Florida Design Miami 18.3

Page 56

FLORIDA DESIGN MIAMI EDITION ART & THE CITY The Players, Must-Sees, and Surprises of Basel 2022 Creative Class ART-CENTRIC INTERIORS FROM MIAMI TO SUNNY ISLES BEACH DESIGN INTEL One-on-One With Paola Lenti
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FLORIDA DESIGN

FEATURES 112 ROOTED IN BEAUTY

VOL. 18 NO.

ON THE COVER

PRIVATE MOMENTS

INTERIOR DESIGN BY TAMARA FELDMAN

A couples’ Mexican heritage makes its presence known through the design of their Privé apartment. 124

FIRE & ICE

INTERIOR DESIGN BY JESSICA JAEGGER

INTERIOR DESIGN

LUCIANA

A designer looks to nature for inspiration to create a dream home for her and her family in South Miami.

Homeowners ask for a Rio de Janeiro essence at their Sunny Isles Beach perch and their designer delivers that and so much more. 132

SCANDINAVIAN SPECIAL

INTERIOR DESIGN BY CAROL FARAH & JOANA RIBEIRO

Danish sensibilities find their way into a Key Biscayne vacation home. 138

PERFECT TEN

INTERIOR DESIGN BY SOFIA JOELSSON

After some delayed starts, a New York couple embraces Bal Harbour living with a sophisticated residence that’s ideal for their art proclivities. 144

EXPERT TOUCH

INTERIOR DESIGN BY DAVID MIRANDA & DIANA URIBE

Two savvy design professionals deliver a vacation getaway that’s tailor-made for its jet-setting owners.

20 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
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MIAMI EDITION ART & THE CITY The Players, Must-Sees, and Surprises of Basel 2022 Creative Class ART-CENTRIC INTERIORS FROM MIAMI TO SUNNY ISLES BEACH DESIGN INTEL One-on-One With Paola Lenti
124 FIRE & ICE
COVER PHOTO BY KRIS TAMBURELLO
104

ART WEEK 2022

ART & THE CITY

hit list of Art Basel-related highlights to navigate Miami’s most wonderful time of the year FD ASKS

ROTHKO OR THE KNOLL?

designers reveal their respective approaches to balancing cherished art collections and winning interiors. SHOWROOMS

22 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3 contents VOL. 18 NO. 3 48 ORANGE CRUSH departments IN EVERY ISSUE 26 Editor’s Message 28 Publisher’s Note 30 Featured Designers DETAILS 41 Signature Style 42 Sculptural Pedigree 44 Sun Sass 46 Material Implications 48 Orange Crush 50 La Vie En Rose IN DEPTH 52 SILVER
BUZZ 54
LINING Maxime Boutillier dissects his Praha 01 chair and its Czech Cubism influences.
BUZZ What’s new, now, and next in Miami’s design scene
58
78
82
84
96
GARDENS 100
ARBITER 102
Paola
COVET 152
78 THE
A
THE
Three
FORM & FUNCTION Flexform brings its Italian flair to the Design District.
CARPET RIDE Two new showrooms make a case for the artistry and versatility of rugs. REAL ESTATE
SUNNY NOSTALGIA Designer Michelle Haim mixes Palm Springs vibes and MiMO charm in the public spaces of Gio Midtown.
THE NATURAL APPROACH Christopher Cawley brings his green expertise to the gardens of a Star Island estate.
DESIGN PRINCIPLES
Lenti makes a splash in Miami during Art Week with a new showroom and a buzzy collaboration with the Campana brothers.
ORGANIC APPEAL Modplay’s leading men on the charm of The Davani Group’s Lamé table
ROTHKO OR THE KNOLL?

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FLORIDA DESIGN

VOL.18 NO.3

editorial director DAPHNE NIKOLOPOULOS

editor-in-chief LUIS R. RIGUAL design director LAURIE SPECTOR

acquisitions editor ANNETTE SESSA-GALBO web editor ABIGAIL DUFFY social media manager ROXY ROONEY

contributing writers

RIKI ALTMAN-YEE | CHRISTOPHER DAY JEANNE DE LATHOUDER | KERRY SHORR

contributing photographers TROY CAMPBELL | EMILIO COLLAVINO CRAIG DENIS | DENILSON MACHADO KRIS TAMBURELLO

production director SELENE M. CEBALLO production manager LOURDES LINARES production coordinator ILEANA CABAN

digital prepress specialist GEORGE DAVIS

advertising design coordinators ANAELY J. PEREZ-VARGAS JEFFREY REY

publisher TERRY DUFFY associate publisher HARVEY M. DANA account executives JENNIFER DARDANO | ELIZABETH GOODMAN SUSAN GIBSON HOWARD marketing manager REBECCA DESIR

advertising services coordinator ELIZABETH HACKNEY

chief operating officer TODD SCHMIDT it manager KEITH GONZALEZ

circulation manager MARJORIE LEIVA distribution manager JUDY HEFLIN circulation assistant BRITNEY STINSON logistics manager OMAR MORALES accounting specialists MARY BETH COOK

accounts receivable specialist ANA CORONEL founder JEFF LICHTENSTEIN

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24 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
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THE BASEL EXPERIENCE

We are finishing 2022 on quite the high note here at Florida Design Miami. Starting in 2023, this title will be coming at you four times a year at the start of every season, an expansion that reflects the vibrancy of Miami’s design industry and our commitment to cover the very best it has to offer. As we enter our 19th year of publication, we are energized by what we see out there, not just in terms of interior design, but also real estate, art, and retail. Miami doesn’t want to slow down, and it’s exciting to see this energy while spearheading a magazine that reports on much of that action from a design perspective.

Speaking of inspiring energy, this issue’s art coverage is as dynamic as Art Week (Nov. 28 to Dec. 3) itself. As Art Basel Miami Beach returns for its 20th anniversary, the city is primed for all the creative excess that comes with the renowned fair. For the uninitiated, that entails a whirlwind of exhibitions, showcases, discussions, celebrations, and discoveries that extend far beyond the walls of the Miami Beach Convention Center where Basel holds court. This is a time in Miami like no other, and although naysayers complain about the traffic and overexposure, Art Week deserves to be experienced. To help you navigate the cool madness is this issue’s “Art & the City,” a hit list, if you will, of what we’ve deemed to be the most important happenings of those seven days. Use it as your guide and report back to us as to whether we hit the mark or not.

I hope you find the rest of this volume equally enticing. Our six home features all address how art plays a role in interiors in one way or another. In FD Asks, we chat with three seasoned designers about their respective approaches to balancing superior art collections and decor. For Arbiter, I had the rare opportunity of speaking to Paola Lenti about her new collaboration with the Campana brothers, as well as about her new showroom in Wynwood. And what can I say about our always on-point Details pages, which this time highlight everything from Barbiecore to out-of-the-box day beds? Think of them as one of the many gifts you’ll find in this edition. After all, ’tis the season.

lrigual@floridadesign.com

26 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3 | EDITOR’S MESSAGE |
MANOLO DORESTE
PHOTO BY

SMALL TOWN

From the water, Miami looks very much like the towering international powerhouse that it has become. Up close, however, in the city’s neighborhoods, markets, shops, and restaurants, Miami is more of a collection of small towns. It’s easy to explore your area and find familiar faces and experiences, whether that’s in between the gigantic high-rises of Brickell or the shaded Mediterranean blocks of Coral Gables. When I lived in North Miami, I could swear that I saw the same couple for 20 years at our regular pizza joint, at King Palace Chinese, and at Padrino’s. They may have even been wearing the same outfits!

When our parent company added Florida Design Miami to our family of publications in 2019, I got a call almost immediately from the man who is now the driving force behind this magazine’s sales efforts. Harvey Dana and I had worked together in Miami back in the early aughts and I felt there was no person better suited to join our growing organization than him. With his “Miami is my neighborhood” approach, he is both our Miami market director and FD Miami associate publisher. Harvey has leveraged the brand and taken the magazine in a whole new direction. And with Luis R. Rigual, another Miami veteran expertly versed in the city, we have a power duo fulfilling the magazine’s sales and editorial needs, respectively. We are thrilled! Come 2023, you will notice some exciting changes in these pages. Harvey’s words and perspective of what makes Miami tick will replace mine in this Publisher’s Note, and the magazine will expand from three to four issues per year so that we can better cover and serve a city that’s continuously reinventing itself. We look forward to the expansion and increased presence in the market.

Lastly, a note about my favorite feature in this edition. “Rooted in Beauty” covers the wonderful home of designer Luciana Fragali, which she tackled herself, and a big part of the story is how the design centers its energy and focus on an ancient banyan tree. I love the concept of bringing the design and execution of a project back to natural and familiar elements. By embracing that frame of mind, the end result is a residence that’s welcoming, functional, and elegant. As Miami continues to evolve, it’s fulfilling to celebrate the natural beauty in our tropical paradise in these pages. After all, that’s the reason we do this.

tduffy@floridadesign.com

28 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3 PHOTO BY LILA PHOTO | PUBLISHER’S NOTE |

TAMARA FELDMAN

Tamara Feldman Design

“Private Moments,” page 104

“The main goal of the commission was to bring the clients’ Mexican culture into the space,” says designer Tamara Feldman, about the residence at Privé Island that graces this issue’s cover. “To accomplish that we opted for vibrant blue tones on walls, terracotta hues in specific spaces, and layers of sculptural statements.” Art, such as Isabell Beyel’s intriguing Mask Study 3, also played a big role. The end result? “A welcoming, comfortable, and sophisticated home,” says the designer. “A personal reflection of their style and culture.”

LUCIANA FRAGALI

Design Solutions

“Rooted in Beauty,” page 112

Designer Luciana Fragali didn’t have to fulfill anybody else’s wants or needs for a recent commission in South Miami, but her own. For her new home in South Miami, the designer wanted an aesthetic that united both the indoor and outdoor spaces with a reverence for nature. Inside, she did that with expertly crafted custom millwork and stellar artwork. Outside, she accomplished it by designing around the 400-year-old banyan tree on the property. “This is my dream home in every way,” says Fragali, “and the fact that I got to design it for my family makes it extra special.”

JESSICA JAEGGER

Jaegger Interior Design “Fire & Ice,” page 124

“Our designs evoke an emotional response by creating intimate connections,” says designer Jessica Jaegger when asked to summarize her approach in the Sunny Isles Beach residence featured in this edition. “I used everything from my Brazilian design legacy to the mid-century modern and contemporary design ideas that shaped my upbringing, which is what I do in all jobs. And we were incredibly fortunate to have had wonderful clients that allowed us to freely express our interpretation of sophistication. That made all the difference.”

CAROL FARAH & JOANA RIBEIRO

“Scandinavian Special,” page 132

It took two Brazilian women to bring Scandinavian design sensibilities to a vacation house in Key Biscayne that was in dire need of a renovation. But if you’re familiar with the portfolios of Carol Farah and Joana Ribeiro, you know the two seasoned designers are always up for a creative challenge. The Danish vibe, warmed up a bit for Miami’s sun-and-beach lifestyle, worked flawlessly in what’s now a relaxed hideaway of modernity and color. “The home needed to express a sense of calm and peacefulness,” says Ribeiro, “and bring the outdoors in.”

SOFIA JOELSSON

Sofia Joelsson Design “Perfect Ten” page 138

Once the homeowners of a prime condominium at The St. Regis Bal Harbour Resort tapped designer Sofia Joelsson to spearhead the interiors of their vacation pad, they gave her one important note to keep in mind. “They wanted something modern, clean, and understated, with warmth and comfort,” says Joelsson. “It was important to them that the apartment didn’t feel like a showroom.” Well-versed in these matters, Joelsson delivered a home that so personified the vision they had in mind—elegant, chic, and livable—they’ve since hired her for their other vacation property in The Hamptons.

DAVID MIRANDA & DIANA URIBE

“Our design approach is modern, organic, versatile and eclectic,” says Diana Uribe, one half of the duo behind DIDA Home. “We like to cater to our clients, so we love to play with different styles.” That mindset was just what the jet-setting owners of a condominium in Sunny Isles Beach wanted from their designers when it came to their getaway. DIDA Home delivered a comfortable yet refined aesthetic with a mélange of custom, handcrafted furnishings and accessories, as well as sophisticated and tactile fabrics like silk and raffia. “The clients loved the finished product,” says Miranda, “and we couldn’t be happier.”

30 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3 | FEATURED DESIGNERS |
DIDA Home “Expert Touch,” page 144

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SIGNATURE STYLE

Designer KENNETH COBONPUE never fails to inspire. This carefully composed vignette showcases the tastemaker’s penchant for pieces that embrace craftsmanship and imagination. The Ziggy armchair is crafted from hand-coiled foam tubes, which are upholstered and then woven around a steel frame. The Tria end tables marry oak and steel in a geometric statement inspired by the beauty and precision of bridges. And then there’s the Little People floor lamp, a composition of individual figurines made from Salago fiber in a climb that defies gravity. kennethcobonpue.com

| DETAILS | compiled by ANNETTE SESSA-GALBO & LUIS R. RIGUAL

A progeny of two of the brand’s products, the Cloud Mobile lamp by RICHARD CLARKSON STUDIO can’t help but recall the works of Alexander Calder as it alludes to the magical quality of celestial poufs. richardclarkson.com

Sculptural PEDIGREE

AMORPHOUS SILHOUETTES GIVE FURNITURE THE ARTISTIC TREATMENT

ABOVE: Stainless steel yields in the hands of Xavier Lust, who contorts the material to his whim to create pieces like the Eagle for RALPH PUCCI. The console is one of nine works from the limited-edition “Metalmorphosis” series. ralphpucci.com

Designer Kelly Hoppen’s new collection of side tables for CARACOLE presents an interplay of geometry. The Rona (left) stacks six discs for a modern statement, while the Onyx mixes sycamore and stainless steel through multiple shapes that defy equilibrium. caracole.com

ABOVE: Art deco legs made of steel anchor the walnut top of the Aurora dining table by BEN SOLEIMANI, a study of forms and materials. bensoleimani.com

LEFT: Teak and raw marble from Portugal meld to create the Atus lounge by BEA PERNIA, an inspiring statement of organic forms and structure. beainteriorsdesign.com

42 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3

With an intricate wicker pattern that lets breezes in, the Cube by SKYLINE DESIGN is a modern cocoon of privacy. skylinedesign.com

SUN SASS

POOLSIDE LOUNGING GETS A SERIOUS UPGRADE WITH DAYBEDS THAT DEFY THE ORDINARY

ABOVE: Accented with banana leaves in a gold finish, the Miami outdoor bed by EICHHOLTZ makes the ultimate tropical statement. eichholtz.com

ABOVE: For use individually or combined into one, the Savannah daybed by CANE-LINE boasts removable sunshields for optimal ray protection. cane-line.us

RIGHT: The spacious Dala by DEDON has wheels underneath for smooth rotation, pull-out casters for easy mobility, and a swiveling table made of teak for that all-important cocktail. dedon.de

44 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
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material IMPLICATIONS

LIVELY FABRICS AND WALLCOVERINGS CREATE BOLD BACKDROPS MEANT TO BE REMEMBERED

The eco-friendly Fitzcarraldo Collection of wallcoverings by TWILL & TEXTURE was inspired by different natural atmospheres and subjects that create highly artistic backdrops. twillandtexture.com

Defined by its exotic flora and reptilian stars, the Snakes Garden pattern by WALL IN VOGUE was designed to stand out. The wallpaper comes in non-woven and peel-and-stick versions. wallinvogue.com

Details like metallic foil underlays and handapplied fibers create the intricate detailing of the Shangri-La wallcoverings line by Carlisle & Co. for HOLLY HUNT hollyhunt.com

Made in Austria, the

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Inspired by the intricate nature of Tiffany’s Favrile glass, designer Nadia Watts’ Gem collection of fabrics for KRAVET offers four different patterns and textures. kravet.com

46 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3 | DETAILS |
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ABOVE: Conceived by Miguel Herranz for LZF LAMPS, the Mikado chandelier’s wood veneer strips spread outward like an exotic bird’s plumage. lzf-lamps.com

BELOW: With a round powder-coated steel base and a tight supportive seat, the Puff Puff ottoman by BLU DOT is everything it should be. bludot.com

Designed by Neri & Hu for M2L, the Intersection sideboard’s storage component is positioned atop a solid wood pedestal, which gives the piece a sculptural and monolithic look. m2l.com

Orange Crush

WINTER DESIGN GETS A DOSE OF TANGERINE FLAVOR

ABOVE: The Kingdom fabric from the Great Outdoors collection by Andrew Martin for KRAVET features a cavalcade of wild creatures against a tangerine terrain. kravet.com

RIGHT: Natural rope and painted cotton cord wrapped over a wood base elevate Christian Astuguevieille’s Champ chest for HOLLY HUNT from a piece of furniture into a work of art. hollyhunt.com

ABOVE: From SEVINCH PASSEMENTERIE this handmade tassel tie-back can be custom-dyed to fit any decor. passementerie.org; jnelson.com

48 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3 | DETAILS |
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La Vie En Rose

HOME DESIGNERS SALUTE MATTEL’S PASTEL PRINCESS WITH BARBIECORE, A CELEBRATION OF VINTAGE PINK PANACHE

1 The yesteryear aesthetic of the Avery fixture by MITZI delights the eye with its simplicity. mitzi.hvlgroup.com 2 Solid pink acrylic cabochons set in polished brass give the Globo console by JONATHAN ADLER a dose of high-voltage glamour with mid-century modern sensibilities. jonathanadler.com 3 Drawings by Edgardo Osorio, creative director of Aquazzura, turn this cooking range from OFFICINE-GULLO into a standout work of art that’s as charming as it is collectible. us.officinegullo.com 4 The Isabella sofa by JIMMY DELAURENTIS was conceived with princesses and fairy tales in mind. The contrast piping and button detail add to its vintage appeal. jimmydelaurentis.com 5 Leaping cheetahs create a dynamic scene in this SCALAMANDRÉ pattern, which is digitally printed on a cotton sateen weave to give the surface a subtle sheen. scalamandre.com 6 A balance of shapes and color informs the Bubble Family vase by CUORECARPENITO, a piece inspired by ’70s and ’80s Italian design. cuorecarpenito.com

50 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
Margot Robbie stars as the blond icon in next year’s Barbie, a live-action film that coincides with the doll’s 60th anniversary.
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Silver Lining

DESIGNER MAXIME BOUTILLIER HONORS THE HALLMARKS OF CZECH CUBISM WITH THE PRAHA 01 CHAIR

SIGNATURE PIECE

The Praha 01 chair is part of designer Maxime Boutillier’s Raçines collection, a line that brings together the distinctive influences and inspirations that have shaped his aesthetic as a creative. “The Praha is a tribute to the Czech Cubism movement from the early 20th century, which was born in Prague,” says Boutillier.

“The movement is an important source of inspiration in my everyday work.”

HEAVY METAL

Made of stainless steel with a slightly blurred finish, the Praha is welded into shape (there are no screws whatsoever) to give it its austere silhouette. “I selected metal to make it resemble a sculpture,” says Boutillier. “I wanted to glorify it.”

ARTISANAL APPROACH

Made by master craftsmen in France, each Praha takes about 12 weeks to complete and deliver. StudioTwentySeven, which carries the piece exclusively in the U.S., describes it as a “blurring of the lines between the past and the future, the self and the collective, the brutal and the delicate.”

GEOMETRIC APPEAL

The triangle shape on the Praha’s back and base is not coincidental by any means. “Triangles, trapezoids, and stars are typical of the Cubism movement,” says Boutillier. “The triangle is also the negative form created by emptiness.” maximeboutillier.com; studiotwentyseven.com

52 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3 | IN-DEPTH |
PHOTO COURTESY OF STUDIOTWENTYSEVEN

THE SHAPE OF THINGS

Ornare in the Design District is in celebration mode this season. To commemorate its 35th anniversary, the brand recently made the Square Round collection available to consumers after its successful introduction at Salone. A partnership between Ornare’s art director, Ricardo Bello Diaz, and architects Patricia Martinez and Vivian Closer, the New Age-y line is composed of five lines—Round, Wire, Move, Square Wall, and 270 Degrees—that highlight kitchen, closet, and bathroom furniture and accessories, as well as standalone organizational systems for various environments. ornare.com

Lucid Dreams

A NEW GALLERY IN THE DESIGN DISTRICT PUTS THE FOCUS ON COLOR FOR ITS ART WEEK OPENING

The debut of Lucid in the Design District couldn’t be more timely. The new gallery from former IT executive and artist Payal Tak will open its doors on Nov. 29th just in time for Art Week—and its prime location right across the street from the ICA Miami and the De La Cruz Collection (the neighborhood’s so-called “art corner”) should guarantee it heavy foot traffic during Art Basel’s Miami Beach run when thousands of collectors are in town. Tak’s programming skills will be put to the test with Chroma , an opening exhibition (running well into 2023) featuring 11 different artists from all around the world and their respective takes on the theme of purity of color. “My goal is to make available a commercial platform for artists whose voices need to be heard,” says Tak. “Our objective is to allow artistic creations to become a force for good in society.” luciddesigndistrict.com

54 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3 | BUZZ |
Darlingtonia Daisy by Graciela Montich PHOTOS COURTESY OF VENUES above: Custom finishes in this Square Round kitchen include a metallic iron profile, bronze lapidated glass, wave handles, and dark gray matte paint. left: Vulpes and Erinaceinae by Gustavo Ramirez Cruz right: Lucid owner and artist Payal Tak compiled by LUIS R. RIGUAL LA Boogie by Robert Frankel My Madonna by Romina Garbarino above: A Square Round wall system with metallic gold shelves and LED lights The Fear of Transparency by Brandon Clark
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Classical Dialogue

DESIGNER

PATRICIA ANASTASSIADIS LOOKS TO ANCIENT GREECE FOR HER LATEST ARTEFACTO COLLECTION

For her fifth collection for Brazilian brand Artefacto, designer Patricia Anastassiadis let herself be inspired by the Greece of Socrates and Homer, a time in history, when, as she puts it, “humanity was able to transform nature through balance and rationality, by having an intense connection to it.” Psyche introduces 12 new pieces to the Artefacto inventory, including standouts such as the Thalia side tables (which combine natural rocks in a glossy finish), the Daphne chair (which can have pleats or be left smooth), and the Midas coffee table (made with natural stone and a top covered in leather). “I wanted to create a more curvilinear and loose relationship with the upholstery, using freer elements, but embracing the simplicity of the designs,” says Anastassiadis. “But these pieces are about more than just ergonomic design; I want them to encourage people to talk and interact with each other, which was the basis of Greek civilization.” artefacto.com

DECO MOVES

Art Deco is hard to beat when it comes to inspiration. The movement’s happy colors, smooth lines, and geometric ornamentation can’t help but delight the eye. NIBA Designs has captured all those qualities in its new rug collection, a line inspired by the style’s influence on the architecture of New York City and Miami. A dozen or so patterns pay tribute to well-known landmarks including Modernity, which nods to Manhattan’s Flatiron Building, and Interlace, which recalls the curves of South Beach’s Raleigh Hotel pool. nibadesigns.com

ARTISTIC LINEUP

Tastemaker Kelly Wearstler is ending 2022 on a high artistic note. The designer has added eight new collections to her Gallery platform, a series under her brand dedicated to artist collaborations and collectible design that launched in 2021. Each Gallery line explores materiality, craft, and technology, and features works previously unavailable in international markets. Among these are ceramics and sculptures by Ebitenyefa Baralaye, three-hand mirrors by Amelia Briggs, wall reliefs referencing Los Angeles by Lior Modan, stone tables by Felix Muhrhofer, recycled plastic furniture and accessories by Dirk van der Kooij, terracotta tables by YehRim Lee, light sculptures by Hagit Pincovici, and Sticky Glass glassware by Grace Whiteside. kellywearstler.com

56 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3 | BUZZ | PHOTOS COURTESY OF BRANDS
Dirk van der Kooij offerings from the Gallery collection from Kelly Wearstler ABOVE: A living room setting featuring various pieces from the Psyche collection, including the Eos sofa and the Pollux armchair ABOVE RIGHT: Designer Patricia Anastassiadis FROM TOP: The Museum and U-Turn patterns from NIBA Designs’ new collection of Art Deco-themed rugs

ART & THE CITY

Forward Momentum

AT 20 YEARS OLD, ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH REMAINS AS RELEVANT AS EVER

In certain circles, Miami is often referred to as BB or AB (before Basel or after Basel), which shows the undeniable influence Art Basel Miami Beach has had on the city since its debut in 2012. Not only is the contemporary fair the most important gathering of its type in this side of the world, but its yearly run at the Convention Center was the stepping stone Miami needed to catapult it to global status. At 20, the event is as impressive and all-encompassing as ever with 283 participating galleries representing 38 countries and territories. For multisensory experiences, however, you can’t beat the Meridians sector, where visitors will encounter highlights such as an installation of chairs suspended from the ceiling with a six-hour daily dance work by Colombian artist Maria José Arjona (Rolf Art) and a performance by Rafa Esparza in which the artist impersonates a lowrider cyborg turned into a 25-cent ride machine (Commonwealth and Council). Nov. 29-Dec. 3, artbasel.com

58 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3 | ART WEEK 2022 | PHOTOS COURTESY
OF ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH ABOVE: Set of 10 Polaroids by Ari Marcopoulos, Galerie Frank Elbaz booth, Galleries (main floor) sector
LET THE
BONANZA BEGIN WITH THIS HIT LIST OF ART WEEK’S WINNING PROGRAMMING
BASEL
THE MAIN EVENT
ABOVE: Colored Bone China Rags by Juana Valdes, Spinello Projects booth, Nova sector LEFT: Title Unknown by Q Ei, Watanuki Ltd./ Toki-no-Wasuremono booth, Survey sector ABOVE: Vinson by Carrie Mae Weems, Galerie Barbara Thumn booth, Galleries (main floor) sector ABOVE: quickening by Rebecca Ward, Peter Blum Gallery booth, Galleries (main floor) sector

Man With a Message

One of the most welcome activations to come out of Art Week in recent years, the annual Miami Design District Annual Neighborhood Commission is a chance for creatives to show off their skills as far as immersive exhibitions go and dazzle the city with their artistic vision. Those of us who were here still remember the tinsel wonderland that Charlap Hyman & Herrero gave us in 2017 and the furry pink characters by Fernando Laposse in 2019. This year’s commission is special for multiple reasons, and prime among those is that the man tasked with spearheading the effort is the first Miami resident to do so. “It’s incredible,” says 35-year-old Germane Barnes, who moved to Miami in 2013. “Miami has provided me with a platform to design and test theories that may not have been possible in other locations.” Barnes’ contribution, Rock | Roll , is inspired by the Caribbean people that were instrumental in building Miami and defined by the colorful regalia and pageantry of this community’s celebrations. As such, passersby will encounter pedestrian corridors with seating capsules that rock back and forth when activated by users and feature colorful, shaggy surfaces that are reminiscent of feathered costumes. All this will be enhanced by a robust program of talks, panel discussions, and even dance parties from Nov. 28 to Dec. 5 (after that, the commission will remain up through summer 2023). “It’s an opportunity to celebrate the unique character of a city that has become my adopted home and the joyful spirit that persists in Miami’s Black communities,” says Barnes, who’s also the head of his own studio and the director of the Community Housing & Identity Lab at UM’s School of Architecture. “Think of it as my thank you note to Miami.” germanebarnes.com; miamidesigndistrict.net

THE ARTIST OF THE MOMENT
LEFT: An illustration of Rock | Roll’s disco ball at Jade Alley BELOW: The project’s shaggy and colorful seating capsules An assistant professor at the University of Miami’s School of Architecture, Germane Barnes is the artist behind this year’s Miami Design District Annual Neighborhood Commission. Los Angeles, from Barnes’ exhibition at Nina Johnson gallery earlier this year
PHOTOS COURTESY OF MIAMI DESIGN DISTRICT & NINA JOHNSON

Tomorrow Today

DESIGN MIAMI/ RETURNS WITH A FUTURISTIC THEME AND OUTLOOK

There is no better showcase for magical thinking during Art Week than Design Miami/. The collectible furniture fair (as if what you see on this page qualifies as furniture) is a forum for imagination of the coolest kind. This year, the creatives whose booths make up the fair were asked to set their sights forward and get inspired by the 2022 theme, The Golden Age: Looking to the Future, and the results were as inspiring as ever. Paris’ Gallery Negropontes will present the work of craftspeople who are reinventing the French decorative arts with pieces that offer a dialogue between tradition and modernity. London’s Sarah Myercough Gallery will preview an immersive collection of art objects that champion innovative, sustainable, and restorative design practices. And all the way from Cape Town, Southern Guild returns to Miami with an exhibition that promises to “elevate the everyday toward the divine.” Nov. 29-Dec. 4, designmiami.com

60 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3 ART WEEK 2022 | THE GATHERING FOR AESTHETES
Ibubu (Flock) by Andile Dyalvane, Southern Guild booth Y Lamp by Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance, Ateliers Courbet booth Untitled by Harry Morgan, Wexler Gallery booth RIGHT: Moss Giant by Kim Simonsson, Jason Jacques booth
PHOTOS COURTESY OF DESIGN MIAMI/ | ART WEEK 2022 |
Storyteller by Barbora Zilinskaite, Friedman Benda booth
” 9 TRAJECTOIRES” Pancho
Quilici

THE SURREAL WORLD

No bones about it. The organizers behind the delightfully immersive Liminal , a new exhibition at PAMM dedicated to the work of Argentine artist Leandro Erlich, are out to get us. Spanning two decades of the artist’s career, the monographic show (Erlich’s first in North America) is laid out as a series of everyday spaces—a laundry room, an elevator, a swimming pool, a corner window—that are anything but ordinary. In a Twilight Zone scheme of sorts, each of the seemingly banal scenarios fosters thoughtprovoking moments that cast doubt on the idea of perception. Take The Swimming Pool , an installation that invites viewers to look down and see people “underwater,” when in reality what they’re seeing is just the effect of a layer of water contained in transparent glass. Even more deceptive is Hair Salon, an environment devised so that when you look into the mirror on a wall, it appears as if said room is reflected, when in fact an identical room has been created symmetrically behind the mirror. Additional moments of illusion versus reality run the gamut—from a showcase of clouds to a garden that appears infinite in size. “I believe in art as a practice that sparks dialogue,” says Erlich, “a dynamic and ongoing conversation with the audience and the greater context.”

Nov. 29-Sept. 4, 2023, pamm.org

LEFT: A visitor is encouraged to enjoy The View, an installation that plays with our voyeuristic tendencies.

RIGHT: The Swimming Pool uses light and water to fool viewers on both sides of the surface.

62 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3 | ART WEEK 2022 |
THE MUSEUM MUST-SEE
A NEW EXHIBITION AT PAMM PLAYS WITH VIEWERS’ PERCEPTIONS AS IT EXPANDS THE POSSIBILITIES OF INSTALLATION ART
Esoteric beauty comes alive in Leandro Erlich’s The Cloud–América del Sur, an installation that “traps” clouds in exhibition cages. ABOVE: Six Cycles takes viewers into a laundromat that encourages relaxation. PHOTOS COURTESY OF PAMM

One and All

ART MIAMI OFFERS A MORE EGALITARIAN APPROACH TO COLLECTING

Long before Basel set its sights on Miami Beach, there was Art Miami, a showcase going on its 32nd year that’s always done its best to champion local galleries. A must for more realistic curators (the ones that don’t arrive in town via Gulfstream, swoop down on Basel for two hours, and leave knowing the latest Zheng Lu sculpture is theirs), Art Miami continually lives up to its reputation of showcasing the most significant artworks from the 20th and 21st centuries in the areas of painting, drawing, design, sculpture, photography, and, as of late, NFTs. That’s some 155 galleries and more than 600 established and emerging artists. Among the locals participating this year are Ascaso Gallery, Cernuda Arte, Dean Project, SmithDavidson Gallery, and some others. Discovery awaits! Nov. 29-Dec. 4, artmiami.com

Thrilling Trio

One of the few Miami galleries that presents new work throughout most of the year, Nina Johnson always saves the best for last. This Art Week is no different with three showcases featuring artists that deserve collectors’ attention. In Eyelash in the Unknown , Nadia Ayari presents work that brings life and movement to elements of nature typically thought of as still. Through her dancing flowers and rippling branches, Ayari gives us a narrative vibrant with color. For his contribution, Korean artist Minjae Kim will share emotive furnishings that reject pristine surfaces and rigid architectural forms. And if a new take on folklore is what you seek, look no further than Raul de Nieves. The Mexican artist is known for exuberant figurative sculptures that reflect his heritage and roots in queer club culture. Nov. 28-Jan. 7, 2023, ninajohnson.com

64 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
THE GALLERY PROGRAM YOU CAN’T MISS
THE OG OF SATELLITE FAIRS
above and right: Visitors peruse the artwork selections at Art Miami 2021.
INTRODUCES MIAMI TO THREE EMERGING ARTISTS WITH BRIGHT FUTURES
from far left: Nadia Ayari’s Synch and Cross I offer a new way to look at traditional still-life subjects.
NINA JOHNSON
PHOTOS COURTESY OF ART MIAMI & NINA JOHNSON
BARBARA SILVER abstractions All That Glitters 917-757-0447 | barbarasilverabstractions@gmail.com | www.barbarasilvergallery.com

Supper 2.0

Even the culinary arts get a stab at Art Week. A so-called “special activation” at the Superblue Miami space in Allapattah, Aerobanquets

RMX is a culinary experience seasoned with mix-reality art. Remember those diningin-the-dark spots that were all the rage in the early aughts? Think of this as its 2022 incarnation—with gadgets to boot. Wearing an audio-visual contraption known as a Meta Quest 2 VR headset, diners are guided through a narration by renowned chef Gail Simmons that touches on the artistry of food as they enjoy a menu of small bites by Michelin-starred, James Beard Award-winning chef Chintan Pandya. Good taste, indeed. Nov. 28-Dec. 4, superblue.com/aero

far left: Falooda on ice from the Aerobanquets RMX culinary experience left: A guest wearing a Meta Quest 2 VR headset considers a dish. above: An amuse-bouche is presented on a marble pedestal.

Continent Close-up

Like all good showcases, Art Week always leaves us with a vision of what will make the art world tick in the new year. This time around, it seems a newfound appreciation for African art and the work of African artists is in the cards. Exhibit A: Prizm (Nov. 30-Dec. 4, prizm.art), one of the many satellite fairs that set up across the city, will be celebrating its 10th anniversary by focusing exclusively on contemporary African art and talents from Angola, Kenya, South Africa, Mozambique, as well as other countries not in the continent where African artists thrive. Exhibit B: London’s Saatchi Yates is dedicating its temporary space in the Miami Design District to a solo exhibition of new paintings by Ethiopia’s Tesfaye Urgessa (Nov. 22-Dec. 20, saatchiyates.com), an artist celebrated for his representations of race politics. Urgessa’s 15 large-scale works address his own frustrations as a Black man and the human need to be acknowledged for who one is. As for African art in general? It appears it’s here to stay. “The success of other artists has opened the floodgates for the African contemporary market,” Unit London gallery co-founder Johnny Burt told The Art Newspaper earlier this year. “We have a huge waiting list [for works.]” Sounds like he’s not the only one.

66 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3 | ART WEEK 2022 |
THE TREND TO LOOK OUT FOR
above: Ethiopian artist Tesfaye Urgessa is the focus of Saatchi Yates’ exhibition in the Miami Design District.
THE ONE-OF-A-KIN D EXPERIENCE
above: Mattie by Jeremy Biggers, on view at the Daisha Board Gallery booth, is one of the thousands of Africathemed artworks that will be on display at this year’s Prizm.
AEROBANQUETS RMX ELEVATES THE ART OF DINING
AFRICAN ART AND ITS CREATORS GET THE ATTENTION THEY DESERVE
PHOTOS COURTESY OF SUPERBLUE MIAMI, PRIZM & SAATCHI YATES
For Further Information Call Ron 917-697-3635 Explore the
at THE PARTY 54 X 42, Acrylic on Canvas THE GAMBLER 26 X 48, Acrylic on canvas
varied works of Ron Krivosheiw
WE TRAVEL
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C reating art with the ones you love...
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1ST WED 3-7 PM 1ST THUR 1-5 PM 3RD SAT 1-5 PM Nov. 2 Nov. 3 Nov. 19 Dec. 7 Dec. 8 Dec. 17 Jan. 4 Jan. 5 Jan. 21 Feb. 1 Feb. 2 Feb. 18 Mar. 1 Mar. 2 Mar. 18 Apr. 5 Apr. 6 Apr. 15 May 3 May 4 Fun and lively free open studio events, November through May. Visitors can view live demonstrations and see artwork in the making. MONTHLY OPEN STUDIOS 2023 SEASON SPECIAL EVENTS: Jan. 21-Feb. 2, 2023 Mar. 23-25, 2023 Feb. 22-25, 2023 CERAMICS | PHOTOGRAPHY | JEWELRY | PAINTING | SCULPTURE | MIXED MEDIA GLASS | PASTELS | PRINTMAKING | WOOD | MOSAIC | COLLAGE | FIBER Visit NaplesArtDistrict.com/Design-Miami to locate our working studios in the Naples Art District and to see more original art created by our 100+ artist members. SOUTHWEST FLORIDA’S LARGEST CONCENTRATION OF WORKING ARTISTS
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The Rothko or the Knoll?

CREATIVE DISCOURSE

WHEN IT COMES TO ART-CENTRIC INTERIORS, ESTABLISHING A DIALOGUE BETWEEN ARTWORK AND SPACE IS A DUNAGAN DIVERIO MUST

What’s the first thing you think of when you learn of a new commission that will have a significant art component? Diverio: When a client’s artwork is going to be involved in a project, we are both excited and challenged. That’s because most of our clients have valuable art collections that are both satisfying and captivating to work with.

Is helping clients curate an art collection from scratch something you do as well? Dunagan: Yes, and when clients choose to buy artwork, we suggest using a curator or established art gallery. When incorporating a significant art collection is a major part of a design commission, what’s nonnegotiable? Diverio: Using a lighting designer. Fine art needs to be lit properly to assure its aesthetic. The painting that touched you emotionally in the gallery might not have the same effect if it’s bathed in shadows or blasted with sunlight. Professional lighting is meant to place your art at center stage so it’s enjoyed properly.

What other aspects regarding art do you keep front of mind? Dunagan: Placement, because it affects the choice of the furniture’s style, where it goes, and its size.

Is there a particular art medium that’s more challenging to work with? Diverio: We work with

all genres of art. Often, a piece may need to be reframed to incorporate the design style of the space, but fine art, whether it’s classic or traditional, can blend well with any room’s interior. Design is such a subjective discipline. What do you focus on when the art isn’t to your liking? Dunagan: Whether we like the artwork or not is irrelevant. We design around it and choose interior pieces that complement the art style. dunagandiverio.com

78 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
CREATING HARMONIOUS INTERIORS WITH CHERISHED ARTWORKS REMAINS ONE OF DECOR’S MOST DELICATE BALANCING ACTS. HERE, THREE MIAMI DESIGNERS REVEAL THEIR RESPECTIVE APPROACHES
PHOTOS COURTESY OF DUNAGAN DIVERIO DESIGN GROUP
After a curator decided to place a Mickalene Thomas painting (If This Is Love) with a gold relief by John Miller (Is That All There Is?) in the dining room of this Miami Beach residence, the design team stepped in and furnished the room to enhance the bold art pieces. “It’s a modern take on a vintage Mediterranean home,” says Thomas Diverio. “We incorporated floating crown moldings, contemporary furnishings, and black metal.” above: Designers Charlotte Dunagan and Thomas Diverio far right: The sectional in this family room echoes the gray palette of the screen print on linen by David Noonan (Untitled) on the wall.

ROYAL TREATMENT

FROM LIFE-SIZE PANDAS TO SOMBER MIRRORS, THERE’S NO ART COLLECTION DEBORAH WECSELMAN CAN’T ENHANCE WITH HER DESIGN APPROACH

A commission with a significant art component comes your way. Do you start thinking about it differently than other less art-centric jobs? Absolutely. For me, it’s peace of mind to have an art collector as a client. Art determines everything in terms of design as there are so many factors to consider. For example, the relationship of the walls to the design of the space. And the approach to furniture selection, which we do in a much more holistic way when art is involved. Suddenly, the art is the protagonist.

Have you ever helped a client curate a collection as part of the design process? We do it all the time. We just finished a project for a client who only wanted to incorporate Spanish and Latin American art with a focus on emerging

talent. Being part of that process and discovering these artists with them was very inspiring.

What are the main priorities to consider when dealing with an art collection?

Proportion, lighting, placement, and the composition of the art piece. That’s where the conversation with the homeowners starts.

Can you expand on the importance of lighting? It’s simply the most important element when it comes to presenting artwork in a space. It needs to be bright, but not overly so, and never obvious. It also needs to create a sense of discovery as you walk into the room. What do you focus on when you have to work with a collection or a piece of art that isn’t to your liking?

You embrace it… and work around it. wecselmandesign.com

above: An all-white palette in this living room provides the ideal backdrop for Allora and Calzadilla’s Solar Catastrophe and Anish Kapoor’s Mirror (Black to Garnet to Red), a reflective stainless steel and lacquer piece that adds intrigue to the room.

80 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3 | FD ASKS |
Rob Pruitt’s Seated Panda (Good Karma) introduces a humorous element in a classically elegant dining room.
PHOTOS
DESIGN
above: At the residence of celebrated radio host Tom Joyner, a colorful canvas depicting a DJ at work was placed in the foyer under the staircase to denote its importance to the homeowner. right: Designer Deborah Wecselman
COURTESY OF WECSELMAN
FREDY VILLAMIL Call for Show Dates 256 Worth Avenue I Palm Beach, FL 33480 I (561) 223-2194 4530 PGA Blvd., Suite 101 I Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418 I (561) 355-8061 WWW.ONESSIMOFINEART.COM Winter Exhibitions
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ALEXANDRA
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FORM & FU NCTION

Located between Wynwood and the Design District, the new Flexform showroom is marked by its austere metal structure and abundant use of glass panels, a most appropriate backdrop for an Italian brand (60-plus years and counting) that prides itself on the timeless aesthetic of its product.

The flagship’s 800 square feet of modern and minimalist space is the ideal setting for company standouts like the Groundpiece, Zeus, and Sveva seating systems, sectionals that run the gamut from serious to cheeky. Not too far from these cushioned statements, we find 2022 additions to Flexform’s armchair inventory: the Alma, which works at home or at the office equally; the Doris, which embodies the ancient art of cabinet making down to its hand-woven cord seat; and the Haiku, which, true to its name, gets its appeal from its elegant simplicity. Then come tables like the popular Pico, an industrial marriage of marble and cast aluminum, and the brand-new Boma, which takes its cues from sailboats.

By the time we arrive at the showroom’s outdoor collection and its daybeds, all of which remind us of the pleasures of living in South Florida, we are diehard Flexform fans for life. flexform.it

above: Flexform’s Pico table, featuring cast aluminum legs and a marble top, is surrounded by Echoes chairs, whose seat and backrest are handmade of paper rush cord.

right: Known for their superior construction, the Happy-hour chairs feature clean, uncluttered lines that make them ideal for multiple environments.

right: The Gregory sofa is popular for the cowhide finish on the exposed parts of the elastic webbing that supports the seat cushions.

82 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
COURTESY
FLEXFORM
PHOTOS
OF
FLEXFORM’S NEW SHOWROOM IS ALL ABOUT BRAND AWARENESS
| SHOWROOMS |
FENCES PERGOLAS ARBORS GATES TRELLISES RAILINGS Bring inspired ideas for your outdoor home to life with Walpole Outdoors. Schedule your free design consultation today. walpoleoutdoors.com | 866.850.2863 LIVE OUTSIDE EXPECTATIONS

Carpet Ride

TWO NEW SHOWROOMS PUT RUG ARTISTRY IN THE SPOTLIGHT

left: The Smoke & Mirrors rug by Jenna Krypell is made of New Zealand wool and Chinese silk.

right: Rug samples at the Art + Loom showroom include the Rock Paper Edge style from the Shape line seen on the floor.

ARTISTIC QUALITY

At the new Art + Loom showroom in the Design District, area rugs are treated like masterpieces. This all has to do with founder and Creative Director Samantha Gallagher, an interior and product designer who’s worked with the top names in the industry. Art + Loom’s 1,500 square feet of space are devoted to Gallagher’s own lines, including Shape, which features carpets in configurations that defy imagination, and Paint, a line whose designs resemble abstract artworks.

The rest of the inventory consists of collaborations with tastemakers such as Lauren Williams, Thomas Hayes, and Jenna Krypell. artandloom.com

TEXTILE TACTICS

The idea at the RUGit, a new showroom at 7255 NE Fourth Avenue, is that underfoot textures and high maintenance need not go hand in hand. Founder and owner Paula Estrada doesn’t believe high-traffic areas, messy pets, or oblivious kids should get in the way of design enjoyment. That’s why her inventory includes rugs that are washable and made from natural materials such as jute, which is soft to the touch, yet tough enough to handle wear and tear. As Estrada puts it: “I want to take away people’s fear of placing a rug in, say, the dining room because it may get stained with wine. I want our customers to place them anywhere they want and enjoy them.” rugit.us

above left and right: RUGit’s easy-care jute rugs can handle anything life throws at them.

84 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3 | SHOWROOMS |
PHOTOS COURTESY OF BRANDS

LE JEUNE UPHOLSTERY

Fifty years after the inception of Le Jeune Upholstery by their parents, Connie and Osmundo, it remains one of the top workrooms in the nation. The Alvarez brothers – Fernando, Alex and Gerry – continue the legacy begun by their parents and are perfectly balanced as they split their business responsibilities harmoniously.

Over the years, the business has evolved considerably; today it is one of the largest and finest workrooms for custom furniture. They do everything it takes to make the finest upholstered furniture, honoring the highest quality materials, workmanship, and customer experience. “Our goal is the action or process of improving something until it is flawless,” says Fernando Alvarez. The Le Jeune Studio showroom features bespoke classic and contemporary designs.

LE JEUNE UPHOLSTERY

7270 SW 42nd Street Miami, Florida 33155 305.261.4009 lejeuneupholstery.com

ADVERTORIAL

DUNAGAN DIVERIO

Dunagan Diverio Design was established in 2002 as a unique firm specializing in high-end luxury residential projects. Today, the team of discreet design professionals focuses on interiors and exteriors with a deeper, richer, more intuitive understanding of its clients’ needs. “We find that our clients are seeking a more simplified lifestyle, with clean lines and a sophisticated palate,” says Charlotte Dunagan, founding principal partner. “Most clients prefer open spaces with tons of natural light.”

Designers strive to integrate timeless architectural elements of the past with contemporary materials and methods of the present. Clean lines and simple, well-crafted furnishings, with an attention to texture and the highest quality materials. The company’s innovative architectural elements meld seamlessly with its renowned interior schemes, creating the perfect marriage between modern and classic

design. Its aesthetic is timeless and elegant. “Tailored furnishings alongside custom designed millwork and carefully selected materials blend the indoors with the outdoors,” says Thomas Diverio, principal partner. Every design project is tailored to the client’s needs and vision and highly attuned to each client’s lifestyle. Patience and caring are reflected in all its work. Dunagan Diverio Design Group, located in Coral Gables, is recognized for its luxurious homes throughout the nation.

DUNAGAN DIVERIO

2100 Ponce de Leon Coral Gables, FL 33134 305.438.0130 dunagandiverio.com

86 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3 ADVERTORIAL

ARTEFACTO

International lifestyle brand Artefacto is celebrating 20 years in Miami. The renowned family business continues its unrivaled approach to contemporary living with its sixth exclusive collection by designer Patricia Anastassiadis.

Titled Psyché–meaning breath, life and soul–the new collection of twelve limited-edition pieces draws inspiration from Greek history, culture and architecture. Anastassiadis, in collaboration with the Bacchi family, designed the collection to convey a sense of space and function while celebrating the home as host to life’s moments–from working and entertaining, to relaxing and evolving.

“Our new collection is a beautifully curated celebration of history, home, and a cultured life,” says Paulo Bacchi, Artefacto chief executive officer, who is recognized as South Florida’s go-to asset for creating Insta-worthy multimillion-dollar condos and estates in the most coveted towers and neighborhoods.

A signature Artefacto home features layered organic textures and furnishings, surrounded by warm contemporary aesthetics as captivating as its location. Brand loyalists gravitate toward styling rooms around a single statement piece, while embracing rich neutral tones of a monochrome home.

For more information, visit Artefacto.com or a showroom in Coral Gables, Aventura or Doral.

ARTEFACTO

101 South Dixie Hwy., Coral Gables, FL 33146

17651 Biscayne Blvd., Aventura, FL 33160 3290 NW 79th Ave, Doral, FL 33166 305.774.0004 artefacto.com

88 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3 ADVERTORIAL

KAREN ASPREA STUDIO

Karen Asprea and her boutique studio, KAS, have officially launched a luxury design studio in the South Florida Market. Asprea kicked off the fall season with a collaboration between the studio and Italian furniture brand, HENGE, in a design collaboration that married her tonal inspiration palette with HENGE’s exclusive material bank. The event, hosted at The SOLESDI Showroom in the Miami Design District, boasted an exclusive guest list of industry professionals in design and real estate development. The collaboration featured a natural coastal vibe showcasing Asprea’s clean design and connection with nature through materials and textures. “Designing with naturally occurring elements

brings the opportunity to define an organic environment that will evolve and change with age,” Asprea says.

Asprea’s studio recently completed a penthouse project in Tribeca, NYC also using a tonal palette alongside bold highlights of rich leathers, wood paneling and bespoke Poliform furnishings. The clean lines bring a sense of continuity and seamless efforts in this project showcasing a custom designed marble island and a professional appliance package from Gaggenau. The light tones of wood and dark metal accents bring a sense of dimension and purpose throughout the space, allowing it to soak up the sun on the brightest days and maintain a warm mood as the evening approaches.

90 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3 ADVERTORIAL

KAREN ASPREA STUDIO

431 Washington Street New York, NY 10013 917.309.4354

karenasprea.com

218 North West 24th Street, 2nd Floor Miami, FL 33127 786.743.0997

CASA CASA ITALIA

Casa Casa Italia is an Italian-based showroom founded and curated by designer Cyrilla J. Yanez that introduces artisans and the finest luxury hand-crafted Italian furniture makers. Cosy International is a luxury, bespoke furniture maker, 100% made in Italy.

Founded on the experience of a renowned historical company from Florence, Cosy specializes in the nighttime area furnishing. The company provides a high-quality, tailor-made service by bringing innovation and tradition together in its exclusive Italian wardrobe closet designs, which feature a perfectly integrated technological system.

Cosy aims to satisfy the ever-evolving demand for style and elegance in the bespoke furniture industry. The company’s Italian-made, walk-in closet design projects feature maximum versatility and customization with its products, achieving inspired solutions to its customers’ wardrobing needs.

The Cosy team of professionals creatively design multifunctional closets with furnishing proposals and a unique assembly service. The team ensures an original look, perfect functionality, and long-lasting durability.

CASA CASA ITALIA

2157 South US Highway 1 Jupiter, FL 33477 561.295.5839 casacasaitalia.com

92 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3 ADVERTORIAL 92FLORIDA

PLOUM FROM LIGNE ROSET

Non-conformist designs set trends; they don’t follow them. Bring this confidence into your rooms with the unexpected curves of Ploum by Erwan and Ronan Bouroullec. The unique sofa brings comfort along with its cozy shape, molding to the body with its high-density foam and organic lines. Offered in a wide array of textures and colors, the upholstery can reflect your personality, too.

Making spaces feel effortless and sophisticated for 161 years, Ligne Roset continues to pave the way for what’s next in contemporary style. The family-run company is known for collaborating with established as well as up-and-coming talents in contemporary design to create irresistible furnishings. Founded in France in 1860, Ligne Roset is becoming a world-renowned brand. Its sophisticated pieces have a certain je ne sais quoi.

ADVERTORIAL 94 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
LIGNE ROSET MIAMI 4040 NE 2nd Ave., Suite 104 Miami, FL 33137 305.576.4662

Sunny Nostalgia

PALM SPRINGS VIBES AND MIMO CHARM MAKE A RETRO STATEMENT AT GIO MIDTOWN THANKS TO THE EFFORTS OF DESIGNER MICHELLE HAIM TEXT LUIS R. RIGUAL | PHOTOGRAPHY KRIS TAMBURELLO
| REAL ESTATE |
From the palms chosen to the pink stools and hanging orbs, Gio Midtown’s pool bar enchants with its unmistakable Palm Springs aesthetic.

Some months before the pandemic shutdown, Deborah Samuel, an executive for Midtown Miami Group, happened to walk into a Büro working space and instantly fell in love with its interior design concept and execution by Fanny Haim & Associates. At the time, MMG was looking for a firm to oversee the look of the public spaces, amenities, corridors, and rental units for Gio Midtown, one of its newest apartment-rental properties, and Samuel felt she had found the studio for the job. Soon thereafter, a connection between the designer, developer Alex Vadia, the architects of the building, and the property managers was made, and before she knew it, Michelle Haim was spearheading one of her company’s largest commissions to date.

“The directive was to put a strong emphasis on family friendliness, wellness, and the feeling that the building was an extension of one’s home,” says Haim, “but on the aesthetic level we were given carte blanche, which was wonderful.” After multiple discussions with her team, it became clear that a Palm-Springs-meets-MiMO (Miami Modern) perspective was the way to go. “We thought that would be a perfect match with Miami’s retro past,” adds Haim. “The goal was to infuse some of the elements that make the Palm Springs aesthetic jive with

above: “This screen was installed to provide some privacy to the tenants entering the building’s spa,” says designer Michelle Haim. “The pattern was derived from my research into MiMO architecture.”

above: A spot for two in Level 5 reveals Haim’s approach of using a classic blue-and-white palette meant to stay relevant for many years to come.

right: A brass chandelier illuminates an elevated workspace in Level 5.

left: The design team chose warm brown tones for the furniture in Level 31, an area that can be reserved by the building’s tenants for gatherings and celebrations.

below: Custom millwork in the building’s lobby imparts both warmth and grandeur. The Ceramic Matrix tile flooring was selected for its motif, as well as for its ability to handle heavy foot traffic. inset far left: A seating area on Level 5 reveals the area’s welcoming vibe.

the already bountiful spirit of MiMO that we have here in Miami.”

This translated to multiple white backdrops, eye-soothing colors, textures that exude warmth, intriguing patterns and motifs, and plenty of those past-meets-future touches that mid-century modern design is so good at.

Haim’s expert approach is evident upon setting foot in the lobby, where millwork wood paneling does double duty by creating a warm counterpoint to the striking flagstone flooring and by containing many of the reception desk components. Above head, custom-designed pendants from Interieurs add a sculptural mobile touch as they bathe the lobby in ambient light.

On Level 5, a social hub for the building’s tenants that includes a game room, living room, and study, practicality took a front seat alongside style. “To address all the energy going on here, we chose terrazzo because it can take all that foot traffic,” says the designer. “And this is where my blue story comes in. Since it’s impossible to please everyone, we opted for a classic color scheme that will stand the test of time, and what’s more classic than white and blue?”

Of course, nowhere is Haim’s intended Palm Springs joie de vivre more apparent than in the pool bar, a sun-drenched perch of alfresco bonhomie. “The idea here was to make this spot as fun and inviting as the interior spaces by using decorative lighting, the color pink, and a layout that caters to entertaining,” says Haim. “We wanted warmth, timelessness and retro flair, a playful and colorful edginess that spoke to MiMo architecture and Palm Springs style.”

Mission accomplished. fannyhaim.com; giomidtown.com

98 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
| REAL ESTATE |
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The Natural Approach

When architects Francisco Llado Neuffer and Rob Moehring, and developer Todd Michael Glaser tapped landscape pro Christopher Cawley to spearhead the 22,500 square feet of gardens in a Star Island residence, they had one main decree. “They wanted my approach to blend in with the tropical surroundings,” says Cawley, “and for everything to appear as if it had just sprouted from the ground.”

Easier said than done, but it wasn’t anything Cawley hadn’t heard before. As of recent years, more and more of his clients seem to crave a genuinely lush look to their outdoor spaces, with greenery that appears to have grown there organically and hardscape that looks like it’s always been there, although the reality couldn’t be further from the truth. It takes a seasoned green thumb to make a garden appear spontaneously natural.

Cawley and his team followed the aforementioned directive to a tee, and his approach is evident to anyone entering the home via the long driveway, which is framed by coconut palms, gumbo-limbo trees, and an assortment of large-leaf philodendrons. As one nears the front door,

100 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT CHRISTOPHER CAWLEY DELIVERS TROPICAL CANDOR IN A STAR ISLAND ESTATE above: The Star Island property consists of the main modern house (on the left) and a Mediterranean structure that serves as a guest house. Closer to the main residence’s entrance, bushes of bougainvillea above head add some color. left: Palm fronds rise up to the balcony of the guest house.
| GARDENS |
text LUIS R. RIGUAL | photography PAUL STOPPI left: Landscape architect Christopher Cawley above: “The driveway leading to the home is composed of granite cobblestone,” says Cawley. “The stone’s split sides have a characteristic rough edge and surface, which creates a distinctive appearance.” The road is flanked by coconut palms, gumbo-limbo trees, and large-leaf philodendrons.

right:

left: A view of the raised pool area reveals the use of seagrape, coconut palms, and fountain grass.

sculptural sabal palms frame the entrance as tropical plantings soften the home’s modern architecture. Above, purple bougainvillea borders the lower roof’s ledge and provides a pop of color.

In the back of the structure, the surrounding landscape flows from the ground level to a series of raised gardens that are completely integrated with the home’s architecture. A generously sized pool area features floating daybeds and a metal-slatted cabana surrounded by potted specimens. Not far, fountain grass was used to soften the groves of the trunks of coconut palms. Here, as throughout the rest of the house’s footprint, native strangler figs were protected and integrated within the overall landscape design.

The sum of the landscape team’s efforts is quintessential five-star Miami—this is just the type of garden component that estates in this ZIPcode are known for. For Cawley, it’s just another day at the office. “We wanted to create a seamless harmony with nature and the house itself,” says the designer. “The location by the water and the property’s superior architecture allowed us to do just that.” christophercawley.com

above: A terrace off the primary bedroom is bordered by tropical plantings. “By preserving existing specimen trees and palms, we created a private oasis with both large-leaf tropicals and sculptural plantings,” says Cawley. “For privacy, we planted leaning coconut palms that frame the Miami skyline and the water.” A set of stairs leads to a cabana surrounded by seagrape trees.

ABOVE: “Metamorphosis is not only a design project,” says designer Paola Lenti, shown above with collaborator Humberto Campana. “It is, above all, an expression of social responsibility.”

Design Principles

PAOLA LENTI CEMENTS HER MIAMI PRESENCE WITH A NEW WYNWOOD SHOWROOM AND AN INTRIGUING COLLABORATION WITH THE CAMPANA BROTHERS THAT PUTS SUSTAINABILITY FIRST

Part of the Metamorphosis collection, the Chromodoris, which can be positioned as desired, is free in movement like the sinuous body of the mollusk from which it takes its name.

A tastemaker for the modern world, Paola Lenti is a champion of ingenuity, imagination, and sustainability—a savvy mindset that has served her innovative company well since its debut in 1994. Those three attributes are very much at the core of her latest project, Metamorphosis, a new limited-edition collection of unconventional furniture developed in collaboration with the Campana brothers. The collectible pieces will be revealed at the opening of the new Paola Lenti showroom in Wynwood during this year’s Art Week, a move that will further raise Lenti’s profile as a trailblazer. We spoke to the design doyenne about the new line and its backstory, ecological responsibility, and what we can expect from her Miami showplace.

How did the Metamorphosis collaboration come about? The project really took shape during the lockdown. We reached out to the Campana brothers, who we didn’t know personally at that time, to explain what we had in mind and see if they’d be interested to work with us. We sent them a box with production scraps to their studio in Brazil and Humberto instantly fell in love with the project. During our Skype meetings, we

102 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3 | ARBITER |
TEXT LUIS R. BELOW: Reminiscent of a centipede, the Centopeia can be arranged in multiple configurations.

quickly discovered our shared love for the materials and our affinity for color.

The idea of addressing sustainability in a collaboration was something you’d been thinking about for a while, wasn’t it? Yes. I’ve always been very concerned about reducing our ecological impact, and I had long imagined doing some kind of project with waste, with the idea that something unexpected, creative, and even a little crazy should come out with a little imagination. And who better to partner with than the Campana brothers, who have championed the idea of reuse as a hallmark of their brand?

How did the concept of using leftover fabrics from other Paola Lenti collections emerge? Going around our factory, I can’t help myself from recovering fabric remnants from the scraps bin. We were collecting these remnants before we knew what we were going to do with them, so when we connected with the Campana brothers, we instantly connected on the idea of using them, and Metamorphosis was born.

What can you tell us about the collection itself and what it consists of? It’s a balance of art and design. Each piece in the collection (five seating items and a tapestry) is named for a living organism, most from the invertebrate.

The Chromodoris is a marine mollusk. The Alicia is for the Alicia Mirabilis, a species typical of the Mediterranean Sea that expands up to several meters in height at night. The Bruco reminds us of a caterpillar before it becomes a butterfly. And the Centopeia recalls one of the many positions that a centipede can assume. Every single piece in the collection is completely handmade and takes several weeks to finish. And like art, no two are the same because of the [different scraps used].

RIGHT: The Alicia was inspired by a Mediterranean Sea creature that expands its size by several meters at night.

BELOW: The Morpho is an indoor tapestry composed of rounded elements joined in a discontinuous surface.

What kind of environment do you envision them in?

Given the striking nature of each piece, they would be equally well suited to certain residential and contract settings, introducing a focal point with a burst of color and character.

What was the role of CouLture Migrante in the creation of the collection and why was it so important to you? CouLture Migrante is a social tailoring organization in Como that works to provide opportunities for vulnerable men and women at risk of social exclusion. In our philosophy, beauty cannot be separated from ethics, and if I want to be truly sustainable I cannot ignore ethics, which extends beyond our physical environment. So why not commit to reducing inequality as well as consumption? That’s why we involved CouLture Migrante. Metamorphosis will be unveiled here in Miami at the opening of your new showroom in Wynwood during Art Week. What prompted your decision to open a Paola Lenti store in our city? It made sense to open our first few mono-brand stores in cities like Los Angeles and now Miami, which have temperate year-round climates that invite an open-air lifestyle. Miami’s climate provides us with the ideal opportunity to showcase the unparalleled performance of our products.

Was there a reason in particular you chose Wynwood? Like all booming neighborhoods, Wynwood is characterized by its strong positive charge, fervent activity, and creative effervescence. We often chose unconventional areas for our flagship stores. That’s the Paola Lenti style.

And what can you tell us about your plans for the showroom as we move into the new year and beyond? 2023 is a work in progress. Stay tuned. paolalenti.it

PHOTOS
COURTESY OF PAOLA LENTI
LEFT: The collection’s pieces, including the Zoide, were all sketched by Humberto Campana.
104 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
MOMENTS MID-CENTURY MODERN SENSIBILITIES WARM THINGS UP IN A PRIVÉ ISLAND RESIDENCE
to
Privé’s
Intracoastal views, the living room’s chic
curated pieces
warm wood
and luxurious textures. Studiopepe’s cognac leather bench and Avenue Road’s
armchairs
Oak millwork
the master suite.
PRIVATE
Positioned
capture
coveted
design combines deftly
with
tones
woven leather-backed
create clever architectural silhouettes.
composes a private hallway to

A FRONT-RUNNER IN MIAMI’S HIGH-END design scene, Tamara Feldman is undoubtedly someone to watch. Born in Mexico City, her early exposure to the region’s architecture and lively cultural landscape deeply influenced her to pursue interior design. Later in life, her studies at New York’s renowned Pratt Institute and the University of Miami’s School of Architecture, and time spent living in Tokyo earned her a unique comprehensive perspective of innovative design concepts valued by her loyal clientele. Among her impressive repertoire of projects, one of Feldman’s latest—for a family rooted in her homeplace of Mexico City—demonstrates the breadth of her talents full circle.

interior design TAMARA FELDMAN, TAMARA FELDMAN DESIGN, NORTH MIAMI, FL text JEANNE DE LATHOUDER photography KRIS TAMBURELLO, MIAMI, FL

Located in Aventura’s elite Privé Island, a secluded eight-acre enclave that boasts twin 16-story towers, t he clients’ 3,500 square-foot dwelling supplies them with the ultimate family oasis.

“The homeowners value their privacy, and the island offers that,” says Feldman. “They are very familyoriented, and we designed the property as a relaxing vacation home for them.”

The challenge for this promising space, which Feldman’s team received as a “white box,” was to transform it into a true home, adding warmth and integrating the residents’ Mexican culture with touches of vibrant color and mid-century modern sentiments. Feldman and her team opted for blue tones on the walls and layered-in terracotta hues, compelling artwork, and sculptural statement furnishings, while keeping an overall neutral aesthetic. The end result is a charismatic design aesthetic that’s sophisticated, yet welcoming.

106 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3

above: Beautifully grained wood accents flow into the dining area furnished with a round two-toned Poliform table and Almeida chairs. A sculptural installation from Troika composing Perspex tubes and photographic film hovers over a built-in, marble-topped buffet. White oak and metal columns discreetly delineate the area from the kitchen.

right: Isabell Beyel’s intriguing Mask Study 3 (2020) creates a compelling conversation piece and punctuates the living room’s deep blue accent wall. Curated from Mexico City’s Gallery OMR, the piece incorporates recycled materials enclosed in a painted plexiglass box.

To better delineate the spaces within the home’s open floor plan, the design crew incorporated contemporary architectural features, including custom white oak millwork throughout. “Stylistic wood and metal panel slats create the idea of a private dining room as you walk into the open plan,” says the designer. “The primary bedroom has an interesting backdrop that creates visual appeal with layered walnut panels.”

Upon entering the residence, a private hallway opens into the apartment. This entry foyer is defined with a sleek white oak wall treatment that is softly illuminated with slender built-in LED lighting tubes. Once inside, the formal living and dining areas display exhilarating water views from an expanse of floor-to-ceiling windows. The adjacent kitchen and family room, discreetly

108 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3

left: The cozy family room nestles behind a Pellizzoni screen made of aluminum and leather modules that rotate independently. The kitchen’s sleek aesthetic combines polished marbles, a wooden countertop, and concealed steel appliances that blend fluently with the open floor plan.

below: The entrance foyer’s artful and sophisticated elegance hints at what’s inside the residence. White oak walls emit a soft glow with built-in LED lighting features and an undulating custom bench that anchors a floating console table finished in ebony marble from ARCA.

separated with custom panel slats, still feel connected to the view. The primary bedroom showcases tranquil ocean views, while on the other side, guest quarters, and the children’s bedrooms enjoy splendid views of the Intracoastal.

“I remember walking in to check on the millwork installation—and that was a wow moment,” says Feldman. “To see how we transformed the apartment into this amazing, sophisticated, yet warm and inviting home is always exciting. We were able to create exactly what our clients envisioned feeling and experiencing—family gatherings, a home that is welcoming, comfortable, and sophisticated. They absolutely love their home, which is a personal reflection of their style and culture.”

left: A textural walnut accent wall creates an alluring focal point in the primary bedroom. The warm wood paneling counterbalances the cool gray palette of the contemporary Minotti bed.

right: The residence’s airy guest room takes inspiration from the calming blues of the scenic Intracoastal Waterway dominating the view. Behind a pristine white upholstered bed, a textured herringbone patterned wallpaper complements the room’s blue-and-white area rug.

SOURCE LIST

LIVING ROOM

Sofa lounges and side tables – Poliform, Miami, FL

Chairs – Avenue Road, Miami Beach, FL

Bench – Studiopepe, Arravanti, Miami, FL

Cocktail table – Modloft, Miami, FL

Area rug – RH, rh.com

Decorative wall designed by Tamara Feldman Design, North Miami, FL, and fabricated by Blue Star Carpentry, Miami, FL

Artwork – Isabell Beyel, OMR Gallery, Mexico City, Mexico

Lighting sculpture – Konstantin Grcic, Flos, usa.flos.com

DINING AREA

Table – Poliform, Miami, FL

110 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
below: Featuring panoramic water views from the outdoor terrace, the children’s bedroom reiterates sea and sky with a variation of cool blue hues. An ombré textured wallpaper from Twill & Texture creates a tranquil backdrop for a rainbow palette of whimsical artwork.

Chairs – Jader Almeida, Luminaire, Miami, FL

Cabinetry design by Tamara Feldman Design, North Miami, FL, and fabricated by Blue Star Carpentry, Miami, FL

Artwork – Troika, OMR Gallery, Mexico City, Mexico

Sculpture accessories – Holly Hunt, Miami, FL

Bar cart – Roda, Miami, FL

Dining table and chairs on terrace – Roda, Miami, FL

KITCHEN AREA

Island designed by Tamara Feldman Design, North Miami, FL, and fabricated by Blue Star Carpentry, Miami, FL

Stools – Design Within Reach, Miami, FL

Lighting pendants – Bouroullec Brothers, Flos, usa.flos.com

FAMILY ROOM

Sofa – RH, rh.com

Cocktail ottoman – Molteni & C., Miami, FL

Decorative divider – Pellizzoni, Arravanti, Miami, FL

Area rug – RH, rh.com

FOYER

Bench – Zara Home, Mexico City, Mexico

Floating shelf designed by Tamara Feldman Design, North Miami, FL, and fabricated by Blue Star Carpentry, Miami, FL

GUEST BEDROOM

Bed & headboard – RH, rh.com

Bedside table – West Elm, Miami, FL

Wall covering – Twill & Texture Wallpaper Store, Miami, FL

Area rug – RH, rh.com

GUEST BEDROOM

Bed & headboard – RH, rh.com

Bedside table – CB2, Miami Beach, FL

Table lamp – CB2, Miami Beach, FL

Wall covering – Phillip Jeffries, SFDP, Hollywood, FL

Area rug – RH, rh.com

Lounges on terrace – RH, rh.com

PRIMARY BEDROOM

Bed & headboard – Minotti, Miami, FL

Side tables – Anima Domus, Miami, FL

Wall coverings – Duchateau, Los Angeles, CA

Area rug – The Rug Company, DCOTA, Dania Beach, FL

THROUGHOUT

Millwork designed by Tamara Feldman Design, North Miami, FL, and fabricated by Blue Star Carpentry, Miami, FL

112 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3 IN SOUTH MIAMI, A SEASONED DESIGNER STRIKES A BEAUTIFUL BALANCE OF ART AND NATURE IN HER MAGICAL DREAM HOME
interior design
ROOTED IN BEAUTY
LUCIANA FRAGALI, DESIGN SOLUTIONS, MIAMI, FL exterior architecture CMA DESIGN STUDIO, CORAL GABLES, FL builder MOCCA CONSTRUCTION, MIAMI, FL
Blissfully secluded amid a jungle of native foliage and towering palms, the backyard pool area offers a private oasis where the homeowners love to relax and entertain. A pair of aluminum sculptures by Manolo Valdes preside over the plush lawn between two luxurious seating areas sporting Kettal outdoor lounge furniture. landscape architecture OVERLAND LANDSCAPE, MIAMI, FL text JEANNE DE LATHOUDER photography CRAIG DENIS, MIAMI, FL

Poised underneath a staircase is Jade, an ethereal bronze female sculpture by Bruno Catalano that mesmerizes viewers with a pierced structure that reveals the potted plant foliage behind it. A pair of three-dimensional framed wall hangings from Fragali’s design studio make compelling companion pieces that echo the surreal nature of the sculpture.

FOR SOME, IT’S THE CURB APPEAL in a charming neighborhood setting. For others, it’s the grand-scale architecture of a luxurious property. But for designer Luciana Fragali, it was a tree—a magnificent 400-year-old banyan rooted in all its sprawling splendor like an enchanting fantasy dream. Comfortably at home within the Old Florida allure of South Miami’s Ponce Davis neighborhood, the majestic specimen appeared to be awaiting an elaborate home—still under construction—that would someday surround it. Fragali and her family happened on the lot while riding their bikes through the neighborhood when she first spotted the tree between the gaps of the construction gates.

“I wa s awestruck,” says the owner and principal of Design Solutions. “I went right up to it and felt the most amazing energy ever—a happiness I cannot explain.”

Hours later, she told her husband, David, she had to have this house. Immersed in the real estate business, he knew it was not on

left: “I didn’t buy the house—I bought the tree,” says homeowner Luciana Fragali of the 400-year-old banyan that canopies her backyard pool area. She first spotted it through the construction gates when the house was being built, and within days, the dwelling became her dream home.

below: Amplifying the grandeur of the front entrance, massive columns of cut coral stone flank an oversize custom swivel door that makes a dramatic statement. The entry door and ceiling are crafted from two different shades of Brazilian chestnut.

the market, yet she persisted. But a call to the construction company went unanswered.

“That evening, I dreamed about that tree all night,” says Fragali, “and the very next day, we got a call from the developer. One week later, we had a deal and began building our dream house around our tree.”

Situated on a prime 14,547-square-foot lot, the 6,000-square-foot tropical modern oasis was designed by Cesar Molina, an architect known for his contemporary Balinese-style homes throughout the area. Having purchased the home when it was only a shell, Fragali seized the opportunity to inject her input without having to change much of anything already standing. Because the house was planned as a spec home by the developers, she was able to step in and create a fully customized design. “I called Cesar to ask him what his original vision was for the home,” recalls Fragali, “and sure enough, his vision aligned with what I had in mind. The rest came together magnificently.”

116 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3

First, the designer selected a gorgeous split-cut coral stone, uncommon in Miami and much more costly than regional stones, for interior and exterior applications. However, when it came to the rest of the material choices, Fragali was determined to ensure Molina’s vision was respected. She even consulted with him about the types of plants he had envisioned for the exterior. “The interiors were completely done by my firm,” she notes. “We stuck with the floor plan since the shell itself was complete, but we were able to make some changes in drywall, recessed ceiling designs, and lighting.”

Th roughout, expertly crafted custom millwork, including stunning accent walls, niches, builtin display cabinetry, and a state-of-the-art custom kitchen, characterize each space with rich patinas and innovative touches. But it’s the exquisite artwork sprinkled from room to room that truly brings this home to life. Upon entering through a grand Brazilian chestnut door, where one is greeted by a custom-made round pink onyx table, the eye is immediately drawn to a graphically powerful

The textural cut coral stone continues inside on the living room wall, which highlights a vibrant abstract by Manolo Valdes. Chic, low-profile leather furnishings include an Italian sofa from Cassina and a circular chair from Sergio Rodrigues. The adjacent dining area complements the sleek aesthetic with a pod-shaped table accented with Jader Almeida chairs.
118 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
left: The kitchen is outfitted in a modern gray and walnut wood palette with a polished marble backsplash that is repeated in the waterfall island. Streamlined gray custom cabinetry fabricated by MiaCucina all but disappears, keeping the space clean and contemporary. A trio of lavender Louis Poulsen pendant lights accents the island lined with Jader Almeida counter stools. above: Floor-to-ceiling windows frame the exquisite views of the residence’s lush pool landscape. Sergio Rodrigues’ roomy beige leather Moleca chair and ottoman offer a cozy spot for relaxing. Underfoot, a Minotti area rug introduces visual pattern and texture to the otherwise solid upholstery fabrics.

The living room emits a casual elegance with a plush beige Baxter sofa and shapely Minotti chairs with matching green ottomans. An entrancing artwork by Abraham Palatnik hovers over a an acrylic console table designed by Fragali’s Design Solutions studio.

painting on the living room’s stone accent wall. Created by Manolo Valdes, the piece was specially made for Fragali to commemorate their partnerships and collaborations over the years. Moooi’s sinuous Flock of Light chandelier centers the space, separating the living room and adjacent dining area. The entire room faces 10-foot sliding glass doors allowing picture-perfect views of the pool and gardens. Above the dining table, the designer chose a Dew Drops chandelier by Boris Klimek—a piece near and dear to her heart: “It represents dew drops sparkling on a thin blade of grass, revealing the elemental beauty of nature that continues to fascinate us.” Fragali also incorporated extensive Australian walnut millwork and two custom wine refrigerators within the dining space.

In t he kitchen, Natori Azul polished marble applied to the waterfall island, countertops, and back-

splash creates a dynamic visual impact. Ivory honed-marble floors counterbalance the room’s bold black accents. Sleek appliances and custom cabinetry and drawers bring elegance and high functionality to the space. “The kitchen is one of my favorite rooms as it overlooks the family room where my children play,” says Fragali. “What I love about this house is that anywhere you are inside, you feel like you are outside—always at one with nature.”

For the color scheme, Fragali composed a neutral palette infused with whimsical decorative accents. Skillfully demonstrated in the primary bedroom, the rich earthy hues of walnut, bronze, moss, and ivory radiate an organic essence, blurring the lines between inside and out. The designer also selected classic pieces that would stand the test of time and incorporated meaningful collectibles acquired during her many travels.

“A ll [our design decisions] were based on comfort and beauty,” she says. “This is the house where we want to raise our kids and build amazing memories, which is what we believe life is all about.”

120 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
Dressed in luxurious earth tones, the primary bedroom showcases an extraordinary slatted-wood accent wall created by Design Solutions that dramatically defines the space. The linear forms of a custom bed and oversize bench from Artefacto complement the oval cocoon-like lounge chair by the window.

above right: The spa-like primary bathroom emanates a decidedly Japanese vibe with sleek hidden cabinetry from MiaCucina and a stylish grid-patterned wall treatment lining the vanity. Bold black hardware gives visual punch to a pristine white soaking tub from Maison & Co. A graphite vanity surface reiterates the ebonytoned walls and stone flooring.

SOURCES BACK EXTERIOR

Sculptures of women – Manolo Valdes, Manolo Valdes Studio, New York, NY

Lounge chairs and side tables – Kettal, Coral Gables, FL

Umbrellas – Kettal, Coral Gables, FL Day beds – Design Solutions, Miami, FL

Pool designed by Design Solutions, Miami, FL, and fabricated by Mocca Construction, FL

STAIRWAY

Sculpture – Bruno Catalano, Galaries Bartoux, Miami, FL

Artwork on wall – Luciana Fragali, Design Solutions, Miami, FL

Floating stairs designed by Design Solutions, Miami, FL, and fabricated by Mocca Construction, Miami, FL

LIVING AREA

Entry table and ottomans – Design Solutions, Miami, FL

Lighting – Moooi, Fadecci, Miami, FL

Sofa – Cassina S.p.A., Meda, Italy

Side chair – Jader Almeida, Brazil

Round chair – Sergio Rodrigues, Espasso, Miami, FL

Cocktail table – Roberta Schilling Collection, Miami, FL

Stone wall designed by Design Solutions, Miami, FL, and fabricated by Mocca Construction, Miami, FL

Artwork of face – Manolo Valdes, Manolo Valdes Studio, New York, NY

Area rug – Oriental Rugs, Miami, FL

DINING AREA

Table – Design Solutions, Miami, FL

Chairs – Jader Almeida, Brazil

Lighting – Boris Klimek, Fadecci, Miami, FL

Wall, cabinetry, and display shelves designed by Design Solutions, Miami, FL, and fabricated by Fulia Inc., Miami, FL

“WHAT I LOVE ABOUT THIS HOUSE IS THAT ANYWHERE YOU ARE INSIDE, YOU FEEL LIKE YOU ARE OUTSIDE,” SAYS DESIGNER AND OWNER LUCIANA FRAGALI, “ALWAYS AT ONE WITH NATURE.”
122 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3

KITCHEN

Cabinetry designed by Design Solutions, Miami, FL, and fabricated by MiaCucina, Miami, FL

Backsplash and island designed by Design Solutions, Miami, FL, and fabricated by Fine Surfaces, Doral, FL

Stools – Jader Almeida, Brazil

Pendant lighting – PH 5 Pendant, Louis Poulsen, Fadecci, Miami, FL

FAMILY ROOM

Sofa – Baxter, Miami, FL

Round cocktail table – Jader Almeida, Brazil

Brown ottoman – Jader Almeida, Brazil

Green ottoman – Roberta Schilling Collection, Miami, FL

Green chairs and foot stools – Minotti, Miami, FL

Beige chair and foot stool – Sergio Rodrigues, Espasso, Miami, FL

Console table – Design Solutions, Miami, FL

Orange ottomans – Artefacto, Miami, FL

Art above console – Abraham Palatnik

Area rug – Minotti, Miami, FL

PRIMARY BEDROOM

Bed designed and fabricated by Artefacto, Miami, FL

Bedside chest – Design Solutions, Miami, FL

Hanging lighting – Multi-Lite Pendant, Louis Weisdorf, GUBI, Fadecci, Miami, FL

Ceiling light – Kosa LED Flushmount , Sean Lavin, Fadecci, Miami, FL

Bench – Artefacto, Miami, FL

Oval lounge – Anima Domus, Miami, FL

Wall behind bed designed by Design Solutions, Miami, FL, and fabricated by Fulia Inc., Miami, FL

Drapery fabric – Casa Mayo Design, Miami, FL

Area rug – Oriental Rugs, Miami, FL

PRIMARY BATHROOM

Cabinetry designed by Design Solutions, Miami, FL, and fabricated by MiaCucina, Coral Gables, FL

Wall behind sink designed by Design Solutions, Miami, FL, and fabricated by Fulia Inc., Miami, FL

Tub – Maison & Co. Doral, FL

LOGGIA

Outdoor seating – B&B Italia, Miami, FL

Decorative chair – B&B Italia, Miami, FL

Outdoor dining table and chairs – B&B Italia, Miami, FL

Area rug – Design Solutions, Miami, FL

THROUGHOUT

Artwork – Galaries Bartoux, Miami, FL

Porcelain fabrication – Moderno Porcelain Works, Sunrise, FL

Concrete surfacing – Cement Designs, Miami, FL

Automation – Tech Squad AV & Automation, Boca Raton, FL

Appliances – Mia Appliances, Miami, FL

Window treatments – Casa Mayo, Miami, FL

Wall coverings – Casa Metier, Miami, FL

Greenery – Ana Roma Floral Design, anaromadesign.com

left: The enchanting gardens surrounding the loggia befit the mystical allure of the ancient banyan tree across the yard. Under an illuminated Brazilian chestnut ceiling, a modern outdoor dining table, chairs, and lounge seating from B&B Italia exude chic European style. A textural area rug from Design Solutions mirrors the tactile rattan elements of the seating pieces.

FIRE & ICE

FURNITURE

ISLES BEACH CONDO

BOLD POPS OF COLOR AND NEUTRAL
SELECTIONS CREATE THE IDEAL AESTHETIC YIN-YANG IN A SUNNY
interior design JESSICA JAEGGER, JAEGGER INTERIOR DESIGN, MIAMI, FL text RIKI ALTMAN-YEE photography DENILSON MACHADO, BRAZIL
Physichromie Panam 319 by Venezuelan artist Carlos Cruz-Diez stars as part of a sophisticated oceanfacing scene, alongside an Arthur Casas floating walnut console, a long table from Artefacto, and Cantu chairs by legendary Brazilian designer Sergio Rodrigues. The multi-tiered linear crystal chandeliers were sourced from The Lighting Studio.
126 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
Poliform’s Mondrian sofa anchors the living room, encircling cocktail tables by Jessica Jaegger Interior Design, which AWM Group fabricated. Manolo Valdés’ Superposicion II (2021) peers over the space.

WHEN IT COMES TO INTERIOR DESIGN,

some homeowners have to be pointed in the right direction while others know exactly where they want to go.

Just ask designer Jessica Jaegger who knows and deals with this type of informed customer often—most recently during a commission that found her transforming the interiors of a 48th-floor penthouse at The Ritz-Carlton Residences in Sunny Isles Beach.

The homeowners, a Rio de Janeiro-based tech entrepreneur and his wife, purchased the 5,000-squarefoot residence with five bedrooms and six baths for use as a South Florida vacation home for them and their extended family, and their design directive was clear: palm trees, bold colors, and elegant beach home sophistication. Or, as Jaegger puts it: “They wanted many of the references of their native Brazil, so I began to think a lot about tropical modern architecture. Our connection came from that point of reference.”

A Rio native herself, Jaegger spoke their language in more ways than one, and by the time the pre-construction condo was delivered, the designer already had a complete

above: “The client’s favorite color is red,” says designer Jessica Jaegger of the decorative Mole chair by Sergio Rodrigues, accompanied by a Jardim side table by Jader Almeida.

plan in place: “I love to work with natural materials and organic textures, so lots of wood, lots of stone, lots of natural fibers. These bring a distinctive beauty and warmth to spaces. We like to do things very neutral, but throw in pops of color.” She also added plenty of bronze and brass throughout, “just to give that, you know, little touch of sophistication. That is our stamp.”

Wh ile the designer-ready home required a few edits, including changes to the layout of the master bathroom, a ceiling-suspended Futuro Futuro hood vent with display shelves, and the inclusion of a glass-enclosed wine cellar, the biggest surprise came just as Jaegger had scheduled to have nearly 2,000 square feet of white oak slat panels affixed above. “We had to completely demo all of the ceilings where wood panels were to be installed and redo the structure of the ceiling to be stronger,” she explains. “This was a major setback both in terms of time and cost, but the client gave us the go-ahead.”

128 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
The all-glass wine cellar, built to accommodate more than 350 bottles, has a white oak floor-toceiling cabinet with LED-lit shelves and a floating cabinet with a Taj Mahal quartzite recessed counter.

Jaegger opted for Santa Caterina Italian travertine, sourced from BKF Decor Solutions, for a ll the common area floors and, once the entirely neutral canvas was established, it was finally time to ornament. The design team took no chances and opted for proven designers and brands, from Brazil’s Artefacto to Italy’s Minotti. A beloved art collection with pieces by Manolo Valdés and Carlos Cruz-Diez completed the aesthetic sentiments. The residence’s million-dollar views do the rest.

The end result? A sky home that’s both Rio-inspired and homeowner approved.

above: A Groundpiece sofa by Flexform includes a sofa side table, and the designer paired them with a Bangkok ottoman and an area rug from Rug & Kilim. The family enjoys an incredible media experience designed by Ikatu, thanks largely in part to the speakers on the Bang & Olufsen TV system, which fan out like butterfly wings while the screen stretches upward to the correct viewing height.

SOURCES

DINING ROOM

Table – Artefacto, Coral Gables, FL

Chairs – Cantu, Sergio Rodrigues, sergiodriguesatelier.com.br

Floating shelf designed by Arthur Casas, and fabricated by Etel, etel.design

Artwork above shelf – Carlos Cruz-Diez

Chandeliers – The Lighting Studio, Miami, FL

LIVING ROOM

Sofa – Mondrian, Poliform Miami, Miami, FL

Cocktail tables design by Jaegger Interior Design, Miami, FL, and fabricated by AWM Group, Miami, FL

Chair – Mole, Sergio Rodrigues, sergiodriguesatelier.com.br

Side table – Jardim, Jader Almeida, Luminaire, Coral Gables, FL

Artwork – Manolo Valdez, Opera Gallery, Miami, FL

Area rug – Rug and Kilim, Queens, NY

WINE ROOM

Wine room designed by Jaegger Interior Design, Miami, FL, and

fabricated by Dragon Cellars, Delray Beach, FL and Robert Carpentry, Miami, FL

FAMILY ROOM

Sofa – Groundpiece, Flexform Miami, Miami, FL

Chair – Annette, Jorge Zalszupin, Etel, etel.design

Pouf – Bangkok, Flexform Miami, Miami, FL

Wall designed by Jaegger Interior Design, Miami, FL, and fabricated by Robert Carpentry, Miami, FL

Drapery fabric – Romo Collection, romo.com

Area rug – Rug and Kilim, Queens, NY

PRIMARY BEDROOM

Bed and headboard design by Jaegger Interior Design, Miami, FL, and fabricated by Casa Dio, Miami, FL

Bedside tables – Artefacto, Coral Gables, FL

Table lamps – Atollo, Oluce, The Lighting Studio, Miami, FL

Chandelier – Bling, Robert Abbey, The Lighting Studio, Miami, FL

Wall designed by Jaegger Interior Design, Miami, FL, and fabricated by Robert Carpentry, Miami, FL

Area rug – Helen Amy Murray, The Rug Company, Miami, FL

TERRACE

Table and chairs – Minotti, Miami, FL

THROUGHOUT

Builder – Julio Ruffinelli, Chateau Group, Miami, FL

Millwork designed by Jaegger Interior Design, Miami, FL, and fabricated by Robert Carpentry, Miami, FL

Flooring – BKF Décor Solutions, Miami, FL and Storia Flooring, Miami, FL

above: In the primary bedroom, Jaegger chose an emerald green shade for the custom velvet headboard fabricated by Casa Dio. Highlighting the customdesigned white oak wall panels are a Bling chandelier by Robert Abbey and a Star Silk rug by Helen Amy Murray for The Rug Company.

130 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
Minotti outdoor furnishings make this terrace off the primary bedroom an often-used spot all year round.

SCANDINAVIAN SPECIAL

AN ALL-BRAZILIAN DESIGN TEAM INFUSES SUNLIT DANISH FLAIR IN A KEY BISCAYNE RESIDENCE

KEY BISCAYNE ARCHITECT and interior designer Carol Farah is used to traveling the world for her profession, but one of her most recent commissions took place much closer to home after her former employer, Rio de Janeiro’s Bernardes Arquitetura, reached out with an enticing offer.

“They had a client on the island who wanted their whole house remodeled and I happen to live five blocks away from them,” says Farah. “So, they recommended me.”

Fa rah herself didn’t waste any time and called on Miami interior designer and frequent collaborator Joana Ribeiro of JRiD to help her spearhead the project, a 6,500-square-foot residence in dire need of new aesthetic life. The homeowners, a Brazilian couple who spends

132 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
interior design CAROL FARAH & JOANA RIBEIRO, CAROL FARAH, KEY BISCAYNE, FL & JRID, CORAL GABLES, FL text KERRY SHORR photography DENILSON MACHADO, BRAZIL left: Great effort went into achieving the ideal green shade for the home’s front door. Architect Carol Farah saw the color in a Bulgari ad and hired an artist to re-create it. The family room is outfitted with RH’s Cloud bench-seat sofa and a pair of Luminaire tables that display cocktail books and the homeowners’ collection of Ritzy Casa ceramic rocks.

above: The living and dining room offer a Danish vibe with furnishings that meld minimalism, curvaceous silhouettes, and strong wood accents. A cow rug, Tam Tam lamp from Marset USA, and artwork from Amberlee Gallery in Paris serve as eye-catching extras.

left: A nook in the living room overlooks the home’s glassed-in patio and pool deck.

134 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
above: In the foyer, a Mai-Britt Wolthers painting hangs above an RH console in antique oak topped with an Ingo Maurer Yoruba Rose lamp.

most of their time in South America, purchased the home as a family getaway for them and their two young sons. “The home needed to express a sense of calm and peacefulness,” says Ribeiro, “and bring the outdoors in.”

With a clear directive in mind, the designers and their teams set about creating a series of bright, airy interiors that flowed seamlessly into one another and the rest of the house. “Light wood flooring and furnishings throughout the main floor level and upstairs helped knit the project together and give the illusion of warmth,” says Ribeiro. To further emphasize that idea, walls were drenched in SherwinWilliams Snowbound shade to unify the spaces and serve as a backdrop for vibrant artworks that includes a Mai-Britt Wolthers painting that greets guests in the foyer. Pops of gray, light green, and deep blue peppered in pillows, rugs, and textiles comprise the remaining color palette.

A glassed-in patio with Jean-Marie Massaud’s Sealine sofa and Sebastian Herkner’s Mbrace wicker rocking chair allows the home’s residents to enjoy the outdoors with sun and rain protection.

In the main social hubs, relaxed arrangements of comfortable, easy-care furniture like RH’s Cloud bench-seat sofa and chairs with stain-resistant fabric—purchased from retailers like Design Within Reach and Luminaire—exude a distinctively Danish vibe with toss pillows and comfortable throws that infuse some much-desired hygge, the Scandinavian term for coziness.

On t he home’s western periphery, floor-to-ceiling windows and doorways frame lush vantages and open to a glassed-in patio whose stairs descend onto a tropical pool deck with native trees, all the work of Brazilian landscape designer Patricia Golombek.

The finishing touch was the front door’s jewel-like green color. Farah saw a Bulgari ad with the tone, fell in love with it, and sent the owner a photo of it. Once approved, she hired an artist to re-create the exact same shade. “That was a special little touch,” she says, “but it’s those small details that really make an impact.”

In

SOURCES ENTRY

Console – RH, rh.com

Artwork above console – Mai-Brit Wolthers, Gallery Eduardo Fernandes, Brazil

Ceiling designed by Carmen Landaeta Design Studio, Miami, FL, and fabricated by Home Interiors, Miami, FL

LIVING ROOM

White sofa – Cloud, RH, rh.com

Cocktail table – Room & Board, roomandboard.com

Side table – Sergio Rodrigues, Brazil

Hanging light – Tolomeu, Design Within Reach, Miami, FL

Area rug – Carpet Boutique, Coral Gables, FL

FAMILY & DINING AREA

Sofa – Luminaire, Miami, FL

Decorative chair – Design Within Reach, Miami, FL

Cocktail table – Rio, Luminaire, Miami, FL

Side table – Owner’s collection

Area rug – Design Within Reach, Miami, FL

PRIMARY BEDROOM

Bed and headboard – Restoration Hardware, rh.com

Side table – Faithful Roots, faithfulroots.com

Area rug – Carpet Boutique, Coral Gables, FL

BACK EXTERIOR

Sofa – Dedon, Clima Home, Miami, FL

Cocktail table – Dedon, Clima Home, Miami, FL

Dining table – Janus et Cie, DCOTA, Dania Beach, FL

Chairs and counter stools – Janus et Cie, DCOTA, Dania Beach, FL

Pool designed by Carmen Landaeta Design Studio, Miami, FL, and fabricated by Juan Pablo, Home Interiors, Miami, FL

THROUGHOUT

Exterior architecture – Carmen Landaeta Design Studio, Miami, FL, and Paula Laveglia, Interior Design, Miami, FL

Builder – Juan Pablo, Home Interiors, Miami, FL

136 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
far right: Hedged with native trees and plantings by landscape designer Patricia Golombek, the outdoor pool deck offers a welcoming spot for entertaining with tables and seating from Janus et Cie and Clima Home. the guest bedroom, furnishings made from natural woods nod to the environment.
138 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
interior design SOFIA JOELSSON, SOFIA JOELSSON DESIGN, MIAMI BEACH, FL text RIKI ALTMAN-YEE photography EMILIO COLLAVINO, MIAMI BEACH, FL left: Deep balconies give the residence more visual depth, while also allowing residents to enjoy true indoor/outdoor experiences. The chairs are from Holly Hunt with cushions upholstered in Perennials fabric.

A variety of colors and textures add interest to the living room, for which designer Sofia Joelsson commissioned a custom rug with a chartreuse border. A pillow with feathers, a curvy floor lamp, a coffee table with textured legs, and a black leather bench with a surface attached complete the design equation.

The painting Protest Color Tagged 2 by Aboudia echoes the yellow and green shades found in the furniture.

Perfect Ten

AFTER A DECADE OF STARTS AND STOPS, A MANHATTAN COUPLE GOES FULL THROTTLE TO MAKE THEIR BAL HARBOUR RESIDENCE AN ENVIABLE, ART-FILLED DESTINATION

BACK IN 2012 BENEDICT MORELLI, an attorney based in New York, and his wife, Arlene, spent hours touring the units for sale at the exclusive St. Regis Bal Harbour Resort, the tony residential tower right across the street from Bal Harbour Shops. When they finally set foot on a 19th-floor, 3,500-square-foot residence with gloriously high ceilings and ample terraces, they instantly knew they had found “the one.” Before an offer was even made, the couple began envisioning the long weekends they would spend on those balconies as they enjoyed the breezes from the ocean.

Once sale matters were settled, Arlene began the hunt for the right designer to transform the condominium into a glamorous, art-forward home. Her research soon led her to Sofia Joelsson, a tastemaker well-versed in vertical living.

“They wanted something modern, clean, and understated, with warmth and comfort, so their two adult sons could move around and have different experiences when they visited,” says Joelsson. “It was important to them that the apartment didn’t feel like a showroom.”

Work soon began in the kitchen, where dark cabinets were replaced with white glass ones; on the floors, which were covered in hardwood and thin-cut travertine; and in the primary bedroom, which received a total makeover. Then, just as abruptly, the process stopped when the Morellis had a change of heart and put the residence up for sale. Years later they changed their minds yet again, and Joelsson was back at work and thrilled about it: “The original vision was back on,” she says, “and we started from where we left off.”

As more customizing ensued and certain rooms were rethought (such as the midnight kitchen that turned into a dressing room), the attention turned to the Morellis’ art collection of works from new and established artists from all around the world. Arlene and Joelsson opted for architectural furniture to enhance and anchor the artworks, but they didn’t shy away from color—one example of this approach is found in the living room where chartreuse velvet chairs were chosen to offset a busy figurative painting titled Protest Color Tagged 2 by the Ivorian-born artist Aboudia.

As time passed and the project progressed, the homeowners invited Joelsson on their annual

140 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3

right: The residence’s kitchen boasts high-tech accessories like a Qlocktwo display that announces time typographically and a built-in wine refrigerator. Joelsson made the space visually cohesive by introducing minkcolored marble countertops with white veining to tie in the white glass Scavolini cabinetry and travertine floors. The paint sculpture, Big Tomato Splash by Pimax, was sourced from Bel Air Fine Art in Miami.

left: A view of the dining room reveals a set of Kaws drawings and a dining table from Roche Bobois. In the family room, which offers views of the Intracoastal Waterway, a fireplace and TV set were integrated into the wall. The husband insisted on a wine display for his cherished vintages. All the mechanicals for the cooling system are built into the ceiling, as are LED lights, which complement the hanging fixtures in the adjoining dining room.

shopping trip to Art Basel and welcomed her input as the condo moved forward. “Art will always find its home,” says the designer. “We didn’t mix and match art with furniture; it was all about complementing.” In some instances, Joelsson even provided her own creative contributions, including a hand-painted mural depicting serene clouds that now rises behind the bed in the primary bedroom.

Not always present but still involved in the design decisions, Benedict’s only request was a wine storage area equipped to display his prized labels. Joelsson delivered with a custom wine wall—complete with bronze handles and stainless-steel pegs—that showcases the bottles as if they are floating on air. This linear setup in the dining room is the ideal partner for a series of 10 black-and-white drawings by Kaws. Here, a bronze-and-glass dining table for eight from Roche Bobois is all but unused, as the more casual Morellis prefer to dine alfresco on any of the nearby terraces every chance they get. These outdoor perches have also come in handy for regular Zoom sessions with friends and family. “We don’t mind when people visit as long as it’s virtually,” Benedict jokes. “It’s less messy that way.”

Th rilled with the end result and Joelsson’s work, the couple recently began renovating another vacation home in The Hamptons and once again tapped Joelsson to handle the interiors. We’re certain that association will yield yet another masterpiece—hopefully in a much shorter timeline.

The primary bathroom was entirely clad in Calacatta Borghini marble.

SOURCES

LIVING ROOM

Sofa – Camerich Miami, Miami, FL

Club chairs – Anthropologie, Miami Beach, FL

Accent chair – Desiree, Anima Domus, Miami, FL

Fabric – Romo, DCOTA, Dania Beach, FL

Cocktail table – Nest Casa, Miami, FL

Oval side table – Holly Hunt, Miami, FL

Bench – True Design, Design Public Group, Los Angeles, CA

Floor lamp – Merve Kahraman, Milan, Italy

Artwork above sofa – Ethan Cohen Gallery, New York, NY

Area rug designed by Sofia Joelsson Design,

Miami Beach, FL, and fabricated by Oliver Treutlein, Meerbusch, Germany

DINING AREA

Table – Roche Bobois, Miami, FL

Chairs – Olivya Stone, Los Angeles, CA

Chandelier – Sonneman Lighting, Farrey’s, North Miami, FL

B/W artwork – Kaws, Gallery Art, Aventura, FL

Wine wall designed by Sofia Joelsson Design, Miami Beach, FL, and fabricated by Sempre Avanti Woodwork & Design, Hollywood, FL

Wine wall glass – Nations Glass, Cooper City, FL

SEATING OFF DINING AREA

Sofa – Camerich Miami, Miami, FL

Club chair – Bernhardt, Curated Living, Miami, FL

Cocktail table designed by Sofia Joelsson Design, Miami Beach, FL, and fabricated by R.E.J. Doza Designs, Boynton Beach, FL

Side table – Curated Living, Miami, FL

Floor lamp – Arteriors Home, Curated Living, Miami, FL

Red paint sculpture – Bel Air Fine Art, Miami, FL

Area rug designed by Sofia Joelsson Design, Miami Beach, FL, and fabricated by Kyle Bunting, Austin, TX KITCHEN

Cabinetry and island designed by Sofia Joelsson Design, Miami Beach, FL, and fabricated by Scavolini,

142 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3

The ocean and sky outside are echoed in the blues of the custom mural behind the bed. Unlike the main traffic areas, this primary bedroom has wideplank wood floors in a matte finish. The desk by the window is where the Morellis conduct many of their virtual meetings with their Manhattan law firm.

Coral Gables, FL

Stool – Design Within Reach, Miami, FL

Pendant lighting – Troy Lighting, ylighting.com

PRIMARY BEDROOM

Bed and headboard designed by Sofia Joelsson Design, Miami Beach, FL and fabricated by Vant Panels, vantpanels.com

Wallcovering behind bed – Calico Wallpaper, The Future Perfect, New York, NY

Bench designed by Sofia Joelsson Design, Miami Beach, FL, and fabricated by R.E.J. Doza Designs, Boynton Beach, FL

Side table – Camerich Miami, Miami, FL

Pendant lighting – Humanscale, Lightology,

Chicago, IL

Hanging lighting – Tech Lighting, ylighting.com

Artwork of swimmer – Nelson de la Nuez, Luria Gallery, Los Angeles, CA

Artwork of abstract – JonOne, Fabien Castanier Gallery, Culver City, CA

Area rug designed by Sofia Joelsson Design, Miami Beach, FL, and fabricated by Oliver Treutlein, Meerbusch, Germany

PRIMARY BATHROOM

Cabinetry, shower and tub designed by Sofia Joelsson Design, Miami Beach, FL, and fabricated by Nacho & Son Construction Company, Miami, FL

Sconce – Astro Lighting, ylighting.com

Ceiling light – Astro Lighting, ylighting.com

Flooring – Marble of the World, Miami, FL

TERRACE

Seating grouping – Holly Hunt, Miami, FL

Cocktail table – Holly Hunt, Miami, FL

Decorative pendants – Contardi, Curated Living, Miami, FL

THROUGHOUT

General contractor – Nacho & Son Construction Company, Miami, FL

Millwork – Sempre Avanti Woodwork & Design, Hollywood, FL

Glass wine enclosure – Nations Glass and Mirror, Inc., Cooper City, FL

Expert Touch

144 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
CURATED ART AND SAVVY SPACE DECISIONS TRANSFORM A SUNNY ISLES BEACH APARTMENT INTO A CHERISHED VACATION HOME
CAREFULLY

BUYING REAL ESTATE on the Internet has its advantages… and inevitable letdowns. Case in point: When a jet-setting couple purchased a 2,200-square-foot unit at The Ritz-Carlton Residences in Sunny Isles Beach, they initially thought they’d found the ideal Miami vacation perch. But once they saw the 29th-floor residence in person, they weren’t so certain anymore. “They were shocked,” says designer Diana Uribe of DIDA Home. “They thought it was too small.”

The buyer’s remorse didn’t last long, however. Uribe and her partner David Miranda urged them to accentuate the positive (glorious ocean views, day-and-night Ritz perks) and promised to deliver a smart design layout that made the most of the (in their eyes) limited square footage. The husband and wife, who own several homes around the United States and Mexico, were more than willing to be pleasantly surprised.

Uribe and Miranda began by devising a floorplan with an intimately sized living room balanced between a trio of bedrooms, an open-concept

above: The living room’s wood paneling creates cohesion and secret doorways to the main bedroom, a powder room, and a hidden bar. In the living room, DIDA Home’s Diana Uribe and David Miranda juxtaposed traditional design and silhouettes with eye-grabbing artwork including Aldo Chaparro’s Mx Silver, a piece constructed from bent steel, and Jonathan Paul’s Lollipop, a whimsical candy sculpture. The modular sofa and Nelson cocktail table by Frigerio, Gabriel Scott Prong bench, and Art & Loom area rug unite the space with a neutral palette and textures found throughout the rest of the home. interior design DAVID MIRANDA & DIANA URIBE, DIDA HOME, MIAMI, FL text KERRY SHORR photography TROY CAMPBELL, FORT LAUDERDALE, FL

kitchen and dining room, and a cozy nook for TV watching. Helping the design team along were the spectacular ocean vistas, visible from just about anywhere in the apartment. “The views are insane,” says Miranda. “When you look out, you feel like you’re on a yacht in the middle of the Atlantic.”

The duo then turned their attention to the all-white, finished kitchen and sunlit living room. Wood wall panels milled in Italy exude the sensation of warmth and conceal storage and a series of doorways leading to a powder room, closet, and the main bedroom. In the kitchen, the island and backsplash were reimagined in ebullient green, black, and white marble, and a long communal table connected to the island serves as a gathering spot for family meals and convivial gatherings. “The home’s configuration couldn’t accommodate a formal dining room, so this was the perfect compromise,” says Uribe.

The condo’s comfortable yet refined aesthetic was accomplished with a mélange of custom, handcrafted furnishings and accessories, as well as sophisticated and tactile fabrics like silk and raffia. “There’s pearl, flax, and oatmeal with hints of green and dusky coppers and pinks throughout,” says Uribe, describing the color palette, “with copious amounts of wood, marble, metal, and leather to keep things warm and organic.”

146 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
below: The powder room is covered in malachite-inspired wallcoverings and features a wall-mounted vanity carved from Nero Marquina marble. In the kitchen, the marble island and dining table were united to make the most of limited space. A Caralarga wall weaving near the window nods to the homeowners’ Latin American lineage.
148 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3
above: Bolle pendants resembling soap bubbles flank a Yuki bed and freestanding headboard by Massimo Castagna in the primary bedroom. DIDA Home designed the column cover and connecting bench.

There’s also an impressive collection of art. Aldo Chaparro’s bent steel abstract, Mx Silver, hangs in the living room, where it captures the movement and distorted reflections of those who walk by. Not too far, a Jonathan Paul lollipop-shaped sculpture rests on a white bronze Luca stool by Muse Collection, while a Caralarga macramel—woven in Querétaro using ancient textile techniques—hangs proudly in the kitchen. The art moments may not be many, but they are impactful, honest, and memorable.

Once the DIDA Home crew was finished and the apartment delivered, the owners no longer spoke of lack of space, but rather reveled in their Miami home’s potential. “When the clients saw the finished product and their vision of a relaxing and modern space realized, they told us we nailed it.” says Miranda. “As a designer, you can’t ask for a better reaction.”

SOURCES

LIVING ROOM

Sofa – Frigerio, Milan, Italy

Armchair – Audrey Poltrona, Gallotti & Radice, gallottiradice.it

Cocktail tables – Nelson, Frigerio, Milan, Italy

Drink table – Elan Atelier, New York, NY

Sculpture – Desire Obtain Cherish, desireobtaincherish.com

Table between sofa designed by DIDA Home, Miami, FL

Bench – Gabriel Scott, New York, NY

Artwork above bench – Aldo Chaparro Studio, Mexico

Display cabinetry designed and fabricated by DIDA Home, Miami, FL

Area rug – Art + Loom, Miami, FL

& DINING AREA

KITCHEN

Dining table designed by DIDA Home, Miami, FL Chairs – Gallotti & Radice, gallottiradice.it

Chandelier – Gabriel Scott, New York, NY

Cabinetry, island and back splash designed by DIDA Home, Miami, FL

Stools – Mater, Agoura Hills, CA

Hanging art – Caralarga, caralarga.com.mx

Drapery fabric – Holly Hunt, Miami, FL

POWDER ROOM

Cabinetry and mirror designed by DIDA Home, Miami, FL

Wall covering – Holly Hunt, Miami, FL

PRIMARY BEDROOM

Bed and headboard – Gallotti & Radice, gallottiradice.it

Occasional chair – Bessie, Frigerio, Milan, Italy

Side table – Elan Atelier, New York, NY

Drink table – Torre, Kreoo, kreoo.com

Pendant lighting – Bolle, Giopato & Coombes, giopatocoombes.com

Column and bench designed by DIDA Home, Miami, FL

Wallcovering – Porter Teleo, Kansas City, MO

Flooring – Storia Flooring, Miami, FL

TERRACE

Lounge chairs and drink table – Gervasoni, gervasoni1882.com

Pillows – Romo Fabrics, Chagrin Falls, OH

right: On the covered terrace, Gervasoni lounge chairs with Romo Fabrics-covered toss pillows are relaxing requisites for lazy afternoons.

ORGANIC APPEAL

THE DESIGNERS: Pratt Institute graduates Carlos Rodriguez and Leandro Lantigua are the founders and principals of Modplay Studio, a Miami-based design firm informed by their signature blend of classicism and modernity.

THE OBJECT: Available in various heights and sizes, the Lamé occasional table by The Davani Group is made with four types of marbles selected for their fossilized, sedimentary characteristics to emphasize the untouched beauty of nature. Interlocking slabs of rock come together to create the Lamé in a single self-supporting structure with puzzle-like features.

IN THEIR WORDS: “It’s a complex marriage of raw materials and soft fluid forms,” says Rodriguez, “a contemporary piece that draws on primitive connections and concepts.” Adds Lantigua: “The Lamé is the type of piece that can be used in any project that seeks a balance between traditional and contemporary ideas.” modplaystudio.com; thedavanigroup.com

152 FLORIDA DESIGN’S MIAMI EDITION 18-3 | COVET |
DESIGNERS
PHOTOS COURTESY OF MODPLAY
Miami Design District, 3921 NE 2nd Ave, FL 33137 enne.com.tr | ennefurniture | +1 305-631-2115
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