Cultural Council Collecting Art 2023

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in The Palm Beaches

A guide presented by the Cultural Council for Palm Beach County

@mtnspacegallery mtnspace.com 502 lake avenue lake worth beach, fl

Some of this content was originally published in art&culture magazine, produced three times a year by the Cultural Council for Palm Beach County. Members of the Council receive a complimentary subscription. For more information on art&culture and membership, visit palmbeachculture.com/magazine.

Collecting Art in The Palm Beaches

5 INTRODUCTION

Welcome from a local collector

6 THE ART OF COLLECTING IN THE PALM BEACHES

Local galleries beckon the first-time collector

14

GALLERY & STUDIO GUIDE

A curated selection of galleries to explore

18

SCULPTURAL SANCTUARIES

Tips for creating a personal sculpture garden

10 ART OF TODAY

Meet three South Florida gallery proprietors

ON THE COVER: Anthea Kerou, Lillies in Kyoto (2022), mixed media on wood canvas, 36 x 48 inches

3
CONTENTS

601

PRESIDENT & CEO

Dave Lawrence

VICE PRESIDENT OF MARKETING & PROGRAMS

Jennifer Sullivan

DIRECTOR OF ARTIST SERVICES

Jessica Ransom

MARKETING MANAGER

Nick Murray

CREATIVE LEAD

Grazie Prokopetz

PUBLISHER

Terry Duffy

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Daphne Nikolopoulos

EDITOR

Mary Murray

ART DIRECTOR

Frank Pace

DIGITAL IMAGING SPECIALIST

Leonor Alvarez Maza

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Nick Murray, Judy Martel, Lola Thélin, Susie Stanton Staikos

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Jerry Rabinowitz

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

Selene M. Ceballo

PRODUCTION MANAGER

Lourdes Linares

DIGITAL PRE-PRESS SPECIALIST

George Davis

4 Collecting Art in The Palm Beaches
Lake Avenue, Lake Worth Beach | 561.471.2901 | palmbeachculture.com
BY PALM BEACH MEDIA GROUP NORTH P.O. Box 3344, Palm Beach, FL 33480 Telephone: 561.659.0210 • Fax: 561.659.1736 www.palmbeachmedia.com Copyright 2023 Palm Beach Media Group North Inc. All rights reserved.
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KYLE
LUCKS, WORTH AFTER THE RAIN (DETAIL)

It is my distinct honor to welcome you to the second annual issue of Collecting Art in The Palm Beaches. There’s much knowledge to be gleaned in the pages ahead for both new and established collectors visiting the area and for those of us lucky to call it home.

Though I myself am a patron and active supporter of the arts and serve on the boards of many institutions in Boston and here in Palm Beach—it all started when I met my late husband, Frederic, that I knew I was marrying a collector in the truest sense of the word. He was inquisitive, intellectual, and passionate about subjects that interested him. This was a man who as a student at Harvard University had opted to spend his money (initially intended for textbooks) on pictures and paintings. After we were married, I also found myself drawn to collecting. For decades, we spent time antiquing and browsing auctions, always adding pieces to our growing collection of SpanishAmerican War illustrations, architectural drawings, automotive design drawings, Japanese Meiji period woodblock prints, fashion illustrations, 1940s British women’s wear and even cartoons.

Throughout the years, pieces from our collections have been donated to and exhibited at many institutions across the U.S. including the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Florida International University, the Norton Museum of Art, and the Henry Morrison Flagler Museum in Palm Beach.

That love and dedication to the art of collecting that Frederic and I shared for so many years is something that I sincerely hope is passed on to readers of this guide.

Thank you,

5
INTRODUCTION

The Art of Collecting in The Palm Beaches

The Palm Beaches are home to dozens of top-notch galleries and studios offering curated selections for collectors at any level. If you’re eager to support the work of emerging artists and the creative economy at large, you can do so by collecting works by artists based here in Palm Beach County. Here are four galleries and organizations that’ll inspire you to hang art on your walls—in addition to spending a fun weekend in Florida’s Cultural Capital®.

The Peach, West Palm Beach

One of the newer, more unique destinations where collectors can purchase art is at The Peach in West Palm Beach. Situated like a hidden gem in the city’s industrial district, The Peach is an art collective that seeks to serve artists and the community alike. “The vision for [The Peach] was for it to be a place where artists are not only collaborating with each other, but also collaborating with the community of creatives that we’re surrounded by,”

6 Collecting Art in The Palm Beaches

says The Peach’s managing artist, Craig McInnis, who also has his studio on-site.

The campus features a main building with six separate studio spaces, an open performance/music hall, and a restaurant area dedicated to the ever-popular Troy’s Barbecue. The best time to visit The Peach is during its series of monthly art walks, where the public can visit the studios, hear great music by local bands, and enjoy food and drinks at Troy’s.

The core to the work of The Peach, though, is in its support of Palm Beach County-based artists, bands, and businesses and imparting to their customers the importance of that support. “You’re basically keeping the soul of the area alive when you support the arts here,” explains McInnis. “If you’re making your way through the scene and buying a print, a painting, a sculpture…you’re making sure that we as artists can keep our heads above the water line so that we can keep creating and adding to the cultural landscape here.”

He also contributes a bit of wisdom to newer collectors: “Start small and build your way up. Don’t necessarily chase what you think is the hot-ticket item. Art is a collectible and it is an investment, yes, but I also think that you should have things that you like to look at.” The Peach, 3950 Georgia Ave., West Palm Beach, thepeachwpb.com, 561.532.0900

JF Gallery, Antique Row, West Palm Beach

West Palm Beach’s Antique Row Art & Design District is a no-brainer for those interested in adding a touch of class to their homes. With more than 40 shops, restaurants, galleries, and more to visit, one could make an entire day of enjoying this chic historic district.

JF Gallery is one of four galleries within the district specifically focused on art. Owner Jamnea Finlayson has a distinct vision for the work within her gallery, as well, gravitating toward large-scale, abstract pieces. “My passion is abstract work, so that’s what I decided to stick with,” says Finlayson.

The true uniquity of JF Gallery, however, is that more than half of the artists represented are based in Palm Beach County. Finlayson serves an even mix of collectors and interior designers and says that work by local artists is “important to include in a collection because if [the artist] is serious about their career and the collector gets them early…that work will have value in the future. She adds that “you’re also supporting the local community. Any art collection should be peppered with a little bit of local work especially if [the artist] is up and coming. I myself purchase from emerging artists that I know for a

fact are going somewhere.”

As someone who has been at the helm of a gallery for 20 years in the same space, Finlayson offers valuable advice to those just starting their collection: “A lot of the collectors that I’ve dealt with always have a major focus. Whether it’s Latin American art or color-field paintings

or collage work—there’s always a focus and sometimes they don’t really know what it is until much later. Figure out what you’re really passionate about and stick with it.” JF Gallery, 3901 S. Dixie Hwy., West Palm Beach, jfgallery.com, 561.478.8281

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ABOVE: THE PEACH; BELOW: JF GALLERY; OPPOSITE PAGE: ONE OF THREE GALLERIES AT THE CULTURAL COUNCIL IN LAKE WORTH BEACH

Lighthouse ArtCenter Gallery & School of Art, Tequesta

At the northern tip of Palm Beach County is the laidback, seaside village of Tequesta. One of the village’s most-visited destinations is Lighthouse ArtCenter Gallery and School of Art (LAC), a beloved nonprofit organization that has hosted a dizzying number of classes, events, and exhibitions for the community since its inception in 1964. “Right now we are booked well into 2025 with what we hope will be exciting exhibitions designed to fascinate collectors and guests from near and far,” explains Janeen Mason, LAC’s curator. Though the organization regularly hosts exhibitions featuring international artists, it also works with Palm Beach County’s creative community to put on a number of shows and festivals throughout the year. These collaborations run from smaller, individual-focused shows to LAC’s most-famous event, the annual Plein Air Festival. The fact that the organization has two gallery spaces means that it gives Mason the ability “to show

collectors and interior designers alike from its fine art gallery and custom framing shop in Boca Raton. Though the gallery is focused on contemporary, post-war, and modern works and artists from across the globe, it’s also home to works from South Florida-based artists.

spectacular local art that we didn’t know we couldn’t live without.”

When speaking about the value in collecting work by Palm Beach County-based artists, Mason first establishes the importance of art, saying that “the act of creating art is a profound investment in hope— the hope of communicating the experience of our shared humanity.” She continues, “Your purchase is, of course, an investment in something which will enhance your life. It is also a part of a very big and very important economic engine.“ Lighthouse ArtCenter Gallery and School of Art, 373 Tequesta Dr., Tequesta, lighthousearts.org, 561.746.3101

Rosenbaum Contemporary, Boca Raton & Palm Beach

Since 1979, Rosenbaum Contemporary has served

“What we do well is that we bring art from around the globe with an incredible, well-curated mix of different genres,” explains Howard Rosenbaum, the gallery’s founder and owner. “We’re not just specialists in one limited market. We have Latin American, Eastern European, Western European, Asian…we have a great worldwide mix of mid-career emerging artists as well as master contemporary works.”

He adds that this diversity is due to the location: “[South Florida] is an emerging market of fabulous talent because it pulls globally from all around the world…I think it has a great future ahead for appreciation.”

Rosenbaum’s expertise is extensive. As of this writing, his gallery just opened its second Palm Beach County location on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach. His advice to collectors is simple: “Only buy what you truly love and choose a dealer you can trust, who can help you through the process.” Rosenbaum Contemporary, 150 Yamato Rd., Boca Raton, rosenbaumcontemporary.com, 561.994.9180 ❖

8 Collecting Art in The Palm Beaches
ROSENBAUM CONTEMPORARY IN PALM BEACH LIGHTHOUSE ARTCENTER GALLERY

Expanding minds. Inspiring community.

We believe in the sustaining power of arts & culture.

The museum painting that touches your soul.

The symphony that stirs your emotions.

The world-class science center that blows your mind.

They are more than buildings, experiences or personal expressions. They are the lifeblood of our community.

At the Cultural Council for Palm Beach County, we work hard to integrate arts & culture into everyday life for everybody. And we’ve done so for more than 40 years.

We support creative professionals and cultural organizations. We award grants and advocate for resources. We promote cultural tourism and champion arts education.

#palmbeachculture

To learn more about the work and the mission of the Cultural Council, visit palmbeachculture.com/about.

Art of Today

THREE SOUTH FLORIDA GALLERISTS AND CURATORS OFFER INSIGHT INTO THE ARTISTS, MEDIUMS, AND TOPICS LEADING THE WAY IN THE CONTEMPORARY ART WORLD

Contemporary art seems to always be having a moment. The best examples of contemporary art—which is simply defined as “the art of today”—have the uncanny ability to thrive in a global, multifaceted environment and connect with viewers across a variety of platforms. Cultural Council for Palm Beach County recently spoke with Adeze Wilford, curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami (MOCA); Devon McCready, gallery director of Samuel Owen Gallery on Palm Beach; and Nick Hissom, co-owner of Aktion Art on Palm Beach, to better understand the current nuances of the allencompassing art genre.

CCPBC: What excites you about contemporary art?

Wilford: Contemporary art drew me in early in my career because of the opportunity to engage with living artists. You get to know them, spend time in their studio, and hear firsthand why a gesture is important or how they source specific materials.

McCready: The contemporary art world is one of the most exciting and unpredictable industries in the world. I love exploring the vast variety of mediums available to artists and how they are constantly pushing those limits.

Hissom: It is a fast-moving, fasttraveling international art community that has its finger directly on the pulse, helping to introduce and create culture and art throughout the world. Are there any specific forms of expression coming through in contemporary art?

Hissom: There is certainly this idea of contemporary surrealism and flatness, particularly when applied to colorful landscapes, that is coming back. Surrealism is one of the most interesting forms of expression through art, and to reimagine it in a contemporary way is both incredibly challenging and stimulating. In the modern day we are exposed to so much fantasy through special effects and technology; it makes it hard to paint something as captivating by comparison, so it’s a real triumph when done right.

Is there a dominant aesthetic in contemporary art?

Hissom: I would say either abstract expressionism or modern surrealism. Abstract expression in one form or the other has been highly dominant since its emergence in the 1940s and ’50s, and the Pop Art movement has, of course, captivated much of contemporary figuratism and portraiture. But now, art is very openended in terms of stylistically what it can be. There is definitely a revisitation of surrealism starting to emerge over the past three to five years, but I would still say abstract is more widely dominant for now.

10 Collecting Art in The Palm Beaches
FEATURED GALLERISTS AND CURATORS, FROM LEFT: ADEZE WILFORD, DEVON MCCREADY, AND NICK HISSOM (RIGHT) WITH HIS PARTNER, KAMERON RAMIREZ.

Who are your favorite female artists painting contemporary surrealism?

McCready: Audra Weaser creates dreamlike, watery, abstract paintings with a unique process. She builds up different washes on color on a wood panel, then sands away at the surface to reveal pieces of the layers underneath. Her compositions are inspired by [the] photos she has taken in nature.

Hissom: Hilary Pecis is definitely one of my favorites, as well as Shara Hughes.

Large auction houses have shown a growing interest in pop culture and cross-branded collectibles. How does this affect an artist’s appeal?

McCready: A great example of this cross-branding is the collaboration between surfer/artist Tim Bessell and The Warhol Foundation. This series features surfboards with iconic Warhol images that can be installed as wall art but also come with fins and can function as real surfboards. After learning that

Warhol’s Shot Sage Blue Marilyn sold for $195 million at Sotheby’s this spring, I noticed an increased interest in the Bessell x Warhol collaboration. Cross-branded collectibles and collaborations like this one can give collectors on every level the ability to participate in these historic, record-breaking sales.

Any collaborations that are catching your eye?

Wilford: I’ve been following what Nina Chanel Abney has been doing in this space; she released some innovative collectible items that seamlessly fit in with her larger practice. Her most recent collaboration with the Jordan Brand for a capsule collection of sneakers and clothing was really exciting. I also love that the branding featured the founders of BLK MKT Vintage, an incredible store that specializes in vintage housewares and books [that] look at Black American culture in an accessible and fresh way.

How does technology and science advance contemporary art?

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ASSEMBLY, 2022, RASHAAD NEWSOME

Wilford: I’m really interested in the ways visual art and performance can build new methodologies within a rapidly changing tech landscape. Artists are such visionaries and can bring new ideas to these conversations about building the tech that will shape our future. Rashaad Newsome has been doing impressive things with merging his practice that explores Black visual culture across the diaspora, the LGBTQIA community, and cutting-edge technology. He’s been working with AI on this ongoing project called Being, and it blends video and performance with explorations of mental health within the Black community in the wake of George Floyd.

Who is melding technology with art in unique ways?

McCready: I am fascinated by the artwork of British photographer Nick Veasey. Using a large format X-ray machine, Veasey creates X-ray photographs of everyday objects and vehicles. The image is comprised of hundreds of smaller X-rays. Veasey is limited by the film size of 14 inch by 17 inch. To capture any object larger than this size, he must dismantle the subject and X-ray each element individually.

Hissom: I love the work of ThankYouX [Ryan Wilson]. Not only do his swirling colors and brushstrokes deeply captivate the viewer, but his incorporation of digital screens displaying unique NFTs into his work takes the canvases to another level. Credited as the inventor of “phigital” [physical and digital] art, his work includes musical collaborations with Hans Zimmer, video-game-level world building, and museum-quality painterly technique.

How have artists’ choice of materials changed recently? Is the industry going more green?

Wilford: I do see artists being engaged with ecologically sustainable practices, including material choices. I’ve also noticed institutions making decisions like shipping via boat rather than air … and measures like that really can make a difference. MOCA was designed to be a completely flexible space, so we do a lot of wall building for our exhibitions. I’m committed to exploring new ways to do this [that allow] for reusing of materials.

What social themes do you see interpreted through art?

Hissom: I think the primary theme that I have seen commented on in some form or another most dominantly over the past few years has been the

pandemic. As it has affected us all, it has also affected every artist—the isolation, reflection, and change in society. Some artists have struggled, some have excelled creatively, many have drawn inspiration from the emotions they experienced, and others have directly depicted viruses or health in their artistry. Which artists’ social messages have resonated with you?

Hissom: Kevin Hees’ series AKT: Acceptance, Kindness, and Tolerance became a main theme of inspiration and light for me during [the pandemic]. His motifs of universal positivity and spiritual freedom resonated with me on a personal level and made me feel less closed in at home.

Wilford: I’ve really admired Nicole Fleetwood’s exploration of the criminal justice and carceral system with her exhibition and long-term research project Marking Time. Here in Miami, I’ve really responded to Reginald O’Neal’s recent installation 18 Years and Counting at Oolite Arts in the exhibition “Lean To.” It is an immersive space that replicates the square footage of a prison cell and is activated by a portrait of the artist’s father and audio recordings of their familial conversations throughout O’Neal’s father’s ongoing incarceration.

Is the art world paying more attention to BIPOC and LGBTQIA contemporary artists?

Wilford: We are in a place where there are faster means of information and images being shared with the world, and it feels a lot more present in everyday conversation than in generations past. However, there have always been galleries and collectors who have engaged with and collected artists who have existed outside of the margins of the dominant discourse. The role of artists throughout time has been to engage with the social and political climate of their time. They respond to oppression, changing cultural norms, and the issues at the forefront of the world’s focus. That has never changed. Prior to the political uprisings in 2020, there was greater attention being paid to BIPOC and LGBTQIA artists, but I think that also has a lot to do with the landscape of cultural producers including artists,

12 Collecting Art in The Palm Beaches

curators, and museum directors evolving to begin to represent a fuller picture of where we are nationally.

How does MOCA help chart the next big artist?

Wilford: MOCA’s primary role is to provide a platform for artists who have been left out of the dominant art historical discourse and to present living artists’ work at pivotal moments in their careers. We work with artists who we feel have [a] timeliness to their practice—artists who are engaged with sociopolitical issues and artists who have been under-explored are who make up our program. My curatorial practice is artist-driven, and I find inspiration through being in conversation with artists who have long-term established careers [and] artists who are just finishing MFA programs. I’m hoping to keep that duality present in my work at MOCA. I think

that balance of established and emerging is where meaningful explorations can begin.

As of late, have you noticed any trends emerge from your

I see a trend toward visually uplifting artwork. From my insight on what collectors want for their residential collections, I can see a trend toward art that is energetic, dynamic, and playful. The aesthetic is bright and colorful, with an emphasis on nuanced techniques and materials. I also have noticed collectors wanting to diversify the artists they collect. They want artists of different backgrounds and who employ innovative techniques.

How do you advise a first-time buyer?

McCready: The world of contemporary art collecting is intimidating and opaque to new buyers. By asking questions and understanding the buyer’s goals I can best assist them in their first acquisition. As a 28-yearold gallery owner and director, I find myself in a unique position working in parallel with collectors to demystify the contemporary art market.

Hissom: We advise our buyers based off their needs— working within their wants and level of interest in art from an aesthetic or per-project basis, advising on art as an investment value asset, or creating from scratch a dynamic and well-rounded collection. ❖

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ABOVE: TIM BESSELL SURFBOARDS FEATURING WORKS BY ANDY WARHOL. BELOW: COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND SAMUEL OWEN GALLERY. OPPOSITE PAGE: COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND SPINELLO PROJECTS

PALM BEACH

ACQUAVELLA

In its 100-year history, New York–based Acquavella has provided international collectors and museums with works from old masters through to the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries.

340 Royal Poinciana Way Suite M309, acquavellagalleries.com, 561.283.3415

ADELSON GALLERIES

With locations in New York and Palm Beach, Adelson Galleries is a family-run enterprise that showcases living artists with strong aesthetic, technical, and academic merit.

318 Worth Ave., adelsongalleries.com, 561.720.2079

AKTION ART

Run by Nick Hissom and Kameron Ramirez, Aktion Art offers gallery,

advisory, and dealer services. Hissom and Ramirez also foster the work of emerging artists, with a roster that includes Kevin Hees, Connor Addison, and ThankYouX.

150 Worth Ave. Suite 224, aktionart. com

BEN BROWN FINE ARTS

This recent London transplant presents curated selections of iconic works by gallery artists and twentieth-century masters.

244 Worth Ave., benbrownfinearts.com, 561.366.9985

BRINTZ GALLERY

Founded in 2014, Brintz exhibits and promotes established, mid-career, and emerging artists, with a focus toward painting and sculpture.

375 S. County Road, brintzgallery.com, 561.469.7771

DTR MODERN

DTR Modern has strong relationships with some of today’s modern masters and showcases works by blue-chip artists from the last 100 years.

408 Hibiscus Ave., dtrmodern.com, 561.366.9387

FINDLAY GALLERIES

Founded in 1870, Findlay Galleries is the second oldest art gallery in the United States and opened its Palm Beach location in 1961. The gallery represents more than 100 artists and artist estates, presenting bimonthly exhibitions featuring works from a wide range of styles, including impressionism, l’Ecole de Rouen, L’Ecole de Paris, mid-century American abstraction, and European modernism alongside a highly regarded stable of contemporary artists.

165 Worth Ave., findlaygalleries.com, 561.655.2090

14 Collecting Art in The Palm Beaches
TO
GALLERIES & STUDIOS
EXPLORE
© ROBERTO MATTA, COURTESY PACE GALLERY z BIPOC OR WOMEN OWNED OR OPERATED z SHOWING PALM BEACH COUNTY ARTISTS

GALERIA OF SCULPTURE

Peruse museum-quality art glass by American and European artists, including unique furniture pieces.

11 Via Parigi, galeriaofsculpture.com, 561.659.7557

GALLERY BIBA

Paintings, sculptures, and works on paper by modern and contemporary masters abound at Gallery Biba.

224A Worth Ave., gallerybiba.com, 561.651.1371

GAVLAK

This contemporary gallery focuses on the representation of women, LGBTQ+, and BIPOC artists. A stable of more than 20 artists includes Marilyn Minter and Betty Tompkins.

340 Royal Poinciana Way Suite M334, gavlakgallery.com, 561.833.0583

HOLDEN LUNTZ GALLERY

Holden Luntz exists to acquire and present the work of significant photographers who are defining or expanding the parameters of photography, as well as images by such iconic pioneers as Diane Arbus, Berenice Abbott, John Baeder, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Horst P. Horst, and Robert Mapplethorpe. 332 Worth Ave., holdenluntz.com, 561.805.9550

PACE GALLERY

Pace Gallery provides locals with direct access to some of the contemporary art world’s leading voices.

340 Royal Poinciana Way Suite M333, pacegallery.com, 561.444.3922

PROVIDENT FINE ART

If you are building a collection or divesting of pieces you no longer want, this gallery offers a range of

helpful services. Provident Fine Art is highly regarded for its expertise in nineteenth- and twentiethcentury French and American impressionism, post-impressionism, modern, and contemporary art. 125 Worth Ave., providentfineart.com, 561.249.7929

ROBERT FONTAINE GALLERY

Representing artists in every stage of their careers, the Robert Fontaine Gallery carries Post-War works through to current expressions of digital media, conceptual installations, and urban interventionism.

256 Worth Ave., robertfontainegallery. com, 305.397.8530

RUSSECK GALLERY

With roots in Philadelphia, Russeck Gallery now operates on Worth Avenue and specializes in paintings, sculptures, and major works on

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NINA DAVIDOWITZ, OCEAN SUNRISE NO. 2. COURTESY MTN SPACE GALLERY.

paper by twentieth-century artists, as well as paintings and sculptures of the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American West.

203 Worth Ave., russeckgalleries.com, 561.832.4811

SAMUEL OWEN GALLERY

In addition to three locations in New England, Samuel Owen Gallery resides on Royal Poinciana Way and represents contemporary artists who reflect upon the twentieth- and twenty-firstcentury zeitgeist. Its roster includes South Florida–based artists as well as Palm Beach artist Cayla Birk.

253 Royal Poinciana Way, samuelowen. com, 561.249.1876

SOTHEBY’S PALM BEACH

Sotheby’s carries an array of luxury goods, from fine art to fine jewelry and automobiles.

50 Cocoanut Row Suite S101, sothebys. com/palmbeach, 561.710.8830

SUROVEK GALLERY

Surovek Gallery identifies “the acquisition and sale of American works of art” as its “foremost goal,” offering American paintings, drawings, watercolors, and prints from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

349 Worth Ave. 8 Via Parigi, surovekgallery.com, 561.832.0422

TAGLIALATELLA GALLERIES

This international gallery has become synonymous with modern and contemporary art, specializing in recent Pop and street art movements.

313 1/2 Worth Ave., taglialatellagalleries.com, 561.833.4700

WEST PALM BEACH

THE BOX GALLERY

More than just a gallery, this 4,000-square-foot space acts as a hub for local, national, and international artists to present a variety of artworks, cultural experiences, and programs including exhibitions, lectures, and screenings.

811 Belvedere Road, theboxgallery.info, 786.521.1199

HABATAT GALLERIES

Specializing in glass, Habatat Galleries represents world-renowned artists and offers custom services.

2401 N. Dixie Hwy., habatatgalleries. com, 561.469.8587

JF GALLERY

This contemporary art gallery nestled in the Antique Row district provides framing services and exhibits new works by nationally and internationally lauded painters and sculptors.

3901 S. Dixie Hwy., jfgallery.com, 561.478.8281

MARY WOERNER FINE ARTS

In addition to personal collection services such as restoration, framing, and installation, Mary Woerner sells contemporary paintings, drawings, sculptures, objects, mixed media, and graphics.

3700 S. Dixie Hwy. #7, marywoernerfinearts.com, 561.832.3233

THE PEACH

Local artists such as Craig McInnis create at this art collective, which often hosts open studios. The community can also visit during monthly art walks that feature live entertainment, family-friendly activities, and food from Troy’s Barbeque.

3950 Georgia Ave., thepeachwpb.com, 561.532.0900

WHITE CUBE

This seasonal art gallery occupies an industrial space and hosts exhibitions by such major artists as Gilbert & George and Theaster Gates.

2512 Florida Ave., whitecube.com, 949.981.4893

PALM BEACH GARDENS

CALL OF AFRICA’S NATIVE VISIONS GALLERIES

Native Visions specializes in works by internationally acclaimed environmental and wildlife artists, including David Longmead, John Seerey-Lester, Mopho Gonde, and Margaret Gradwell.

4600 PGA Blvd. Suite 105, nativevisions.com, 561.741.1600

ONESSIMO FINE ART

Showcasing fine art, sculpture, and contemporary glass from old and modern masters as well as established contemporary artists.

4530 PGA Blvd. Suite 101, onessimofineart.com, 561.355.8061 (more locations online)

STUDIO E GALLERY

For collectors wanting to discover a not-yet-famous talent or an internationally known artist, this is the place to browse original works in glass, bronze, mixed media, and paintings— and to learn the stories behind them.

4600 PGA Blvd. Suite 101, studioegallery.com, 561.799.3333

JUPITER/TEQUESTA

LIGHTHOUSE

ARTCENTER GALLERY & SCHOOL OF ART

Founded by a group of artists and the son of the founders of the Norton Museum of Art, the Lighthouse ArtCenter boasts a gallery that features curated exhibitions centered around works by local, national, and international artists. 373 Tequesta Drive, lighthousearts.org, 561.746.3101

MAC ART GALLERIES

MAC Art Galleries offers a diverse collection of paintings, sculptures, photography, glass, and installations, and provides personalized guidance and in-home showings to clients.

4601 Military Trail Unit 101, macfineart. com, 561.429.4829 (more locations online)

THE VILLAGE ART STUDIOS

This hidden gem has spotlighted and sold the original works of local artists for 10 years.

578 N. U.S. Hwy. 1, thevillageartists. webs.com, 561.310.8499

LAKE WORTH BEACH

CULTURAL COUNCIL FOR PALM BEACH COUNTY

The Cultural Council’s Lake Worth Beach headquarters is home to three gallery spaces (the main gallery, solo

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gallery, and north gallery), all dedicated to celebrating and showcasing works by Palm Beach County artists.

601 Lake Ave., palmbeachculture.com, 561.471.2901

MTN SPACE

In addition to special exhibitions, this artist-owned gallery offers curation, collection development, and art rental services.

502 Lake Ave., mtnspace.com, 561.285.4883

STEIDEL CONTEMPORARY

Known for sculptural objects and emerging international collections, Steidel Contemporary hosts exhibitions showcasing mixed-media makers, ceramists, and glass artists.

500 N. Dixie Hwy. Suite 305, steidelcontemporary.com, 561.283.2446

DELRAY BEACH

ADDISON GALLERY

In the Pineapple Grove arts district, this contemporary art gallery represents both established and emerging artists whose work the gallery describes as innovative, passionate, and uplifting.

206 N.E. 2nd St., addisongallery.com, 561.278.5700

AMANDA JAMES GALLERY

This boutique gallery is run by a husband-and-wife team of artists, James Knill and Amanda Johnson.

400 Gulfstream Blvd. #7, amandajamesgallery.com, 561.270.7832

ARTS WAREHOUSE

This arts incubator also holds exhibitions where local arts enthusiasts can discover new and exciting works by the artists who create within the warehouse and others.

313 N.E. 3rd St., artswarehouse.org, 561.330.9614

BLUE

GALLERY

Across two locations on Atlantic Avenue, Blue Gallery showcases heavy hitters in the world of contemporary art.

600 E. Atlantic Ave., 616 E. Atlantic Ave., bluefineart.com, 561.265.0020, 561.562.5390

DEBILZAN GALLERIES

Artist William DeBilzan creates both paintings and sculptures featuring elongated figures, engaging textures, and a rich color palette.

38 E. Atlantic Ave., debilzan.com, 561.266.2090

FORD FINE ART

For a snapshot of the best in Latin American art, visit Ford Fine Art and view works by Mexican, South American, and Central American masters.

260 N.E. 5th Ave., fordfineart.com, 561.243.0630

THE HEART OF DELRAY GALLERY

Featuring works by more than 90 artists, including some who call Delray Beach home.

301 N.E. 2nd Ave., theheartofdelraygallery.com, 561.278.0074

JOHN SCHUYLER GALLERY

At his eponymous gallery, John Schuyler displays his ethereal abstract landscapes and paintings.

200 N.E. 2nd Ave. Suite 101, johnschuyler.com, 561.330.4615

MAGNUS & GORDON GALLERY

Established in 2013, this gallery features the work of South Florida artists Brenda Gordon and Magnus Sebastian.

354 N.E. 4th St. Unit C, magnusandgordongallery.com, 561.212.6714

RENATA FINE ARTS

Stop by to peruse modern and contemporary works on paper, sculptures, and paintings.

502 E. Atlantic Ave. Suite 103, renatafinearts.com, 561.385.4779

SUNDOOK

FINE ART GALLERIES

Sundook has earned a national reputation for its vast catalogue of original paintings, fine art prints, bronze sculptures, and acrylic sculptures.

524 E. Atlantic Ave., sundook.com, 561.266.3425

BOCA RATON

ROSENBAUM CONTEMPORARY

Rosenbaum Contemporary features a nationally recognized, museumcaliber exhibition program of PostWar, modern, and contemporary masters in all mediums, with works by Thomas Hartmann, Hunt Slonem, and Mira Lehr, among others.

150 Yamato Road, rosenbaumcontemporary.com, 561.994.9180 (more locations online)

SPONDER GALLERY

With a focus on Post-War, contemporary paintings, sculpture, and photography, this gallery provides support and consulting in all aspects of collecting, including appraisal services. The Boca Raton, 501 E. Camino Real, spondergallery.com, 561.241.3050

VERTU FINE ART

This established gallery boasts Pop, abstract expressionism, and optical art, as well as photography.

5250 Town Center Circle Suite 128, vertufineart.com, 561.368.4680

WENTWORTH GALLERY

With locations across the East Coast, Wentworth Gallery features works by some of the world’s most acclaimed artists. 6000 Glades Road #1089, wentworthgallery.com, 561.338.0804

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* This list is curated by editors and is not a complete listing of galleries in Palm Beach County.

SCULPTURAL SANCTUARIES

THREE PALM BEACH COUNTY ART COLLECTORS SHARE THEIR PRIVATE SCULPTURE GARDENS AND WHAT THEY LOVE ABOUT THEM

White Out

As the gallery director of DTR Modern Gallery on Palm Beach, Bryan Walsh spends his days surrounded by amazing artworks and getting to know the artists behind them. These relationships have informed the type of art he displays in his own home in West Palm Beach’s historic Flamingo Park neighborhood, including the bright white contemporary sculptures in his garden.

CCPBC: How did you go about curating this collection and what are some highlights?

Walsh: Apart from Keith Haring, I have met all the artists and have forged friendships with them. It makes their works even more special. The big heart sculpture, Big Love, was a wedding gift from the artist Rainer

Lagemann. It was the focal point on the stage at the wedding, and now every day I get to look at it in my garden. It brings me joy every single day.

Once an artist’s work speaks to me it becomes a chain reaction. In the garden I have larger outdoor sculptures, but inside the house you’ll find small works by each of these artists as well. When I first started collecting, everything was very traditional and classical, both in painting and sculpture. Since my taste has evolved, everything is modern and contemporary. My house is a 1925, Spanish-style house with the character and charm of that design, and with the juxtaposition of the contemporary sculptures it works quite beautifully.

Why the emphasis on white?

It is quite intentional that all the sculptures are white

18 Collecting Art in The Palm Beaches
Story By Susie Stanton Staikos Photography by Jerry Rabinowitz

because when I entertain, I like to do lighting, and you can transform a white sculpture into any color sculpture you want by putting a colored lens over the light. Let’s say you’re doing a Valentine’s party and you want to have hot pink or red, you can do that with the lighting. Anytime I do a dinner party in the dining pavilion it’s magical to see the sculptures illuminated in the background. It adds to the ambience. The white lends a cohesion to the collection even though they are very different styles. The green tropical foliage as a backdrop allows the sculptures to pop.

What maintenance issues are there in having outdoor sculptures in Florida?

The main thing that I look for in any of the sculptures in my collection is that they can be sustainable in Florida’s humid and really wet environment. Most of the sculptures are aluminum with either powder coating or paint, or stainless steel with a powdered coat so they can endure the elements. Sculptures made of a medium that is not corrosive are pretty easy to maintain. [They typically] just require occasional washing and then some of the works require a light waxing.

Labor of Love

A highly regarded entrepreneur and businessman, John Sculley’s career included stints as president of PepsiCo and CEO of Apple during the 1980s and early ’90s, followed by investments in a string of tech companies. His wife, Diane, has a background in construction and has been involved in the building and designing of many local homes. Together they fulfilled their dream to have an oceanside home in Palm Beach, where their sculpture

garden serves as a beautiful complement to the grounds and a deeply fulfilling creative endeavor.

What was your motivation behind establishing a sculpture garden?

John: We are not really curators of collectable art—we did it for what we enjoy being around. We came across the works at different times and fell in love with them. Jane Manus became a friend, and we now have two of her works. Diane is a very good designer and has really been the mind behind what we created.

Diane: When we bought the house, I wanted blue shutters and a blue front door that referenced the ocean and the Greek island houses we had fallen in love with. They lend the backdrop to a sheltered, sweeping lawn that John always wanted for his sculpture garden—a collection of five large, contemporary figurative and abstract sculptures in different materials. I’m on the

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ABOVE: BRYAN WALSH POSES WITH AN UNTITLED WORK BY KEITH HARING. HIS SCULPTURE GARDEN INCLUDES ALL-WHITE PIECES THAT HE CAN TRANSFORM WITH LIGHTING. OPPOSITE PAGE, FROM LEFT: WHITE WEDDING, MATT DEVINE; WHITE WEB, TRAVIS SEEGER

Sculpture Care 101

Palm Beach County is home to many public sculpture gardens, including those at the Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens, the Norton Museum of Art, and The Society of the Four Arts. As the staff at these organizations know all too well, Florida’s humid, windy, and salty environs can cause issues for sculptures of all materials. Here, Stephen Futej, aka the “Sculpture Doctor” and a consultant to The Society of the Four Arts, shares maintenance tips for private collectors.

1. At the outset, bring in a conservator for initial evaluation and consultation. The ideal is to work from a position of preservation and prevention rather than repair.

2. Monthly inspections help professionals develop familiarity with an object, so they’re aware when there’s a change in condition. Dated photographs are also useful.

3. As a general rule, schedule a maintenance plan to have a professional expert apply noninvasive protectants two to

four times a year, depending on the material and individual piece.

4. Immediately remove highly corrosive bird droppings using a mild dish soap and filtered water.

5. To ensure stability, most sculptures rest on a base. If necessary, a concrete pad can be poured to provide a level surface. Other anchoring devises can also be applied.

6. Have an engineer ascertain the wind speed a sculpture can withstand. In some instances, sculptures will need to be moved to safety in advance of a hurricane or storm.

7. A change in patina can occur on bronze. It can be a personal choice by the artist or collector to allow for patina to occur. Sometimes, fresh foundry-style re-patination or re-painting is desired. Conservators will often use faux painting methods to visually unify a degraded patina. However, preservation through maintenance visits is the preferred method.

lookout for another but haven’t come across it yet.

What was your thought process behind landscaping the garden?

Diane: We planted a thick row of tall trees around the garden on all sides to obscure [it] from the road and neighboring houses. The simple color palette of the low, lightgreen hedges bordering the lawn contrasts with the taller, darker green foliage behind [and] focuses the eye on the sculptures. Gino Miles’ stainless-steel Forever sculpture stands against the green foliage at the north end of the pool. We framed it with a group of palm trees that draws you in and makes the piece stand out even more. Reflections in the pool add another dimension to the sculpture.

We recently redid the garden and laid down a new lawn with the help of Justin Dwyer of Greenscape Design Landscaping in Lake Worth. Justin goes not just one mile, but a hundred miles to get things done. When we needed to have a sculpture moved, we didn’t have to say anything. He gets the equipment, figures out how to move it, and how much it weighs.

Did you have a strategy for where to place the sculptures?

Diane: It was a very personal choice. We wanted to give space to Jane’s two blue painted abstract pieces so we could walk around them and see all the angles. We placed them together in a central area on the lawn in conversation with one another—like a mother and child piece. It made sense to have Boaz Vaadia’s Asaf with Dog siting on a stone slab placed at the side of the pool watching the swimmers. We deliberately placed [Dorit Levinstein’s] Matisse Dancers on the lawn close to the house so that it serves as a welcome piece and can be seen from the large dining room windows. The floating, life-size, brightly colored dancers make people happy. Dancing in the backyard—how can that not be happy?

Full of Surprises

Peggy Moore and her husband, Dudley, live in a historic Palm Beach home designed by John Volk, the same architect behind The Royal Poinciana Plaza. Peggy Moore is one of the leading lights in The Garden Club of Palm Beach and takes great pride in her own garden.

20 Collecting Art in The Palm Beaches

The charming environment she has created is an ideal setting for a variety of sculptures, many of which hold personal meaning to her and her family.

How have you curated your sculpture garden?

Moore: Sculptures make your garden come alive. [They] make it more interesting. My garden is a flower garden filled with trees, hedges, and fountains, and it has paths that lead you to discover a variety of enchanting sculptures. When my landscape architect, Mario Nievera, and I were working on it together, he said that each little place in the garden is a different room. I like coming into the room and seeing Leda and the Swan nestled against a wall of greenery. It’s a little special place, [and] I think it also gives some fantasy to the garden, which I like. Farther along you discover another surprise. Everything in this garden looks different.

How did you decide where to place certain sculptures?

The Barry Flanagan was the first one for this yard; the musical theme and the sense of having a good time made this perfect for Florida. It stands framed by an arch of leaves facing the loggia, giving the impression that it has jumped out of the hedge. Having the Fernando Botero oversized, handsome woman on a horse in the driveway

at the front of the house is a good way to leave or enter. It’s more fantasy.

Which sculptures are particularly personal to you?

The little bronze boy on the bicycle we found in Bermuda when the kids were small. It sits on the ground as you step out onto the terrace. The one I have in Atlanta that’s coming down looks just like my daughter did—sitting on a bench reading a book. They just mean something to you. They talk to you. It’s something you can enjoy every day. ❖

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OPPOSITE PAGE: DORIT LEVINSTEIN, MATISSE DANCERS. THIS PAGE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: THE MOORES’ COLLECTION INCLUDES A EUROPEAN FOUNTAIN DEPICTING A CHERUB ON A DOLPHIN; BOY ON A BICYCLE, DESMOND FOUNTAIN. LEDA AND THE SWAN, ENZO PLAZZOTTA.
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SETTING THE STANDARD

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Stuart Magazine Community Report: Collier Community Foundation

Naples 100

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Palm Beach 100 Pinnacle: Jupiter Medical Center Foundation Waypoints: Naples Yacht Club

Naples on the Gulf: Greater Naples Chamber Vero Beach Magazine: Vero Beach Handbook

art&culture: Cultural Council for Palm Beach County Time and Treasure: Guide to Better Giving

Florida Design Southwest Florida Relocation Guide

Florida Design Annual Sourcebook

Florida Design

Florida Design Miami Edition

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Fisher Island Magazine

Club Braman Magazine Advances: Tampa General Hospital

Browse the Cultural Council’s Artist Directory to Source Your Local Art Collection palmbeachculture.com/artist-directory
Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building 601 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth Beach, FL 33460 Tuesday – Saturday, 12 – 5 p.m. Free and open to the public
Arlet Gomez, Allison Cary, Dana Donaty, Nestor Guzman, Mark Walnock, Allan Creary, Josh Fradis, Marianela Perez, Renata Rodrigues, Barbara Ziev, Andrea Facusse
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