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ISSUE 23 ° APRIL’ 2008” US $7.99 UK £2.60 JP ¥1000


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CONTENTS

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CONTENTS in brief Issue 23, April, 2008

Guest List

008

Editorial

010

Calendar

014

008

GUEST LIST

010

EDITORIAL

People Smooth Riders

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Kate Everton

021

Ann Smiths

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Lorem Ipsum

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Lorem Ipsum

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SMOOTH RIDERS

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CALENDAR

kate everton

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Visual Poetry Seperatist

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NUMB345

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Destinations Ending Regime

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Hotel Mirella

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Safari

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Lorem Ipsum

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Lorem Ipsum

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ending regime

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hotel mirella

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Design Lifestyle Carry On

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Timeless

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Leather

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Lorem Ipsum

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carry on

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Timeless

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Fashion Sleepless Afternoon

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NDVSK23

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Wreckless Fashion

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sleepless afternoon

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Short Story Lost in Suburbia

090

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Entertainment Reading

094

Listening

098

Watching

099

Stocklist

100

Thoughts

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READING

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LOST IN SUBURBIA

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CONTENTS

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CONTENTS IN DEPTH Issue 23, April, 2008

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Editor Andrew Mackay

Editor Andrew Mackay

Art Direction & Design Matthew Hay

Art Direction & Design Matthew Hay

Managing Editor Angelina Peach

Managing Editor Angelina Peach

Fashion Editor Chiara Thompson

Fashion Editor Chiara Thompson

Project Manager Mark Stuarts

Project Manager Mark Stuarts

Editor-in-chief Tony Edwards

Editor-in-chief Tony Edwards

Fashion Editor Chiara Thompson

Fashion Editor Chiara Thompson

kate everton

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leather Is, nont. Antis, a ips, morum ommorum rebatur, etimoeriae fue cont. Satum no. Vivil haedNos alisl delendi onsequis nullan vel dolortisit adionsecte dolobor percin utpat aliquissi

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WRECKLESS FASHION

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LISTENING

THOUGHTS

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STOCKLIST

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watching


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GUEST LIST

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CONTRIBUTORS

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For Santogold, things are really starting to come together as she leaps into a performance career that has already proven itself to be the path she was always meant to walk down. As a DJ I’ve performed on stage with Santi White and can honestly say I’ve been inspired by her. Her energy, attitude and ability to engage the crowd is amazing. She has an unlimited amount of beautiful and positive personal energy that seems to be overflowing and affects all of those that are lucky enough to be surrounding her.

Art Director: Stephanie Nanson Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.

Photographer: Mike Mcpharlin Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.

Illustrator: Jonathon Pinx Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.

Illustrator: Jane Knightworth Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.


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Elliot Smith Eitor Shot on location, based on the 2005 series of Things Will Be Better. Stelly returns for one last battle. P.156

EDITORIAL

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EDITORIAL

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EDITORIAL Until then, we should all just play along nicely

Cover: Mike Mcpharlin Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Curabitur sed arcu sed lacus pharetra pellentesque. Ut nisl orci, fermentum non, molestie ac, sodales sit amet, dolor. Quisque at risus et ligula varius fermentum. Suspendisse eget velit sit amet justo feugiat eleifend. Integer ac magna. Nam nec nibh. Donec eu orci a turpis pharetra vestibulum. Phasellus dapibus. Suspendisse eget lectus eu eros congue vulputate. Proin tortor risus, cursus at, sagittis et, lacinia id, nulla. Sed nulla. Cras dui mauris, condimentum nec, gravida a, varius eu, tellus. Duis sed justo. Ut placerat, eros et varius semper, nunc orci lobortis odio, et cursus enim massa eget nisl. Morbi volutpat vestibulum elit. Duis a sapien. Sed vestibulum augue interdum dolor. Nulla feugiat. Phasellus quis nisl non lacus tincidunt condimentum. Quisque volutpat nisl id massa. Ut enim diam, commodo molestie, ultrices ut, imperdiet vel, nibh. Nulla dictum ultrices magna. Donec sit amet augue in urna viverra placerat. Sed lectus elit, ornare non, luctus sit amet, scelerisque eget, mi. Donec dignissim est. Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae; Praesent at metus. Ut sollicitudin turpis eu purus. Ut vehicula iaculis erat. Cras dapibus semper lectus. Aliquam iaculis scelerisque ante. Aliquam lobortis odio vel lectus viverra mattis. Vestibulum non mauris. John Edwards, Editor-in-Chief


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CALENDAR

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APRIL ‘08 Monday

Tuedsay

Wednesday

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16 (01) SALONE DEL MOBILE MILAN www.pig.com

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PEOPLE

Photographer: Mike Mcpharlin Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.

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TRANSPORT FASHION

SMOOTH RIDERS

FROM TOKYO TO MILAN, citizens of the city are redefining the street transportation landscape with outlandish styles that would have any motorist jealous.

I recently saw Dragonette play the one and only American date of their recent tour to a mid-sized yet fanatic crowd at NYC’s Canal Room. I took a friend who had never seen the band perform live before with me to the event, and we ended up drunkenly dancing and fist pumping to every chorus. When the show was over, my friend turned to me and said, “It’s so weird to hear music like that played in a club. It sounds like we should be in a huge arena or something.” He was totally right, for a minute there it felt like Dragonette’s furious pop hooks were emanating from the gigantic PA at Madison Square Garden, not the tiny speakers at the Canal Room. by Jacob Fabricius


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Photographer: Mike Mcpharlin Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.

Photographer: Mike Mcpharlin Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.

‘The first thing that drew me to Friendly Fires was their cover of Frankie Knuckles’

For Santogold, things are really starting to come together as she leaps into a performance career that has already proven itself to be the path she was always meant to walk down. As a DJ I’ve performed on stage with Santi White and can honestly say I’ve been inspired by her. Her energy, attitude and ability to engage the crowd is amazing. She has an unlimited amount of beautiful and positive personal energy that seems to be overflowing and affects all of those that are lucky enough to be surrounding her. White moved to New York in early 2005 after she lost her father and decided she needed to focus on her music. She started out as a songwriter, and has written with Lily Allen and Mark Ronson as well as for Ashlee Simpson. Currently she’s been collaborating with artists like Diplo, Spank Rock, and Switch and has performed on stage with good friend Amanda Blank as well. Her upcoming album entitled

Santogold will be released on Downtown records in the US and on Atlantic in the UK. ’Sup caught up with Santogold in the studio while she was working on the final mixing of the album. Longitude: How did you connect with Downtown? I didn’t want to sign directly to a major in the States because I didn’t think they’d really know what to do with the album. I was already signed to Lizard King, part of Warner/ Atlantic, but the majors totally weren’t interested at all. It’s not like we were done but it’s also not like they were sniffing around. [Lizard King’s] deal was running out with Warner and then Downtown signed Spank Rock. It was a perfect scenario because I couldn’t really go outside of the Warner system anyway due to my deal [Downtown is distributed by Warner]. It was an ideal place because they have Spank Rock, Amanda Blank, Gnarls Barkley, Eagles of Death Metal, and they’d just signed Justice. All these artists I thought were interesting. And as far as Spank and Amanda we could all tour together and I couldn’t get out of Warner anyway so I was like, ‘perfect!’ Where did the name Santogold come from? It was from this cheap gold infomercial that was around when I was a kid. It became a nickname because I used to wear these big gold earrings that said Santi on ‘em. The big fly girl earrings. My friends started calling me Santogold. I brought it back ‘cause I remembered it and I thought it was cool. Several articles on you have said you are a classically trained musician – is it true? No, I was a music major in school at Wesleyan. One thing I read said that I play drums, bass, guitar and keyboard or something [laughing]. I was really into ethnomusicology at school and the culture of music so I took as many classes in that as I could. I also just got exposed to a lot of different types of music. But I wasn’t a performer,

and I never wanted to be. My instrument was hand drums and I actually studied Haitian drumming styles and Cuban and West African. That’s what I studied. When did the decision to become a performer take place? I’ve always been a songwriter since I was a little kid. I used to write raps all the time and I did that until I was a teenager. Then when I was about 15 I started playing guitar and then I bought some beat production equipment. I don’t think I ever thought I’d make music for myself to perform. It was more for fun – a form of writing. Poems and raps were the same thing to me. After I had been playing around on instruments a bit I started writing songs instead of raps. By that time I was working at Sony as an A&R assistant and I wanted to sign the singer Res for a demo deal. I did the deal for her and while making the demo I couldn’t find any good songs so I was like, ‘Sing these’ and they were the songs that I wrote. They ended up being the best songs for her. I had something in mind that I wanted her to sound like that I hadn’t heard anywhere and she was into it. At that point I was operating under the assumption that I wanted to own a record label. I had been interning at labels since I was in high school but then I realized I hated the business side and I left. I decided I wanted to be on the creative side. I spent the next time executive producing and writing her record. I quit Sony and I got Res a deal and brought some producers on and we did her record. That was early 2001. It didn’t sound like anything else that was out at that time. No, but it also wasn’t exactly what I wanted it to sound like either. I’m happy about that now because it would have sounded closer to my sound. I think it did reach more people. It was more digestible because of the soul influence it had. Anyway, it was really tough for me. I was really young and really inexperienced and that was the first time I


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Photographer: Mike Mcpharlin Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.

had done any of that stuff. After that I decided I didn’t like writing for other people, but I didn’t want to be a performer either. I had started singing by referencing stuff. I knew how to sing. I was in chorus all through school and everything. And I had a solo in high school, which was so fucking embarrassing it was horrible. After that I was scarred and I never wanted to sing again. But after the Res stuff people were like, ‘Why don’t you sing? You can sing’. But I wasn’t sure. I was thinking I wanted to make something that sounded like what I had in my head. So I called my friend Chuck [Treece] and I was like, ‘Why don’t we record some songs and I think I’m gonna make a record but I’m never gonna perform’. He agreed and we did it. It took a while for me to be able to perform. Chuck was a great help. He was the drummer in my band Stiffed and he plays drums on all my records and he’s just amazing. He told me I had to perform. What is the difference between writing for someone else and writing for yourself? It’s very different. But when I was doing the Res record it was different from how I write for other people now. It was my first thing and it was kind of like writing for myself. I was so attached to that project. I put so much into it. More than I’ll ever do again because you don’t need to be that connected to something when you’re writing it for someone else. It actually made it harder for everyone. When you’re writing for somebody extremely pop – you can’t say hardly anything. You have to keep it very simple. You have to maintain this very plain balance. Not too much intention, not to little intention. You have to be right in the middle. When I write for myself it’s like art. It’s fun and it’s not work and it’s not formulaic and there are no rules. Who are the producers on this album? John Hill and I did most of it. I’m not sure how it’s going to end up because we keep adding shit. But it started out that me and

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Photographer: Mike Mcpharlin Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.

“I’ve never had so much fun in my life...I’m never going back!”

John were just writing and producing together. And then I got a song from Switch, Diplo, Radioclit and Disco D worked on one with John and I. Then Switch and Sinden did a “You’ll Find A Way” remix. Now I don’t know what’s going on but I might be adding a couple of more songs. What is the difference between writing for someone else and writing for yourself? It’s very different. But when I was doing the Res record it was different from how I write for other people now. It was my first thing and it was kind of like writing for myself. I was so attached to that project. I put so much into it. More than I’ll ever do again because you don’t need to be that connected to something when you’re writing it for someone else. It actually made it harder for everyone. When you’re writing for somebody extremely pop – you can’t say hardly anything. You have to keep it very simple. You have to maintain this very plain balance. Not too much intention, not to little intention. You have to be right in the middle. When I write for myself it’s like art. It’s fun and it’s not work and it’s not formulaic and there are no rules. It was my first thing and it was kind of like writing for myself. I was so attached to that project. I put so much into it. More than I’ll ever do again because you don’t need to be that connected to something when you’re writing it for someone else. It actually made it harder for everyone. When you’re writing for somebody extremely pop – you can’t say hardly anything. You have to keep it very simple. You have to maintain this very plain balance. Not too much intention, not to little intention. You have to be right in the middle. When I write for myself it’s like art. It’s fun and it’s not work and it’s not formulaic and there are no rules.

More info at www.info.org. Flying disasters.


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KNOWING KATE

EVERTONE THE BEST KEPT SMILE IN TOWN, WHAT DOES SHE KNOW THAT YOU’RE MISSING? IS IT REALLY WORTH IT? WHERE DO WE GET IT? LOREM IPSUM I recently saw Dragonette play the one and only American date of their recent tour to a mid-sized yet fanatic crowd at NYC’s Canal Room. I took a friend who had never seen the band perform live before with me to the event, and we ended up drunkenly dancing and fist pumping to every chorus. When the show was over, my friend turned to me and said, “It’s so weird to hear music like that played in a club. It sounds like we should be in a huge arena or something.” He was totally right, for a minute there it felt like Dragonette’s furious pop hooks were emanating from the gigantic PA at Madison Square Garden, not the tiny speakers at the Canal Room. by Jacob Fabricius


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“I had never had so much fun, it was discovering how to walk again”


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‘The first thing that drew me to Friendly Fires was their cover of Frankie Knuckles’

Yeah, that’s probably why we got on so well, actually. [Whilst recording in Nebraska] I got my own house, but when Conor was at the studio I would stay at his house and at like six in the morning I’d walk back to mine. So you recorded the single and just stood back, no way, really? Yes. It’s really bad, but I’m happy recording. Then, when someone cares enough to put it out that’s amazing to me. I don’t really think about that stuff. That is cool though! Your forthcoming album was produced by Mike Mogis [who sometimes plays with and produces Bright Eyes]. He was given my demos, but I didn’t know. So, I was in my kitchen and got a phone call from Laurence [Bell, founder of Domino Records]. He said, ‘I’m going to pass you over to Mike Mogis’. I was like ‘What? What! What are you telling me here?’ What was it like to work with him? It was cool actually. We spoke on the phone for about five months leading up to eventually me flying to Omaha. So it was cool. But the surreality didn’t really hit until after. I mean, I knew Tilly and the Wall anyway and I’d talked to Mike for ages, but Conor [Oberst of Bright Eyes] sort of drifted in and out. How are you? Okay, yeah. I bought a new album. I’ve never owned Is This It by the Strokes. [He fishes a small brown paper bag from his pocket and pulls out the CD]. A new Rough Trade shop opened. I don’t buy CDs and I don’t buy music often, so I thought I would go to the Rough Trade shop and for my first purchase I bought Is This It. Is that the indiest thing you have ever done? I don’t think you could actually get more indie. Let me start properly by asking: is it true that if you weren’t called Lightspeed Champion, you would be called Apple Cue [i.e. the quit everything command on Macs]? It was going to be Dev and the Apple Cues. Well I suppose Steve Jobs will be happier with Lightspeed Champion. Yeah. I like that name though! Maybe there is room for it in the album’s sleeve notes? I haven’t done the notes for the album yet, so I might actually play on it. I like that idea. It’s like Elvis Costello and The Attractions. At this point I have to say, congratulations for two fantastic singles. I especially liked “Galaxy Of The Lost”. [The interviewee’s eyes widen and he leans forward] Oh, thank you! I went looking for it in Rough Trade and they didn’t have it! I don’t know anything about it actually. Literally, I forgot the single had come out until my violinist reminded me. He said, ‘What happed with the single?’ and I was like ‘Shit! It came out?’ Well I can tell you that it got to Nº. 21 in the independent charts. No way! Wow! I didn’t know that. Wow! God! That’s amazing. So you recorded the single and just stood back, no way, really? Yes. It’s really bad, but I’m happy recording. Then, when someone cares enough to put it out that’s amazing to me. I don’t really think about that stuff. That is cool though, even though it’s insane.

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Your forthcoming album was produced by Mike Mogis [who sometimes plays with and produces Bright Eyes]. He was given my demos, but I didn’t know. So, I was in my kitchen and got a phone call from Laurence [Bell, founder of Domino Records]. He said, ‘I’m going to pass you over to Mike Mogis’. I was like ‘What? What! What are you telling me here?’ What was it like to work with him? It was cool actually. We spoke on the phone for about five months leading up to eventually me flying to Omaha. So it was cool. But the surreality didn’t really hit until after. I mean, I knew Tilly and the Wall anyway and I’d talked to Mike for ages, but Conor [Oberst of Bright Eyes] sort of drifted in and out. Is Conor a nice guy? His music is quite intense. Does he reflect that? Yeah, he’s an amazing, amazing guy. I mean he is like that, but if I’m completely honest he’s the most outgoing and open person. You probably expect him to brood, but he’s actually one of those people that’s naturally loud. In fact, he should probably hold more stuff in. Do you see any of yourself in him? I should definitely hold more stuff in! I mean it seems that you both make dark and direct records, but in person both of you are gregarious. Yeah, that’s probably why we got on so well, actually. [Whilst recording in Nebraska] I got my own house, but when Conor was at the studio I would stay at his house and at like six in the morning I’d walk back to mine. You were born in Houston, now live in London and recorded in Nebraska. Where do you feel that you belong? I don’t know. It’s weird actually, because lately I’ve been feeling really English. I don’t know what it is. It is something that has happened. Or European maybe. It’s weird. When I got back from Omaha, I went straight to Paris, because I felt weird in lots of ways. I needed an escape so I went to Paris and stayed a while. I had a list of certain artists, musically, that I wanted to look up and indulge in. So I spent a lot of time just searching around. A lot of that is still in me, I think. I’m trying to experiment musically, writing songs in the style of these weird French Jazz composers from the late ’50s and ’70s. The main guy I was looking for was Alain Goraguer, who composed a soundtrack for the animated film, Fantastic Planet, or La Planète Sauvage. I was just really obsessive in trying to find all of the stuff that he did. So I’ve been experimenting and maybe that’s something to do with this newly felt European identity. But it’s weird. Whose idea was your recent Big Brother’s Big Mouth appearance? Mine. Peaches [Geldof] was presenting and I’ve been good friends with her for a really long time. I was homeless and she gave me a place to stay. One night, we all went out and I said ‘You should get me to come on and play!’ She didn’t mention it again, but then the next week I got a phone call from the show’s producer who said ‘I really like your single, will you do the show?’ I was like ‘That’s really funny, but I’ll do it because it’ll be awesome!’ So I did it. It was really fun – it was actually one of the most fun days I’ve had this year. You seem like a happy-go-lucky guy, but also most comfortable writing dark songs. Is it catharsis? Wow. It’s weird. I suffer from pretty horrible mood swings. It’s either like that [raises his hand to signify high] or like that [drops his hand down low], so that’s probably coming up. I dunno really though, it varies. Lately, I’ve been writing really uplifting songs. And it’s a shame, because I guess no one’s going to hear them ‘til 2009 or something. Does writing help you to rationalise? Well last night, I think I wrote the darkest song I’ve ever written, which is weird since I’ve been working on really uplifting songs lately. But this song last night is really odd and I don’t know what to do with it. It just happened. I was talking to a friend of mine

in New York; I love her to death but in this conversation she was just hitting different parts of me and pressing the right buttons. I got really cold to her. In the end I couldn’t even talk to her. She reminded me of things that I had completely forgotten about. I just had to get it all out. It was really dark. I re-read it this morning and was like, ‘Errrrrr!’do all the sounds vocally. That’s so fun! What was it like to work with him? It was cool actually. We spoke on the phone for about five months leading up to eventually me flying to Omaha. So it was cool. But the surreality didn’t really hit until after. I mean, I knew Tilly and the Wall anyway and I’d talked to Mike for ages, but Conor [Oberst of Bright Eyes] sort of drifted in and out. Is Conor a nice guy? His music is quite intense. Does he reflect that? Yeah, he’s an amazing, amazing guy. I mean he is like that, but if I’m completely honest he’s the most outgoing and open person. You probably expect him to brood, but he’s actually one of those people that’s naturally loud. In fact, he should probably hold more stuff in. Do you see any of yourself in him? I should definitely hold more stuff in! I mean it seems that you both make dark and direct records, but in person both of you are gregarious. Yeah, that’s probably why we got on so well, actually. [Whilst recording in Nebraska] I got my own house, but when Conor was at the studio I would stay at his house and at like six in the morning I’d walk back to mine. So you recorded the single and just stood back, no way, really? Yes. It’s really bad, but I’m happy recording. Then, when someone cares enough to put it out that’s amazing to me. I don’t really think about that stuff. That is cool though! Your forthcoming album was produced by Mike Mogis [who sometimes plays with and produces Bright Eyes]. He was given my demos, but I didn’t know. So, I was in my kitchen and got a phone call from Laurence [Bell, founder of Domino Records]. He said, ‘I’m going to pass you over to Mike Mogis’. I was like ‘What? What! What are you telling me here?’ What was it like to work with him? It was cool actually. We spoke on the phone for about five months leading up to eventually me flying to Omaha. So it was cool. But the surreality didn’t really hit until after. I mean, I knew Tilly and the Wall anyway and I’d talked to Mike for ages, but Conor [Oberst of Bright Eyes] sort of drifted in and out. Yeah, that’s probably why we got on so well, actually. [Whilst recording in Nebraska] I got my own house, but when Conor was at the studio I would stay at his house and at like six in the morning I’d walk back to mine. So you recorded the single and just stood back, no way, really? Yes. It’s really bad, but I’m happy recording. Then, when someone cares enough to put it out that’s amazing to me. I don’t really think about that stuff. That is cool though! Your forthcoming album was produced by Mike Mogis [who sometimes plays with and produces Bright Eyes]. He was given my demos, but I didn’t know. So, I was in my kitchen and got a phone call from Laurence [Bell, founder of Domino Records]. He said, ‘I’m going to pass you over to Mike Mogis’. I was like ‘What? What! What are you telling me here?’ What was it like to work with him? It was cool actually. We spoke on the phone for about five months leading up to eventually me flying to Omaha. So it was cool. But the surreality didn’t really hit until after. I mean, I knew Tilly and the Wall anyway and I’d talked to Mike for ages, but Conor [Oberst of Bright Eyes] sort of drifted in and out. More info at www.info.org. Flying disasters.

Photographer: Mike Mcpharlin Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.


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ANN SM PEEPING INTO THE POLAROID LIFE OF

FROM TOKYO TO MILAN, citizens of the landscape with outlandish styles that woul


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city are redefining the street transportation ld have any motorist jealous. Lorem Ipsum. by Jacob Fabricius


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PEOPLE

‘The first thing that drew me to Friendly Fires was their cover of Frankie Knuckles’

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Photographer: Mike Mcpharlin Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.

Photographer: Mike Mcpharlin Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.

It was a chilly Sunday in the fall when ‘Sup met up with four guys in a sandy, beachthemed eatery. Those four guys happened to be Bill Gillim, Joel Ford, Aynsley Powell, and Andrew Brad – also known as Tigercity. We were meeting up to eat and chat about what’s new with them, but we’ll get to that in a sec. The band started in Massachusetts in 2004 by Bill and Joel. A few short months later, they met Andres and Ansyley, which completed Tigercity as the suave band we know and love today. Perhaps Tigercity isn’t already rotating around in your iPod playlist? If that is the case, then you probably aren’t aware of their modern day soft-rock sound – but they do it in a totally awesome and nonironic way. Citing influences that range from The Police and Prince to Roxy Music and Daft Punk, Tigercity has created a fresh take on soft rock that can fit in just

as well next to LCD Soundsystem as, say, Michael McDonald. They have an EP out called Pretend Not to Love, which boasts six tracks and four white horses galloping in the waters of a beach on its cover – smooth indeed. The songs encased in that EP are just as evocative as those beachy stallions: easy synths dancing with subtle power pop riffs, bouncing bass lines, and harmonious vocals will take the listener back to a time of school dances and the first insurgence of legwarmers (but without all that awkward stuff like acne and shoulder pads). Tigercity didn’t plan for their music to be a part of a musical movement, but lucky for them, while they were busy touring and recording, people simultaneously seem to have been unearthing their old records and looking back to that specific niche era of late-‘70s, early-‘80s music now known as yacht rock – which has become so popular it was chronicled in a Channel 101 series. Whether it was something that was in the ether waiting for many to pick up on or not, Tigercity are now at the forefront of this new surge of modern day savvy rockers and we are all A-OK with it. So you guys are Tigercity. All: Yeah… [Pointing to Joel’s white tiger T-shirt] So do you always wear tigers? All: [Laughs] No! Joel: I only had one shirt that like, didn’t smell. Bill: My suit smells, though. How long have you guys been a band? Bill: About two years. Joel: It’ll be two years in January. Bill: We were pretty much all in different bands before this one. Were the sounds similar? Bill: Nah, they were kind of all over the place. I was in this band that sounded like an old German psychedelic band, and the all of a sudden started sounding like Fugazi. Joel: Before this band I played drums in a rock band that was just synthesizers and singers, and before that, mostly funk bands. Andrew: I was most in funk fusion stuff too. Joel and I were in this band together for like three months. Joel: When was that, like early college? Andrew: It was like 2000, 2001. It was called The Uplift Ensemble. [Laughs] I dare you to find that, somewhere. You guys totally have a soft-rock vibe now. Bill [appalled]: What? Joel: No! Andrew: That’s embarrassing. [Laughs] Bill: Maybe. Then, how would you describe your sound? Joel: Adult Contemporary. Aynsley: If our moms like it, then we know it’s good! It’s called “The Mom Test”. And what does “The Mom Test” entail?

Aynsley: You know, she’s in the minivan, driving the kids to school, and if she does that little subtle head bop/finger snap— not exactly singing to herself, but like, mouthing the words—then you’ve got it [laughs]. A lot of other bands have a soft-rock, adult contemporary vibe to them right now. Do you feel any relation to bands like that? Bill: Not really. Andrew: Which bands? You know, like Hot Chip, Junior Boys, Chromeo, Sans Serac. My friends have a party called Yacht Rock where they only play ‘70s and ‘80s soft rock hits. Then of course there are the Yacht Rock sketches. There’s definitely a resurgence. Bill: Honestly, we discovered Yacht Rock way after we had formed. I think movements like that happen all the time, where people all happen onto the same thing at once. Aynsley: People needed a label for it, so the Yacht Rock guys sort of capitalized on that, like ‘Yeah, this is hip!’ Meanwhile we were holed up in our practice space doing our thing, to be honest. It happened separately, you know? Bill: Probably, we all just started listening to the same music from 20 years ago, so we all suddenly have the same influences. What ‘80s teen movie do you think your music would score the best? Bill: Um, what’s the one where Mickey Rourke fucks the really young girl? All: [Laughs] Bill: 9 ½ Weeks. I don’t know if it’s a teen movie, but I’ll go with that one! Joel: We were talking about scoring Shooter, that movie that Marky Mark was in. Andrew: Shooter 2! Bill: We’ll do any inane action movie. How funny is it that Marky Mark is now like a relevant superstar? Joel: He’s super legit! [Singing] ‘Feel it, feel it!’ All: [Laughs] Andrew: That was relevant when it happened! Joel: It was totally relevant! He’s never been irrelevant! A solid congregation of admirers watched eagerly and patiently at the launch party for What Of Our Future, their fixed eyes betraying an intense concentration as Cazals appeared on stage. There was little movement amongst the crowd; most people seemed too enraptured to even dance, immersing themselves in the sound as it seeped out as lucidly as the band’s flowing hair. With the resurgence of the dystopian post-punk that has been infiltrating London recently, the East-end band could easily have slipped by unnoticed, but they seem to have captivated their niche audience. Kitsuné know how to purvey the bands of the future, and this performance affirmed their place in its realm; each


PEOPLE

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Photographer: Mike Mcpharlin Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.

“Mother would always disappear on sunday”

song was poured out with perfect, successive ease, yet with the raw enthusiasm indicative of an up-and-coming band safe in the knowledge of a mainstream becoming. The components of their songs seem incongruous, comprising elements of indie, dance, post-punk and electro with an American emo tinge, yet work intrinsically well when combined; uncomplicated, anxiety-induced indie riffs accompanied by Phil’s growling Anglo-American voice, stiffly emitting the post-modernist sentiments of Life Is Boring, which reflect somewhat upon the album’s ominous title. Their performance of the new single Somebody, Somewhere and Poor Innocent Boys justified Cazals as being, allegedly, one of Britain’s most forward new bands; their distinct sound manages to subtly transcend the boundaries of musical genres yet without appearing to try. Delivered with grubby vigour, the songs’ carefully placed pauses and thrashing guitars enhanced the succinct lyrics that were positively spat out as Phil stooped and swayed on his sweat-dripping microphone stand. Sharp, assured, positive-thinking yet fatally flawed, with all the conviction of our future-aware youth, Cazals’ own lyrics can be epitomised as the collective conscience of our zeitgeist; hopeless romantics with dirty minds. A solid congregation of admirers watched eagerly and patiently at the launch party for What Of Our Future, their fixed eyes betraying an intense concentration as Cazals appeared on stage. There was little movement amongst the crowd; most people seemed too enraptured to even dance, immersing themselves in the sound as it seeped out as lucidly as the band’s flowing hair. With the resurgence of the dystopian post-punk that has been infiltrating London recently, the East-end band could easily have slipped by unnoticed, but they seem to have captivated their niche audience. Kitsuné know how to purvey the bands of the future, and this performance affirmed their place in its realm; each song was poured out with perfect, successive ease, yet with the raw enthusiasm indicative of an up-and-coming band safe in the knowledge of a mainstream becoming. The components of their songs seem incongruous, comprising elements of indie, dance, post-punk and electro with an American emo tinge, yet work intrinsically well when combined; uncomplicated, anxiety-induced indie riffs accompanied by Phil’s growling Anglo-American voice, stiffly emitting the post-modernist sentiments of Life Is Boring, which reflect somewhat upon the album’s ominous title. Their performance of the new single Somebody, Somewhere and Poor Innocent Boys justified Cazals as being, allegedly, one of Britain’s most forward new bands;

their distinct sound manages to subtly transcend the boundaries of musical genres yet without appearing to try. Delivered with grubby vigour, the songs’ carefully placed pauses and thrashing guitars enhanced the succinct lyrics that were positively spat out as Phil stooped and swayed on his sweat-dripping microphone stand. Sharp, assured, positive-thinking yet fatally flawed, with all the conviction of our future-aware youth, Cazals’ own lyrics can be epitomised as the collective conscience of our zeitgeist; hopeless romantics with dirty minds. A solid congregation of admirers watched eagerly and patiently at the launch party for What Of Our Future, their fixed eyes betraying an intense concentration as Cazals appeared on stage. There was little movement amongst the crowd; most people seemed too enraptured to even dance, immersing themselves in the sound as it seeped out as lucidly as the band’s flowing hair. With the resurgence of the dystopian post-punk that has been infiltrating London recently, the East-end band could easily have slipped by unnoticed, but they seem to have captivated their niche audience. Kitsuné know how to purvey the bands of the future, and this performance affirmed their place in its realm; each song was poured out with perfect, successive ease, yet with the raw enthusiasm indicative of an up-and-coming band safe in the knowledge of a mainstream becoming. The components of their songs seem incongruous, comprising elements of indie, dance, post-punk and electro with an American emo tinge, yet work intrinsically well when combined; uncomplicated, anxiety-induced indie riffs accompanied by Phil’s growling Anglo-American voice, stiffly emitting the post-modernist sentiments of Life Is Boring, which reflect somewhat upon the album’s ominous title. Their performance of the new single Somebody, Somewhere and Poor Innocent Boys justified Cazals as being, allegedly, one of Britain’s most forward new bands; their distinct sound manages to subtly transcend the boundaries of musical genres yet without appearing to try. Delivered with grubby vigour, the songs’ carefully placed pauses and thrashing guitars enhanced the succinct lyrics that were positively spat out as Phil stooped and swayed on his sweat-dripping microphone stand. Sharp, assured, positive-thinking yet fatally flawed, with all the conviction of our future-aware youth, Cazals’ own lyrics can be epitomised as the collective conscience of our zeitgeist; hopeless romantics with dirty minds.

More info at www.info.org. Flying disasters.

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Photographer: Mike Mcpharlin Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.


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SEPERATIST

CARLIMOORE The seperated one must

1. 2. Numerical 3. 4. poetry 5. justice 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.


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VISUAL POETRY

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2 The seperated one must

1. 2. Within 3. 4. the 5. 6. looks 7. changes. 8. 9. 10.


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3 The seperated one must

1. one 2. one one 3. one one one 4. one one one one 5. one one one one one 6. one one one one one one 7. one one one one one one one 8. one one one one one one one one 9. one one one one one one one one one 10.


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DISCOVERING FUNDAMENTALS

ENDING REGIME FROM TOKYO TO MILAN, citizens of the city are redefining the street transportation landscape with outlandish styles that would have any motorist jealous. I recently saw Dragonette play the one and only American date of their recent tour to a mid-sized yet fanatic crowd at NYC’s Canal Room. I took a friend who had never seen the band perform live before with me to the event, and we ended up drunkenly dancing and fist pumping to every chorus. When the show was over, my friend turned to me and said, “It’s so weird to hear music like that played in a club. It sounds like we should be in a huge arena or something.” by Jacob Fabricius


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‘The first thing that drew me to Friendly Fires was their cover of Frankie Knuckles’

The first thing that drew me to Friendly Fires was their cover of Frankie Knuckles’ disco classic “Your Love”, which may or may not have been an intentional way to make nice with the new rave kids. My friend did a search on myspace for all the bands that covered that song and FF’s was one of our favorites. I met the band for the first time at the ’SUP UK launch party last fall. It was their first-ever London show, which they also headlined. That night, Friendly Fires brought extra sound, lights, and their own smoke machine (as well as a banner that

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didn’t get put up) for added effect. The gig was packed. Everyone was dancing, the girls loved it, and the industry types who stuck around to see them almost all stayed until the end. Friendly Fires make danceable pop music with sound effects, lyrical harmonies, keyboards and fist-pumping beats, but they’re not waving glowsticks around aimlessly. Lolo did an interview for ’SUP that involved a cut-and-paste exercise at the Old Blue Last. We followed that up with this.I recently saw Dragonette play the one and only American date of their recent tour to a mid-sized yet fanatic crowd at NYC’s Canal Room. I took a friend who had never seen the band perform live before with me to the event, and we ended up drunkenly dancing and fist pumping to every chorus. When the show was over, my friend turned to me and said, “It’s so weird to hear music like that played in a club. It sounds like we should be in a huge arena or something.” He was totally right, for a minute there it felt like Dragonette’s furious pop hooks were emanating from the gigantic PA at Madison Square Garden, not the tiny speakers at the Canal Room.

Photographer: Mike Mcpharlin Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.

2007 was the year pop broke, with artists like Kate Nash topping the charts and triumphing over tired indie and mainstream rock. However, this movement of accessibility is pioneered by more underground acts that aren’t afraid to show that their roots lie in Madonna, Culture Club and Duran Duran. For the purpose of this article (far from us to try to coin some sort of new genre or phrase or something) let’s call the bands that are at the forefront of this new appropriation of pop music “true pop”. The Clik Clik, the Ting Tings and New Young Pony Club are all True Pop, but Dragonette are the most influential to me because 1) They’ve managed to sign to a major label everywhere but the US, 2) They have a strong and well thought out image and personality and 3) All the members have spent time in different bands in the past, thus making their distinct turn to a more pop sound deliberate and not the by-product of marketing or label influence (Lead singer Martina Sorbara actually released solo material as a singer-songwriter and sang on Basement Jaxx’s 2006 single “Take Me Back to Your House” before creating Dragonette).


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Dragonette’s debut album, Galore, hops from one style to the next, featuring dance floor electro stompers like the anthemic “I Get Around” to straight up ballads like “Another Day”. It’s an album that Gwen Stefani wishes she had written, and if true pop really breaks away from it’s indie ethos and makes the mainstream, Galore will be its London Calling. I sat down in a noisy little bar with Martina, her husband, songwriting partner and bassist Dan Kurtz, guitarist Will Stapleton and drummer Joel Stouffer and discussed the fate of True Pop and the band’s current ascent to stardom. 2007 was the year pop broke, with artists like Kate Nash topping the charts and triumphing over tired indie and mainstream rock. However, this movement of accessibility is pioneered by more underground acts that aren’t afraid to show that their roots lie in Madonna, Culture Club and Duran Duran. For the purpose of this article (far from us to try to coin some sort of new genre or phrase or something) let’s call the bands that are at the forefront of this new appropriation of pop music “true pop”. The Clik Clik, the Ting Tings and New Young Pony Club are

“Mother would always disappear on sunday”

all True Pop, but Dragonette are the most influential to me because 1) They’ve managed to sign to a major label everywhere but the US, 2) They have a strong and well thought out image and personality and 3) All the members have spent time in different bands in the past, thus making their distinct turn to a more pop sound deliberate and not the by-product of marketing or label influence (Lead singer Martina Sorbara actually released solo material as a singer-songwriter and sang on Basement Jaxx’s 2006 single “Take Me Back to Your House” before creating Dragonette). Dragonette’s debut album, Galore, hops from one style to the next, featuring dance floor electro stompers like the anthemic “I Get Around” to straight up ballads like “Another Day”. It’s an album that Gwen Stefani wishes she had written, and if true pop really breaks away from it’s indie ethos and makes the mainstream, Galore will be its London Calling.

More info at www.info.org. Flying disasters.

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Photographer: Mike Mcpharlin Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.


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PONTE DI LEGNO

HOTEL MIRELLA

A TASTE OF HOSPITALITY, Situated in the heart of Camonica Valley, in the natural parks of Adamello and Stelvio, Hotel Mirella offers tailored holidays all year around. An occasion to jump into nature, relax and culture, all this with a high level hotel service. by Jacob Fabricius

A Taste of Relaxation The Taste of Wellness

The tradition of hospitality, care about details, the excellent cuisine and the hotel infrastructure with every confort make the hotel in the heart of Ponte di Legno the right place for your well being. A professional management and kind staff, will take care of your stay in the mountains, in a moment to remember and a place where to come back. Tastefully furnished rooms, most with panoramic balconies, guarantee that you will have a quiet and very private stay.

Each of our rooms, have a direct telephone line, safe and TV. Should you wish a Wi Fi connection, cards may be purchased at reception. We offer rooms to accommodate couples and families creating a home-like ambiance. The qualified staff ensures that your room will be well kept and that you will have a good rest. Hotel Mirella has a fine restaurant, where a prestigious chef proposes dishes interesting dishes with harmonious matching between local recipies and more international once. The menu, that has many dishes, is taken care by the hotel’s management that proposes dishes day by day. You can taste various flavours from the region presented with art and creativity, that make the restaurant became, a exclusive pleasure for your taste. The wines from of a wide selection in our cellar, will make your meals unforgettable. During your holiday our wellness services are available. Hotel Mirella has a indoor natural lighted swimming pool, other services such as sauna, where you can spoil yourself. The Hotel has two tennis course, where a qualified tennis teacher gives lessons.

Restaurant facilities, a well prepared bar, a disco and a TV room complete the offer to let yourself take fine moments, while having a nice drink in front of the fire place. Hotel Mirella Congress Centre has appropriate facilities for conventions or small meetings. Updated multimedia tools guarantee any type of communication: audio – video system simultaneous translation, press room, video conference. In the meeting rooms there can be exposition spaces. The capacity of the meeting rooms is from 35 spaces in the ”Sala Bleis” up to 300 spaces in the “Sala Paradiso”, for a total of 500 seats on a surface of 600 square meters. Hotel Mirella can also support in organizing, numerous sport and cultural activities, from snow mobile tours, ski races to sleddog. A professional management and kind staff, will take care of your stay in the mountains, in a moment to remember and a place where to come back.

More info at www.info.org. Flying disasters.

Right: Indoor delights: Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.


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SAFA

AN AFRICAN

BREATHING, NEVER GOT SO E


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EASY, Forgetting about the rest of the world. by Jacob Fabricius


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A Taste of Relaxation The Taste of Wellness

The tradition of hospitality, care about details, the excellent cuisine and the hotel infrastructure with every confort make the hotel in the heart of Ponte di Legno the right place for your well being. A professional management and kind staff, will take care of your stay in the mountains, in a moment to remember and a place where to come back. Tastefully furnished rooms, most with panoramic balconies, guarantee that you will have a quiet and very private stay. Each of our rooms, have a direct telephone line, safe and TV. Should you wish a Wi Fi connection, cards may be purchased at reception. We offer rooms to accommodate couples and families creating a home-like ambiance. The qualified staff ensures that your room will be well kept and that you will have a good rest. Hotel Mirella has a fine restaurant, where a prestigious chef proposes dishes interesting dishes with harmonious matching between local recipies and more international once. The menu, that has many dishes, is taken care by the hotel’s management that proposes dishes day by day. You can taste various flavours from the region presented with art and creativity, that make the restaurant became, a exclusive pleasure for your taste. The wines from of a wide selection in our cellar, will make your meals unforgettable. During your holiday our wellness services are available. Hotel Mirella has a indoor natural lighted swimming pool, other services such as sauna, where you can spoil yourself. The Hotel has two tennis course, where a qualified tennis teacher gives lessons. Restaurant facilities, a well prepared bar, a disco and a TV room complete the offer to let yourself take fine moments, while having a nice drink in front of the fire place. Hotel Mirella Congress Centre has appropriate facilities for conventions or small meetings. Updated multimedia tools guarantee any type of communication: audio – video system simultaneous translation, press room, video conference. In the meeting rooms there can be exposition spaces. The capacity of the meeting rooms is from 35 spaces in the ”Sala Bleis” up to 300 spaces in the “Sala Paradiso”, for a total of 500 seats on a surface of 600 square meters. Hotel Mirella can also support in organizing, numerous sport and cultural activities, from snow mobile tours, ski races to sleddog. A professional management and kind staff, will take care of your stay in the mountains, in a moment to remember and a place where to come back.

More info at www.info.org. Flying disasters.


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Right: Indoor delights: Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.

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Photographer: Mike Mcpharlin Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.

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LUXURY GUIDE TO TRAVEL

CARRY ON FROM TOKYO TO MILAN, citizens of the city are redefining the street transportation landscape with outlandish styles that would have any motorist jealous. I recently saw Dragonette play the one and only American date of their recent tour to a mid-sized yet fanatic crowd at NYC’s Canal Room. I took a friend who had never seen the band perform live before with me to the event, and we ended up drunkenly dancing and fist pumping to every chorus. When the show was over, my friend turned to me and said, “It’s so weird to hear music like that played in a club. It sounds like we should be in a huge arena or something.” He was totally right, for a minute there it felt like Dragonette’s furious pop hooks were emanating from the gigantic PA at Madison Square Garden, not the tiny speakers at the Canal Room. by Jacob Fabricius


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on board, anything can happen...

‘The first thing that drew me to Friendly Fires was their cover of Frankie Knuckles’

The first thing that drew me to Friendly Fires was their cover of Frankie Knuckles’ disco classic “Your Love”, which may or may not have been an intentional way to make nice with the new rave kids. My friend did a search on myspace for all the bands that covered that song and FF’s was one of our favorites. I met the band for the first time at the ’SUP UK launch party last fall. It was their first-ever London show, which they also headlined. That night, Friendly Fires brought extra sound, lights, and their own smoke machine (as well as a banner that

didn’t get put up) for added effect. The gig was packed. Everyone was dancing, the girls loved it, and the industry types who stuck around to see them almost all stayed until the end. Friendly Fires make danceable pop music with sound effects, lyrical harmonies, keyboards and fist-pumping beats, but they’re not waving glowsticks around aimlessly. Lolo did an interview for ’SUP that involved a cut-and-paste exercise at the Old Blue Last. We followed that up with this.I recently saw Dragonette play the one and only American date of their recent tour to a mid-sized yet fanatic crowd at NYC’s Canal Room. I took a friend who had never seen the band perform live before with me to the event, and we ended up drunkenly dancing and fist pumping to every chorus. When the show was over, my friend turned to me and said, “It’s so weird to hear music like that played in a club. It sounds like we should be in a huge arena or something.”

More info at www.info.org. Flying disasters.


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“you can never be too prepared”

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001. Sac en vison rase et pierres de couleur, Louis Vuitton. 002. Sac en astrakan, Tod’s. 003. Sac “Bag It” et anses en cuir metallise, Fendi.004. Sac en cuir tresse et bandes de velous, Bottega Veneta. 005. Sac en cuir et noeud en gros-grain, Lancel. 006. Sac en cuir gaufre, onyx et ceramique, Giorgio Armani. 007. Sac en crcodile mat, Longchamp. 008. Sac “255” en cuir metelasse, Chanel.


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ACCURACY WHILE

TIMELES FOUR TIMING, citizens of the city are redefining the street transportation landscape with outlandish styles that would have any motorist jealous. I recently saw Dragonette play the one and only American date of their recent tour to a mid-sized yet fanatic crowd at NYC’s Canal Room. I took a friend who had never seen the band perform live before with me to the event, and we ended up drunkenly dancing and fist pumping to every chorus. When the show was over, my friend turned to me and said, “It’s so weird to hear music like that played in a club. It sounds like we should be in a huge arena or something.” He was totally right, for a minute there it felt like Dragonette’s furious pop hooks were emanating from the gigantic PA at Madison Square Garden, not the tiny speakers at the Canal Room.

by Jacob Fabricius

Right: Indoor delights: Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.

WITH THE COMING YEAR’S MOST

INNOVATIVE

MEN’S

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The tradition of hospitality, care about details, the excellent cuisine and the hotel infrastructure with every confort make the hotel in the heart of Ponte di Legno the right place for your well being. A professional management and kind staff, will take care of your stay in the mountains, in a moment to remember and a place where to come back. Tastefully furnished rooms, most with panoramic balconies, guarantee that you will have a quiet and very private stay.

Each of our rooms, have a direct telephone line, safe and TV. Should you wish a Wi Fi connection, cards may be purchased at reception. We offer rooms to accommodate couples and families creating a home-like ambiance. The qualified staff ensures that your room will be well kept and that you will have a good rest. Hotel Mirella has a fine restaurant, where a prestigious chef proposes dishes interesting dishes with harmonious matching between local recipies and more international once. The menu, that has many dishes, is taken care by the hotel’s management that proposes dishes day by day. You can taste various flavours from the region presented with art and creativity, that make the restaurant became, a exclusive pleasure for your taste. The wines from of a wide selection in our cellar, will make your meals unforgettable. During your holiday our wellness services are available. Hotel Mirella has a indoor natural lighted swimming pool, other services such as sauna, where you can spoil yourself. The Hotel has two tennis course, where a qualified tennis teacher gives lessons.

Restaurant facilities, a well prepared bar, a disco and a TV room complete the offer to let yourself take fine moments, while having a nice drink in front of the fire place. Hotel Mirella Congress Centre has appropriate facilities for conventions or small meetings. Updated multimedia tools guarantee any type of communication: audio – video system simultaneous translation, press room, video conference. In the meeting rooms there can be exposition spaces. The capacity of the meeting rooms is from 35 spaces in the ”Sala Bleis” up to 300 spaces in the “Sala Paradiso”, for a total of 500 seats on a surface of 600 square meters. Hotel Mirella can also support in organizing, numerous sport and cultural activities, from snow mobile tours, ski races to sleddog. A professional management and kind staff, will take care of your stay in the mountains, in a moment to remember and a place where to come back.

More info at www.info.org. Flying disasters.


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FROM SPAIN, LOWEW PRESENTS

LEATHER

EVERY SEAM, PERFECT. Situated in the heart of Camonica Valley, in the natural parks of Adamello and Stelvio, Hotel Mirella offers tailored holidays all year around. An occasion to jump into nature, relax and culture, all this with a high level hotel service. Publis, qui se effre in nors labem auctussim antes norsules? Gerica molto unc by Jacob Fabricius


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LUXURY GUIDE TO TRAVEL

SLEEPLESS AFTERNOON FROM TOKYO TO MILAN, citizens of the city are redefining the street transportation landscape with outlandish styles that would have any motorist jealous. I recently saw Dragonette play the one and only American date of their recent tour to a mid-sized yet fanatic crowd at NYC’s Canal Room. I took a friend who had never seen the band perform live before with me to the event, and we ended up drunkenly dancing and fist pumping to every chorus. When the show was over, my friend turned to me and said, “It’s so weird to hear music like that played in a club. It sounds like we should be in a huge arena or something.” He was totally right, for a minute there it felt like Dragonette’s furious pop hooks were emanating from the gigantic PA at Madison Square Garden, not the tiny speakers at the Canal Room. by Jacob Fabricius


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Photographer: Mike Mcpharlin Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.

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Photographer: Mike Mcpharlin Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.

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LEARNING HOW TO FLY

NDVSK23.

FROM TOKYO TO MILAN, citizens of the city are redefining the street transportation landscape with outlandish styles that would have any motorist jealous. I recently saw Dragonette play the one and only American date of their recent tour to a mid-sized yet fanatic crowd at NYC’s Canal Room. I took a friend who had never seen the band perform live before with me to the event, and we ended up drunkenly dancing and fist pumping to every chorus. When the show was over, my friend turned to me and said, “It’s so weird to hear music like that played in a club. It sounds like we should be in a huge arena or something.” He was totally right, for a minute there it felt like Dragonette’s furious pop hooks were emanating from the gigantic PA at Madison Square Garden, not the tiny speakers at the Canal Room. by Jacob Fabricius


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Photographer: Mike Mcpharlin Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.


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Photographer: Mike Mcpharlin Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.


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Photographer: Mike Mcpharlin Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.


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Photographer: Mike Mcpharlin Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.


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FROM TOKYO TO MILAN, citizens of the landscape with outlandish styles that woul


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city are redefining the street transportation ld have any motorist jealous. Lorem Ipsum.

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JANE SMITH

LOST IN SUBURBIA

A SHORT STORY ON LUST, BOREDOM AND PSYCHADELIC JOURNEYS.

I recently saw Dragonette play the one and only American date of their recent tour to a mid-sized yet fanatic crowd at NYC’s Canal Room. I took a friend who had never seen the band perform live before with me to the event, and we ended up drunkenly dancing and fist pumping to every chorus. When the show was over, my friend turned to me and said, “It’s so weird to hear music like that played in a club. It sounds like we should be in a huge arena or something.” He was totally right, for a minute there it felt like Dragonette’s furious pop hooks were emanating from the gigantic PA at Madison Square Garden, not the tiny speakers at the Canal Room. by Jacob Fabricius


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No reason to go back now, it’s hear to stay.

Per quanto avesse rischiato di morire durante le vacanze, Cheever tornò a Boston per il secondo semestre e la situazione non fece che peggiorare. Tristemente, raccontava agli amici che era un posto da “merda e lode”, e gli studenti erano delle “amebe”. Convinse Updike a far visita alle sue classi riunite per due ore di domande e risposte che Cheever interruppe bruscamente dopo meno di mezz’ora (lasciando a bocca aperta Updike), perché i suoi studenti, in soggezione per la situazione, non davano segni di vita. “Avete avuto l’occasione di fare delle domande a John Updike” gli disse in seguito con voce tremante dalla rabbia, “e nessuno ha aperto bocca, dannazione”. Dopo questo episodio sembrava davvero aver gettato la spugna. Faceva le cose di routine, più o meno, ma non si preoccupava più di nascondere la sua ubriachezza, o di insegnare davvero qualcosa. Aveva anche orari piuttosto flessibili. “Dobbiamo andare a cercarlo?”, cominciavano a chiedersi a bassa voce i suoi studenti quando passavano più di 15 minuti dall’inizio della lezione e lui non si era ancora fatto vivo. Mentre stavano organizzando una spedizione di salvataggio videro l’insegnante che arrancava in corridoio, passando oltre l’aula. “Mr. Cheever?”, lo chiamavano. “Mr. Cheeeeever?” Una voce elegante risuonava dall’altra parte del corridoio: “Sìììììì…?”. “Praticamente lo abbiamo convinto a tornare in classe”, ricorda uno degli studenti. “Lui è tornato con questo bel sorriso in faccia e si è messo a girare tra i banchi baciando le ragazze e stringendo la mano ai ragazzi”. Quel giorno andò relativamente bene. Ma sempre più spesso Cheever sembrava del tutto impreparato, e leggeva un suo vecchio racconto oppure stava seduto in silenzio finché i suoi studenti se ne andavano. Un giovane un giorno espresse il suo disappunto togliendosi la maglietta e montando sopra i banchi messi in circolo, guardandosi intorno mentre Cheever lo guardava in muto sbalordimento. L’ultimo mese a Boston trascorse in caduta libera. Un vecchio amico di nome Raphael Rudnik—che aveva sentito dello stato di prostrazione di Cheever e aveva timore che potesse suicidarsi—cercò di tirarlo su con una visita, ma lo trovò “inavvicinabile”. L’unica cosa cui Cheever era disposto a pensare o di cui voleva parlare era l’alcol. Quando Rudnik cercò di farlò mangiare, Cheever disse, “Se mangio poi possiamo andare a bere qualcosa?” Rudnik gli fece notare che era già prossimo allo svenimento. “Sì”, fece Cheever, “ma tu ancora no”. Forse uno degli ultimi impegni onorati da Cheever fu una cena da Sally Swope alla casa di suo padre in Louisburg Square. Arrivò con un’ora di ritardo sotto un diluvio, scivolò sugli scalini e sbattè la testa su una ringhiera; una domestica gli fasciò la ferita aperta, e Cheever infine si unì agli altri commensali. Da allora in poi rifiutò gli inviti e scoraggiò le visite. Nel frattempo, visto che si sentiva prossimo alla morte, pensò bene di dedicarsi anche agli altri piaceri della vita. Comprò una “rivista tutta cazzi” ma la trovò “a dir

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poco irragionevole” (anche se non si decideva mai a liberarsene), e portò almeno un prostituto nel suo appartamento, per poi “metterlo frettolosamente alla porta” una volta che aveva fatto il suo lavoro. In questo periodo si sedette vicino ad un barbone al parco e gli chiese “un sorso” dalla sua bottiglia, e cominciò a sperare di essere messo sotto da una macchina mentre camminava nel traffico. Quando il suo studente Rick Siggelkow passò a fargli una visita, Cheever insistette per dar al giovane, molto più alto di lui, un paio di completi scuri estivi di Brooks Brothers: “Ora hai due completi per andare ad un funerale d’estate”, commentò. (Siggelkow nota che questo era un commento “molto alla Cheever”: “Tutto quello che diceva alludeva sempre a qualcos’altro. In altre parole, non mi ha semplicemente dato due vestiti, mi ha dato due vestiti “per un funerale d’estate”, e da come l’ha detto potevi già vederti al funerale con il suo completo”.) Mentre i due bevevano insieme, Cheever cominciò a tossire senza respiro, e alla fine chiese a Siggelkow di chiamare un’ambulanza—per poi, testardamente, cambiare idea. “Ora devi andare via”, disse, chiudendo gli occhi e sedendosi rigido nella sua poltrona, “o succederà qualcosa di cui entrambi ci pentiremo”. Siggelkow protestò, ma Cheever gli domandò di uscire immediatamente, e quando il ragazzo alzò lo sguardo dalla tromba delle scale, Cheever ricambiò lo sguardo con un finto e mestissimo sorriso cordiale (“tipico dei suoi modi del New England”, secondo Siggelkow). Dietro le insistenze di suo fratello maggiore, Fred—che viveva nella vicina Plymouth e lo chiamava tutte le mattine per assicurarsi che fosse ancora vivo—Cheever si dimise dal suo incarico accademico alla fine di marzo, non prima comunque di aver definito il direttore del dipartimento uno “stronzo criminale”. Ce l’aveva con tutto e con tutti, e quando un tecnico passò dal suo appartamento per ritirare il telefono, Cheever lo strappò dalla parete e glielo tirò dietro. Con gli studenti comunque cercò solo di scusarsi: parlando con gli occhi bassi, fece capire che era stato trattato senza riguardo dall’università, ma del resto lui aveva problemi più gravi e non poteva più andare avanti; per le ultime sei settimane del semestre, gli disse, Updike si sarebbe occupato delle classi, e anche per loro sarebbe stato molto meglio così. Libero infine, Cheever passo gli ultimi giorni a Bay State Road nella solita maniera. La domenica prima di trasferirsi chiamò Ivan Gold: “Non mi sento un granché”, gli annunciò, chiedendogli se poteva offrirgli una bottiglia di gin. Gold aveva in casa una bottiglia quasi intera di Gordon, ed era anche disposto ad offrirgli una boccia di Noilly Prat: lui e Cheever non si erano mai avvicinati, e per Gold questa era la sospirata occasione di “parlare con un maestro”. Ma quando Cheever arrivò (i due vivevano ad una manciata di case di distanze, cosa che spiega la scelta di chiamarlo da parte di Cheever), non diede alcun segno di voler rimanere. Al figlio di tre anni di Gold Cheever sembrava una scimmia [monkey] e glielo ripetè diverse volte (Gold cercava di giustificarlo dicendo che voleva dire “marchese” [marquis], mentre lui fissava alternativamente il bambino e le bottiglie che Gold aveva in mano. “Cancellai il programma che mi ero fatto, e lo accompagnai alla porta”, ricorda Gold. “Dalla finestra lo vidi tornare al suo eremo buio, barcollando, stringendo a sé il bottino che si era appena procurato”. Fred cercò di contattarlo per telefono (senza sapere del distacco improvviso della linea), e si preoccupò vedendo che John non rispondeva. Si precipitò a Bay State Road, dove trovò suo fratello nudo e in stato confusionale. Lo fece vestire e lo portò in macchina fino alla casa di Ossining. Il giorno dopo Fred scrisse a suo figlio un resoconto piuttosto reticente dell’episodio, dicendo di essere “molto preoccupato”

per John: “È una persona davvero straordinaria, non è solo colto e intelligente, ma anche gentile e premuroso, sarebbe un grande dolore per tante, tante persone se gli succedesse qualcosa”. Fred era così preoccupato di salvare il fratello che non si curò di recuperare dall’appartamento né i suoi manoscritti, né tantomeno la dentiera di John e la sua tessera dell’Accademia delle Belle Arti, che furono poi ritrovate nell’armadio della sua camera da letto.

The greatest risk was the night running in the nude. who knows what could have happened...

“Dovevo essere piuttosto ubriaco e fuori controllo”, scrisse Cheever qualche settimana dopo, quando si rese conto che non si ricordava nulla del tragitto di ritorno a Ossining (durante il quale si era scolato una bottiglia di scotch e poi ci aveva urinato dentro), né del suo ricovero a Phelps, dove gli fu diagnostico un leggero danno cerebrale, oltre alla nota disfunzione cardiaca. Ancora una volta, di fronte al bivio tra la vita e la morte, Cheever dimostrò tutto sommato di preferire la vita— incurante di chi si aspettava che andasse fino in fondo e vivesse in prima persona il “mito di Orfeo”. Era solo in disaccordo con sua moglie e con i dottori sulla strada da seguire per curarsi. Il suo psichiatra gli organizzò un periodo alla Smithers Rehabilitation Unit nell’Upper East Side di Manhattan, 28 giorni di trattamenti intensivi senza poter uscire. Terrorizzato dalla prospettiva di essere incarcerato, Cheever chiamò sua figlia e le chiese di scoprire se questa clinica fosse in qualche modo connessa con la Alcolisti Anonimi, perché non aveva alcuna intenzione di avere a che fare con “un mucchio di chiesaroli”. Susan verificò, e alla Smithers negarono ogni affiliazione—mentendo, ma rispettando il criterio di anonimato della AA. Cheever in seguito ammise che quella bugia gli salvò la vita, ma, all’epoca, il suo atteggiamento era molto contraddittorio, e cercò addirittura di saltare giù dalla macchina in corsa quando Mary lo accompagnò alla Smithers il 9 Aprile. Considerato tutto quello che aveva passato si presentò alla reception in discreta forma; aveva un’aria piuttosto lucida e suoi segni vitali erano normali. Dopo che gli perquisirono la macchina da scrivere alla ricerca di alcol nascosto, gli fecero il test rapido d’intelligenza Shipler (in cui, come sempre, ottenne un punteggio molto alto), e la Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. Il colloquio introduttivo con gli esperti della clinica andò meno bene: la memoria di Cheever aveva evidentemente delle “falle”, visto che negava di aver mai avuto momenti di vuoto, delirium tremens, o di essere mai stato in terapia (salvo qualche “consulenza matrimoniale” circa cinque anni prima), anche se la sua cartella clinica lo contraddiceva su tutti i fronti, per non parlare del fatto che il paziente sosteneva che “tutti i suoi problemi erano cominciati con il suicidio di una cara amica [la Sexton!] l’anno precedente”. Malgrado continuasse a “minimizzare”, per il resto, si mostrava disposto a collaborare, stabilendo buoni (per quanto molto riservati) rapporti con il personale e gli altri pazienti. “Una delusione; non va così male, ma neanche così bene”, scrisse nel suo diario il secondo giorno. “A colazione mi chiedono di non sedermi ad un certo tavolo. ‘Non stiamo giocando al gioco della sedia’, mi ha detto una donna sui quaranta, un po’ in carne”. Ma non aveva certo molto tempo da dedicare ai rapporti sociali. Tra un pasto e l’altro (“carne, riso e gelatina di frutta”), lo portavano da un seminario ad una sessione di terapia di gruppo ad un incontro individuale con uno dei membri dello staff, non particolarmente simpatici, e la maggior parte del tempo doveva ascoltare i saggi consigli dei fondatori della AA, “Bill W.”, e “Dr. Bob”. Come scrisse ad un amico, “L’indottrinamento qui è severo, evangelico, protestante, e senza pause”. L’obiettivo principale di un programma di recupero di quel tipo è di fare breccia nel rifiuto del paziente, e Cheever si rivelò un


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paziente molto difficile, appunto perché sembrava così docile, almeno inizialmente. Se gli chiedevano come andava l’appetito (odiava il cibo), lui rispondeva “Benissimo”. Dorme bene? “Benissimo”. Lei è un alcolizzato? “Sì”. Ma in realtà non pensava di avere granchè in comune con gli altri “disgraziati” pazienti, con cui era stato messo insieme da un sistema troppo democratico. “Divido la camera e il bagno con quattro altri uomini”, scrisse. “1. Un fallito ex carcerato, 2. Un fallito tedesco che aveva un negozio di alimentari, 3. Un marinaio impresentabile con la faccia da troll e vari tattuaggi (sic) stinti e 4. Un primo ballerino dell’American Ballet”. Più che altro, l’atteggiamento di Cheever rimaneva distaccato e vagamente ironico. Un dottore che si era commosso durante un incontro di gruppo, notò il rapido sguardo divertito negli occhi di Cheever. Questo non vuol dire che desse sempre giudizi sprezzanti o che non fosse assolutamente cauto nei comportamenti; teneva per sé le sue idee e faceva del suo meglio per tenersi fuori dai guai, visto che considerava Smithers un luogo violento, dove la sua vulnerabilità sarebbe stata facilmente punita. “Dopo una sessione di analisi di gruppo un giovane ha parlato apertamente della sua bisessualità e tutti nel gruppo tranne me lo hanno definito un falso”, scrisse nel suo diario. “Forse avrei dovuto dire apertamente che se è da falsi preoccuparsi della propria bisessualità io mi devo dichiarare falso”. Anni dopo Cheever ancora si lamentava che il personale era stato “crudele” con questo giovane bisessuale, arrivando, infine, a cacciarlo dal programma. Il fatto che la direttrice della Smithers, LeClaire Bissell, fosse una lesbica dichiarata, suggerisce che probabilmente Cheever aveva fatto finta di non capire il punto—e cioè che non consentivano al paziente di usare i problemi sessuali come scusa per bere. “La direttrice”, scrisse, “verso la quale nutro sensazioni contrastanti, dice che una persona sana è in grado di adeguarsi a norme sociali ragionevoli. La banalità di un programma televisivo, per me del tutto irragionevole, è quello che mi fa venire voglia di bere”. Questo tipo di atteggiamento (è colpa del mondo e della sua mortale banalità, soprattutto per chi ha una sensibilità superiore come me etc. etc.) incoraggiò lo staff a insistere, dopo una settimana o poco più, che Cheever smettesse di scrivere il suo diario e cominciasse a concentrarsi sui Dodici Passi. Come risposta scrisse una lettera rassegnata al fratello Fred: “Non vogliono che lavori, e mi sembra più opportuno assecondarli in questo e in tutto il resto” E Cheever li assecondò, o credette di farlo, ma la situazione peggiorò. Fu attaccato senza pietà per le sue pose. Per esempio, da tempo aveva sviluppato la tendenza a fare lunghe pause con uno sguardo affaticato, come se non riuscisse a trovare le parole, e stesse raccogliendo le forze, prima di uscirsene con qualche frase falsamente gentile; notando quest’abitudine, uno dei terapisti gli disse che sembrava “sul punto di fare un rutto”, e “sembra avere un altissimo concetto di se stesso”. Per quanto riguarda la sua fama letteraria (“continua a ripetere che i suoi romanzi hanno avuto grande successo”), solo poche persone alla Smithers avrebbero saputo distinguere Cheever dagli altri alcolisti, e comunque non importava a nessuno. Lui se ne rese conto—anche se naturalmente sperava di essere associato ai suoi successi—e fece avere “quasi di nascosto” un libro autografato alla sua terapista personale, Ruth Maxwell, che subito lo riportò al problema dell’alcol. Cheever rispose alle domande con l’aria di chi è costretto a chiacchierare con un ospite noiosissimo ad una cena— come se si annoiasse a morte a parlare delle solite cose ma fosse disposto a farlo per educazione. “Io sto davvero bene, ma non posso dirlo perché qui solo i casi senza speranza dicono di stare bene”, scrisse ad un amico. “Ma questo è un punto di vista che mi si sconsiglia di assumere, perché

mi sono già rovinato la vita con la falsa giovialità”. Cheever era ironico, ovviamente, eppure anche i suoi amici spesso si erano chiesti il motivo della sua costante e nervosa “risatina tremante” (come la definì Shirley Hazzard), spesso nei momenti più strani; alla Smithers nessuno nascondeva il proprio disappunto. “Ma perché ridi?”, gli chiedevano tutte le volte che Cheever ridacchiava tremolante, rievocando qualche dettaglio terribilmente triste della sua infanzia, o qualche crudeltà cui aveva sottoposto i figli. Tormentato ogni momento per la sua “falsa allegria” e per la sua “megalomania”, Cheever si ritirò dietro una completa e falsissima umiltà. “Oh certo, hai ragione”, mormorava (dilungandosi), quando qualcuno lo criticava. Nessuno ci cascava, né lo trovava divertente. Carol Kitman, una psicologa della clinica, notò che Cheever le ricordava Uriah Heep: “È il tipico negazionista, che cerca sempre di sfuggire all’attenzione”, scrisse nei suoi appunti sul caso. “Non ama vedersi in cattiva luce e sembra aver fatto sue le maniere autoritarie dell’alta società di Boston, un atteggiamento su cui sembra ironizzare ma che, al tempo stesso, mette in pratica… è necessario obbligarlo a fare i conti con la propria umanità.” Quando gli dissero che sembrava John Berryman, Cheever (“umilmente”) rispose, “Ma lui era un grande poeta ed un ottimo studioso, e io non sono nessuno dei due”. “Sì,” rispose il terapeuta, “ma era anche un falso e un ubriacone: è questo che vuole diventare?” Cheever mostrava di prenderla sportivamente, ma erano umiliazioni cocenti. “Non posso, cara”, diceva, in italiano, a sua figlia, piangendo al telefono durante l’unica chiamata giornaliera che gli veniva concessa, da un telefono a gettoni. “Non posso stare qui”. Sembrava così distrutto che Susan si preoccupò davvero che non ce la facesse, e cominciò a parcheggiare la sua auto proprio fuori dalla sede di Newsweek, così che potesse lasciare subito il lavoro e andarlo a prendere di corsa e portarlo al più mite centro di Silver Hill in Connecticut, dove aveva prenotato un posto, per sicurezza. “Quindici pazienti sono scappati da quando mi sono unito alla festa”, Cheever raccontava ad un amico il 21 aprile. “Qui in Siberia la situazione è piuttosto triste”.

No way was I going back, I didn’t care how much money they were going to give me...

Ma Cheever tenne duro, e lentamente cominciò a fare progressi. Un atteggiamento più tollerante verso gli altri pazienti lo aiutò. All’inizio era disgustato dai “relitti umani” con cui doveva convivere: si rubavano oggetti a vicenda; si rifiutavano di pulire i peli pubici dalla vasca. Incapace di nascondere il suo disgusto, Cheever stesso cominciò ad essere odiato da tutti; quando arrivava il suo turno di servire ai tavoli, era così nervoso al pensiero di non farcela che una volta versò un piatto di piselli in grembo ad una donna. Quando in terapia di gruppo gli fecero notare di essere distaccato e snob, Cheever infine crollò e assicurò a tutti che stava prendendo la cosa “molto sul serio”. Quando venne a fargli visita la famiglia di domenica, Cheever sembrava quasi in armonia con l’ambiente. “L’alcolismo sembra un problema delle classi inferiori”, notò Mary osservando la sala da pranzo, ma lo sguardo di Cheever era pieno di simpatia e calore. “Mi è sempre piaciuto farmela con gente che mia madre avrebbe odiato”, raccontò in seguito, “e alla Smithers mi sentivo così”. Verso la metà della sua permanenza, “un nero zoppo che lavora sempre a maglia” fu trasferito nella sua camera e cominciò a comportarsi esattamente come Cheever due settimane prima: “Dice che se fosse forte abbastanza da sollevare la sua valigia se ne andrebbe subito. Mi sono offerto di portare io la sua valigia ma non mi ha risposto”. Verso la fine era proprio l’idea di andarsene che a volte preoccupava Cheever. “A volte chiamo Mary, e lei si lamenta di tutto”, scrisse a William Maxwell. “La banca è in rosso, i cani (4) sono sporchi, il prato

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è secco, Susie è andata a Chicago con un uomo che non vale niente, e ovviamente suo marito è in una clinica di disintossicazione sulla 93esima est”. Nel suo diario scrisse un resoconto più cupo della conversazione (Mary era “di pessimo umore”, più che altro perché lui aveva perso i suoi documenti bancari—li aveva lasciati a Boston—e con il tempo era andato sotto di 2.000 dollari): “Questo è il genere di cosa che mi fa bere”, concludeva. “Mi fa temere il ritorno a casa”. Il personale alla Smithers era altrettanto spaventato per lui. Quando Mary non si presentò ad un incontro che avevano concordato, uno dei terapeuti la chiamò; con gelida freddezza lei gli spiegò che non c’era molto di nuovo che loro potessero dirle sull’uomo con cui viveva da 35 anni—ma che non si preoccupassero, non aveva alcuna intenzione di lasciarlo (“È un povero vecchio, ha bisogno di cure”). “Aveva un modo di fare passivo-aggressivo”, notò il terapeuta, “e sembrava aver perso ogni speranza sul marito, lo considerava solo qualcuno di cui occuparsi prima che morisse”. Quando gli dissero del suo atteggiamento, Cheever non si mostrò sorpreso, e, con un po’ di autocommiserazione, commentò che era sempre stato lui quello che “dava”, nella coppia verde. Quando Cheever fu dimesso il 7 maggio la prognosi era “controllata” (“Il nostro referto unanime è che il paziente è così preso da se stesso che non ha spazio per nient’altro”). Ruth Maxwell era scoppiata a ridere quando Cheever le aveva annunciato di punto in bianco che non avrebbe bevuto mai più, ma il dott. Robert de Veer era convinto che Cheever avesse infine accettato di essere un alcolizzato e dunque non avesse più scuse per bere—che fossero il matrimonio in crisi o la banalità della televisione. Uno degli studenti di Cheever, a Boston, che era stato particolarmente scettico sulla possibilità che un alcolizzato cronico come lui potesse mai ripulirsi davvero, un giorno ricevette una cartolina dal suo vecchio insegnante, con un laconico messaggio: “Visto?”preoccupato di salvare il fratello che non si curò di recuperare dall’appartamento né i suoi manoscritti, né tantomeno la dentiera di John e la sua tessera dell’Accademia delle Belle Arti, che furono poi ritrovate nell’armadio della sua camera da letto.

“Dovevo essere piuttosto ubriaco e fuori controllo”, scrisse Cheever qualche settimana dopo, quando si rese conto che non si ricordava nulla del tragitto di ritorno a Ossining (durante il quale si era scolato una bottiglia di scotch e poi ci aveva urinato dentro), né del suo ricovero a Phelps, dove gli fu diagnostico un leggero danno cerebrale, oltre alla nota disfunzione cardiaca. Ancora una volta, di fronte al bivio tra la vita e la morte, Cheever dimostrò tutto sommato di preferire la vita— incurante di chi si aspettava che andasse fino in fondo e vivesse in prima persona il “mito di Orfeo”. Era solo in disaccordo con sua moglie e con i dottori sulla strada da seguire per curarsi. Il suo psichiatra gli organizzò un periodo alla Smithers Rehabilitation Unit nell’Upper East Side di Manhattan, 28 giorni di trattamenti intensivi senza poter uscire. Terrorizzato dalla prospettiva di essere incarcerato, Cheever chiamò sua figlia e le chiese di scoprire se questa clinica fosse in qualche modo connessa con la Alcolisti Anonimi, perché non aveva alcuna intenzione di avere a che fare con “un mucchio di chiesaroli”. Susan verificò, e alla Smithers negarono ogni affiliazione—mentendo, ma rispettando il criterio di anonimato della AA. Cheever in seguito ammise che quella bugia gli salvò la vita, ma, all’epoca, il suo atteggiamento era molto contraddittorio, e cercò addirittura di saltare giù dalla macchina in corsa quando Mary lo accompagnò alla Smithers il 9 Aprile. More info at www.info.org. Flying disasters.


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AM 2 PRESENTS

CENTRE FOLD

WHEN ALL ELSE FAILS, TRY SLEEPING. Situated in the heart of Camonica Valley, in the natural parks of Adamello and Stelvio, Hotel Mirella offers tailored holidays all year around. An occasion to jump into nature, relax and culture, all this with a high level hotel service. Publis, qui se effre in nors labem auctussim antes norsules? Gerica molto unc by Jacob Fabricius


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NEVER TIRING OF FLIPPING OVER AND OVER AND OVER AND OVER AND OVER...

The tradition of hospitality, care about details, the excellent cuisine and the hotel infrastructure with every confort make the hotel in the heart of Ponte di Legno the right place for your well being. A professional management and kind staff, will take care of your stay in the mountains, in a moment to remember and a place where to come back. Tastefully furnished rooms, most with panoramic balconies, guarantee that you will have a quiet and very private stay.

Each of our rooms, have a direct telephone line, safe and TV. Should you wish a Wi Fi connection, cards may be purchased at reception. We offer rooms to accommodate couples and families creating a home-like ambiance. The qualified staff ensures that your room will be well kept and that you will have a good rest. Hotel Mirella has a fine restaurant, where a prestigious chef proposes dishes interesting dishes with harmonious matching between local recipies and more international once. The menu, that has many dishes, is taken care by the hotel’s management that proposes dishes day by day. You can taste various flavours from the region presented with art and creativity, that make the restaurant became, a exclusive pleasure for your taste. The wines from of a wide selection in our cellar, will make your meals unforgettable. During your holiday our wellness services are available. Hotel Mirella has a indoor natural lighted swimming pool, other services such as sauna, where you can spoil yourself. The Hotel has two tennis course, where a qualified tennis teacher gives lessons.

Restaurant facilities, a well prepared bar, a disco and a TV room complete the offer to let yourself take fine moments, while having a nice drink in front of the fire place. Hotel Mirella Congress Centre has appropriate facilities for conventions or small meetings. Updated multimedia tools guarantee any type of communication: audio – video system simultaneous translation, press room, video conference. In the meeting rooms there can be exposition spaces. The capacity of the meeting rooms is from 35 spaces in the ”Sala Bleis” up to 300 spaces in the “Sala Paradiso”, for a total of 500 seats on a surface of 600 square meters. Hotel Mirella can also support in organizing, numerous sport and cultural activities, from snow mobile tours, ski races to sleddog. A professional management and kind staff, will take care of your stay in the mountains, in a moment to remember and a place where to come back.

More info at www.info.org. Flying disasters.

Right: Indoor delights: Los Angeles based photographer illustrator, sculptor, housewife and singer portrays the brilliance of living within the walls of confinement, part of editorial, see page 205.


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WHEN THE SUN GOES AWAY

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The first thing that drew me to Friendly Fires was their cover of Frankie Knuckles’ disco classic “Your Love”, which may or may not have been an intentional way to make nice with the new rave kids. My friend did a search on myspace for all the bands that covered that song and FF’s was one of our favorites.

I met the band for the first time at the ’SUP UK launch party last fall. It was their first-ever London show, which they also headlined. That night, Friendly Fires brought extra sound, lights, and their own smoke machine (as well as a banner that didn’t get put up) for added effect. The gig was packed. Everyone was dancing, the girls loved it, and the industry types who stuck around to see them almost all stayed until the end.

Friendly Fires make danceable pop music with sound effects, lyrical harmonies, keyboards and fist-pumping beats, but they’re not waving glowsticks around aimlessly.

Lolo did an interview for ’SUP that involved a cut-and-paste exercise at the Old Blue Last. We followed that up with this.I recently saw Dragonette play the one and only American date of their recent tour to a mid-sized yet fanatic crowd at NYC’s Canal Room. played in a club. It sounds like we should be in a huge arena or something.”

Fires brought extra sound, lights, and their own smoke machine (as well as a banner that didn’t get put up) for added effect. The gig was packed. Everyone was dancing, the girls loved it, and the industry types who stuck around to see them almost all stayed until the end.


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The first thing that drew me to Friendly Fires was their cover of Frankie Knuckles’ disco classic “Your Love”, which may or may not have been an intentional way to make nice with the new rave kids. My friend did a search on myspace for all the bands that covered that song and FF’s was one of our favorites.

I met the band for the first time at the ’SUP UK launch party last fall. It was their first-ever London show, which they also headlined. That night, Friendly Fires brought extra sound, lights, and their own smoke machine (as well as a banner that didn’t get put up) for added effect. The gig was packed. Everyone was dancing, the girls loved it, and the industry types who stuck around to see them almost all stayed until the end.

Friendly Fires make danceable pop music with sound effects, lyrical harmonies, keyboards and fist-pumping beats, but they’re not waving glowsticks around aimlessly.

Lolo did an interview for ’SUP that involved a cut-and-paste exercise at the Old Blue Last. We followed that up with this.I recently saw Dragonette play the one and only American date of their recent tour to a mid-sized yet fanatic crowd at NYC’s Canal Room. played in a club. It sounds like we should be in a huge arena or something.”

Fires brought extra sound, lights, and their own smoke machine (as well as a banner that didn’t get put up) for added effect. The gig was packed. Everyone was dancing, the girls loved it, and the industry types who stuck around to see them almost all stayed until the end.


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STOCKLIST

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Stocklist ° New York city OPENING CEREMONY ST. MARK BOOK STORE MCNALLY ROBINSON BOOKS A & P ENTERPRISES AROUND THE WORLD ATLANTIC NEWS B J MAGAZINES BROADWAY NEWS & MAGAZINE CHOICE NEWS EAST VILLAGE NEWS ETC NEWS GLOBAL NEWS INC / CAS INKONOVA INTERNATIONAL NEWS J & P LOBBYSTAND KHWAJA NEWS LAFAYETTE SMOKE SHOP LISHAM NEWS MAGAZINE PLUS NILESH MAGAZINE OXFORD NEWS & SMOKE PAPERSMITH @ 48 INC PARSLEY SAGE INC SAVOY NEWS SHAMI SMOKE & MAGAZINE SHRIKRUSHNA INC SILVERBUCKS INC SKYWAY MINI MART UNION PARK SULEMAN UNIVERSAL NEWS - 23RD ST UNIVERSAL NEWS - 35TH ST UNIVERSAL NEWS 14TH ST UNIVERSAL NEWS 8TH AV UNIVERSAL NEWS 42ND ST UNIVERSAL NEWS 56 ST UNIVERSAL NEWS SOHO USA SWEET & SOUR VILLAGE MAGAZINE & SMOKE 1ST CHOICE NEWS INC 7TH AVENUE CONVENIENCE 7TH AVENUE INC DBA IQB 8TH AVENUE GIFT SHOP 8TH AVENUE TOBACCO

london AFREEN ENTERINC JESSIE CONVENIENCES OFF-CITY CONV.INC DEKALB CONV STORE SAHIL IMPEX INC SPOONBILL BOOKS

Sydney AFREEN ENTERPRISES JESSIE CONVENIENCES OFF-CITY CONV.INC DEKALB CONV STORE SAHIL IMPEX INC SPOONBILL BOOKS

LOS ANGELES Opening celemony CIRCUS OF BOOKS 1 CIRCUS OF BOOKS 2 SKYLIGHT BOOKS

SAN FRANCISCO BOOKS INC JUICY NEWS SMOKE SIGNALS

TOKYO *7


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THOUGHTS

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THOUGHTS

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THOUGHTS ° THIS IS A MAGAZINE DESIGNED FOR THE CLASS OF PUBLISHING, 2008, UNDER THE GUIDANCE OF MARINA BONANI, AT THE ISTITUTO EUROPEO DI DESIGN

° DESIGNED BY PAUL PJ CHENG, 2008


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Longitude  

Longitude Magazine

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