cost: $1,995 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, support van, Timberline van shuttles, leaders, tour maps & narratives) We probably spend way too much time crowing about how unique we are as an organization and how we always have been on the cutting edge of adventure. And so, how do we explain why it took us 25 years to discover the White Mountains of eastern Arizona? Because, make no mistake, the White Mountains, referred to as Arizona’s Alps, define adventure. Well, better late than never, and White Mountains of Arizona has become a fixture in our overall program. In the context of this 7-day program, we’ll ride from the Verde Valley into Zane Grey country atop the Mogollon Rim. We’ll visit Payson, Show Low,

2010



OF THE SOUTHWEST in both parks. We’ll also offer another in our group of “signature” tours—the Canyon Country Classic, a 10-day adventure that not only explores Zion, Bryce and Cedar Breaks, but also ventures well beyond into the sparsely-travelled Grand Staircase/Escalante National Monument regions in the heart of the Dixie National Forest and on through the surreal rock formations of Capitol Reef National Park. We finally discovered the exciting cycling opportunities in the ruggedly beautiful and relatively remote White Mountains of eastern Arizona and we’ll again offer this epic 7-day adventure in the season ahead. 

and Pinetop-Lakeside, all portals to the recreational wonders of the Whites, before climbing beyond 9,000 feet into the heart of these rugged mountains. We’ll ride the beautiful White Mountains Scenic Byway to Greer, nestled in the high alpine Lee Valley at 8,525' near the headwaters of the Little Colorado, and then challenge the awesome Coronado Trail, named Arizona’s most beautiful scenic road by Arizona Highways, prior to our descent to the High Sonoran Desert at Safford. White Mountains of Arizona assembles in Camp Verde north of Phoenix, and we’ll provide a van shuttle from Phoenix early enough on Assembly Day to visit the 800-year-old cliff dwelling ruins at Montezuma Castle National Monument. We’ll ride east from Camp Verde Day 1 along the sparsely traveled General Crook Trail, named for the U.S. General who waged war on the Apaches in the early 1870’s, leading to the relocation of the tribe to nearby Fort Apache. We’ll climb steadily from the valley into the Coconino National Forest on the Mogollon Rim and spend our first overnight in Payson. Early morning of Day 2, we’ll ride into the Sitgreaves National Forest through Heber to Show Low, and then spend much of Day 3 engaged with the upwardly undulating, but scenically rewarding White Mountains Scenic Byway. We’ll spend the evening at the beautiful Greer Lodge near the Little Colorado and then we’re off to join the Coronado

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES

Trail the following day at Eager. As we head south along the Coronado Byway, we’ll quickly climb into the ponderosa of the Apache-Sitgreaves Forest. The cinder cones that mark our course reveal the volcanic legacy of this region. We’ll continue to climb to the Alpine Divide north of the town of Alpine, our last town until we descend into Morenci at the end of Day 5. We’ll spend the night at the historic Hannagan Meadows Lodge and much of the next day riding in the high alpine wilderness of the Whites. With the exception of the San Francisco Range north of Flagstaff, Arizona’s highest peaks line our route; Reno, Rose, Mitchell, Coronado and Malpais stand as magnificent sentinels from north to south. Clearly, we could go on and on as we attempt to convey the utter thrill of cycling the Coronado Trail. Know, though, that this day will rank among the elite cycling experiences in our entire program. We’ll conclude this extraordinary day with a long descent into historic Morenci, home to the second largest copper pit mine in North America. Our descent continues on Day 6 as we leave the Whites and enter the high Sonoran Desert of the fertile Gila River Valley enroute to our overnight in Safford. We’ll continue through the Sonoran region on our final day to Globe where we’ll conclude our program before shuttling back to Phoenix. Total mileage – 462

17


BR Y CE / Z I O N B I K E R / H I K E R

Dates (7 days, 6 nights; Sun-Sat) June 13-19; Oct. 10-16 Assembly Point: Cedar City, UT (airline and bus service to Cedar City; or airline service to Las Vegas, NV; Timberline van shuttle between Las Vegas and Cedar City prior to tour and from St. George following tour) Tour Cost: $2,095 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, park entrance fees, support van, roundtrip Timberline shuttles to and from Las Vegas, leaders, tour maps & narratives) Deep canyons, the startling hoodoos of Bryce and the rock temples of Zion, the breathtaking array of color, the variety of vegetation, the high alpine setting of the Dixie National Forest—all contribute to the excitement of the Bryce/Zion Biker/Hiker. Our tour focuses on the southwestern corner of Utah, including Bryce Canyon and Zion National Parks, and Cedar Breaks National Monument. An area of indescribable beauty, these parklands offer convincing testimony to the awesome forces of nature. We’ll assemble in Cedar City and head for Cedar Breaks National Monument early morning of Day 1. The ride to Cedar Breaks is singularly spectacular as we climb through beautiful Cedar Canyon along cascading Cedar Creek to Cedar Breaks summit at 10,200'. We’ll visit the many viewpoints within the monument before a rapid descent to the ski resort village of Brian Head where we’ll spend the evening at the Cedar Breaks Lodge. It’s on to Bryce on Day 2 in the heart of Utah’s “Color Country.” A beautiful ride through the sandstone formations of Red Canyon carries us to the open expanse of the Paunsaugunt Plateau and Bryce Canyon, where we’ll spend the next two nights and a layover day exploring this geological wonder. Several outstanding hiking and cycling options are available in Bryce for the layover day. We’ll leave Bryce on Day 4, descending through Red Canyon into the Sevier River Valley. We’re head-

18

ed to Mt. Carmel and an evening at the Thunderbird Resort prior to Day 5’s short ride to Zion. The full afternoon of Day 5 is available for hiking in Zion, with an opportunity to visit the awesome summit of Angel’s Landing. Without a doubt, Zion is a fantasyland that offers an incredible array of hiking options and our greatest challenge for Day 6 will be to see how much we can cram into this day. Observation Point, featuring Zion’s highest viewpoint (8 miles) is a must early in the day. Later that afternoon, we’ll walk along and into the Virgin River toward the Narrows (3 miles). Following a second evening at the Zion Lodge, we’ll cycle leisurely through the high desert of southern Utah to St. George and then van shuttle on to Las Vegas, where our program concludes. Total cycling mileage – 235 Total hiking mileage – 25

CA NY O N CO U NT R Y CL AS SI C

Dates (10 days, 9 nights; Fri-Sun) Sept. 17-26 Assembly Point: St. George (airline service to Las Vegas; Timberline van shuttle to St. George prior to tour and from Cedar City following tour) Tour Cost: $2,895 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, park entrance fees, support van, roundtrip Timberline shuttles between Las Vegas and St. George, leaders, tour maps & narratives)

In the course of the 28 years that we’ve been planning and staging bicycle tours throughout the western U.S. and Canada, we’ve assembled a select group of extended programs that distinguish our organization from others. Montana Magic, Dakota Dreamin’ Columbia River Classic, and, of course, Sea-to-Shining Sea, are just examples of the extraordinary experiences created by cyclists for cyclists who love to cycle. Included in this group of elite cycling experiences is our Canyon Country Classic, an adventure that offers some of the Southwest’s most exciting

cycling terrain remotely tucked within the eastern reaches of the Dixie National Forest in south-central Utah. The fascination of Canyon Country is the marriage of Zion, Bryce and Cedar Breaks with the rugged Grand Staircase National Monument, the shimmering aspen groves of Boulder Mountain ablaze in a full array of fall colors, and the surreal rock formations of Capitol Reef National Park. Canyon Country assembles in St. George and we’ll ride through the Virgin River Valley to Zion National Park on Day 1. Much of Day 2 will be spent exploring Zion, including the opportunity to hike the Narrows or climb to Angel’s Landing. Late that afternoon, we’ll cycle the short distance to Mt. Carmel Junction, where we’ll spend the evening at the Thunderbird Resort. It’s on to Bryce on Day 3 as we climb gently through the beautiful red sandstone of Red Canyon. We’ll spend the next two nights at Bryce, with a layover day that offers great hiking opportunities. We’re headed east from Bryce to Escalante with an optional opportunity to visit fascinating Kodachrome Basin State Park near Tropic. Following an overnight at the Prospector, we’ll ride into the heart of the rugged Grand Staircase National Monument along spectacular Highway 12 to Boulder and then climb beautiful Boulder Mountain. A long descent provides an incredible ending to this memorable day as we ride to Torrey, gateway to Capitol Reef National Park. We’ll spend the evening at Capitol Reef Resort with its inviting outdoor pool, enjoy an unforgettable dinner at Café Diablo and then explore Capitol Reef in the context of our second layover day. Like Bryce and Zion, Capitol Reef offers irresistible hiking opportunities, including remarkable Cassidy Arch and the Navajo Knobs. Early-morning of Day 8, we’ll ride from Torrey into the Sevier River Valley to Panguitch and then climb amid the golden aspen of the Dixie Forest the following day. We’re headed for Brian Head on Day 9 and a final evening at the luxurious Cedar Breaks Lodge. A short but “attention-grabbing” climb early on Day 10 is a not-so-subtle reminder that our adventure, though in its final day, continues unabated. We’ll visit beautiful Cedar Breaks National Monument that morning and then its downhill, and we mean downhill, through Cedar Canyon to Cedar City. We’ll end this extraordinary adventure on this dramatic note and van shuttle back to St. George and Las Vegas. Total cycling mileage – 448 Total hiking mileage – 22


NEW MEXICO’S LAND OF ENCHANTMENT New Mexico truly is a “Land of Enchantment” with its rich southwestern cultural legacy and its dramatically rugged landscape. Native American pueblo communities, many of which predate the arrival of the first Europeans in the New World, blend with remnants of Spain’s colonial empire to convey a sense of the cultural and historical vibrancy of this region. Our focus will continue to be northern New Mexico—the majestic snow-capped peaks of the Sangre De Cristos and Southern San Juans; the undulating juniper-covered hills that surround

Santa Fe and Taos; the Rio Grande and Rio Chama, among the great rivers of the west; and the continuum of small villages that stand in stark contrast to our increasingly urbanized culture. In the season ahead, we’ll again offer our Northern New Mexico Alpiner and New Mexico Rambler, along with last year’s excitng new Northern New Mexico Classic that embraces not only the Turquoise Trail and Enchanted Circle, but also explores the magnificent high country that surrounds Chama along with the legendary Ghost Ranch and Abiquiu.  dwelling ruins of Frijoles Canyon. We’ll then climb from Bandelier into the Jemez Mountains and descend into the Grand Valle as we trace the Jemez River in it’s plunge to Jemez Springs. We’ll conclude this extraordinary day with a soak in the natural hot springs of the Jemez River and spend our final evening at the River Dancer Inn. Our descent continues into the Rio Grande River Valley on Day 7 as we return to Albuquerque, where our tour concludes. Total mileage – 386

NORTH ERN NE W ME XICO CL A SS IC

NO R TH E R N N E W ME XI C O AL P IN E R

Dates:(7 days, 6 nights; Sun-Sat) May 23-29 Assembly Point: Albuquerque (airline service to Albuquerque; Timberline van transfers to and from airport) Tour Cost: $1,995 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, support van, transfers, leaders, tour maps & narratives) For so many years, in the context of our earliest experiences in New Mexico, we cycled to the “doorstep” of the mysterious Jemez Mountains, hovering just to the west of Bandelier National Monument, only to turn back for our overnight in White Rock. Finally, with the introduction of the Northern New Mexico Alpiner, we climbed into the Jemez and discovered one of the Southwest’s great cycling adventures. The Northern New Mexico Alpiner assembles in Albuquerque in the heart of the Rio Grande Valley. Early-morning of Day 1, we’ll climb the Sandia Crest as we ride the Turquoise Trail through historic Madrid on our way to Santa Fe. Following an overnight at Garrett’s Desert Inn adjacent to the Plaza in Santa Fe, we’ll ride the backroads through the Nambe and Tesuque Pueblos to Chimayo, where we’ll visit the

2010



famed Santuario and sample some of Leona’s freshlyfired tortillas. And then it’s on to the challenge of the High Road as we climb to Truchas—gateway to the Carson National Forest. Ojo Sarco, Las Trampas, Chamisal, Penasco—these are the villages we’ll visit along the High Road—they are the essence of northern New Mexico. We’ll spend the evening in Taos at the Sagebrush Inn with its welcome pool and hot tub, and incredible northern New Mexican cuisine. Early-morning of Day 3, we’ll ride beautiful Taos Canyon as it climbs gently along Taos Creek to the crest of Palo Flechado Pass and then descend into the ethereal Merino Valley for a visit to the DAV Vietnam War Memorial at Angel Fire. We’ll continue on to Red River for the evening and a delicious western meal at Texas Red’s. It’s back to Taos earlyafternoon of Day 4, with a full afternoon available to explore this fascinating area, including a visit to the ancient Taos Pueblo. We’ll trace the course of the Rio Grande from Taos through Espanola to White Rock on Day 5. An interesting climb to the Pajarito Plateau and Los Alamos is an additional option on Day 5, and we’ll visit the renowned Bradbury Science Museum. Katherine also is in White Rock and that’s a primary reason why we’ve been coming here as often as possible for the past 24 years. After Kate’s dinner, you’ll understand a major part of our attachment to the area. It’s on to Bandelier National Monument on Day 6 with an opportunity to explore the Anasazi cliff

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES

Dates:(10 days, 9 nights; Fri-Sun) Sept. 24-Oct. 3 Assembly Point: Albuquerque (airline service to Albuquerque; Timberline van transfers to and from airport) Tour Cost: $2,995 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, park entrance fees, support van, transfers, leaders, tour maps & narratives) In our earliest years, as we searched for new adventures beyond the borders of Colorado, we headed to northern New Mexico to see what the Enchanted Circle around Taos was all about. It would be fair to say that we liked what we saw—the Enchanted Circle, Taos, Red River, Santa Fe and Bandelier Monument have been a part of our cycling program for the past 26 years. And then, three years ago, in the context of Chasing the Great Divide, as we traced the Continental Divide from Lordsburg through the entire length of New Mexico into Colorado (and ultimately on to Jasper, AB), we were embarrassed by all that we have overlooked for so long. Without a doubt, we learned that there is so much more to New Mexico than Taos, Santa Fe and Albuquerque. In the season ahead, we’ll again share our discoveries in the context of the Northern New Mexico Classic. We’ll continue to embrace the Enchanted Circle, but we’ll explore well beyond as we ride the San Luis Valley northward into Colorado, visit Great Sand Dunes National Park and then challenge the mighty Southern San Juans that guard the approach to Chama. Ghost Ranch, Abiquiu, Bandelier and Jemez Springs are only a part of the excitement that we’ll experience on our return to Albuquerque. Northern New Mexico Classic assembles in

19


Albuquerque, and we’ll climb the Sandia Crest on Day 1 as we ride the Turquoise Trail through historic Madrid to Santa Fe. Following an overnight at Garrett’s Desert Inn adjacent to the plaza in Santa Fe, we’ll ride the backroads through the Nambe and Tesuque Pueblos to Chimayo, where we’ll visit the mystical Santuario and sample some of Leona’s freshly-fired tortillas. And then it’s on to the challenge of the High Road as we climb to Truchas, gateway to the Carson National Forest. Ojo Sarco, Las Trampas, Chamisal, Penasco—these are the villages that we’ll visit along the High Road—they are the essence of northern New Mexico. We’ll spend the evening in Taos at the Sagebrush Inn with its welcome pool and hot tub and incredible northern New Mexican cuisine. Early morning of Day 3, we’ll ride beautiful Taos Canyon as it climbs gently along Taos Creek to the crest of Palo Flechado Pass (9,101') and then descend into the ethereal Merino Valley for a visit to the DAV Vietnam War Memorial at Angel Fire. It’s then up and over Bobcat Pass (9,820') on the way to Red River for the evening and a delicious western meal at Texas Red’s. We’ll leave Red River early morning of Day 4 and trace the downhill course of the river as it plunges toward its confluence with the Rio Grande. We’ll turn north from Questa and ride the beautiful San Luis Valley into Colorado and an overnight in Great Sand Dunes National Park at the Sand Dunes Lodge. As you may have guessed, we can’t leave the Dunes until we have “played” in the sand, if you consider climbing 750-foot High Dune “playing”. We’ll climb the dune before breakfast on Day 5, eat that well deserved breakfast, and then ride the short distance through the valley to Alamosa. Day 6, we’ll climb from the valley into the heart of the Southern San Juans. We’ll crest at La Manga Pass (10,230') and then again atop beautiful Cumbres (10,022') before descending into Chama, where we’ll spend the evening at the Branding Iron. We’re headed to Georgia O’Keefe country on Day 7

20

as we descend along the Rio Chama to Ghost Ranch and Abiquiu, where we’ll overnight. On Day 8, we’ll return briefly to the Rio Grande Valley and then climb to Los Alamos and a visit to the renowned Bradbury Science Museum. The brooding Jemez Mountains dominate the skyline to the west as we ride to Bandelier National Monument early morning of Day 9. We’ll tour the Anasazi cliff dwellings in Frijoles Canyon before climbing to the crest of the Jemez. A long descent follows through the vastness of the Grand Valle as we trace the Jemez River in its plunge to Jemez Springs. We’ll conclude this extraordinary day with a soak in the natural hot springs of the Jemez River and spend our final evening at the Cañon del Rio. Our descent continues into the Rio Grande River Valley on our final day as we return to Albuquerque, where our tour concludes. Total cycling mileage – 572 Total hiking mileage – 3

N EW MEX IC O RAM B L ER

Date: (9 days, 8 nights; Sat-Sun) Aug. 28-Sept. 5 Assembly Point: Albuquerque (airline service to Albuquerque; Timberline van transfers to and from airports; note that this tour originates in Albuquerque but terminates in Denver) Tour Cost: $2,695 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, support van, transfers, leaders, tour maps & narratives) In so many ways, the New Mexico Rambler brings together the best of bicycle touring in the Southwest. The rolling high desert of Northern New Mexico, sprawling beneath the rugged Sangre De Cristos, the vast tablelands of the San Luis Valley and South Park, the surrealism of the Great Sand Dunes, and the alpine grandeur of Hoosier and Loveland Passes—these are only a few of the scenic highlights of this epic tour from Albuquerque to Denver.

We’ll ride from Albuquerque along the legendary Turquoise Trail through Madrid and on to Santa Fe where we’ll spend the evening. The following morning, we’re off to Taos along the backroads through the Tesuque, Pojoaque and Nambe Pueblos to Chimayo. We’ll visit the Santuario de Chimayo, sample Leona’s freshly-fired tortillas, and then challenge the awesome High Road as it climbs from the Rio Grande Valley to Truchas and into the Carson National Forest. The day is a continuum of tiny villages—Ojo Sarco, Las Trampas, Chamisal, Penasco—that symbolize the spirit and culture of northern New Mexico. A 13-mile descent to Taos is a dramatic conclusion to an extraordinary day. We’ll be ready for the layover day that follows in Taos with its opportunities to visit the Taos Pueblo and hike into the depths of the Rio Grande Gorge to the confluence of the Red and Rio Grande Rivers. Our lodge’s inviting outdoor pool and hot tub are options for those who choose to treat a layover day literally. On day 4, we’ll ride north from Taos along the Sangre de Cristos into Colorado. We’ll overnight at the Sand Dunes Lodge, adjacent to the Great Sand Dunes National Park. We’ll visit the Dunes the following morning enroute to Salida. As we continue northward into the heart of Colorado’s Central Rockies, the changes in topography are dramatic. The mighty Collegiate Range with its snowclad “fourteeners” looms to the west as we ride to South Park and the 19th century mining camp of Fairplay. We’ll spend the evening in historic Fairplay and then climb Hoosier Pass (11,541') on Day 7 before descending to Breckenridge and an early arrival at the Beaver Run Resort. From Breckenridge, we’ll ride the sparkling shores of Lake Dillon as we climb beyond timberline to the Continental Divide atop spectacular Loveland Pass (11,992'). It’s downhill to Georgetown from Loveland’s above-timberline summit for our final evening in this quaint 19th-century Victorian town. Our descent along Clear Creek continues into our final day and we can’t resist the opportunity for one more adventure on this day. Mighty Mt. Evans, just one of Colorado’s 54 “fourteeners,” looms just up the road from Idaho Springs. It’s 14,260-foot summit is tempting, but we’ll settle for stunning Echo Lake at 10,000', crest Squaw Pass and then coast downhill to Bergen Park before shuttling the few remaining miles into Denver. Total mileage – 524

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES



2010


PACIFIC NORTHWEST Environmental factors play a large role in the success of a cycling experience and these factors are anything other than static. Areas develop and grow, traffic patters change, and usually not for the better. What once was an excellent road to ride can become less so with the passage of time. For these reasons, we believe that it is essential that we periodically review and evaluate what we do, with a willingness to make the changes necessary to maintain and secure a quality cycling experience. The application of this process produced significant changes in our Pacific Northwest category of cycling programs last year and accounts for the emergence of our two new Volcanoes adventures that we will introduce in 2010.

Last season’s 17-day odyssey, Volcanoes of the Cascades, has morphed into Volcanoes North and Volcanoes South, and has been scheduled in a manner that encourages linking the two as an extended experience. Our Rogue River Rambler, likely the most popular bike tour in our entire program over the past decade, remains intact and unchanged. We’ve revised and combined our Columbia River and Kootenay Classic tours into a single program that retains the best of both tours. New last year and returning this season is our 7-day Northwest Passage that joins the Columbia River Gorge with the North Oregon Coast. And, of course, we could never consider a new season without the latest chapter in our Sea-to-Sky series.  descend to Ohanapecosh and ride westward to Morton, where we’ll spend our final evening. We’ll begin our final day with a short van shuttle just beyond Toledo so that we’ll have the opportunity to ride the entirety of the excellent road to its summit at the Visitors Center at the base of the Volcano. Later that afternoon, we’ll van shuttle to Troutdale, just to the east of Portland and adjacent to the Portland Airport. Total mileage – 537

OLYMPICS / SA N J U A N S / NORTH CASCADES VOLCAN OES OF THE CA S CAD E S / N ORT H

Date: (9 days, 8 nights; Thurs-Fri) July 22-30 Assembly Point: La Conner, WA (airline service to Seattle, Timberline van shuttle from Seattle to La Conner prior to tour. Note that this tour ends in Troutdale, OR, with easy access to Portland airport, or post-tour lodging at airport) Tour Cost: $2,895 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, van shuttle to La Conner prior to tour, park entrance fees, support van, leaders, tour maps & narratives)

The eruptions of Mt. St. Helens in 1980, and its subsequent rumblings as recently as 2007, are fiery and unforgettable lessons that our planet is a living, everchanging force never to be taken for granted. St. Helens’ explosion in 1980, in fact, ended decades of commitment to the notion that the volcanoes of the Cascades were extinct; dormant, perhaps, but not extinct and fully capable of coming to life at some unexpected point in time. Mt. St. Helens is only one of 14 major volcanoes in the Cascade Range, and one of the approximate 400 volcanoes that comprise the “Ring of Fire” of the Pacific Rim. Geographically, the Cascade Range extends from southern British Columbia to northern California—from Mt. Lytton in B.C. to Lassen in California. The range embraces no less than 12 peaks rising in elevation in excess of 10,000-feet, and two of that number— Rainier and Shasta—rise beyond 14,000-feet. Timberline’s fascination with the volcanoes of the Cascades has deep roots, dating back to earlier 9-day cycling programs, curiously also named “Volcanoes of the Cascades”, but limited in scope to the state of Washington. That earlier program lapsed into dormancy, but, as the mighty Cascade volcanoes have demonstrated over time, dormancy is not to be confused with extinction. Last season, the Cascade volcanoes became the focus of Odyssey 2009, a 17-day adventure along the spine of the Cascades from northern Washington to Crater Lake in southern Oregon. But our Odyssey Series is unique; content and location change with each season, and this year’s odyssey will carry us across the North American Continent. Odyssey Series or otherwise, however, we’re not about to abandon a region that provided an outstanding cycling experience. And so, last year’s odyssey has spawned two new adventures in 2010: Volcanoes of the Cascades/North and, as you might have guessed, Volcanoes of the Cascades/South. Volcanoes North will explore the

2010



SE A -T O- SK Y 20 10 :

TH E OLYM PICS A N D IS L A N D S OF P U GET S O U N D

Washington Cascades from North Cascades National Park southward through Mt. Rainier National Park to the summit of the Mt. St. Helens road at the base of the volcano. Volcanoes South (described in the Oregon Coast/Cascades section) begins at the western portal of the Columbia River Gorge, and continues through the gorge to Hood River, Mt. Hood, Bend and on to Crater Lake. Volcanoes North assembles in the quaint town of La Conner to the north of Seattle, near Puget Sound (we’ll provide a van shuttle from the Seattle airport on Assembly Day). Early morning of Day 1, we’ll ride east along the Skagit River to Marblemount, where we’ll spend the night at the Skagit River Resort. Day 2, we’ll launch into a long, gradual climb into North Cascades National Park to the very crest of the Cascades atop Washington Pass (5,477’). We’ll descend into the Methow Valley to, Winthrop, spend the night at the Winthrop Inn, and then continue along the downstream course of the Methow River to it’s confluence with the mighty Columbia River. We’ll overnight in Chelan on Day 3, on the shores of beautiful Lake Chelan, and then continue downstream along the Columbia to the Bavarian-style village of Leavenworth. Day 5, it’s up and over Blewett Pass (4102’), through Ellensburg to reach the Yakima River Valley before challenging awesome Chinook Pass (5,430’) on our way to Rainier. We’ll trace the Naches River to its source in the High Cascades as we climb Chinook. Just beyond the summit, we’ll ride beneath the historic arch that announces our arrival in Mt. Rainier National Park and catch our first incredible views of magnificent Rainier. We’ll spend our first of two overnights at the Crystal Mountain Resort and a layover day that offers outstanding above-timberline hiking options at Sunrise. Day 8, we’ll climb from Crystal Mountain to Cayuse Pass (4,675’) on the eastern edge of the park,

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES

Date: (9 days, 8 nights; Sat-Sun) July 10-18 Assembly Point: Edmonds, WA (airline service to Seattle; commercial shuttle or Timberline van shuttle from Seattle to Edmonds prior to tour and from Anacortes to Seattle following tour) Tour Cost: $3,095 (all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, park entrance fees, ferry tolls, van shuttles, support van, leaders, tour maps & narratives)

Some of you long-time readers of Timberline catalogs may (or at least should be) wondering after all of these years why our Sea-to-Sky Adventure, by now a Pacific Northwest fixture for us, is never quite the same from year to year. Rather than tap dance around an explanation, the truth is—we love the “Sea-to-Sky” title and just can’t let it go. We may retire past content, or at least tweak it, but if the new itinerary fits, Sea-to-Sky lives on. Believe it or not, though, in our latest rendition of Seato-Sky, we have crafted an itinerary that will endure for the ages (or, at least for a season or two). In the season ahead, we’ll join the awesome challenge of Hurricane Ridge in Olympic National Park and the maritime setting of the Olympic Peninsula with the utter leisure of cycling and exploring a collection of islands in Puget Sound. Sea-to-Sky 2010 gathers in the harbor village of Edmonds, north of Seattle, where we’ll board the ferry early morning of Day 1 for the short voyage across the Sound to Kingston. We’ll ride from Kingston to the northern shore of the Olympic Peninsula, and on to Sequim. A short side journey from Sequim leads to the scenic Dungeness Spit and an opportunity for a great lunch at Three Crabs. We’ll continue on to Port Angeles along the new off-road Olympic Discovery Trail to the seaside setting of the Bayshore Inn, where we’ll spend the next two nights. We’re headed to Olympic National Park on Day 2 and a never-to-be-forgotten cycling adventure to Hurricane Ridge. Without a doubt, the 17-mile climb to the summit rises to epic levels, but the reward is well worth the effort. Hiking opportunities atop the Ridge

21


are irresistible and we’ll at least hike to Hurricane Hill before we descend back to Port Angeles. Following our second overnight in Port Angeles, we’ll board the Black Ball Ferry to Victoria early morning of Day 3. We’ll ride north from Victoria to Butchart Gardens and, following our tour of Butchart, ferry to Saltspring Island, the largest and most developed of the Canadian Gulfs, and our home for the next two nights. We’ll explore the island’s many coves, secluded beaches and quaint villages on Day 4 and then set sail for the outer islands early morning of Day 5. We’ll tour Galiano that day, spend the evening in Village Bay and then it’s on to the San Juans on Day 6. We’re headed to lively Friday Harbor on San Juan Island, where we’ll spend our next two nights in the luxurious Friday Harbor Suites. Day 7 will be dedicated to a 46-mile grand tour of San Juan Island. We’ll cycle to Roche Harbor in the morning and visit British and American Camps, Lime Kiln and Cattle Point in the course of the day. At Lime Kilm, we’ll hike the short distance to Whale Watchers Point in hopes of catching a glimpse of the magnificent Orca Whales that frequent the waters off the point. Following a second night in Friday Harbor, we’ll ferry to Orcas Island and ride from Deer Harbor to Moran State Park and our inevitable encounter with Mt. Constitution. The climb to Constitution’s summit may not rank among the longest ascents in our program; it’s well shy of the 17-mile climb to Hurricane Ridge earlier in the week. But don’t be fooled by distance; Constitution is formidable without a doubt. Know, though, that the spectacular views from it’s summit of the surrounding Gulfs, and the peaks of the Olympics and Cascades are awesome. We’ll return to the village of Eastsound for a final night and then ferry to Lopez Island the following morning. In many ways, you likely will feel that we’ve saved the best for last. Lopez’ 36 miles of hilly, trafficfree cycling are a cyclist’s dream—a great finale for Sea-to-Sky 2010. Late that afternoon, we’ll ferry to Anacortes for a van shuttle return to Seattle. Total mileage – 336

OR E G O N C O A S T / C A S C A DE S

VOLCAN OES OF THE CA S CAD E S / S OUT H

Date: (8 days, 7 nights; Thurs-Fri) Aug. 1-8 Assembly Point: Troutdale/Portland (airline service to Portland, Timberline van transfer from Portland Airport to Troutdale prior to tour and from Crater Lake to Portland following tour) Tour Cost: $2,595 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, van shuttles from Portland airport prior to tour and return to Portland from Crater Lake following tour, park entrance fees, support van, leaders, tour maps & narratives)

Volcanoes South presents a dramatic illustration of the geographic diversity of the Cascade Range. A product of the region’s intense volcanic legacy, the Cascades began to take shape approximately 15-17 million years ago. As the landscape rose, the Columbia River, with its vast area of drainage, began to carve its course through the basalt bedrock on its way to the Pacific, a process that was dramatically accelerated at the end of the last Ice Age when the Missoula Floods cut the dramatic walls that exist today. The result of those floods is the

22

NORT H WE ST PAS S AG E

80-mile gorge that at times reaches depths up to 4,000 feet. The many streams that drain the region’s abundant snowmelt were left hanging by this cataclysmic event, and account for the 77 spectacular waterfalls that today pour hundreds of feet from the basalt cliffs into the Columbia below. Perhaps the best measure of the force of these floods is a comparison of landform elevations within a 40-mile radius of the gorge: Hood River, on the Columbia, at 400', Mt. Adams to the north, at 12, 251', and Mt. Hood, to the south, at 11,240' The gorge today presents the only navigable breach in the Cascade barrier between the Columbia Plateau to the east and the Pacific. Its role in the settlement and economic development of the Pacific Northwest has been profound. The gorge also illustrates the manner in which prudent governmental management and oversight has created an environment in which economic, recreational and environmental interests can successfully co-exist. The Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, administered by the U.S. Forest Service, and its efforts in the rehabilitation of the historic Columbia River Highway, has resulted in the creation of a bicycling corridor through the gorge that is truly extraordinary, and it is through this corridor that we will launch Volcanoes South. We’ll assemble in Troutdale, just to the east of Portland and situated perfectly at the gorge’s western portal. We’ll ride east into the gorge early morning of Day 1, climbing initially to the Vista House, with it’s commanding view of the western reaches of the river and gorge, and then spend much of the day exploring many of the gorge’s magnificent waterfalls, including its highest— Multnomah at 620'. We’re headed to Hood River and our first overnight on the Columbia at the Hood River Inn. The climb from Hood River to Timberline Lodge on the slopes of Mt. Hood, planned for Day 2, is heroic, to say the least—a true classic Timberline (as in Timberline Adventures) climb. The views of Hood as we climb from the gorge are breathtaking and continue throughout this extraordinary day. The layover day that follows at Timberline is a welcome and compassionate gesture—but not to be confused with a rest day. The hiking at Timberline is extraordinary, and for those interested, we’ll climb to the summit of Tom, Dick & Harry Mountain, for yet more views of awesome Hood. Much of Day 3 can be considered payback for our climb to Hood as we roll downhill to Madras. Following an overnight at the Inn at Cross Keys Station, we’ll continue south along the eastern foothills to the vibrant town of Bend. Day 6, we’ll climb moderately to Mt. Bachelor and continue along the quiet roads of the Cascade Lakes Scenic Byway to LaPine. We’ll then van shuttle early morning of Day 7 to avoid an unexceptional stretch of roadway along US 97, and then it’s back on the bikes as we ride to Crater Lake and a never-to-be-forgotten loop along the crater’s rim. We’ll spend our final night at the magnificent Crater Lake Lodge, on the brink of the caldera, and then launch into an exciting downhill plunge along the beautiful North Umpqua River toward Roseburg on our final day, prior to our van shuttle return to Portland. Total mileage – 350

Date: (7 days, 6 nights; Sun-Sat) July 11-17; Sept. 5-11 Assembly Point: Portland/Troutdale (airline service to Portland; Timberline van transfers from Portland Airport to Troutdale prior to tour and from Florence to Portland following tour) Tour Cost: $2,595 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, support van, van shuttles, leaders, tour maps & narratives) Near the end of the last ice age some 15,000 years ago, the continental ice sheet advanced into what is now northwestern Montana, damming the waters flowing west from the Rockies. The backed-up waters formed massive glacial Lake Missoula, covering more than 100,000 square miles. Ultimately, the dam burst, releasing the great Missoula Flood westward down the channel of the Columbia River. The force of this torrent scoured cliffs 1200 feet above the river and gouged the channel in a manner that has created one of the world’s greatest concentrations of waterfalls from tributaries left hanging above the river. The Columbia Gorge and the mighty river running through it would play a major role thousands of years later in the exploration, expansion and settlement of the continent, beginning in the early 19th century. During that early period of our nation’s history, the notion of a water passage across the continent was still prevalent. The search for this northwest passage was an important force in Thomas Jefferson’s advocacy of the Lewis & Clark Expedition 1804-06. Although the Corps of Discovery never found that all-water route across the continent, they did make their way to the Columbia and followed its flow to the Pacific. In the season ahead, our Northwest Passage will trace Lewis & Clark’s journey through the Columbia Gorge, paralleling the Columbia River as it empties into the Pacific at Astoria. Once we’ve reached the incomparable Oregon coast, of course, we’re not about to turn back. With the prevailing wind at our backs, the massive headlands and pounding surf almost always in sight, we can’t think of any reason why we wouldn’t cycle at least to Florence on the Coast. Northwest Passage assembles in Troutdale, just to the east of Portland, and we’ll ride into the Gorge early morning of Day 1 along the Historic Columbia River Highway. Built in the early 1900’s, the road has been all but abandoned by the high-speed traffic blowing through the Gorge on I-84, but is maintained by the Forest Service as a cherished national recreation resource. Once on the historic road, we’ll climb to Vista House, aptly named for its breathtaking panoramic view, and then it’s one spectacular waterfall after another—Latourell, Wahkeena, Oneonta, Multnomah, Horsetail. We’ll continue through Cascade Locks to Hood River and spend our first two overnights at the Hood River Inn, overlooking the Columbia. Geography and climate have conspired in this region to produce an incredibly fertile and productive agricultural environment. The terraces above Hood River are a patchwork of apple, cherry and pear orchards, and the numerous vineyards are evidence of a thriving wine-producing industry. In the context of an exciting, undulating 45-mile ride, we’ll explore the famed Fruit Loop of the Hood River Valley on Day 2. Day 3 is dedicated to hiking and we’ll cross the river to the Washington side for what we believe to be

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES



2010


the best hike in the Gorge. Our ascent up Dog Mountain will be memorable, we promise, but the explosion of wildflowers and views of the snowclad peaks of the surrounding Cascades will justify the effort. Hood to the south, Adams to the north and Mt. St. Helens to the west are only a part of the panorama that will be ours to experience. Following our engagement with Dog Mountain, we’ll shuttle from the gorge through Portland to Hillsboro. It’s back on the bikes early morning of Day 4 as we ride toward the coast, following the course of the Nehalem River on our way to the historic seaport of Astoria, where the Columbia pours into the Pacific. We’ll explore Astoria the following morning and tour nearby Fort Clatsop, where the Lewis & Clark Expedition wintered in 1805-06. We’ll continue south along the coast through the charming seaside village of Cannon Beach and on to Tillamook, where we’ll spend the night. Along the way, we’ll visit the Nehalem Bay Winery and, of course, the Tillamook Cheese Factory, the largest cheese producer in the western U.S. The Oregon coast in its grandest expression is our setting for Day 6 as we ride the Three Capes Scenic Route on the way to Lincoln City and an oceanfront evening at the Shilo Inn. We’ll hug the shoreline throughout our final day to Florence. The day is a progression of state parklands, created to protect the entire length of the Oregon shore, and an almost endless string of quaint seaside villages. From Florence, we’ll van shuttle back to Portland, where our program concludes. Total cycling mileage – 408 Total hiking mileage – 8

ROG U E RIVER RA M B L E R

Date: (9 days, 8 nights; Sat-Sun) Aug. 14-22 Assembly Point: Eugene (airline service to Eugene; Timberline van transfer to and from airport) Tour Cost: $2,995 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, support van, park entrance fees, transfers, leaders, tour maps & narratives)

Among our most popular programs for the past several seasons, the Rogue River Rambler has solidly settled into that select group of adventures guaranteed to seduce any cyclist who truly hungers for the ultimate experience. This program offers the marriage of the incomparable Oregon Coast with the rugged alpine setting of the Cascades as dramatic testimony to the fascination of Oregon. The Rogue River Rambler assembles in Eugene, the vibrant site of the University of Oregon on the southern fringe of the Willamette Valley. Early-morning of Day 1, we’ll climb the gentle Coastal Range to the west into the Siuslaw National Forest and trace the Smith River as it empties into the Pacific at Reedsport, where we’ll spend the evening at the Salbasgeon Inn. From Reedsport, we’ll visit the famous Umpqua Lighthouse and then ride the coast through the progression of state parks and sparkling beaches so characteristic of the Oregon shore. We’ll spend the next evening on the ocean in Bandon at the Sunset Lodge and then continue south to Gold Beach at the mouth of the Rogue River. Following an overnight oceanside at the Gold Beach Resort, we’ll head inland along the Rogue into the heart of the Rogue River Forest. Near the village of Agness, we’ll leave the Rogue for a memorable encounter with Bearcamp Pass; 16 miles and 4,600 vertical feet and we’ve conquered the crest of the rugged Coastal Range. An incredible downhill is our reward and we’ll rejoin the Rogue near Galice and continue on to

2010



Morrison’s Lodge, where we’ll spend the evening and dine outdoors on the deck overlooking this mighty river. On Day 5, we’ll continue along the Rogue to Grants Pass and then traverse the rolling Rogue River Valley through historic Jacksonville to the fascinating town of Ashland, renowned for its annual Shakespearian Festival. We’ll ride from Ashland early-morning of Day 6 and climb memorably along Dead Indian Memorial Road into the Cascades and an overnight at the Running Y Resort on the shores of Klamath Lake. The next day’s ride to Crater Lake is one that you won’t forget. The climb to the brink of the caldera is challenging, yet ethereal. The slopes of what was once Mt. Mazama are not unlike those of the surrounding peaks, but what lies beyond the brink in the bowels of the volcano is singularly exceptional. We’ll spend two nights and a layover day at the newly restored Crater Lake Lodge, the National Park Lodge situated on the rim overlooking the lake. Among the activities available on the layover day are some outstanding hiking opportunities, including a trek to the summit of Mt. Scott, the tallest peak in the park. For those who can’t resist another cycling challenge, the loop along the caldera’s rim is an intriguing option. From Crater Lake, we’ll spend much of our final day in a downhill plunge along the beautiful North Umpqua River toward Roseburg. We’ll van shuttle back to Eugene late that final afternoon. Total mileage – 528

INLAND EMPIRE

COL U MBI A / KO OTE N A Y CL A S S I C

Date: (10 days, 9 nights; Fri-Sun) Aug. 20-29 Assembly Point: Spokane/Colville (airline service to Spokane; Timberline van shuttles from Spokane to Colville prior to tour and from Kettle Falls to Spokane following tour) Tour Cost: $3,095 (all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, support van, shuttles, leaders, tour maps & narratives) The Columbia/Kootenay River system is one of the world’s great river networks and, by far, the largest in the Pacific Northwest. With a combined length of 1,700 miles, and a drainage basin approaching 280,000 square miles, the Columbia/Kootenay also ranks as the greatest source of hydroelectric power in North America. Each has its source within the Canadian province of British Columbia as it carves its course through some of the continent’s most spectacular landscape. In the course of our newly crafted Columbia/ Kootenay River Classic, we’ll trace a major section of this astounding river network. We’ll ride along the banks of the Pend Oreille and Kettle Rivers, two of the system’s major tributaries, and the shorelines of Kootenay and Arrow Lakes, two major bodies of water formed by the Columbia and Kootenay. Columbia/ Kootenay also is about mountains—the Rockies, Selkirks, Purcells, Monashees and Kettle Ranges—and we’ll climb our share in the course of this program. Columbia/Kootenay assembles in Spokane and we’ll immediately van shuttle the short distance to Colville on our assembly day (day prior to tour departure). We’ll ride east from Colville on Day 1 into the Selkirks and then follow the downstream course of the Pend Oreille as it flows to its rendezvous with the Columbia. We’ll spend

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES

our first night in Metaline Falls and cross the border into British Columbia early the following morning. We’re headed to Creston on this day, but not before challenging awesome Kootenay Pass (5,585’) along the way. From Kootenay’s summit, it’s downhill into Creston, where we’ll spend the evening and enjoy an incredible Italian dinner at Aldo’s next door to our lodge. Shortly into our ride on Day 3, we’re on the beautiful eastern shoreline of Kootenay Lake. We’ll ride the lakeshore to Crawford Bay, cross the lake by ferry to Balfour, and then follow the western shoreline to Ainsworth and overnight at the Ainsworth Hot Springs Lodge. On Day 4, we’ll ride to Kaslo and then climb above Kootenay Lake into the Selkirks before descending into the beautiful Slocan Valley. We’ll explore New Denver on Slocan Lake and then head north to Nakusp, on the shores of Upper Arrow Lake. We’re almost midway through our adventure at a point where you likely are convinced that the scenery can’t possibly improve. Wrong! Day 5 is absolutely incredible as we ride south along the Arrow Lakes and then board a ferry at Faquier to cross Lower Arrow to Needles. From Needles, we’ll climb among the high snowcaps of the Monashees to Monashee Pass and then begin our descent into the Okanagan Valley. Following an overnight in Cherryville, we’ll ride into the heart of the Okanagan to vibrant Kelowna, on the eastern shore of Okanagan Lake. A well-earned layover day is planned for Day 7, with several optional activities from which to choose, including a morning hike along the restored trestles of beautiful Myra Canyon. Another viable option, of course, would be to do nothing other than vegetate poolside at our Lakeshore Lodge, overlooking Okanagan Lake. Rested—we’re ready for Day 8. We’ll climb from Kelowna to McCulloch Lake and follow the Kettle River south to Midway, named for its geographic position midway between the Rockies and the Pacific. We’ll overnight in Midway and then ride east into Doukhabor Country to Grand Forks at the confluence of the Granby and Kettle Rivers. The Doukhabors were a religious sect that fled persecution in Russia in the late-1800’s, settling initially in Saskatchewan and subsequently migrating to southeastern British Columbia. We’re into our final day and we’ll follow the Kettle River south across the border to Republic. And, to dispel any thoughts that this final day is just a downhill cruiser to the finish line, we’ll launch into one last heroic climb as we leave Republic. After, all, the Kettle Range stands between Republic and that finish line, and Sherman Pass (5,587') is our portal over the Kettles. From Sherman’s summit, we then can say that it’s almost all downhill to Kettle Falls on the Columbia. We’ll call it a tour at Kettle Falls and van shuttle back to Spokane. Total mileage–627

23


CALIFORNIA DREAMIN’ The rugged California Coast with its relentless, pounding surf, hidden coves, magnificent beaches and imposing headlands; the undulating, pastoral beauty of the wine country that lies beyond the Coastal Range to the east—the marriage of these dramatically contrasting settings provides the substance for two distinctly different cycling opportunities that constitute California Dreamin’ for 2010. Classic California embodies everything that one would hope to experience in the context of a California cycling adventure. It is the Napa,

Alexander and Anderson Valleys combined with the Mendocino and Sonoma Coasts, and more. What, then, can possibly remain for California Dreamin’: The Central Coast? Only the absolutely most spectacular segment of the entire Pacific shoreline from Monterey to Pismo Beach combined with the understated and relatively undiscovered elegance of Paso Robles, the Edna Valley and Santa Ynez, and historic San Luis Obispo. 

CA L I F O R N IA D R E AM I N :’ TH E CEN T RA L COA ST

Date: (7 days, 6 nights; Sun-Sat) May 16-22 Assembly Point: Monterey (airline service to San Jose; Timberline van shuttle from San Jose prior to tour and from Santa Maria to San Jose following tour) Tour Cost: $2,395 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, support van, Timberline shuttles to and from San Jose, leaders, tour maps & narratives) In so many ways, California’s Highway 1, as it snakes southward from Monterey hugging the incomparable Pacific shoreline through Big Sur, Cambria, San Luis Obispo, Pismo Beach to Santa Barbara, is, arguably, America’s greatest, most scenic roadway. Nowhere along the entirety of the Pacific coastline are the cliffs so sheer, the headlands so overpowering and the surf as wild and relentless as that which characterizes the dramatic tapestry of the Central Coast. Add to the thrill and challenge of cycling along this shoreline the opportunity to explore the rolling, verdant valleys to the east that comprise one of the world’s great wine-producing regions and we believe that you will agree that our latest addition to California Dreamin’ is a cyclist’s fantasy to its core. By design, we’ve chosen to construe liberally the northern parameters of the Central Coast by launching our week-long adventure in Monterey. Once you’ve cycled the beautiful 17-Mile Drive early morning of Day 1 to Carmel-By-the-Sea and experienced the excitement of Rocky Point and the many arched bridges and spectacular headlands that extend to Big Sur and beyond, we know that you will forgive our geographic transgressions. We’ll spend our first overnight south of Big Sur at the Ragged Point Resort overlooking the ocean and continue south along the coast through San Simeon to Cambria on Day 2. Once again, this day, like Day 1, is a continuum of one spectacular vista after another as we cycle Highway 1. We’ll pause in San Simeon to tour the Hearst Castle and then ride on to Cambria. On Day 3, we’ll leave the coast for our first of several forays into the wine country to the east. Early into our ride through the hills east of Cambria, you’ll know why we’ve chosen a spring date for this tour. We’ve never been to Ireland, but we can’t imagine anything greener or more beautiful than the hills that we’ll encounter as we ride to Paso Robles. We’ll explore several of the region’s local vineyards, and a bakery or two, before settling into the beautiful Paso Robles Inn in the heart of town. It’s back to the ocean on Day 4 as we ride to Morro Bay and then visit exciting San Luis Obispo. We’ll linger in this historic town well into the afternoon before continuing to Pismo Beach, where we’ll spend

24

our next two evenings. We’re headed to the Edna Valley on Day 5, not only to visit a few additional vineyards, but more importantly, to enjoy the valley’s rolling, quiet country roads that constitute a not-to-be-missed cycling opportunity. We’ll climb gradually to the Lopez Lake Recreational Area, picnic at the lake and then return to Pismo Beach. On Day 6, we’ll ride south to Solvang and experience its Old-World Danish culture and charm. We’ll spend our final night in Solvang, explore Santa Ynez and Los Olivos (of Sideways fame) the next morning and continue through the rural countryside of Santa Barbara County to Santa Maria. We’ll call it a tour mid-afternoon in Santa Maria and van shuttle back to San Jose. Total mileage – 350

C L AS SIC C A LIF ORN IA

Date: (7 days, 6 nights; Sun-Sat) Sept. 26-Oct. 2 Assembly Point: Calistoga (airline service to San Francisco; Timberline van shuttle between airport and Calistoga prior to and from Sausalito following tour) Tour Cost: $2,395 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, support van, round-trip Timberline shuttles between San Francisco and Calistoga, leaders, tour maps & narratives) If your interest is a conventional, leisurely tour of the California Wine Country, don’t waste another moment with Classic California. Make no mistake, Classic California simply is not another in the vast array of traditional wine country excursions that have been around forever. It’s not that the wine country is not a part of Classic California. We, too, will explore one of the world’s great wine producing regions with ample opportunity to tour many of the area’s renowned wineries. We’ll ride the rolling expanse of the Napa Valley and into the Alexander

and Anderson Valleys to the north. But we’ll also explore well beyond these valleys as we climb to the summit of the Coastal Range on our way to the magnificent Pacific shoreline at Mendocino. We’ll continue south along the Mendocino and Sonoma Coasts to Bodega Bay and Sausalito, and it’s this marriage of wine country and coast that creates the extraordinary experience that is Classic California. Classic California assembles in Calistoga and on Day 1 we’ll ride the gentle Silverado Trail as it winds through the heart of Napa Valley’s wine country. Along the way, we’ll visit the prolific vineyards and grand estates of some of the world’s most renowned wineries. We’ll spend the evening in Calistoga and then ride into the beautiful Alexander Valley on Day 2. Following an overnight in Cloverdale, we’ll challenge California’s Coastal Range as we head for the sea and Mendocino. We’ll spend our next two nights at the McCallum House in the heart of Mendocino with a layover day in this lively coastal village. Among the many options on our layover day is a relaxed hike to the falls in Russian Gulch State Park, north of Mendocino. During our final three days, we’ll ride the spectacular coast the way it should be cycled—with the prevailing wind at our back and surf almost always in view. Our evenings at the Breakers Lodge in Gualala and Inn of the Tides in Bodega Bay, with their oceanfront settings, are truly special. Perhaps we’ve saved our greatest adventure for our final day. Rather than turning inland on Day 7 for a somewhat uneventful ride to one of a variety of locations—Napa, Sonoma or Healdsburg, among others— we’ve opted for a more heroic finish. From Bodega Bay, we’ll continue south along the rugged coast through Tomales, Point Reyes and Stinson Beach, a ride that offers several incredible ocean vistas. Ultimately, we’re headed for Sausalito, just north of the Golden Gate Bridge, where our program concludes. Total mileage – 298

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES



2010


THE HEARTLAND The Heartland, in perhaps its most expansive expression, can be said to embrace geographically the interior of the continental U.S., reaching from the Appalachians to the Rockies, from the Canadian border to the Gulf. Its utter vastness discourages any sweeping generalizations about its character. To consider the Heartland merely as a geographic distinction, though, would miss its greater significance. The Heartland well may be our nation’s geographic center, but perhaps it more aptly should be thought of as America’s spiritual core—the heart and soul of our country. The region may lack the towering snowclad mountains of the Rockies, the pounding surf of the Pacific shoreline. Instead, its beauty is more subtle, and is eloquently expressed in the rugged limestone cliffs that line the banks of the

Kentucky and Missouri Rivers, the terraced cherry orchards of Michigan’s Leelanau Peninsula and the remarkable sand dunes that guard Lake Michigan’s eastern shoreline, the bucolic charm of Wisconsin’s Door Peninsula, the lush grasslands of the Kentucky horse country and the rolling ranchlands of the Texas Hill Country, the friendliness of countless rural hamlets, and the charm of its lakeside communities that remain as nostalgic reminders of an earlier generation. Timberline has cherished our long-standing love affair with the Heartland, and our attachment to this region continues and grows with each passing season. The extensive collection of proud programs that we have planned for the Heartland reflects the utter vastness and diversity of the region. 

T EX AS HIL L COUN TR Y

Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) April 18-23; Oct. 24-29 Assembly Point: New Braunfels (airline service to San Antonio; Timberline van shuttle between San Antonio and New Braunfels prior to tour and from Center Point to San Antonio following tour) Tour Cost: $1,795 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, van shuttles, support van, leaders, tour maps & narratives) The Hill Country of Central Texas may be bicycle touring’s best-kept secret and among the last frontiers of adventure cycling in the U.S. Visualize a vast network of 2-lane farm-to-market country roads traversing a vast undulating expanse dissected by deep green valleys, rolling hills, rushing creeks, and rugged limestone cliffs, and no more than a scattering of small villages, and you then can begin to appreciate the absolute allure of the Hill Country as a bicycle touring opportunity. Notwithstanding its proximity to the major population centers of San Antonio and Austin, the Hill Country is astonishingly rural and unpopulated—a nostalgic reminder of a past era. It is an area that retains its rich cultural heritage and identity. Fredericksburg and Boerne are characteristic of the early German immigrants who settled and homesteaded in the Hill Country in the 1840’s. The Hill Country is also cattle country and the region’s many historic ranches are reminders that we are in Texas. And, lest we forget, the Hill Country is Texas Bluebonnet Country and these hills in the spring are ablaze in an array of bluebonnet blooms. Not coincidentally, we’ve planned a spring visit to the Hill Country, and a fall departure as well. Our program assembles in New Braunfels on the Guadalupe River and we’ll ride through the Guadalupe River Valley early morning of Day 1. By mid-morning, expect to be jolted out of our early reverie as our route begins to undulate in earnest. The climb to Devil’s Backbone is a poignant reminder that we are, after all, in Hill Country. Country-style hospitality awaits our arrival in Blanco, where we’ll spend our first night at the Blanco Settlement. We’ll ride south from Blanco along the Blanco River on Day 2. Count on a fair number of Texassized “rollers” that we’ll likely chat about over dinner

2010



in Boerne that evening. It’s on to Fredericksburg the following morning, but not before a visit to Luckenbach of Willie and Waylon fame. Fredericksburg is a fascinating town, richly endowed by its German cultural legacy, with an abundance of intriguing museums, craft shops, restored early settlements structures, and, of course, its biergartens. We’ll spend our next two nights at the Inn on Baron’s Creek. Day 4 includes several tantalizing options. Enchanted Rock State Natural Area, located 18 miles north of Fredericksburg, offers an outstanding hiking opportunity. Another option suggests a leisurely day of exploration of the wonders of Fredericksburg, including some quality pool time at our lodge. We are, though, cyclists to the core in the midst of an extraordinary bicycle tour, and an irresistible option on this day is the not-to-be-missed Willow City Loop that is a true Hill Country classic. In the course of this ride, we’ll visit Enchanted Rock Park and climb this remarkable granite batholith. Our adventure continues on Day 5 as we ride to Kerrville, where we’ll spend our final evening at the Inn of the Hills Resort. An early arrival in Kerrville on this relatively short day presents the excellent optional opportunity to ride out along the Guadalupe and see what Stonehenge II is all about. We had to choose between two alternatives for our final day—a pleasant, but relatively uneventful return ride to New Braunfels to complete our loop, or

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES

one final “rock & roller” ride, including lung-buster Eagles Nest, with its magnificent panoramic Hill Country vista, through Medina and Center Point. Guess which one we chose? We’ll end our ride at Center Point and van shuttle back to San Antonio, where our Hill Country adventure concludes. Total mileage – 326

KEN T UC K Y ’S B L UE GR AS S COUN T RY

Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) May 9-14; Oct. 10-15 Assembly Point: Lexington (airline service to Lexington; Timberline van transfers to and from airport) Tour Cost: $1,795 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, support van, transfers, park entrance fees, leaders, tour maps & narratives) The addition of Kentucky’s Bluegrass Country to Timberline’s program was the natural extension of our career commitment to western adventure. In so many ways, the Kentucky Territory was among the first of America’s western frontiers. Hemmed in by the forbidding barrier of the Appalachians, Virginia

25


DA K O T A D RE AM I N ’

Dates: (12 days, 11 nights; Sun-Thurs) June 20-July 1 Assembly Point: Bismarck, ND (airline service to Bismarck prior to tour and from Rapid City following tour; Timberline van transfers to and from airports. Note that tour originates in Bismarck and terminates in Rapid City. Van shuttle return to Bismarck will be provided for those who need it immediately following tourʼs conclusion July 1) Tour Cost: $3,400 (includes all lodging, all breakfasts and dinners, park entrance fees, support van, leaders, tour maps & narratives)

settlers, hungry for land, finally breached the barrier at Cumberland Gap and soon asked that the federal government recognize their trans-Appalachian western settlement as the “free and independent state of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.” In 1792, Kentucky became the first state west of the Appalachians to be admitted to the Union. Kentucky’s historical and cultural heritage is rich and diverse. Its character and tradition, to a great extent, is southern, but at the same time exhibits the fierce, rugged mood of the western frontier. It is the home of Daniel Boone and Henry Clay, and the birthplace of Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis, born one year apart and within 140 miles of one another. Not surprisingly though, Kentucky never seceded from the Union and, given its geographical position, was a pivotal battleground during the Civil War. Many key battles were fought on its soil; its sons fought for both sides. We’ve chosen the Bluegrass region of north central Kentucky as the focus for our Kentucky bicycling adventure. The rolling pastoral countryside, the grand, historic horse farms, the deep historical and cultural legacy, and the region’s excellent cycling roads are the ingredients for an extraordinary and rewarding cycling experience. We’ll assemble in Lexington, the heart of Bluegrass Country, and ride from the city on Day 1 to beautiful Bourbon County, home to some of the world’s greatest thoroughbred horse farms—the breeding grounds for the likes of Man O’War, Secretariat and Riva Ridge. As we ride from Lexington, we’ll visit the historic Keeneland Race Course, have breakfast with the trainers and jockeys at the Track Kitchen and likely catch a few thoroughbreds during early morning workouts. We’ll ride from Keeneland’s back gate along the quiet roads lined with the magnificent Kentucky horse farms (estates!) for which this region is so well-known. We’re headed for a visit to the Kentucky Horse Park, a great portrayal of Kentucky’s thoroughbred culture. We’ll spend the evening in Winchester and enjoy a great dinner at Hall’s on the Kentucky River. Early morning of Day 2, we’ll ride south to Fort Boonesborough State Park, site of the fort constructed by Daniel Boone on the banks of the Kentucky River in 1775. We’ll continue south to the fascinating

26

town of Berea, where we’ll spend our second night in the historic Boone’s Tavern Inn. Regarded as the arts and crafts capital of Kentucky, Berea boasts over 150 antique shops and more than 40 crafts workshops. From Berea, we’ll ride west to Danville, the original capital of the Kentucky District of Virginia and a major trading center on the Wilderness Road that extended westward from Cumberland Gap. We’ll continue west for a visit to Perryville Battlefield State Historical Park, site of a major Civil War battle in 1862. We’ll tour the battlefield and then ride on to Harrodsburg, founded in 1774 as Kentucky’s first permanent settlement. We’ll visit the Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill north of Harrodsburg for dinner and spend the evening in the grand, historic Beaumont Inn. On Day 4, we’ll ride to Bardstown and visit My Old Kentucky Home State Park. Bardstown also is home to four noted bourbon distilleries and is the repository for the legend of “good old Kentucky bourbon.” More of the beautiful Bluegrass Country unfolds as we ride east through Lawrenceburg across the beautiful Kentucky River to Versailles on Day 5. We’ll spend our final night in the elegant Montgomery Inn in Versailles prior to our return to Lexington. Total mileage – 245

From the Missouri River, as it carves its course through the center of the Dakotas, effectively dividing east from west, to the badlands and rugged hills of the west, there is an undeniable wildness and majesty to this vast landscape that is the western Dakotas. Over 200 years have passed since the Lewis and Clark Corps of Discovery traveled through this region in search of an all-water route across the continent. That route, of course, was not to be found, but the expedition opened the west to the tide of settlement that followed. It began with prospectors, farmers, ranchers, merchants and traders, all headed westward to seek their fortunes. Two centuries later, Urban America is very much a western reality. But not so in the Dakotas, which, for better or worse, has clung to its rural character. Unpopulated and unhurried, a pace of life to be envied in a land that is ruggedly beautiful—this is the western Dakotas, North and South, that we fell in love with in the course of our Lewis and Clark Odyssey in 2004, and again in the context of Odyssey 2006:Lewis and Clark in the Dakotas. Irresistibly, we’re back in 2010; Dakota Dreamin’ will be our way of expressing how we feel about the Dakotas as an exciting bicycle touring opportunity. We’ll launch our journey in Bismarck, ND, near the Mandan Villages where the Lewis and Clark Expedition wintered in 1804-05 before continuing its mission to the Pacific. We’ll trace the Missouri upstream from North Dakota’s capital to the Mandan Villages and beyond. We’ll ride the shores of sprawling lakes created by the dams constructed along the Missouri. We’ll overnight in Pick City on Lake Sakakawea and then in New Town before riding west to Williston on Day 3. From Williston, we’ll visit Fort Buford State Historical Site, the army post where both the great Sioux chief, Sitting Bull, and Nez Perce leader, Chief Joseph, were imprisoned following their capture as the U.S. Government drove the Native Americans from their lands to make way for the tide of settlers that followed in the wake of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Near Fort Buford, we’ll also visit the Confluence National Monument, where the Yellowstone joins the Missouri and the point at which the captains were reunited on their journey home. We’re headed south from Ft. Buford to Watford City, gateway to the North Unit of Theodore Roosevelt National Park. Early morning of Day 5, we’ll ride the park’s scenic road to road’s end. Bison are everywhere along this route as are magnificent

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES



2010


views of the badlands carved by the Little Missouri. We’ll ride on to Medora that afternoon, spend the evening at the Badlands Motel, and then ride the scenic loop through Theodore Roosevelt’s South Unit the next morning. Once we’ve completed our tour of the park, we’ll van shuttle to Spearfish, SD, where we’ll spend the evening. The ride from Spearfish into the Black Hills is extraordinary and we’ll climb through magnificent Spearfish Canyon on the morning of Day 7 to the late-19th century silver mining camp of Lead. A quick descent to Rocheford and we’re on the hardpacked (road-bike appropriate) off-road Mickelson Trail for a scenic ride to Hill City. We’ll overnight at the Golden Spike and ride to Mt. Rushmore on Day 8. Following our tour of Rushmore, we’ll ride to Custer State Park and an evening at the State Game Lodge, a favorite summer retreat of former presidents Coolidge and Eisenhower. We’ll continue our exploration of Custer Park throughout Day 9. We’ll cycle the Wildlife Loop, home to a free-ranging herd of bison as well as the surprising wild burros. Later in the day, we’ll ride the awesome Needles Highway through the corridor of towering granite spires. We’re headed for the Sylvan Lake Resort on the shores of Sylvan Lake, where we’ll spend our next two nights. A layover day presents the opportunity to hike nearby Harney Peak in the Black Elk Wilderness. A beautiful 6-mile trail leads to Harney’s 7,242-foot summit, the highest peak east of the Rockies. That afternoon, we’ll tour the Crazy Horse Memorial, the massive sculpture still in progress that honors the great Lakota warrior. Day 11, we’ll head downhill through Custer to Jewel Cave, tour the amazing cave with the National Park Service and ultimately return to Custer for our final overnight at the Buffalo Ridge Lodge. Following a visit to Sheridan Lake on our final day, we’ll enjoy a long, long descent from the Hills to Rapid City, where our program concludes. Total cycling mileage–704 Total hiking mileage–6

WISCONSIN’S DOOR COUNTY

Dates: (7 days, 6 nights; Sun-Sat) July 25-31 Assembly Point: Port Washington (airline to Milwaukee; Timberline van shuttle between Milwaukee and Port Washington prior to and following tour) Tour Cost: $2,295 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, support van, Timberline shuttles between Milwaukee and Port Washington, ferry tolls, leaders, tour maps & narratives)

Like a giant thumb on a mitten jutting into the waters of Lake Michigan, Door County is Wisconsin’s unparalleled Great Lakes fantasyland. With more miles of shoreline, more lighthouses and more state parks than any other county in the nation, Door County rivals Cape Cod, minus the smell of salt. Scenic similarities do exist, but the peninsula has a distinct personality of its own. The Lake Michigan shoreline along the peninsula’s eastern side is relatively unsettled—wild and exposed, and pounded by crashing waves. The Green Bay waters on the western side are calmer and the coastline is dotted with numerous sheltered

2010



coves and quaint Victorian lakeside villages. In the course of this 7-day adventure, we’ll cycle much of the peninsula’s 250 miles of coastline, often along the quiet county roads for which this region is noted as a favorite cycling destination. We’ll visit Washington Island off the peninsula’s northern tip, and the many charming villages that reflect the history and culture of Door County. Although our primary focus is Door County, we refuse to ignore the proximity of the beautiful Kettle Moraine, one of the region’s natural wonders. Nowhere else in the U.S. are the steep ridges, sparkling lakes and other unique landforms created by the Wisconsin Glacier more evident and better preserved than in the Kettle Moraine and we’ll tour the northern unit. Our program assembles in Port Washington and we’ll cycle north along the Lake Michigan shoreline on Day 1. We’ll stop in Sheboygan’s harbor area for lunch—the first of many opportunities for a famous Wisconsin brat—and continue on to Manitowoc, where we’ll spend the evening at the Maritime Inn. On Day 2, we’re headed to Sturgeon Bay, considered the gateway to Door County, and we’ll spend the evening at the Stone Harbor Resort. Early morning of Day 3, we’ll begin to trace the peninsula’s eastern shore through Whitefish Dunes State Park and on to Bailey’s Harbor. Following a visit to the Cana Island Lighthouse, we’ll board a ferry across the swift currents of Porte des Mortes (Door of Death), for which the peninsula was named, to Washington Island and an overnight at Findlay’s Holiday Inn. We’ll explore Washington Island early morning of Day 4, returning by ferry to the mainland, and then trace the peninsula’s western shoreline along Green Bay through the continuum of charming lakeside villages. We’ll visit Ellison Bay, Sister Bay, Ephraim and Fish Creek on our way to Egg Harbor, where we’ll spend the night. We’ll continue along the bay the following morning through Sturgeon Bay before touring the rural countryside of Kewaunee County. We’ll cycle beyond Green Bay to De Pere and an overnight at the extraordinary James Street Inn. On Day 6, we’ll continue along the region’s quiet county roads to the resort village of Elkhart Lake, the northern gateway to the Kettle Moraine. Following an overnight at the Victorian Village, we’re headed for the Kettle Moraine State Forest. We’ll cycle the

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES

Kettle Moraine Scenic Drive to the fascinating Henry Reuss Ice Age Visitor Center and explore the unique landforms carved by the Wisconsin Glacier some 10,000 years ago. We’ll return to Port Washington late-afternoon. Total mileage – 370

LE EL A NA U /MA CKI N A C EXPLORE R

Dates: (7 days, 6 nights; Sun-Sat) Aug. 8-14 Assembly Point: Traverse City, MI (airline service to Traverse City; Timberline van transfers to and from airport) Tour Cost: $2,295 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, support van, transfers, ferry tolls, leaders, tour maps & narratives) The beautiful rolling hills and windswept dunes of Leelanau, the expansive wooded shoreline of Torch Lake, miles and miles of magnificent beaches along Lake Michigan’s eastern shore, charming Charlevoix and historic Mackinac Island, and the utter brilliance of summer in northern Michigan—this is a hint of the excitement of our Leelanau/Mackinac Explorer. Set in the northwestern corner of Michigan’s Lower Peninsula, we’ll focus initially on the Leelanau Peninsula, acclaimed as the “cherry capital of the world.” We’ll assemble in Traverse City and ride the quiet country roads on the Peninsula to the shore of

27


TH E KA TY TRA I L

Lake Michigan. Mid-day of Day 1, we’ll enter Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore and ride the wild, challenging Pierce Stocking Scenic Road up, over and around the dunes. We’re headed for Leland and a night at the Leland Lodge. We’ll ride to land’s end at the northern tip of the peninsula early morning of Day 2 and visit the historic Grand Traverse Lighthouse in Leelanau State Park. We’ll continue along Grand Traverse Bay, through Northport and Suttons Bay, as we return to Traverse City and an evening at the historic Park Place Hotel. Count on ingesting a few calories before leaving Northport, however, because our route just happens to roll past the front door of what we believe to be one of the world’s great bakeries. We’ll trace the eastern shore of Torch Lake on our way to Charlevoix on Day 3, and spend this evening at the Weathervane Inn, with views of both Lake Michigan and Lake Charlevoix. Day 4 is a delight! We’ll ride from Charlevoix to Petoskey and then trace the Lake Michigan coast through Harbor Springs to tiny Cross Village on what has been labeled as “Michigan’s most scenic road.” Along the way, plan on another of those deadly visits to a “killer” bakery in Good Hart and lunch at Leggs in Cross Village. A short ferry ride will carry us across the Straits of Mackinac to Mackinac Island, where we’ll spend two evenings at the Inn at Mackinac and a layover day to tour the island’s many historic and natural features. We’ll return to the mainland on Day 6 and ride through the heart of Boyne Country to Boyne City on the eastern tip of Lake Charlevoix for a final evening prior to our return to Traverse City. Total mileage – 372

BL A CK HIL L S O F SO U TH D AK OT A

Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) Sept. 12-17 Assembly Point: Rapid City/Deadwood (airline service to Rapid City; Timberline van shuttle from Rapid City to Deadwood prior to tour. Note that tour originates in Deadwood but concludes in Rapid City. Tour Cost: $1,795 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, van shuttles to and from Rapid City, support van, park entrance fees, leaders, tour maps & narratives)

The Black Hills of South Dakota stand as sentinels announcing to westbound travelers that they at last have reached the threshold of the Great American West. The heavily forested, rugged hills present a dramatic contrast with the vast expanse of the plains to the east.

28

The story of settlement in the Black Hills is integral to the saga of the West. The land is rich in its Native American legacy—it is the land of Crazy Horse and the Lakota Sioux, but also the land of the sadness of Wounded Knee. Settlers poured into the Black Hills in the 1870’s, lured by the discovery of gold in Deadwood Gulch. The Black Hills gold rush was the last of its kind in North America and it generated its share of legendary figures of the frontier. Wild Bill Hickok and Calamity Jane are among those who lived and died in Deadwood Gulch. The natural beauty of the Black Hills also is remarkable. Rugged mountains and shimmering high country lakes, Custer State Park with its enormous bison herd and famous wild burros, Needles Highway, Mt. Rushmore and the Crazy Horse Memorial are only a few of the reasons why we are once again headed to the Black Hills of South Dakota in the season ahead. Our 6-day adventure assembles in Deadwood (we’ll provide a mid-afternoon shuttle from Rapid City on assembly day) and we’ll head south through Deadwood Gulch and the legendary mining camps of Lead and Mystic on our way to Hill City. Much of this ride is planned for the Mickelson Trail, whose hardpacked crushed limestone surface provides a beautiful off-road experience totally appropriate for road-bike tires. Early morning of Day 2, we’re headed to Mt. Rushmore National Monument and then on to Custer State Park, where we’ll spend the evening at the State Game Lodge, a favorite summer retreat of former presidents Coolidge and Eisenhower. We’ll continue our exploration of Custer Park throughout Day 3. We’ll cycle the Wildlife Loop, home to a free-ranging herd of bison as well as the surprising wild burros. Later in the day, we’ll ride awesome Needles Highway through its corridor of towering granite spires. We’re headed for the Sylvan Lake Resort on the shores of Sylvan Lake, where we’ll spend our next two nights. A layover day presents the opportunity to hike nearby Harney Peak in the Black Elk Wilderness. A beautiful 6-mile trail leads to Harney’s 7,242-foot summit, the highest peak east of the Rockies. Later that afternoon, we’ll visit the Crazy Horse Memorial, the massive granite sculpture still in progress that honors the great Lakota warrior. We’ll ride from Sylvan Lake on Day 5 to Jewel Cave National Monument and explore this massive cavern in the context of a Ranger-led program. We’ll return to Custer for our final overnight and ride to Sheridan Lake the following morning before launching into an amazing descent from the Hills to Rapid City where our program concludes. Total Cycling Mileage – 216 Total Hiking Mileage – 6

(Off-Road; Cross Bikes Recommended) Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) Sept. 26-Oct. 1 Assembly Point: Clinton, MO (airline service to Kansas City; Timberline van shuttle between Kansas City and Clinton prior to tour and from St. Charles to St. Louis airport following tour. Note that Timberline van will also return to Clinton on the day the tour concludes) Tour Cost: $1,795 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, support van, leaders, Timberline van shuttles from Kansas City to Clinton prior to tour and from St. Charles to Clinton and Kansas City following tour, tour maps & narratives) We at Timberline long have fancied ourselves as mountain folk always eager to challenge the “gnarliest” terrain the west can offer. Then, we discovered the Katy Trail, a 227-mile totally “nongnarly” rails-to-trails corridor across the state of Missouri that has provided us with some of the most thoroughly enjoyable fun-filled weeks over the past decade. In 1986, the Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad (always known as the Katy) ceased operation along its trans-Missouri route. After a protracted legal struggle, the Missouri Department of Natural Resources secured the abandoned right-of-way and created the Katy Trail State Park. With the recent opening of the Clinton-Sedalia section, the Katy ranks as the nation’s longest rails-to-trails corridor. Why do we find the Katy so intriguing? Scenically, the trail traverses Missouri’s most magnificent landscape. For much of its route, it follows the course of the Missouri River to its confluence with the Mississippi. Frequently, we are riding this basically hard-pack crushed limestone trail with the Missouri to the right and the rugged limestone bluffs for which Missouri is famous on our left. At times, we are cycling through an arboreal wonderland, ablaze with color in the fall; other times we ride through the incomparably fertile bottomlands and beautiful vineyards of the Missouri wine country. From the moment we begin our journey at the trail’s western terminus in Clinton to the final moments at the landing in St. Charles, we are surrounded and immersed in the rich historical and cultural legacy of this region. Timberline’s identity as an organization is predicated on western adventure as its sole focus. What could be more appropriate than an adventure in the “Gateway to the West”? The role of the Lewis & Clark expedition of 1804-06 was profound in the opening of the west.

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES



2010


Katy Rails-to-Trails will trace the early (and final) stages of that expedition as it launched from St. Charles and followed the river across the Missouri Territory, and beyond to its headwaters in Montana, ultimately returning on the Missouri to St. Charles in 1806. The Katy also was a vital force in the opening of the west, and its rails were laid along the natural corridor that followed the course of the river. Early settlement followed the river and we’ll experience the rich cultural legacy of those German immigrants. Katy assembles in Clinton, about an hour’s van shuttle southeast of Kansas City, and we’ll ride to Sedalia, perennial site of the Missouri State Fair, on Day 1. We’re headed to Boonville on Day 2 and our first rendezvous with the Missouri, followed by an evening at the grand Rivercene B & B. Shortly after leaving Boonville early-morning of Day 3, we’ll encounter the trail’s only tunnel near Rocheport and then ride along the Missouri much of the day to Jefferson City. We’ll overnight in the Capitol Plaza Hotel, situated within a short walk of the magnificent capitol grounds. We’re headed for Hermann and the wine country on Day 4 and we’ll arrive early enough to tour the Hermanhoff and Stone Hill Wineries. We’ll overnight at the Captain Wohlt Inn, and then it’s on to Augusta the following morning and an opportunity to visit the famous Augusta Winery. Our final overnight is planned for the Augusta Wine Country Inn, and we’ll ride into St. Charles’ Frontier Park along the river by early afternoon of Day 6, where our program concludes. Total mileage – 227

APPALACHIAN HIGHLANDS THE BLUE RIDGE OF NORTH CAROLINA

Dates: (6 days, 5 nights; Mon-Sat) May 17-22; Oct. 18-23 Assembly Point: Sparta (airline service to Charlotte; Timberline van shuttle from Charlotte prior to tour and from Cherokee to Charlotte following tour) Tour Cost: $1,795 (all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, park entrance fees, Timberline van shuttles to and from Charlotte, support van, leaders, tour maps & narratives)

highest of the Appalachian peaks, skirt the flank of Grandfather Mountain (5,837'), ride the awesome Pisgah Ridge and challenge the Great Balsams (Richland Balsam—6,053'). By Rocky Mountain standards, these are puny elevations, but don’t be fooled! The elevation increments and grades to these summits are formidable. Without a doubt, the Blue Ridge will offer our most seasoned cyclists a memorable and engaging experience. The Blue Ridge also offers some of North America’s best hiking opportunities—don’t forget to pack your trail shoes. On our short cycling day from Asheville to the Pisgah Inn, we’ll hike to the summit of Mt. Pisgah (5,730') in the afternoon. A relatively short first day also offers the opportunity to hike in beautiful Doughton Park. We’ll assemble in Sparta (we’ll provide a midmorning van shuttle from the Charlotte airport on the day prior to departure) and then join the Parkway early morning of Day 1. Enjoy our first several miles—they likely are the last relatively level miles that we’ll experience for the week. Before long, the terrain changes from farmland to mountain as we begin a 1,000-foot climb to Doughton Park. We’ll pause at the park and hike to the Bluff Mountain overlook for a great view of the Parkway. We’re ultimately headed to the Glendale Springs Inn just beyond the Northwest Trading Post for our first overnight. The undulations of the Parkway command our attention on Day 2 as we ride to Blowing Rock, where we’ll spend the evening. From the moment when we rejoin the Parkway on Day 3, the massive presence of Grandfather Mountain is everywhere. The manner in which the Parkway negotiates its course around the mountain constitutes an engineering masterpiece by the National Park Service. We’ll ride across the amazing Linn Cove Viaduct which hangs in partial suspension, pause at the Grandfather Mountain Overlook, and continue on toward the Linville Gorge Wilderness Area. Know that we’re committed to filling your days with us, and a hike from the Linville Falls Visitors Center into the gorge for views of the upper and lower falls of the Linville River is an irresistible option. We’re ultimately

headed to Little Switzerland for the evening. Day 4, and we’re off to challenge mighty Mt. Mitchell, but don’t attempt to equate our encounter with the notorious Assault on Mt. Mitchell, the 102mile endurance event sponsored by the Spartanburg Freewheelers. Ours is a more modest 5-mile, 1,390foot ascent to Mitchell’s summit from the Parkway. From the summit, it’s bombs away (a figure of speech—always under control!) to Asheville, where we’ll spend the evening. At some point in the course of the previous day’s descent from Mitchell, the thought that you likely will have a debt to settle may have crossed your mind. Well, payment is due early morning of Day 5 as we climb 3,700 feet along a 24-mile section that includes nine tunnels to Mt. Pisgah. We’ll arrive at the magnificent Pisgah Inn in time for a late lunch and a moderate afternoon hike (or not!) to Pisgah’s summit (4 miles). Sixty ruggedly spectacular miles highlight our final day as we ride the Parkway along the Pisgah Ridge through the beautiful Balsams to the Parkway’s southern terminus at Cherokee. In the course of this day, we will have climbed to the Parkway’s highest point atop Richland Balsam at (6,053') and tallied no less than 6,225 feet of elevation gain before a final descent into Cherokee. Late afternoon, we’ll van shuttle back to Charlotte, where our program concludes. Total cycling mileage – 264 Total hiking mileage – 4

We’ve climbed our share of mountains in the course of this 28-year adventure—Trail Ridge, Beartooth, Going-to-the Sun, Hurricane Ridge, Slumgullion, Sonora, and on and on. All of these classic western climbs always have been the centerpiece of our program, and the source from which our identity as an organization has evolved. Could there ever have been any doubt that, at some point, we would be drawn irresistibly to the Blue Ridge of North Carolina, the highest range east of the Rockies? In the context of this 6-day Blue Ridge of North Carolina program, we’ll ride the southernmost 260mile section of the magnificent Blue Ridge Parkway, from milepost 217 at Cumberland Knob just south of the Virginia-North Carolina state line to the southern terminus at Cherokee. We’ll climb to the renowned summit of Mt. Mitchell (6,684'), the

2010



TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES

29


GREA T A LLEGH EN Y PA SS AGE & T HE C &O CAN A L : P ITT S BU R G H TO WAS H I N G T ON

Dates: (8 days, 7 nights; Sat-Sat) May 29-June 5; Oct. 2-9 Assembly Point: Pittsburgh/West Mifflin, PA (airline service to Pittsburgh; Timberline van shuttle from airport to West Mifflin. Note that tour originates in Pittsburgh and terminates in Washington) Tour Cost: $2,595 (includes all lodging, breakfasts and dinners, park entrance fees, support van, Timberline van shuttle from Pittsburgh to West Mifflin prior to tour, leaders, trail maps & narratives)

After 30 years of planning and years of construction, along with the cooperative, heroic efforts of a committed battalion of volunteers, the final section of the Great Allegheny Passage was completed in lateDecember, 2006, and opened to public use during the summer of 2007. With its seamless connection to the Chesapeake and Ohio Historical Trail, cyclists can now celebrate and enjoy an incredible 335-mile off-road, traffic-free adventure from Pittsburgh, PA, to Washington, D.C. Without a doubt, the Allegheny Passage/C & O Trail ranks as the crown jewel in our nation’s growing network of Rails-to-Trails. For us, the opportunity is irresistible. For years, we’ve considered new adventure opportunities in the trans-Appalachian regions to our east, but we’ve always deferred because of reluctance to deal with

some of the issues inherent in riding the heavily-traveled roads of the area. Last season, the Allegheny/C&O joined a growing number of rails-totrails in our program that has included the Katy across Missouri, the Mickelson in South Dakota’s Black Hills, and the Kettle Valley in southern British Columbia. Like our other rails-to-trails tours, we’ll ride a hardpacked crushed limestone and gravel surface bestsuited for a hybrid, rather than a skinny-tire road bike. We’ll assemble near West Mifflin, join the Allegheny Trail early morning and ride to Perryopolis on Day 1. We’ll spend the evening at the Inn at Lenora and then, on Day 2, trace the Youghiogheny River as we ride beyond Falling Waters to Ohiopyle in the heart of the Laurel Highlands. We’re ultimately headed to Confluence on this day, named for the town’s location at the confluence of the Youghiogheny and Casselman Rivers. The excitement builds on Day 3 as we ride from Confluence toward the Allegheny Highlands. We’ll detour around the 800’-long Pinkerton Tunnel, which remains closed because of extensive freeze damage, and then cross the 100’-high Salisbury Trestle that spans the Casselman Valley. Meyersdale offers a good opportunity for lunch before we begin our climb to the Eastern Continental Divide, separating waters flowing to the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. The Divide also marks the high point on the Allegheny Passage. Lurking 1-1/2 miles beyond the Divide is the Big Savage Tunnel, a 3300-foot, illuminated course cut through the heart of Big Savage Mountain. The views of the surrounding Allegheny Highlands are spectacular as we emerge from the tunnel and launch into a long downhill beyond the Mason-Dixon Line to Cumberland, MD.

CUSTOM TOURING An important area of emphasis for Timberline again this season will be the creation of custom and charter programs. A custom program presents an extraordinary opportunity for a group of people sharing a common interest, or some other special bond, to share a very intimate, personalized experience. The custom program also extends the added opportunity for members of the group to participate in the process of shaping the content of that experience in a manner that will best respond to the needs and expectations of the group. Any program described in this brochure can be staged as a custom tour. Itineraries can be modified to accommodate the particular needs of the group. Programs can also be structured through the cooperative input of group representatives and our staff, and can involve a number of activities including cycling, both on-road and off-road, hiking, rafting, canoeing and horsepacking.

30

Cumberland, for us, marks the end of the Great Allegheny Passage and the beginning of the C&O Trail. The C&O, for most of its 184-mile length, follows the north bank of the Potomac River. Built between 1828 and 1850, the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal operated sporadically until 1924. The canal lapsed into inactivity and proposals to convert the towpath into a highway were seriously considered. Led by the efforts of Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas to preserve this national treasure, the canal’s towpath achieved protection as a national historical park in 1971. Early morning of Day 4, we’re back on the trail as we set out from the Western Maryland Scenic Rail Station in Cumberland. We’ll ride east through the Maryland countryside into West Virginia and then plunge into the darkness of the 3100-foot Paw Paw Tunnel. A light is essential through the tunnel. Another viable option is a half-mile walk to the light at the end of the tunnel. The landscape beyond the tunnel is rugged, remote and stunningly beautiful. We’re headed for Hancock on this night, a town that was a major inland port during the canal’s heyday. We’re off to Fort Frederick early on Day 5. Built in 1756 to defend Maryland’s western frontier during the French and Indian War, the fort today is preserved and remembered as a state park. Later that afternoon, we’ll leave the C & O and detour to the National Battlefield at Antietam. We’ll walk the grounds of this storied Civil War landmark and then ride the short distance into Sharpsburg to the Jacob Rohrbach Inn, where we’ll spend the night. Day 6, we’ll return to the trail and ride to Harpers Ferry, at the confluence of the Shenandoah and Potomac Rivers. We’ll then continue on to White’s Ferry and cross the Potomac for access to Leesburg and our overnight at the Norris House. It should be noted that Confederate General Robert E. Lee utilized this same ferry on the way to his command at Antietam. Day 7, we’ll ride through Great Falls Park, marking the site of what once posed the most formidable obstacle to navigation on the Potomac. We’ll follow the trail to its end in the heart of the Georgetown District of D.C., and our final evening at the Latham Hotel, situated a block from trail’s end. The history that surrounds us in our nation’s capital is overpowering—so much so that we need to linger for an additional day. And what better way to spend this final day than a ride to the historic home of George Washington on the Potomac along the 18-mile paved trail to Mount Vernon. Total mileage – 271

WITH TIMBERLINE Moreover, we are not limited in our ability to structure custom programs by that which constitutes our existing proprietary program. In past seasons, for example, we have planned and staged programs in northern Vermont, California’s Death Valley and Joshua Tree National Monuments, northern Michigan and in Canada’s Atlantic provinces. Dates for custom programs can be selected by the group, though governed by certain practical considerations. As a general rule of thumb, availability of dates is a function of advance notice in the planning of a program and particularly those focusing upon our national parks during peak summer months. Drop us a line or telephone; tell us what you have in mind and we’ll start to formulate some ideas with you that ultimately will materialize into that “special program” that you will not soon forget. 

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES



2010


HIKING ADVENTURES Timberline’s hiking program, from its earliest days when we first hiked the Grand Canyon, has always reflected our reverence and love for our national parks. In the season ahead, we’ll add four new (at least new for us) parks to our growing collection: Joshua Tree, Mount Rainier, Guadalupe and Craters of the Moon. In total, we’ll offer hiking programs in 31 national parks throughout the western U.S and Canada in 2010. Our Odyssey Series for Hikers continues in 2010, and we’ll offer our 11-day, 105-mile Cotswold Hike in England one final time. At the heart of all of our hiking programs is the same spirit of adventure which has been the driving force for our entire program since our beginnings 28 years ago. We are committed in our hiking program to creating true backcountry, wilderness adventures that fall just short of actual extended backpacking trips. All hikes are inn-to-inn experiences and not camping, but, on occasion, we’ll each carry whatever we may need for an overnight stay at a backcountry lodge accessible only by foot. Important components of several of our hikes are the exceptional opportunities to spend overnights at remote lodges like the Phantom Ranch on the floor of the Grand Canyon and Havasupai Lodge in Supai village deep within Havasu Canyon, and the magical Shadow Lake Lodge in the heart of the Canadian Rockies wilderness. 


ODYSSEY SERIES FOR HIKERS

O DY S S E Y 20 1 0: COTSWOLDSOF GREAT BRI T A I N

Date: (11 days, 10 nights; Sun-Wed) Sept 5-15 Assembly Point: Chipping Campden (airline service to London/Heathrow; shuttle to Chipping Campden prior to tour and from Bath to London following tour) Tour Cost: $4,500 (includes 10 nights lodging, all meals, luggage transfers from lodge to lodge, leaders, trail maps & narratives) When we launched our Odyssey Series for Hikers three years ago, we intended to offer the Cotswolds only during that first season. Early into that initial hike, however, it became clear that we couldn’t abandon this program after a single season. In so many ways, the Cotswold Way is so quintessentially

32

English. The beautiful, rolling countryside, charming villages, unique lodges and the incredible warmth and friendliness of the people that we met along the way—one season in the Cotswolds just wasn’t enough. And so, again in 2010, we’ll once again hike the entire 105-mile path from Chipping Campden southward to Bath. The Cotswolds offer everything one might hope to find in the English countryside. Rising gently from the broad, green meadows of the Upper Thames, cresting in a dramatic escarpment above the Severn Valley, the Cotswolds clearly are best defined as gently rolling hills, rather than mountains. The characteristic honey limestone, which constitutes the bedrock of the Cotswolds, produces the fertile soil and lush grasslands for which this area is noted. Sheep have grazed the Cotswold hills for centuries and the region has prospered in the past as a major producer of wool and as a substantial trading center. But, along came cotton and the Industrial Revolution leaving the Cotswolds locked in a time warp. As a result, this region never lost its rural character and remains wonderfully untainted by industrialization and urbanization. We’ll head to Chipping Campden on Day 1 (we’ll provide transportation early morning from London Heathrow) and we’ll arrive early enough to explore this town whose prosperity during the early 17th century typified the golden age of the Cotswold wool trade. On Day 2, we’ll hike to Broadway (5 miles), considered to be one of Britain’s most beautiful villages with its attractive houses and shops built of honey limestone. Day 3, it’s on to Winchcombe, the ancient Saxon capital, noted for its many ornate churches. Along the way, we’ll pass through Stanton, whose narrow streets are lined with stunning cottages and farmhouses, and visit the ruins of Hailes Abbey, founded in 1246, and Sudeley Castle (12 miles). On Day 4, we’ll walk through the delightful

countryside of Cleve Hill Common, the highest point (1,083') on the Cotswold Way, and spend the evening at the Cleeve Hill Hotel (7 miles). Our path continues along the top of the escarpment on Day 5, crossing open grasslands into a beautiful beech forest. We’ll overnight in Birdlip (15 miles) and continue to Painswick on Day 6 (7 miles), a fascinating town with its honey limestone structures and wealth of historic treasures to visit on this relatively short day. We’ll cross the valley of the River Frome on Day 7 to Nympsfield (14miles), passing numerous ancient burial grounds along the way. Nympsfield Long Barrow was excavated in 1937, yielding some 13 skeletons dating back to 2500 B.C. We’ll spend the evening in Nympsfield and hike on Day 8 to WottonUnder-Edge, a delightful village situated under the edge of the Cotswold Escarpment and noted for its fine shops and lively pubs (11 miles). On the way to Tormarton on Day 9, we’ll walk through ancient Old Sodbury, dating back in time to the 11th-century reign of Edward the Confessor (8 miles). It’s then on to Bath at the southern terminus of the Cotswold Way on Day 10 (15 miles). Ancient Bath is the only town in Britain to have achieved World Heritage City designation. Magnificent architecture and landscape are everywhere, a reflection of Bath’s 2,000-year-old legacy. Among the many features for which Bath is noted are its legendary Roman baths, fed by the waters of the area’s prolific hot springs. Bath clearly is one of those places in which we need to linger; it’s gardens, art galleries and museums demand that we spend, not only our final night here, but a good part of our final day exploring this extraordinary town. We’ll ultimately return to London, where Odyssey 2010 concludes.

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES



2010


HAWAII

KA UA I : WA I M EA CA N Y ON A ND T HE NA PA LI COA ST

Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) (2010) Feb. 14-19; (2011) Feb. 20-25 Assembly Point: Lihue (airline service to Lihue; Timberline van transfers to and from airport) Tour Cost: $2,195 (includes all lodging, all meals, leaders, transfers, tour maps & narratives) Rain forests, waterfalls, deep canyons not to be believed, and a wilderness shoreline without equal—Kauai is a hiker’s fantasy. Kauai is the oldest geologically of the Hawaiian chain and the first to be visited by Captain James Cook (a distinction perhaps best forgotten). Located on Kauai is Mt. Waialeale, the wettest spot on earth (did you really want to know that) and the only place where the unique iliau plant is found. In the course of our Kauai program, we’ll visit Kokee State Park and hike magnificent Waimea Canyon, the Grand Canyon of the Pacific. We’ll hike to several of the island’s fabled waterfalls, explore the wild Na Pali Coast, experience the magic of Hanalei, and, who knows, perhaps even catch a glimpse of Puff, that magic dragon, off the shores of Hanalei Beach. We’ll assemble in Lihue mid-morning of Day 1 and head directly to Poipu Beach, a no-nonsense approach to quality beach time from the “get-go.” We’ll walk the coastline of Poipu along the Shiprock Beach Trail and climb a promontory for an incredible panoramic view of the cinder cones and lava tubes that extend into the ocean as evidence of Kauai’s most recent volcanic activity (4 miles). Later that afternoon, we’re headed for the Waimea Plantation Cottages, where we’ll spend our first three nights. Day 2 has been dedicated to the NualoloAwaawapui Trail, considered among the best hikes in all of Hawaii. The trail begins in a rain forest, but ultimately breaks into the open on a ridge leading to the spectacular Na Pali Cliffs and their phenomenal views of the brilliant blue waters of the sea and the Na Pali Coast nearly 2,000 feet below (6.5 miles). Magnificent Waimea Canyon is our plan for Day 3 along the Kukui Trail that drops 2,000 feet to the canyon floor and (in case you were hoping for a

2010



miracle) inevitably rises again to the canyon rim (5 miles). Following a third night at the Waimea Plantation Cottages, we’ll change pace on Day 4 as we head to Wailua River State Park. We’ll spend much of the day kayaking on the Wailua River, which flows from Mt. Waialeale, the world’s wettest location, to the sea. A short hike along the way leads to one of Kauai’s spectacular waterfalls. We’re off to Kapaa late-afternoon of Day 4, where we’ll spend the next two nights at the beautiful ResortQuest Kauai Beach at Makaiwa, and begin our exploration of the Na Pali Coast the following morning. We’ll hike the remarkable Kalalau Trail, though not to its terminus at Kalalau Beach. We’ll begin at Kee Beach and alternately climb to overpowering views from high cliffs only to again descend, first to Hanakapiai Beach and then into the rain forest of Hanakapiai Valley. We’ll hike along the valley floor to Hanakapiai Falls and then return to our trailhead (9.2 miles). The Sleeping Giant awaits on our final day and we’ll head to Nonou Mountain for one of Kauai’s finest hikes. We’ll climb to the Giant’s chin, nose and beyond to his forehead along a narrow ridge reminiscent of the final ascent to Angel’s Landing in Zion (4 miles). We’ll have lunch and head for Lihue where our program concludes.

HA WA II : VOL CA NOE S AN D T H E KA ILUA -KON A COA ST

Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) (2010) Feb. 21-26; (2011) Feb 27-March 4 Assembly Point: Kailua-Kona (airline service to Kailua-Kona; Timberline van transfers to and from airport) Tour Cost: $2,195 (includes all lodging, all meals, park entrance fees, leaders, transfers, tour maps & narratives) Vast, surreal lava fields streaming from towering, massive mountains that rise from the ocean floor; a lush remote valley whose parameters are defined by 1,000-foot walls and whose landscape is punctuated by a myriad of thunderous waterfalls; miles and miles of remote black sand beaches—this is the Big Island of Hawaii and that’s where we’re once again headed in the season ahead. We’d like to say that we at Timberline are the first to visit this island in search of adventure. The reality is that Hawaii has been the destination of

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES

choice for adventurers for many centuries, from the ancient Polynesians, perhaps the greatest seafaring adventurers of all time, to modern day hikers and backpackers, among others, who have discovered a new meaning to adventure in this tropical paradise. Adventure for Timberline on the Big Island translates into a 6-day hiking program that will experience the island’s amazing diversity. We’ll visit the awesome volcanoes, hike their rims and into the bowels of their craters. We’ll trek into the isolation of the Waipio Valley, and then explore the breathtaking Kailua-Kona Coast. We’ll assemble in Kailua-Kona early morning of Day 1 and van shuttle directly to Volcanoes National Park. Our plans for this day include a hike to the floor of Kilauea Iki, one of Volcanoes’ premier hikes. From the crater overlook we’ll descend into the heart of the crater and walk across its floor as steam curls from the many fissures in the lava surface. We’ll return to the forest on the crater’s eastern edge for a moderate climb back to the rim (4 miles). At the rim, we’ll walk through the Thurston Lava Tube and then head to the Kilauea Lodge, where we’ll spend our first of three nights. Day 2, we’ll return to the park and set out on the Crater Rim Trail that encircles Kilauea’s caldera. We’ll visit the Volcano Observatory and Jaggar Museum along the way and then join the Halemaumau Trail as it descends into the Kilauea crater. We’ll cross this vast crater and return to the rim at Volcano House (8 miles). On Day 3, we’ll hike the Napau Crater Trail as it traverses lava fields to Puu Huluhulu, and then to the observation point above with its views into the volcano’s fern-filled crater and the rain forest beyond. Also visible is the smoking hulk of Mauna Ulu. Our trail soon passes into the dense rain forest and we’ll continue to vast Napau Crater (7 miles). At dusk, we’ll return to Chain of Craters Road and drive to road’s end to view the awesome red glow of the fiery lava that still spews from Kilauea and flows into the sea. Following a final overnight at Kilauea Lodge, we’ll head to Waipio Valley. A steep descent from the trailhead leads to the valley floor and we’ll spend the day exploring this magnificent area. We’ll visit the black sand beaches of Waipio as well as its spectacular waterfalls (7 miles). From Waipio, we’ll shuttle to the Outrigger Beach Resort on the Kona Coast, where we’ll spend our final two evenings. Day 5 is a treat with a healthy dose of leisure and an intriguing change of pace. We’ll hike the Captain Cook Trail, a 4-mile round-tripper that includes an


awesome 1400-foot descent to the pounding surf below. We’ll hang out for much of this day on a beautiful black sand beach that offers some of the best snorkeling on the island. We’ll spend our final night at the Outrigger and then visit the City of Refuge the following morning. We’ll hike the 2-mile interpretive loop through this historical site, catch a glimpse of the giant sea turtles that swim the placid lagoons along the shoreline, capture one last snorkeling opportunity, and ultimately return to KailuaKona, where our program concludes mid-afternoon.

SO UT HW ES T: CAN YON S AN D COLO R COU NTR Y

GRA ND CA N YON / HA VA S U P A I

Dates: (6 days, 5 nights) April 19-24 (Mon-Sat); Oct 26-31 (Tues-Sun) Assembly Point: Grand Canyon Village (airline, rail & bus service to Flagstaff; Timberline van shuttle between Flagstaff and South Rim prior to tour and from Havasupai to Flagstaff following the tour) Tour Cost: $1,995 (all lodging, all meals, park entrance fees, van shuttles, leaders, trail maps & narratives) At some point during our earliest years when Timberline was primarily a bicycle touring organization, we proclaimed that “you’ve never seen the West until you’ve done so by bicycle.” But if we learned anything from our first hike into the Grand Canyon as part of a Biker/Hiker 25 years ago, the only way to experience the Grand Canyon is on foot. For sure, one can float the Canyon on the Colorado, or lumber to the river’s edge on the back of a mule, but the reality is — if you really want to see and feel the Canyon — HIKE IT! Our Grand Canyon/Havasupai Hike assembles at the Grand Canyon Village on the South Rim (we’ll provide shuttle service from Flagstaff to the Canyon early-morning of Day 1). Shortly after our arrival at the Canyon, we’ll hike along the West Rim, with its awesome view into the canyon, as a preview of what lies ahead for the next two days (4 miles). Following an evening at the Maswik Lodge on the rim, we’ll shuttle to the South Kaibab trailhead early the next morning and begin an 8-mile, 4,800-foot descent to the floor of the Canyon. The variety within the Canyon is overwhelming. The land forms, the colors, the spectacular vistas, that first sighting of the Colorado—every switchback along the trail is its own visual and sensual adventure. We’ll descend from the ponderosa forests at the Rim through the desert scrub of the Tonto Platform to the Colorado at the base of the Canyon. We’ll spend the evening at Phantom Ranch and greet the rising sun as we begin our ascent up the Bright Angel Trail, to the South Rim (10 miles). Another night on the South Rim at Maswik and an awesome dinner at El Tovar precedes a van shuttle from the village to the Havasu Canyon trailhead at the Hualapai Hilltop. An 8-mile trek into Havasu Canyon leads to Supai Village on the Havasupai Indian Reservation, and we’ll spend our first of two nights at the Havasupai Lodge. The magnificent

34

waterfalls of Havasu provide the adventure for Day 5. We’ll hike from the lodge along Havasu Creek, with an opportunity to visit Havasu’s two newest falls, creations of the flood of 2008. It’s then on to Havasu Falls with its drop of nearly 100 feet. Another mile downstream, we’ll visit legendary Mooney Falls, where the waters of Havasu plunge 196 feet in a dramatic descent to the Colorado. A final evening at the Havasupai Lodge precedes our hike from the canyon and return to Flagstaff.

GRAN D CANYON : RI M -T O -RI VE R -T O -RI M

Dates: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) May 23-28; Sept. 12-17; Oct. 11-16 (Mon-Sat) Assembly Point: Flagstaff (airline, rail and bus service to Flagstaff; Timberline van shuttle from Flagstaff to North Rim prior to tour and from Havasupai to Flagstaff following tour) Tour Cost: $1,995 (includes all lodging, all meals, park entrance fees, van shuttles from Flagstaff to North Rim prior to tour and return to Flagstaff, leaders, trail maps & narratives) Every now and then, a program comes together that really spikes our pulse. Rim-to-River-to-Rim, since its inception, has always been that kind of experience. We truly believe that, if you’re a hiker to the core, at some time in your life you need to hike the Grand Canyon from rim-to-river-to-rim. Rim-to-River-to-Rim will assemble in Flagstaff early morning of Day 1 and we’ll shuttle to the North Rim, arriving early enough for a leisurely walk along the Rim. We’ll overnight at the Grand Front Lodge

and then begin our descent into the canyon the next morning, following Bright Angel Creek as it tumbles toward the Colorado. Along the way, we’ll pass Roaring Springs, the primary water source for both the North and South Rim villages. A short spur trail offers the irresistible opportunity to visit Ribbon Falls. By the time we reach Phantom Ranch, our destination for the evening, we will have descended almost 6,300 feet over 14 miles through five distinct life zones to the canyon floor. Breakfast precedes daybreak—a Phantom Ranch tradition—and we’ll be crossing over the Colorado as the sun begins to rise above the canyon walls. We’ll follow the Bright Angel Trail as it climbs from the river beyond the Inner Canyon to Indian Gardens, and onward and upward to the South Rim (10 miles). We’ll spend the evening at the Maswik Lodge on the Rim and celebrate over dinner at magnificent El Tovar. We’ll leave the South Rim early morning of Day 4 (but, we promise, not as early as our departure from Phantom Ranch the previous morning) and head to the Hualapai Hilltop, trailhead for our hike to Supai. An 8-mile trek into Havasu leads to Supai Village, tribal center of the Havasupai Nation, and we’ll spend our first of two nights at the Havasupai Lodge. The magnificent waterfalls of Havasu provide the adventure for Day 5. We’ll hike from the lodge along Havasu Creek, with an opportunity to visit Havasu’s two newest falls, created by the 2008 flood. We’ll continue to Havasu and Mooney, with their spectacular drops of 100' and 196' respectively, as the creek plunges toward the Colorado (6 miles). Following a final evening at the Havasupai Lodge, we’ll hike from the canyon and return to Flagstaff.

BIG BE N D NATI ON AL PAR K

Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Mon-Sat) March 1-6 Assembly Point: Big Bend N.P. (airline service to Midland, TX; Timberline van shuttle between Midland and Big Bend N.P. prior to and following tour) Tour Cost: $1,995 (all lodging, all meals, full-day raft program, park entrance fees, van shuttle between Midland and Big Bend, leaders, trail maps & narratives) If someone had suggested to us hard-core Coloradans in our early adventure days that we would ever stage a program in Texas, at the very least we might have smiled and raised a collective eyebrow in disbelief. Merely a reflection of our parochial ignorance in those days and a reflection of

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES



2010


how much we yet had to learn about this western land we call home. Clearly, we had yet to discover the wonders of Big Bend National Park. Nestled in the southwest corner of Texas, not close enough to any major city to provide any meaningful clue as to its location, Big Bend requires a little scrutiny to understand its remote and wild character. The park is situated along a 107-mile stretch of the Rio Grande, including that point where the river turns sharply to the north (hence, its name, “Big Bend”). This section of the Rio Grande is protected as a Wild and Scenic River and the spectacular limestone gorges through which the river flows are among the astonishing, varied natural features contained within the park’s boundaries. The vast Chihuahan Desert, extending northward from Mexico, dominates a considerable expanse of the park, but standing in stark contrast to the desert lowlands are the rugged, forested Chisos Mountains, whose peaks reach an elevation of 8,000'. Without a doubt, Big Bend offers some of the wildest and unspoiled land remaining in the “lower 48”. We’ve planned our Big Bend program for early spring—the absolute best time to visit this park. With an estimated 1,100 plant species, 430 species of birds and a wide range of other wildlife, including gray fox, pronghorn antelope and mule deer, spring is an exciting season in this desert environment.

We’ve structured this program in a manner that will provide the varied experiences that are the essence of Big Bend. We’ll hike the high country of the Chisos, explore the erosional landscapes of the Window, the Chihuahan Desert environment and the breathtaking gorges carved by the Rio Grande. A full-day’s raft journey on the Rio Grande in spectacular Santa Elena Canyon is another dramatic feature of this program. We’ll assemble mid-afternoon of Day 1 at the Chisos Mountain Lodge, our home for the next five nights (we’ll provide a van shuttle from Midland to the park earlier that day). We’ll arrive early enough to hike leisurely along the Windows Trail to the spectacular Window, a pour-off that offers a magnificent view of the desert lowlands (4 miles). Early the following morning, we’ll hike from the lodge into the Chisos as we head for the South Rim on what generally is recognized as the quintessential hike in Texas. The views along the trail of much of the Big Bend country extending into Mexico are unsur-

2010



passed (13 miles). We’ll head south from the Chisos Basin along the Ross Maxwell Scenic Drive on Day 3 to the Mule Ears Trailhead. Our hike to the base of Mule Ears Peaks will showcase the incredible beauty of the Chihuahan Desert at a time when the Chihuahan well may be in full spring bloom. The variety of cacti, yucca, ocotillo and other desert plants along the trail is truly amazing (7 miles). Following our Mule Ears hike, we’ll drive to the end of the Ross Maxwell Road and hike along the Rio Grande into the mouth of Santa Elena Canyon (2 miles). We’ve planned a relatively moderate hike to Lost Mine for Day 4, our final trek in the Chisos highlands (7 miles). Later that afternoon, we’ll van shuttle to Terlingua with time to explore this old mining camp before an awesome dinner at the Starlight Theater. On Day 5, we’ll join Big Bend River Tours for a full-day rafting (or canoeing, depending on river flow) adventure on the Rio Grande as it twists through the Santa Elena Gorge. The sheer limestone walls that line the gorge soar 1,500 feet above the river. We’ll spend a final evening at the Chisos Lodge and then hike leisurely through the narrowing canyon atop Burro Mesa the following morning to the spectacular pour-off at the mesa’s southern edge (4 miles). We’ll then shuttle back to Midland later in the day.

B I G B E N D EX T EN D E R : C A R LS B A D C A V E R N S

Date: (2 days, 1 nights; Sun-Mon) March 7-8 Assembly Point: Odessa, TX (Hampton Inn) Tour Cost: $500 (includes lodging, all meals, park entrance fees, ranger guided tours, round-trip transportation between Odessa and Carlsbad Caverns, leaders, tour maps & narratives)

We’ve extended the Extender for 2010; the opportunity to bag another of our national parks is irresistible. In the season ahead, we’ll visit the labyrinth of Carlsbad Caverns National Park, overnight in Carlsbad, and then head down the road to Guadalupe National Park. One of the largest and most astounding cave systems in the world, Carlsbad Caverns National Park is actually comprised of a network of over 100 known caves within the porous limestone bowels of

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES

the Guadalupe Mountains of southeastern New Mexico. The park is situated about 170 miles northwest of the Midland/Odessa area, or about a 3-hour drive from the assembly location for our Big Bend Hike. The point being—how can we resist a visit to Carlsbad since we’re in the neighborhood anyway? We’ll give our Big Bend hikers an opportunity to take a shower, maybe do some laundry, have dinner and a good night’s sleep in Odessa and then we’re off early the next morning for Carlsbad. Following a picnic lunch at the Caverns, we’ll spend much of the afternoon exploring the spectacular Big Room, with its incredibly dramatic formations. We’ll enter the caverns and follow the Natural Entrance Route, which simulates the basic route utilized by early explorers. We’ll descend some 750 feet on a switchbacking trail illuminated, fortunately, by the park service. We’ll spend the evening in Carlsbad and then it’s off to Guadalupe Park early the following morning. The Guadalupe’s certainly look like mountains looming on the western horizon, but technically are the components of the Capitan Reef, an exposed formation of ancient marine fossils. In so many ways, Guadalupe is another reflection of the incredible diversity of the Chihuahuan Desert. Our choice of hikes will be dictated by weather and trail conditions, but among those choices is the McKittrick Canyon Trail, from the Visitors’ Center beyond the historic Pratt Lodge to the Grotto. For much of its course, the trail follows a permanent desert stream that supports a lush abundance of vegetation (7 miles). We’ll ultimately return to Midland late afternoon.

CA NYO NL A ND S /ARCHE S

Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) May 9-14 Assembly Point: Moab, UT (airline service to Salt Lake City; Timberline van shuttle between Salt Lake City and Moab prior to and following tour) Tour Cost: $1,995 (includes all lodging, all meals, park entrance fees, rafting program, van shuttles, leaders, trail maps & narratives) Moab, Utah—mountain biking mecca of global proportions! That’s the image most commonly associated with Moab. Timberline, in fact, staged a wide range of mountain bike activities in the region well before it became fashionable to do so. But

35


Chesler Park, more than any other trail in Needles, showcases the amazing sandstone spires for which this region is named. We’ll also experience the exciting Joint section of the trail that leads to an incredible view of the expanse of Chesler Park. Following our Chesler Park adventure, we’re headed to Moab and our final three nights at the Canyonlands Inn. Our focus on Day 4 will be Arches National Park with its astounding array of sandstone arches. We’ll hike the complete loop through the fantasyland of Devil’s Garden (8 miles). A change of pace is planned Day 5 when we challenge the rapids of the Colorado River as part of a full-day whitewater rafting adventure. Perhaps Utah’s best-known and certainly mostphotographed natural feature is Delicate Arch in Arches and that’s our destination for our final day (5 miles). And since we’re in the neighborhood, we won’t leave Arches before visiting Double Arch and The Windows.

BRYCE/ZION

Dates: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) June 6-11; Oct 3-8 Assembly Point: Bryce Canyon (airline service to Las Vegas; Timberline van shuttle between Las Vegas and Bryce prior to tour and from Zion to Las Vegas following tour) Tour Cost: $1,995 (includes all lodging, all meals, park entrance fees, van shuttles, leaders, trail maps & narratives)

Moab’s best-kept secret is its phenomenal hiking opportunities. Perhaps Canyonlands, of all of the five national parks within the state of Utah, offers the grandest array of geologic and geographic phenomena that define Utah. Within the park’s vast expanse are two of the west’s great rivers—the Colorado and Green—gaping canyons, open desert and towering mesas covered with stands of pinion and juniper, natural arches, spires and towers, and miles and miles of colorful slickrock. Timberline will provide a van shuttle early morning of Day 1 from Salt Lake City to Canyonlands. We’re headed to Monticello because of its proximity to the Needles District where we’ll hike on Days 2 and 3. Enroute to Monticello, we’ll head for the Island-in-the-Sky District of Canyonlands and hike to Neck Spring, a great introduction to the ecology and geology of canyon country. Near the conclusion of the Neck Spring hike, we’ll pause at the Shafer Canyon Trailhead with its awesome view of the Shafer Trail that descends from Island-in-the-Sky to the White Rim (5 miles). We’ll then continue to Monticello and our first of two overnights. Early morning of Day 2, we’re off to The Needles, a vast wild region of the park, laced with serpentine canyons and towering spires of pink sandstone. Our goal is the breathtaking overlook of the confluence of the Colorado and Green Rivers and the awesome 1,000' gorges these great rivers have carved through the rugged Colorado Plateau landscape (12 miles). On Day 3, we’ll return to the Needles District and hike to Chesler Park, a hike widely regarded as the premier hike in all of Canyonlands (10 miles).

36

Southern Utah is a geologic fantasyland that offers some of the most fascinating and breathtakingly beautiful landscapes to be found on this planet. Nowhere is nature’s workshop so dramatically displayed, where time is inconsequential and the artistry will always be a work in progress. Thankfully, much of nature’s handiwork in the region lies within the protective confines of a series of national parks and monuments that are remarkably accessible for those ambitious enough to set forth on foot to explore their wonders. We’ll explore the heart of Utah’s “color country” in the context of our Bryce/Zion Hike.

Our program assembles mid-afternoon at Bryce Canyon (we’ll provide a van shuttle from Las Vegas) with time for at least an introduction to Bryce. We’ll tour several of the overlooks along the Rim Trail and watch the sun set from Sunset Point. We’ll spend our first of two evenings at Bryce and then begin our trek into the canyon along the Queen’s Garden trail complex early the following morning. Early into this hike, you’ll understand that those who view Bryce only from the rim overlooks are without a clue as to what Bryce is all about. Each bend in the trail reveals a view more spectacular than the last. The towering hoodoos and peek-a-boo windows are everywhere. Before we’re finished, we will have done not only Queen’s Garden, but also the entire Navajo and Peekaboo loops and returned to the rim through awesome Wall Street (8 miles). We’ll hike the Fairyland Loop (9 miles) on Day 3 with its magnificent views of the Sinking Ship, Tower Bridge, and the Chinese Wall and then head to Zion where we’ll spend the next three days and nights. Without a doubt, Zion is a hiker’s fantasy with a large and varied selection of trails that will captivate the imagination of participants of all levels. On Day 4, we’re headed for the Kolob Terraces region in the remote northwest corner of Zion. We’ll trace the course of the Middle Fork of Taylor Creek through stands of oak and bigtooth maple to magical Double Arch Alcove (6 miles). We’ll then return to Zion early afternoon in time for a visit to the Narrows of the Virgin River. We’ll wade through the shallow river bed upstream at least far enough to sense the awesome beauty of this narrow corridor through which the Virgin flows (3 miles). On Day 5, we’ll climb from the floor of Zion Canyon through Echo Canyon to awesome Observation Point, the highest accessible promontory in Zion. The views from Observation Point are incredible. Far below, the Virgin River winds through Zion Canyon towards its ultimate rendezvous with the Colorado; massive sandstone temples line the Virgin corridor. From our vantage point, we look down on famed Angel’s Landing with its swarms of hikers (8 miles). The Zion experience requires a visit to fabled Angels’ Landing and that’s our plan on our final day (5 miles). We’ll finish by noon, head to the Pioneer in Springdale for lunch and then return to Las Vegas.

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES



2010


CA PIT OL REE F AN D TH E GR A N D ST A IR C AS E

Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) Sept. 26-Oct. 1 Assembly Point: Torrey, UT (airline service to Salt Lake City; Timberline van shuttle to and from Salt Lake airport prior to and following tour) Tour Cost: $1,895 (includes all lodging, all meals, park entrance fees, van shuttles to and from Salt Lake airport, leaders, trail maps & narratives)

Of all the hiking programs that we have crafted in the course of the 17 years since we launched our first Grand Canyon Hike, none has posed a greater challenge as to content than our Capitol Reef and the Grand Staircase adventure. Our other Colorado Plateau hikes—the Grand Canyon series, Canyonlands/Arches and Bryce/Zion—provide well-delineated parameters within which to structure a program. In contrast, the vast expanse of the Grand Staircase/Escalante National Monument is daunting, to say the least and the inclusion of Capitol Reef National Park with its geographical proximity and geological affinity with the Grand Staircase, creates hiking options without limits. Creation in 1996 of the Grand Staircase/ Escalante, one of our newest national monuments, has provided a partial cloak of protection (falling well short of wilderness designation protection) over some of our nation’s most precious remaining wildlands in an area that has been a fierce battleground between developers and environmentalists. Our program assembles in Torrey, UT, at the western entrance to Capitol Reef, and we’ll provide van shuttle transportation from Salt Lake City early morning of Day 1. We’ll arrive at the Capitol Reef Resort early enough to visit the Visitors Center within the park and stretch our legs with a short hike along the Fremont River Trail that rises above the river for an outstanding view of the Fruita orchards and several of the park’s prominent formations (3 miles). Following our first of two overnights at the Capitol Reef Resort, we’ll hike to Cohab Canyon, climbing initially to a grand overlook of the Fremont River Canyon and then descending into the narrows of Cohab with its soaring sandstone walls. We’ll continue on to Cassidy Arch and through the Grand Wash (10 miles). The Rim Overlook Trail is our focus for Day 3. We’ll climb from the Fremont River, initially to Hickman Natural Bridge and then well beyond to Navajo Knobs, some 2,000 feet above the valley floor. The views from the Knobs, in a word, are incredible (10 miles). We’ll van shuttle from Capitol Reef late in the afternoon to Boulder and spend the next two evenings at the Boulder Mountain Lodge. We’re headed for the Burr Trail on Day 4 and a full day’s exploration of the intriguing Waterpocket Fold. We’ll hike Lower Muley Twist Canyon and then climb from the canyon to the crest of the Fold with its striking views of the Fold and the high peaks of the Henry Mountains to the east (10 miles). On Day 5, we’ll travel west into the Escalante to experience the remarkable slot canyon hiking for which this region is famous. We’ll spend much of the day in the Dry Fork of Coyote Gulch, scrambling, and we do mean scrambling, through slots aptly named “Spooky” and “Peekaboo” (7 miles). We’ll spend our final overnight at the Prospector Lodge in Escalante and hike to beautiful Calf Creek Falls (6 miles) prior to our return to Salt Lake.

2010



CA LI F ORNI A: HI G H SI E RR A/ CAS CADE S / DE SE RT

JOSHUA TREE

Dates: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) Feb. 14-19 Assembly Point: Palm Springs, CA/Joshua Tree N.P. (airline service to Palm Springs; Timberline van shuttles between Palm Springs and Joshua Tee prior to and following tour) Tour Cost: $1,995 (includes all lodging, all meals, van shuttles between Palm Springs and Joshua Tree, park entrance fees, leaders, tour maps & narratives)

In the eyes of filmmaker Ken Burns, the creation of the national park system is America’s “Greatest Idea”. As an organization whose primary focus embraces the national parks throughout the U.S. and Canada, we are in awe of the enduring commitment to the preservation of these national treasures. Joshua Tree is a relatively new addition to our national park network. A national monument since 1936, Joshua Tree was elevated to national park protection in 1994, and for good reason. Desert, oases, mountains, slot canyons, mazes of rocks, and, of course, an abundance of the cherished Joshua trees combine to create a region of incredible diversity and, for our benefit, a hikers’ paradise. Factor in the quirky nature of the area—so close to Palm Springs, yet a world away—and the town of Twenty-Nine Palms, an incongruous blend of weird and sophistication. Twenty-Nine Palms, and the semi-famous Twenty-Nine Palms Inn, will be our home for all five nights. We’ll gather in Palm Springs early morning of Day 1 and shuttle directly to Joshua Tree. We’re headed to the Indian Cove area at the northern edge of the park on the fringe of the fascinating formations of the Wonderland of Rocks. Early into this “warm-up” hike, we’ll enter the dramatic slot of Rattlesnake Canyon as it twists its way through the Wonderland (3 miles). We’ll return to the Wonderland area on Day 2 as we skirt its western flank along the Boy Scout Trail (8 miles). Day 3, we’re off to the Cottonwood region at the park’s southern end. We’ll hike from the Visitors Center to Cottonwood Spring and then continue toward the fascinating fan palms and pools at Lost Palms Oasis in the context of a 10-mile hike that many consider to be the park’s premier day hike. Day 4, we’ll visit the Black Rock Canyon area, situated on the northwestern slopes of the Little San Bernardino Mountains. Much of the terrain in this region sits above 4,000 feet in elevation and supports a range of vegetation not found elsewhere in the park.

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES

We’ll hike the Panorama Loop, with its optional scramble to the top of Warren Peak and its unobstructed views of the Little San Bernardino Mountains, Coachella Valley and Mt. San Jacinto (8 miles). We’ll focus on the Mojave section of the park the morning of Day 5. We’re headed for the summit of Ryan Peak, fifth tallest in the park at 5,457-feet. The good (or bad) news, depending on your personal preference, is that we begin at 4,480’ (3 miles). Later that afternoon, we’ll walk the moderate, but dramatic trail to Barker Dam (2.5 miles), and then return for our final evening in Twenty-Nine Palms. We’ll head back toward Palm Springs on our final day into the foothills surrounding the town, where Tahquitz Creek and the various tributaries of Palm Canyon Wash have carved narrow canyons containing year-round water that sustains many groves of California Fan Palms. Known collectively as Indian Canyons, we’ll meander in these gorges into the early afternoon, stop for lunch at the Trading Post and then return to Palm Springs.

DE AT H VA L LE Y

Dates: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) Feb. 21-26 Assembly Point: Las Vegas (airline service to Las Vegas; Timberline van shuttle between Las Vegas and Death Valley prior to and following tour) Tour Cost: $1,995 (includes all lodging, all meals, van shuttle between Las Vegas and Death Valley, park entrance fees, leaders, tour maps & narratives) Death Valley has an instantaneous emotional impact on everyone who sees it. That initial view from Zabriskie Point across the vastness of the valley floor to the distant Panamint Peaks rising from the valley clad in an unmistakable mantle of snow is unlike anything that you have ever experienced. Spectacular though this view may be, it reveals nothing of the intrigue of Death Valley. Several days of hiking into just a few of the nooks and crannies of Death Valley confirmed for us why we choose to hike

37


rather than do bus tours (as though we ever entertained such a choice!). You won’t believe the hidden treasures that await you—the startling colors of Mosaic Canyon, the improbability of a waterfall in Fall Canyon and the narrows of that canyon above the fall, the Ubehebe Volcanic Crater, the mining history and breathtaking views from the Keene Wonder Mine, to name a few. And, with a little luck (and winter rain), we may be dazzled by an array of desert golds that will surpass any prior images of a desert in bloom. The reality is—when you’ve chosen to visit a region that embraces the lowest point in the western hemisphere that is located only 80 miles from the highest point in the “lower 48”, you need to expect the unexpected. Death Valley does not disappoint. As a fitting beginning for our visit to a land of extremes, we’ll assemble in Las Vegas, but escape the city limits relatively early morning of Day 1. We’re headed for Red Rock Canyon on our way to Death Valley and we’ll explore the intriguing rock formations and geology of this National Conservation Area administered by the Bureau of Land Management. Initially, we’ll hike to the Keystone Thrust, considered the park’s most significant geologic feature (2.5 miles) and then explore beautiful Pine Creek Canyon with the hope of seeing a seasonal waterfall (3 miles). We’ll then head to Death Valley and continue on to the Furnace Creek Ranch, our home for the next five nights. On Day 2, we’re off to Fall Canyon. The deeper we walk into the canyon, the higher the walls lining the trail and the narrower our passageway. At what appears to be the head of the canyon is the amazing pour-off with its year-round flow of water. A negotiable bypass will take us to the top of the fall and into one of the narrowest slots in all of Death Valley (8 miles). We’ll head north toward the Funeral Mountains on Day 3, and step back in time to the gold mining glory days in Death Valley during the early years of the 20th century. We’ll climb to the extensive remains of the Keene Wonder Mine and its magnificent views of the valley floor below (5 miles).

38

Later that afternoon, we’re off to Stovepipe Wells for a visit to Mosaic Canyon. If you have even the slightest interest in geology, you will be dazzled by the rock and color of Mosaic Canyon. The characteristic pinks and oranges of the predominant dolomite formation are offset by the intense polished white of the metamorphosed marble. Erosion has created a corridor of spectacularly narrow slots in Mosaic Canyon (3-4 miles). Day 4, we’ll head south from Furnace Creek to the Badwater region. We’ll hike from the Golden Canyon Trailhead along, over, around and through the otherworldly labyrinth of Golden Canyon to Zabriskie Point overlook for an awesome view of the vast and varied panorama of Death Valley (5 miles). Day 5, we’re headed for the northern reaches of the park. We’ll hike along the rim and into the bowels of both Little and Big Ubehebe craters, reminders of Death Valley’s volcanic legacy (3 miles). We’ll then tour historic Scotty’s Castle, the somewhat bizarre vacation home built as a playground by the wealthy friends of “Death Valley” Scotty during the gold boom days of the 1920’s. Time permitting, we may try to squeeze in a round at the Devil’s Golf Course. On our return to Furnace Creek, we’ll visit the amazing sand dunes near Stovepipe Wells with ample opportunity to play in the sand. Following our final overnight at the Ranch, we’ll van shuttle to road’s end at the 5,475’summit at Dante’s View. We’ll hike from the overlook to Dante’s Peak (3 miles) for one final overpowering view and then van shuttle back to Las Vegas.

YOS EM ITE

Dates: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) June 27-July 2; Sept. 5-10 Assembly Point: Lee Vining, CA (airline service to Fresno; Timberline van shuttle between Fresno and Yosemite prior to and following tour) Tour Cost: $2,095 (includes all lodging, all meals, park entrance fees, leaders, van shuttles between Fresno and Yosemite, trail maps & narratives) One of the undeniable realities of Yosemite is its vastness and, apart from the well-documented level of activity in the valley, so much of the park is astoundingly remote, if not impenetrable. Of the park’s approximate 750,000 acres, or 1,200 square miles, over 90 percent of its area is protected wilderness. The vast majority of the park’s visitors never venture more than a 1/2-mile from their vehicles. Five minutes removed from the trailhead parking lot and we well may not see another person on the trail until our return at day’s end. And so, in the season ahead, we’ll again explore the wonders of Yosemite, its giant sequoias, dramatic waterfalls, deep glacier-carved canyons, snowclad Sierra peaks and magnificent domes. As is the case with so many of our programs where the hiking opportunities are essentially without limits, we’ll always struggle with the decisions as to which hikes to select for a 6-day program. Our goal has been to include those trails that are reasonably athletic, nontechnical day hikes, and that best reflect the variety and scenic fascination that is Yosemite. Our program assembles in Lee Vining, near the Tioga Pass entrance to Yosemite, late-afternoon of Day 1 and we’ll provide a van shuttle to that location from Fresno. Our shuttle will leave Fresno early

morning of Day 1 and we’ll pause within Yosemite to hike to beautiful May Lake at the base of Mt. Hoffman (2.5 miles). We’ll spend our first of three nights on the shores of Mono Lake at Murphy’s Lodge in Lee Vining and devote our next two hikes to the Tuolumne Meadows region of the park. Early morning of Day 2, we’ll shuttle to Tuolumne Meadows and hike along the beautiful Tuolumne River to Tuolumne Falls. We’ll descend from the falls along the river and enjoy a picnic on the rocks at the river’s edge just below the Falls and then return to our trailhead (12 miles). After a second overnight in Lee Vining, we’ll hike from Dana Meadows to historic Mono Pass with its great alpine views of the Sierra crest and Blood Canyon, as well as Mono Lake and the high desert of the Great Basin east of the Sierra (10 miles). On Day 4, we’re off for what well may be the park’s most spectacular viewpoint as we challenge the Clouds Rest Trail that ultimately will lead to the Clouds Rest summit. Clouds Rest is substantially higher than better-known Half Dome, safer to climb without the terrifying drop-offs for which Half Dome is famous, and, most importantly, far less crowded with significantly better views of the park (14 miles). Following the Clouds Rest hike, we’re headed for the valley, where we’ll spend our next two overnights at Yosemite Lodge. Glacier Point-to-Happy Isle trail, considered to be among the park’s most scenic hikes, is our plan for Day 5. We’ll begin our hike from Glacier Point along the dramatic Panorama Trail with countless breathtaking views of the massive monoliths—Half Dome, Liberty Cap, and Clouds Rest—for which Yosemite is famous. Early on, we’ll also capture the breathtaking views of Nevada and Vernal Falls and later, as we approach Panorama Point, we’ll see awesome Yosemite Falls in the distance. We’ll visit Illilouette Falls initially, climb to Panorama Point and then descend to the Merced River at the very brink of Nevada Fall. The Mist Trail, as it descends along the face of Vernal Falls, is our route to the Yosemite Valley floor (8 miles). The magnificent giant sequoias of the Mariposa Grove will be the focus for our final day, prior to our mid-afternoon return to Fresno (5 miles).

S EQU O IA /KI N GS CA N Y ON

Dates: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) Sept. 12-17 Assembly Point: Wuksachi Lodge/Sequoia (airline service to Fresno; Timberline van shuttle between Fresno and Sequoia prior to and following tour) Tour Cost: $2,095 (includes all lodging, all meals, park entrance fees, van shuttles to and from Fresno, leaders, trail maps & narratives) Sequoia and Kings Canyon, the twin national parks situated at the southern extremity of California's Sierra Nevada Range, define the concept of diversity. The extreme contrasts in climate, topography and vegetation expressed in this region are astounding. Consider the rise in elevation from 1,700 feet at park headquarters at Ash Mountain to the summit of Mt. Whitney at 14,495' on Sequoia’s eastern fringe, and then contemplate how that differential impacts the ecology of the parks. Rarely does snow fall in the foothills near the western entrance, nor does the snow ever completely melt in the park's higher reaches. Spring flowers bloom from January through October. Sequoia contains the highest peak in the “lower 48”– Mt. Whitney at 14,495', and the deepest

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES



2010


L A S S E N VO L C A N I C NATIONAL PARK

canyon – Kings Canyon (8,200'), and, yes, deeper than even the Grand Canyon. And, of course, there are the mighty sequoias, the largest living things on earth. Reason enough for Timberline to cherish Sequoia/Kings Canyon as a part of its adventure hiking program. Our program assembles at the Wuksachi Lodge in Sequoia, where we’ll spend all five nights. We’ll meet early morning of Day 1, and we’ll provide a van shuttle from Fresno. We'll arrive in Sequoia early enough to head to Lodgepole and hike along the Marble Fork of the Kaweah River. Our goal is Tokopah Falls, and a short final boulder scramble will bring us to the base of this 1,200-foot marvel. Early morning of Day 2, we’ll shuttle the short distance to the Wolverton Trailhead and head out on the Lakes Trail, which offers another perspective on the beautiful Kaweah River and Tokopah Valley. We viewed the Watchtower from a distance the previous day as we hiked to Tokopah Falls. On this day, our trail snakes along a ledge on the Watchtower itself before descending to Heather Lake. We’ll continue on to Emerald Lake, nestled at the base of mighty Alta Peak. Take note of this magnificent mountain – we’re headed for its above-timberline summit on Day 5 (10 miles). We’re off to Cedar Grove in adjacent Kings Canyon on Day 3. From our trailhead at Roads End, we’ll trace the course of the Kings River upstream to Mist Falls and then cross the river at its confluence with Bubbs Creek as we return to our trailhead (8 miles). Consider Day 4 as somewhat of a “breather”; our Alta Peak adventure approaches the next day. We’ll devote much of Day 4 to the awesome sequoias as we explore the trails of the Giant Forest. We’ll hike the Congress Trail, view The House, The Senate, The President and, of course, The General Sherman Tree, “the largest living thing on Earth”, and then follow the Trail of the Sequoias to Crescent Meadows. Later that afternoon, we’ll also climb to the top of remarkable Moro Rock for one of the park’s most incredible views (8 miles). As promised, early morning of Day 5, we’ll challenge one of the great trails in the parks. We’re headed for the 11,204' summit of Alta Peak on this day in the context of a 12-mile round trip trek that offers some of the finest alpine vistas in the Sierra. From Alta’s summit, we’ll see the towering peaks of the Mt. Goddard region to the north and those of the Great Western Divide rising out of Mineral King to the south. Whitney's crest dominates the eastern horizon and far below rests shimmering Emerald Lake, along whose shores we picnicked a couple of days earlier. We’re into our final day but the adventure continues as we climb the polished granite dome of Little Baldy for its spectacular 360-degree view of the High Sierra (4 miles). We’ll visit Grant Grove and then return to Fresno.

2010



Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) Aug. 29-Sept. 3 Assembly Point: Reno, NV (airline service to Reno; Timberline van shuttle between Reno and Lassen Park prior to and following tour) Tour Cost: $1,795 (includes all lodging, all meals, Timberline van shuttles between Reno and Lassen, park entrance fees, leaders, trail maps & narratives) On Memorial Day, 1914, after centuries of slumber, Lassen Peak, southernmost of the mighty volcanoes of the Cascades, awakened with a ferocity not unlike that replicated some 66 years later by its sister peak to the north—Mount Saint Helens. About a year later, after a period of sustained activity, Lassen blew its top, tossing 20-ton boulders about like pebbles, some of which landed in the distant streets of Reno to the east. Smaller eruptions continued for the next seven years leaving the landscape littered to this day with volcanic debris. Though Lassen once again sleeps, the region remains as one of our youngest active volcanoes. Today, Lassen Peak, its extensive adjacent collection of geothermal features, its volcanic moonscape surrounded by lush coniferous forests and countless, glistening high country lakes, have found protection within the parameters of Lassen Volcanic National Park. The message of this Park is clear—our planet is alive; its surface may be quiet, but its profound energy bubbles within. Lassen’s numerous fumaroles and mud pots offer convincing evidence of this geothermal presence. We’ll assemble in Reno, still home to some of those random parts of Lassen Mountain, and van shuttle early morning of Day 1 to the Drakesbad region of the park. We’ll spend the afternoon exploring the Warner Valley region with its bubbling hot springs, lush meadows and secluded lakes. We’ll climb moderately from the valley and visit Devil’s Kitchen, one of the most volatile and isolated geothermal areas in the park (5 miles). We’ll then head to Chester and our first of two overnights at the Bidwell House. We’re headed for Lassen’s south entrance on Day 2 and an engagement with Brokeoff Mountain in the context of what many consider to be Lassen’s finest hike. Though not as high as Lassen Peak and

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES

perhaps not quite as dramatic, Brokeoff features excellent hiking through more varied terrain than Lassen, along with a thrilling traverse along its summit ridge. From the summit, the views of Lassen Peak are without equal (7 miles). Following a second night in Chester, we’ll return to the park and the Kings Creek Falls Trailhead for another of the park’s exceptional day hikes. From beautiful Lower Meadow, to the wild cascades along Kings Creek, to awesome Kings Creek Falls, finally reaching the secluded basin of Sifford Lake, the Kings Creek hike is awesome (10 miles). We’ll spend this night at the Childs Meadow Resort and we promise one of the best home-cooked meals you’ve ever experienced. Lassen is a land of countless glacially-sculpted lakes and we’ll visit a cluster in the course of our hike planned for Day 4. We’ll climb from Summit Lake, initially to Cliff Lake and beyond to Shadow and Terrace Lakes. Shortly beyond Terrace, we’ll launch into a long descent along cascading Hat Creek to beautiful Paradise Meadows before reaching trail’s end at Hat Lake. We’ll then head to the park’s western entrance and the Manzanita Lake Museum and Visitor Center on the way to Shingletown and the secluded setting of the Weston House, where we’ll spend our final two overnights. Lest you think that we have no intention of challenging the formidable summit for which this park is named, let us quickly dispel those concerns. We’ve never bypassed an opportunity for a dramatic touch—why not save the best for last? And so, on Day 5, our final full day, we’ll climb Lassen to its spectacular 10,457-foot crest along a trail that, though moderately steep, is well-maintained and non-technical, and ultimately ascends to the rim of the crater. From the summit, the views of Mt. Shasta to the northwest and the Devastated Area on the slopes of Lassen itself are breathtaking (5 miles). Believe it or not, we’ll be down from Lassen early enough to picnic along the shores of Lake Helen and then hike through nearby Bumpass Hell, an area of geothermal activity considered to be the park’s most colorful and extensive (3 miles). We may now be into our final day but our Lassen adventure is far from over. We’re headed back to Reno when we’re finished but we’ll return by way of the park’s far northeastern corner on the shores of Butte Lake for a memorable encounter with awesome Cinder Cone. Cinder Cone is yet another product of the same enormous internal geothermal forces that produced Lassen and Brokeoff Peaks, Bumpass Hell and Devil’s Kitchen. The first mile of the Cinder Cone trail is a gen-

39


CO L U M BI A RI V ER GO R GE

Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) June 13-18 Assembly Point: Portland (airline service to Portland; Timberline van shuttle from Portland to Cascade Locks prior to tour and from Mt. Hood to Portland following tour) Tour Cost: $2,095 (includes all lodging, all meals, park entrance fees, Timberline van shuttles, leaders, trail maps & narratives)

tle stroll along the edge of the Fantastic Lava Beds of which we have no hint as to their extent until we reach the Cinder Cone rim. The trail’s last mile, translating into just shy of 1,000 feet of elevation gain, lends a new meaning to the concept “one step at a time.” The view from the rim, though, is a 360-degree masterpiece. Butte and Snag Lakes, Lassen and Prospect Peaks, the vastness of the Fantastic Lava Beds and the Painted Dunes are ours to behold. And for those who want more, a trail leads down into the bowels of Cinder Cone’s crater. What a way to end our week in Lassen! (5 miles)

PA C IFIC NORT HW ES T

ROG U E RI V ER WI L D ERN ES S

Dates: (6 days, 5 nights) May 10-15 (Mon-Sat); Sept. 26-Oct. 1 (Sun-Fri) Assembly Point: : Medford, OR (airline service to Medford; Timberline van transfers to and from airport) Tour Cost: $2,095 (includes all lodging, all meals, park entrance fees, transfers, leaders, luggage transport, tour maps & narratives) The Rogue River, with its source in the high snowladen Cascades near Crater Lake, certainly ranks among the most legendary rivers in the Pacific Northwest. The river’s dramatic drop in elevation over a relatively short distance combined with the enormous seasonal snowfall at its headwaters accounts for the astounding power of the river. The Rogue is one of only three rivers in the northwest with sufficient force to carve a course through the coastal mountain barrier on its way to the Pacific. The result—an incredibly spectacular 4,000-foot-deep gorge with countless Class IV rapids and waterfalls that cradles the Rogue through the Klamath Mountains. The federal government, in recognition of the river’s unique and extraordinary nature, included the Rogue among the eight rivers originally designated for inclusion in the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968. For the most part, the Rogue River Canyon is inaccessible other than by boat or on foot along the 42mile Rogue River National Recreation Trail that follows the river’s north bank from Graves Creek at the canyon’s eastern entrance to Foster Bar at the west-

40

ern portal. This trail, embraced within the heart of the Wild Rogue Wilderness, will be the focus of our Rogue River Wilderness adventure in the season ahead. We’ll hike the entire 42-mile length of the Rogue Trail from Graves Creek to Foster Bar in four days, and we’ll do so carrying only daypacks—our remaining baggage will be transported from lodge to lodge by boat. And, yes, we did say “lodge”, because we’ll spend our three nights along the river trail in a series of backcountry lodges also accessible only by boat and foot. Our two planned itineraries vary slightly for seasonal reasons. For each date, we’ll hike the Rogue Trail over the final four days. In May, we’ll explore the fascinating stalagmite and stalactites of Oregon Caves National Monument in the Siskiyou foothills to the south of Medford during the first two days of that program. Our overnight at Oregon Caves deserves special mention; we’ll spend this evening and enjoy dinner at the historic Oregon Caves Chateau at the park’s entrance, one of the grand lodges so characteristic of our national parks. In late-September, we’re headed for magnificent Crater Lake National Park in the Cascades to the east of the Rogue Canyon. In the course of our visit at Crater Lake, we’ll climb to the summit of Mt Scott, the highest peak in the park, and spend our first night at Crater Lake Lodge on the rim of the caldera overlooking the beautiful lake. On our way to Crater Lake on Day 1, we’ll hike along the Boundary Springs Trail into the park to the source of the Rogue, where the river actually emerges from the ground and begins its plunge to the Pacific. The actual Rogue experience begins late afternoon of Day 2 upon our arrival at the Riverside Lodge in Grant’s Pass, on the banks of the Rogue. Early morning of Day 3, we’ll shuttle to Graves Creek and begin our trek into the Rogue Wilderness. For the most part, the trail is situated well above the river offering outstanding unobstructed views of the canyon below. Each day is a continuum of waterfalls, cascades, swirling rapids, intriguing rock formations and a rich and diverse collection of wildlife. Expect to see deer and elk grazing along the river’s banks, beaver, otter, and, though less likely, black bear, mountain lion, and bobcat. The area is also renowned among birdwatchers, with frequent sightings of osprey and bald eagles. We’ll hike to Black Bar Lodge on Day 3 (9.5 miles), Marial Lodge (14 miles) on Day 4, and spend our final overnight at Clay Hill (10 miles). Early morning of our final day, we’ll hike to Foster Bar (7 miles), and then shuttle back to Medford.

The historical role of the Columbia River Gorge in the westward expansion of our country was profound. Early explorers probed the mouth of the Columbia near present-day Astoria where the mighty river poured into the Pacific. Dreams of a water passage across the mountains to the Pacific lingered into the early years of the 19th century—a dream still cherished by Thomas Jefferson as he commissioned Lewis and Clark to explore the newly-acquired Louisiana Country. The Columbia Gorge was the corridor through which Lewis and Clark traveled to reach the Pacific, and the avenue by which they began their long journey home. Even though the expedition finally ended hopes of an all-water route across the continent, the information they gathered and documented, along with their reports and illustrations of the vast resources of the Pacific Northwest provided the inspiration for the tide of western expansion and settlement that followed. By the mid-19th century, almost 12,000 pioneers had migrated to the Oregon Territory. The Columbia Gorge also is a geologic wonder and its landscape truly reflects the power of nature. For millions of years, hundreds of erupting volcanoes frequently altered the course of the Columbia, ultimately creating one of the few canyons in the world oriented in an east-west direction. Near the end of the last Ice Age, the massive Missoula Floods swept across eastern Washington, scouring cliffs high above the river bed, creating one of the world’s greatest concentrations of waterfalls from tributaries left hanging above the river. No less than 77 of these falls can be found in the relatively short span between Troutdale and The Dalles. Our program assembles early morning of Day 1 in Portland and we’ll van shuttle the short distance through the western portal of the Gorge. We’re headed to Beacon Rock State Park, named for the massive rock promontory identified by Lewis and Clark as they passed along this section of the river as winter approached in 1805. We’ll hike the Hamilton Mountain Trail, an 8-mile loop that includes a visit to stunning Rodney and Hardy Falls before cresting Hamilton’s summit for its breathtaking views of Mt. Hood, Mt. Adams and Table Rock. We’ll then head to Cascade Locks for our first of three evenings at the Columbia River Inn. On Day 2, we’ll set out along Eagle Creek, though quickly climbing well above the creek to 100-foot Metlako Falls and Punchbowl Falls. We’ll continue to High Bridge, a metal footbridge spanning an incredible slot-like chasm, before reaching Skooknichuck Falls. Our ultimate destination is awesome Tunnel Falls before returning to our trailhead (12 miles). So many falls, so little time but we’ll bag a bunch as we dedicate Day 3 to the falls of the Columbia Gorge. Before day’s end, we will have hiked to Latourell, Wahkeena, Horsetail and magnificent 620foot Multnomah Falls (7 miles). And for those who

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES



2010


want more, we teased you with a glimpse of Beacon Rock on Day 1; late afternoon of Day 3, we’ll climb the astounding trail with its 47 switchbacks to the rock’s summit (2.5 miles). On Day 4, it’s off to Dog Mountain and what well may be the Gorge’s premier hike. Without a doubt, Dog Mountain is a challenge with a 2,900-foot ascent in the context of a 7-mile loop. But the trail’s spectacular wildflower display and the incredible views of the Gorge are well worth the effort. From Dog Mountain, we’ll shuttle across the river to the slopes of Mt. Hood, where we’ll spend our final two overnights at the grand, historic Timberline Lodge. We’ve planned our spring Columbia Gorge hike with an ulterior motive in mind. Both the Gorge, and particularly the Hamilton Mountain and Dog Mountain trails, and the Mt. Hood area well may offer the most spectacular wildflower displays that we experience throughout our entire program. On Day 5, we’ll climb to the summit of Tom, Dick & Harry Mountain in the shadow of Hood’s southwestern flank through an unbelievable rhododendron forest in full bloom (7 miles). Following our final evening at Timberline, we’ll visit beautiful Tamanawas Falls, named by Native American inhabitants of the region who regarded this 100-foot curtain as a “friendly guardian spirit” protecting Hood’s eastern flank (5 miles). Following lunch in Hood River, we’ll return to Portland where our program concludes.

OL YMPIC N AT ION A L PA RK

Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) July 25-30 Assembly Point: Seattle/Kalaloch, WA (airline service to Seattle; Timberline van shuttle from Seattle to Kalaloch prior to tour and from Port Angeles to Seattle following tour) Tour Cost: $2,095 (includes all lodging, all meals, Timberline van shuttles from Seattle to Kalaloch prior to tour and from Port Angeles to Seattle following tour, park entrance fees, leaders, trail maps & narratives) Olympic National Park, situated in the heart of the Olympic Peninsula at land’s end in the northwestern corner of Washington, dominated by the towering glacier-capped peaks of the Olympic Range, stands as one of the last genuine wilderness regions in the “lower 48.” Much of the park can only be accessed on foot and the park’s 600 miles of trails are proof that the Olympics are a hiker’s fantasyland. An important element contributing to the fascination of Olympic Park is the astounding diversity embraced within its boundaries. From the Pacific beaches of Kalaloch through the rain forests of Quinault and the Hoh River, along the thunderous rivers—the Elwha, Bogachiel, Quinault—that carve spectacular deep gorges, to the soaring snowclad summits of Mount Olympus and the Bailey Range, Olympic National Park offers an extraordinary adventure hiking opportunity. It is this remarkable diversity that we hope to capture in the course of our Olympics Hike. We’ll assemble early morning of Day 1 in Seattle and van shuttle to Kalaloch on the windswept beaches of the Pacific. We’ll have the full afternoon to explore the tide pools and fascinating rock formations along the beach and then spend the night oceanside at the beautiful Kalaloch Lodge (4 miles). On Day 2, we’re headed toward land’s end near

2010



the peninsula’s northwestern tip. We’ll spend this day exploring Washington’s wild wilderness coast, whose pounding surf is surpassed in violence only by that of Tierra Del Fuego along the entirety of the Pacific shoreline. Add to that the wide beaches, needle-like stacks of rock, and abundant marine wildlife, all of which conspire to create a never-to-be-forgotten coastal experience (9 miles). We’ll then van shuttle to Forks where we’ll spend the evening. Day 3 will be devoted to the Hoh Rain Forest and a moderate valley trek along the Hoh River deep into this magnificent forest of giant hemlocks, cedar, spruce, fir and maple. We’ll hike to Happy Four Camp before returning to our trailhead at the Hoh Visitor Center (11 miles). It’s then off to the Sol Duc Valley and the Sol Duc Resort, arriving early enough to enjoy a good soak in the resort’s hot springs pool. Early morning of Day 4, we’ll shuttle to the end of the Sol Duc Road and hike above Sol Duc to Sol Duc Falls and beyond to the Bogachiel Trail. We’ll skirt the shoreline of Deer Lake and continue along the slopes of Bogachiel Peak. As we emerge onto Bogachiel’s southern slope, mighty Mt. Olympus dominates the southern horizon. Trail conditions permitting, we’ll climb to the craggy summit of the High Divide before returning to our trailhead (16 miles). Following a second night at Sol Duc, we’re off to the Elwha Valley on Day 5. We’ll initially hike along the mighty Elwha, occasionally climbing well above the boiling river as it plunges dramatically to the Pacific. We’ll descend into Rica Canyon and Krause Bottom to the remains of Hume’s Ranch before completing our loop at Whiskey Bend (7 miles). We’re then headed to Port Angeles and the Bayshore Inn for our final night. No early flights on our final day because we have a full day planned in the alpine reaches of Hurricane Ridge. From the Ridge, we’ll hike above the trees to Hurricane Hill, with its sweeping views of the snowclad peaks of the Bailey Range. We may also venture out to Obstruction Point for more above-timberline alpine excitement, or settle for the tamer, but no less beautiful Klahhane Ridge (6 miles). Ultimately, we will have to leave this wonderland for our return to Seattle.

SUN VA LL EY / SAWTOOTHS OF IDAH O

Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Mon-Sat) Aug. 2-7 Assembly Point: Ketchum/Sun Valley (airline to Boise; Timberline van shuttle between Boise and Sun Valley prior to and following tour) Tour Cost: $2,095 (includes all lodging, all meals, raft trip, van shuttles between Boise and Sun Valley prior to and following tour, park entrance fees, leaders, tour maps & narratives)

recreational importance is recognized and protected within the Sawtooth National Recreation Area. The beautiful Sawtooths will be the focus of our Idaho Hike, which will assemble in the world-famous ski resort of Sun Valley. We’ll spend our first and final nights in Sun Valley at the Tyrolean Lodge with ample opportunity to enjoy the excitement of the area as well as our lodge’s inviting outdoor swimming pool. We’ll provide a van shuttle early morning of Day 1 from Boise to Sun Valley and arrive early enough to hike Adams Gulch near Ketchum (5 miles). Early-morning of Day 2, we’ll shuttle north toward the “tooths” over Galena Summit and beyond the headwaters of the Salmon River. We’re headed for Alturas Lake, second largest in the Sawtooths, and we’ll hike above the lake along Cabin Creek to a series of high lakes from which the creek flows (8 miles). Later that afternoon, we’ll shuttle to the mountain village of Stanley on the banks of the Salmon, and we’ll spend our next three nights at the Valley Creek Lodge. An early breakfast on Day 3 and we’ll then board the shuttle boat at Redfish Lake for a quick trip across the lake to our next trailhead. We’ll hike from the shoreline through Redfish Lake Creek Canyon to Alpine Lake. Beyond the lake, we’ll cross a meadow ablaze with wildflowers; another 720 feet of elevation and we’re standing atop spectacular Baron Divide, near timberline at 9,160'. The view from the divide is breathtaking with wild Baron Creek Canyon and Baron Lakes below and Big Baron Spire on the western horizon (13 miles). Our plan for Day 4 is an engagement with the most renowned of Idaho’s backcountry lakes, incomparably beautiful Sawtooth Lake. We’ll hike initially among the lodgepole pine along Iron Creek to Alpine Lake, which in reality is sub-alpine and largely surrounded by fir except for its magnificent view of massive Alpine Peak to the south. We’ll switchback

Idaho, among the last of the “lower 48” to be settled and granted statehood, today remains one of the last true reminders of the pristine beauty of the West as it must have appeared to those earliest settlers. Vast regions of Idaho today remain wild, undeveloped and inaccessible, and the state ranks second only to Alaska in the amount of totally undeveloped land. Among the many magnificent mountain ranges that dominate Idaho’s geography, perhaps none can match the rugged Sawtooths for sheer scenic splendor. Much of the range is embraced within the 2.1-million acre Sawtooth National Forest and its

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES

41


beyond Alpine Lake above the trees as we head for Sawtooth. Our first view of Sawtooth is one never to be forgotten as it mirrors the image of towering, snowcapped Mt. Regan hovering above (10 miles). In past years, we devoted a half-day to rafting the Salmon River near Stanley. Last year’s group, however, persuaded us to forego the rafting and, instead, visit Craters of the Moon National Monument. What a great choice, and we’ll do so again on Day 5 for the season ahead. We’ll do a series of shorter hikes at the monument and then return to Ketchum for our final evening. One last climb is planned for our final day to Mt. Baldy’s impressive summit. To prove that we are not totally without some compassion, after enjoying the spectacular 360-degree view from Baldy, we’ll ride the chairlift down to the village (5 miles). And rest assured we won’t leave Sun Valley without a visit to the world-renowned Sun Valley Lodge. Following our ascent of Baldy, lunch is planned alongside the lodge’s storied ice rink prior to our return to Boise.

AL AS KA : TH E KE NA I

Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) Aug. 8-13 Assembly Point: Girdwood (airline service to Anchorage; Timberline van shuttles to and from Anchorage prior to and following tour) Tour Cost: $2,195 (includes all lodging, all meals, van shuttles, Kenai Fjord boat cruise, park entrance fees, leaders, trail maps & narratives) Alaska, perhaps more than any other region in North America, is cloaked in a mystical aura that ignites the imagination. To some extent, that aura obviously is the product of Alaska’s incredible, incomparable natural beauty. Its mountains, glaciers, coastline and wilderness are without equal. Arguably, though, without in any way diminishing its physical magnificence, Alaska’s irresistible attraction is that it symbolizes the “Final Frontier,” a last opportunity to experience the wilderness in its most pristine, unspoiled expression. Alaska still promises the opportunity to see a bear scramble through the brush of a mountain valley or to sit in a kayak and watch a massive glacier calve ice off its face into the fjords below. Our Alaska Hike assembles in Girdwood near Anchorage at noon of Day 1 (we’ll provide van transportation from Anchorage earlier in the day) and we’ll spend our first of two overnights at the Aleyeska Resort. The Winner Creek Trail is planned for Day 2 as we explore the historic Iditarod Trail that provided access to the gold fields near Crow

42

Pass during the early years of the 20th century. We’ll continue to climb moderately along the upper reaches of the creek to the picturesque falls of Winner Creek Gorge (6 miles). Along the way, we’ll pass the remains of the Monarch Mine, a hardrock gold mine that ceased operations in 1948. Nearby Crystal Lake lies nestled beneath a steep mountain wall and then its on to the Raven Glacier overlook before descending to the trailhead. We’ll spend a second evening at Aleyeska and then head out along the Course Creek Trail the following morning with its startling views of Right and Wrong Mountains. We’ll continue on to Crescent Lake and then return to our trailhead and a late afternoon shuttle to Seward, where we’ll spend our final three overnights (12 miles). Lost Lake is our goal for Day 4 as we climb moderately along Box Canyon Creek. The snowclad Resurrection Peaks hover above our trail as we approach the lake. Spectacular views of the Kenai Mountains and Resurrection Bay are added features of this exciting hike (14 miles). A change of pace is planned for Day 5. Seward is the gateway to Kenai Fjords National Park and we’ll explore this extraordinary treasure in the context of a scenic boat cruise. The glacier-laced fjords offer an exceptional wildlife opportunity that, with a little luck, can include whale sightings. Our visit to Kenai Fjords Park continues on our final day. We’ll hike the Harding Trail along Exit Glacier to the Harding Icefield, one of the largest icefields in North America (7 miles). The icefield is 35 miles long and 20 miles wide, and is the source of the glaciers of Kenai Fjords. Following our visit to the icefield, we’ll van shuttle back to Anchorage.

M T . RA I N I E R N A T I O N A L PA RK

Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) Aug. 15-20 Assembly Point: Seattle, WA (airline service to Seattle; Timberline van shuttles between Seattle and Mt. Rainier Park prior to and following tour) Tour Cost: $2,095 (includes all lodging, all meals, van shuttles between Seattle and Mt. Rainier, park entrance fees, leaders, tour maps & narratives)

Of all the mighty volcanoes of the Cascade Range, extending from southern British Columbia through northern California, none rise and dominate the horizon as does Mt. Rainier. Rising from the Cascade foothills of central Washington, Rainier easily is the tallest of the High Cascade peaks. At 14,411 feet, Rainier is almost 300 feet higher than Shasta, the only other Cascade volcano exceeding 13,000 feet.

On the other hand, as impressive as it is, Rainier is only one of more than 400 volcanoes that comprise the Ring of Fire that encircles the Pacific Ocean. The fact that Rainier rises to its lofty height virtually from sea level accounts for the incredible diversity of habitats of both vegetation and wildlife that thrive on the mountain. Temperate rain forests at lower elevations give way to lush subalpine forests, tundra, and ultimately permanent snowfields and glaciers as elevation increases. Thanks to conservationists, including John Muir, Congress enacted the necessary legislation on March 2, 1899, creating Mt. Rainier National Park, our fifth national park. After years of cycling the slopes of Rainier, Timberline will finally add this magnificent jewel to our hiking program. We’ve chosen a mid-August date as the time when most, if not all of the snow, has melted from our planned trails and the mosquitoes are in full retreat. We’ll assemble early morning of Day 1 and head directly to Rainier’s western entrance at Nisqually. From the Van Trump Trailhead, we’ll hike through the forest, initially to views of Christine and spectacular Comet Falls, one of the park’s tallest at 130-feet. We’ll then climb beyond Comet to the flower-filled meadows of Van Trump Park, with its striking views of Rainier and the Tatoosh Range (6 miles). It’s then on to Paradise, where we’ll spend our first three overnights at the historic Paradise Lodge. Day 2, we’ll hike from our lodge along the Skyline Trail, likely the park’s most popular hike, and for good reason. A solid climb early into the hike and we’re beyond timberline where the spectacular vistas reside, and Rainier is in our face at all times. A short spur trail offers an irresistible opportunity to view Nisqually Glacier, before we begin our descent back to Paradise (6 miles). We’ll devote much of Day 3 to the Stevens Canyon/Ohanapecosh area of the park. From the Reflection Lakes Trailhead, we’ll climb steadily to the saddle between Pinnacle and Plummer Peaks for some extraordinary views of the peaks that dominate the landscape in the southeastern corner of the park (3 miles). We’ll then return to the Reflection Lakes Trailhead and hike the loop that encircles these lakes. We’ll follow the trail as it climbs above the lakes to and along Mazama Ridge for its awesome views of the Tatoosh Peaks (3 miles). Early morning of Day 4, we’ll leave Paradise and head east to Chinook Pass, just beyond the park’s eastern boundary. We’ll join the Pacific Crest Trail just east of the pass as part of a grand loop that encircles Naches Peak (6,452’). Stunning views of Rainier and many of the other dominant peaks of the eastern slope highlight our return to our trailhead (5 miles). We’ll then head to the Crystal Mountain Resort, where we’ll spend our final two nights. Day 5, we’ll re-enter the park through the White River Station toward Sunrise. Our focus for this day is a section of the famed Wonderland Trail, the 90mile epic track that encircles Rainier. We’ll hike the Fryingpan Creek section to the subalpine meadows of Summerland and beyond into the rocky alpine above to the edge of the snowfields (9 miles). Following a final night at Crystal Mountain, we’ll drive to road’s end at Sunrise and hike beyond timberline to the Mt. Fremont Fire Lookout. The views of Rainier throughout this hike are incredible along a trail that overlooks the entire expanse of the park’s northern section—all in all, a dramatic conclusion to our week-long engagement with this grand mountain (5.5 miles).

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES



2010


CANADIAN RO C KY MO U N T A I N SE RIE S

GLA CIE R /MT . REVEL S TO KE MOU N T A I N PARKS

Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) July 18-23 Assembly Point: Glacier Park/Rogers Pass (airline service to Calgary; Timberline van shuttle between Calgary and Glacier Park prior to and following tour) Tour Cost: $2,095 (includes all lodging, all meals, park entrance fees, van shuttles between Calgary and Glacier Park, leaders, trail maps & narratives) At the outset, we should mention that Canada’s Glacier National Park, which is the focus of this program, should not be confused with Glacier National Park in northwestern Montana, which also, for years, has been the focus of countless Timberline cycling and hiking adventures, and will be again this season. The two Glaciers are separate and distinct, separated by hundreds of miles, but they do share one very significant quality—an incredible alpine landscape that is simply unreal. Like Montana’s Glacier Park, the history of Canada’s Glacier is tied closely to the development of the transcontinental railroad. As the Canadian Pacific forged westward over and beyond the Rocky Mountain barrier, the region’s breathtaking beauty provided a compelling incentive to pursue the economic potential that tourism would bring to the region. Lodges, hotels and other tourist facilities were built in this uncharted wilderness, which subsequently was protected as a national park in 1886. Despite the continued presence of the railroad and the Trans Canada Highway, the park remains an astonishingly pristine wilderness. Global warming notwithstanding, 400 glaciers still cover approximately one-tenth of the park’s acreage. Winters in the park, although marked by substantial snowfall, are surprisingly moderate without harsh extremes and the park’s ecology supports a broad variety of wildlife, including a substantial mountain caribou herd. And so, in the season ahead, Timberline will explore the newest in its expanding array of alpine wonderlands in the context of a 6-day program that combines Glacier and adjacent Mount Revelstoke National Parks. We’ll provide a van shuttle from Calgary early morning of Day 1, pausing along the way within Glacier’s East Entrance to hike to the base of Bear Creek Falls (2 miles). We’ll then continue to Rogers Pass and tour the Visitors Center at Park Headquarters. Later that afternoon, we’ll walk the interpretive Abandoned Rails Trail as an introduction to the history of the area. The Glacier Park Lodge, perched atop Rogers Pass, will be our home for our first three overnights. Day 2, we’re headed for the Asulkan Valley and Columbia Mountains. The Alsulkan Trail has it all— breathtaking mountain scenery, waterfalls, meadows and a spectacular view of the Alsulkan Glacier. We’ll hike to the toe of the glacier along a high ridge that offers an incredible 360-degree panorama, including the dramatic Hermit Range to the south (8.5 miles). “Balu” translates as “bear” and we’ll hope for a distant sighting in the course of our hike to Balu Pass on Day 3. In so many ways, Balu is a signature

2010



Glacier Park hike. Within less than a mile from the trailhead, the views of the snowclad summits are everywhere—Grizzly, Ursus Minor and Major, Cheops, Cougar, to name a few. A final scramble above the pass offers views of the lush valley from which we have climbed (7 miles). Just when you are convinced that it can’t possibly get any better, we’ll introduce you, on Day 4, to Glacier Crest, a 6-mile (round-trip) trek that offers a continuum of jaw-dropping views—Illecillewaet and Asulkan Glaciers, Mt. Abbott, Rampart, Mt. Jupiter, and on an on. We’ll ultimately return to our trailhead and shuttle to Revelstoke, where we’ll spend our final two nights at the Regency Hotel. Day 5 offers the opportunity to experience the premier hike in Mt. Revelstoke National Park to the summit of Jade Pass. Along the way, we’ll skirt the shorelines of several stunning subalpine lakes— Heather, Miller and Eva. As you may have guessed, we have a climb ahead of us, but the views from Jade Pass are well worth the effort (10 miles). Following a final overnight at the Regency, we’ll return to Revelstoke Park for a gentle stroll to and around Balsam Lake. But in case you’re concerned that we’ve “gone soft”, we’ll tempt you with one final, but short, climb along Eagle Knoll for one last dramatic vista (2 miles). It’s then back to Calgary, where our program concludes.

BAN FF & KOO TE N A Y PAR K S

Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) Aug. 15-20 Assembly Point: Lake Louise (airline service to Calgary; bus or Timberline van shuttle between Calgary airport and Lake Louise prior to and following tour) Tour Cost: $2,095 (includes all lodging, all meals, park entrance fees, van shuttles between Calgary and Lake Louise, leaders, trail maps & narratives) In so many ways, Lake Louise symbolizes the magic of the Canadian Rockies. The lake itself, the backdrop of Victoria Glacier, towering Temple Mountain and its glacial cap, the proximity of stunning Moraine Lake and the Valley of the Ten Peaks—Lake Louise, at the very least, is the portal through which we enter a true alpine fantasyland. And so, Lake Louise was the obvious choice as the focal point for a Canadian Rocky Mountain hiking program. We’ll gather in Lake Louise early-afternoon of Day 1 (we’ll provide a van shuttle from the Calgary airport early-morning) in time to hike leisurely along and above the lake to Agnes’ Teahouse before dinner (4 miles). We’ll spend our first of two overnights at the Paradise Lodge in Lake Louise. On day 2, we’ll shuttle the short distance to Moraine Lake and trek through the flowering meadows of beautiful Larch Valley, surrounded by the spectacular spires of the Ten Peaks that hover above the valley, to the awesome switchbacks leading to majestic Sentinel Pass. The views from Sentinel’s summit are incredible; the expanse of the awesome Paradise Valley unfolds before us to the north while the snowclad summits of the Ten Peaks fills the southern horizon. We’ll return to Larch Valley for a visit to nearby Eiffel Lake along a trail that perhaps offers the most spectacular views of Moraine Lake and the Valley of the Ten Peaks (12 miles). We’ll depart Lake Louise early morning of Day 3 to begin a 3-day backcountry adventure you won’t soon forget. We’ll van shuttle to the Vista Lake Trailhead at

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES

the summit of Vermillion Pass near the Continental Divide and descend immediately to Vista Lake. As you may have guessed, we’ll then climb to beautiful Arnica Lake, whose shores are ablaze with the abundant blooms for which the Lake is named. Our trail leads to the picturesque Twin Lakes and then climbs to the tundra at timberline astride Gibbons Pass. A rapid descent and we’re at magnificent Shadow Lake, a backcountry jewel in the heart of Banff National Park, and our home for the next two nights (9 miles). Painful though it may sound, an incredible reward awaits those hardy souls willing to leave the delicious warmth of down-quilted beds at sunrise and hike the 1/2-mile to Shadow Lake. As the sun rises and illuminates the crown of rugged Ball Mountain, its reflection in the glassy, still waters of Shadow Lake is a photographer’s fantasy. We’ll return to the lodge for the usual hearty breakfast that is a Shadow Lake tradition, pack lunches from a sumptuous spread, and then hike from the Lodge beyond Shadow Lake to beautiful Haiduk Lake, nestled at the base of Whistling Pass (10 miles). On Day 5, following another incredible Shadow Lake breakfast, we’ll hike leisurely along Redearth Creek in a long descent into the Bow River Valley (9 miles). Enroute to our final overnight destination at the remarkable Storm Mountain Lodge, we’ll pause at Johnston Canyon and hike along the falls that tumble through this narrow chasm (2 miles). Among those of our guests who are veterans of many of our prior programs, Storm Mountain Lodge, perched majestically at the Continental Divide at Vermillion Pass, is a perennial favorite. We’ll try our best to pry you out of there in the morning for a final hike into the Stanley Glacier Basin and a close-up view of Stanley Glacier prior to our return to Calgary (5 miles).

43


YO H O !

Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) Aug. 29-Sept. 3 Assembly Point: Lake Louise (airline service to Calgary; bus or Timberline van shuttle between Calgary and Lake Louise prior to and following tour) Tour Cost: $2,095 (includes all lodging, all meals, van shuttles between Calgary and Lake Louise, tour leaders, trail maps & narratives) “Yoho” is a Cree word that translates roughly as “how magnificent” and, if anything, the Cree perhaps understated the utter magnificence of this Canadian Rocky Mountain region. Second smallest of the Canadian Rocky Mountain Parks, Yoho is a land of glacial lakes and towering, snowclad mountains whose steepness explains the park’s many spectacular waterfalls. And not lost upon us is Yoho’s 252-mile network of trails; without a doubt, Yoho is exciting as a hiking destination for Timberline in the season ahead. Yoho assembles in Lake Louise early-afternoon of Day 1 (we’ll provide a van shuttle from Calgary earlier in the day) with ample opportunity to hike to either of the famous teahouses above the Lake before dinner (4 miles). We’ll spend our first two overnights at beautiful Paradise Lodge, near the lake. A word of warning about the hikes planned for Day 2—you won’t believe what you will see on that day. Tucked away in the remote reaches above the Great Divide is some of the most amazing high alpine scenery that you will ever experience. We’re headed for Lake O’Hara on this day and the myriad of alpine hiking opportunities that radiate in every direction from the lake. We’ll climb from the lake, initially to Schaffer Lake and then well beyond along the McArthur High Route to the startling deep blue waters of Lake McArthur. We’ll next return to McArthur Pass for a visit to the Odaray Prospect for what well may be the finest vista in the O’Hara area, including views of Morning Glory Lake and massive Cathedral Mountain (8 miles). Following a second night at Paradise, we’ll head to beautiful Yoho Valley early morning of Day 3. From the Whiskey Jack trailhead, we’ll climb to Yoho Lake near Yoho Pass and then beyond to the open slopes at the foot of Emerald Glacier. We’ll settle in at the glacier’s toe for lunch and enjoy the incredible views across the valley to Takakkaw Falls and up valley along the Iceline Trail (8 miles). The Kicking Horse Lodge will be “home” for the next three nights. On Day 4, we’ll van shuttle to Emerald Lake for our encounter with the exciting

44

Wapta Highline. We’ll climb steadily from the lake’s eastern shore in the shadow of the Presidential Range to Yoho Pass. Our trail moderates at the pass and we’ll soon emerge from the trees into the open expanse of the Wapta Highline as it skirts the base of Wapta Peak. The views across valley of the heavily glaciated Presidents are incredible as we approach Burgess Pass. From Burgess, where we’ll picnic, we’ll be treated to the awesome panorama that includes Mt. Stephen, the town of Field in the Kicking Horse Valley, and Emerald Lake. A long descent follows and we’re back to the Emerald Lake shoreline trail (12 miles). We’ll return to the Yoho Valley on Day 5, a day devoted to the many spectacular waterfalls of Yoho. Following a visit to Takakkaw Falls, which vies with Della Falls on Vancouver Island as Canada’s highest waterfall, we’ll hike upstream along the Yoho River toward Twin Falls. Waterfalls are everywhere— Angel’s Staircase, Point Lace, Laughing Falls—and then a final climb to Twin Falls (11 miles). We’ll spend a final night at the Kicking Horse and then hike leisurely to the glacier-green waters of Sherbrooke Lake above Kicking Horse Pass (5 miles).

ROCKY MOU NTA IN MA GIC

NORTHERN NEW MEXICO/ GREAT SAND DUNES OF COLORADO

Dates: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) June 20-25; Sept. 19-24 Assembly Point: Albuquerque (airline service to Albuquerque; Timberline van shuttles to Sand Dunes prior to tour and return to Albuquerque following tour) Tour Cost: $1,895 (includes all lodging, all meals, park entrance fees, Timberline van shuttles, leaders, tour maps & narratives)

Ours is a program predicated on exploring the incredible natural wonders preserved within the national park networks in both the U.S. and Canada. But, of the many magnificent landscapes that we embrace as a part of our program, perhaps none is more startling than that offered by Great Sand Dunes National Park, America’s newest national park. Nestled against the grand backdrop of the rugged Sangre De Cristo Mountains in southern Colorado, the dunes are the centerpiece in the surreal setting that defines the magnificence of the Rocky Mountain West. Distantly removed from any ocean or desert, the dunes present an incongruous contrast with the snowclad peaks that hover above. Created by the persistent winds that blow across the San Luis Valley, the dunes soar to an elevation of 750 feet and are the tallest dunes in North America. In the season ahead, we’ll again visit the Great Sand Dunes National Park in the context of a 6-day hiking program that also includes the high alpine country of the Sangre De Cristos in northern New Mexico. We’ve planned two dates—a late-spring date when Medano and Sand Creeks, swollen with snowmelt from the Sangre De Cristos, flow along the dunes’ perimeter as an essential ingredient in the ecosystems of the region, and a fall program highlighting the spectacular “changing of the aspen” in the surrounding high country.

We’ll assemble in Albuquerque early morning of Day 1 and begin our van shuttle north through the San Luis Valley into Colorado. We’ll pause along the way, midway between Albuquerque and Santa Fe, for a visit to amazing Tent Rocks. We’ll hike among the striking sandstone spires (4 miles) and then resume our shuttle to Great Sand Dunes National Park. We’ll spend our first two nights at the Sand Dunes Lodge and hike into the Sangre De Cristos the next morning. We’re headed to the summit of Mosca Pass (9,751'), a moderate hike that showcases the many life zones embraced within the park (7 miles). We’re up at dawn on Day 3 and in the cool early morning, before breakfast, we’re off to play in the sand, if climbing the 750-foot High Dune can be characterized as playing. We’ll return to the lodge for that well-earned breakfast and then head south to Taos and a visit to the historic Taos Pueblo that afternoon. We’ll overnight at the El Pueblo Lodge in the heart of Taos. Day 4, we’ll challenge Gold Hill, New Mexico’s third tallest peak at 12,711'. Far less traveled than nearby Wheeler Peak, Gold Hill commands views no less spectacular than Wheeler’s. Several of the mighty “fourteeners” of Colorado line the northern horizon while Wheeler looms to the south (11 miles). On Day 5, we’re headed north of Questa to the Rio Grande Gorge Recreation Area. We’ll descend into the gorge overlooking the confluence of the Rio Grande and Red Rivers. We’ll hike to that confluence and then along the Rio Grande before climbing from the gorge to return to our trailhead (8 miles). Following a final overnight in Taos, we’ll return to the Taos Ski Valley and hike to beautiful Williams Lake on the slopes of Mt. Wheeler (5 miles) prior to our return to Albuquerque.

YELLOWSTONE /GRANDTETONS

Dates: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) July 18-23; Aug. 29-Sept. 3 Assembly Point: Jackson Hole (airline service to Jackson; Timberline van shuttle to and from Jackson prior to and following tour) Tour Cost: $2,095 (includes all lodging, all meals, park entrance fees, shuttles prior to and following tour, leaders, trail maps & narratives)

Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, long regarded as the crown jewels among our national parks and a focal point for us since our earliest days, continues to be an integral component in our hiking program. Our 6-day Yellowstone/Tetons Hike has been structured to capture not only the clearly recognized natural beauty of the Yellowstone Country, but the incredible diversity of this region. Our program assembles in Jackson Hole early morning of Day 1 and we’ll van shuttle to Yellowstone. Along the way, we’ll visit Kebler Cascades and hike to Lone Star Geyser, hopefully timed to capture an eruption of this backcountry gem (5 miles). It’s then on to Old Faithful where we’ll explore the fascinating thermal features that surround the Inn, including the famous Old Faithful Geyser itself. Day 2, we’re off on a 13-mile hike along the Fairy Creek Trail as it meanders through meadows that are prime feeding habitats for bison and elk herds. We’ll hike to Mystic Falls and Imperial Geyser, one of the park’s most active and dramatic thermal features, and then on to Fairy Falls, whose 300-foot drop is

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES



2010


among Yellowstone’s highest. The Mystic/Fairy Falls Trail additionally offers substantial testimony to the progressive regeneration of the Yellowstone forests that were decimated by the fires of 1988. We’ll leave Old Faithful early morning of Day 3 and head to the summit of Dunraven Pass and the Mt. Washburn trailhead. As you might have guessed, we’re headed to Washburn’s awesome 10,243’ summit (6 miles). Following our encounter with Washburn, we’ll descend to Canyon Village and devote much of the afternoon to the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone as we hike along the rim to the various viewpoints of the Upper and Lower Falls. From Canyon, we’ll head to Grand Teton and the beautiful Jackson Lake Lodge, our home for the final three evenings. Early-morning of Day 4, we’ll hike Death Canyon above Phelps Lake with its spectacular views of the majestic, snowclad spires of the Teton Range (8 miles). Perhaps the most spectacular and challenging hike of the program is planned for Day 5. We’ll cross Jenny Lake by boat and follow the popular trail to Hidden Falls. The adventure begins beyond the falls as we begin a 2,000-foot climb to Lake Solitude in the heart of the magnificent Tetons. If you’re awed by the beauty of the Tetons from the valley below, you won’t believe that which awaits you along the trail to Solitude–a hike that many consider to be the quintessential Teton experience (14 miles). We’ll spend a farewell evening at the Jackson Lake Lodge, hike leisurely to Bradley and Taggert Lakes the following day before returning to Jackson where our program concludes mid-afternoon.

GLA CIE R PAR K/ WA T ER TON L AK ES

Dates: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) July 25-30; Aug. 22-27 Assembly Point: Kalispell, MT (airline service to Kalispell; Timberline van shuttles from Kalispell to Waterton prior to tour and from Glacier to Kalispell following tour) Tour Cost: $2,095 (all lodging, all meals, park entrance fees, transfers, leaders, trail maps & narratives) If we’ve learned anything in the course of our many years of cycling in Glacier and Waterton, it’s that the cyclist experiences only a hint of this region’s alpine beauty. Glacier’s “frontcountry” that is accessible by road is spectacular, but pales in comparison with its vast backcountry. It’s the hiker who will have the opportunity to capture this greater essence of the park. In the season ahead, we’ve planned what we believe to be an extraordinary 6-day program that explores the alpine magic and magnificent backcountry of Glacier and Waterton Parks. We restructured this program last season by joining Waterton with Glacier, rather than staging separate hikes in each park. Glacier and Waterton share a common ecosystem; their separation by national boundaries is artificial. We’ve selected what we long have considered to be the best day hikes in each park as the components of what we now believe will be the most exciting program offered in this region. Glacier/Waterton assembles in Kalispell and we’ll provide a van shuttle to Waterton early morning of Day 1. We’ll arrive in Waterton early enough not only to explore the Waterton townsite but also to hike above the town to beautiful Bertha Falls (5 miles). We’ll spend our first of two overnights at the luxuri-

2010



ous Lodge at Waterton and then head for Cameron Lake well above the village early the following morning. We’ll hike along the Cameron lakeshore, climb gently to Summit Lake, and then more seriously as we emerge from the trees on our approach to the rugged crest of Carthew Ridge. The views of the snowclad summits of Mt. Alderson and Carthew are magnificent as we begin our descent to Alderson Lake, and ultimately back to the townsite (12 miles). Crypt Lake is considered by many to be the finest dayhike in all of the Canadian Rockies and that’s our plan for Day 3. We’ll travel across Waterton Lake by boat and immediately begin a steady ascent above the lake. We’ll pass Twin Falls, emerge from the trees and enjoy magnificent open vistas all the way to Crypt Lake. The final approach to the lake is memorable and includes a scramble through a tunnel and beyond to the glacial amphitheater in which the lake is nestled (11 miles). Later that afternoon, we’ll van shuttle back across the border to St. Mary Resort, where we’ll spend the evening. We’ll enter Glacier Park on Day 4 as we shuttle to Logan Pass atop Going-to-the-Sun Road early the following morning. We’ll hike the magnificent Highline Trail from Logan Pass along the Garden Wall and the West Face of the Continental Divide to the Granite Chalet in one of the most incredibly beautiful high-alpine settings to be found anywhere. Another short gentle climb and we’re atop the Swiftcurrent Lookout, with a 360-degree panoramic view of the glacier-carved rockscape. We’ll then descend below Swiftcurrent Pass into the Many Glacier drainage, passing a series of highalpine lakes linked by magnificent waterfalls as we head to the Many Glacier Hotel where we’ll spend our next two nights (13 miles). We’ll hike to Grinnell Glacier on Day 5 from the Swiftcurrent trailhead. We’ll walk along Lake Josephine to Mt. Grinnell, climb high above Grinnell Lake and Grinnell Falls, and ultimately to Upper Grinnell Lake and the Glacier itself (9 miles). Our destination for our final day is stunning Iceberg Lake, a 9-mile hike through meadows ablaze with wildflowers beyond Ptarmigan Falls to the glacial cirque where we’ll find the lake nestled in the shadow of Iceberg Peak. Floating on the lake’s surface are the startling ice formations for which the lake is named. Following this full day’s hike, we’ll return to Kalispell late afternoon.

beginnings. But for us, let there be no doubt, Beartooth is without equal—it is the best! Situated northeast of the Northeast Entrance to Yellowstone National Park, the Beartooths, for the most part, are contained within the vast AbsarokaBeartooth Wilderness. The rugged terrain, high elevations and somewhat remote location are factors that conspire to preserve the pristine quality of this region. Our program will assemble in Red Lodge, eastern gateway to the Beartooths, mid-morning on Day 1 and we’ll provide a short van shuttle from Billings. We’ll hike along the Lake Fork of Rock Creek to Broadwater Lake and then head for Rock Creek Resort, where we’ll spend our first of three overnights (7 miles). On Day 2, we’ll shuttle along the West Fork of Rock Creek for an engaging 9-mile introduction to the wilderness as we hike to Timberline Lake. The views from the lake are magnificent, including Timberline Glacier and 12,500' Silver Run Peak. Early morning of Day 3, we’re headed through Roscoe to the East Rosebud Trailhead for our trek along The Beaten Path, the 26-mile trans-wilderness trail that showcases the unspoiled beauty of the Beartooths. No, we’re not planning on the full 26mile course of The Beaten Path, but, rather, the first six-to-seven miles to magnificent Rimrock and Rainbow Lakes. This day’s adventure, though, does not end with our return to the trailhead. We’re headed for dinner at the incomparable Grizzly Bar in Roscoe, but be forewarned, some of last year’s guests have threatened to return this season if only to be part of another Grizzly Bar experience. On Day 4, we’ll climb moderately along the cascading West Fork of Rock Creek to beautiful Quinnebaugh Meadows, passing Calamity and Sentinel Falls along the way (10 miles). We’ll then shuttle over awesome Beartooth Pass on the famous Beartooth Highway to Cooke City, where we’ll spend our final two nights at the Alpine Lodge. Day 5, we’re headed for Beartooth Butte and a spectacular encounter with Beartooth High Lakes. Much of this 9-mile hike in the Beartooth high country is at or above timberline with breathtaking views of countless high alpine lakes and the dominating presence of Lonesome Mountain and famous Beartooth Butte. We’ll bid farewell to the magnificent Beartooths the following day as we hike leisurely to Island and Night Lakes (4 miles), re-visit Beartooth Pass and return to Billings.

T HE BE AR TOO TH S

Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) Aug. 22-27 Assembly Point: Red Lodge, MT (airline and bus service to Billings; Timberline van shuttle between Billings and Red Lodge prior to and following tour) Tour Cost: $1,995 (includes all lodging, all meals, shuttle between Billings and Red Lodge prior to and following tour, leaders, trail maps & narratives) From our earliest days, Beartooth Pass, straddling the rugged Montana/Wyoming border, has been the cornerstone of many of the cycling and hiking programs that we have developed in the Yellowstone Country. In so many ways, the Beartooths symbolize the concept of adventure that is the heart of our program. We are a group with an enormous appetite for high mountain adventure; we cherish each and every alpine encounter that we have embraced in our program since our earliest

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES

45


CO LO R AD O ’S R O C K Y M O U NT A I N PA R K Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) Sept. 12-17

Assembly Point: Boulder (airline, rail and bus service to Denver; bus or Timberline van shuttle between Denver and Boulder prior to and following tour) Tour Cost: $1,995 (all lodging, all meals, van shuttles, park entrance fees, leaders, trail maps & narratives) Rocky Mountain National Park is one of America’s great scenic treasures. Within its borders are some of the world’s most spectacular alpine features—towering above-timberline peaks that are snowclad year-round, countless lakes and beautiful mountain valleys. In so many ways, the park also is a celebration of Colorado, a state renowned for its high-mountain majesty, attributable in no small measure to the presence of 54 named summits exceeding 14,000 feet in elevation. We’ve chosen a September date for our Rocky Mountain Park adventure for two primary reasons. The park’s accessibility attracts substantial numbers of visitors during the peak summer period, visitors who vanish after Labor Day. Perhaps more importantly, autumn in Colorado is extraordinary. The changing aspen are magnificent; this is Colorado high-country gold at its best. And nowhere are the aspen more glorious in mid-September than in the high altitude setting within the park. Our program assembles in Boulder early morning of Day 1 and we’ll shuttle west into the high country to Brainard Lake, gateway to the Indian Peaks Wilderness. Our first hike climbs modestly above Brainard, reaching timberline rapidly. The climb intensifies as it courses through the alpine tundra with magnificent open views of the Great Plains to the east and the snowclad Indian Peaks to the west. Our destination is magnificent Mount Audubon, whose lofty summit promises views of two of Colorado’s most famous “fourteeners”—Mount Evans and Long’s Peak (7 miles). We’ll spend our first overnight at the Aspen Lodge and then head for the Wild Basin region of Rocky Mountain Park the following morning. From the Wild Basin trailhead, we’ll follow the cascading course of the North St. Vrain Creek, so wild that it appears to be one continuous waterfall throughout its entire length. Little wonder that this trail is considered one of Colorado’s best waterfall opportunities. We’ll hike initially to Calypso Cascade prior to our view of thundering Ouzel Fall. We’ll continue to a high ridge with outstanding views of Longs Peak and Mt. Meeker before we reach our destination of Ouzel Lake (10 miles). We’re then off to Estes Park, where we’ll spend the next two evenings at the Silver Moon. We’ll re-enter Rocky Mountain Park on Day 3 and hike from the Glacier Gorge trailhead, following Glacier Creek as it carves its course through the Gorge. Early into the hike, we’ll encounter thundering Alberta Falls and then its on to some of the park’s most renowned lakes. In rapid succession, we’ll climb to the Loch, rise beyond treeline to Timberline Falls, scramble up a ledge along the falls to Lake of Glass and beyond, finally reaching our destination—incredibly beautiful Sky Pond, nestled in the shadow of Powell and Taylor Peaks. The views of all that we passed are breathtaking as they unfold in a panoramic fantasy in the course of our descent (9 miles). Following a second night in Estes Park, we’ll

46

shuttle along Trail Ridge Road to a more moderate, but no less spectacular hike to Fern Lake. Initially, we’ll walk along the Big Thompson River to Fern Falls. A final mile and we’re at the lake with the rugged peaks of the Little Matterhorn and Notchtop as its dramatic backdrop (7.5 miles). It’s on to Grand Lake on the park’s western slope, where we’ll spend our final two overnights at the new Gateway Inn. On Day 5, we’ll challenge the East Inlet Trail that rises well above Grand Lake. Early into the hike, we’ll visit popular Adams Falls and then continue on to Lone Pine Lake. A final climb to a rocky ridge is rewarded with a magnificent view of the fiord-like Lake Verna, our turnaround point for this hike (14 miles). Following our final overnight in Grand Lake, we’ll shuttle back into the park to the Old Ute Trailhead at Poudre Lake and one final visit to the park’s vast alpine world above tree-line. We’ll hike from Poudre’s lakeshore through the fascinating rock spires and hanging gardens above the lake, emerge from the trees at timberline and continue on to Fall River Pass (5 miles). Following lunch in Estes Park, we’ll return to Boulder and Denver.

GRE A T NORT HWO ODS

T HE SU PE RI OR T RA I L

Date: (6 days, 5 nights; Sun-Fri) Sept. 19-24 Assembly Point: Duluth (airline service to Duluth; Timberline van transfers to and from airport) Tour Cost: $1,895 (all lodging, all meals, leaders, park entrance fees, transfers, tour maps & narratives) We’ve had our eye on Minnesota’s Superior Trail likely from the first moment that we became aware of its existence. In the course of our 28 years of doing these sort of things, we’ve had numerous flirtations with the Great Northwoods, including Lake Superior’s North Shore and the Arrowhead region of northern Minnesota. Many years ago, we cycled the North Shore to Grand Marais, climbed to the crest of the Sawtooth Ridge above the lake and beyond, and added a wilderness canoe adventure in the adjacent Boundary Waters. We ultimately mothballed that program but our passion for the raw and pristine beauty of Minnesota’s Arrowhead never wavered. The Superior Trail provided all the reason we needed to return to the Arrowhead Country. Conceived in the mid-1980’s as a through hiking

trail extending from Duluth to the Canadian border, often along the ridgeline overlooking Superior’s North Shore, the trail is complete and continuous from Two Harbors to the border, a distance of 205 miles. No, we’re not hiking the entire length of the Superior Trail. For the season ahead, our 6-day program will focus on selected segments, capturing much, though certainly not all of the trail’s scenic excitement. We’ll also strive to convey a significant sense of hiking an extended through trail that many believe rivals, if not surpasses in quality of experience, the better-known Appalachian and Pacific Crest Trails. We’ll assemble in Duluth early morning of Day 1 and van shuttle to Gooseberry Falls State Park, where we’ll join the Superior Trail. We’ll spend the better part of the day hiking along the meandering course of the Gooseberry River within the park with outstanding views of several dramatic waterfalls as the river plunges toward the lake (8 miles). We’ll spend our first of three overnights at the Grand Superior Lodge and return to the park and rejoin the trail the following morning. We’ll climb initially to the crest of Bread Loaf Ridge and continue along the ridge with its stunning views of Superior, descend to Split Rock River and spend the afternoon hiking along the river as it cascades over sheer red rock on its way to Superior (11 miles). Early morning of Day 3, we’ll shuttle to Silver Bay and rejoin the trail in time to enjoy one of its most challenging sections. Lots of up and down on this day, but count on some of the best views of Superior, adjacent bluffs and the dramatic High Falls of the Baptism River, as we hike Into and through Tettegouche State Park. On Day 4, we’ll hike from Cross River in Temperance River State Park, walk along the deep chasm through which the Temperance flows, and then scramble to the top of Carleton Peak, with its astounding views of Britton Peak and Raven’s Ridge above Tofte (11 miles). We’ll shuttle to Grand Marais where we’ll spend our final two nights at the Harbor Inn. Early morning of Day 5, we’re off to Cascade River State Park and we’ll hike from the park along the cascading waterfalls of Cascade River (8 miles). No early flights home on our final day because we just can’t resist one last adventure. We’re headed a few miles east of Grand Marais where we’ll rendezvous with the Devil Track River Trail. We’ll hike initially to the bridge that spans awesome Devil Track River Canyon, Minnesota’s deepest gorge, and beyond to the summit of Pincushion Mountain. The awesome views of Superior from Pincushion’s crest are an appropriate finale to an extraordinary week (10 miles). We’ll have a late lunch (early dinner?) in Grand Marais and return to Duluth.

TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES



2010


G E N E R A L I N FO R M A T I O N

DI S C O U NT S The following discounts apply to groups registering for the same tour: 4-7 persons—5%; 8 or more persons—10%. Persons registering for more than one tour during the course of a season qualify for 5% discounts applicable to each tour. “Returning vets” (i.e. those who have toured with Timberline in prior seasons) qualify for the following discounts: 1 prior tour—5%; 2 or more tours— 10%. Total applicable discounts may not exceed 10%. Note that appropriate discounts may be applied only when programs are booked directly with Timberline. 

CANCELLATIO NS AND REFUNDS In the event of cancellation by a participant, all monies paid toward a trip registration will be refunded with the exception of a $100 per person cancellation fee, provided that written notification of such cancellation is received by Timberline not later than 60 days prior to tour departure. In the event of cancellation less than 60 days, but more than 30 days prior to tour departure, only those funds in excess of the initial deposit will be refunded. No refunds will be granted for cancellations received less than 30 days prior to tour departure. No refund or discount will be granted for arriving late or leaving a tour prior to its conclusion. Timberline reserves the right to cancel any tour for which less than six persons have registered, provided that registrants are notified of such cancellation not less than 30 days prior to that tour’s departure. In the event of such cancellation, participants may transfer to another tour or receive a full refund at their option. Refunds constitute full settlement in the event of cancellation of a tour; Timberline is not responsible for non-refundable airfares. 

TOU R D EP A RT U RE A ND TE RM IN A T I ON All cycling tours depart from assembly locations early morning of Day 1. Guests should plan arrivals at assembly locations not later than the evening prior to tour departure. Note that pre-tour orientation dinners will be held on the evening prior to tour departure. Hiking programs assemble early morning of Day 1 and orientation dinners are planned for that first evening. Guests for hiking programs should plan their arrival at assembly locations not later than early-morning of Day 1 or, preferably, the evening prior to tour departure. Contact our office for the specific details that vary for each program. All tours will conclude by late afternoon of the final day, although times vary according to tour. If you plan to travel on the day the tour concludes, we recommend that you contact Timberline to determine whether a particular travel connection is workable. 

PR E -T O U R / P O S T-T O U R L O D GI N G Lodging for the nights prior to departure and following the tour’s conclusion is not included in the tour package cost. As a convenience for our guests, Timberline has blocked a number of rooms at a designated lodge for both pre-tour and post-tour nights for all tours. We can include you in these room blocks, but only upon request (see Registration Form). Payment for these rooms will be made directly by each guest to the lodge at the time of check-in. 

BICYCLE /HEL M ET R E N T A L S A bicycle that is properly conditioned is essential (for bicycle tours only). Bring your own bicycle or rent one of our triple chainring Specialized Allez touring or Sirrus hybrid (upright handlebars) road bikes. All rental bicycles are equipped with touring saddles, water bottles, toe clips, rear pannier rack and rack-top pack, at a cost of $125 per tour. We urge all cyclists to wear helmets, which are available for use at no charge. Rental bicycles and helmets will be available at all tour locations, but must be reserved in advance. 

INSUR ANCE Trip cancellation insurance provides reimbursement for non-refundable airfares and tour deposits should you have to cancel a tour due to personal or family illness or accident. That insurance also can provide reimbursement for non-refundable airfares should we cancel a tour. Insurance information will be included in your post-registration packet. 

RES ERV A T IO NS /D EP OS I TS /PA Y ME NT S Reservations can be made by completing the Registration Form in this brochure and mailing it to the address indicated on the form. Reservations must be accompanied by a deposit of $300 per person; full payment of the remaining balance must follow not later than 30 days prior to the tour’s departure. Timberline will also accept a reservation by telephone, fax or e-mail, and will hold space for 7 days pending the arrival of the Registration form and deposit. We will accept both Visa and Master Card for payment of deposits, but not for subsequent payments of remaining balances. Personal check, money orders or bank drafts are acceptable methods of payment for that remaining balance. 

2010



TIMBERLINE ADVENTURES

47


7975 E. Harvard #J Denver, Colorado 80231

Web Site: www.timbertours.com E-mail: timber@earthnet.net

(800)417-2453 (303)368-4418 Fax: (303)368-1651

Timberline 2010 Catalog  

Adventures biking and hiking across the North America

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you