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PORTFOLIO

PAUL KAZMIERCZAK ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Biophilic Views

4

Public Voids

22

Translucent Concrete

40

Obama Midway Campus

44

Building Bridges

56

Impatient Tower Design Studio Spring 2012

Columbia College Theater Design Studio Fall 2011

I-90/ I-94

Chicago

I-290 I-55

Material Research and Prototype Group Members: Kareem Cousar, Jake Emery, Jennifer Nowak

I-90/ I-94

Presidential Library Campus Design Studio Fall 2012 Group Members: Jonathan Fair, Maggie Burke 0 mi

4 mi

Medical Prep High School and Community Center Design Studio Spring 2013 2

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BIOPHILIC VIEWS

In relation of biophillic design, the design concept of this impatient tower was to create a patient room that brings the patient close to nature in order for them to recover more quickly. The strategy implemented to do this was to create patient rooms that function as a stage that frames views toward two layers of nature: individual terrariums in the patient room that function as a foreground and framed views by the terrarium toward outdoor green spaces that function as a background.

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DESIGN STRATEGY This final strategy gives patients the opportunity to look at two layers of nature. The prefabricated terrarium units function as a foreground view and the view of nature outside functions as a background. This layering of nature and scenic views puts the patient in close contact to nature so they can heal more quickly, relating to biophilic design.

Parking Garage

Patient Room Patient Bed

Terrarium

View

Foreground

Prefabricated Terrarium

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B k Background d Views from the Patient Room

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FACADE AND MASSING ITERATIONS

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The material pallet of the building envelope consist primarily of natural materials to bring the patients closer to nature and make them feel more comfortable. The terrariums will contain not just traditional terrarium plants such as ferns, but also flowers such as African Violets and Orchids. 4

Impatient Tower Massing Development

Domed Ceiling

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ck

Ba

6 units

Views

Kostner

Overhead Lighting

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u ro

Background

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In order to create visually larger exhibit spaces, large museum dioramas have no vertical edges or long horizontal lines. In plan and section the diorama is curved to make it difficult for the viewer to get a sense of the actual size of the space. These design characteristics were used on the north and west facade of a new parking garage by creating spherical voids. Inside each spherical void are greenspaces that patients can view from their patient rooms.

After designing the individual patient room with their prefabricated terrarium bays, massing model iterations were used to develop the overall form of the building. The iterations led to putting the mechanical floor in the center of the building and randomly removing patient rooms and replacing them with respite areas to break down the massing of the building.

Building Envelope Materials

10 units Side Lighting

Bridge

Impatient Tower

6 units

Access

Plan

Slope on Floor Section

Proportions for a Well Designed Museum Diorama Parking Garage

Clear Glass

Wood

Green Tinted Glass

Terrarium

Views

Terrarium Plants Winter

5

Future Park 5

8

Ferns

African Violets

Orchids

Peperomias

Oak Lawn, IL

95th

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1

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Parking Garage Tower Development

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POSTPARTUM PATIENT ROOM The patient room is organized into four zones: patient zone, caregiver zone, family zone, and toilet zone. The room is organized so the patient in the bed has a view of both the terrarium and the hallway. This allows the nurse to see the patient from the hallway.

Headwall

Shower Seat Terrarium Maintenance Door

Curtain

Caregiver Zone

Toilet Zone

Info Board

Family Zone

Terrarium

Bassinet

Patient Zone

Curtain

View Toward Hallway

Terrazo Floor Rocking Chair

Caregiver Zone

View Toward Terrarium and Exterior Nature View

Desk Staff Info Board

10 0

Patient Storage

TV

Patient Info Board

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SUN STUDY A sun study analysis was done on the patient room to see the effect of sunlight in the room on December 21, March/September 21, and June 21. One effect was on certain times of the day direct sunlight will hit the wood paneling on the side of the terrarium, giving the room a feeling of warmth and comfort to the patient.

December 21 9:00

March 21 9:00

June 21 9:00

December 21 12:00

March 21 12:00

Jun 21 12:00

March 21 11:00

December 21 15:00

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March 21 15:00

June 21 15:00

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POSTPARTUM FLOOR 0

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The floorplate is divided into two postpartum units with twelve patient rooms on each side. This minimizes circulation time for the staff and patients. The public elevator core is in a secure center of the building where family can walk into the north or south postpartum unit.

Public Patient Staff Service

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Staff Service

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Patient

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Public

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Primary Care Area 1. Postpartum Patient Rooms 2. Intensive Patient Room 3. Bariatric Room Nursery and Support 4 Newborn Nursery 5. Exam/ Procedure Room 6. Emergency Alcove 7. Working/ Charting Area

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8. Pneumatic Tube Station 9. Clean Utility Room 10. Soiled Utility Room 11. Nursery Storage 12. Janitors Closet Clinical Support 13. Clean Supply/ Linen 14. Soiled Utility 15. Equipment Storage

16. Nourishment 17. Medi-Prep Room 18. Crash Cart Alcove 19. Pneumatic Tube Station 20. Handwashing Alcove Staff Support 21. Team Workstation 22. Copier 23. Quiet Workroom

24. Consultation Room 25. Nurse Manager Office 26. OB Staff Work Cubicles 27. Staff Locker Room 28. Staff Coat/ Boot Storage 29. Staff Toilet 30. Staff Respite Public Support 31. Family Respite

32. Handwashing Sink Alcove 33. Public Toilet 34. Public Lobby Building Support 35. Electrical Closet 36. Janitor Closet Terrarium

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FIRST FLOOR 0

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On the first floor the main entrance for staff, patients, and the public is on the south side of the building. Another entrance is located on the north side for service and staff entering the building from the north. In the back of the building is a patient departure hallway so released patients can leave in private.

Public Patient Staff Service

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Staff

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Primary Entrance/ Exit

Service

9 Patient

Patient Departure

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Public

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Staff and Service Entrance/ Exit

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Secondary Entrance/ Exit

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1. Cafeteria 2. Kitchen 3. Lobby 4. Patient Departure Lobby 5. Security Control Station 6. Public Rest Room

7. Private Rest Room 8. Family Rest Room 9. Lactation Room 10. Retail- Flower Shop 11. Retail- Gift Shop 12. Conference

13. Patient Departure Hallway 14. Chapel 15. Viewing Room 16. Office/ Administration 17. Loading Dock 18. Laundry

19. Storage 20. Service Locker Rooms

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STRUCTURE SYSTEM Each floorplate has a grid of steel columns. The prefabricated terrarium units plug into the perimeter colum grid. Sheer wall are located in the center of the floorplate and around staircases to support lateral loads.

Roof

Steel Column

Sheer Walls

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On Grade

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Foundation

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SECTIONAL ORGANIZATION The building is organized with Labor and Deliver, and Postpartum on the 2nd-4th floors and the Intensive Care Unit on the 6th-8th floors. The fifth floor contains a lobby and bridge connections to the parking garage and the rest of the hospital campus. The fifth floor connection allows for the public entering the building from the parking garage to easily go up to the ICU floors or down to the Postpartum and LDR unit from the fifth floor lobby.

ICU ICU ICU Lobby Postpartum Postpartum Labor and Delivery

South Elevation

Lobby

Laditudinal Section

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East Elevation

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PUBLIC VOIDS

The design concept of this project is about creating civic engagement between Columbia College and the surrounding neighborhood. A dialogue of civic engagement can promote greater participation of the surrounding community, attempting to engage a larger demographic base of patrons to Columbia College and its dance center. The strategy used to create this engagement was to create a series of internal voids in the building for this engagement to occur in.

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DESIGN STRATEGY

Site

The design concept of this project is about creating civic engagement between Columbia College and the surrounding neighborhood. A dialogue of civic engagement can promote greater participation of the surrounding community, attempting to engage a larger demographic base of patrons to Columbia College and its dance center. The strategy used to create this engagement was to create a series of internal voids in the building for this engagement to occur in. The Poetry Center in Chicago and the IT University Building in Copenhagen were looked at as case studies of solid/void strategies.

9th Street Grant Park

Poetry Center

Building

Voids/ Public Space

11th Street

Michigan

Columbia College

Wabash

State

Case Studies

Outdoor Public Space Public Space in Building Public

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Views into Building 0

100

200

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IT University of Copenhagen Building

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MASSING ITERATIONS The voids are enclosed on all four sides so the Chicago street facade is respected. Inside the voids a separate Columbia College environment is created that pedestrians from the outside are allowed to look or walk into to observe. Two large voids are created near the Wabash and Michigan Avenue intersections with 11th Avenue where pedestrian traffic is highest to invite pedestrians in and walk into the Columbia academic world. 1

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Inside these two voids programs are cantilevered into them to further put Columbia College on display for the public to see. A smaller, linear third void is created to run parallel with the 500 seat theater. This third void engages people from outside to see dancers and patrons inside the theater before and after a performance. During performances a curtain inside the theater wall adjacent to this void is closed for complete lighting control.

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FIRST FLOOR Educational Programs 9. Classroom 10. Dance Studio 11. Gallery 12. Library 13. Sound Media 14. Stretch Space 15. Student Lounge Educational &Theater Support

16. Cafe 17. Multifunction Space Administration 18. Dance Administration 19. Dean Administration Building Support 20. Storage 21. Outdoor Courtyard

On the first floor the main entrance for students and faculty is on Wabash while the main entrance for patrons is on Michigan Avenue. There is a large public plaza (the public void) at both entrances for pedestrians to enter. Students/ Faculty Theater Patrons

Michigan

Wabash

Theater Support 1. Theater 2. Stage/ Wingspace 3. Locker Room 4. Green Room 5. Scene Shop 6. Tickets, Coatroom 7. Lobby 8. Gallery

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11th Street

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SECOND AND THIRD FLOOR Theater Support 1. Theater 2. Stage/ Wingspace 3. Locker Room 4. Green Room 5. Scene Shop 6. Tickets, Coatroom 7. Lobby 8. Gallery

16. Cafe 17. Multifunction Space Administration 18. Dance Administration 19. Dean Administration Building Support 20. Storage

Educational Programs 9. Classroom 10. Dance Studio 11. Gallery 12. Library 13. Sound Media 14. Stretch Space 15. Student Lounge Educational &Theater Support

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The second and third floors contains classrooms, dance studios, cafe and the library. The library wraps around the south and west side of the building and provides views below to the public plaza on Wabash street.

21. Outdoor Courtyard

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FOURTH AND FIFTH FLOOR Theater Support 1. Theater 2. Stage/ Wingspace 3. Locker Room 4. Green Room 5. Scene Shop 6. Tickets, Coatroom 7. Lobby 8. Gallery

Educational Programs 9. Classroom 10. Dance Studio 11. Gallery 12. Library 13. Sound Media 14. Stretch Space 15. Student Lounge Educational &Theater Support

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16. Cafe 17. Multifunction Space Administration 18. Dance Administration 19. Dean Administration Building Support 20. Storage

The fourth and the fifth floor contains classrooms, dance studios, a multifunction space and a cafe. The cafe completely wraps around the public plaza on Michigan Avenue and provides views to the plaza below.

21. Outdoor Courtyard

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STRUCTURE SYSTEM Steel cage boxes are used to canteliver programs into the two large voids in the building. These cantelievered boxes have a glass curtain walls so the public in the plazas below can look up into them to see the Columbia College programs.

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Outdoor Plaza

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STRUCTURE SYSTEM The structure of the building is steel. A large vierendeel truss is used to support the cantilevers on the east and west plazas of the building. Small steel cages are plugged into the steel frame of the building to support the cantilevered boxes into the plazas.

Steel Column

Sheer Walls

0

10 20 30

Steel Cage Vierendeel Truss

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Roof

On Grade

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SECTIONAL ORGANIZATION Theater Support 1. Theater 2. Stage/ Wingspace 3. Locker Room 4. Green Room 5. Scene Shop 6. Tickets, Coatroom 7. Lobby 8. Gallery

Educational Programs 9. Classroom 10. Dance Studio 11. Gallery 12. Library 13. Sound Media 14. Stretch Space 15. Student Lounge Educational &Theater Support

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14

11 Wabash

21. Outdoor Courtyard

On the first floor the main entrance for staff, patients, and the public is on the south side of the building. Another entrance is located on the north side for service and staff entering the building from the north. In the back of the building is a patient departure hallway so released patients can leave in private.

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16. Cafe 17. Multifunction Space Administration 18. Dance Administration 19. Dean Administration Building Support 20. Storage

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Michigan

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11 11th Street

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TRANSLUCENT CONCRETE

After researching the recent development of translucent concrete, our group spent half the semester developing its own prototype of translucent concrete. The main objective of this study was to explore variations in multiple other materials that allowed light to transmit through concrete and make it translucent. The tests were based on the standard of a light transmitting material that would make up no more than 4% of the overall volume of the concrete block.

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HISTORY OF TRANSLUCENT CONCRETE

Translucent Concrete inventables.com

DEVELOPING A PROTOTYPE The trombe wall is a very efficient and effective way to incorporate a thermal mass into a building for heating properties. However, the trombe wall system is rarely used due to the lack of visibility to the exterior from inside. The investigation soon began to center along the concept of finding a material that would act as a thermal mass, yet some translucency.

Four diverse materials were tested as the lighttransmitting secondary material including recycled crushed glass, acrylic rods (1/16� diameter), fishing wire (1/8 lb), and fiber optics (1mm and 2mm diameter). The best results of light transmittance were produced by the optic fiber cables although other materials were successful.

Translucent concrete is a special concrete tile or block made with concrete and optical fibers that allows light to pass through. It is still in the developmental stage and has only been used in small scale projects and prototypes. The material is often referred to as Litracon, named after the primary manufacturer. Translucent concrete is manufactured by pouring alternating layers of concrete and optical fibers. The optical fibers are poured in one of two ways. They are poured uniformly or they can be poured to create a certain pattern such as an artificial wood grain. The concrete then sets and the material is cut into tiles or blocks.

Future testing of the translucent concrete can contribute to finding the thermal mass or structural properties if possible. To be structurally stronger an improved concrete mix will have to be developed that has stone aggregate and still allow for the fiber optics to be inserted into the concrete mix. It would also be necessary to find a quicker way to push the strands through the framework or make use of a mesh fiber optic system that Litracon may apply in their translucent concrete. Glass

Fishing Wire

Acrylic Rods Foam Formwork

Fiber Optics Formwork

Acrylic Rods

Fiber Optics

After learning about this breakthrough in concrete technology, the group spent half the semester developing its own prototype of translucent concrete. The main objective of this study was to explore variations in multiple other materials that allowed light to transmit through concrete and make it translucent. The tests were based on the standard of a light transmitting material that would make up no more than 4% of the overall volume of the concrete block.

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Museum Cella Septichora; litracon.hu

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OBAMA MIDWAY CAMPUS

Using the 1893 Columbian Exposition as precedence, the Barack Obama Presidential Library and campus at Washington Park seeks to embody the legacy of President Obama by developing new landscape and infrastructure that strengthens the connections to the Chicago Emerald Necklace, University of Chicago and Washington Park. To create the new campus, the Garfield Boulevard median was widened to create a new Midway that contains the library and other civic buildings. The Obama Presidential Library will serve as a catalyst for the greater redevelopment of the site.

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DESIGN STRATEGY The Midway Plaisance during the 1893 Columbian Exposition was a site of unique attractions including the world's first ferris wheel and immitation villages from various cultures around the world featuring "authentic" indigenous villagers. The excitment, innovation, and curiosity produced by the 1893 Columbian Exposition serves as precedence for the spirit that the Obama Presidential Library and Midway Campus seeks to capture and expound upon. To create the new campus, the Garfield Boulevard median was widened to create a new Midway that contains the library and other civic buildings. The Obama Presidential Library will serve as the initial catalyst for the greater redevelopment of the site. By preserving and enriching the existing Garfield Boulevard, the library campus strengthens Chicago's Emerald Necklace and celebrates its connection to Olmsted's historic Washington Park.

Washington Park

Expanded Garfield Expanded Boulevard Garfield Boulevard

Obama Obama Presidential Presidential Library

Library

I -94Dan I-94 Dan Ryan

Ryan

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Washington Park

Project Site Existing Garfield Boulevard Existing Garfield Boulevard

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I -94Dan I-94 Dan Ryan

Midway Plaisance 1893 Columbian Exposition

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Ryan

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SITE PLAN

Existing Median of Garfield Boulevard

Elevated Walking Pathways

Metra Train Station Hotel

Red Line Station

Section B

Section A

0 80

N

Connection to Garfield Boulevard

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Green Line Academic Village: Station Obama Public Policy Department, Presidential Academic Housing, Student Library & Museum Center

Research Center Land Bridge

Commercial

Magnet School

Art Gallery and Commercial Stores & Restaurants

Connection to Washington Park

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SITE SECTIONS Garfield Boulevard Westbound

Garfield Boulevard Eastbound

CTA Red Line Stop

Dan Ryan Highway

Section A

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Garfield Boulevard Westbound

Presidential Library

Original Garfield Boulevard Median/ Library Courtyard

Presidential Library

Garfield Boulevard Eastbound

Section B

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0

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PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY In order to distinguish the Presidential Library from other buildings on the midway campus, the building is on both sides of the old Garfield Boulevard median. In order to do this, various strategies were studied to create various courtyard voids in the building to preserve the existing trees in the old median. The material pallet of the building envelope consists of clear and frittted glass to promoted the transparency of the library, brown aggregate concrete columns to relate to the courtyard trees, and an extruded aluminum curtain wall frame. Building Envelope Materials

Clear Glass

Brown Aggregate Fritted Glass Concrete

Aluminum

Massing Iterations

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1

2

3

Existing Garfield Boulevard Median Trees

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LANDSCAPE Topography

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0

300

Landscape Types

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300

0’ -1’ -2’ -3’ -4’

15’ 12’ 9’ 6’ 3’

Topographic change creates a diversity of ecologies and moments throughout the library campus. The dramatic landscape makes use of demolition rubbel while abstracting landforms of Olmsted's picturesque landscapes Garfield Boulevard Washington Park Campus Lawn Wetland lagoons Learning gardens Wildflower garden Prairie Urban forest Plaza

A variety of landscape typologies supports ecological biodiversity and provides unique experiences for Washington Park residents, students and vistors of the site. Canopy Cover

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0

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Mature boulevard trees Parkway trees Park trees Urban forest Library courtyard Library entrance

A rich and diverse canopy cover supports local ecologies, as well as the campus's environmental framework. Native trees, which relate to the Washington Park Arboretum, line pedestrian corridors while providing animal habitat.

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BUILDING BRIDGES

My project is a new medical prep magnet high school in the Near West Side of Chicago. The project will break educational and physical neighborhood barriers residents face by using small school design principles and containing a community center for the neighborhood to use during non class hours. The project addresses the high dropout rate in Chicago and will function as a catalyst for growth in the Near West Side.

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DESIGN STRATEGY Small Schools Design Principles

Large School

School School School School Shared Facilities

School as a Catalyst for Urban Growth

Neighborhood residents in the Near West Side Community face educational barriers with their local high school having a drop out rate of 32%. Physical barriers in the neighborhood are the I-290 highway, elevated industrial train tracks, and the neighborhood’s disconnected street grid that has deteriorated over time. The strategy to break the educational barriers children face in this neighborhood was to organize a new school into small classroom clusters based on Small School Principles. The curriculum as a medical prep magnet school relates to the site’s proximity to the Illinois Medical District and introduces students into the healthcare industry that has seen continued job growth.

Site

1950

2000

Elevated Train Tracks

I-290

Disconnected Streets

The strategy to break the physical barriers of the site is for the school to contain a community center for the neighborhood to use during non class hours. The community center bridges over the highway to break the physical barrier of I-290. The community center also includes a new CTA connection on the CTA Blue Line. 2023

2033

Proposal

Congress 1

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2

Connected Streets

Van Buren I-290 Eastbound

Massing Iterations

New CTA Connection

CTA Stop

I-290 Westbound

3

East Elevation

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SECOND FLOOR Classroom Cluster 1. Classroom 2. Laboratory 3. Flex Space Shared Labs/ Spaces 4. Student Lounge 5. Computer Lab

Areas in blue are the community center programs. This area can be opened and closed off from the rest of the school to be used by the public during non school hours. Landscaped areas consist of a plaza, courtyard, and a community garden for the neighborhood to use.

11. Locker Room 12. CTA Entrance/ Reception 13. Clinic 14. Running Track

6. Project Room 7. Biology Lab Wellness/ Community Center 8. Media Center 9. Workout Room/ Area 10. Half Court Gymnasium

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Athletic Field

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Community Garden

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Courtyard

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Plaza

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CLASSROOM CLUSTERS Active Learning Strategies Architecture as a Three Dimensional Textbook

Project Based Learning

Environment Based Learning

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Presentation

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Group Work

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Each classroom cluster operates semi independently that holds an entire school grade. Each cluster contains four classrooms, laboratory, and a cluster flex space. Classrooms are large and flexible to allow for various furniture configurations. Some interior walls are glass to allow teachers to have views into the corridor to monitor their students.

Study Space

Group Work

Presentation

Lecture

Lecture

Presentation

Courtyard Group Work Laboratory

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Group Work

Group Work

Group Work

View Into Corridor

Laboratory

1/16�=1’

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COMMUNITY CENTER Classroom Cluster 1. Classroom 2. Laboratory 3. Flex Space Shared Labs/ Spaces 4. Student Lounge 5. Computer Lab

6. Project Room 7. Biology Lab Wellness/ Community Center 8. Media Center 9. Workout Room/ Area 10. Half Court Gymnasium

11. Locker Room 12. CTA Entrance/ Reception 13. Clinic 14. Running Track 0

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The community center programs of the school are able to be used by the neighborhhod residents during non class hours. These programs include a media center, workout rooms, running track, half court gymnasium, CTA stop connection, and clinic.

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Athletic Field

14 Congress

I-290 Eastbound

Van Buren

I-290 Westbound

Media Center Mezzanine Lobby

Clinic

Lobby

Elevator

Congress I-290 Eastbound

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Bleachers

Lockers

CTA Stop

Gymnasium

Lobby

Workout Room Van Buren

Running Track

Media Center Cafeteria

I-290 Westbound

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SKYLIGHTS The slits on the roof of the school are skylights that relate to the programs in the building. The skylights are close together in the athletic programs to create a sense of movement. The skylights become farther apart as the programs become the clinic and media center.

Clinic

Athletic Facilities

Media Center

Runnin

g Track

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STRUCTURE SYSTEM The structure of the building is steel. A large vierendeel truss is used to span over I-290. The largest two spans over the highway is 150 ft and there are two additional shorter spans of about 50’ over Van Buren and Congress.

Aluminum Composite Panel

Perforated Aluminum Composite Panel

Van Buren I-290 Westbound

Aluminum Composite Color Panel

Aluminum Composite Panel Clear Glass

Aluminum Composite Color Panel

I-290 Eastbound

150’

Clear Glass

Vierendeel Truss Congress

Perforated Aluminum Composite Panel

Perforated Aluminum Composite Panel

150’

Aluminum Composite Panel

1/2”=1’

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CURTAIN WALL PANEL SYSTEM 12’6” Slow Movement 8’4”

4’2” Fast Movement

Circulation/ Public

The skin of the building expresses the horizontal movement and connection along the east and west elevation. This is done with a curtain wall system of aluminum composite and glass panels. The panel widths are in three sizes to express slow and fast movement. Four arrangements of the panels are then created based on program.

Running Track

Running Eye Level

Running Eye Level

Clinic/ Private

Walking Eye Level Sitting

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Classrooms

Walking Eye Level Sitting

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Kazmierczak portfolio 6 21 13 (spreads)