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The Charolais Connection 124 Shannon Road Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 5B1 Ph. (306) 584-7937 • Fax (306) 546-3942 Home Page: http://www.charolaisbanner.com email: charolaisbanner@gmail.com ISSN 0824-1767 Manager/Publisher Helge By Managing Editor Candace By charolaisbanner@gmail.com @ByCandace

FEBRUARY 2019 • VOL. XXXVI, NO. 1

Production/Graphic Design Susan Penner charolais.susan@sasktel.net Web Design Dalyse Robertson pdmrobertson@gmail.com

From the Field ..........................................................................................8 Dans nos champs ....................................................................................10 Canadian Charolais Association ............................................................14 De L’Association de Charolais Canadien ................................................16 Profile – Star City Colony ........................................................................21 Herd Health ............................................................................................40 Charolais Success ....................................................................................46 Coccidiosis in Baby Calves and Weaned Calves ....................................52 Clostridial Diseases..................................................................................60 Industry Info ..........................................................................................64 CCYA News ..............................................................................................65 Calendar of Events ..................................................................................73 Index of Advertisers ................................................................................78

FIELDMEN: Alberta & British Columbia Craig Scott 14 Keown Close, Olds, AB T4H 0E7 Res. (403) 507-2258 • Fax (403) 507-2268 Cell (403) 651-9441 sbanner@telusplanet.net @craigscott222 Saskatchewan, Manitoba, USA & Eastern Canada Helge By 124 Shannon Rd., Regina, SK S4S 5B1 (306) 584-7937 • Fax (306) 546-3942 Cell (306) 536-4261 charolaisbanner@gmail.com @CharolaisBanner Jon Wright Cell (306) 807-8424 SUBSCRIPTIONS: $9.45 per year $25.20 – 3 years (Prices include 5% GST) The Charolais Connection is mailed to over 8,000 cattlemen nationwide. Those cattlemen include all purebred Charolais breeders, buyers of purebred Charolais bulls from the past six years and all subscribers to the Charolais Banner. No material contained in the Charolais Connection may be reprinted without the permission of the Charolais Banner. The publishers reserve the right to refuse any advertisements. The material produced in this publication is done so with the highest integrity, however, we assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. We are responsible for only the value of the advertisement.

On the cover…

Animals in the photographs in the Connection have not been altered by computer enhancement or mechanical methods according to the knowledge of the publisher.

Charcross steers at Star City Colony

Printed by Print West, Regina, Saskatchewan Publications Mail Agreement No. 40047726 Postage paid at Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

Photo: Helge By Design: Susan Penner

Postmaster: Please return undeliverable publications (covers only) to: Charolais Banner, 124 Shannon Road, Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 5B1, Canada. Published by the Charolais Banner, Regina, SK (3 times per year - February, March and Fall)

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POINTS TO PONDER

From the Field Helge By

We have come a long way in the Charolais breed in respect to calving ease in the past 30 years. I have heard one very true expression, “these aren’t your grandfather’s Charolais anymore.” The stigma that Charolais are hard calvers still lingers in some people’s minds, but the reality is that in many cases, they will calve as well or better than any other breed. The reason I bring this up is that our commercial breeder profiles in the next two issues of the Connection are producers that have been and will be using Charolais bulls on their heifers. Now I am not saying that you run out and buy the first low birth weight bull to put on your heifers, but by doing your research and utilizing EPD along with your eye, you can find very easy calving bulls to use. I also encourage you to talk with the purebred breeders to make sure you are buying something they feel comfortable recommending that doesn’t have a big birth weight animal close in the pedigree that can come up and bite you. In the past few years, I have bought several bulls for commercial producers to use on their heifers. They are doing it is so the calves from their first calvers can sell in the big packages along with the calves off their cows. Some are calving

the heifers a cycle earlier, so the calves have a bit more age, but it is working well for them. Uniform bigger packages of tan or silver calves have been topping the market consistently. On the world stage the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association did a great job working to get the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for TransPacific Partnership (CPTPP) ratified. With this, the tariffs on beef to Japan have dropped by 11 percent to 27.5 percent followed by further 1% declines each year to nine percent by 2033. This is important as Japan is our second-best beef customer. Exports add over $600 per head so it is significant. Sales to other Asian countries such as China, Vietnam, Philipines, Indonesia, Taiwan and Singapore are small but hopefully growing as well. Also starting this year the Canadian beef yield grades standards were updated to match those in the United States, who is our largest export market. We have had three yield grades and now we have five. The quality grades have not changed though. The original method used to predict lean yield came into effect in 1992 and was revised in 2001 when changes were made to reduce the minimum amount of backfat thickness. Currently a grader will estimate the lean yield after a carcass is given a

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quality grade of Prime, AAA, AA or A. A yield grade 1 Y1 is an estimated yield of 59 percent, a Y2 is an estimated yield of 54 to 58 per cent and anything under 53 percent is classed as a Y3. The US numbers are somewhat different as the USDA Yield Grade 1 is given to carcasses with an estimated lean yield of more than 52.3 percent. Yield Grade 2 is 50 to 52.3 percent; Yield Grade 3 is 47.7 to 50 percent; Yield Grade 4 is 45.4 to 47.7 percent and Yield Grade 5 is less that 45.4 percent. Complete information is on the Canadian Beef Grading Agency’s website at www.beefgradingagency.ca. Now I am off to do some more picturing for the spring bull sales. As we get into the bull sales, if Craig Scott, Jon Wright or I can be of any assistance, please don’t hesitate to give us a call. We are always happy to help in any way we can. All our Charolais Banner and Charolais Connection magazines are online for free at charolaisbanner.com, if you want to go back to past issues. We also try to keep the sale news very current on our homepage so check it out. And remember – the only thing more expensive than an expensive bull, is a cheap one that diminishes the value of an entire calf crop. Until next time, Helge


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POINTS À RÉFLÉCHIR

Dans nos champs Helge By

En trente ans, la race Charolais a fait d’énorme progrès pour ce qui est de la facilité des vêlages. L’expression: ‘Ce n’est pas les Charolais de ton grand-père’ a un ton bien vrai. Malgré ce progrès, notre race porte toujours cette cicatrice que les vêlages Charolais sont exigeant pour encore bien des gens. En réalité, nos vêlages sont, dans la plupart des cas, de la même facilité, ou mieux que bien d’autres races. La raison pour laquelle j’aborde ce sujet est le fait que le profil de certains producteurs commerciaux seront mis en page dans les deux prochaines publications du magazine Charolais Connection. Ces producteurs utilisent et continueront d’utiliser des taureaux Charolais sur leurs femelles. Ceci ne veut pas dire que vous devriez vous dépêcher à acquérir le premier taureau de qualité avec les indices EPD de poids à la naissance le plus bas, mais plutôt, de faire votre propre recherche visuelle en conjonction avec des données EPD en main. Il est possible de trouver le bon taureau, avec la bonne facilité de vêlage pour votre troupeau. Je vous encourage à discuter avec des producteurs pur-sang pour vous assurez d’être confortable avec votre achat. Il est important de garder un poids à la naissance raisonnable ainsi qu’une conformité semblable pour éviter une saison de vêlage pénible. Depuis plusieurs années, j’ai acheté des taureaux pour des éleveurs commerciaux utilisés sur leurs génisses. L’idée est de saillir ces taures avec leurs premier veau pour ensuite vendre en un lot vache-veau à l’encan. Certains de ces producteurs optent pour un vêlage un cycle plus tôt, pour obtenir un veau plus mature lors de la vente et cela fonctionne bien pour

eux. D’une manière ou d’une autre, les lots de veaux uniformes beiges ou gris rapportent toujours mieux aux encans. Sur la scène internationale, l’association Canadienne Cattleman à travailler très fort pour être inclus dans les négociations des droits de douanes de l’accord de partenariat transpacifique (PTPGP). Comme résultat, les droits de douanes sur le bœuf exporté au Japon à baissé de 11%, ce qui se rapporte cet indice à maintenant à 27.5%, avec une baisse additionnelle de 1% à chaque année pour rejoindre le taux de 9% d’ici 2033. Ceci est très important si on considère que le Japon est notre deuxième plus gros exportateur de bœuf et que chaque bête exporté représente des frais d’environ 600$. Les ventes dans les autres pays asiatique incluant la Chine, le Vietnam, la Philippine, l’Indonésie, Taïwan et Singapour sont moins importantes mais nous espérons plus de développement futur pour ces marchés. On débute l’année avec un nouveau classement du boeuf Canadien. Celuici sera maintenant identique à celui des États-Unis, qui est notre plus gros exportateur de boeuf. Nous passons d’un classement de trois à cinq niveaux sans changer la qualité de chaque niveaux. La méthode pour classer le rendement de la carcasse (sans gras) date de 1992 et a été révisée en 2001 lorsque plusieurs facteurs extérieurs voulaient la réduction du gras de dos. Présentement, un inspecteur classe le rendement de la carcasse avec un sceau de qualité allant de Prime, AAA, AA à A. Une carcasse au classement Y1 est estimée de donner un rendement de 59%ou plus, un classement de niveau Y2 apporterait

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de 54% à 58% de rendement et tout classement en dessous de 53% serait classé dans la catégorie Y3. Les données provenant des ÉtatsUnis sont toutefois différentes. Dans la catégorie Y1, le pourcentage de rendement doit être plus élevé que 52.3%. Pour se classer dans la catégorie Y2, le rendement de celle-ci doit se situer entre 50% et 52.3%, l’écart de 47.7% et 50% représente la catégorie Y3, un résultat entre 45.4% et 47.7% sera un classement de niveau Y4 et tout classement sous 45.4% de rendement est classé dans la catégorie Y5. Pour consulter les informations sur le web à propos des différents classements, veuillez consulter le site de l’Agence Canadienne du Classement du Boeuf au: www.beefgradingagency.ca/!lang/fr/ index.html. Je me prépare pour la saison des photos qui est signe du début de la saison des ventes de taureaux du printemps. En approchant cette saison, je vous offre l’aide de Craig Scott, Jon Wright et moi-même pour vous assister. N’hésitez pas à nous rejoindre. Nous sommes toujours heureux de vous aider. Tous les articles paru dans le magazine du Charolais Banner et Charolais Connection sont disponibles gratuitement sur le site www.charolaisbanner.com. Vous y trouverez aussi tous les détails sur les dernières ventes et leurs résultats. Allez jeter un coup d’oeil! Je vous laisse sur cette pensée: ‘La chose plus dispendieuse qu’un taureau dispendieux est un taureau de mauvaise qualité qui diminuera la valeur en entièreté de votre récolte de veaux.’ À la prochaine, Helge


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FROM THE CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION

CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION 2320, 41st Avenue NE, Calgary, AB T2E 6W8 403.250.9242 F 403.291.9324 www.charolais.com @canCharolais www.facebook.com/cdncharolais

PROVINCIAL REPRESENTATIVES: ALBERTA President: Stephen Cholak, Lamont Secretary: Jocelyn O’Neill, Innisfail SASKATCHEWAN President: Kelly Howe, Moose Jaw Secretary: Saskatchewan Livestock Assoc., Regina MANITOBA President: Hans Myrhe, Dauphin Secretary: Rae Trimble, Portage la Prairie ONTARIO President: Ryan Nesbitt, Nestleton Secretary: Doris Aitken, Mount Forest QUEBEC President: Mathieu Palerme, Gatineau Secretary: Chantal Raymond, Sainte-Eulalie MARITIMES President: Jason Ringuette, Bridgetown, NS Secretary: Nancy Milton, Nine Mile Creek, PEI STAFF: General Manager: MEL REEKIE Registry: SALLY STORCH French Membership: BERNARD DORE 514-910-4935 • bernarddore@videotron.ca EXECUTIVE: PRESIDENT: DARWIN ROSSO 78 325 4th Ave SW, Moose Jaw, SK S6H 5V2 • 306.693.2384 rosso.c@sasktel.net 1st VICE-PRESIDENT: MIKE ELDER Box 216, Coronach, SK S0H 0Z0 306.267.5655 C 306.267.7730 mjelder@sasktel.net 2nd VICE-PRES: KASEY PHILLIPS Box 420, Waskatenau, AB T0A 3P0 780.358.2360 C 780.656.6400 kphillips@mcsnet.ca PAST PRESIDENT: BRIAN COUGHLIN RR3 1012 Snake River Line, Cobden, ON K0J 1K0 • 613.646.9741 C 613.312.0270 bh.cornerview@gmail.com DIRECTORS: MATHIEU PALERME 814 Pink Rd., Gatineau, QC J9J 3N2 819.682.2723 C 819.213.3143 matpalerme@yahoo.ca ROGER MALONEY 2420 Jermyn Line Indian River, ON K0L 2B0 705.295.6439 C 705.761.7316 roger@mlcattleco.com SHAWN AIREY Box 639, Rivers, MB R0K 1X0 204.328.7704 C 204.724.8823 htacharolais@hotmail.com JIM OLSON Box 882, Portage la Prairie, MB R1N 3C3 204.252.3115 C 204.856.6357 lejcharolais@gmail.com ALLAN MARSHALL 65266 RG RD 33 Red Deer County, AB T4G 0N3 403.227.2594 C 403.588.5282 allan@futurefarms.ca LORNE LAKUSTA Box 37, Andrew, AB T0B 0C0 780.365.2079 C780.719.0264 spruceviewcharolais@gmail.com

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Does Your Bull Come With A Registration Certificate? Mel Reekie, General Manager

When you look around to replace and improve your bull battery, you seek a bull that is going to mate well with your cows and please your marketplace by providing a sound product. When you’re selling, a good bull is a SOLD bull. However, when you are buying you’ll probably look at calving ease, semen quality, sound feet and legs, performance (the list goes on) but do you also consider a Purebred Registration Certificate? Did your last bull purchase come with a Registration paper? The Animal Pedigree Act creates discipline and allows only one association to represent breeders of a breed, set rules for the registrations and certify the animals of said breed. The Canadian Charolais Association (CCA) is incorporated under the Animal Pedigree Act (APA) and represents breeders throughout the country as the official breed registry for Charolais cattle in Canada. The APA provides the enabling legal framework ensuring that: • The Association verifies the correct pedigree information by applying consistent rules for all members • The breed association and breeder stand behind the quality of information represented on the certificate • An animal with a registration paper is genetically stable • Breed improvement measures are being completed providing sustainability and value • Those who raise and purchase purebred stock are protected As such, the CCA administers their own business and affairs but are bound by their by-laws as approved by the members; in doing so the CCA also respects the APA

by abiding and seeking ministerial approval. What’s the significance of the Registration Certificate? A Registration paper from the Canadian Charolais Association provides value; it’s recognized around the globe as representing integrity, traceability and a guarantee of the product. Registration and identification are cornerstones to the association. The CCA collects performance data and monitors desirable traits for overall breed improvement made possible through maintained and detailed pedigrees. Breeders and Purchasers are protected. The public cannot legally be deceived with a false registration paper [APA Section 63 (2)]. As well, it is an offence and legal action can be pursued for any person who knowingly sells an animal in a manner that creates an erroneous impression that the animal is registered or is eligible to be registered [APA Section 64 (g)]. The old adage Knowledge is Power certainly applies to the purebred breeder. As a breeder and member of the breed association they have contributed a lot of time, effort and information leading to genetic progress to not only their own herd but also the Canadian herd. Without data there’s no comparison, without comparison there’s no improvement and ultimately without improvement the future isn’t so bright when you’re not optimizing genetic potential. Before you sign the cheque, ask for that Registration Certificate and ensure that your herd will benefit. For more information contact the Canadian Charolais Association 403.250.9242 or www.charolais.com

www.charolais.com Charolais Connection • February 2019


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DE LA CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION CANADIENNE

CANADIAN CHAROLAIS ASSOCIATION 2320, 41st Avenue NE, Calgary, AB T2E 6W8 403.250.9242 F 403.291.9324 www.charolais.com @canCharolais

Votre taureau est-il enregistré? Mel Reekie, directeur général

www.facebook.com/cdncharolais

PROVINCIAUX REPRÉSENTANTS: ALBERTA Président: Stephen Cholak, Lamont Secrétaire: Jocelyn O’Neill, Innisfail SASKATCHEWAN Président: Kelly Howe, Moose Jaw Secrétaire: Sask. Livestock Assoc., Regina MANITOBA Président: Hans Myrhe, Dauphin Secrétaire: Rae Trimble, Portage la Prairie ONTARIO Président: Ryan Nesbitt, Nestleton Secrétaire: Doris Aitken, Mount Forest QUEBEC Président: Mathieu Palerme, Gatineau Secrétaire: Chantal Raymond, Sainte-Eulalie MARITIMES Président: Jason Ringuette, Bridgetown, NS Secrétaire: Nancy Milton, Nine Mile Creek, PEI PERSONNEL: Directeur général: MEL REEKIE Registry: SALLY STORCH Composition française: BERNARD DORE 514.910.4935 • bernarddore@videotron.ca EXÉCUTIF: PRÉSIDENT: DARWIN ROSSO 78 325 4th Ave SW, Moose Jaw, SK S6H 5V2 • 306.693.2384 rosso.c@sasktel.net 1er VICE- PRÉSIDENT: MIKE ELDER Box 216, Coronach, SK S0H 0Z0 306.267.5655 C 306.267.7730 mjelder@sasktel.net 2e VICE- PRÉSIDENT: KASEY PHILLIPS Box 420, Waskatenau, AB T0A 3P0 780.358.2360 C 780.656.6400 kphillips@mcsnet.ca ANCIEN PRÉSIDENT: BRIAN COUGHLIN RR3 1012 Snake River Line, Cobden, ON K0J 1K0 • 613.646.9741 C613.312.0270 bh.cornerview@gmail.com ADMINISTRATION: MATHIEU PALERME 814 Pink Rd., Gatineau, QC J9J 3N2 819.682.2723 C 819.213.3143 matpalerme@yahoo.ca ROGER MALONEY 2420 Jermyn Line Indian River, ON K0L 2B0 705.295.6439 C 705.761.7316 roger@mlcattleco.com SHAWN AIREY Box 639, Rivers, MB R0K 1X0 204.328.7704 C 204.724.8823 htacharolais@hotmail.com JIM OLSON Box 882, Portage la Prairie, MB R1N 3C3 204.252.3115 C 204.856.6357 lejcharolais@gmail.com ALLAN MARSHALL 65266 RG RD 33 Red Deer County, AB T4G 0N3 403.227.2594 C 403.588.5282 allan@futurefarms.ca LORNE LAKUSTA Box 37, Andrew, AB T0B 0C0 780.365.2079 C780.719.0264 spruceviewcharolais@gmail.com

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Lorsque vous êtes à la recherche d’un taureau, certainement que vous cherchez un géniteur qui améliora votre cheptel et produira des veaux qui répondent à la demande du marché. Vous considérez aussi une longue liste d’attributs tels que la facilité de vêlage, la qualité de la semence, la conformation, la performance etc., mais est-ce que votre liste de demandes inclus également un certificat d’enregistrement? Achetez-vous des taureaux avec ou sans un papier d'enregistrement ? La Loi sur la généalogie des animaux (LGA) crée la discipline et ne permet qu'une seule association par race pour représenter les éleveurs. L’association de race a le pouvoir de définir ses règles d'enregistrements et certifier les animaux de sa race respective selon les directives de ses membres. L'Association canadienne Charolais (ACC) est constituée en vertu de La Loi sur la généalogie des animaux et représente tous les éleveurs du pays en tant que le registre officiel de la race charolaise au Canada. La Loi sur la généalogie des animaux fournit le cadre juridique propice afin de veiller à ce que : • L'Association vérifie l'information généalogique correcte en appliquant des règles cohérentes pour tous les membres • L'association de race et l'éleveur de l’animal garantissent la qualité de l'information représentée sur le certificat • L’animal muni d’un papier d'enregistrement est génétiquement stable. • Des mesures d'amélioration de race sont entreprises assurant une préservation • Les éleveurs d’animaux pur-sang sont protégés Par conséquent, l’ACC administre ses propres activités et ses affaires, mais est liée par des règlements tels qu'approuvés par ses membres tout en respectant également la Loi sur la généalogie des animaux selon l'approbation ministérielle.

Quelle est la signification du certificat d’enregistrement ? Un papier d'enregistrement émis par l’Association Canadienne Charolais fournit de la valeur ; le papier confirme une intégrité qui est reconnu dans le monde entier, pour sa traçabilité et une garantie du produit. L’enregistrement et l’identification de nos animaux sont les fondations de l'association. L’ACC recueille des données de performance afin que les caractères désirables soient maintenus et certains d’autres soient améliorés pour l’avancement global de la race grâce à la connaissance des lignées généalogiques du herdbook. Ainsi les éleveurs et les acheteurs sont protégés. Le public ne peut légalement être trompé avec un papier de fausse inscription [LGA Section 63 (2)]. Il est un délit pouvant enchainer une action justicière envers toute personne qui délibérément, vend un animal d'une manière qui crée une fausse impression que l'animal est enregistré ou est susceptible d'être enregistré [LGA Section 64 (g)]. Le vieil adage Le vrai pouvoir, c'est la connaissance s'applique certainement à l'éleveur de pur-sang. Les éleveurs membre de l'association de race, ont contribué beaucoup de temps et d’efforts ainsi que des informations conduisant à des progrès génétiques non seulement bénéficiant leur propre troupeau, mais le cheptel canadien en général. Sans données, il n'y a aucune comparaison, sans comparaison il n'y a aucune amélioration et sans amélioration quel avenir avons-nous sur le plan de potentiel génétique? Avant de signer le chèque pour payer votre nouveau taureau, exigez son certificat d'enregistrement et faites en sorte que votre troupeau en bénéficiera. Pour plus d'informations, veuillez contacter l'Association Charolais 403.250.9242 or www.charolais.com

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HERD HEALTH

Improper Cervical Dilation at Calving Roy Lewis, DVM

One of the hardest calving dilemmas you face as producers, or we face as veterinarians, is improper cervical dilation. When going through the stages of labor before expulsion of the fetus, the cervix relaxes, softens and opens up essentially as wide as the vagina to allow the fetus to enter the vaginal vault. When this does not happen normally, or is delayed, the health of the fetus and dam may be in jeopardy. If one were to examine a close-toterm pregnancy the cervix is to the front of the vagina and the opening is normally about one to two fingers wide. It would be like sticking your finger in a doughnut. So when a cow is straining somewhat and you do a vaginal exam and find this condition, what is your next step? First off, I hope you have fully cleaned the cow’s back end, used OB sleeves and an approved lubricant or surgical soap. The very act of examining her may initiate a small degree of straining that may look like she’s calving, so be gentle. What I do in these situations, if I think a cow is calving and find a closed cervix, is re-examine her a couple hours later. If I find the cervical opening has increased that tells me calving is progressing. If there is no change you now have to decide if this is a false alarm or an early indication that there is a problem. For example, her vagina could be prolapsing or she is strainng lots from kidney infection. At this juncture, some vets may have you give the cow more time and some may opt to perform a caesarian section. Each case is different. Check to make sure there is normal colostrum in the udder indicating she is at or very near her due date. Another issue involves a cervix that will only open wide enough to get the

front two legs through. This is not common but does require different interventions depending on how it is progressing. In a normal birth the cervix is right out of the way when we get to the expulsion of the fetus. When it isn’t, we have a dystocia, and the veterinarian will first try to dilate the cervix manually to facilitate delivery. If the nose and head can be partially delivered a slight amount of traction may help dilate the cervix fully. This is where one has to be really careful as too much traction is both stressful on the calf and may rip the cervix causing excessive bleeding and possibly be fatal to the cow. If no progress is made, a caesarian section is performed to get a live calf, and save the cow but she should be marked for shipping the next year. Usually the fetal membranes can be passed through a partially opened cervix. Some of these cows with a partially opened cervix may have had a difficult calving the year before which caused some damage to the cervix . Even though there is a lot of room in the pelvis and vaginal opening, c-sections are the only solution for a cervix that won’t dilate. As mentioned, a forced extraction through a partially open cervix puts both the cow and calf’s life in jeopardy so a c-section is a win-win solution most times. You can usually tell if the cervix will open with just some manual dilation. They are soft and supple and you make progress getting them to open more after 10 or 15 minutes. If the cervix has a hard fibrous feel no amount of time will get it to open up so jumping to a c-section hopefully will be in time to have a good result for cow and calf. There are a couple other instances where a partially closed cervix will

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be encountered. After correcting a torsed uterus your veterinarian may encounter a partially closed cervix . Because of the twist the cervix cannot fully dilate but upon correction it can generally be dilated by hand. There is a tendency to let it dilate on its own but I have done that and ran out of time resulting in a stillborn calf. Now I proceed to dilate the cervix manually to facilitate extraction. Generally these cervixes are soft and supple and in my experience easy to dilate by putting pressure along the outside of the cervical ring. The other condition is a delayed calving that results in death and an emphysematous fetus. This could be because of a malpresentation such as a breech birth where the cervix is opened, straining does not ensue, time runs out, the calf dies, bloats up and straining ensues. Often the cervix can start to close up, much as it would after a normal calving. These cases may require a fetotomy or partial fetotomy, in order to salvage the cow. Although infrequent partial cervical dilation does require serious intervention by either yourself or your veterinarian depending on your level of experience. Recognizing them is the first step. If you think a cow is in labor and no progress is being made don’t hesitate to do a vaginal exam, as improper cervical dilation may be a cause. As a producer you know your cows better than anyone, so if behavior around calving is not normal for a particular cow, a vaginal exam is a quick way to rule in or out a problem, false alarm or find a cow that simply needs more time. By recognizing issues early, you have the time to intervene, and provide a favorable outcome. Have a great 2019 calving season everyone.


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CHAROLAI S

Success

Charolais Sweep Supreme at The Royal

MVY Caous 64D, sired by TR PZC Mr Turton 0794 ET, owned by Rollin’ Acres Charolais, Shelburne, Dudgeon-Snobelen Land & Cattle, Ripley & McAvoy Charolais, Arelee, SK was named Supreme Champion Bull at the 2018 The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, November 4th in Toronto, ON.

Winning the Supreme Champion Female honours over all breeds was CRG Princess Valentine 42D, sired by TR PZC Mr Turton 0794 ET and her bull calf sired by M & M Outsider 4003 PLD, exhibited by Oattes Cattle Co, Cobden. This female was also Supreme at Renfrew Fair.

Charcross Steers Sweep Dauphin 4-H

Porter Fox, of Eddystone Combined Club, won Grand Champion steer at the Dauphin (MB) 4-H show and sale June 28th. The steer weighed 1,487 lb and sold for $2.40/lb to Dauphin & Ste Rose Vet Clinic.

Reserve Grand Champion steer as judged by Michael Hunter was exhibited by Nia Devonald of the Rorketon Variety 4-H Club. This steer weighed 1,369 lb and sold for $1.90/lb to Ste Rose Concrete. The average price of the 22 steers was $2.20/lb.

Charcross Steer Reserve at Okanagan Show Below:Mariah Mitchell, Armstrong, BC had the Reserve Grand Champion Steer at the Okanagan Stock Show and Sale in Armstrong in July with a Charcross steer. Judged by Jim & Leona Wright of Chilliwack the steer weighed 1,350 lb and sold for $6.50/lb to Associated Ready Mix, Armstrong.

Charcross Steer Wins Maple Creek 4-H Right: Will Banford, Eastend, SK had Grand Champion Steer over 50 others at the District 10 Regional 4-H show June 12th in Maple Creek. The steer judged by BJ Scheirlinck weighed 1,564 lb and sold for $4/lb to Instow Reclamation, Shaunavon and Hidden Valley Agra, Eastend.

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MANAGEMENT

Coccidiosis in Baby Calves and Weaned Calves Heather Smith Thomas

This intestinal disease is caused by protozoa, picked up by the calf from the environment. Most cattle have encountered these protozoa and have developed some immunity, but may continue to shed a few oocytes in their feces—which can then contaminate feed or water and be picked up by other cattle. Calves are most vulnerable to the disease because they don’t yet have much immunity. If they ingest a high number of protozoa in a dirty environment they may break with coccidiosis. Dr. James Hawkins (part-time consultant for Merial) in Jackson, Mississippi says cattle eventually develop a good immune response, but this takes time. “Situations in which we see serious disease with coccidiosis are where young calves are kept in a feed yard or small pen rather than out on pasture. If there are high numbers of calves in a small area this makes it worse because the contamination is greater. The people who run into problems with calves are usually backgrounders who buy small calves from many different sources and put them together— keeping them for 90 days or less and then reselling them. Then they buy another group, putting the new ones in the same facility,” he says. The number of coccidia organisms in these facilities builds up to high levels. “All cattle are infected. This parasite is a normal inhabitant of the intestines in a healthy animal. Situations where we run into problems are when young calves haven’t had time to develop an immune response and are exposed to high levels of infection from a contaminated environment. They are most vulnerable when stressed, because stress tends to suppress their normal immune response. If calves have already been exposed for a couple months, you would consider them to be immune—maybe not completely because there is no such

thing as complete immunity—yet if those animals get highly stressed for some reason, they might show signs of coccidiosis,” Hawkins says. Cold weather, wet weather or hot weather can be a stress that hinders their immune system. Nutritional stress can also be a factor, as many cattle experienced during the last several years of drought in many parts of the country. “We’ve seen more problems in young cattle coming from those areas. Over the past 10 years or more, we’ve also seen more problems in pastured cattle with coccidiosis—which we wouldn’t normally expect,” he says. Since cattle normally develop a good immune response, the goal is to allow them to become exposed to coccidia, but at a low enough level that they don’t get sick. Good management plays a big role. “If there are any other diseases that come along and affect the herd—such as IBR, BVD, PI3, etc.—this can open the way for coccidiosis. If young cattle get sick, their immune system is suppressed, so they get coccidiosis, too,” he says. “If you see coccidiosis in a group of calves, there is usually something else there that’s causing them to be more vulnerable, either severe stress, parasites, or some other disease. Taking a group of calves off the cows, shipping them somewhere else and introducing them to a bunch of other calves from different places is enough stress to throw them into a problem,” he explains. “This is why we need everything else taken care of, health-wise. We need good parasite control, a good vaccination program, and need to make sure the calves have good nutrition. When shipping calves or putting a bunch together, you don’t want them to get severely dehydrated or go without food for too long. All these little things can add up to a problem,” says Hawkins. Some cattle seem more susceptible.

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“We have seen problems in nursing calves on pasture, or young calves getting coccidiosis in situations where we might not expect it, and we are not sure why,” says Hawkins. It might be that some cattle have less ability to mount a strong immune response. “We have selectively bred for better cattle in regard to productivity and ability to gain weight quickly,” he explains. By focusing on a few desired traits, we inadvertently bred away some of their normal, innate immune response. Immune factors are inherent in their genetics, and we have overlooked this in our selection process. Before we domesticated cattle they were shaped by evolutionary factors and survival of the fittest. The hardy ones with the strongest immune responses survived. Today, animals are selectively bred for certain traits, using inbreeding and line-breeding to produce animals that consistently excel in those traits, but they are less hardy. Cattle with more diverse genetics are generally healthier than purebreds. “If a variety of calves are run under the same conditions, normally the purebred calves get sick first,” says Hawkins. The crossbred calves benefit from heterosis and a stronger immune system and more solid immune response when challenged. “There is no question that in our pure breeds we have bred away from some of the characteristics that make cattle hardy. This is even more of a problem in purebred dairy cattle because they have been selectively bred for just one trait—milk production. We see coccidiosis a lot in young dairy calves if they are stressed. Most purebred cattle (beef or dairy) are managed better than commercial cattle and they stay healthy, but there are some stresses, like weather, that we don’t have control over. It is important to understand that coccidiosis is a

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disease problem that is not always management related.” Sometimes people choose to manage cattle in situations where they are more likely to get coccidiosis just because it’s more efficient. In a purebred herd, because they are more valuable, cattle may be kept more confined for observation during calving, for instance. “Some management problems are inherent in the fact that it’s the most efficient way to raise/feed them and you make more money doing it that way, but this increases likelihood of coccidiosis. This is why some people use a coccidiosis product as preventative treatment—as a routine part of their animal health program,” says Hawkins. Treatment/Control “The good news is that we have several products that can help us deal with an outbreak situation. Amprolium (Corid) is an old product that’s been around a long time but still considered the best for treating coccidiosis, especially if calves have clinical signs. If calves are visibly sick or have diarrhea—especially bloody diarrhea—Corid is a good product for treatment,” he says. It is also very good for prevention. “It’s not 100% effective but you don’t want it to be. You want calves to get a low level of infection, which allows them to build an immune response— just like vaccinating. Some ranchers have had enough experience in certain situations that they know they are going to have problems, perhaps when it gets cold in November or December, or when it starts to rain a lot. It depends on the local environment and whatever stresses the calves.” This would be the time to mass treat a group of calves, to prevent clinical disease. “Some of the old-timers talk about coccidia being associated with blackbirds. When it gets cold, blackbirds start migrating and come into feedlots and backgrounding lots, sometimes in massive numbers, and eat the feed. This time of year is when calves are likely to get coccidiosis, and many people thought they got it from the blackbirds. Birds do have coccidia but it’s a different species (coccidia are host-

specific) and they can’t spread it to cattle,” says Hawkins. The blackbird migrations coincide with the time of year when calves are stressed with cold weather. “There are several products that work as preventatives. These can be fed at a low level during a period when you would expect to have problems,” he says. This might be the case if you had to wean calves during bad weather and the facilities are contaminated. If you’ve had experience in the past with this problem under these conditions, it is wise to use a preventative treatment before you see any problems. “Conditions may be very different for different producers. Someone who is buying a lot of calves in Florida may have the worst time of year during a hot, dry summer when calves are stressed by heat and dust. It can be totally different in different environments. You have to know what stresses the calves,” he says. In some climates it might be wet, sloppy weather during March and April for baby calves. Sometimes dry, windy weather with dust puts cattle at risk for respiratory disease and they become vulnerable to other problems; the immune system is compromised and they get coccidiosis. “It’s a complicated disease that shows up occasionally in unexpected environments. But it’s something most people have learned to deal with if they do the same things over and over. They know when to expect this problem. Producers who have experienced coccidiosis often just use Corid as a routine part of management. Every time they get in a new group of calves, they’ll give those calves 21 days or more of preventive level of Corid,” says Hawkins. “The label for Corid as a preventative is 21 days at half the dose of the treatment dose (which is given for 5 days). Some people use the preventative dose longer than 21 days because they’ve found that in their situation, in their environment, some calves will still break with coccidiosis after the 21 days,” he says. Producers have to figure out what works best for

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their own situation. “It really doesn’t say on the label that if you use the treatment dose (for 5 days) that you should follow that with the lower (preventative) dose for 3 weeks, but it is often helpful, to prevent re-infection. Many producers don’t have the option of moving calves to a cleaner area, and they don’t want to get into a situation of getting them to the point where they are doing better and then breaking with diarrhea again, because of the overwhelming levels of coccidia and re-infection.” So they often follow the treatment dose with 3 weeks of the low-level dose, just to get the calves past their vulnerability while they are building some immunity. There is data to show that coccidiosis is often sub-clinical, and even healthy-looking calves may have lower weight gains. “Even before you see evidence of coccidiosis, it can affect appetite and feed consumption, and rate of gain. This won’t occur in every situation, but several feed trials have shown that when people use a preventative treatment as a routine part of management with weaned calves, most groups of calves will gain significantly better with the treatment than the calves which are not treated,” he says. Using a product to prevent coccidiosis more than pays for itself in better gains, but there is also the fact that without its use you might have some actual cases of disease. This would add to your costs, in treatment. “You don’t really know how much a coccidiosis product might actually help you, unless you are using an untreated control group, in the exact same conditions, to compare. There have been some trials that showed an advantage. Even though no sickness was observed in the untreated calves, the treated calves gained more weight,” he says. “We don’t recommend treating every group of calves that gets weaned, but if you know they will be weaned in stressful conditions, it’s a good practice. The more concentrated and confined the calves are, the more likely you are to have a problem.”


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MANAGEMENT

Clostridial Diseases Heather Smith Thomas

Several serious livestock diseases are caused by a group of bacteria called Clostridia. They have the ability to form a protective waxy covering in a dormant stage (spores) when exposed to adverse conditions such as heat or drying. These spores can remain alive almost indefinitely. Some live in soil for many years and infect animals later when ingested with feed, or when introduced into a wound. Spores can also exist within the bodies of animals in a latent state without causing disease, then suddenly come to life and multiply when conditions become favorable. Clostridia can produce deadly toxins that may kill the animal if they get into the bloodstream. The toxins of different types of Clostridia vary in their effects and the way they gain access to the bloodstream. These bacteria multiply in the absence of oxygen and release deadly toxins faster than the body can mount a defense (unless the animal was previously vaccinated), causing sudden death. Many Clostridia bacteria are found in the intestinal contents of normal animals (and humans) as part of the GI tract flora. They also exist in soil that contains manure. They cause disease in certain situations, as when diet or management changes produce an environment more favorable for swift multiplication. Since most of these bacteria are ever-present in the environment—and cattle are always exposed to them – the only way to protect cattle is by vaccination. “Blackleg is probably the most prevalent,” says John Campbell (Professor, and Head of the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, Saskatchewan). “The bacterial spores are everywhere. Clostridial diseases occur most often in young, unvaccinated cattle,” he

says. Older animals may have been exposed earlier in life (with low levels of bacteria) and developed resistance. “There are certain geographic regions where redwater is very common,” says Campbell. In regions with liver flukes, stockmen may have to vaccinate for redwater twice a year. Flukes damage the liver, enabling bacteria to gain entrance to these tissues. “Blackleg and malignant edema are very similar and we see these diseases quite often unless cattle are vaccinated,” says Campbell. There are 7 and 8-way vaccines combining protection against most of these diseases, including blackleg, redwater, malignant edema, black disease, enteroxemia (gut infection caused by C. perfringens types C and D). “There is one 8-way vaccine here in Canada, a Schering-Plough product, that includes tetanus,” says Campbell. All clostridial diseases can be deadly, but they are also unique in that they can be very effectively prevented by vaccination. Dr. Steve Hendrick, Coaldale Veterinary Clinic, Coaldale, Alberta (former professor at Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan) says clostridial diseases are not contagious in the usual sense, so they are different from what most producers are accustomed to dealing with. “We are used to diseases where one animal gets sick and can pass the disease directly to another. This is not the case with clostridial diseases. They are caused by spores that live happily in the environment for many years. The spores are resistant to heat, cold and any other harsh environmental conditions. We joke that these diseases are very happy, even living in the cold weather of Saskatchewan,” he says. “It just depends on whether or not the environment on your farm or ranch has been contaminated in the past. The spores can last a long time and cause disease many years later. In wet conditions we see more cases. We had wet weather last fall and a lot of

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snow this past winter, so clostridial diseases could potentially be a serious issue this year,” says Hendrick. “Dormant spores are brought up to the ground surface with the moisture. If we get some dry weather this year, spores will concentrate on the ground surface. They float on top of the water, and as the puddle dries up, they gradually concentrate on the surface. As cattle graze in low areas, or drink from shrinking puddles, they may pick up spores,” he explains. “With these diseases you usually don’t see sick animals. You generally go out to the pasture and find one or two animals dead. Some are brought in for treatment, but usually they die so quickly that you just find them dead,” he says. “Clinical signs, such as swelling in a muscle (typical of blackleg), particularly if there is no wound with it, may be difficult to notice. The animal ingested the spores, which eventually end up in the muscles. It’s usually a very fast-growing calf (one of your best animals) that’s affected. If the muscles don’t get enough oxygen, the spores proliferate in the muscle. Bruised tissue creates ideal conditions for spores to grow,” says Hendrick. “Many of the cattle we’ve looked at that died from blackleg also had

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infection around the lining of the heart,” says Campbell. “It can affect the muscle around the heart. These animals have heart lesions as well as muscle lesions,” he explains. Blackleg has been a serious problem in livestock (especially young, growing animals) for a long time. One of the first cattle vaccines created was for this disease. “Some of the clostridial vaccines have been developed in different countries, where there are different disease conditions. The big difference is the inclusion of tetanus in some of the combination vaccines. Producers here should be aware that tetanus is not included in all clostridial vaccines in North America,” says Hendrick. The single tetanus vaccines are only used in horses, and very expensive. “We’ve seen outbreaks of tetanus when people are banding bull calves at weaning time or when coming into a feedlot,” says Campbell. “We don’t see it so much in baby calves, but more in the larger calves. For these big calves, many people use banders. All clostridial organisms thrive in an anaerobic environment (without oxygen). The clamp against the testicles provides a perfect place for bacteria to grow. We’ve seen producers do this and get away without using tetanus vaccine year after year, and all of a sudden one year they have a large number of banded cattle develop tetanus a few weeks later,” he says. There are many clostridial diseases. “People might be aware of botulism or tetanus because humans get these, also. Unfortunately, we don’t have a cattle vaccine for botulism in Canada. But we can protect cattle against tetanus, blackleg, gas gangrene, malignant edema, etc. Some of those spores can get into the body through a wound, if it is contaminated with soil,” says Hendrick. “In other instances the animal ingests spores with feed and the spores get into the liver or muscles. Many people don’t realize that redwater disease starts with liver damage. In an area that has liver flukes, cattle are at risk for redwater. The difference between a 7-way and an 8-way vaccine is the inclusion of

redwater,” he explains. Calves are at risk for gut infection from Clostridium perfringens. “These clostridia can cause intestinal damage and severe hemorrhagic diarrhea,” he says. Calves may die suddenly if the gut damage allows bacterial toxins to seep through into the bloodstream. The animal quickly goes into shock and dies within a few hours. It’s often the biggest, fastest-growing calves that suddenly develop gut infection, often called enterotoxemia by ranchers. “Most cattle have clostridium perfringens in the GI tract. There are several different types, such as A, B, C and D. It’s common to find some of these types in the GI tract, without disease. This makes it more difficult to accurately diagnose a problem, but typically when a calf dies from this kind of infection there is very severe hemorrhagic enteritis—with bloody diarrhea due to extreme gut damage.” The animal may die so quickly, however, that there is no evidence of diarrhea. The clinical signs may be severe gut pain (the calf kicking at its belly or throwing itself on the ground) and then the calf goes into shock and dies. “The bacteria are normally found in the gut, and spores are passed in feces. If cows are passing some of the spores, they may pass even more when stressed at calving time. Depending on the ranch management, there may be more exposure for calves,” says Hendrick. Certain conditions within the gut also make a calf more likely to have a problem, such as when a calf has been off feed awhile and then loads up on a large amount of milk. This creates an ideal environment for certain types of C. perfringens to proliferate. Prevention is crucial. “The vaccine is relatively inexpensive—probably the cheapest one—and works very well, compared to some of the other vaccines. Efficacy of clostridial vaccines (even though they have multiple components) is great, giving good protection—as compared with some of the respiratory vaccines,” says Hendrick. “Clostridial vaccines have been in use for many years and have

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dramatically cut down the incidence of these diseases,” says Campbell. “I still see some cases, on farms where people try to save money and didn’t vaccinate. The disaster that can happen—especially with blackleg— can be tremendous. One farmer lost about half his calf crop to blackleg, dying at pasture,” says Campbell. There is no reason to not vaccinate for clostridial diseases. “It is an irritating vaccine, however, so you want to give it under the skin and not into the muscle,” says Campbell. Some animals react more adversely than others, developing swelling at the site. “The vaccine companies are working on trying to make these vaccines less irritating,” he says. “One challenge for people who calve on pasture later in the year is that they have to round up the calves at some point to vaccinate and make sure they get their first clostridial vaccine. In the more traditional setting, where ranchers calve in March and April, they gather and vaccinate cattle before they are turned out to summer pasture. It’s more challenging for people who calve later, out on summer pasture, to vaccinate calves at 1 or 2 months of age,” he says. “In other aspects of prevention, I try to promote proper disposal of the carcass when an animal dies,” says Hendrick. “This topic came to the forefront with anthrax, when people started asking what to do with dead animals. The clostridial diseases are no different. If you leave the carcass for scavengers to scatter, you are creating the same scenario as you would with anthrax. The bacteria create spores and contaminate the surrounding environment. These may create problems later—maybe not the next year, but possibly sometime in the future. The spores last forever, and may affect cattle many years from now,” he explains. “Everyone got worried about anthrax, and I’ve been amazed at the extent people will go to, burning carcasses and burying them—which is good. Yet if they find a dead calf and assume it was blackleg, they don’t seem to worry about it. They need to realize that these carcasses should also be properly disposed of,” he says.


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NEWS

Industry Info Menu Design Encourages Consumption Restaurant customers are more likely to choose a meat dish if vegetarian options have their own section on a menu, researchers at the London School of Economics report. The findings indicate that common practice of separating vegetarian dishes on a menu can reduce the proportions of people that choose them. The study found that when a chef features a vegetarian dish as a menu special, it also encourages restaurant patrons to order dishes containing meat. Computer Predicts Colour, Marbling Quality Scientists at North Dakota State University and the University of Arkansas have developed a computer

vision system (CVS) that uses artificial intelligence (AI) prediction model to objectively measure pork loin colour and marbling quality at online speeds in the processing plant. When compared to traditional scoring or measurement, the AI-boosted CVS achieved a more objective quality measurement with higher prediction accuracy at 92.5% for measured pork colour score and 75% for measured pork marbling score. Device Senses Spoilage, Signal Smartphone Scientists have developed a wireless tagging device that can send signals to smartphones warning consumers and food distributors when meat and other perishables have spoiled. Scientists from the University of Texas at Austin and Nanjing

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University in China have created a nanostructures, polymer-based gas sensor that can detect substances call biogenic amines (BAs), which give decomposing meat its odor. New Research Battling Superbugs A new technique called SAFIRE has been developed by the University of Colorado to fight antibiotic resistant superbugs. More than 23,000 people die annually in the United States from bacterial infections that have evolved to resist antibiotics. By screening for new small molecules with anti-microbial properties, the researchers found that the bacteria itself is not killed, but cellular machines are shut off which bacteria use to protect themselves from both antibiotic medications and the body’s own immune-boosting proteins.


CANADIAN CHAROLAIS YOUTH ASSOCIATION NEWS

Genetics Program Keegan Blehm, Vice President

I hope the New Year and calving are going well for everyone. Each spring the CCYA National Board runs a program for juniors that allows them to receive two free straws off semen from any bull in the Genex or Semex catalogues. The Genetics Program offers choice CCYA NATIONAL BOARD charolaisyouth@gmail.com President: Shelby Evans sle379@mail.usask.ca Vice-President: Keegan Blehm keegb34@yahoo.ca Treasurer: Tyson Black blackbern@hotmail.com Secretary: Raelynne Rosso littlerosso@hotmail.ca

of semen from industry leading bulls. The program encourages youth to take an active role in planning their breeding program and allows members to use genetics that would ordinarily be inaccessible. This program gives members a unique chance to add outstanding genetics to their herd. To qualify for the program, the member must be a Director: Bret Marshall blm5012@cesd73.ca Director: Lindsay Verwey Lindsay.verwey16@gmail.com Director: Reegan McLeod Reeganmc11@gmail.com Director: Bradley Fergus bradleyfergus3@gmail.com Ex-Officio: Shae-Lynn Evans evans32s@uregina.ca

2019 CCYA member, must fill out the application form, and list the registered animal that the semen will be used on. Keep an eye out for the application form and don’t miss this fantastic opportunity. Stay up to date with the CCYA by checking out our website: youth.charolais.com and our Facebook page. 2019 CCYA Conference & Show Exec. President: Dale Weinbender Vice-President: Shelby Evans Treasurer: Raelynne Rosso Secretary: Kylie Beck CCYA Provincial Advisors SK: Jill Debenham kidsandcows@sasktel.net ON: Karen Black blackbern@hotmail.com MB: Jeff & Jackie Cavers tobbagirl@yahoo.ca AB: Kasey Phillips | kphillips@mcsnet.ca Youth Coordinator: Kirstin Sparrow kp.sparrow@hotmail.com

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Services

Advertise Your Services! Call today 306.584.7937

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Alberta Breeders

Barry & Lee-Ann Kaiser & family 403.787.2489 Box 209, Hussar, AB T0J 1S0 Barry 403.334.2489 Lee-Ann 403.334.2155 kaiserbarry@gmail.com

Kasey, Arlana, Kord & Peri Phillips Box 420, Waskatenau, AB T0A 3P0

T 780.358.2360 • C 780.656.6400 • kphillips@mcsnet.ca KREATING KONFIDENCE

Be Wise — Advertise. Your ad should be here. 306.584.7937

GOOD ANCHOR CHAROLAIS HOME OF “GOOD” CATTLE! Don Good and Marion Smyth Box 3261, Vermilion, AB T9X 2B2 780.853.2220 • Don.marion.good@gmail.com

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caught you looking! Your ad should be here. 306.584.7937

SADDLERIDGE CHAROLAIS

Ralph Retzlaff 403.793.0794 Leonard Retzlaff 403.501.9333 Rosemary, AB • www.saddleridgecharolais.com

British Columbia Breeders

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Charolais Connection • February 2019


Manitoba Breeders

Ontario Breeders

Kevin, Crystal, Kory & Shaylin Stebeleski P/F 204.234.5425 Cell 204.365.6010 Box 266, Oakburn, MB R0J 1L0 | happyhavencharolais@gmail.com

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Quebec Breeders

Rollin’ Acres Charolais Full French Charolais 598516 2nd Line, Mulmur, ON L9V 0B6 chester.tupling@premierequipment.ca Chester Tupling 519.925.2938 C 705.627.0672

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Saskatchewan Breeders

Wendall & Leanne Weston Box 206, Maidstone, SK S0M 1M0 • wlweston@sasktel.net

Tel 306.893.4510 • Cell 306.893.7801

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USA Breeders

Advertise your program here. Call today! 306.584.7937

STAY INFORMED ON CANADIAN GENETICS 8 TIMES PER YEAR WITH THE

124 Shannon Road Regina, SK S4S 5B1 Canada Tel: 1.306.584.7937 Fax: 1.306.546.3942 charolaisbanner@sasktel.net www.charolaisbanner.com

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Charolais Banner Subscription Order Form CANADA

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IMPORTANT ACTIVITIES IN OUR INDUSTRY

Calendar of Events January 30 Moose Creek Red Angus & Charolais Two-Year Old Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Kisbey, SK February 3 Hill 70 Quantock “Barn Burnin’” Bull Sale, 12:00 noon, at the ranch, Lloydminster, AB February 14 Wilkie Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Stettler (AB) Auction Mart February 15 “Muscle Up” at Stephen Charolais and Guests 2nd Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Whitewood (SK) Auction Mart February 16 P & H Ranching 9th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Innisfail (AB) Auction Mart February 16 Saint Martin Test Station Sale, Saint Martin, QC

February 16 Crossroads Beef Expo, Oyen, AB February 18 Tip the Scale Angus & Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Vikse Family Farm, Donalda, AB February 19 Rawes Ranches 36th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the ranch, Strome, AB February 20 McLeod Livestock & Kay-R Land & Livestock Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Olds (AB) Cow Palace February 21 Prairie Cove Charolais Bull and Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the ranch, Bashaw, AB February 22 Maple Leaf Charolais & Guests 15th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Calnash Ag Events Centre, Ponoka, AB Charolais Connection • February 2019

February 22 HEJ Charolais 14th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Innisfail (AB) Auction Mart February 23 Myhre Land & Cattle Co./Bar J Charolais Bull Sale (Denbie Ranch & Guests) Ste. Rose du Lac, MB February 23 SanDan Charolais/Springside Farms 22nd Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Erskine, AB February 23 Quebec Select Bull Sale, Danville, QC February 24 Pro-Char and Guests 8th Annual Bull Sale, at the farm, Glenevis, AB February 27 Saddleridge Charolais with Kaiser Cattle Co. Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Bow Slope Shipping, Brooks, AB 73


February 27 Beck Farms & McCoy Cattle Co. 10th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Milestone, SK March 1 M & L Cattle Company Bull Sale, 7:00 p.m., at the farm, Indian River, ON March 1 38th Annual Select Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Innisfail (AB) Auction Mart March 2 Ferme Louber 15th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Ste-Marie de Beauce, QC

March 3 ”The Legacy Bull Sale” LEGACY Charolais with BOB Charolais 2nd Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Botha, AB March 3-4 100th Pride of the Prairies Bull Show & Sale, Lloydminster (SK) Exhibition Grounds March 5 Built Right 6th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Provost (AB) Livestock Exchange

March 9 Horseshoe E Charolais Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Kenaston, SK March 9 Blackbern, WhiteWater & Kirlene Charolais Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., Renfrew Pontiac Livestock Facility, Cobden, ON March 9 Source for Success Bull Sale, at Elmlodge Herefords, Indian River, ON

March 5 RRTS Charolais Bull Sale, 12:30 p.m., BC Livestock Co-op, Kamloops, BC

March 10 Steppler Farms 8th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m. DST, Steppler Sale Barn, Miami, MB

March 7 Buffalo Lake Charolais 13th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Stettler (AB) Auction Mart

March 11 Palmer Charolais with Nielson Land & Cattle Co. 8th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Bladworth, SK

March 2 Chomiak Charolais 15th Annual Bull & Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., Viking (AB) Auction Market

March 8 15th Annual Northern Classic Bull Sale, Grand Prairie, AB

March 12 Harvie Ranching Bull Sale, at the ranch, Olds, AB

March 8 CK Sparrow Farms Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Vanscoy, SK

March 14 Creek’s Edge Land & Cattle Co. 2nd Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Yellow Creek, SK

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Charolais Connection • February 2019

March 2 High Country 45th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Pincher Creek (AB) Ag Grounds March 2 Wrangler Made 7th Annual Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the farm, Westlock, AB


March 14 Lazy S Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., VJV Auction Mart, Beaverlodge, AB March 14 McKeary Charolais Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Bow Slope Shipping , Brooks, AB March 15 High Bluff Stock Farm Charolais & Simmental Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., at the farm, Inglis, MB March 15 Reese Cattle Co. 10th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Innisfail (AB) Auction Mart March 15-17 Cody Sibbald Legacy Classic Junior Show, Medicine Hat, AB March 16 Northern Impact VI, North Central Livestock Exchange, Clyde, AB March 16 Pleasant Dawn Charolais 17th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Heartland Livestock, Virden, MB March 16 Rollin’ Acres/Whiskey Hollow & Guests 9th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Maple Hill Auctions, Hanover, ON

March 16 Ferme Palerme Charolais Bull Sale, Vinoy Test Station, 1:00 p.m., at Ferme Gagnon, Cheneville, QC

March 20 HTA Charolais & Guest Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., Beautiful Plains Ag Complex, Neepawa, MB

March 16 Select Genetics Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at Forsyth Angus, Herbert, SK

March 21 Elder Charolais 9th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Coronach, SK

March 16 Canada’s Red, White & Black Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Johnstone Auction Mart, Moose Jaw, SK

March 21 Footprint Farms Bull Sale, 3:30 p.m, at the ranch, Esther, AB

March 18 North West Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Kramer’s Big Bid Barn, North Battleford, SK March 18 Neilson Cattle Co. 29th Annual Bull Sale, at the farm, Willowbrook, SK March 18 Grassroots Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Dryland Trading Corp, Veteran, AB March 19 Diamond W Charolais, Red & Black Angus 17th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Minitonas, MB

Charolais Connection • February 2019

March 22 McTavish Farms and Guest 8th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Moosomin, SK March 22 Thistle Ridge Ranch Bull Sale, Taber (AB) Agriplex March 23 Impact Angus & Charolais 11th Annual Bull & Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., Saskatoon (SK) Livestock Sales March 23 Cornerview Charolais Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the farm, Cobden, ON

75


March 23 7th Annual “Thickness Sells” Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Atlantic Stockyards, Truro, NS

March 28 Coyote Flats Charolais 4th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Coaldale, AB

March 23 Lazy S Cattle Co. Limousin & Charolais Bull Sale, 6:00 p.m., VJV Auction Mart, Rimbey, AB

March 28 RanAMan Ranch 4th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Olds (AB) Auction Mart

March 23 K-Cow Ranch Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the ranch, Elk Point, AB

March 28 C2 Charolais Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Killarney (MB) Auction Mart

March 24 Best of the Breeds 15th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Heartland Livestock, Yorkton, SK

March 30 Tri-N Charolais Farms 4th Annual Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the farm, Lenore, MB

March 25 Allanville Farms Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Tisdale, SK

March 30 High Point Charolais Bull Sale, 6:00 p.m., at Sunrise Charolais, Stayner, ON

March 26 Prairie Distinction Charolais 5th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Beautiful Plains Ag Complex, Neepawa, MB

March 30 Transcon’s 23rd Annual Advantage Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Saskatoon (SK) Livestock Sales

March 26 Poplar Bluff Stock Farm & Twin Anchor Charolais 3rd Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Dryland Trading Corp, Veteran, AB

March 30 Alameda Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Alameda (SK) Auction Mart

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Charolais Connection • February 2019

March 30 Borderland Cattle Company Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the ranch, Rockglen, SK March 30 Candiac Choice Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Candiac (SK) Auction Mart April 1 North of the 49th 16th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at Wilgenbusch Charolais, Halbrite, SK April 2 Cedarlea Farms “Git ‘R Done” Bull Sale, at Windy Willows Angus, Hodgeville, SK April 2 Gilliland Bros. Charolais 7th Annual Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at Chopper K Auction Mart, Alameda, SK April 2 White Lake Colony Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Balog Auction, Lethbridge, AB April 3 White Cap/Rosso Charolais & Howe Red Angus 29th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the Howe Family Farm, Moose Jaw, SK


April 9 Top Cut 29th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Stockman’s Weigh Co., Mankota, SK April 11 Sliding Hills Charolais 13th Annual Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., at the farm, Canora, SK April 11 Daines Cattle Co. Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Innisfail (AB) Auction Mart April 13 Eastern Select Bull & Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., Hoards Station Sale Barn, Campbellford, ON

April 4 Hunter Charolais 7th Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Roblin, MB April 4 Ringuette Charolais Annual Bull Sale, 12:00 noon, Atlantic Stock Yards, Truro, NS April 6 Vermilion Charolais Group 33rd Annual Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., North Central Livestock, Vermilion, AB April 6 Acadia Ranching Charolais & Angus Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Bow Slope Shipping Association, Brooks, AB April 6 Maritime Bull Test Station Sale, at the test station, Nappan, NS April 6 Saunders Charolais 14th Annual Bull Sale, 2:00 p.m., Keady (ON) Livestock Market April 6 JTA Diamond Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Courval, SK April 8 Cattle Capital Bull Sale, 1:00 p.m., Ste. Rose (MB) Auction Mart

April 20 Brimner Cattle Co., Cornerstone Bull Sale, 1:30 p.m., Whitewood (SK) Auction Mart April 20 Cedardale Charolais 16th Annual Bull & Select Female Sale, 1:00 p.m., at the farm, Nestleton, ON April 20 Lindskov-Thiel Bull Sale, at the ranch, Isabel, SD June 5-9 Canadian Charolais Association Annual General Meeting and Tour, NB, PE, NS June 6 Canadian Charolais Association Annual General Meeting, Moncton, NB June 29 ACA Tour, Vermilion, AB July 24-27 Canadian Charolais Youth Association Conference and Show, Weyburn, SK August 4-12 World Charolais Technical Conference, Republic of Ireland

Charolais Connection • February 2019

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LOOKING TO FIND SOMEONE?

Advertisers Index Alta Custom Programs .................................66 Amabec Charolais ........................................69 Annuroc Charolais........................................69 B Bar D Charolais..........................................69 Baker Farms ..................................................69 Balamore Farms............................................76 Bar H Charolais ...................................15,34,71 Beck Farms..........................................38,39,71 Be-Rich Farms ...............................................67 Big Johnson Charolais ..................................55 Blackbern Charolais ................................41,70 Bob Charolais .....................................44,45,67 Bo-Jan Enterprises ........................................71 Borderland Cattle Co. ..................................71 Bow Valley Genetics Ltd. .............................66 Bricney Stock Farms .....................................71 Bridor Charolais.......................................59,70 Brimner Cattle Company .............................71 Buffalo Lake Charolais ...........................53,67 By Livestock ...........................3,6,7,9,11,12,15, .............................20,23,25,42-45,47,50,51,IBC Carey, Brent ..................................................66 Cedardale Charolais .....................................70 Cedarlea Farms..........................................7,71 Charla Moore Farms.....................................71 Char-Lew Ranch ...........................................67 Char-Maine Ranching ..................................67 Charolais Journal..........................................66 Chartop Charolais ........................................71 Charworth Charolais Farms .........................67 Chomiak Charolais ......................................67 Circle Cee Charolais Farms ......................37,67 Circle G Simmentals & Angus ......................13 Cline Cattle Co..............................................69 Cockburn Farms............................................70 Cornerview Charolais ...................................57 Cougar Hill Ranch ........................................69 Coyote Flats Charolais..................................67 Creek's Edge Land & Cattle Co. ..............11,71 C2 Charolais.............................................69,75 Davis-Rairdan ...............................................66 Defoort Stock Farm ......................................69 Demarah Farms ............................................71 Diamond W Charolais .............................48,71 Dorran, Ryan ................................................66 Double P Stock Farms ..................................69 Dowell Charolais ..........................................67 DRD Charolais............................................8,15 Dubuc Charolais ...........................................70 Dudgeon-Snobelen Land & Cattle ..............70 Eaton Charolais ............................................72 Echo Spring Charolais .............................59,70 Edge, Dean ...................................................66 Elder Charolais Farms................................9,71 Fergus Family Charolais ...............................70 Fischer Charolais...........................................67 Flat Valley Cattle Co.....................................67 Fleury, Michael .............................................66 Flewelling, Craig ..........................................66 Footprint Farms ...........................................67 Future Farms.................................................67 Gilliland Bros. Charolais ...............................71

Good Anchor Charolais................................67 H.S. Knill Company Ltd. ...............................66 Happy Haven Charolais................................69 Harcourt Charolais ..................................61,71 Hard Rock Land & Cattle Co. .......................69 Harvie Crest Cattle Co. .................................56 Harvie Ranching .....................................56,67 HEJ Charolais ..........................................33,67 Hicks Charolais .............................................70 High Bluff Stock Farm ...............................5,69 Holk Charolais ..............................................67 Hopewell Charolais ......................................71 Horseshoe E Charolais.............................47,71 Howe Family Farm .......................................71 HTA Charolais Farm ..................................3,69 Hunter Charolais ...................................69,IBC Jakes Butte Charolais ...................................12 JMB Charolais ..............................................69 Johnson Charolais ..............................30,31,67 Johnstone Auction .......................................66 June Rose Charolais .....................................71 Kaiser Cattle Co.......................................36,67 Kay-R Land & Cattle Ltd..........................19,67 KCH Charolais ...............................................68 Kirlene Cattle ..........................................41,70 KT Ranches ...................................................56 La Ferme Patry de Weedon .........................70 Land O' Lakes Charolais ...............................70 Langstaff Charolais ......................................70 Leemar Charolais..........................................67 Legacy Charolais.................................42,43,67 LEJ Charolais.................................................69 Lindskov-Thiel Charolais Ranch ...................72 Louber Farm .................................................35 M & L Cattle Co. ......................................25,70 Mack's Charolais...........................................70 Maple Leaf Charolais ..............................23,67 Martens Cattle Co. .......................................71 Martens Charolais ........................................69 McAvoy Charolais Farm ...............................71 McKay Charolais ...........................................69 McKeary Charolais .......................................68 McLeod Livestock ....................................19,66 McTavish Farms.............................................71 Medonte Charolais.......................................70 Meridian Agriculture Co. Ltd. .....................64 Miller Land & Livestock................................70 Moyer Cattle Co. ..........................................59 Murphy Livestock .........................................68 Mutrie Farms ................................................71 Myhre Land and Cattle ...........................34,69 Nahachewsky Charolais ...............................71 Nielson Land & Cattle Co. ............................20 Norheim Ranching .......................................66 Norway Valley Farm .....................................23 P & H Ranching Co. .................................13,68 Packer Charolais ...........................................70 Palmer Charolais .....................................20,71 Parklane Charolais .......................................68 Phillips Farms...........................................65,72 Pine Bluff Farm.............................................73 Pleasant Dawn Charolais ..........................6,69

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Charolais Connection • February 2019

Potter Charolais............................................70 Prairie Cove Charolais ..................................68 Prairie Gold Charolais ..................................72 Pro-Char Charolais .............................30,31,68 Qualman Charolais ......................................72 Raffan, Don ..................................................66 Rawes Ranches ........................................18,68 Rebuild with Steel ........................................66 Reeleder, Andrew.........................................66 Reese Cattle Co. ...........................................48 Rollin' Acres Charolais .................................70 Ross Lake Charolais .................................23,68 Rosso Charolais.............................................72 Royale Charolais ...........................................70 RRTS Charolais ..............................................68 Saddleridge Farming Co. ........................36,68 SanDan Charolais Farms ....................26,27,68 Saunders Charolais .......................................70 Scarth Cattle Co............................................69 Serhienko/Voegeli Cattle Co........................72 Sharodon Farms ...........................................70 Skeels, Danny ...............................................66 Sliding Hills Charolais...................................72 Snake Valley Farm ........................................77 Southside Charolais.................................23,68 Southview Farms ..........................................70 CK Sparrow Farms .......................................IFC Springside Farms ................................26,27,68 Spruce View Charolais..................................68 Stach Farms Charolais ..................................68 Stephen Charolais Farm ..........................15,72 Steppler Farms Ltd. ...........................50,51,69 Stock, Mark...................................................66 Stockmen's Insurance...................................66 Sugarloaf Charolais ......................................68 Sunrise Charolais II .......................................59 Sunshine Oak Charolais ...............................69 T Bar C Cattle Co ..26,27,33,38,39,61,64,66,77 Temple Farms................................................72 Thistle Ridge Ranch......................................68 Transcon Livestock Corp..........................58,66 Triangle Stock Farm.................................30,31 Tri-N Charolais ..............................................69 Turnbull Charolais ...................................49,68 Twin Anchor Charolais .................................68 Vikse Family Farm.........................................17 Wendt & Murray Farms Ltd. ...................68,74 Western Litho ...............................................67 White Lake Colony .......................................68 White Meadow Charolais Ltd......................69 WhiteWater Livestock.............................41,70 Wilgenbusch Charolais ........................72,OBC Wilkie Charolais ...........................................12 Wilkie Ranch............................................12,68 WJ Simmentals .............................................55 Wood River Charolais ..................................72 Wrangler Charolais .................................29,68


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February 2019 Charolais Connection  

February 2019 Charolais Connection