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HOW CAN HPISD CONVINCE VOTERS TO GIVE IT $358.3 MILLION?

JULY 2015 I Vol. 35, No. 7 parkcitiespeople.com  

8

@pcpeople

Man on the Move

E D U C AT I O N

LOCAL ENTREPRENEUR BRINGS BUSES BACK TO BUSINESS CLASS 10

Tragedy leads widow to  start home-care provider 28

HPISD’s new boss has an award-winning pedigree 8 SOCIETY Check out the glamour at this year’s La Fiesta ball   14 LIVIN G WELL

COMMUNITY UP mom stays objective with book review website 29 SPORTS Net gains: Jeffett heads to tennis hall of fame  1B BUSINESS

SMU grads get rolling on a cool concept for haute fashions 10

COMMUNITY

It’s tricky: Hoop videos become calling card for young filmmaker 29

SPORTS

Bumpy roads are smooth sailing for racing enthusiast 1B


ralph@daveperrymiller.com 214-533-8355

2   JULY 2015 | PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM

CONTENTS FROM THE PUBLISHER

Let’s Not Forget Why We Celebrate 6210 RAINTREE COURT (SALE PENDING)

$1,995,000

10040 MEADOWBROOK DRIVE (SALE PENDING)

$2,750,000

4117 WINDSOR PARKWAY

$2,995,000

G

rowing up with seven brothers, there were a whole lot of shenanigans going on, and the Fourth of July was an excuse to amp it up. Shooting coffee cans and homemade rockets in the air was a normal after-school activity, but for the Fourth we saved our money from babysitting and odd jobs to buy “real” fireworks. I’ve heard that my dad was quite a rascal as a boy, so I think my brothers got away with a lot of what I would call dangerous activity: Roman candle wars, bonfire bombs, and firecracker sneak attacks. I’m not sure if it was just our family, but being an American and knowing what that means was instilled in us. Perhaps that was because my mom was a naturalized citizen, leaving her native Philippines and pledging her allegiance to the United States. Or possibly that my father was intensely patriotic, and his past military service was a source of great pride for the family, and I believe influenced three of my siblings decision to join the Service. I’m hopelessly patriotic. In school, I remember looking forward to the morning ritual of reciting the Pledge of Allegiance. I have to admit, I still get a little choked up when I hear the National Anthem. These days, I think we all take our freedom and the benefits of living in the United States a bit for granted. Do we even know what we are celebrating? Do we take even a moment away from our barbecues, pool parties, and the endless retail opportunities that come with every holiday these days? Each year on the Fourth of July, our newspapers document the various neighborhood parades and celebrations, and as

a company we participate in the Park Cities parade and celebration at Goar Park. It’s always a lot of good old-fashioned family fun and a great way to get out and meet folks in the community. And yes, there will be an opportunity to hear “The Star-Spangled Banner.” Please join us if you can. God Bless America. Pat Martin, Publisher pat.martin@ peoplenewspapers.com

POLICE . ............................................................ 4 EDUCATION ��������������������������������������������������� 8 BUSINESS . ..................................................... 10 SOCIETY ......................................................... 14

WEDDINGS ��������������������������������������������������� 25 LIVING WELL ���������������������������������������������� 27 COMMUNITY ���������������������������������������������� 29 CLASSIFIEDS ����������������������������������������������� 32

PAT M A R T I N

“ IN S CH O O L , I RE ME MBE R LO O KIN G FO RWARD TO T H E MO RN IN G RIT UAL O F RE CIT IN G T H E PL E D GE O F ALL E GIAN CE . ”

Publisher: Patricia Martin EDITORIAL

A DV E R T I S I N G

O P E R AT I O N S

Editor Todd Jorgenson

Senior Account Executives

Business Manager Alma Ritter

Assistant Editor Sarah Bennett

Kim Hurmis Kate Martin

Art Director Elizabeth Ygartua

Account Executives Clarke Dvoskin Geraldine Galentree DeeAnna Thompson

Distribution Manager Don Hancock

Assistant Art Director Curtis Thornton Consulting Editor Jeff Bowden Interns Sara Cagle Tanner Garza

Intern Cassidy Hansen People Newspapers are printed on recycled paper. Help us show love for the earth by recycling this newspaper and any magazines from the D family to which you subscribe.

Park Cities People is published monthly by CITY NEWSPAPERS LP, an affiliate of D Magazine Partners LP, 750 N. Saint Paul St., Suite 2100, Dallas, TX 75201. Copyright 2015. All rights reserved. No reproduction without permission. Submissions to the editor may be sent via e-mail to editor@peoplenewspapers.com. Correspondence must include writer’s name and contact number. Main phone number, 214-739-2244


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3804 Villanova Street | $2,795,000 Kay Weeks | 214-676-8230

6414 Aberdeen Avenue | $2,350,000 Kay Weeks | 214-676-8230

3536 Haynie Avenue | $1,590,000 Kenneth Walters | 214-923-3297

3441 University Boulevard | $1,450,000 Kenneth Walters | 214-923-3297

6908 Forest Cove Circle | $1,150,000 Melissa Watt | 214-714-3574

264 HCR 3136 | $779,000 Mary Poss | 214-738-0777

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EBBY’S LITTLE WHITE HOUSE | 214-210-1500 EBBY PRESTON CENTER | 214-692-0000 EBBY LAKEWOOD/LAKE HIGHLANDS | 214-826-0316 ©2015. Equal Housing Opportunity.


4   JULY 2015 | PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM

POLICE K E E P I N G TA B S

SKULD UG GE RY of the MO NT H

Too Much Raising the Roof? Townhome Roof Fights Back

I

t was a scary situation for residents of a townhome complex in the 4200 block of Lomo Alto Drive on the evening of June 11 when their roof suddenly collapsed. Thankfully, there were no injuries, although a few residents were displaced. A 9-1-1 caller in the 12-unit, three-story building said she heard a crash. “My ceiling has fallen into the floor,” she told dispatchers. The collapse affected three townhomes in the Gables Highland Park complex, two of which were occupied at the time. Other residents in the same building were temporarily evacuated for precautionary reasons after collecting personal belongings, and electric and gas services were turned off.

PAINS OF GL A S S At 6:08 a.m. on May 25, a burglary was reported at Goo Goo Eyes in the Miracle Mile shopping center in which a miscreant broke the front window and stole more than $30,000 worth of Chanel, Miu Miu, Ray-Ban, and Prada sunglasses.

We won! 10

MARCH 2014

Park Cit tiees Peo pllee 2014

SPECIAL REPORT

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Highlan d Park senior looks to B I G G E S T make hist CONTRIBUTORS state to ory at urnam Court Alley ent

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By Tod

PE OP

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M I MAY 20 14

SPORT

Peo ple

THEY’RE IN THE MONEY!

At press time, Highland Park police and building officials hadn’t determined a cause for the collapse, although they have ruled out a fire or explosion. As part of the collapse, a 20-square-foot area of roof,

ceiling, and attic debris fell to the third floor, causing a chain reaction that damaged townhomes on the first and second floors below. An investigation is ongoing. — Todd Jorgenson

1B

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N L I N KS

1. Richard Rogers .............. $10,000 Peo ple d Jorgenson New spa 2. Ellen Flowers.................... $7,500 per s 3. William Dunn ....................$5,551 Nobody T4. Roy Coffee ..................... $5,000 if his min could blam e T4.Sch Joe Colonnetta ............. $5,000 nom will d was elsewhe Scottie effler Colonnetta .. $5,000 re. TheT4. Kimberly tee off for the tion eve in golf phe nts this at rim loca be at - Madeley ............ $5,000 summer least two T4. The inte Amateu A will PGADaniel Tour Ward ............... $5,000 as wel T4. r Champi es YMC l as theWilliam Park Citi ter. onship. He’s U.S. Dunlap................. $3,000 DalCen 9. Debbie high sch pre par ing Preston of Metropolitan to a lease 10. Accountability YMCA ty of Tex ool and enroll gra dua te y signed from ity ials toda First PAC................................ $2,855 the foo as, where he at the Uni Cities facil on las offic ver Park tste hopes e sithe ps of to Leonar -foot spac to move d, Har Dallas standou follow in 0-square Hop rison Spieth. to a 15,00 e adjacent to ts Jus Frazar, Lan across and Jor tin Luther Yet the Bar and ed dan Burger Black-ey Park Hig main focu doddy 1. Howard Crow ................ $25,000 s for the t from The formerly a the ind h School in Highlan the stree senthe Three Republicans are trying to replace Dan Branch as District 108’s representative 2. H.R. Perot Jr................... $25,000 ior ivid space was Class 4A ual and team is on defendi d Pea. The er. 3. ng Robert B. Rowling ......... $25,000 state tou titles at to the AT H E Y Texas House. We’ll profile each of these men Con theC Gfollowing pages. Inhasthe meantime, let’s fitness centwill relocate the T4. Albert Huddleston..... $10,000 rnamen a cha HRIS M upt in Aus UIL to The Y ing the nce ton during the tin. T4. take a look at their campaigns’ finances. These numbers are based on reports e hist filed with fi theymak the Pres He Morgan Meyer ............ $10,000 y space ory by of a new behind vidual rst HP player temporar tion alley bec the omT6. Bracewell & Giuliani construc ent location ents in the Texas Ethics Commission, covering activity between July 1 and Jan. 23.championships, to win three ind favorite coming post cont and. Committee PAC................... $5,000 to do and he Presat its curr their com e weekGarl will be ition of facility Still, for so. for twicNEWSPAPERS show off Worm Ranch in the T6. Lisa Fichtel.................... $5,000 BY DAN KOLLER • asPEOPLE intersec Drive. a golfer r: the n Dall dleman s the stat mandy near the of Sch task, eithe than Revolutio ScottieJohn .................. $5,000 Leslie Nee e to the Texa T6. Natalie and Nor cted to last effler’s no small Recycle tige, but tournament Scheffl Bass and goes directly more ton Road stature expe And it’s mig er III Kathryn donated $5,000 will...com , Henry Ross Perot ction is products ly pickup. loyalty he doesn’t see ht lack in pre T6. rs Mary rated and Constru year. pete in to his co-owne of leftover months. it that bar gene Ryan Rogers .................. $5,000 s-T6.star have post last than two two PGA juice way, The GEM efront. The mix prim S I D E - B Y- S I D E C O M P A R I SdsOof about 12-14 very excited to for N com S D I Das Y O UaryK N Osch Wool. . . ting to Tour eve more stor Twomey e com .............. $5,000 sources and his team citing T6. Brian 33,000 poun e bar began of Lovnts this “We are Center ry hom That bod e together “It tion of mat pora was juic mot rsec summer es Sch Citto a tem now.” ivation. The es wel son with the really fun the inte moved the Park after he secured effler, l Contributions winnin d Jorgen per s Citt here in who is for the Scots guys, 8 percent s ago near ood Road, and In addifinishes ofg last Tod year Park ter wou By s, and “The rou Inw taking the Y righ spa and for FIL ago. ld like his pos and that’s year New some tim nding into John Palm chai rma n. $0 $100K $200K $300K $400K $500K $600K $700K t a year to docourt tseason E P H O T O : C H R urant someth ers Lane adds a fact that he’s during “We’ve Peo ple the conform afd ies,” said again,”Alley’s ter abou e away IS M ing I little extr run for s, the resta and basketb so team been imp contributions promote ton Cen CA boar juice Sch many, from of ries of lishmakes Pres * YM in es, Highlan C G AT H E Y u all effl -ori a drive. roving almost LLC ................ step season.$46,592the link ies estab Westcott nic eate it easi smoothi full men d Park. as a team er said. 1. s Loy every That certented — Sch Chart Westcott: $376,918 the next in the Park He has came from Many orga green” inside their practice tion to a ds, soups, and seas event $35,000 d. “Whener,” said HP “This is 2. Carl on,Westcott ................. . It’s all played g . into whe new Y for sala it ucts head coa ainly ron effler will “goin es the the can n puts you residents of prod he’s iber, tha es mak pre Scots compet cept of not com$25,000 Nelson towards ch Jeff T3.stig Lamar ................... r organic ious Loe this The GEM t’s goin get a player l business of age in the peting Cha events e will Conroe, TEXAS, sponso the guy sells othe es more loca of that g to elev bar at Morgan Meyer: $312,293 ment. But fits HP Byin else Cities.” the mov . T3. Jimmy Westcott ......... $25,000 F juice mor bene r’s exe mpionship s calwhe hop well O beh said nic ng ate the e e as t the re. ind him Bass orga in mp the he will TBAL hisO wife’s Officials their fundraisi outside After game ated abou h tends to be mor 5. Commodore Partners* .. $16,810 .” provide play in tion. Three May on a ers of the the stat of in L me educ once weeks the Fed percent whic Coast The own 28-29 happy to r building, hometown. beco , t e Me 80 are tou Wes happen cling 6. Court mp Westcott ...............$15,000 late — assu Ex Court Alley: $104,743 recy Center on the y to n reaches nd thei ming he rnament on rs also plan his on graduati St. Jude Cla r, gressive n areas Preston campaig million necessar s dumpste 7. Michael Smartt ...............$14,000 alley behi April qualifi ssic s to ent on wee ,” lar in urba Palm f in the al assortment of es, $28 well popu ken ity. er of so the proo course U.S. Ope of d. SOFT T8. John Adams ................ $10,000 Texas. be done a typic new facil r this n qualify He EXPENDITURES The than in good to and can BALL home to build the will be late bins. T8. J. Baxter Brinkmann . $10,000 ing nging to is being d so clean enjoy cling nic to belo C raise is “It’s that e with recy ONTI post and Y has ng orga 10 percent of hopes $0 $100K have $200K $300K $400K $500K . “Bei $600K $700Ka difference been able T10. D. Andrew Beal........... $5,000 NUED inside thos organic com years. ently, the than t.” rs out Glance Bass said ON 2 e making footprin Morgan Meyer’s custome for the past two year. Curr million, or less , and the n right T10. Susan Beard ................. We’r $5,000 our ever B h. GEM eate eart more reducing .jorgenson@ GEM, how gh to be literally contributions about $13.5 of its goal. s andWestcott: Chart $659,851 previous- the resources and T10. Sally Jordan ................. $5,000 SOC juice ent Email todd apers.com our C loyees inly by space will fresh enou . E 50 perc came from to ry emp certa R wsp T10. Jack Knox .................... $5,000 es pora nior her aps, but in peoplene themselv The tem the same ame of the trash his law firm, ans, perh ness, Bass m Ranch T10. Penny Loyd .................. $5,000 compost But two Morgan Meyer: t of ding ted the$152,778 Not by hum of the Texas Wor ient of or- busi 3B T10. A. Mack Pogue ............ $5,000 as area. have mos existing Y, inclu Bracewell & ly transpor s in the Dall recip hip with bitants area, the sole farm the inha t fitness a partners ties as the Giuliani, AND T10. Rod Rohrich ................ $5,000 organic s, which is the juice bar. uare-foo formed they$48,995 Alley: ething Court Garland, cise room a 3,500-sq s ago its employees. T10. Lee Ann White ........... $5,000 post from t, it’s som group exer , multipury year ganic com cious capitalis spin and wner Mar T10. Kathryn Woods .......... $5,000 atch area and lock4B “As a cons said GEM co-o nse that we e, a child-w expe to do,” ting spac shar-CASH ON HAND (As of Jan. 23) an extra I have ers for both like pose mee “It’s . show we T= Tie Bass 37 percent s with because Kathryn er room $0 $100K $200K $300K $400K $500K $600K $700K taking on of Chart .” women. * in-kind contributions ersity Park don’t mind pressed our juice men and us t’s left of combination of l, the Univ Westcott’s 5B In Apri ing wha unanimo fruits andChart Westcott: $395,512 that’s a NOTE: The numbers on this page various contributions ncil gave for reUsually, for the isting of City Cou the site plan ect diet ins cons don’t reflect contributions from came from to ity at 6000 juice rema which make a perf which raises approval the facil h, the fi rst half of 2013. Morgan Meyer: s, $186,200 UP his immediate ting vegetable Worm Rancorganic gardenyear ago, for construc GE T TH at Texas family AND Road. A C H A R T S & I L LU S T R AT I O N ing and critters E PL AI regenergo-ahead tPreston compost helps to B Y R I C K LO P E Z gave the exis D RE companies they Court Alley: $62,492 worms for post, in turn, olish its officials PO RT t diseases. A to dem own. : Ou r The com ild with ress plan and s ing. rebu supp the YMC fruit we nic ekl y e-n soil and a becture and y, the orga ate poor ew sle BA S S ing stru ity and Steve Clar ms love tte r pro ry facil ATH RY N “Our wor The GEM,” said a two -sto parking garage. ent vid es MA RY K from e Ranch. the sco its curr veggies drating s Worm low-grad op on been at of Texa the dehy all thi The Y has 1951. founder aren’t in ngs Sco n@ since Since they ts. Sig .jorgenso location n up tod Email todd apers.com ay at par wsp peoplene

Jorgenson By ToddNew spa per s

C H R I S M C G AT H E Y

Damage from the collapse was still visible the next day.

People Newspapers won first place for best local election coverage, second place for best sports section, and third place for best coverage of local business and economic news from the Local Media Association!

Morgan Meyer

N O TA B L E I N C I D E N T S

H I G H L A N D PA R K

June 1 Between May 25 and June 1, a thief stole a $4,200 Trane air-conditioning unit and cut the copper wires to a second unit at a vacant house in the 4600 block of Belclaire Avenue.

Scots to be drills pr gin spring ior debut in to fall Class 6A

Chart Westcott

380

ung lin eup lead June 8 Lady Sc s ots to be HP girls st season na in histor y Between 4 p.m. on June 5 stmatises third strrraowiglyht tourna and 9:02 a.m. on June 8, a thief ment Combined value of two bottles of Far Niente stole a $1,100 Hilti concrete Cabernet Sauvignon saw from a construction stolen by a male trailer in the 3700 block of Normandy Avenue. shoplifter from Tom Thumb in The Plaza at June 8 Preston Center at 5:46 At 6:36 p.m., two 16-yearp.m. on June 10. old Highland Park residents were arrested in the 4400 block of Bordeaux Avenue WANT TO READ on charges of possession of MORE CRIMES? marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. Yo

’S AL IST , IT US CA PIT IT ’S AN E X TR A ON SC IO . “A S A C VE TO DO ND TA KIN G ON IN G I HA N’ T MI FT OF DO SO ME TH WE AT ’S LE TH AT IN G WH E XP EN SE E SH AR E WE LIK BE CA US ICE .” JU R OU

June 4 Between 12:30 and 12:47 p.m., a thief stole $800 worth of Stihl landscaping equipment from the back of a white 2002 GMC pickup in the 3500 block of Beverly Drive. June 8 Between 8 p.m. on June 7 and 6:25 a.m. on June 8, a burglar broke into a white 2011 Jeep Wrangler inside a garage in the 3600 block of Crescent Avenue and stole a garage-door opener, a lug-nut key, and a phone charger.

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June 13 Between 5:30 p.m. on June 12 and 6 a.m. on June 13, a thief stole a Wacker Neuson drum roller after cutting a lock at a construction site in the 5000 block of Airline Road.

peo ple

.co m

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U N I V E R S I T Y PA R K June 1 Between May 23 and June 1, a burglar broke into a red 2008 Jeep Wrangler in the 3200 block of Lovers Lane and stole $400 worth of items. June 4 Between 10:30 p.m. on June 3 and 7 a.m. on June 4, a thief stole four tires and rims, valued at $1,200, from a white 2015 GMC Yukon in the 3900 block of Bryn Mawr Drive. During the same time frame, the tires and rims were taken from a gray 2015 Yukon in the 3900 block of Southwestern Boulevard. June 7 At 5:40 p.m., a pickpocket stole a $20 Old Navy purse containing a $40 Coach wallet and $30 in cash from the front

seat of a gray 2010 Ford SUV at a gas station in the 8400 block of Preston Road. June 10 At 3:05 p.m., a thief stole a $500 iPhone from a table at a restaurant in Park Cities Plaza. June 12 Between 10 a.m. on June 9 and 11 a.m. on June 12, a thief stole the license plates off a black 2014 Honda moped in the 3700 block of Granada Avenue. June 13 Between 7:30 p.m. on June 12 and 9 a.m. on June 13, a thief entered an unlocked gold 2009 Chevrolet sedan in the 3400 block of Colgate Avenue and stole an $8,500 Rolex watch from the console.


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6738 Northport Dr.

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$1,699,000 Master suite fit for a queen, with $1,599,000 Custom built for current owners by magnificent kitchen highlight this executive Rosewood! Great floorplan with quality finishout. level home. 5 bedrooms, 5.1 baths. 6 bedrooms, 5.2 baths. Kyle Rovinsky

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3 Lakeside Park

14 Cheltenham Way

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214.205.2056

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$747,000 Georgeous and charming home that has been nicely updated! 5 bedrooms, 4.1 baths.

972.757.4284 Don Thomas

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4700 SAINT JOHNS :: HIGHLAND PARK :: $15,985,000 GULLOTTO + BARNES GROUP 214.797.1900

4612 ISABELLA :: PRESTON HOLLOW :: $3,695,000 Mark Cain 214.642.6516

5139 SENECA :: PRESTON HOLLOW :: $9,688,000

Dave Perry-Miller 972.380.7723 | Chad Schulin 214.529.1758

4117 WINDSOR PKWY :: UNIVERISTY PARK :: $2,875,000 Ralph Randall 214.217.3511

9430 HATHAWAY :: PRESTON HOLLOW :: $2,499,000 Laura Michelle 214.228.3854

Be sure to stop by our lemonade stand in Goar Park after the Park Cities Fourth of July Parade.

10455 STRAIT :: PRESTON HOLLOW :: $6,950,000 Christopher Miller 214.528.0707

12218 CREEK FOREST :: LAKE FOREST :: $1,895,000 Mark Cain 214.642.6516

10121 WALLER :: PRESTON HOLLOW :: $5,995,000 Mark Cain 214.642.6516 | Susie Swanson 214.533.4656

6615 BROOKSHIRE :: PRESTON HOLLOW :: $1,279,000 Julie Boren 214.402.8778

4598 RHEIMS :: HIGHLAND PARK :: $1,550,000 Don Averitt 214.502.9070 | CC Allen 214.912.8326

1136 TURNER :: KESSLER PARK :: $1,199,500 Mike Bates 214.418.3443

5319 LIVINGSTON :: MOCKINGBIRD PARK :: $1,475,000 Debbie Sherrington 214.762.6957


RITZ-CARLTON RESIDENCES :: UPTOWN :: $9,000,000 -$950,000 Sharon S. Quist 214.695.9595

3141 GREENBRIER :: UNIVERSITY PARK :: $2,099,500 Laura Michelle 214.228.3854

9246 SUNNYBROOK :: PRESTON HOLLOW :: $8,395,000 Mark Cain 214.642.6516 | Susie Swanson 214.533.4656

3648 MCFARLIN :: UNIVERSITY PARK :: $2,095,000 Laura Michelle 214.228.3854

3424 UNIVERSITY :: UNIVERSITY PARK :: $1,995,000 Sharon Redd 469.835.5363

An Ebby Halliday Company PRESTON CENTER :: 214.369.6000

HIGHLAND PARK :: 214.526.6600

3712 BRYN MAWR :: UNIVERISTY PARK :: $2,560,000 Paige & Curt Elliott 214.478.9544

7906 PURDUE :: PARK CITIES :: $879,000 Paige & Curt Elliott 214.478.9544

INTOWN :: 214.303.1133

PARK CITIES :: 214.522.3838

2800 HANOVER :: UNIVERSITY PARK :: $1,699,999

4205 MANNING :: PRESTON HOLLOW :: $799,000 Julie Boren 214.402.8778

24 CHELTENHAM :: DOWNS OF HILLCREST :: $875,000 Eloise Eriksson Martin & James Martin 214.616.3343

LAKEWOOD :: 214.522.3838

Lisa & Kristi Johnson 214.356.5616

7239 MIMOSA :: PRESTON HOLLOW :: $599,000 (PENDING) Frada Sandler 214.616.6476

7510 ROPER :: DALLAS :: $599,000 Hickman+Weber Group 214.300.8439


8   JULY 2015 | PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM

E D U C AT I O N HPISD Tackles High Cost of Managing Growth By Todd Jorgenson

People Newspapers Regardless of how public sentiment shakes out on Highland Park ISD’s massive bond proposal, everyone can agree on at least two things — it certainly is ambitious, and $358.3 million is a lot of money. Although a final price tag hasn’t been determined yet, that’s an estimated cost of the unprecedented package that HPISD trustees hope will win voter approval in November, allowing for a complete overhaul of district facilities. The primary goals are to relieve overcrowding at each campus — including the accommodation of projected future growth for the next 20 years — and to update aging buildings that in some cases have outlived their usefulness. “We all believe that our children deserve the best facilities,” said trustee Kelly Walker. So the trustees, in conjunction with the Facilities Advisory Committee — consisting of 22 community volunteers charged with making recommendations to the board — have spent the last several months hashing through various proposals in an effort to reach consensus on what the future of schools in HPISD will look like. During that time, both sides have consistently expressed the desire to think big, citing low interest rates that offer favorable timing to purchase bonds, so they can avoid patching up

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BIG CHANGES PROPOSED Hyer (1), University Park (2), and Bradfield (3) elementary schools will be demolished and rebuilt under the current plan. Highland Park High School (4) will undergo extensive renovations including adding classroom space to where the current natatorium is. P H O T O S : TA N N E R G A R Z A

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problems as the district has done in the past. Bond referendums have traditionally fared well in HPISD, including a $75.4 million plan that passed in 2008. But the district has never tried anything of this scope, which could add about $1,500 each year to the property tax bill for a $1 million Park Cities home. For proof that this is new territory, consider the plan just at the elementary level. The bond proposal calls for building a fifth campus — which would be the first new elementary school

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in HPISD since 1949 — while scraping and rebuilding three others from the ground up. In May, the district finalized a deal to purchase 4.6 acres from Northway Christian Church for $20 million for the new campus. If the current proposal is passed, the new school would be constructed first, then would likely serve as a relief campus for Bradfield, Hyer, and University Park while each of them is being torn down and reconstructed at their current sites (the order of those rebuilds isn’t known yet).

While that timeline might seem aggressive, “it has become the norm to get an elementary done in 10 to 12 months,” said Jonathan Aldis, a consulting architect at Stantec. Each of the four new schools would have enough space to comfortably accommodate 770 students, while Armstrong would be renovated at its existing smaller site, and could handle 550 students. That would amount to about $140 million total, including new parking structures at each school. One of the district’s big-

gest challenges is trying to expand without the luxury of land availability, and nowhere is that issue greater than at Highland Park High School. There, the bond plan calls for a multi-story addition for fine arts and other programs on the northwest corner of the school, which currently houses a teacher parking lot. The proposal also aims to fill in the existing natatorium with more classroom space, add an underground parking garage likely beneath the existing softball field, and renovate the school in general. Total cost would be $83 million. That doesn’t count the $29.9 million for athletics that would include a new multi-sport building at the site of the existing Seay Tennis Center, the relocation of the Seay, and upgrades to Highlander Stadium. Other pieces to the puzzle remain unsolved, such as where a new natatorium would be located — inside the multi-sport building remains one option — and where HPISD can acquire more land for surface parking around the high school. So what’s next? It’s the task of the FAC to sell the package to voters this summer, both through online feedback and public forums. Everything needs to be finalized by Aug. 24, which is the deadline for calling a November bond election. “This is going to be a very large conversation with the community and we need to treat it as such,” said board president Joe Taylor. “We’re all united.”

New HPISD Chief Lauded As Leader By Sarah Bennett

People Newspapers Dr. Tom Trigg is eager to get started as the new chief of Highland Park ISD. On June 1, Trigg was named the lone finalist by HPISD trustees to replace Dawson Orr, who is leaving after six years as the district’s superintendent for a faculty position at SMU. Trigg comes to the Park Cities from Overland Park, Kan., where he has been the superintendent of Blue Valley Schools for 11 years after serving as assistant superintendent for eight years. He’s also been a math teacher

and athletic coach in Overland Park, which is a suburb of Kansas City, as well as a high school principal in Gardner, Kan. He was named the Superintendent of the Year in 2011 by the Kansas Association of School Administrators, and was one of four finalists for National Superintendent of the Year. “The opportunity is just tremendous,” Trigg said. “It’s such a quality district with a foundation of excellence.” Trigg will be formally hired in late June following a state-mandated 21-day waiting period as the lone finalist. He will then transition into his new role be-

fore Orr’s final day on Aug. 31. Trigg’s wife, Julie, is a Spanish teacher, and the couple has three grown children — one of whom lives in Amarillo. Trigg plans to work with parents, board members, teachers, and staff for the good of the students and community. “I’m trying to absorb as much as I can,” he said. “I’m not going to turn things upside down. I think we can work together collaboratively.” Trigg’s district in Kansas has already implemented the Spanish program that HPISD is working to incorporate. “Dr. Trigg is an educational

TA N N E R G A R Z A

Tom Trigg meets teachers at Bradfield Elementary. leader and team-builder of the highest caliber,” HPISD board president Joe Taylor said. “He has an impressive track record of

working within a high-performing district to build on existing excellence while developing innovative educational programs.”


PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM | JULY 2015  9

G R A D UAT I ON H I G H L A N D PA R K H I G H S C H O O L C O M M E N C E M E N T C E R E M O N Y

Valedictorian Amy Vania Liu gives her graduation speech.

DON JOHNSON

Andie Caroline Dorn performs during the ceremony.

The Class of 2015 celebrates graduating at a ceremony at Moody Coliseum on May 30. See more photos at parkcitiespeople.com.

Kathryn Davidson, Katherine Neelyper, and Katelin Adams form the Irish Suite by Sandra Howard.

There were 535 students in this year’s graduating class.

Class president Peyton Lee Ward

Dawson Orr makes his last speech as HPISD superintendent.

A W A R D S A S S E M B LY

Blanket Award winner Stuart Forrester, valedictorian Amy Liu, salutatorian Jiamin Zhou, and Blanket Award winner Gabby Crank

TA N N E R G A R Z A

Top 10 graduating seniors (not in order): Alyssa Chen, Kelsey Shipman, Benjamin Klimko, Benjamin Walzel, Amy Liu, Aileen Wang, Katherine Neely, David Wiegn, Christine Ramjee, and Jiamin Zhou pose with principal Walter Kelly and superintendent Dawson Orr.

This year’s Highland Park High School seniors participated in the traditional Senior Honors Day ceremony on May 28. Members of the class of 2015 received $15.57 million in scholarship awards, for which they were recognized amid school board trustees, administration, and scholarship donors. The Blanket Award winners were Gabby Crank and Stuart Forrester. Amy Liu, who will attend MIT, was valedictorian and Jiamin Zhou, who will attend Cambridge, was salutatorian.


10   JULY 2015 | PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM

BUSINESS

THESE FASHIONISTAS ARE ROLLING Company runs closet on wheels By Sara Cagle

People Newspapers Racks of contemporary women’s clothing adorn turquoise and gray chevron walls, jewelry twinkles on shelves, and a fitting room stands in the corner. It’s a boutique, all right, but it’s inside of a truck. Shop Haute Wheels, a traveling fashion truck operated by two SMU graduates, offers speedy styling to on-the-go shoppers. Last summer, fashion-forward friends Kelly Aguilar and Abby Elstad were eating at Klyde Warren Park when they realized that if a truck could become a restaurant, it could also become a store. In October, Haute Wheels hit the road. “We go to really popular bars and restaurants,” Aguilar said. “Let’s say you’re working all day and want to meet girlfriends for happy hour, but you would prefer to change. You can show up to where we are, we’ll style you, and when you step off the truck, you’re at the best place in town.” Elstad and Aguilar also stop at festivals, apartment parties, office lunch hours, and — their favorite — home parties, when they take the truck to wine nights or bridal showers and the host receives a gift card worth 10 percent of the event’s sales.

“If it were up to us, we would do home parties five days a week,” Aguilar said. “It’s kind of the new Tupperware party.” The fact that Haute Wheels is not limited to one location like a brick-and-mortar store, Aguilar said, allows the women to make connections all over the city. For them, making relationships is one of the best parts of the job. “We want people to feel like you’re coming into this giant closet and your girlfriend

is helping you get ready,” Aguilar said. “It’s really rewarding when you know that you’ve helped people and they’re genuinely happy, and the best is when they come back.” Elstad believes that their ability to offer personal styling without the fee also keeps customers coming back. “You get our raw, honest opinion of how things look, and we’re not going to put you out there wearing something that looks terrible,” Elstad said. “Ev-

eryone is so set in their ways of what they think they can wear, so we’re pushing people’s boundaries. You’re getting a story to tell when you buy something from our truck.” Haute Wheels has customers of all ages and has recently started carrying clothes for babies and men. The looks, all under $100 and mostly from local brands, cater to a variety of occasions. “We have something for everyone — the professional, the

SMU graduates Abby Elstad and Kelly Aguilar show off some of the summer selections from their rolling boutique. TA N N E R G A R Z A

hippie, the student, you name it,” Aguilar said. “We like smaller brands because we’re also a small business, the price is lower, and you find unique pieces that you aren’t going to see your best friend wearing when you go out to dinner.”

Are Buses Back For Executives? By Sarah Bennett

People Newspapers Bus travel may not be the top form of transportation that comes to mind when local executives shuttle to Austin or Houston. But one Park Cities resident wants to change that. Alex Danza, founder of Vonlane luxury coach bus service, started his company after working in high-end ground transport for 10 years. “Along the way, I came across

the motor coach industry and realized that industry didn’t have much exciting going on,” he said. “It was pretty standard, predominately charter operators [such as] Greyhound and Megabus … but nothing at a higher level for more sophisticated travelers.” Realizing this, he purchased a motor coach and had the interior transformed to resemble a private-jet cabin. With one year under the company’s belt, the shuttle service provides transport to Aus-

tin and Houston from Dallas. The next step is to link Austin and Houston, then later add additional cities such as San Antonio. Most clients are traveling for business, though some are for leisure — such as older folks who can no longer drive themselves to visit family. “They get dropped off right at door to the coach,” Danza said. “It’s a game-changer for them.”

CONTINUED ON 11

DON JOHNSON

Park Cities entrepreneur Alex Danza is targeting executives across Texas with his Vonlane luxury coach bus service.


PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM | JULY 2015  11

BUSINE S S An Ebby Halliday Company

CONTINUED FROM 10 Park Cities resident Wayne McCullough has used the service three times already and plans to use it more with his family come football season. Danza argues — and McCullough agrees — that the service provides significant advantages over flying or driving yourself. “I was just avoiding the general chaos of air traffic — taking your shoes off and trying to make your flight,” said the president of Benchmark Private Wealth Management. “From point to point, the flight takes you 50 minutes but you have to get there an hour ahead of time and then you’re 25 minutes outside of town … it’s the same or a little faster with Vonlane.” With the road scenario, Danza cites the advantage of being able to work or rest instead of spending your time doing the actual driving. Customers see additional benefit. “On 35, you white-knuckle it the whole time,” McCullough said. “They’re navigating traffic at central command at home. If there’s a wreck, they know ahead of time and take alternate routes. That’s my biggest concern.” The buses shuttle back and forth from established hotel lo-

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Vonlane started by transforming the interior of a motor coach to resemble a private jet cabin complete with a conference room. cations. In Dallas, that means the Doubletree near Love Field. A variety of amenities are available once onboard, such as full beverage and snack service, muffins, sandwiches, noise-canceling headphones, pillows and blankets, newspapers, television, radio, Wi-Fi, and a wireless printer. If you’re going straight to a meeting, they’ve even got things such as shoeshine kits, toothbrushes, pens, and pencils. “It’s ease of use and comfort,” Danza said. “It’s not taking your suit and shoving it in an overhead, and when you get to your destination it looks ter-

rible. It’s more dignified than the cattle call.” It’s $100 one-way to book, which Danza said is pretty competitive when you consider flight prices and gas estimates. Tickets can be purchased online or by phone. Each coach includes 16 seats in addition to a six-seat conference room that may be reserved during booking. “[Danza] saw a gap in the market,” McCullough said. “You’d never think of taking a bus, but once you use it, you will use it again.” Email sarah.bennett@ peoplenewspapers.com

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Park Cities resident David Daniel has stepped down as the president of the University of Texas at Dallas to become a deputy chancellor of the UT system. Daniel was at UT-Dallas for 10 years, and the school was lauded during his tenure for its advances in research and funding. Annual giving increased from $17.4 million to almost $79 million per year. Daniel oversaw enrollment growth from 14,000 to 23,000 at the school, and a four-year graduation rate that increased from 30 percent to 53 percent.

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Methodist Health System Fo u n d a t i o n has named businessman and philanthropist Jack Jack Lowe Lowe Jr. as the 2015 recipient of the Robert S. Folsom Leadership Award. Lowe is a past president of the Dallas ISD board of trustees and the Salesmanship Club, among other positions. The foundation also added Allie Beth Allman, Mark Craig, and Paul Rasmussen to its board of trustees. Allman is the president and CEO of real-estate firm Allie Beth Allman & Associates; Craig is the retired senior minister at Highland Park United Methodist Church; and Rasmussen is the current senior minister at HPUMC.

Greenway Parks is the new executive director of the Da l l a s Historical Society. The fourth-generation Dallasite was chosen following a nationwide search. The ESD graduate most recently served as the executive director of the Santa Fe Children’s Museum in New Mexico. She has also held executive roles with the Dallas Children’s Museum and Dallas Children’s Theater.

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SOCIETY L A F I E S TA D E L A S S E I S B A N D E R A S

E L I Z A B E T H YG A R T U A

Duchess of the Mississippi River Lindsey Elliott and father Curt Elliott

Allie Beth and Pierce Allman

Escort John Mitchell Clarke Jr., Duchess of France Sara Catherine Keith, and her father Russell Keith

Caroline, Cindy, and Alexandra McGeoch Duchess of Cinco de Mayo Lauren Rose Sands and father Patrick Sands

Nina Luskey, Graham Lewis, and Lily Guevel

Honoray chairs Lindalyn Adams and Jennie Reeves

Duchess of Santiago de Compostela Staley Anne Rose and father Hal Rose

Duchess of Chichen Itza Hannah Nicole Davis and father Bill Davis

Duchess of Versailles Catherine McGeoch and father Alex McGeoch Sarah Kate Welch, Dorothy Hino, and Michal Krikorian

Chairs Mary Hubbard and Lori Martin

Kate McDaniel, Savannah Eidson, Claire De La Chappelle, and Caroline Taylor

Duchess of Highland Park Loring Dalton and father Sam Dalton

La Fiesta De Las Seis Banderas celebrated its 30th debutante ball and presentation at the Hilton Anatole on June 13, as evident by the theme, “Celebración!” Honorary chairs were original founders Pierce Allman, Lindalyn Adams, and Jennie Reeves. Chairs were Mary Hubbard and Lori Martin. All in all, 15 beneficiaries received funding from the event. Check parkcitiespeople.com/ category/society for more photos.


PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM | JULY 2015  15

S O C IET Y S A LV A T I O N A R M Y F A S H I O N S H O W A N D L U N C H E O N

KRISTINA BOWMAN

Maggie Kipp, Kristina Whitcomb, Melinda Rathke Moore, and Shelly Slater

Betsy Price, Laura Bush, and Sharon McCullough

Ginger Sager and Dixey Arterburn Jo Lawrence, Gina Jones, and Ramona Jones

Debbie Oates, JoAnn Roosevelt, and Sara Martineau

Charlotte Anderson and Gene Jones

The annual Salvation Army Women’s Auxiliary Fashion Show & Luncheon on May 4 was chaired by Dixey Arterburn and Ginger Sager. Marilyn Augur, Margaret Hancock, Elizabeth Taylor, Ann Hardaway, Sharon McCullough, Libby Hunt, Debbie Hayhurst, Terry McCullough, and Lissie McCullough served as honorary co-chairs. WFAA anchor Shelly Slater emceed the sold-out event, which was held at Brook Hollow Golf Club. Gene Jones and Charlotte Anderson received the 2015 Margot Perot Award for excellence in service to The Salvation Army.


16   JULY 2015 | PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM

S OCI ET Y GENESIS LUNCHEON

DANA DRIENSKY

Lesly Annen, Connie Kleinert, Ashlee Kleinert, Emily Eisenhauer, and Robin Bagwell

Crayton Webb and Joshua Ragsdale Gail Turner and Pat Schenkel

Maria Shriver and Jan Langbein

Jan Baldwin, Angela Nash, and Meredith Camp

Catherine New, Bianca Jackson, & Jennifer Burns

More than 1,800 people attended the Genesis Women’s Shelter & Support Annual Luncheon on Tuesday, May 5, at the Hilton Anatole. This year, the luncheon celebrated 30 years of service to women and children who are victims of domestic violence.

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TWO RE VOLUTIONS WERE DOCUMENTED

In their declaration of political independence, a committee of concerned businessmen illuminated the spirit and purposes of the American Revolution. Meanwhile, a Scot philosopher charted economic independence through the Industrial Revolution. Thomas Jefferson, applying centuries of principles, drafted an unequivocal statement of free men with equal opportunity. In “The Wealth of Nations,” Adam Smith theorized that if free individuals used their resources to produce profit, it could also benefit the public interest. Having declared the right to establish commerce, America gave Smith’s theory its first trial run. The Profit Motive required a proper setting. Instead of a master economic plan, sorely needed after the long war, American entrepreneurs worked to create the right political framework. When our new Constitution vowed to protect the rights of an individual, it was recognition that political and economic liberties stand or fall together. Our founders figured a business system giving free play to individuals and voluntary groups would induce a kind of co-action impossible under centralized government planning. Smith was right. As were Jefferson, Adams, Hamilton, Madison and the other originators. Profit, the economic carrot, produced more than the stick. Individual initiative and free association worked wonders. Out of this unsystematic system called free enterprise grew a self-reliant nation and market economy that transformed the world. Shared is the understanding that business-for-profit isn’t an end in itself, but it makes achievement of great ends possible. Since our firm’s founding here in 1985, we have invested in education, the arts, and a wide range of social problem-solving. We believe there should be no conflict between seeking profit and serving the public good. When free and enterprising, all can achieve a broad range of social goals with creativity and effectiveness. Yes, we are entrepreneurs and business people. Before that, we are citizens. As such, we bear responsibilities, clearly stated over 2,000 years ago in Athens: “ONE CITIZEN MAY DIFFER WITH ANOTHER, BUT THE SALVATION OF THE COMMUNIT Y IS THE COMMON BUSINESS OF US ALL.”

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7112 TURTLE CREEK BOULEVARD | Offered for $4,750,000

4308 ARCADY AVENUE | Offered for $4,150,000

5 Beds | 5.2 Baths | 6,943 Sq.Ft.

4 Beds | 4.2 Baths | 5,787 Sq.Ft.

CAROLE McBRIDE | 214.212.0921 | carole.mcbride@alliebeth.com

ALEX PERRY | 214.926.0158 | alex.perry@alliebeth.com

5818 LAKEHURST AVENUE | Offered for $2,495,000

3912 CENTENARY AVENUE | Offered for $2,325,000

5 Beds | 7.1 Baths | 8,034 Sq.Ft.

6 Beds | 6.1 Baths | 5,716 Sq.Ft.

ALEX PERRY | 214.926.0158 | alex.perry@alliebeth.com

PINKSTON-HARRIS | 214.803.1721 | stephanie.pinkston@alliebeth.com

3900 POTOMAC AVENUE

3533 VILLANOVA STREET

3401 LEE PARKWAY #2201

4324 POTOMAC AVENUE

Offered for $3,750,000

Offered for $3,300,000

Offered for $2,150,000

Offered for $1,950,000

4 Beds | 4.1 Baths | 5,536 Sq.Ft. | .466 Acre Corner

5 Beds | 6.1 Baths | 6,564 Sq.Ft.

3 Beds | 3.1 Baths | 4,777 Sq.Ft.

4 Beds | 5.1 Baths | 5,462 Sq.Ft.

CYNTHIA BEAIRD

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Information contained herein is believed to be correct, but neither agents nor owner assumes any responsibility for this information or gives any warranty to it. Square foot numbers will vary from county tax records to drawings by a prior sale or withdrawal without notice. In accordance with the Law, this property is offered without respect to race, color, creed or national origin.


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3916 MIRAMAR AVENUE | Offered for $3,690,000

6339 LAKEHURST AVENUE | Offered for $2,500,000

Premier Old Highland Park Building Site

5 Beds | 4.1 Baths | 7,056 Sq.Ft.

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11259 LEACHMAN CIRCLE | Offered for $1,425,000

7538 COLGATE AVENUE | Offered for $1,295,000

5 Beds | 5.1 Baths | 5,744 Sq.Ft. | Pool | Creek Lot | 0.776 Acres

5 Beds | 4.1 Baths | 5 Living Areas | Vrnda w/ WBFP & Kit Facilities | 5,632 Sq.Ft. | 65’ x 160’

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2732 STANFORD AVENUE

7222 STEFANI DRIVE

9108 CLEARLAKE DRIVE

4323 GILBERT AVENUE #4

Offered for $1,880,000

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JULY 2015 | PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM

S OCI ET Y CAN DO LUNCHEON

Linda Sikes, Laura Reeder, Denise Cardenas, and Sara Matlock LISA MEANS

Leslie Diers, Tonya Howard, Brent Christopher, Carlin Morris, and Anne Reeder

Jane Murray, May Day, and Kristi Francis

Leslie Melnick, Cynthia Koons, and Michele Axley

Beth Thoele, Carmyn Neely, Leslie Diers, Kristina Whitcomb, Karen Kline, and Pam Perella

Fredye Factor and Sarah Losinger

Melanie Myers and Meridith Zidell Wilkinson Center celebrated its third annual Can Do luncheon on May 12 at Dallas Country Club. Recipients at the awards ceremony included shoe-drive founder Carlin Morris and Communities Foundation of Texas. The luncheon chair was Leslie Diers.

Alex Sizemore and Kathleen Gibson

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S O C IET Y D S O L FA S H I O N S H OW

LAURA BUCKMAN

A model walks the runway during the dress show.

Nancy Labadie and Melissa Lewis

Marielle LeMasters, Elizabeth Metzger, and Claire McCormick

You can make all the difference in the life of an abused child.

Volunteer! To learn more, join us for the

2015 Parade of Playhouses at NorthPark Center, July 10-26 Simona Beal with her two debutante daughters Tasha and Lauren

Dorothy Weil and daughter debutante Allison

This fun, family event benefiting Dallas CASA is a great way find out more about volunteering AND purchase raffle tickets for a chance to win a dream-making playhouse to help connect abused and neglected children to safe, permanent homes.

Or visit dallascasa.org to learn more today!

The Dallas Symphony Orchestra League debutantes enjoyed refreshments and a bridal fashion show at Neiman Marcus downtown on May 30. Project Runway’s Austin Scarlett was on hand for consultations. The debs have a full social calendar this summer with dress showings and cocktail parties scheduled.


22   JULY 2015 | PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM

S OCI ET Y J I M M Y C H O O PA R T Y

Nicole Barrett and Carmen Surgent

QC CONG/ XO PHOTOGRAPHY

Choo lovers mingled and browsed Jimmy Choo’s newest lineup at the Pre-Fall Collection Party on May 20 at the Jimmy Choo boutique in Highland Park Village. Choo donated a portion of the proceeds from the event to the SPCA of Texas in partnership with this year’s Paws Cause 20th Anniversary Celebration and Fur Ball 2015.

Liza Krengle, Tiffany Moon, and Yana Landman

JUNE 24 PATIO MUSIC with OPEN CLASSICAL/ CLASSICALLY JAZZ 7–10 PM FREE Exposition Plaza Bring chairs/blankets. Concessions/food trucks onsite. No coolers. Free parking / Gate 3!

HISTORIC SPOTLIGHT 6-7:30 PM FREE Parry Ave. Gates

Dallas Center for Architecture details Fair Park’s history through various topics, speakers & tours. RSVP to info@DallasCFA.com!

JUNE 25 MOVIE SERIES: “HUNGER GAMES: MOCKINGJAY PART 1” 8:30 PM FREE

Exposition Plaza Bring chairs/blankets. Concessions/food trucks/onsite. No coolers. Free parking/ Gate 3!

VISIT FAIRPARK.ORG FOR UP-TO-DATE INFORMATION

JUNE 29 PROJECT SEW 10 AM–8 PM FREE Women’s Museum Bring your sewing machine, tools, lunch & sew for a few hours or for the day. RSVP at www.fairpark.org.

JUNE 30 CABARET MUSIC SERIES 7:30–9 PM FREE Women’s Museum Musical theater features Dallas’ star entertainers!

JULY 1 PATIO MUSIC with JEFF AYCOCK 7–10 PM FREE Exposition Plaza

JUNE/JULY 2015 Programs/Activities

JULY 2 MOVIE SERIES: “ALEXANDER AND THE TERRIBLE, HORRIBLE, NO GOOD, VERY BAD DAY” 8:30 PM FREE

JULY 15 PATIO MUSIC with SONGBIRD JONES 7–10 PM FREE

JULY 23 MOVIE SERIES: “BOXTROLLS” 8:30 PM FREE

JULY 4 FAIR PARK FOURTH Parkwide

JULY 16 MOVIE SERIES: “PADDINGTON” 8:30 PM FREE

JULY 27 PROJECT SEW 10 AM–8 PM FREE

Exposition Plaza

Exposition Plaza

FREE

Day-long fun with food and fireworks!

JULY 8 PATIO MUSIC with EASTWOOD 7–10 PM FREE Exposition Plaza

JULY 9 MOVIE SERIES: “INTO THE WOODS” 8:30 PM FREE Exposition Plaza

Exposition Plaza

Exposition Plaza

Women’s Museum

JULY 28 CABARET MUSIC SERIES 7:30–9 PM FREE

JULY 17 FOOD TRUCK FRENZY 11 AM–2 PM

Women’s Museum

DAILY ACTIVITIES Esplanade Fountain Shows / Discovery Garden Butterfly House / African American Museum / Hall of State / Dallas Children’s Aquarium EVENING ACTIVITIES DALLAS SUMMER MUSICALS JUNE 9–21 “Cinderella”

JUNE 23–JULY 5 “Dirty Dancing”

GEXA ENERGY PAVILION

Exposition Plaza Enjoy Ruthie’s Rolling Café, Texas Burrito Co., Mr. Snowie & The Butcher’s Son! Free parking/Gates 3 & 4!

JULY 29 PATIO MUSIC with MRS THESIS 7–10 PM FREE

JUNE 19 Darius Rucker, Brett Eldredge, Brothers Osbourne & A Thousand Horses

JULY 22 PATIO MUSIC with BLANDELLES 7–10 PM FREE

JULY 30 MOVIE SERIES: “MALEFICENT” 8:30 PM FREE

JUNE 20 Julion Alvarez

Exposition Plaza

Exposition Plaza

Exposition Plaza

JUNE 26 Kings of the Mic: LL Cool J, Bone Thugs-NHarmony & Doug E. Fresh

PROGRAMS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE


PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM | JULY 2015  23

S OC I ET Y ELIZABETH TOON CHARITIES CONCERT & SHOOTOUT

Join the Y in June for free! No joiners fee for all new members in the month of June.

www.pcymca.org 214-526-7293

Our building may be gone but we are still offering lots of activities for our Park Cities Community at our Preston Center Location. We are currently registering for our fall programs. We offer: Andrea Cedillos and Shannon Johnston

Clark Knippers and Kersten Rettig

Chad and Molly Robottom

J E R RY M C C LU R E

Justin Toon, Mary Margaret Toon, Wade Bowen, Phil Pritchett, Patti Toon, Larry Toon, Laura Toon Brooks, and Taylor Brooks celebrate the Elizabeth Toon Charities Concert & Shootout at the Rustic on May 7. Bowen and Pritchett were the musical guests. The golf shootout on May 8 was attended by 450 people on 83 teams. First place was awarded to E Smith Realty Partners. All the funds raised at the concert and shootout will benefit 18 children’s charities in North Texas.

Soccer Flag / Tackle Football Volleyball Karate Adventure Guides / Princess Dallas Summer Musical Classes Youth Fitness Certification

Fall program sign up at the

Park Cities YMCA!

MEADOWS MUSEUM

SMU

DALLAS

INFANTA MARGARITA In a Blue Dress

A MASTERWORK BY VELÁZQUEZ FROM VIENNA JULY 25-NOVEMBER 1, 2015

COMING UP AT THE MEADOWS MUSEUM Saturday, July 25, 3 p.m. Diego Velázquez’s Infanta Margarita in a Blue Dress Ángel Aterido Fernández, Professor of Art History, Fundación Ortega-Marañon, Centro de Estudios Internacional de Toledo FREE

This exhibition has been organized by the Meadows Museum. It is part of the Museum’s Golden Anniversary, which is sponsored by The Meadows Foundation, The Moody Foundation, the Dallas Tourism Public Improvement District and the Dallas Convention & Visitors Bureau. Media sponsorship has been provided by The Dallas Morning News. Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez (Spanish, 1599-1660), Infanta Margarita in a Blue Dress, 1659. Oil on canvas. Kunsthistorisches Museum, Gemäldegalerie, Vienna. Copyright: Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna.


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PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM | JULY 2015  25

WEDDINGS WEDDING

CAROLINE LA RASH & BRIAN KERR PEOPLE’S

OICE RUNN E CH

P 2011

aroline Jordan La Rash and Brian Christopher Kerr were joined in holy matrimony Saturday, April 18, at Park Cities Presbyterian Church. The Rev. Mark Davis officiated their evening ceremony. The Rev. Joshua Whitfield read from scripture and offered the benediction and blessing. A reception followed at the Belo Mansion. The rehearsal dinner was hosted by the parents of the groom on the eve of the wedding at the Dallas Petroleum Club. The bride is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Stephen J. La Rash of University Park, the granddaughter of Mrs. Martha Scott and the late Dr. Robert A. Scott, and Mrs. Betty La Rash and the late Mr. Joseph La Rash. The groom is the son of Dr. Vivian Kerr and Mr. Kenneth Kerr of Plano, Texas. He is the grandson of Mrs. Helen Windsor and the late Dr. Zoltan W. Windsor, and the late Mr. and Mrs. Ernest L. Kerr. The bride was presented in marriage by her father. She wore an ivory gown designed by Nardos Imam and a lace capelet worn by her mother when her parents married 38 years ago. Matron of honor was the bride’s sister Lindsay La Rash McKinney and the maid of honor was in loving remembrance of her younger sister Christena Lindstrom La Rash. Bridesmaids included Elizabeth Shuford Conroy, McLean Brittingham Fairchild, Michelle Gillespie Hunt, Lauren Elizabeth Kerr, and Jordan Ashleigh Meridith. Among the members of the house party were Avri Morgan Brousseau, Betsy Houseman Fisher, Eliz-

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abeth Oates Goodyear, Melissa Sue Oates, Gabrielle Alexandria Sztamenits, and Kaitlin Jane Van Dyk. The flower girl was Stella Kate McKinney. Assisting the groom as best man was his brother, Robert Windsor Kerr. Groomsmen included Jack Frances Fabick, John Gregory Grinnan, Robert Joseph La Rash, Elliott Thomas Marshall, and Michael Blayze Woodlock. Serving as ushers were Ernest Lee Kerr III, Nathan Swain Kerr, Phillip Patrick McKinney, and Michael Anthony Sinacola

II. The ring bearer was Austin Patrick McKinney. A Highland Park High School graduate, Caroline received a Bachelor of Business Administration in marketing from Southern Methodist University. A Jesuit College Preparatory School of Dallas graduate, Brian received a Bachelor of Business Administration in finance from Southern Methodist University. He is a CFA charter holder. Following their wedding trip to Antigua, the couple have made Dallas their home.

ENGAGEMENT

STENSRUD - EVANS

M

r. and Mrs. Bruce John Stensrud of University Park are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Sterling Anne Stensrud, to Robert Markham Evans, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mark Cumbie Evans of Houston. The bride is a 2008 graduate of Highland Park High School. She received a Bachelor of Science in elementary education from The University of Texas at Austin in 2012. Sterling is a kin-

dergarten teacher at Highland Park Presbyterian Day School. The groom is a 2008 graduate of St. John’s School in Houston. He received a Bachelor of Business Administration in finance from The University of Texas at Austin in 2012. Rob is an associate at Kayne Anderson Capital Advisors in Houston. The couple will exchange vows on Dec. 19, 2015 at Highland Park United Methodist Church.

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26   JULY 2015 | PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM

FOCUS ON PHILANTHROPY

LEARNING CAN BE FUN AFTERSCHOOL Nonprofit aims to keep kids active

many of the kids, expecting them to participate every day the program is offered.” Dallas Afterschool has partnered with SMU to learn what elements truly have an impact on education and social and emotional development. They’re takBy Jacie Scott ing a systemic and collaborative Special Contributor approach to this through their Out of School Time Initiative, to There was a time when afterbe implemented in August. school care was just homework “If we work intentionally in help, apple-juice boxes, and peafour neighborhoods and we add nut butter sandwiches — not the additional resources to work between parents and providers and most appealing situation for today’s youth. schools, then we can determine Introducing Dallas Afterwhat kind of programming parschool, where there’s more to ents want in their neighborhood, what kind of interventions are programming than just snacks. The staff is in the business of imneeded, and what the schools proving the quality of afterschool want afterschool providers to be and summer programs. Since focusing on,” Hanger said. Q U I C K FAC T S The OST initiative will zone 2007, Dallas Afterschool has collaborated with nonprofit afterin on neighborhoods in the West FOUNDED: 2007 school sites in low-income neighDallas, Fair Park, South Oak Cliff, borhoods to suit the needs of the and Bachman Lake areas. Right BEING NOTICED: Dallas youth in that area.. now about 3 percent of the chilAfterschool has twice been “There’s something to be said dren in those neighborhoods are nominated for the Center for having kids safe between in programs that Dallas Afterfor Nonprofit Managment’s school supports. Hanger hopes the hours of three and six,” said “Nonprofit of the Year” award. to increase that number to 7 perChristina Hanger, CEO at Dallas FIND THEM AT: Afterschool. cent. dallasafterschool.org Today, Dallas Afterschool The goal for OST is to deliver serves 120 nonprofit afterschool equitable access to quality proC O U R T E SY O F D A L L A S A F T E R S C H O O L grams and use the collected data sites, including Trinity River Bottom left: Dallas Afterschool works with 120 sites throughout Dallas, collectively serving 9,000 Mission and Family Place shelter, to provide programs that meet students. Activity boxes contain 45-minute activities to help actively engage the students. serving nearly 9,000 students. the needs of students. UltimateThe organization doesn’t work ly, Hanger would like to use the with students directly. In essence, cent of a child’s time awake is born into poverty experience a Hank Lawson, community en- outcome of the initiative to push they serve as a one-stop shop for spent away from the classroom, 6,000-hour learning gap by sixth gagement advisor at Frazier Revi- for public funding of afterschool other programs, providing staff and schools are already given so grade in comparison to their mid- talization, Inc., saw this as an op- programs. “If we can work in these training, free engaging curricu- much to cover that social and dle-class classmates. One way portunity to upgrade programs at lum, funding for field trips, and emotional enhancement is not al- that Dallas Afterschool works all of their afterschool sites. neighborhoods and show what a professional development. “We can now count on having positive impact it has, maybe we ways addressed. to bridge this gap is by providEach partner site is evaluated “Kids in Dallas face a lot of ing creative activity boxes for af- quality hands-on activities at all can get there,” Hanger said. on 10 elements of quality. There’s challenges, and so many of our terschool programs. Each one is of our sites,” said Lawson after a In the meantime, Dallas Aftera follow-up assessment at the end kids are growing up in poverty,” a 45-minute lesson that teaches training session with the Dallas school is taking on more sites and Highland Park Village - ParkCity Preston Hollow - July 2015 of the year. Hanger said. spreading skills that align with the Texas Afterschool staff. “This turn partners lastinmodified: Jun 10,and 2015 5:07 PMits misTrim: 10”w x 3”h, Bleed: 10.25”w x 3.25”h, Safety: .25” Hanger noted that eighty perStatistics show that children Education Knowledge Standards. means that we should hold on to sion.

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PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM | JULY 2015  27

LIVING WELL Finding a Suite Solution During Brain Surgery By Sarah Bennett

People Newspapers Brain surgery still isn’t child’s play, but neurosurgeons’ jobs at UT Southwestern Medical Center just got a little easier — or rather, a lot more efficient. As of January, the center has a hybrid cerebrovascular operating suite, which will allow doctors to adapt to a patient’s needs in high-stakes surgery more easily. “The suite has two components: one that it’s an operative suite, the second is that it’s an endovascular suite,” Park Cities resident and neurointerventional surgeon Lee Pride said. What does that mean in layman’s terms? When doctors need to get to a blockage in the brain, say from a stroke, there are two ways to go about it: one is cranially, and the other is endovascular, where doctors follow blood vessels from the groin up to the brain, similar to some cardiac procedures. Traditionally, the endovascular procedure is done in an angiography suite. But now, either procedure can be done in the same suite. “You have a room that is big

C O U R T E SY P H O T O

Two Park Cities doctors were instrumental in starting a new hybrid cerebrovascular operating suite earlier this year at UT Southwestern Medical Center. enough to hold all of the angiographic equipment as well all of the surgical equipment and a table that is built for angiography,” said Hunt Batjer, a Park Cities resident and the hospital’s chairman of neurological surgery. Pride said he has seen three or four cases in the past few

months that specifically require both procedures. Though endovascular is more minimally invasive, if a clear path is not possible, the doctors must pursue a cranial operation, which would typically require rescheduling all together. “It makes it very convenient if you have an environment that

doesn’t sacrifice anything,” he said. “We can just go immediately into the surgical approach … it just gives us a lot of flexibility.” Babu Welch, associate professor of neurological surgery and radiology, is trained in both procedures and was instrumental in the $3 million design of the suite at the Zale Lipshy Univer-

sity Hospital, which was funded both publicly and privately. With the suite’s high-resolution imaging equipment, aneurysms, carotid artery disease, and other conditions can now be diagnosed right there. “It is unbelievably convenient and rapid. If you’ve got a problem, you know it right then,” Batjer said. He explained that there are a number of factors that need to be controlled during these procedures, such as head movements. What if a patient coughs under anesthesia? The new operating suite includes radiolucent pins to hold patients’ heads perfectly still to avoid such problems. In addition, there is the necessary angiogram following the procedure’s completion. “In the old days, we would close the wound, put a dressing on it, and then go across and do an angiogram,” Batjer said. “That’s the kind of circumstance that this suite eliminates for us. It all happens bang, bang, bang.” UT Southwestern is the only facility in the region that has been certified as an Advanced Comprehensive Stroke Center by The Joint Commission.

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28 JULY 2015 | PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM

LI VI N G W ELL

Tragedy Prompts Widow to Fill a Need For In-Home Care By Paige Skinner

Special Contributor As Lollie Scheble dealt with her husband’s case of Glioblastoma Multiforme, a malignant tumor affecting the brain, she struggled to find adequate inhome care. “From the time my second daughter was born until the time he passed away, it was really chaotic in my house,” the Park Cities resident said. “And I couldn’t find an agency. I went through several in Dallas and I couldn’t find anyone to help us — someone that could come in and assimilate into our home.” Because she couldn’t find help through an agency, Scheble decided to take matters into her own hands. She began recruiting freelance nurses, and that’s who helped her and her family during the last two months of her husband’s life. “It really was amazing; it was just a gift,” she said. “And I’ve realized there’s a big difference

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C O U R T E SY P H O T O

Lollie Scheble is pictured with her late husband, Phil, and children. in caregiving and why we don’t spend a lot of time recruiting and training caregivers. Baby Boomers want to stay at home and will just hire anyone and not give a lot of mindfulness into who they are bringing into their home.” So Scheble took her human resources background and founded FHL Home Care, which provides in-home care. FHL stands for faith, hope and love, and phonet-

ically, it’s also her late husband’s name — Phil. FHL Home Care is made up of about 15 certified nurse assistants, Scheble said. The CNAs help with a variety of things, from medication reminders to meal preparation to driving the patients to doctor appointments. But Scheble, who is executive director and founder of FHL, takes it a step further and ensures

it’s a right match for the patient and CNA. Depending on the patient’s needs or circumstances, she matches a CNA depending on their skills. For instance, if a patient has small children, Scheble knows the CNA must be ready to attend to the children’s needs — something Scheble required with her in-home care. One of the CNAs who helped take care of Scheble’s late husband is Tonya Walls, who is now a CNA for FHL. She said in-home care is typically the better option for patients. “I feel it’s important because the patient is at home, number one,” Walls said. “A lot of times when you have a patient that is confused and you take them out of their home environment, it makes it worse. It makes some patients become very depressed. Anytime you’re in a home, it just makes you feel better. But as you get older and someone takes you out of your home, you lose some of your will to live. It just takes

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away a lot from patients. So inhome care is always the best if possible.” Walls is responsible for her patient’s immediate care and said FHL allows her to get to know her patients on a more personal level.

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PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM | JULY 2015  29

COMMUNITY

DIRECTORS OF DUNK

Mom Hopes Site Brings Objectivity For Books By Sarah Bennett

People Newspapers

TA N N E R G A R Z A

Armstrong Simms and his brothers can often be found at a basketball hoop, recording trick shots for their BasketBros channel.

Siblings grow viewership for trick-shot vids By Meredith Carey

Special Contributor Armstrong Simms is getting accustomed to the attention. “My brother the other day was getting his hair cut and this guy came up to him and said, ‘Hey, I know you, you’re from BasketBros,’” said the Highland Park High School junior. With hundreds of views on their trickshot videos, Simms and his three brothers hope to make a name for themselves online through their YouTube channel. “Our family loves sports, loves to play sports, watch sports, so we would always play around in the backyard and so I figured I’d just record these trick shots,” Simms said. But Simms has another passion — filmmaking. With a camera in hand since he was 8 years old, the Highland Park native has made it his mission to learn as much as possible. In his mind, practice makes perfect.

For Simms, BasketBros brings together two passions: basketball and filmmaking. “I want to do this. I make sure to shoot at least one video every week, even if it’s just of my brothers doing random stuff, edited together in a cool way,” he said. He has two YouTube channels — one for the golf, Frisbee, and basketball trick shots and the other for more creative work. Simms takes inspiration from his favorite movies and tries to emulate certain techniques by recreating interesting scenes.

“Armstrong is a bright spot in my class; he has a very creative mind,” said Manuel Vasquez, advanced broadcast journalism teacher at HPHS. “It’s very interesting to see a young person who already knows what they want to do 10, 20 years from now. He knows and it shows. He wants to be a director.” Simms writes scripts, uses his friends as actors, and edits the footage together nearly every week, whether or not for class. From videos of his youngest brother Boone hitting golf balls down the stairs to one-shot music videos in parking garages, Simms uses all of his resources, and the school’s equipment, to push himself. Getting the Simms brothers and friends in order, when the trick shots take at least five but sometimes 30 tries, isn’t always easy. “Sometimes my mom has to make my brothers help me with projects and they’re very uncooperative, but we take breaks and that’s what I’ll be dealing with later. I think it’s good practice,” he said. Now on their seventh edition of BasketBros heading into summer, Simms and his brothers will have even more time to shoot hoops and putt through the house. “My parents are super supportive through it all,” Simms said. “We haven’t wrecked anything yet, but I don’t know many moms who would be so OK with us playing like this in the house.”

Park Cities parent Gina Culpepper couldn’t find a book review site that gave reviews without age recommendations or ranking. So she started one. As the outgoing PTA president at Highland Park High School, she was Gina well aware of the Culpepper HPISD booklist debate that dragged on during the school year, though she remained neutral due to her position. “A lot of sites provide traditional reviews, good or bad,” she said. “What I think is appropriate for a 14-year-old is different than my best friend, so I tried to find a site that gave no recommendations and said, ‘here are the facts.’ I couldn’t find it. That is what I’m trying to do.” Objectivereader.com officially launched on June 2 with more than 20 reviews written by Culpepper. She texted a few friends and within 24 hours, she had 1,300 page views. “It’s a great starting point for conversation if you don’t have the time to read the books but want to be somewhat engaged,” Park Cities parent Dina Kirkpatrick said. “I’ve actually referred it to several friends.” Culpepper has since added a number of titles to the site. Books are searchable alphabetically and by recent additions. They are not organized by grade year or reading list, because Culpepper intends the reach to spread beyond the Park Cities. “There are only so many high school and AP reading lists out there,” she said. “It’s a resource anyone can use, not just Highland Park.” For each book, Culpepper includes a basic plot summary and then lists any instances that may fall under the following categories: language, drug and alcohol use, violence and crime, sexual content, and other. What’s “other,” you ask?

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30

JULY 2015 | PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM

C O MMUN I T Y

Can a Simple Ping Boost Your Social Life? By Sara Cagle

People Newspapers For three roommates at the University of Texas, the best parts of college were not always planned events, but more spontaneous ones. To pass these kinds of memories on to other students, they created Ping Social, an app designed to bring friends together in an easier way than Facebook or group messaging. Co-founders Will Ko and Winston Tri, both seniors with technical backgrounds, are the brains behind the coding for the iOS application, while Highland Park High School graduate Wes Cole serves as Ping’s marketing director. “Our fondest experiences were the spontaneous road trips or late-night doughnut runs, so those things we wanted to make more accessible to UT students,” Cole said. “We believe that everyone should have the opportunity to spend time with the people they care about.” Ping Social allows users to create a social event, or a Ping, specify the time and location, and invite people from their friends list. Events range from coffee runs to pickup soccer games and can be public to friends or private for those invited. The app had its soft launch in mid-April and now boasts 1,600 users creating 20-30 Pings a day. This summer, the app’s eight-person team is fixing bugs and generating buzz for a hard launch in the fall, when it hopes to expand its user base. While Cole reaches out to college friends across the country to become Ping ambassadors, Ko and Tri are adding features to hide unwanted Pings and create custom friend groups. As members of the millennial generation, the Ping team is aware that people already have texting, Facebook, Twitter, and more to socialize. However, they believe that Ping solves important problems within these popular apps. “When we say spend time with your friends, we don’t mean looking through

C O U R T E SY P H O T O

Highland Park High School graduate Wes Cole (far left) is the marketing director for Ping Social, which will launch this fall. profiles or looking through pictures that have already happened,” Cole said. “Ping Social is about planning ways to spend time with people you love doing things that you love.” The friends also found that, for planning activities with friends, messy group texts make it hard to confirm details, while formal Facebook events are filled with unnecessary posts. Ping, they say, forces users to be proactive in making a plan that is easy for friends to follow. “Ping is right in the middle in that it caters to local and spontaneous events that are more casual but can also scale up to big events and be personal at the same time,” Ko said.

Ping Social began with three months of Ko and Tri coding for 12 hours a day. Two extremely reversed sleep cycles, 100 cans of Red Bull, and one resulting stomach ulcer later, the Ping team now works from the Capital Factory technology incubator in downtown Austin. The app will remain U.S.-based for now, but with connections in cities such as Hong Kong and Beijing, the team plans to expand on an even broader scale. “Our focus is on getting a small group of people to really love the application and then moving out that way,” Ko said. “We’re definitely looking to go international; we want people to know that we are looking ahead.”

“ W HE N W E SAY SPEND TIME WITH YOU R FR I E N D S , W E D ON ’ T M E A N LOOK I N G T HROU G H P ROFI L E S OR LOOK I N G T HROU G H P I CT U R E S T HAT HAV E A L R E A DY HA P P E N E D. " WE S C O LE

Dickey’s Owners Look to Back the Blue With Barbecue By Sarah Bennett

People Newspapers Maurine Dickey and her husband met and married while they were students at SMU. Before they graduated, they were running her father-in-law’s barbecue company after his unexpected death. Now, with the company nearing 75 years in the barbecue business, Dickey decided it was time to focus on philanthropic pursuits. That’s why she’s founded Barbecue, Boots & Badges, an organization that gives back to families of fallen

law enforcement officers and officers or departments in need. “There are not a lot of organizations out there that help the police,” she said. “When police or law enforcement have a tragedy or death, the fellow officers pull money out of their own pockets.” Founded just last fall, the organization received its 501(c)3 status rather quickly and got right to work. As seems appropriate for the cause, Barbecue, Boots & Badges takes on projects on a caseby-case basis. Most recently, the nonprofit provided fresh flow-

ers for fallen officers’ graves for a number of holidays at the Garden of Honor at Restland Funeral Home and Cemetery. Dallas police made the request on behalf of the families of the fallen officers, and a ceremony was held on Memorial Day. “Considering what the widows have been through or endured, this was something where we all came together to acknowledge their loss to recognize what those officers meant to them and to us,” Sgt. Demetrick Pennie said. “That’s the overar-

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C O U R T E SY P H O T O

Maurine Dickey smiles with police officers during a Barbecue, Boots & Badges event.


PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM | JULY 2015  31

C OM M U N I T Y BR I E FS Annual Fourth of July Festivities Planned The Park Cities Rotary Club will host its annual parade and family festival on July 4, with the parade beginning at 9 a.m. near Highland Park Town Hall. The route will wind through the Park Cities to Goar Park, adjacent to University Park City Hall, where the festival gets underway about 9:30 a.m. The festival is free and includes food, music, and contests. The festivities also will include the Firecracker Fun Run at Curtis Park and a family bicycle contest at the former Park Cities YMCA site. For more information, call 214-987-5488.

HPDPS Mourns As Chief Dies Suddenly Highland Park Department of Public Safety chief Chris Vinson died suddenly on June 1 following complications from a heart surgery performed three days earlier. Vinson, a well-known member of the community, had been chief since February 2008. The FBI National Academy graduate had served in the department since 1983. “When you have a department with officers who stay for a long period of time, you really get to know each other,” HPDPS Sgt. Lance Koppa said. “That’s your family.”

Kate Smith, p.l.l.c.

PA R K C I T I E S Y M C A B R E A KS G R O U N D

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In late May, community members and key players with the future Moody Family YMCA broke ground on the Preston Road site. Although demolition was completed quickly, recent rains have left the project behind — but now that things are drying up, crews are ready to

New Policy Aims For Pretty Porta-Potties On June 15, Highland Park’s building inspections department introduced a policy designed to clean up residential construction sites by requiring that all portable toilets in plain view from the street be concealed by a wooden screen on three sides.

1205 Hall Johnson Road, Suite 3 Colleyville, TX 76034 P: 817.479.0562

make up for it. Excavation and site utilities are the next steps in the project, which will progress through August 2016. Though much of the project is funded, there’s still plenty to do in the fundraising aspect. Roughly $17 million out of $28 million has been raised.

The policy will make an exception for mobile lavatories that are in the rear of the property. There’s no word yet on whether contractors will raise a stink. “Historically we’ve always gotten really good cooperation and compliance from our builders,” Koppa said. “I don’t see us having any problems with it just being a policy.”

Dermatology

Medical, Cosmetic, and Pediatric

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Matt Gaston, the lead pastor at University Park United Methodist Church, began a bicycle ride on June 10 that will last for 18 days and more than 1,000 miles. Gaston and others are riding from the Park Cities to Nashville, Tenn., to commemorate a new partnership between UPUMC and Project Transformation, a nonprofit that is relocating its headquarters to vacant space in the church building. The Pedal for PT event aims to raise funds for the move, and the journey will include stops at PT chapters in Denison and Oklahoma City. The goal is to raise $100,000.

#RinglingBros

Ringling.com


32  JULY 2015 | PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM

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To place your ad in People Newspapers, please call us at 214-523-5251, fax to 214-363-6948, or e-mail to classified@peoplenewspapers.com. All ads will run in Park Cities People and Preston Hollow People and online on both websites. Pre-payment is required on all ads. Deadline for our next edition is Mon., July 6. People Newspapers reserves the right to edit or reject ads. We assume no liability for errors or omissions in advertisements and no responsibility beyond the cost of the ad. We are responsible only for the first incorrect insertion.

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With this year’s overhaul of EFA (LOCAL) policy finished, HPHS is moving onto next year’s books. Eighty books are listed online as eligible works, and there have been no new reconsideration requests. Per the new policy, the Literature Review Committee is evaluating books through two tracks: 21 works are on Track 1, and 59 works are on Track 2. Of the 21, 16 were approved immediately, and five were sent to community feedback groups.

CONTINUED FROM 29

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“The other category is a catch-all,” she said. “In The Art of Racing in the Rain, it never occurred to me that reincarnation could be an issue. I don’t want to make value judgments.” The site also includes links to other helpful reviews, and Culpepper wants to allow a comments section so people can share their own experiences. “Really, I am trying so hard to just be factual and be completely objective,” she said. “I have had people from two different extremes on this issue who have both, I think, looked at it skeptically and said this is good.” In general, Culpepper is steering clear of the “classics” everyone knows. She’s focusing

CONTINUED FROM 30 ching message, is that we still remember.” But Barbecue, Boots & Badges isn’t just about Dallas law enforcement in need — it has already accepted other projects across the country. Dickey also attended the Police Week Honor Guard Competition in Washington, D.C. — where Dickey’s provided barbecue for the entire event — and also attended a memorial service for all fallen officers in the past year. “It was really moving for me to see these people who came,” said Dickey, who spent eight years as a Dallas County commissioner. The organization also held an event in Minneapolis to build partnerships and has provided hotel rooms near a hospital for family members of a wounded officer in California. Right now, the organization is raising funds for projects through partnerships, private donors, and one other thing — potato chips.

They are: 1. The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein 2. Little Brother by Cory Doctorow 3. A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini 4. The Power of One by Bryce Courtenay 5. The Working Poor by David K. Shipler The list can be found at hphsweb.hpisd.org under “Academic Departments.” on the contemporary titles — say, ones that have stirred controversy in the past year. “It’s very surprising to see the broad spectrum of opinions of people you would have assumed were on the same page, pardon the pun,” she said. “It was impressive that the community was able to have very strong, contrary opinions and still be civil and respectful. It was a good civics lesson for the kids.” This school year, Culpepper will have a freshman and a junior at HPHS. She admits that she usually uses her children’s reading lists as her own. “Honestly, if I do this and no one looks at it, the worst thing that happens is I read a bunch of great books,” she said.

“Last year, Dickey’s invented a potato chip,” she said. “Every store around the country has a rack of Dickey’s potato chips, and every bag sold goes to Barbecue, Boots & Badges.” The chips come in three flavors: barbecue (obviously), jalapeno, and original. Diners can also donate by scanning the QR code found on each table in the company’s 508 restaurants nationwide. The organization will continue to give in two ways: through grants and through an emergency fund. Families or law enforcement can apply for a grant depending on their needs or seek the organization’s help in emergencies. All of this effort boils down to the ultimate goal — to honor officers. “We’re very appreciative of Mrs. Dickey’s philanthropy and even acknowledging that this is a significant issue,” Pennie said. “She asked to talk to us about what our officers needed. That was important to us and has opened up a door for us as officers.”


PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM | JULY 2015  33

CLASSIFIEDS

C O MMUNIT Y

Not Everyone Celebrates Freedom

J

uly is our month dedicated to celebrating freedom; it’s when school kids and teachers are on break, when a significant part of the population chooses to take a vacation, often to one of our national parks to see our landmarks. It’s the Fourth of July, when President John Adams declared that the commemoration of the signing of the Declaration of Independence should be “solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires and illuminations, from one end of this continent to the other.” He forgot the watermelon, barbecue, and beer, but as a renowned quaffer of ale, no doubt he would have approved of our celebrations today. Whatever our faults and differences, and they are hurled at us 24/7 in our age of incessant telecommunications. A whole lot of the planet would still like to pour into our land to experience what we Americans so often take for granted: the freedom to complain, to get furious with our government, to make as much money or seek as much celebrity as we can think up, the freedom to reproduce at will, the freedom to read anything we can lay our hands on, to dress and dance with abandon, and to worship (or not) pretty much as we please. The list goes on and on, despite our increased rules and regulations. So why then did the Catholic and Episcopal churches in Dallas recently host the first-ever Symposium on Human Trafficking, #StopSlaveryDallas? Say what? We have slavery in Dallas, in Texas, in this country 150-plus years after the end of the Civil War? Surely this is the hyperbole of the media today. Nope. Human trafficking is not to be confused with illegal immigrants coming across our

LEN BOURLAND borders after paying “mules” to sneak them across the Rio Grande. Human trafficking is a couple of things, but it is defined as “ongoing exploitation through force, fraud and coercion.” It is involuntary servitude to terrified, marginalized men, women, and children being held against their will often hiding in plain sight. The mayor, police, immigration attorneys, and clergy addressed an overflow crowd in this first consciousness-raising effort this spring. The first category of slaves is the foreign workers seeking paid, advertised work opportunities that are bogus. Instead they are herded into offsite cheap, usually unsanitary housing, then beaten, starved, and intimidated into working menial agricultural jobs without ever seeing their promised money. They have had their papers confiscated, are threatened with harm to family, or threats of prison without any knowledge of their rights or language skills to question. They are trapped without hope. Many die. Bill Bernstein, co-chair of Freedom Network USA, identified several other groups. Some migrant workers — upon discovery that the jobs for which they applied were merely bait for servitude — may be forced to work as nannies or manicurists also without being paid, having their paperwork taken away, and similarly threatened. Begin to peruse the places you frequent and ask questions. One example given was of a boys choir from Zambia that performed

around town but was locked into deplorable facilities by its sponsor, had its funds confiscated, and was threatened with harm to family members back home, then physically assaulted if the choristers complained. Another example given was of an exterminator in a home who noticed a woman hiding in the shadows. He called police, who later rescued an enslaved nanny from Indonesia. A third group of those in peonage are Americans, mostly girls, sold into prostitution to support their drug habits or for money in low-income areas. Jeanne Phillips, a former U.S. ambassador and an advocate for New Friends New Life, estimates as many as 432 children a night are on the streets. There is a call to action to develop a symbol for faith-based organizations that would signal to anyone who is being violated that he or she could come in for rescue. Then there is the sickest of all criminals: those who transport enslaved foreign children in vans from transient motels and cheap apartments from town to town, forcing them to engage in sex acts from those recruited from porn sites on the Internet. These children, from as far away as Southeast Asia, are either abducted or sold by their families and have no language skills when smuggled in. It is estimated that there are anywhere from 25-35 million people on the planet who are in slavery. Some are in Dallas. They are in Texas. They are in our country in the shadows of the free. These are not illegal immigrants seeking citizenship. These are enslaved people in dark places in need of more than the illumination of fireworks. So while we enjoy our holiday, let us remember why we were founded. There is work to be done in the land of the free.

COLEMAN JONES is a member of Troop 72 and a senior at Highland Pa r k High School. For his Eagle service project, the son of Wilson and Lendy Jones made more than a dozen large wooden signs for a school in Guatemala that he will install in person.

Acne, Asthma, UTI, Candida, Uterus & Ovarian Fibroids, Diabetes, Detox, Depression, Fertility, Herpes, Hepatitis, Male Performance, Lupus, Weight Loss etc.

PLEASE CALL FOR A FREE CONSULTATION Leslie Duong, 214-887-8325 BS Biology, Health Nutritionist, Licensed Herbalist

LESLIEDUONG.COM

MARKETPL CE Submit an item for sale and be listed in our online directory for free!

PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM/MARKETPLACE

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Trinity Episcopal Church 9:15 a.m. - Christian Education 10:30 a.m. - Holy Communion 12727 Hillcrest Dallas, Texas 75230

972.991.3601 www.tecdallas.org

Mass Schedule SATURDAY

SUNDAY ENGLISH SPANISH SPANISH ENGLISH

DAILY

9 am & Noon ENGLISH 5 pm 7:30 am & 10:30 am SPANISH 7 pm 1:30 pm & 3 pm 5:30 pm Praise & Worship Mass

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The Cathedral Shrine of the Virgin of Guadalupe 2215 Ross Avenue • Dallas, Texas 75201 • 214.871.1362

WORSHIP WITH US LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR CHURCHES ONLINE: www.parkcitiespeople.com/worship www.prestonhollowpeople.com/worship

EAGLE SCOUTS JARED GATLIN is a member of Troop 412 and a senior at Bishop Lynch. For his Eagle service project, the son of Jeff and Paige Gatlin of Dallas installed a flagstone handicapped-accessible walkway for the stands at the Ursuline Academy softball field.

H E A LT H

ERIC PASK is a member of Troop 82 and an eighth-grader at Christ the King Catholic School. For his Eagle service project, the son of John and Ann Pask of Dallas landscaped a 16-by-26-foot area surrounding a bench at Dallas-Fort Worth National Cemetery.

If your church isn’t among these, have them call 214-523-5251.

ST. JUDE CHAPEL SATURDAY MASS: 4:00 p.m. SUNDAY MASS: 9:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. DAILY MASS: (Monday thru Friday) 11:40 a.m. & 12:15 p.m. 1521 MAIN STREET DALLAS, TX, 75201

214.742.2508 stjudechapel.org


34   JULY 2015 | PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM

S P ECI AL ADVERTISING C ONTENT ALLIE BETH ALLMAN & ASSOCIATES

BRIGGS FREEMAN SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

BRIGGS FREEMAN SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

BRIGGS FREEMAN SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Sandoz Offers Classic Georgian in UP

Enjoy Great Homes with Great Prices

Bradshaw Selling Showplace Ranch

Life on The Lake

Circle 12 Ranch is listed by Bernie Uechtritz and Angie Nelson for $10.8 million.

Whether you prefer the excitement of an afternoon on jet skis or a quiet evening watching the sunset over water, a lakeside retreat offers unlimited opportunities to gather friends and family to create lasting memories. 2951 Colonels Row The ultimate Possum Kingdom Lake retreat is located on one of the most popular and exclusive areas on the peninsula. This private home offers panoramic views of the lake, a covered patio, main level deck, 2nd level balcony, floating dock w lift and tanning deck. Listed by John Zimmerman for $1,095,000 1052 Bluff Creek Point Architectural masterpiece set on 1.2 scenic acres in prestigious Sportsmans World (home to famous Hell’s Gate) provides ultimate lakefront escape with best views of Possum Kingdom Lake. Enjoy rustic elegance w-soaring ceilings & fireplace, huge windows, gorgeous décor. Listed by Nanette and Brian Luker for $3,200,000 230 PR 5944 Enjoy this fun retreat on Texas’ best bass fishing, Lake Fork, featuring waterfront acreage with an automated boat house and dock. A beautifully designed threebedroom home has a 40-foot screened loggia with fireplace to watch the sunsets. Listed by Donald Peterson for $590,000 President and CEO Robbie Briggs independently owns and operates Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty. For more information see briggsfreeman.com.

This Classic Georgian traditional home at 4025 Amherst Avenue is in the center of the coveted City of University Park, only 15 minutes to downtown Dallas, five minutes to SMU and in the exemplary Highland Park Independent School District. This fabulous home has been meticulously maintained and features the highest quality craftsmanship throughout. The soaring ceilings and elegant moldings add to the warmth and elegance of the Georgian design. The home features a center hall plan design with a large dining room with bay window, large formal living with gorgeous fireplace, and the den offers an additional fireplace, walk-in wet bar and a wall of windows to the backyard. The white, bright kitchen has a 15-foot center island, abundant cabinetry and all stainless-steel appliances. The four bedrooms and game room are on the second level. The master suite has ample room for a separate seating area in addition to a spa-like bath. This is a classic, elegant home for the sophisticated buyer. To learn more about this property, visit www. alliebeth.com. To arrange a viewing of the property, contact Listing Agent Brenda Sandoz by calling (214) 202-5300 or emailing Brenda.Sandoz@alliebeth.com.

BRIGGS FREEMAN SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Contemporary Elegance in PH

The home at 6739 Lupton Drive is listed Traci Hummel for $2,599,000. It is always a good day when you find a deal on a home you only dreamed of living in. Here are three homes in great neighborhoods whose price has been reduced. 4331 Lorraine Avenue ​On one of the French streets in Highland Park, find a 1928 English Tudor-style home, designed by the renowned architects of Highland Park Village. Standing on an oversized lot, this home was extensively remodeled with a new kitchen, baths and pool. Listed by Tom Hughes and Seth Pogoloff for $3,399,000 6739 Lupton Drive ​Inside this French-style home find repurposed flooring from an Italian church. The five-bedroom Preston Hollow home has a stone exterior and a stone fireplace in the living room. Two sets of French doors open to a covered outdoor living area. Listed by Traci Hummel for $2,599,000 5102 Homer Street Enter this renovated Tudor home in trendy Knox​ Henderson through a glass front door set in a rock entry. Inside find top-of-the-line finishes and a well-equipped kitchen. French doors open to a pool, covered patio and outdoor fireplace. Listed by Margo Bentsen for $699,000 ​President and CEO Robbie Briggs independently owns and operates Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty. Visit www.Briggsfreeman.com.

Everyone knows Terry Bradshaw as one of the ​ nation’s best quarterbacks having won four Super Bowl titles and was inducted in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. ​What most people don’t know is that Bradshaw is also an accomplished rancher. The Fox Sports broadcaster has built a pristine ​ 744-acre ranch an hour north of the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport.On what he calls his sanctuary from his hectic schedule, Bradshaw raises cattle, horses and hogs. ​The ranch is listed by Bernie Uechtritz and Angie Nelson for $10.8 million. ​On the ranch is an 8,600-square-foot home, built in rustic style. It has six bedrooms and eight baths with tall ceilings, large fireplaces, tiled floors and wood paneling under a green roof. The outdoor patio is more than 1,000 square feet and has a kitchen and bar, a fireplace and a fire pit. There is also a pool and a two-story dog house. ​For the horses there is a four-stall stallion barn, a 20-stall show barn, a 50-stall mare barn with a laboratory and office and a large covered arena. President and CEO Robbie Briggs independently ​ owns and operates Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty. Visit ranch.briggsfreeman.com.

DAVE PERRY-MILLER REAL ESTATE

DAVE PERRY-MILLER REAL ESTATE

Move to Heart of Preston Hollow

Old Meets New in Greenway Parks

The contemporary home a 6305 Tulip is listed by Becky Frey for $2,395,000. With striking luxury and superb privacy, one Preston Hollow contemporary offers an elegant backdrop for a lifetime of making memories. Custom built by renowned Sharif Munir Custom Homes, 6305 Tulip Lane impresses from the very start. A modern glass entry leads to an art collector’s dream, with museum quality walls, an impressive contemporary staircase and appealing natural lighting. Open to the living area and viewing the beautiful landscaping, the kitchen offers the most outstanding appliances including a six-burner cooktop, double ovens, built-in microwave, warming oven as well as dual sinks and dishwashers. Retreat to the master suite, secluded in its own enclave. Serene views line the walls through floor-toceiling glass walls. An adjacent study offers a home office or library with built-in shelves, cabinets and counter space. Upstairs, additional bedrooms each have their own private bath and walk-in closet. A large living area with wet bar with sink, refrigerator and icemaker creates a great secondary entertaining space. The backyard includes a full outdoor kitchen, wood-burning fireplace, covered patio and pool with water feature and spa. Listed by Becky Frey for $2,395,000 President and CEO Robbie Briggs independently owns and operates Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty. Briggsfreeman.com.

The one-story, three-bedroom home at 6622 Desco Drive (6622desco.daveperrymiller.com) is on a luscious treed lot in the heart of Preston Hollow. Dave Perry-Miller Real Estate’s Martha & McKamy Tiner are offering the property for $1,095,000. Built in 1952, the 3,700-square-foot home underwent a complete remodel and expansion 10 years ago that makes it perfect for an indoor-outdoor lifestyle thanks to a third living room with a tile floor, a wet bar, and a vaulted ceiling with multiple skylights. Augmented by a study and a full bath, the room opens to the poolside deck and expansive backyard via a set of French doors. The property has a pair of two-car garages. One is attached to the main house, while the other is under the guest quarters. The latter garage is temperature-controlled, so certain buyers may use it as a workshop or art studio. To schedule a showing, contact McKamy Tiner at 214354-6903 or mckamy@daveperrymiller.com. Dave Perry-Miller Real Estate is an Ebby Halliday Company with five locations that specialize in marketing the Park Cities, Preston Hollow, Uptown, Lakewood, East Dallas, and Kessler Park. Dave Perry-Miller Real Estate is a member of Leading Real Estate Companies of the World and Luxury Portfolio International.

The sensational home on the greenway at 5334 Waneta Drive (5334waneta.daveperrymiller.com) was taken to the studs and expanded in 2008 by noted designer Tony Horton. Providing a superb blend of traditional and transitional, the home features modern amenities while preserving classic Greenway Parks character. Dave Perry-Miller Real Estate’s Stephen Collins is offering the property for $1,995,000. This four-bedroom home is oozing with charm throughout its 5,281 square feet. Most of the interior doorways are arched and wide, setting up a seamless flow from one room to the next. Hardwood floors, white cabinetry, and art lighting are consistent design elements. Updated wiring, plumbing, and HVAC systems, a standing-seam metal roof, and an oversized garage were all part of the 2008 project. Stephen Collins has consistently been a companywide top producer during his 33 years in real estate, closing more than $1.1 billion in sales. To schedule a showing, contact him at 469-774-9749 or steve@ daveperrymiller.com. Dave Perry-Miller Real Estate is an Ebby Halliday Company with five locations that specialize in marketing the Park Cities, Preston Hollow, Uptown, Lakewood, East Dallas, and Kessler Park. Dave Perry-Miller Real Estate is a member of Leading Real Estate Companies of the World and Luxury Portfolio International.

Sip your morning coffee on your lakefront porch at 2951 Colonels Row. Listed by John Zimmerman for $1,095,000.

EBBY HALLIDAY REALTORS

Grand Vie Showcases Luxury Listings The summer 2015 edition of Grand Vie: Luxury in Living magazine recently mailed to homes across North Texas. Grand Vie is the luxuryhome publication of Ebby Halliday Realtors and the newest member of the Ebby Halliday Companies, Visit GrandVie Fort Worth-based Magazine.com Williams Trew Real Estate. Not only has the to view the new magazine’s distribution Grand Vie: Luxury in grown significantly across Living. the Metroplex, it also includes some of the very best luxury real estate companies outside of our local market, in such locations as Beverly Hills/LA, New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Miami, Palm Beach, Newport Beach, Santa Barbara and Vail. In addition to featuring some of Dallas-Fort Worth’s premier luxury properties, the 17th edition of Grand Vie offers a plethora of interesting editorial content, including recipes and grilling tips from local celebrity chefs Tim Byres of Smoke and Jon Bonnell of Bonnell’s Fine Texas Cuisine and Waters I Bonnell’s Coastal Cuisine; “Houses of Art,” showcasing some of the area’s top cultural events; special sections for lake properties and farm & ranch properties; and real estate insider Candy Evans’ take on the vacation-home paradise that is Cape Cod. To view the digital version of Grand Vie, visit GrandVieMagazine.com. To learn more about Ebby Halliday Realtors, its Associates and all of their listings, visit ebby.com.


Time to

?

SMART SIZE “Those craving a new adventure are also moving up to vertical neighborhoods in the city center.”

B

uyers looking for a new home in their postparenting years want everything but the extra space.

At the top of their priority list:

» » » »

A great location near family, friends and lifestyle (shops, dining, entertainment) Amenities they’ve come to love like top-of-the-line kitchens and flexible living spaces A floor plan with lots of room for entertaining and a comfortable, downstairs master suite Lock and leave convenience

Many are looking to stay in established neighborhoods such as the Park Cities, Devonshire and along the Katy Trail. They’re buying or building smaller homes, sometimes in areas zoned for zero-lot lines, but they insist on favorite amenities like wine storage, designer finishes and outdoor living. Smart-sizers want at least three bedrooms and a media/game room so that the grandchildren can come to visit. Those craving a new adventure are also moving up to vertical neighborhoods in the city center. These midrise and high-rise homes come with great views and concierge amenities such as valet and car service and onsite fitness centers, yoga studios and meeting rooms. Whether looking for a new home in a familiar place or a whole new change of scenery, an expert agent can help you sort through the options and choose the best home for the next phase of life.

LIVE WHERE YOU VACATION Artfully uniting extraordinary homes with extraordinary lives f you are vacationing and find the perfect home or second home you would like to buy, we can help you navigate the process with ease.

Please give us a call at

214.350.0400 so we can find the perfect agent to help you find your extraordinary home anywhere in the world.


extraordinary lives | extraordinary homes Food for Thought

F

ood photographer Claire McCormack Hogan has an impressive list of clientele—The Ritz Carlton, FIJI Water, The Superbowl XLV, and Southern Living, to name a few. But no matter the name or brand, she treats every client with the highest honor. “Working as a chef is a vulnerable career—they pour their lives into creating food and are subject to so much criticism,” Hogan says. “It is an honor to be trusted to tell their stories well and to capture the beauty of their work.”

4831 Shadywood Lane $3,895,000 ANNE GOYER | 214.457.0417 agoyer@briggsfreeman.com

Only six months after Hogan graduated from the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University, she quit her stable PR job to pursue a more hands-on and creative venture. And within two and a half years, Hogan had built a network of New From Dallas to Fort Worth, New York and L.A. food photographer York editors and designers who trusted her enough to Claire McCormack Hogan translates delicious food from plate to photo. follow when she launched out on her own. Today, Hogan attributes her success in the business to the clients, designers, and artists who first took a chance and gave Hogan opportunities as a young photographer. But I don’t think they were doing her any favors. Hogan is relational, creative, hardworking, and talented: Who wouldn’t want to work with such a photographer?

In fact, the Dallas-Ft. Worth area has more restaurants per capita than any other city in the United States. And, similar to New York, Dallas also has the resources to value such a luxurious craft as food photography. And yet the industry of food photographers remains small. It’s why when a restaurant gets the chance to work with Hogan, they come back for seconds.

From the beginning of her career, Hogan was inspired by chef’s who felt that food was their art. “The artist in me loved being in an industry and niche market that was working with chef’s who loved what they were creating,” Hogan says. And to find such artistry not in Soho but in her hometown was remarkable.

4331 Lorraine Avenue $3,399,000 TOM HUGHES | 214.649.3323 thughes@briggsfreeman.com

For More InForMatIon clairemccormack.com updatedallas.com Robbie Briggs independently owns and operates Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty.

3309 Stanford Avenue $1,395,000 LINDY MAHONEY | 214.546.1555 lmahoney@briggsfreeman.com

NEW PRICE

4312 Beverly Drive | $2,449,000 Great new opportunity - stunning traditional Highland Park home offers 5,027 sq. ft. including five bedrooms, four and a half baths, two studies and three living rooms. Step outside to an outdoor grill and covered patio overlooking the beautiful pool area. The three-car garage also boasts a spacious living space or additional bedroom upstairs.

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6305 Tulip Lane | $2,395,000 Beauty is captured in timeless appeal. Custom built by Sharif Munir is this extraordinary contemporary in the heart of Preston Hollow designed for extreme privacy, natural light and ultimate entertaining. The home commands presence with pristine landscaping and architectural brilliance.Visit beckyfrey.com for more.

BECKY FREY 214.536.4727 bfrey@briggsfreeman.com

An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Briggs Freeman Real Estate Brokerage, Inc. is independently owned and operated.

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1B  JULY 2015 | PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM

SPORTS

ALL THINGS SCOTS:

Our weekly Plaid Report e-newsletter will return this fall. Parkcitiespeople.com/ plaidreport.

Contributions on, off court lead Jeffett to Hall of Fame By Todd Jorgenson

People Newspapers

C O U R T E SY P H O T O S

Bryan Garvey is in his fifth season competing in organized rally races in desert locales including Mexico and South America.

DRIVEN IN THE DESERT

Entrepreneur has passion for off-road racing By Todd Jorgenson

People Newspapers Bryan Garvey doesn’t care about driving on pavement or going in circles. He’d rather traverse desert dunes and navigate weather-related obstacles. The Park Cities entrepreneur has had a lifelong passion for off-road racing that he’s only recently begun to realize as a frequent competitor in international rally races. “I’ve always had an interest in it,” Garvey said. “It’s not just a pavement event. The terrain changes all the time, and every corner is different.” The enthusiasm for the sport stems from Garvey’s childhood, when his father restored cars as a hobby. As a teenager, he worked as a mechanic in his father’s shop, and later started a fabrication business of his own. These days, Garvey is the president of

Garvey and navigator Roger Franz were second in the prestigious Dakar event. Corbet Design + Build, a Dallas construction firm he started about 12 years ago. But several weeks each year, he’s far removed from the office life behind the wheel of an open-cockpit “buggy” with a navigator at his side. “It’s not about the money,” Garvey said. “It’s about the challenge and proving to yourself that you can do it. It’s about pushing myself. The bigger the challenge, the more it excites me.” Garvey is in his fifth season of organized racing. He essentially taught him-

self after befriending a fellow driver in Nevada who has land on which to practice. Garvey typically races in multi-day “baja” events in Mexico, racing four of those in the past six months. His success led to a breakthrough opportunity in January, when a foreign team hired Garvey to drive a car in the Dakar, a two-week event in January that started in Chile and meandered through South America. One day, he became stuck in silt, had four flat tires, and didn’t wrap up until 4 a.m. Such challenges are common. Yet despite his relative inexperience, Garvey persevered. “You have to cross the Andes four times, and the temperature on Day 2 got up to 122 degrees. Every day, we had some kind of mechanical failure we had to fix,” Garvey said. “It’s a very small percentage that actually finish, and we were second in our class.” While fame and fortune aren’t likely, Garvey said racing teaches lessons about endurance and mental toughness that have carried over to everyday life. “When you go down and race in the Baja and have 30 near-misses, I come back more driven at work and at home,” he said. “It puts me in a better place.”

Nancy Jeffett had lured the best women’s tennis players in the world to Dallas with a promise of unprecedented prize money. The trouble was, she didn’t know if she could pull it off. “I told them I was going to give them $40,000, and I didn’t have a penny of it,” Jeffett recalled. “It was pretty gutsy when I Nancy look back on it. They Jeffett believed in me. They had no guarantees that I would produce.” She did produce, thanks to a friend at Dallas Country Club who talked 200 of his friends into donating $250 apiece into the pot for the winner of the Maureen Connolly Brinker Cup in the early 1960s. It came during a time when women’s tennis wasn’t anywhere near the level it is today, in terms of fame or fortune. And it was Jeffett’s gamble more than 50 years ago that helped pave the way for Martina Navratilova, Serena Williams, and other future superstars who helped define the women’s game. In July, the Greenway Parks resident will join many of those great players as an inductee into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in Newport, R.I. She started as a player in her native St. Louis, but her career didn’t last long despite her ranking as the 10th best junior player in the world during the 1940s. Instead, she focused her attention behind the scenes, giving women opportunities in the sport that didn’t exist at the time, both locally and internationally. As a tournament organizer, Jeffett founded both the Brinker event and the Virginia Slims of Dallas, which was a regular stop on the pro tour for more than a decade and became a premier social event. “That tournament was the first big

CONTINUED ON 2B


NATIONALLY-RECOGNIZED

2  JULY 2015 | PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM

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CONTINUED FROM 1B

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SP O RTS women’s event in the United States,” Jeffett said. “There were men who told me I couldn’t make it happen.” When Navratilova came to the United States from her native Czechoslovakia at age 16, she played Jeffett’s tournament before any others. And in addition to organizing the first women’s event for prize money, she also was the first to put matches on television. At first, Jeffett operated the tournament from her garage apartment. By the end of its run, when it became more difficult to raise the funding through sponsopships, she was able to sell the tour slot for $1 million to a Japanese group trying to expand the sport there. In her heyday, Jeffett ran tournaments all over the world. She was a longtime Wightman Cup and Federation Cup chair and captain of the United States team. “She was a pioneer,” said longtime friend Betty Harlan. “Nancy could sell anything. She has done more to start up women’s tennis than anybody.” Perhaps her most noteworthy accomplishment was starting the Maureen Connolly Brinker Foundation in honor of her close friend who died of cancer in 1969. Although the pro tournament that bears Brinker’s name is defunct, the foundation still runs the prestigious “Little Mo” junior tournament each year in Dallas that has become a stepping stone for such high-profile players as Andy Roddick and Sloane Stephens. “We decided to do everything that we could to carry on the mission,” Jeffett said. “She never saw what we did. I know she would be proud. We’ve had so much fun doing it.” Jeffett has become friends over the years with some of the top women’s players in the world, even inviting many of them to her home when they were in town. She has been an advocate in recent years for gender equality in terms of prize money at major tournaments. Even though she’s slowed down at age

C O U R T E SY P H O T O S

Greenway Parks resident Nancy Jeffett has helped the careers of some of the biggest names in women’s tennis. 87, Jeffett still travels to tournaments when she can, and otherwise follows the results closely on television. It’s reflective of her passion for the game that’s still as lively as ever, and the reason for receiving the sport’s highest honor. “I love the game,” she said, “and it’s been a great part of my life.” CAREER MILESTONES

1946

As a player, she was ranked No. 10 in the world in USTA girls singles

1968

Co-founded the Maureen Connolly Brinker Tennis Foundation

1975

Founded the Virginia Slims Tournament of Dallas, which ran until 1989

1981

Began a 10-year stint as chairman of the U.S. Federation Cup team

1983

Inducted into the Texas Tennis Hall of Fame

BRIGGS FREEMAN SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY

Beautiful Homes in the Park Cities Highland Park and University Park are established neighborhoods with close proximity to Dallas’ great entertainment, shopping and dining. 3228 Colgate Avenue ​This four-bedroom home near SMU has been totally remodeled with a contemporary flair. In mint condition inside and out, the home has bay windows on the front. From the well-equipped kitchen and breakfast room enjoy views through large windows of the pool and backyard. Listed by Lindy Mahoney for $1,665,000 3314 Dartmouth Avenue This modern home features expansive walls for ​ displaying art. With five bedrooms the white stucco home has an atrium-style entry with a floating staircase. The kitchen flows to a gallery with walls of glass that overlook the landscaped backyard. A bedroom is on the first floor and a loft is on the third. Listed by Michelle Wood for $2,650,000 4670 N. Versailles Avenue In west Highland Park, the three-bedroom home is ​ beautifully decorated and has a downstairs master suite. The well-equipped kitchen opens to a light-filled den and an outdoor patio, a perfect area for entertaining.. Listed by Sam Kincaid for $1,399,000

The five-bedroom home at 3314 Dartmouth Avenue is listed by Michelle Wood for $2,650,000. ​President and CEO Robbie Briggs independently owns and operates Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty. For more information see briggsfreeman.com.


PARKCITIESPEOPLE.COM | JULY 2014  3B

S P ORTS

Knost, Gribble Starting To See Green on Tour Golfers with local ties get Nelson lift By Todd Jorgenson

People Newspapers Colt Knost might have been disappointed with his finish at the Byron Nelson Championship, but he had plenty of reasons to smile during the weekend. In front of a healthy gallery of supporters, Knost, a University Park resident and former SMU standout, tied for 10th place at his hometown PGA Tour event in late May. He carded a final-round 68 to finish at 10-under par for the tournament, tying him with five other players. Knost had three bogeys on the 18th hole in four rounds and eight overall, including three straight to open the third round. Still, he tallied 18 birdies, including six each in the second and third rounds. The final round at the TPC Four Seasons in Las Colinas marked the best finish for Knost in nine tries at the Byron Nelson. He has been cut six times. He earned a six-figure paycheck, and the finish matches his best on tour since 2012, when he twice finished third.

C H R I S M C G AT H E Y

Former Highland Park standout Cody Gribble made the cut during his first appearance at the Byron Nelson Championship in May. Gribble made the initial cut after the second round, but was one of a handful of players eliminated prior to the final round. Gribble finished in a tie for 78th place and shot his best round on Friday with a 66. He has been a journeyman on the Web.com tour this season after toiling on the Latin American tour in 2014. Prior to that, Gribble was teammates with Jordan Spieth on a national championship

L E F T : Colt Knost of University

Park posted his best finish this year at the Byron Nelson.

Knost, 29, who graduated from SMU in 2007, is enjoying his best season as a touring pro after bouncing back and forth between the PGA Tour and the Web.com Tour during the past several years. Also at the Nelson, former Highland Park standout Cody

team at the University of Texas. Gribble, 24, made his first PGA Tour cut last year as a qualifier at the U.S. Open, where he tied for 21st and surpassed his earnings from all other pro tournaments combined. He also earned a paycheck this year at the Houston Open, and missed the cut at the Colonial in Fort Worth. Email todd.jorgenson@ peoplenewspapers.com

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hinking about where to go to get out of town on less than a tank of gas? Texas’ natural beauty and pioneer legacy make it the perfect place to roam, play, explore and enjoy – and you might even uncover a giraffe or two on your travels. Feel like horsing around? Denton County has one of the largest concentrations of horse farms in the United States. Discover the behind the scenes happenings of championship breeding farms, training farms and more during one of six Horse Country Tours hosted by the Denton Convention and Visitor’s Bureau, then saddle up for a leisurely ride. Visit discoverdenton.com

Under Contract 4421 Larchmont Street | $1,499,000 MEREDITH FERRELL | 214.868.1177 mferrell@briggsfreeman.com

With natural beauty and pioneer legacy Texas is the perfect place to roam. Visit Horse Country in Denton, safari life at Fossil Rim, enjoy weekly activities at Klyde Warren Park and learn the history of Texas Rangers in Waco.

Just 90 minutes south in Waco you’ll learn all you need to know about Texas swagger. Here, the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame and Museum honors the white-hatted lawmen, while the Dr Pepper Museum tells about the popular soft drink born of the state, and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame spotlights homegrown athletes. Visit wacoheartoftexas.com to learn more. For the adventurous, Fossil Rim Wildlife Center in Glen Rose does not disappoint. Just 55 miles southwest of Fort Worth and 75 miles southwest of Dallas, Fossil Rim offers a real safari experience. Take a wildlife drive and interact at your own pace with animals such as giraffes and ostriches. The center also offers lodging opportunities. Visit fossilrim.org for more information, calendar and prices.

Whether it’s food trucks, sport and fitness activities, kids events or music, the multifaceted and vibrant Klyde Warren Park gives everyone daily choices for entertainment from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. Visit klydewarrenpark. org for a list of activities.

7141 Stefani Drive | SOLD Listed for $799,000 JENNY WOOD | 214.729.0560 jwood@briggsfreeman.com

For More InForMatIon updatedallas.com President and CEO Robbie Briggs independently owns and operates Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty.

Under Contract 5138 Deloache Avenue | $7,249,000 ELLY HOLDER | 214.207.6708 eholder@briggsfreeman.com

The Mansion Residence

4021 Marquette Street | $2,295,000 This well designed home was built in 2006 with meticulous craftsmanship and quality by Craft Barnett Homes. The family room features a stone fireplace and wet bar that overlooks the outdoor loggia which is ideal for entertaining with a built-in grill, refrigerator, pool, spa and water feature. There is also a landscaped side yard and dog run.

AMY DETWILER 214.536.8680

2801Turtle Creek Blvd. #3E | $3,495,000 POGIR | 214.244.3103 pogir@briggsfreeman.com

adetwiler@briggsfreeman.com

1925 Cedar Springs Road #301 | $2,875,000 ANNE GOYER | 214.457.0417 agoyer@briggsfreeman.com

4409 Belclaire Avenue | $2,849,000 Updated traditional home on an 80’ wide lot in the French streets of Highland Park. Kitchen redone in 2014 with Ann Sacks tile and Carrera marble. Other features included master suite with a small balcony overlooking the pool, three additional bedroom suites, large formals, a family room, detached garage with quarters, pool, and play yard.

ALEX TRUSLER 214.755.8180

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An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Briggs Freeman Real Estate Brokerage, Inc. is independently owned and operated.

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Park Cities People – July 2015