PATRON's 2022 October | November Issue

Page 72

RASHID JOHNSON TWO x TWO 2022 ARTIST HONOREE Plus, Matthew Wong, Richard Prince, Sybille Szaggars Redford KATHARINA GROSSE, WUNDERBLOCK 2013, NANCY A. NASHER AND DAVID J. HAEMISEGGER COLLECTION.
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EDITOR’S NOTE

November 2022

During this all-inclusive season, visual art punctuates the months of October and November in its many surprising forms. Working within a wide range of media—sculpture, film, painting, drawing, and installation—Rashid Johnson is this year’s TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art amfAR Honored Artist. He is among the pantheon of artists who commit not only to their own practice but also foster the work of today’s emerging artists. Johnson’s Seascape “Jitter Bug” enhances our cover, a painting donated to TWO x TWO to raise funds for amfAR and the Dallas Museum of Art. Anna Katherine Brodbeck, DMA’s Hoffman Family Senior Curator of Contemporary Art, caught up with the remarkable artist in Rashid Johnson’s Space of Sovereignty and of Contemplation

Art star Matthew Wong’s meteoric rise was cut short by a tragic, untimely death that sent shock waves through the art community. Lucky to have met him during his prolific six years of painting in earnest, I too was struck by his quiet spirit and talent that runneth over, that combined influences from artists and art movements he admired. Matthew Wong: The Realm of Appearances, curated by Vivian Li, the Lupe Murchison Curator of Contemporary Art, opens at the DMA this month. Read about his life and work in Fallen Star Burns Bright by Nancy Cohen Israel.

The fascinating Richard Prince, a pioneer of appropriation art, is the subject of a new show opening at The Karpidas Collection this month, organized by Sara Hignite. Eve Hill-Agnus describes the work of the enfant terrible in Picture Show, which will include an exhibition catalogue edited by Hignite and featuring esteemed art contributors.

TERRI PROVENCAL

Publisher / Editor in Chief terri@patronmagazine.com

Instagram terri_provencal and patronmag

Black Abstraction: From Then ‘til Now, curated by Dexter Wimberly, brings together a cadre of works by major art figures and midcareer artists, reframing the history of abstraction. The show opens this month at the Green Family Art Foundation’s new space in the Dallas Arts District; Darryl Ratcliff offers insight in A Visual History in Color

The Kimbell Art Museum marks its 50th Anniversary with an exhibition that takes us back to the time of Murillo and the secular subjects he painted with the same signature soft-focus, predilection for realism, and delicate hand with which he treated his religious subjects. Brian Allen takes us through Murillo: From Heaven to Earth in The Extraordinary Ordinary.

Moving from exhibitions to the stage, Trammell Crow of EarthxFilm and Michael Cain president of M3 Films joined forces to bring Sibylle Szaggars Redford’s The Way of the Rain—Hope for Earth to Dallas Symphony this month. It’s a multimedia performance with spoken word by Robert Redford. Lee Cullum describes the collaborative work in Sibylle Szaggars Redford’s Conservation Cry.

Gabrielle Goliath’s Chorus, a two-channel video installation, addresses an unspeakable event through voices in union on view at Dallas Contemporary. The lament, in the form of a hum, gives permanence to the lost life of a young college student, Uyinene Mrwetyana, but also includes a roll call of other victims of violence within these communities in South Africa. Curated by Emily Edwards, the work of this South African artist, who dedicates her life work to reverence, beauty, and ritual, will be the subject of discourse regarding violence against women, children, and LGBTIQ persons.

Also in this issue, Chris Byrne visits with curator Phillip E. Collins regarding Fire! The Resurrection of Mr. Imagination, on view at the African American Museum in Fair Park. Steve Carter’s In Glorious Black and White accentuates the sumi ink work of Dallas-based artist Nishiki Sugawara-Beda. Brandon Kennedy plumbs the work of Matthew Ronay in Amorphus Body Study Center, and tells of Gavin Morrison’s work with Atopia Projects in The Curse of Exile Within the Limits of a Particular Landscape : And Charlie Adamski Caulkins highlights her picks from TWO x TWO in Auction

Speaking With Light : Contemporary Indigenous Photography at the Amon Carter brings together the intentionality of Indigenous artists determined to reclaim their identity and conversation. We admire art that speaks loudly. Enjoy the issue.

Portrait Tim Boole, Styling Jeanna Doyle, Stanley Korshak
12 PATRONMAGAZINE.COM
– Terri Provencal
October /
Akris Highland Park Village | www.akris.com

CONTENTS 1

FEATURES

78 RASHID JOHNSON’S SPACE OF SOVEREIGNTY AND OF CONTEMPLATION

The TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art 2022 Artist Honoree speaks of cultivating a body of work.

Interview by Anna Katherine Brodbeck

86 FALLEN STAR BURNS BRIGHT

Dallas Museum of Art presents the first museum retrospective of Matthew Wong’s work.

92 PICTURE SHOW

The Karpidas Collection investigates the enfant terrible of appropriation in an unprecedented show.

98 A VISUAL HISTORY LESSON IN COLOR

Japan-based curator Dexter Wimberly brings Black Abstractionists: From Then ‘til Now to life. By Darryl Ratcliff

102 THE EXTRAORDINARY ORDINARY

Kimbell at 50 opens with Murillo’s masterful renderings of secular subjects.

By Brian Allen

108 SIBYLLE SZAGGARS REDFORD’S CONSERVATION CRY

The multidisciplinary artist brings The Way of the Rain—Hope for Earth to the Dallas Symphony.

By Lee Cullum.

112 SEEING DOUBLE

Overemphasizing the great looks of the season.

Photography by Mindy Byrd; Creative Direction by Elaine Raffel

On the cover: Rashid Johnson, Seascape “Jitter Bug, ” 2022, oil on linen, 72 in x 96.12 in x 1.68 in. Photograph by Stephanie Powell.

14 PATRONMAGAZINE.COM 92 98 78
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TALLER MARMO
HOUSTONDALLASATLANTATOOTSIES.COM

CONTENTS 2

68

74

DEPARTMENTS

12 Editor’s Note

20 Contributors

40 Noted

Auction

58 BIDDING THAT COUNTS

The TWO x TWO auction is legendary. By Charlie Adamski Caulkins.

Fair Trade

60 IT’S ALL IN WITH FRIENDS INDEED

The San Francisco gallery forges Dallas friendships. By Adam Green.

Openings

62 A TRIBUTE TO A LEGENDARY COWGIRL The Modern underscores Anne W. Marion’s contributions.

64 DOUBLE TAKE

Meadows Museum spotlights Vermeer’s influence on Dalí.

By Nancy Cohen Israel

Contemporaries

66 AMORPHOUS BODY STUDY CENTER

The Nasher exhibits Matthew Ronay’s largest sculpture to date. By Brandon Kennedy

68 VOICES IN UNION Chorus, Gabrielle Goliath’s elegy, makes its US debut. By Terri Provencal

70 BY ANY STRETCH OF THE IMAGINATION Fire! The Resurrection of Mr. Imagination. By Chris Byrne

72 SPEND MONEY. SAVE LIVES. Monies raised during TWO x TWO benefit AIDS research through amfAR. Interview by Andrew McInness

Studio

74 IN GLORIOUS BLACK AND WHITE Nishiki Sugawara-Beda’s utilizes ancient materials. By Steve Carter

Volumes

76 THE CURSE OF EXILE WITHIN THE LIMITS OF A LANDSCAPE Gavin Morrison’s Bound Curation. By Brandon Kennedy

Atelier

120 A POWERFUL FORCE Eve & Max is an art-driven fashion label. Interview by Terri Provencal

Morsel

122 PALETTE PLEASERS

TWO x TWO Gala keeps culinary traditions current. By Diana Spechler

There 124 CAMERAS COVERING CULTURAL EVENTS

Furthermore 128 THE CONVERSATION RECLAIMED

Speaking With Light displays work of Indigenous artists at the Carter.

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October 16

Hailed as one of the most talented painters of his generation, Matthew Wong achieved critical acclaim for his spectacular landscape paintings during his short career, spanning just over six years. Featuring approximately 50 works, this exhibition offers the first comprehensive account of how Wong adeptly synthesized many modern inspirations—from the Fauvists to Qing period ink painters—to create a visual language uniquely his own.

Matthew Wong, Once Upon a Time in the West (detail), 2018. Gouache on paper. Collection of Martin Eisenberg. 2022 Matthew Wong Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Matthew Wong: The Realm of Appearances is organized by the Dallas Museum of Art. The Dallas Museum of Art is supported, in part, by the generosity of DMA Members and donors, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Texas Commission on the Arts, and the citizens of Dallas through the City of Dallas Office of Arts and Culture.
Opens
©
EXHIBITION SUPPORT MAJOR SUPPORT E. RHODES AND LEONA B. CARPENTER FOUNDATION ADDITIONAL SUPPORT ROBOT FAMILY FOUNDATION LOCAL SUPPORT
Learn more at dma.org.

© 2022 Sotheby’s International Realty. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty ® is a registered trademark and used with permission. Each Sotheby’s International Realty offi ce is independently owned and operated, except those operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. The Sotheby’s International Realty network fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. All images are a combination of photography and artist renderings. The artist representations and interior decorations, fi nishes, appliances and furnishings are provided for illustrative purposes only. Prices and features are subject to change.

SANTIAGO MONTOYA

Contemporary Colombian artist Santiago Montoya embraces the aesthetics of nontraditional materials to explore meaning, resulting in collections where appearance and concept bear equal weight. Montoya builds cohesive works of art from individual pieces of cross-cultural history in the unifying form of currency. His work has been exhibited in museums, galleries, and private collections worldwide for over twenty years.

Santiago Montoya, "Wall of Lamentations XII", Paper money mounted on stainless steel with acrylic frame 42.5 in. x 63 in. DALLAS | MIAMI | LAGUNA NIGUEL 1700 OAK LAWN AVE, #200 | DALLAS@MARKOWICZFINEART.COM | 214.200.3288

CONTRIBUTORS

ANNA KATHERINE

BRODBECK is the Dallas Museum of Art’s Hoffman Family Senior Curator of Contemporary Art. Previously, she served at Carnegie Museum of Art as associate curator for a retrospective of Brazilian artist Hélio Oiticica co-organized with the Art Institute of Chicago and the Whitney Museum of American Art. For the DMA she curated For a Dreamer of Houses, Jonas Wood, and America Will Be!: Surveying the Contemporary Landscape. In Patron she interviewed TWO x TWO Artist Honoree Rashid Johnson.

STEVE CARTER is an arts writer and ongoing Patron contributor who had the pleasure of visiting with Nishiki Sugawara-Beda, a Dallas-based Japanese American artist who’s been exploring and expanding the possibilities of sumi ink painting for a decade or more. “I learned a lot, first at Cris Worley Fine Arts, where her first Dallas show was about to wrap up, and then at Nishiki’s studio,” Carter says. “I was absolutely beguiled by her work— amazing, inviting, and intriguing.”

LAUREN CHRISTENSEN has over two decades of experience in advertising and marketing. As a principal with L+S Creative Group, she consults with a wide variety of nonprofit organizations and businesses in many sectors, including retail, real estate, and hospitality. Lauren is a Dallas native and a graduate of SMU with a BA in advertising. Her clean, contemporary design aesthetic and generous spirit make Lauren the perfect choice to art direct Patron

NANCY COHEN ISRAEL is Dallas-based writer, art historian, and an educator at the Meadows Museum. In addition to her contributions to Patron, she recently contributed to side by side: James Surls and George Tobolowsky. With her own background in Dutch 17th-century painting, Nancy looks forward to the Meadows’ opening of Dalí/Vermeer: A Dialogue, which she wrote about for the current issue. She also enjoyed writing about the upcoming DMA exhibition, Matthew Wong: The Realm of Appearances

LEE CULLUM is a Dallas journalist who has worked in radio, television, newspapers, and magazines. She was a regular commentator on what is now called the PBS NewsHour as well as All Things Considered on NPR, and, more recently, has interviewed CEOs for the public TV affiliate in DallasFort Worth. For the current issue she talked with Sybille Szaggars Redford about her upcoming piece The Way of the Rain Hope for Earth with the Dallas Symphony Orchestra and spoken word by Robert Redford.

DARRYL RATCLIFF is an award-winning artist and poet with a writing and curatorial practice based in Dallas whose work engages communities and mobilizes social issues. Darryl builds complex, collaborative, durational cultural projects that help tell true community narratives, promote civic engagement, and increase community health. He is a Yerba Buena Center for the Arts 10 Fellow working on prototypes addressing climate change and racial equity and the founder of Gossypion Investments.

BRIAN ALLEN is an art critic who was the director of the museum division of the New York Historical Society and the Addison Gallery of American Art, and the curator of American art at the Clark Art Institute. Though a specialist in American 19thcentury art, he’s done exhibitions on Old Master prints, English silver, the Vienna Secession movement, late 19th-century French art, and the work of living artists. He lives in Arlington, Vermont, where he’s deeply involved in small-town doings.

MINDY BYRD is a Dallas-based multidisciplinary artist focusing on photography and collage. She combines her two creative worlds in the form of handmade cutout patterns and shapes paired with her original photographs for dynamic finished pieces. Her love of bold color, texture, and shape has been the driving force behind her collage work, which she’s explored with clients internationally. Seeing Double shows off her mixed-media talents to highlight the modern looks of the season.

CHRIS BYRNE authored the graphic novel The Magician (Marquand Books, 2013), included in the Library of Congress. He curated Peter Saul: 50 Years of Painting , named one of 2010’s top five shows by the Village Voice, and he organized Susan Te Kahurangi King’s US exhibition, selected by Jerry Saltz for New York magazine’s The 19 Best Art Shows of 2014 Byrne chaired AVAM, the national museum for visionary art. He founded the Elaine de Kooning House and Studio in East Hampton, listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

EVE HILL-AGNUS is a writer, editor, and translator. She has roots in France and California and has been a teacher of literature and journalism; an awardwinning dining critic in Dallas who covered dining, art, and dance; and a freelance art writer and editor of nonfiction, fiction, and poetry. Her joy recently has been translation, whether the translation of one language to another or of art into words. In Picture Show, Eve explores the complexities of The Karpidas Collection’s Richard Prince show.

BRANDON KENNEDY is an occasional artist, book scout/collector, and freelance curator and writer currently based in Dallas, Texas. Kennedy also serves as the Texas Regional Representative for Bonhams auction house. He occasionally contributes to Fine Books & Collections magazine and regularly writes for these pages. For this issue, Kennedy delves into the current projects of curator/ writer Gavin Morrison and engages Matthew Ronay in an interview ahead of his exhibition at the Nasher Sculpture Center.

ELAINE RAFFEL is a Dallas-based creative director and stylist. For this issue, she instigated a collage fashion fantasy, turning again to artist and photographer Mindy Byrd and hair and makeup genius Michael Thomas, with assistance from the always-gracious Kendel Bolton. Showing off Elaine’s fashion prowess and years as a creative working for Stanley Korshak, Neiman Marcus, and Mary Kay, Seeing Double hits all the high notes of the season with headto-toe looks to wear for every art occasion.

John Sutton Photography
20 PATRONMAGAZINE.COM
SAKS IS PROUD TO BE THE PRESENTING SPONSOR OF TWO X TWO FOR AIDS AND ART Valentino

PUBLISHER | EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Terri Provencal terri@patronmagazine.com

ART DIRECTION

Lauren Christensen

DIGITAL MANAGER/PUBLISHING COORDINATOR

Anthony Falcon

COPY EDITOR

Sophia Dembling

PRODUCTION Michele Rodriguez

EDITORIAL INTERN Victoria Gomez

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Brian Allen Anna Katherine Brodbeck Charlie Adamski Caulkin Chris Byrne Steve Carter Nancy Cohen Israel Lee Cullum Adam Green Eve Hill-Agnus Darryl Ratcliff Diana Spechler

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Mindy Byrd Michael Bodycomb Bruno Jessica Dalene Henry DiRocco Victoria Gomez Joan Marcus Jeffrey Noor

STYLISTS Elaine Raffel Kendel Bolton Michael Thomas

Martin Parsekian Tony Prikryl Jay Simon Karsten Staiger Kevin Tachman Kevin Todora Tatiana Wills Filip Woldak

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is published 6X per year by Patron, P.O. Box 12121, Dallas, Texas 75225. Copyright 2022, Patron. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without express written permission of the Publisher is strictly prohibited. Opin ions expressed in editorial copy are those of experts consulted and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the editors, pub lisher or the policy of Patron. Unsolicited manuscripts and photographs should be sent to the address above and accompanied by a self-addressed stamped envelope for return. Publisher will take reasonable precaution with such materials but assumes no responsibility for their safety. Please allow up to two months for return of such materials.

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MODERN MASTERS:

A Tribute to Anne Windfohr Marion

October 23, 2022–January 8, 2023

Modern Masters: A Tribute to Anne Windfohr Marion highlights the contributions of one of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth’s greatest patrons, tracing her support over nearly a half century. The exhibition features 80 works by 47 artists from post-World War II art movements, including Abstract Expressionism, Minimalism, and post-1970 international photography, as well as other major works by key artists.

Each of the works presented in this exhibition was made possible by Anne Marion, Anne and John Marion, or The Burnett Foundation, in addition to gifts donated anonymously or in partnership with the Sid W. Richardson Foundation.

Modern Masters: A Tribute to Anne Windfohr Marion is made possible with the support of Vantage Bank and Frost.

Museum of Anne Marion.
MODERN ART MUSEUM OF FORT WORTH 3200 Darnell Street • Fort Worth, Texas 76107 • www.themodern.org
Willem de Kooning, Two Women, 1954–55. Oil and charcoal on canvas. 40 × 50 inches. Collection of the Modern Art
of Fort Worth, Gift
Windfohr
© The Willem de Kooning Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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THE PACITA ABAD ART ESTATE

Tina Kim Gallery

TUNJI ADENIYI-JONES Morán Morán, Nicelle Beauchene Gallery

DIANA AL-HADID Kasmin

ELIAN ALMEIDA Nara Roesler

WILLIAM ATKINSON

Erin Cluley Gallery

SARAH AWAD Night Gallery

RICHARD AYODEJI IKHIDE

SAIF AZZUZ

Anthony Meier Fine Arts

MERIKOKEB BERHANU

Addis Fine Art

LUIGI BOILLE

ARCHIVE Ronchini

MARCUS BRUTUS Harper’s

BRIAN BYUN

Kate Werble Gallery

XXAVIER EDWARD CARTER

Erin Cluley Gallery

DAN COLEN Gagosian

ROSSON CROW

TIMOTHY CURTIS albertz benda

RAFAEL DELACRUZ Mitchell-Innes & Nash

STEPHEN D’ONOFRIO Galleri Urbane

KYLE DUNN PPOW

TORKWASE DYSON Pace Gallery

GREGORY EDWARDS 47 Canal

MIA ENELL Bienvenu Steinberg & J

TR ERICSSON Harlan Levey Projects

LORSER FEITELSON (THE FEITELSON/ LUNDEBERG ART FOUNDATION)

Louis Stern Fine Arts

NICASIO FERNANDEZ Alexander Berggruen

KOHSHIN FINLEY

Various Small Fires

MATTHIAS FRANZ GRIMM

FRANCESCA FUCHS Inman Gallery, Talley Dunn Gallery

DOMINIQUE FUNG Nicodim Gallery

EMILY FURR 12.26

DANIEL GIBSON Shulamit Nazarian

LIZ GLYNN

Paula Cooper Gallery

ADAM GORDON Chapter NY

DAN GUNN Monique Meloche Gallery

SUNIL GUPTA Hales

HULDA GUZMÁN Alexander Berggruen, Stephen Friedman Gallery

JOSHUA HAGLER Cris Worley Fine Arts

NASIM HANTEHZADEH Pippy Houldsworth Gallery

JOSEPH HAVEL Talley Dunn Gallery

SOPHIE VON HELLERMANN Pilar Corrias

NIR HOD Kohn Gallery

JAMMIE HOLMES Marianne Boesky Gallery

SHIRAZEH HOUSHIARY Lisson Gallery

SHEREE HOVSEPIAN

Rachel Uffner Gallery

VOLKER HÜLLER

Van Doren Waxter

MARGUERITE HUMEAU CLEARING

HANNA HUR Kristina Kite Gallery

VERA ILIATOVA Nathalie Karg Gallery

ULALA IMAI Karma, NonakaHill Gallery

ALEX ISRAEL

Greene Naftali

GREG ITO Anat Ebgi Gallery

DAVID-JEREMIAH Von Ammon Co.

XIAO JIANG Karma

SUI JIANGUO Pace Gallery

AARON JOHNSON Almine Rech

RASHID JOHNSON David Kordansky Gallery, Hauser & Wirth

SAMUEL LEVI JONES

Vielmetter Los Angeles, Patron, Galerie Lelong & Co.

CINDY JI HYE KIM Casey Kaplan

PETER KIM Bienvenu Steinberg & J

MARIA KLABIN Nara Roesler

WANDA KOOP Blouin Division

PAUL KREMER Berggruen Gallery

SHIGEKO KUBOTA VIDEO ART FOUNDATION Fergus McCaffrey

TIMOTHY LAI Jack Barrett

MOSHEKWA LANGA Andrew Kreps Gallery

VIEW THE COMPLETE AUCTION CATALOGUE ONLINE AND REGISTER TO BID AT TWOxTWO.ORG/CATALOGUE THANKS THE ARTISTS AND GALLERIES THAT HAVE CONTRIBUTED TO THIS YEAR’S BENEFIT

GALA AND AUCTION

DORON LANGBERG

Victoria Miro

TREVON LATIN Perrotin

MICKEY LEE

One Trick Pony Gallery

GLENDA LEON Bienvenu Steinberg & J

MARK LEONARD Louis Stern Fine Arts

SPENCER LEWIS Josh Lilley

STEVE LOCKE Alexander Gray Associates

NATE LOWMAN David Zwirner

CANNUPA HANSKA LUGER Garth Greenan Gallery

DANICA LUNDY White Cube

CHRISTIANE LYONS Meliksetian | Briggs

RAFA MACARRÓN

Nino Mier Gallery

TSUYOSHI MAEKAWA Axel Vervoordt Gallery

MARCO MAGGI

Sicardi | Ayers | Bacino

THE ESTATE OF MASAFUMI MAITA Yumiko Chiba Associates

REBECCA MANSON Josh Lilley

THE ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE FOUNDATION Gladstone Gallery

EMMA MCINTYRE Château Shatto

RODNEY MCMILLIAN Petzel, Vielmetter Los Angeles

C. MENG Conduit Gallery

SARAH MEYOHAS Marianne Boesky Gallery

RICHARD MISRACH Pace Gallery

RICHARD MOSSE Jack Shainman Gallery

KALOKI NYAMAI Keijsers Koning

COLLINS OBIJIAKU Luce Gallery

THE ESTATE OF DOUG OHLSON Washburn Gallery

MIE OLISE KJAERGAARD

The Journal Gallery

EAMON ORE-GIRON James Cohan

CLAIRE OSWALT Broadway

ANNA PARK Blum & Poe

HELEN PASHGIAN Lehmann Maupin

ELI PING Ramiken

GIO PONTI Molteni&C

MATTHEW RONAY Casey Kaplan

GUADALUPE ROSALES Commonwealth and Council

RACHEL ROSSIN Magenta Plains

MARGO SAWYER Holly Johnson Gallery

CAROLEE SCHNEEMANN FOUNDATION Galerie Lelong & Co., Hales, PPOW

ADAM SILVERMAN Friedman Benda

ALLISON V. SMITH Barry Whistler Gallery

SYLVIA SNOWDEN Franklin Parrasch Gallery

EMMA SOUCEK Parrasch Heijnen Gallery

KATE SPENCER STEWART Park View/Paul Soto

TAVARES STRACHAN Marian Goodman Gallery

DEVIN TROY STROTHER Broadway

MICHELLE STUART Marc Selwyn Fine Art, The f/0 Project

BENJAMIN STYER Moskowitz Bayse

KEER TANCHAK 12.26

EVITA TEZENO Luis De Jesus Los Angeles

HIROKI TSUKUDA Galerie Gisela Capitain

TRISTAN UNRAU Towards Gallery

ANDRA URSUTA Ramiken, David Zwirner

KELLI VANCE Cris Worley Fine Arts

URSULA VON RYDINGSVARD

Galerie Lelong & Co., Talley Dunn Gallery

JAN WADE Richard Saltoun Gallery

SUSAN WEIL JDJ

BLAIR WHITEFORD Matthew Brown

MICHAEL WILLIAMS Gladstone Gallery

RACHEL EULENA WILLIAMS Xavier Hufkens

ISSY WOOD Michael Werner

JOSEPH YAEGER

Project Native Informant

LIVIEN YIN

Friends Indeed Gallery

GEUN-TAEK YOO Gallery Hyundai

HIEJIN YOO

Half Gallery

THE ESTATE OF KATSURO YOSHIDA Yumiko Chiba Associates

ROBERT ZEHNDER Mrs.

Artist and gallery list as of September 9, 2022 / For inquiries: Meg@RachofskyHouse.org

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THE LATEST CULTURAL NEWS COVERING ALL ASPECTS OF THE ARTS IN NORTH TEXAS: NEW EXHIBITS, NEW PERFORMANCES, GALLERY OPENINGS, AND MORE.

01 AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM

Fire! The Resurrection of Mr. Imagination, featuring 80 works by the late artist known as Mr. Imagination (born Gregory Warmack, 19482012), sheds light on his career and his triumph over destruction and tragedy. Several fires that resulted in the loss of his studio, pets, memorabilia, and art collection expanded his own imaginary world view. Through Jan. 7, 2023. aamdallas.org

02 AMON CARTER MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

Stephanie Syjuco: Double Vision continues through Dec. 2022. Art Making as Life Making: Kinji Akagawa at Tamarind closes Oct. 30. Darryl Lauster: Testament continues through May 2023. Faces from the Interior features over 60 watercolors from the Joslyn Art Museum, including portraits of individuals from the Omaha, Ponca, Yankton, Lakota, Mandan, Hidatsa, Assiniboine, and Blackfoot nations. The Carter’s Speaking with Light: Contemporary Indigenous Photography highlights the ways that Indigenous artists reclaim representation and affirm their existence, perspectives, and trauma. Both will be on view Oct. 30–Jan. 22, 2023. Charles Truett Williams: The Art of the Scene examines mid-century Fort Worth through 30-some works by the artist and the artistic community of the day. Nov. 5–May 7. Image: Tom Jones (Ho-Chunk) (b. 1964), Peyton Grace Rapp, 2017, inkjet print with glass beads. Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas. ©Tom Jones. cartermuseum.org

03 CROW MUSEUM OF ASIAN ART

Rare Earth: The Art and Science of Chinese Stones explores the diverse ways that Chinese and Western cultures have celebrated the beauty of natural stones. This exhibition pairs works of Chinese art from the permanent collection with superb samples of raw minerals from China. Through Feb. 26, 2023. crowmuseum.org

04 DALLAS CONTEMPORARY

Shepard Fairey: Backward Forward and Gabrielle Goliath: We are Chorus remain on view through Mar. 19. Backward Forward sees the artist’s first solo museum exhibition in Texas. Fairey’s medium for public art changed in 2010 from modular wheat-pasted paper murals to more durable painted murals—several of which were commissioned by DC in 2012 and on view at the museum and around the city. Returning with new work, some of his iconic visuals and repeated motifs on display comment on the state of contemporary life in the US. In Gabrielle Goliath’s Chorus, members of the University of Cape Town Choir sound a lament for the slain

Uyinene Mrwetyana. Image: Shepard Fairey, John Lewis-Good Trouble, Version 2, 2020, mixed media (stencil, silkscreen, and collage) on canvas 60 x 44 in. Courtesy of the artist. dallascontemporary.org

05 DALLAS HOLOCAUST AND HUMAN RIGHTS MUSEUM

Through historical artifacts and documents, interactive touch screens, documentary videos, and exceptionally rare photographs, The Girl in the Diary, through Dec. 31, explores the story of a young girl’s fight for survival in the Łódz Ghetto and reconstructs what might have happened to Rywka after her deportation to Auschwitz. dhhrm.org

06 DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART

Octavio Medellín: Spirit and Form continues through Jan. 15, 2023. Movement: The Legacy of Kineticism showcases the work of artists from three historical eras who use optical effects or mechanical or manipulable parts to engage the viewer physically or perceptually; through Jul. 16, 2023. Spanning just six years between 2013 and his death in 2019, Matthew Wong’s landscapes reflect his own transnationality, having spent most of his life between Canada and Hong Kong. Matthew Wong: The Realm of Appearances offers the first formal account of how he adeptly synthesized many inspirations to create a visual language uniquely his own. Image: Friedrich Becker, Kinetic Bangle, 1969, stainless steel, chrysoprase, and hematite, 3 x 2.50 x 2.50 in. Dallas Museum of Art, gift of Edward W. and Deedie Potter Rose, formerly Inge Asenbaum collection, Galerie am Graben in Vienna. © Friedrich Becker. dma.org

07 GEORGE W. BUSH PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY AND MUSEUM

Through Dec. 31, Liberty and Laughter: The Lighter Side of the White House gives visitors a glimpse behind the scenes of life inside the White House. Permanent exhibits, 9/11: The Steel of American Resolve and Dining and Diplomacy, are open to the public. georgewbushlibrary.gov

08 KIMBELL ART MUSEUM

A pair of paintings by Italian Baroque artist Artemisia Gentileschi and American contemporary artist Kehinde Wiley depicting Judith and Holofernes remain on view through Oct. 9 in Slay: Artemisia Gentileschi & Kehinde Wiley. Murillo: From Heaven to Earth celebrates the genre paintings of the esteemed painter of the Spanish Golden age: Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1617–1682). While Murillo is primarily

40 PATRONMAGAZINE.COM
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50 Celebrating a Half Century of Excellence The Kimbell at 50 Special Exhibition Opening Tuesday, October 4, 2022 Visit kimbellart.org/50 to learn more.

known for his religious subject matter, some of his most iconic works depict secular themes. Beggars, street urchins, and flower girls convey the cultural narratives and written tales of Murillo’s time; Sep. 18–Jan. 29, 2023. The Kimbell at 50, opening Oct. 4, invites visitors to learn more about the history of the museum and includes dedicated events throughout the year. Image: Artemisia Gentileschi (Rome, 1593–Naples, ca. 1653), Judith and Holofernes, c. 1612–17, oil on canvas. 62.50 x 49.60 in. Napoli, Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte. kimbellart.org

09 LATINO CULTURAL CENTER

Yanga and the AfroMexican Experience continues through Oct. 15. Workshop de los Muertos—Tree of Life is a free painting workshop featuring local artist Eva Azu, Oct. 21. Workshop de los Muerta: Catrinas de Barro takes place Oct. 28. Noches de Galeria “Portas de Borinquen” sees a bohemian community night of art, music, gastronomy, and fellowship dedicated to each tourism region in Puerto Rico, Oct. 19 and Nov. 19. lcc.dallasculture.org

10 THE MAC

New solo exhibitions feature work by Morgan Grasham, Sarah Lasley, and Laura J. Lawson, curated by a jury of international art figures. Memory Beast, Welcome to the Enclave, and Venus and Mars: Climates in Dialogue continue through Oct. 8. the-mac.org

11 MEADOWS MUSEUM

Masterpiece in Residence highlights The Frick Collection’s portrait King Philip IV of Spain (1644), by Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez. The exceptional loan remains on display through Jan. 15, 2023 with three paintings by Velázquez from the museum’s collection. Picturing Holy Women is an exploration of the role of holy women in Spain and its empire told through etchings, prints, rare books, and more. The exhibition showcases the women as they worked within—and against—the limitations imposed by the Catholic Church and society between 1620 to 1800; through Jan. 15, 2023. Dalí/Vermeer: A Dialogue unites Johannes Vermeer’s Woman Reading a Letter (c. 1663) and Salvador Dalí’s interpretation thereof, The Image Disappears (1938), for the first time Oct. 16–Jan. 15, 2023. meadowsmuseumdallas.org

12 MODERN ART MUSEUM OF FORT WORTH

Modern Masters: A Tribute to Anne Windfohr Marion highlights the contributions of one of the museum’s greatest patrons, tracing her support over nearly a half century. The exhibition of 80 works by 47 artists includes five renowned works from her collection, given to the Modern on her passing in 2021: Arshile Gorky’s The Plow

13 MUSEUM OF BIBLICAL ART

Side by Side: George Tobolowsky and James Surls continues. biblicalarts.org

14 NASHER SCULPTURE CENTER

Nairy Baghramian returns to the Nasher with new works she created after she became the 2022 Nasher Prize Laureate. Over thirty years, Baghramian has delved into elements of sculptural practice and installation to create works that challenge their settings and upend expected modes of presentation as well as the architectural, sociological, political, and historical contexts that inform them; Oct. 15–Jan. 8, 2023. Matthew Ronay: The Crack, the Swell, an Earth, an Ode sees Ronay expand the scale of his work to create his largest and most ambitious sculpture to date in the Lower Level Gallery; Oct. 22–Jan. 15, 2023. Image: Nairy Baghramian, Nasher Sculpture Center, April 1, 2022, Dallas, Texas. Photograph by Amanda Marie Photographie. nashersculpturecenter.org

15 PEROT MUSEUM

Night at the Museum celebrates 10 years of the Perot Museum with an after-hours evening of lavish jubilee on Nov. 12 chaired by Jessica and Dirk Nowitzki. perotmuseum.org

16 SIXTH FLOOR MUSEUM

John F. Kennedy and the Memory of a Nation examines the life, legacy, and assassination of JFK within the events of November 22, 1963, and their aftermath through a multimedia experience. Solidarity Now! 1968 Poor People’s Campaign examines one of the most important grassroots movements of the Civil Rights era, which culminated in a six-week demonstration on the National Mall in Washington, DC. Protestors inhabited “a city of hope”—Resurrection City—on 15 acres—between the Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial—to call attention to the crippling effects of poverty. Through Feb. 26, 2023. jfk.org

17 TYLER MUSEUM OF ART

TEXAS! Selections from The Grace Museum, features work by Texas artists from Abilene’s The Grace Museum’s collection through Nov. 27. Image: Ann Stautberg, 3-19-12, P.M. Abilene, 2012, oil on silver gelatin print, 38.12 x 54.50 in. Gift of Sindy and David Durham, Ann Stautberg, and Barry Whistler Gallery. tylermuseum.org

and the Song , 1947; Willem de Kooning’s Two Women, 1954–55; Mark Rothko’s White Band No. 27, 1954; David Smith’s Dida Becca Merry X, 1964; and Ellsworth Kelly’s Spectrum III, 1967; Oct. 23–Jan. 8, 2023. themodern.org
42 PATRONMAGAZINE.COM NOTED: VISUAL ARTS
1408 06

Velázquez

Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez (Spanish, King Philip IV of Spain (detail), The Frick Collection, New York. The Frick Collection; Photo: Michael Bodycomb; Salvador Dalí (Spanish, Gala-Salvador Salvador Dalí, Gala-Salvador (A. van Hoop
| Dalí | Vermeer Three extraordinary paintings. Two captivating exhibitions. One unforgettable experience at the Meadows Museum this fall. These exhibitions have been organized by the Meadows Museum and are funded by a generous gift from The Meadows Foundation.
1599–1660),
1644. ©
©
1904–1989), The Image Disappears (detail), 1938. Work loaned by the Fundació
Dalí. © 2022
Fundació
Dalí, Artists Rights Society; Johannes Vermeer (Dutch, 1632–1675), Woman in Blue Reading a Letter (detail), c. 1663. Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. On loan from the City of Amsterdam
der
Bequest), SK-C-251 OCTOBER 16, 2022 JANUARY 15, 2023 SEPTEMBER 18, 2022–JANUARY 15, 2023 King Philip IV of Spain Masterpiece in Residence from The Frick Collection meadowsmuseumdallas.org MEADOWS MUSEUM • SMU

01 AMPHIBIAN

On a stormy October evening in 2020, a lonely storyteller arrives at an 18th-century tavern to continue his yearly tradition of performing Washington Irving’s classic, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow.

With the exciting juxtaposition of campfire tales, things that go bump in the night, and the gorgeous prose of one of American history’s most thrilling authors, The Hollow is a ghostly treat. Oct. 12–Nov. 6. amphibianstage.com

02 AT&T PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

In celebration of Women’s Health Month, AT&T PAC with Grit Fitness presents Wellness Series - Body Sculpt Oct. 4–25. Trevor Tyrrell is a Marine Corp veteran from Weatherford, Texas, who is now a full-time artist performing in events and venues all throughout the Metroplex; see him live on Oct. 6. Experience Brass and Jazz in the Park: Crossing Bridges and Connecting Cultures on Oct. 8. Aurora Bleu brings its vintage blend of big band, swing, jump blues, and jazz vibes on Oct. 13. Turn Up the Lights is a benefit for the AT&T Performing Arts Center presented by Wild Turkey and hosted by the AT&T PAC Auxiliary Board on Oct. 15. In the Conservatory with the Knife, Oct. 27–29, is an immersive dance experience loosely inspired by the game of Clue. Celebrate Halloween with a Silent Disco Bash in Sammons Park on Oct. 28. Enjoy the great outdoors at Sammons Park for Family Weekends, with free concerts and outdoor activities, Oct. 8 and 29. Image: Sessions at AT&T Performing Arts Center. Photograph by Jay Simon. attpac.org

03 AVANT CHAMBER BALLET

Avant Chamber Ballet celebrates ten years of excellence with an evening of quintessential ACB repertoire featuring George Balanchine’s Concerto Barocco, Christopher Wheeldon’s The American pas de deux and a world premiere by renowned dancer Jock Soto with special performance by composer and musician Laura Ortman. The evening will feature live chamber and orchestra music conducted by Brad Cawyer. Oct. 15 at Moody Performance Hall. avantchamberballet.org

04 BASS PERFORMANCE HALL

A Tribute to Peace—North Texas Welcomes Kyiv City Ballet, a neoclassical work choreographed by Ekaterina and Ivan Kozlov, comes to Bass Hall Oct. 3 as part of a new tour for the Kyiv City Ballet, marking the company’s first performances in the US and the only stop in Texas. Guitarist Monte Montgomery brings his dizzying accomplishments to the stage Oct. 15. R.E.S.P.E.C.T. is the ultimate tribute to the Queen of Soul, Aretha Franklin , on Oct. 19. The Christmas classic, Elf, hits the stage at Bass Hall on Nov. 11–13. Spend An Evening with Slaid Cleaves on Nov. 18. Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer: The Musical brings the classic to Fort Worth on Nov. 21–22. My Fair Lady makes her run Nov. 29–Dec. 4. basshall.com

05 BROADWAY DALLAS

Find your inner princess at Disney Princess: The Concert on Oct. 22. Learn to find love and pass as a lady on Nov. 2–6 in the Lincoln Center’s production of My Fair Lady at Fair Park. See the spirit of Christmas fly, flip, and tumble through the air in A Magical Cirque Christmas Nov. 19. Image: My Fair Lady. Photograph by Joan Marcus. broadwaydallas.org

06 CASA MAÑANA

Madagascar—A Musical Adventure follows everyone’s favorite zoo crew on a comedy-packed journey around the world. After Marty the Zebra decides to chase his dream to see life outside of the zoo, we follow the “crack-a-lackin” friends on their unexpected adventure to King Julien’s Madagascar. Oct. 8–23. Here You Come Again: How Dolly Saved My Life in 12 Easy Songs is a rollicking and touching new musical about a has-been-who-never-was comedian and his unusual relationship with his longtime idol, Dolly Parton, Nov. 5–13. casamanana.org

07 DALLAS BLACK DANCE THEATRE

DanceAfrica returns to Moody Performance Hall Oct. 7–8. Director’s Choice highlights the best in the future of dance Nov. 4–5. Go Behind the Scenes at the DBDT Studios on Nov. 21–22. Image: Dallas Black Dance Theatre performing in Battery Dance Festival in NYC. Photograph by Jeffrey Noor. dbdt.com

08 DALLAS CHILDREN’S THEATER

Through Oct. 30, see Junie B.’s Essential Survival Guide to School. Junie B. Jones learns some important lessons about school, patience, and personal growth in this family friendly musical . Eubie is, much to the exhaustion of his coworkers, an elf of endless energy looking to get a spot on Santa’s coveted sleigh team. When his unstoppably sunny spirit encounters the miserable town of Bluesville—where every single child is on the naughty list—he is in for the shock of a lifetime. See The Happy Elf Nov. 27–Dec. 23. dct.org

09 THE DALLAS OPERA

The Dallas Opera returns with treachery, seduction, and a raging father dead set on revenge. Rigoletto is the jaded jester paid to make others laugh in the debauched court of Mantua. But when his innocent daughter is cruelly seduced by the predatory Duke, Rigoletto stops being funny and vows revenge. Seething with rage, he launches an elaborate plot to avenge his beloved child. But everything goes terribly, terribly wrong. Experience Verdi at his most dramatically potent, with melody after irresistible melody Oct. 8–16. Hansel and Gretel head into the forest in search of food— but they almost end up as tasty treats themselves when they start nibbling on the deliciously edible house of a very nasty witch! Oct.

44 PATRONMAGAZINE.COM NOTED: PERFORMING ARTS
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FABIO LUISI RETURNS DON QUIXOTE | SEP 29 + OCT 2 DSO GALA AND AFTER-PARTY | OCT 1 HÉLÈNE GRIMAUD PLAYS BRAHMS | OCT 7 – 9 LISE DE LA SALLE PLAYS SCHUMANN | NOV 4 – 6 VERDI REQUIEM | NOV 10 – 13 NICOLA BENEDETTI | NOV 17 – 19 BRAHMS SYMPHONY NO. 3 | MAR 16 – 18 BEETHOVEN AND BRAHMS | MAY 4 – 7 CARMINA BURANA | MAY 11 – 14 dallassymphony.org

28–Nov. 5. The Billy Goats Gruff tells a family friendly story of three goats on Oct. 29. dallasopera.org

10 DALLAS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Embark on a grand musical journey with Strauss’s Don Quixote through Oct. 2. Wildlife conservationist, activist, writer , and virtuosic pianist Hélène Grimaud returns to perform Brahms’ First Piano Concerto on Oct. 7–9. Broadway diva Capathia Jenkins and three-time Grammy nominee Ryan Shaw light up the Meyerson with favorite Aretha Franklin hits on Oct. 14–16. See Song for Hope: The Ryan Anthony Story on Oct. 19. Experience Ravel & Debussy Oct. 20–23. See Sybille Szagger Redford’s The Way of the Rain—Hope for Earth Oct. 22 with EarthxFilm. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets in Concert features the film in HD while the DSO performs John Williams’ unforgettable score, Oct. 28–30. A Day of the Dead concert celebrates lost loved ones with a colorful affirmation of life on Nov. 1. Lise de la Salle Plays Schumann Nov. 4–6. DSO Music Director Fabio Luisi will conduct Verdi’s Requiem with its whitehot moments of bravado alternating with some of the most serene moments of Verdi’s music, Nov. 10–13. Fabio Luisi conducts Nicola Benedetti, one of the most sought-after violinists today, coupled with James MacMillan, the pre-eminent Scottish composer of his generation, Nov. 17–19. Explore The Music of America | Circle T Ranch Music Festival on Nov. 20. Maurice Cohn leads the DSO in selections from Tchaikovsky’s iconic Nutcracker score Nov. 25–27. mydso.com

11 DALLAS THEATER CENTER

Trouble in Mind invites viewers to follow an experienced Black stage actor through rehearsals of a major Broadway production in Alice Childress’ funny, moving, and shattering look at racism, identity, and ego in the high-stakes world of New York theater; Oct. 13–Oct. 30. The Christmas tradition continues as three spirits have come to visit the miserly Ebenezer Scrooge to take him on a fantastic journey through Christmases past, present, and future. But will it be enough to save Scrooge’s soul? Brimming with joyful songs, magical spirits, and holiday cheer, Dallas Theater Center’s A Christmas Carol boldly reimagines Dickens’ classic tale of joy, redemption, and the spirit of Christmas. Nov. 25–Dec. 24. dallastheatercenter.org

12 DALLAS WIND SYMPHONY

Divine Mischief on Oct. 18 sees clarinetist Julian Bliss performing the world premiere of John Mackey’s newest work . At the Cinema calls all movie buffs on Nov. 15. Prepare to relive movies from the past as the band combines selections from unforgettable scores by iconic Hollywood composers with dramatic big-screen imagery. dallaswinds.org

13 EISEMANN CENTER

C.S. Lewis On Stage: Further Up & Further In is a multimedia experience that promises to take audiences into the astonishing mind and uncanny wisdom of C.S. Lewis , Oct. 13–23. Watch Paddington, the accident-prone bear, in a fun-filled comedy presented by the Eisemann Center in partnership with Rockefeller Productions on Oct. 29. Cheek to Cheek stars renowned tribute artists Steve Leeds and Sharon Owens as they recreate the music and onstage magic of Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga. This hot new show is stacked with local musicians conducted by Dallas’ own Bryan English and features the best of American songbook standards on Nov. 12. Spend an evening with Nigella Lawson on Nov. 17. See Chamberlain Ballet perform The Nutcracker on Nov. 25–27. eisemanncenter.com

14 FORT WORTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

October begins with Rachmaninoff’s Thirds, Oct. 7–9. Experience an evening of jazz in an homage to some of America’s greatest music, with works by A-listers like Bernstein, Gershwin, and Duke Ellington. Plus, the FWSO continues to propel classical music forward with a world premiere by noted film, television, and concert music composer Douglas J. Cuomo in A Trip to Harlem: Bernstein, Ellington, Gershwin, and Douglas J. Cuomo, Oct. 14–16. Rodgers and Hammerstein Celebration commences Oct. 21–23. Next take A Trip to St. Petersburg: Glinka, Glazunov, and Tchaikovsky Oct. 28–30. FWSO Music Director Robert Spano delves into the music of Richard Wagner Nov. 18–20. Come on down to Bass Performance Hall to catch a glimpse of jolly old St. Nick when the FWSO brings another installment of every family’s favorite holiday tradition, complete with magical snowfall and Christmas carols. Nov. 25–27. fwsymphony.org

15 KITCHEN DOG THEATER

In the 17 years since she was last published, novelist Bella Baird has completely isolated herself from the world. But things change when she meets Christopher, a brilliant but enigmatic student in her creative writing class at Yale. As their friendship deepens, their lives and stories become intertwined in unpredictable ways, leading to a shocking request , in The Sound Inside, Nov. 3–20. kitchendogtheater.org

16 LYRIC STAGE

The Rocky Horror Show will deliver its rock concert–style show in a ridiculous tribute to the science fiction and horror B movies of the ’30s through the ’60s. It tells the story of the newly engaged Brad and Janet, who get caught in a storm and find themselves seeking shelter at the eerie mansion of mad scientist, Dr. Frank-NFurter, where they meet a houseful of wild characters, including a

46 PATRONMAGAZINE.COM NOTED: PERFORMING ARTS
07 05
Photos by Lynn Lane/Houston Grand Opera and Karen Almond/LA Opera
dallasopera.org | 214.443.1000 The Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House Season Sponsor: Mary Anne Cree, in memory of Rosine Smith Sammons HUMPERDINCK HANSEL AND GRETEL OCT 28, 30 & NOV 2, 5 VERDI RIGOLETTO OCT 8, 12, 14, & 16
Two children take on a nasty witch and win in our “fantasyland production.” LOS ANGELES TIMES Treachery…seduction…and a father who will do anything to avenge his daughter. Rigoletto is sponsored by Martha Peak Rochelle and is the Caroline Rose Hunt Mainstage Production Hansel and Gretel production sponsors are James R. Seitz, Jr. and The Richard and Enika Schulze Foundation

rocking biker, a creepy butler, and a Frankenstein-style muscle man named Rocky, Oct. 26–30. Image: Kit Treece as a Phantom, Jason Wooten as Riff Raff, Laura Shoop as Magenta, Nadine Isenegger as Columbia, and Anna Schnaitter as a Phantom in Richard O'Brien’s The Rocky Horror Show. Photograph by Henry DiRocco. lyricstage.org

17 MAJESTIC THEATRE

Comedian Leanne Morgan embarks on a massive trek titled the Big Panty Tour! with a Dallas stop on Oct. 1–2. See The Kat & Dave Show: David Foster and Katharine McPhee on Oct. 5. Comedian, actor, and host Craig Ferguson brings the Fancy Rascal Tour to town on Oct. 6. Experience a majestic evening this Oct. 7 as The Doobie Brothers bring their signature slick soft rock music to the stage. Amanda Miguel and Diego Verdaguer perform Oct. 9. Marcus Mumford of Mumford & Sons brings his solo act to the Majestic on Oct. 11. Spanish flamenco singer Diego El Cigala performs Oct. 13. J.B. Smoove brings the laughs on Oct. 14. Radio and podcast host Tom Papa takes the stage on Oct. 15. Trash Taste Live is coming to the Majestic on Oct. 16. The Black Jacket Symphony will stun audiences on Oct. 21. Marc Maron brings his This May Be the Last Time Tour to Dallas on Nov. 3. Lewis Black follows with laughs on Nov. 4. Puddles Pity Party and Piff the Magic Dragon are two talented actors onstage Nov. 5. Demetri Martin is back in Dallas on Nov. 11. The Fab Four is a California-based Beatles tribute band coming to Dallas on Nov. 18. Scott Bradlee’s Postmodern Jukebox returns to the stage on Nov. 25. Image: Marcus Mumford. Photograph courtesy of the Majestic Theater and Getty Images. majestic.dallasculture.org

18 TACA

TACA invites you to join the organization for a glamorous, blacktie evening benefit chaired by Wanda Gierhart Fearing and Dean Fearing at the Ritz Carlton. Savor the Broadway-themed culinary artistry of Lexus Culinary Master Chef Dean Fearing and enjoy an exclusive performance by critically acclaimed television, film, and stage actor Erich Bergen and his band. Glitz at the Ritz takes place Nov. 3. taca-arts.org

19 TEXAS BALLET THEATER

Cirque du Ballet presents an amazing array of fabulous characters and choreography under the big top through Oct. 2. In the magical holiday tradition, featuring dazzling choreography and exquisite sets, The Nutcracker celebrates the season with enchantment, snowflakes, and sweets. Nov. 25–Dec. 25. texasballettheater.org

20 THEATRE THREE

Young Frankenstein sees the grandson of the infamous Victor Frankenstein, Frederick Frankenstein, as he inherits his family’s

estate His mad scientist genes come to fruition with the help of his assistant, Igor, Oct. 13–Nov. 13. theatre3dallas.com

21 TITAS/DANCE UNBOUND

With exciting, diverse choreography and stellar dancers, Gibney Company is not to be missed this Oct. 1. Nrityagram Dance Ensemble in collaboration with Chitrasena Dance Company is a stunning partnership that celebrates centuries of rich Indian and Sri Lankan cultures. Watch history unfold on stage Oct. 28–29. BODYTRAFFIC returns to Dallas with a compelling work that reflects the innovation and style of Los Angeles on Nov. 11. Image: BODYTRAFFIC. Photograph by Tatiana Wills. titas.org

22 TURTLE CREEK CHORALE

TCC returns with That’70s Show: A Sing-Along Sensation on Oct. 8–9. Words: A TCC Small Ensemble Showcase honors the lives of Black men killed by police or by authority figures who are the subject of this powerful multi-movement choral work, Seven Last Words of the Unarmed, by Atlanta-based composer Joel Thompson , Nov. 6. turtlecreekchorale.com

23 UNDERMAIN THEATRE

At the Frasier household, preparations for Grandma’s birthday party are underway. Beverly is holding on to her sanity by a thread to make sure this party is perfect, but her sister is drinking, her husband can’t seem to listen, her brother is MIA, and her daughter is a teenager—enough said. Fairview, recipient of the 2019 Pulitzer Prize for drama, begins as an easygoing comedy about a middle-class Black family gathering for a birthday dinner and ends somewhere else entirely. See it Oct. 21–Nov. 6. Nora is a curious writer who seeks to understand her friend and collaborator Katherine’s obsession with 20th-century French philosopher and activist Simone Weil. Feeding on Light is based on playwright Lenora Champagne’s personal relationship and discussions with Undermain’s late founding artistic director Katherine Owens, to whom the play is dedicated. Nov. 10–27. undermain.org

24 WATERTOWER THEATRE

A musical phenomenon with a worldwide fan base having celebrated its 50th anniversary, the iconic rock opera Jesus Christ Superstar comes to WaterTower Theatre Nov. 30–Dec. 11 Featuring awardwinning music by Andrew Lloyd Webber and lyrics by Tim Rice, Jesus Christ Superstar is set against the backdrop of an extraordinary series of events during the final weeks in the life of Jesus Christ as seen through the eyes of Judas. watertowertheatre.org

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02 16 NOTED: PERFORMING ARTS
LONE STAR ART AUCTION OCTOBER 28 - 29, 2022 • DALLAS, TEXAS Presented By: Great American West and Phil Berkebile, Jr. Auctioneer: Jason Brooks, State of Texas License No.16216 8333 DOUGLAS AVENUE, SUITE 360 DALLAS, TX 75225 469.608.7600 WWW.LSARTAUCTION.COM ANDY WARHOL, War Bonnet Indian, TP 6/36, Screenprint Unique, 36"x 36" Estimate: $150,000 200,000 JULIAN ONDERDONK , In the Boerne Hills – Southwest Texas, Oil, 20"x 30" Estimate: $150,000 200,000 CHARLES MARION RUSSELL , Indian Women Moving Camp, 1894, Watercolor, 22.25"x 33.5" Estimate: $225,000-275,000 FREDERIC REMINGTON , The Sergeant, 1904 (Lifetime Casting, No. 8), Bronze, 10.5" Estimate: $70,000 100,000 AUCTION REGISTRATION AND EVENT TICKETS WWW.LSARTAUCTION.COM • 469.608.7600

01 12.26

Emily Furr: Mechanical Poems continues through Oct. 20 at 12.26 West. In Dallas, Keer Tanchak: A Stranger Every Time will be on view at the gallery from Oct. 8–Nov. 12. Image: Emily Furr, Mechanical Poem - Blue, 2022, gouache on paper, 16 x 12 in. gallery1226.com

02 500X GALLERY

500X Gallery is one of the oldest, artist run, cooperative galleries in Texas. Established in 1978, 500X provides one of the best exhibition spaces to up and coming artists. 500x.org

03 ALAN BARNES FINE ART

Alan Barnes Fine Art’s Fall Exhibition, featuring art from around the world, will be on view in their new location in Farmers Branch. alanbarnesfineart.com

04 AND NOW

Kathryn Kerr remains on view through Oct. 29. Next, the gallery will host Leslie Martinez from Nov. 5–Dec. 31. andnow.biz

05 ARTSPACE111

Through Oct. 29, AS111 will host a solo show, Ender Martos: Paradigm Shift, and a group show titled Nightscapes. Blinders, featuring artwork by Jacob Lovett , will continue through Nov. 6. artspace111.com

06 BARRY WHISTLER GALLERY

BWG highlights Christopher Blay’s exploration of possible Black futures through the presentation of slaving vessels as rocket ships in SpLaVCe Ship, through Oct. 15. barrywhistlergallery.com

07 BEATRICE M. HAGGERTY GALLERY

Construction on the Neutral Ground features Dan Charbonnet’s interlaced paintings constructed of strips of canvas woven together to create works of art that are inspired by the city of New Orleans, where he lives and works. The exhibition represents Charbonnet’s most significant body of work since abandoning painting for nearly a decade after the trauma of waiting for seven days to be rescued from the roof of his studio in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina; Oct. 14–Nov. 18. udallas.edu/gallery

08 CADD

Contemporary Art Dealers of Dallas Fall Gallery Night will be held on Oct. 8. caddallas.org

09 CHRISTOPHER MARTIN GALLERY

Celebrating 27 years, the gallery presents the reverse-glass paintings of American artist Christopher Martin; the Rodeo series of Dallas based photographer Steve Wrubel; the color-field paintings of New York–based painter Jeff Muhs; Dutch image maker Isabelle van Zeijl; the acrylic constructions of Dallas artist Jean Paul Khabbaz; the abstract paintings of Angela and Gabriel Collazo; the atmospheric work of California-based painter Elise Morris; and Atlanta artist Liz Barber’s organic paintings; as well as rotating artists. From Oct. 18 through Nov. 4, Sybille Szaggars Redford will show her Rain Paintings, watercolor pieces that tell the story of the changing rain patterns due to climate change. christophermartingallery.com

10 CONDUIT GALLERY

Conduit hosts two solo exhibitions: Lance Letscher: The Art of Painterly Collage and J.C. Fontanive: New Works in Wood. Both exhibitions will be shown through Oct. 15. Next, new work by Anthony Sonnenberg and Desiree Vaniecia will inform two solo shows in the gallery Oct. 22 through Dec. 3. Sonnenberg’s luscious ceramic sculptures set a stage, calling the viewer to ekstasis, standing outside oneself. Vaniecia, a Dallas-based painter raised in a matriarchal home, pays homage to her family and their legacy. Image: Anthony Sonnenberg, Pair of Candelabras (Smiling Through the Darkness), 2022, porcelain over stoneware, recycled tchotchkes, and glaze. conduitgallery.com

11 CRAIGHEAD GREEN GALLERY

CGG will host Heather Gorham, David Crismon, and Carlos Ramirez Oct 8–Nov 12. The gallery will next showcase Carolyn McAdams, Pamela Nelson, and Bernardo Valdes, Nov. 19–Dec. 31. Image: Carolyn Zacharias McAdams, Burning Time, 2020, oil on panel, 3 x 4 in. craigheadgreen.com

12 CRIS WORLEY FINE ARTS

Opening Oct. 8–Nov. 12, Paul Manes: Requiem and Robert Lansden: At·One will be on view. Next, Josephine Durkin: Funeral Flowers and Ruben Nieto Homage: Lessons from the Masters mount Nov. 15 and will remain on view through Dec. 30. Image: Josephine Durkin, Flora 20, Deeper Roots (detail), 2022, sewn digital prints on photo rag, Color-aid paper, charcoal on paper, latex, spray paint, watercolor crayon, pastel, and colored pencil, 90 x 90 in. crisworley.com

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13 CVAD, UNT COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN GALLERIES

CVAD Galleries calls for entries in the 61st Annual Voertman Art Competition through Dec. 3 with Chief Curator Christopher Blay selecting entries. All CVAD students may apply from Nov. 8 through Dec. 3, through UNT. slideroom.com

14 DADA

The Dallas Art Dealers Association is an affiliation of established independent gallery owners and nonprofit art organizations. Fall Gallery Night will be held on Oct. 8. dallasartdealers.org

15 DAISHA BOARD GALLERY

Joey Brock, WE ARE opens Oct. 15 and continues through Nov. 26. Brock is a mixed-media artist whose contemporary portraiture is influenced by the human condition. The focus of his portraits is to celebrate diversity and self- love, to bring greater visibility to people in the LGBTQIA and BIPOC communities, and to explore woman’s rights. daishaboardgallery.com

16 DAVID DIKE FINE ART

DDFA will host the 26th Annual Texas Art Auction on Saturday, Oct. 15 at the gallery’s new location. The sale will be a live auction featuring over 300 lots of Texas art , ranging from early to traditional and contemporary works. daviddike.com

17 ERIN CLULEY GALLERY/CLULEY PROJECTS

James Gilbert: I Don’t Know, You Don’t Know, They Don’t Know and Chul Hyun: Ahn Light / Continuum display Oct. 8–Nov. 12; the opening reception for the congruent exhibitions will be Oct. 8. Cluley Projects OFF THE WALLS presents work by artists J Muzacz, SM SANZ, and Wheron Oct. 1–22, followed by Chuck & George and Colton White, curated by Krista Chalkley, Oct. 29 through Dec. 3. erincluley.com

18 FERRARI FINE ART GALLERY

Ferrari presents the Zion Collection by Debra Ferrari, a series of large-scale canvas paintings inspired by the artist’s hike through Zion National Park in Utah. The gallery also displays the metal work of James Ferrari, photographs by Jeremy McKane, who utilizes water and camera to capture

Speaking withLight Symposium

51OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2022 October 30, 2022–January 22, 2023
Saturday, October 29 | 10:30 a.m.–2 p.m. Join us for a free day of lectures featuring artists and scholars from the exhibition. cartermuseum.org/SWLtalk Speaking with Light: Contemporary Indigenous Photography is organized by the Amon Carter Museum of American Art. Cara Romero (Chemehuevi) (b. 1977), Water Memory (detail), 2015, inkjet print, Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, P2021.54, © Cara Romero. All rights reserved. 10

Art Glass Gallery

the human form and express a passion to preserve our oceans; and works by ceramic sculptor, Kosmas Ballis, who transports viewers to a distinct space through his intricate clay sculptures. ferrarigallery.net

19 FORT WORKS ART

In Crystal Wagner’s Sublime , the artist builds worlds by incorporating textural materials and the natural movement of our bodies through temporary landscapes. Wagner created a large-scale, site-specific installation during her gallery residency, sponsored by Gallery of Dreams. Rachel English’s Vanishing Point highlights the artist’s paintings of dark and bright skies and remains on view through Nov. 15. fortworksart.com

20 FWADA

Fort Worth Art Dealers Association funds and hosts exhibitions of noteworthy art. The members invite art lovers to stroll through participating art spaces on Fall Gallery Night, which will be held on Oct. 8. fwada.com

21 GALLERI URBANE

Galleri Urbane will showcase Benjamin Terry in Gallery One and Tammie Rubin in Gallery Two from Oct. 8–Nov. 12. Next, Jozsef Csató and Sam Mack will fill Gallery One and Gallery Two respectively from Nov. 19–Dec. 24. Image: Tammie Rubin, Always & Forever (forever ever ever) No. 9, 2021, pigmented porcelain, underglazes, glaze, 10 x 24 x 10 in. galleriurbane.com

22 THE GREEN FAMILY ART FOUNDATION

Black Abstractionists: From Then ‘til Now, curated by Dexter Wimberly, and Bernadette Despujols’ Oh Man! will be shown at The Green Family Art Foundation’s new space, 2111 Flora Street, Suite 110, from Oct. 8–Jan. 29, 2023. Image: Shinique Smith (b. 1971), Open Secret, 2020, acrylic, fabric, collage, and found objects on canvas, 72.25 x 72 x 6 in. © Shinique Smith. Courtesy of the artist and David Castillo. greenfamilyartfoundation.org

23 HOLLY JOHNSON GALLERY

Kim Cadmus Owens: Drawings is a solo exhibition spanning twenty years of works on paper by the Dallas-based artist. Recollecting Dallas architecture and other environs, Owens’

52 PATRONMAGAZINE.COM 4500 Sigma Rd. Dallas, Texas 75244  972.239.7957 K ittrell/Riffkind
Offering Dallas’ finest selection of art glass! kittrellriffkind.com Carlos Zervigon “Yellow Twist” ittrell/RiffkindGallery NOTED: GALLERIES
22
S OUTHWEST G ALLER Y 4500 Sigma Rd. Dallas, Te xas n 972.960.8935 n swgallery.com IRENE SHERI Opening Exhibition November 5th SPANISH REALISM Opening Exhibition October 8th

work conveys a moment of retrospect and depicts vernacular spots elevated to icon status; through Nov. 12. hollyjohnsongallery.com

24 KEIJSERS KONING

Kaloki Nyamai: Moments I wished I had continues through Oct. 8. Keijser Koning will present a solo exhibition of Natalie Westbrook that will be a combination of paintings and sculptures, the latter being shown for the first time publicly; Oct. 15–Nov. 19. keijserskoning.com

25 KIRK HOPPER FINE ART

Matthew Bourbon and Bryan Florentin will fill the gallery from Oct. 8–Nov. 12. Next, a solo exhibition for Alice Leora Briggs will be on view Nov. 19–Dec. 31. kirkhopperfineart.com

26 KITTRELL/RIFFKIND ART GLASS

Kittrell-Riffkind 32nd Anniversary Show continues through Oct. 31. Next, the annual Holiday Treasures exhibition will be on view Nov. 13–Dec. 31. kittrellriffkind.com

27 LAURA RATHE FINE ART

Traces, a two-woman exhibition featuring new works by Lucrecia Waggoner and Audra Weaser, will be on view in the gallery Oct. 8–Nov. 12. Traces explores the timeless impressions of art, both physically and metaphorically, and the various processes in which they are created. The artists’ unique practices of mapping and excavating exemplify how art can leave an everlasting footprint. laurarathe.com

28 LILIANA BLOCH GALLERY

In The Red Garden, Ann Glazer exhibits a series of ritual textiles inspired by a 100-year-old family story of love and death. Collaged images of 19th century Eastern European embroidery, enlarged and printed on velvet, reimagine traditional fertility imagery as divine protection for the life and vitality of all women; through Oct. 8 Next, Simón Vega will exhibit their outer space explorations from Oct. 15–Dec. 31. lilianablochgallery.com

29 MARKOWICZ FINE ART

Carole A. Feuerman: Master of Hyperrealism continues through Oct. 5. From Oct. 15 to Nov. 8, best-selling contemporary French artist’s Richard Orlinski: Born Wild in Texas will feature exclusive Texasthemed works as well as exclusive new Hublot watches designed by Richard Orlinski. Image: Carole A. Feuerman, Midpoint, 2022, resin, oil paint, automotive urethane paints, clear coat, 24k gold leaf cap, 35 in. x 19 in. x 15 in. markowiczfineart.com

30 MARTIN LAWRENCE GALLERIES

Martin Lawrence Galleries specializes in original paintings, sculpture, and limited-edition graphics. The gallery is distinguished by works of art by Erté, Marc Chagall, Keith Haring, and many other artists. martinlawrence.com

31 PENCIL ON PAPER

Through Oct. 15, PoP displays two solo exhibitions: Sam Lao: Lines in Liminal Margins and MOM: From Inside. Next, the gallery will host graduates of Booker T. Washington School for the Performing and Visual Arts for an alumni exhibition in Open Call , Oct. 27–30 pencilonpapergallery.com

32 PETER AUGUSTUS

Ryo Nishimura fills the space through Oct. 29. Next , a two-part exhibition, Hiroaki Onuma: ACT I will be shown Nov. 12–Dec. 17. peteraugustusgallery.com

33 PHOTOGRAPHS DO NOT BEND

In Remembrance: Jesse Alexander, Paul Greenberg, and Jeffrey Silverthorne sees PDNB Gallery celebrating the work of three PDNB artists who passed within the last year, through Nov. 12. Keith Carter: Ghostlight is up next at the gallery from Nov. 19–Feb. 11, 2023. Image: Jeffrey Silverthorne, Woman in Yellow Skirt, Nuevo Laredo, 1986, archival pigment print, 17 x 11.25 in. pdnbgallery.com

34 THE POWER STATION

The Power Station is a nonprofit initiative dedicated to providing a platform for contemporary art projects. Opening Oct. 21 and continuing through winter, Michael Williams: Drawings will be on view at the gallery powerstationdallas.com

35 PRP

Founded in 2017, PRP [purp] is an artist-run permanent research project in the Dallas Design District. The space provides artists with an environment to conceptualize, produce, and exhibit their work while seeking to establish a critical setting for investigation, experimentation, and thoughtful discourse. A show for Jesse Morgan Barnett will open Oct. 8. prp.agency

36 RO2 ART

Maryland-based Lindsay McCulloch will present a solo exhibition featuring paintings and works on paper created from 2017-2022. McCulloch’s fascination with limits, boundaries, and opposition forms the backbone for the series of works. Through Oct. 27. ro2art.com

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37 SAMUEL LYNNE GALLERIES

JD Miller’s Reflections From Dragon Street continues through Oct. 23. Next the gallery welcomes David Yarrow’s Storytelling from Nov. 3–Dec. 23. samuellynne.com

38 SITE 131

SITE131, encouraged and supported by its artists, gallery, and teaching community, reopens its fall 2022 schedule with a newly conceived series, TEXAS COLLECTS, presenting highly motivated collectors generously sharing their private holdings with a curious crowd eager to learn about new art. The initial exhibition in the new series, TEXAS COLLECTS: Carter/Wynne Family Collection, presents the holdings of 30-year Dallas collector Michael Wynne and his wife, Betsy Carter through Dec. 10. site131.com

39 SMINK

A showcase of fine design and furniture, SMINK is a purveyor of quality products for living. The showroom also hosts exhibitions featuring Robert Szot, Gary Faye, Richard Hogan, Dara Mark, and Paula Roland. sminkinc.com 3

40 SMU POLLOCK GALLERY

Re/do Until Re/done displays work by Sara Dotterer and Ian Grieve, second-year graduate students, through Oct.15. Next, Aquatic channels: waterways, water resources, fluvial imaginations will open Oct. 29. smu.edu/meadows/areasofstudy/art/pollockgallery

41 SOUTHWEST GALLERY

For over 50 years, Southwest Gallery has provided Dallas with the largest collection of fine 19th–21st century paintings and sculptures. Spanish Realism opens Oct. 5, and a show for Irene Sheri will open Nov. 5. swgallery.com

42 SWEET PASS SCULPTURE PARK

Currently closed due to flooding, Sweet Pass will reopen in Oct. 2022. sweetpasssculpturepark.com

43 TALLEY DUNN GALLERY

Somethin’ Else , f eaturing works by Ori Gersht, Letitia Huckaby, William Kentridge, Linda Ridgway, and Ursula von Rydingsvard, closes Oct. 22. Gabriel Dawe: Ode to Futility continues through Dec. 10. Image: talleydunn.com

44 VALLEY HOUSE GALLERY

Ying Li: Quintessence marks the artist’s first solo exhibition in Texas, opening Oct. 1 with an artist talk and reception on

OUR
TWO
TWO
AND ART
WITH JOSHUA HAGLER KELLI VANCE
55OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2022 TOP: JOSHUA HAGLER | MOSAIC (DETAIL), 2022 MIXED MEDIA ON POLYESTER FILM MOUNTED ON WOOD PANEL, 12 X 12 INCHES BOTTOM: KELLI VANCE | HALF PAST MIDNIGHT (DETAIL), 2022, OIL ON LINEN, 24 X 36 INCHES 214 / 745-1415 | CRISWORLEY.COM 1845 LEVEE STREET, SUITE 110 DALLAS, TEXAS 75207 WE ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE
PARTICIPATION IN THE 2022
X
FOR AIDS
AUCTION
11

LAURA RATHE FINE ART

LUCRECIA WAGGONER AUDRA WEASER TRACES

Opening Reception

October 8, 4:30 7:30 pm

Artist talk at 6:30 pm

October 8 - November 12, 2022

DALLAS DESIGN DISTRICT 1130 Dragon Street, Dallas, TX 75207 lrfadallas@laurarathe.com www.laurarathe.com

03

Oct. 15. With studios in New York City and Haverford, Pennsylvania, Ying Li is a professor of fine arts at Haverford College. The show continues through Nov. 5. David A. Dreyer: Cold Mountain Jam, opens Nov. 12 with a reception. Dreyer’s observations of the vast landscapes and skies in Texas and New Mexico inform his personal language of pictorial elements built over time in layers of color and line. Image: Ying Li, Poetree #3, 2021, oil on linen, 36 x 36 in. valleyhouse.com

45 VARIOUS SMALL FIRES

Tucked behind the Joule Hotel, Various Small Fires will open a solo show for Los Angeles artist Kohshin Finley opens Oct. 8, continuing through Nov. 12. Next, an exhibition for conceptual artist Sean Landers will run Nov. 18–Jan. 7. Landers is best known for using his personal experience as public subject matter and for utilizing diverse styles and media in a performative manner. vsf.la

46 W.A.A.S. GALLERY

Curated through a lens of sustainability, W.A.A.S. empowers artists to connect to their communities and facilitate societal change while offering an interstellar sanctuary to communicate artist expression and immersion. waasgallery.com

47 WEBB GALLERY

Waxahachie’s Webb Gallery presents New Work by Panacea (aka Miss Pussycat), on view Nov. 6–Jan. 29. webbartgallery.com

48 WILLIAM CAMPBELL GALLERY

Steve Murphy: Tipping Point will be on view through Oct. 29. Next, Benito Huerta: Intersection features Huerta’s work through Nov. 5. Additionally, works from artist Billy Hassell will be on view at William Campbell Gallery’s Byers Avenue location from Nov. 12–Jan. 5. williamcampbellcontemporaryart.com

AUCTIONS, EVENTS, AND SPECIAL EXHIBITS

01 DALLAS AUCTION GALLERY

Dallas Auction Gallery specializes in auctioning the best in antiques, fine art, and Asian antiquities. dallasauctiongallery.com

56 PATRONMAGAZINE.COM
NOTED: GALLERIES

02 HERITAGE AUCTIONS

HA slated auctions for the fall are the Illustration Art Signature Auction on Oct. 7, Photographs Signature Auction on Oct. 11, Depth of Field: Photographs Auction on Oct. 12, Fine & Decorative Arts Showcase Auction on Oct. 13, the Alan Kessler Collection Ethnographic Art Signature Auction on Oct. 14, the Texas Art Signature Auction on Oct. 22, the Western Art Showcase Auction on Oct. 28 Nov. 1 sees the In Focus: Peter Max Fine Art Showcase Auction, then the Urban Art Showcase Auction on Nov. 2, Prints In Focus: Marc Chagall Showcase Auction on Nov. 3, the American Art Signature Auction on Nov. 4, the Gilded Age: Property from the Collection of Richard Watson Gilder and Helena de Kay Gilder American Art Signature Auction on Nov. 9, the Modern & Contemporary Art Signature Auction on Nov. 17, the Erté Art & Design Showcase Auction on Nov. 18. ha.com

03 LONE STAR ART AUCTION

Taking place Oct. 28–29 in Dallas, the Lone Star Art Auction is a Texas-sized auction specializing in the best American, Western, wildlife, sporting, and Texas fine art. Presented by Great American West and Phil Berkebile, Jr., the LSAA will bring buyers, collectors, and sellers of historic and contemporary fine art together for an enjoyable and highly entertaining event. Consignments are now being accepted for what will be Texas’ largest art auction event in 2022. Image: Ed Mell, Thunderheads, 2021, oil on linen board, 12 x 16 in. lsartauction.com

04 THE OTHER ART FAIR

Game-changing artists, original artworks, and more than a few surprises—early bird tickets are now on sale for The Other Art Fair at Dallas Market Hall. See affordable and original artworks and 130 independent artists with immersive installations, performances, DJs, and a fully stocked bar, Oct. 20–23. theotherartfair.com

05 TWO x TWO FOR AIDS AND ART

First Look , a preview party and fundraiser, takes place Oct. 6 at The Rachofsky House, presented by Neiman Marcus. While the TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art 2022 Gala is sold out, online bidding opens Oct. 6 and continues through Oct. 22. Image: Rodney McMillian, Untitled, 2019, latex on blanket, 70 x 57 x 2 in. Estimated retail value: $70,000. Courtesy of the artist; Petzel Gallery, New York; and Vielmetter Los Angeles. twoxtwo.org

57OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2022 44

BIDDING THAT COUNTS

Looking to expand or start an art collection?

The charitable TWO x TWO auction is legendary.

Five years ago, in 2018, I attended TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art for the first time. That year, Dana Schutz was the amfAR Artist Honoree, Diana Ross had the entire audience dancing in the gala tent, and it was my first time experiencing the culmination of art, entertainment, and philanthropy that is TWO x TWO. What struck me the most was the fervor around the auction. There was a palpable buzz as partygoers explored the offerings and eager hands shot up to grab the attention of the always-impressive Oliver Barker, a venerated Sotheby’s auctioneer. Following the live auction, an engaged crowd followed event chairs Howard Rachofsky and John Runyon through The Rachofsky House late into the evening as they closed each lot in the silent auction.

Every fall, I eagerly await the release of the online auction catalog, a ripe hunting ground for collectors new and established alike. The TWO x TWO team has a track record for recognizing artists on the rise as well as pinpointing very timely honorees: This year will be art-world superstar Rashid Johnson. The auction includes works in diverse media and at varying price points—something for everyone. Sotheby’s has been a proud supporter of TWO x TWO for 22 years, and I look forward to October 22, when our auctioneer Michael Macaulay will take the stage once again.

As head of office for Sotheby’s Dallas, I advise clients regularly on auction and private-sale purchases and consignments. I see TWO x TWO as an opportunity of discovery for my clients, a chance to learn about new artists and discover various media, with the silver lining that all proceeds go to amfAR and the Dallas Museum of Art.

My first piece of advice when perusing the auction? Follow your gut. Visit twoxtwo.org and browse to find which works speak to you. Second, find an opportunity to see the pieces in person. Thumbnails on a website provide a first impression, but nothing replaces seeing the artwork in real life, especially in the setting of the incredible

Clockwise from above left: Saif Azzuz, Aiken’s Crick (Lulu), 2019, acrylic, enamel, spray paint, and oil stick on canvas, 62 x 90 in. Estimated retail value: $17,500. Courtesy of the artist and Anthony Meier Fine Arts, San Francisco; Charlie Adamski Caulkins at TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art. Photograph by Bruno; Matthew Ronay, Linen and Leather Membrane, 2020, basswood, dye, plastic, steel, and cotton 13.50 x 15.25 x 7.25 in. Estimated retail value: $32,000. Courtesy of the artist and Casey Kaplan, New York. © Matthew Ronay. Photograph by Matthew Ronay.

58 PATRONMAGAZINE.COM

Richard Meier–designed Rachofsky House. (For example, you’ll see that Saif Azzuz’s painting Aiken’s Crick (LULU) measures an imposing 62 x 90 inches.) Next, find out how the works on your list are being sold, whether through OWNitNOW, the silent auction, or the live auction. OWNitNOW works become available on October 6, so you must act fast. Lastly, have fun, learn something about a new artist, and enjoy a little friendly competition in the drama of the auction.

This year’s lineup will not disappoint. Here are a few highlights that caught my attention:

OWNitNOW

Works available for purchase starting October 6. Once sold, they are gone!

Linen and Leather Membrane, 2020, by Matthew Ronay is a strong (and houseable!) example of the Brooklyn-based artist’s sculpture. Ronay successfully combines organic forms of various media, textures, and shapes into whimsical and lively compositions in saturated tones and varying textures. Exhibited at such institutions as the Serpentine Galleries, London; SculptureCenter, New York; and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, amongst others, Ronay also participated in the 2004 Whitney Biennale. The Nasher Sculpture Center recently acquired a work by the artist and opens an exhibition for him this month.

Helen Pashgian, a pioneering member of the 1960s Light and Space movement out of California, has enjoyed well-deserved exposure of late, most recently with a stunning, career-spanning show at SITE Santa Fe. Pashgian is a true innovator, working with industrial plastics to create forms that play with light and space. In Untitled, 2021, a colored cast-epoxy sphere is perched on an acrylic pedestal as if floating in space—a wonderful example of the artist’s intent to create a moment of illusion, perception, and light.

in the shadows. A green-blue trail of liquid drips down her chin. Although the colors seem otherworldly at first, through her mastery in rendering light, depth, and shadow, Yin brings the figure to life and perfectly translates the urgency of this everyday moment. The Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University recently added a work by the artist to their collection.

Robert Mapplethorpe was an American photographer best known for his powerful black-and-white work. He brought a refined sense of sophistication to each image he created even when the subject matter was edgy and raw. Jack Walls is a powerful composition of the artist’s lover, formal in stature. Mapplethorpe’s work is held in many major museum collections around the world. This lot is a perfect example of the established work that awaits discovery at TWO x TWO.

Honorable mentions include Emily Furr’s dramatic yet serene Kamikaze Swansong, or consider Mirror, Mirror... by Dan Colen, who is having a long-awaited show with Gagosian in the fall.

LIVE AUCTION

The moment for audience participation! Telephone bids are also possible if you are unable to be in the room.

My five-year-old son is obsessed with Star Wars, so I could not help but take a closer look when I saw amongst the live-auction lots Japanese artist Ulala Imai’s whimsical still life featuring Chewbacca. Imai’s masterful brushwork brings this bright composition to life by playing with textures and surfaces of objects: the skin of the pineapple contrasts with the hard edge of the coffee kettle and gleaming lemons. Imai successfully breathes life and purpose into these everyday objects found around her home. P

SILENT AUCTION

The silent auction closes the gala, following the dinner. Each lot closes consecutively—and the silent auction can be a great place to look for opportunities. Maximum bids can be arranged for those not in attendance.

I am always drawn to artists who demonstrate mastery in color, and Livien Yin does just that. In Thirsty No. 1, teal green highlights of the woman’s face contrast sharply with the ochre skin tones

Clockwise from above right: Dan Colen, Mirror, Mirror…, 2010, chewing gum on canvas, 105 x 85 in. Estimated retail value: $250,000. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian © Dan Colen.; Ulala Imai, Ambassador, 2020, oil on canvas, 35.87 x 46 in. Estimated retail value: $55,000. Courtesy of the artist; Nonaka-Hill, Los Angeles; and Karma, New York and Los Angeles; Robert Mapplethorpe, Jack Walls, 1983, gelatin silver print, 20 x 16 in. edition 2 of 10. Estimated retail value: $10,000. Courtesy of Gladstone Gallery © The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. Used with permission.

59OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2022
AUCTION

IT’S ALL IN WITH FRIENDS INDEED

Housed in a self-described “absurdly small experimental vitrine,” San Francisco’s Friends Indeed, founded by Micki Meng, is making friends everywhere. Dallas Art Fair and TWO x TWO are a couple of the gallery’s companions in art. Art advisor Adam Green catches up with Meng here:

Adam Green (AG): Micki, I’m so excited to chat with you. Friends Indeed is a really special gallery! You show so many exciting artists, and the energy around your program is palpable. For readers who are new to Friends Indeed, how would you describe your program?

Micki Meng (MM): Before I started the gallery, I had an institutional background and also founded an experimental nonprofit serving artists, where I spent a lot of time researching how to best support their vision. I was thankful to have the mentorship of Laura Owens, Franklin Sirmans, Susanne Ghez, and others on our board. When I started Friends Indeed, I really wanted to continue that ethos. We are a gallery-cum-institution that focuses on equity in the canon. We not only present pioneering artists of our generation, but our aim is to support their longevity. I think it’s important to grow with my generation, so we work with a lot of peer artists and next-generation collectors and advise them to get involved with their local museums. We are also deeply invested in activist issues and are strong advocates for climate action. We are a carbon-negative organization.

AG: You have a really great eye and a talent for identifying artists early in their careers and helping them grow. What are some of the things you look for when meeting with rising artists?

MM: We work with artists who have a singular vision. The most important thing is that we vibe and work well together. When we commit to an artist, we’re all in. The artists we partner with are like family. I always tell the artists we work with that this is a long game, and we want to be doing this for the rest of our lives. We not only place works with surgical precision, but we are committed to building a healthy ecosystem of support and are dedicated to their vision and success.

AG: The gallery is based in San Francisco. What is the art scene like there at the moment? Is the tech industry finally beginning to embrace the art world?

MM: It’s a special community, similar to Dallas, that has a much deeper commitment to art. There is virtually no culture of flipping. The tech industry has always embraced art; it’s just a bit more hidden, non-mainstream, and experimental. Collectors here don’t pay attention to trends and are highly specific. There are many activist-collectors. Some of the biggest collectors and patrons come from tech, and it’s been that way since the ’80s. Two of the most prominent video collections in the world are based in the Bay Area (and have origins in tech): Kadist art foundation and the Kramlich Collection, for example.

AG: It was incredibly generous of you and the artist Lauren Quin to donate a painting to TWO x TWO last year, and we’re thrilled that the gallery and the artist Livien Yin will be donating a painting this year. There are so many

Dedicated to artists with a singular vision, the San Francisco gallery forges friendships in Dallas.
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FAIR TRADE

benefit events throughout the year and artists are often asked to contribute artworks to them. Why have you and your artists chosen to participate in TWO x TWO? How is it different from other benefits?

MM: Livien graduated from Stanford’s MFA program in the middle of the pandemic, and we were able to have her first solo show in San Francisco in January of 2022. We introduced her work to an international audience, and it was very well received. We sold out before we even opened, including to two museums. I connected her with Larry Ossei-Mensah, who put her in a couple shows; she got into Skowhegan; the Cantor will be showing her painting later this year; and she’s moving to New York this fall after being selected for a very notable art residency. Everything has happened this year. Livien’s figurative paintings are incredibly researched and based off of real or fictional accounts of Asian diasporic history. A large work from this Paper Sun series will be auctioned at TWO x TWO in October to benefit amfAR and the Dallas Museum of Art.

AG: You’re all-in on Dallas. You’re also going to be participating in the Dallas Art Fair next year. What excites you about Dallas? Why is it a priority for you to further embed yourself in the Dallas art community?

MM: I was born and raised in Texas, and Dallas feels like an extension of home. There are world-class collections here, and the community is so dedicated to art and providing an ecosystem where artists can thrive. You can’t find better patrons-collectors. They raise the bar.

AG: I know it’s several months away, but what artists will you be showing at the Dallas Art Fair next year?

MM: We are presenting a booth with our friends from Grimm Gallery with Gabriella Boyd, Francesca Mollett, and Rosalind Nashashibi; we’re excited to showcase London-based artists who are making a big impression on the international scene.

About Adam Green:

With over fifteen years of experience in the art industry, Adam Green founded Adam Green Art Advisory in 2016. Adam advises new and experienced collectors on contemporary art acquisitions and collection strategies. He also locates and brokers important contemporary artworks. You can follow him on Instagram at @adamgreenartadvisory. P

This page: Artist Lauren Quin and Micki Meng at TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art. Photograph by Bruno. Opposite, from top: Livien Yin: Ka-La-fonne-a at Friends Indeed Gallery; Livien Yin, Thirsty No. 1, 2022, oil on linen, 54 x 66 in. Courtesy of the artist and Friends Indeed.
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214.649.4375 jeanne.milligan@alliebeth.com jeannemillligan.com

A TRIBUTE TO A LEGENDARY COWGIRL

“Every great museum has its primary patrons who step up in ways that change their museums forever,” says Marla Price, director of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. “Anne Marion’s generosity to the Modern was deep and broad and moved the museum to a new level of importance and recognition.”

The landmark exhibition Modern Masters: A Tribute to Anne Windfohr Marion, which looks back nearly half a century at Anne Windfohr Marion’s contributions to the museum’s foundation, commemorates one of the Modern’s greatest patrons.

Marion’s generosity to many institutions is celebrated throughout the art world and beyond. She was the founder of the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, and funded projects for Texas Tech University, Texas Christian University, and the Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital, among many others. However, the Modern Museum of Fort Worth may have held a special place in her heart.

Modern Masters, which includes 80 works by 47 artists, begins with three extraordinary works from her collection, given to the Modern through her estate in 2021: Arshile Gorky’s The Plow and the Song , 1947; Willem de Kooning’s Two Women, 1954–55; and Mark Rothko’s majestic White Band No. 27, 1954. The Modern’s former chief curator, and the curator of this exhibition, Michael Auping, has described the gift of these paintings as “a monumental addition to the museum’s collection, each work a classic example of the artist’s signature style.”

A scholar of abstract expressionism, Auping elaborates: “The Plow and the Song is an homage to the central theme of Gorky’s imagery— memories of the farms and landscape of his homeland of Armenia,

and de Kooning’s Two Women stands perfectly in the center of the development of the artist’s famous group of Woman paintings. White Band is nothing less than a masterpiece within Rothko’s oeuvre. A diaphanous blue atmosphere holds a mysterious white band in its field, creating an immersive experience that you can only find in his greatest paintings.”

The exhibition will combine these stellar paintings, seen together here for the first time, with a major group of works by Jackson Pollock, purchased by the Modern with the help of Marion and her Burnett Foundation. The works, acquired by the Modern in 1985, poignantly trace Pollock’s expressive journey between psychological figuration and abstraction.

In 1995, Marion provided a $1 million grant for the acquisition of photography after 1970, which allowed the Modern to acquire major works by an international field of artists including Bernd and Hilla Becher, Sally Mann, Yasumasa Morimura, Richard Prince, Cindy Sherman, Thomas Ruff, Thomas Struth, Hiroshi Sugimoto, and Carrie Mae Weems, among many others also in this exhibition.

In 2001, Marion donated more than $12 million to the museum to purchase major works by key artists, resulting in the acquisition of art by Francis Bacon, Howard Hodgkin, Anselm Kiefer, Gerhard Richter, Sean Scully, and Richard Serra. And among her greatest legacies will be her leadership in the drive for a new building for the museum, designed by the world-renowned Japanese architect Tadao Ando. “It is a joy to bring these works together in the building she loved,” says Price. P

Clockwise from top left: Mark Rothko, White Band No. 27, 1954, oil on canvas, 81.25 x 87 in. Collection of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, gift of Anne Windfohr Marion; David Smith, Dida Becca Merry X, 1964, steel, 74.25 x 30.50 x 18 in. Collection of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, gift of Anne Windfohr Marion; Ellsworth Kelly, Spectrum III, 1967, oil on canvas, 33.25 × 108.62 in. Collection of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, gift of Anne Windfohr Marion; Arshile Gorky, The Plow and the Song, 1947, oil on burlap, 52.12 x 64.25 in. Collection of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, gift of Anne Windfohr Marion; Willem de Kooning, Two Women, 1954–55, oil and charcoal on canvas, 40 x 50 in. Collection of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, gift of Anne Windfohr Marion.

Anne Windfohr Marion’s contributions to the Modern are underscored in a new show.
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OPENINGS
Gierhart-Fearing and Dean Fearing, Chairs purchase tickets, vist: taca-arts.org/glitz Complimentary valet provided Individual tickets start at $750 TACA invites you to the inaugural November 3, 2022 - 6PM presented by Ritz-Carlton Dallas Avenue, Dallas, Texas Featuring Broadway & Television Actor & Singer ERICH BERGEN

Johannes Vermeer (Dutch, 1632–1675), Woman in Blue Reading a Letter, c. 1663, oil on canvas, 18.25 x 15.37 in. Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. On loan from the City of Amsterdam (A. van der Hoop bequest).

Meadows Museum spotlights

Johannes Vermeer’s influence on Salvador Dalí

alí was unusually interested in Old Masters and was very candid about it. He had a ranking system for their work,” explains Amanda W. Dotseth, curator and director ad interim at the Meadows Museum. Salvador Dalí was particularly inspired by the Dutch 17th-century painter Johannes Vermeer. As a teenager, Dalí received the entire Gowans’ Art Books series as a gift from his uncle. The Masterpieces of De Hooch and Vermeer was among his favorites in the 52-volume series, which was originally published in the early 20th century.

This fall, the Meadows Museum will present Dalí/Vermeer: A Dialogue. For the first time, Dalí’s painting, The Image Disappears (1938), will be shown alongside the work that inspired it: Vermeer’s Woman in Blue Reading a Letter (c. 1663). They will be on loan from the Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí in Figueres, Spain and the

Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, respectively.

Vermeer’s influence stretches across Dalí’s oeuvre. From individual elements, ranging from anatomical limbs to period clothing to an all-out copy of Vermeer’s Lacemaker, completed as a commission for Robert Lehman in 1955, Dalí looked at the Dutch master’s work from a variety of angles, which he then translated into his own vernacular.

Seeing these brilliant works by the Spanish and Dutch artists side by side, the influence is unmistakable. In Vermeer’s work, an elegantly dressed woman, bathed in the natural light emanating from the window in front of her, stands at a table reading a letter. Between her presumed literacy and the map of the newly independent Netherlands on the wall behind her, it reflects the dynamic contemporary world in which it was created.

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“D

Salvador Dalí (Spanish, 1904–1989), The Image Disappears , 1938, oil on canvas, 22.25 x 19.84 in. Work loaned by the Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí. © 2022

Salvador Dalí, Fundació Gala-Salvador Dalí, Artists Rights Society.

Dalí’s work also reflects its time. Dotseth notes, “Dalí’s double images are a fascinating aspect of his brand of surrealism. It’s a game of one image fading in and out. It forces the viewer to make a choice.”

Furthermore, she says, “What Dalí riffs on is the composition.” The Image Disappears incorporates compositional elements found across Vermeer’s greater body of work, such as the curtain and the checkerboard floor, which are not present in Woman in Blue Reading a Letter. And while nodding to Vermeer compositionally, Dalí’s technique is spectacularly his own. Here, he refashions the 17thcentury Dutch interior while simultaneously using the language of 20th-century surrealism to create a double image. Transposing the map on the back wall into one of Spain further anchors it to his homeland.

Neither of these paintings is frequently loaned, Dotseth explains, making their Dallas debut all the more impressive. Additionally, she speculates, no one knows if Dalí ever saw Woman in Blue Reading a Letter in person or if his only knowledge came from the grainy black-and-white reproductions in the Gowans’ books. She adds, however, “Dalí is working in the moment in which images are traveling in ways they had not been before.”

This is the final exhibition conceived by Dr. Mark Roglán, the museum’s late director. It draws upon research that he did in preparation for the museum’s blockbuster exhibition in 2018, Dalí:

Poetics of the Small, 1929-1936. The essay he wrote for that catalogue, exploring Vermeer’s influence on Dalí, served as a springboard for the current exhibition.

The museum’s vast Dalí collection includes several works on paper that also reflect Vermeer’s influence. These will be installed alongside the two paintings.

The museum also owns L’Homme Poisson (1930), the only painting by Dalí in a public collection in Texas, as well as the sculpture Venus de Milo with Drawers (1936), both of which will be on view.

The second installment of the museum’s Masterpiece in Residence series will run concurrently. This program, begun last spring, brings a Spanish masterwork from an American collection to the Meadows Museum. This fall’s iteration features Diego Velázquez’s King Philip IV of Spain (c. 1644), also known as the Fraga Philip, on loan from New York’s Frick Collection. It will be joined with the three works by the artist in the museum’s collection. “There will be four crackerjack paintings by Velázquez from different moments in his career in one gallery,” Dotseth enthuses.

The opportunity to simultaneously explore Dalí’s inspiration from Vermeer while placing him within the cultural patrimony embodied by the work of Velázquez makes this a unique moment in Dallas. It is one that Dalí himself would surely have relished. P

65OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2022 OPENINGS

AMORPHOUS BODY STUDY CENTER

Matthew Ronay’s The Crack, the Swell, an Earth, an Ode opens at the Nasher Sculpture Center this October. With his most ambitious work to date, the Brooklynbased sculptor lines up all the angles as we negotiate our relationship with encountering a form expanding in tone and complexity, all the while being observed in turn.

Brandon Kennedy (BK): In preparing for your exhibition at the Nasher, you felt the Lower Level Gallery called for an architectural answer initially. How did you envision this and where did it lead you?

Matthew Ronay (MR): The first time I experienced the space I felt its theater-like quality, the stairs forming seating tiers and the glass wall a proscenium. Initially I wanted to have a series of horizontal works on pedestals that graduated higher, mimicking the stairs, but I abandoned this direction. Nevertheless, I held on to the sense that the image of the show develops as you descend the stairs.

BK: Can you speak to how your original concept transformed during the years of the pandemic in relation to your solo gallery exhibitions at Casey Kaplan and Perrotin Shanghai?

MR: I understood immediately that I would be making a large single work for the room. I don’t enjoy scaling objects up because I’m comforted by the limited scale my body imposes on my work. This left me to concentrate on the horizontal. I began to practice drawing exaggerated horizontal forms to prepare for the exhibition as early as 2018. I took the opportunity of making similar-oriented sculptures for an exhibition in Shanghai to stretch my making muscles in preparation for the Nasher work. Halfway through working on that show the pandemic happened. The Nasher was postponed, and my experience of the pandemic folded me inward as I watched the ambition of creating a large work shrivel. Making intimate, discrete works felt centering and allowed me to speed up the evolution of my language. Eventually I returned to the concept of a large horizontal

Nasher Sculpture Center exhibits Matthew Ronay’s largest and lengthiest sculpture.

work, but my approach to the problem of producing something so long had completely changed. I then used my 2021 exhibition at Casey Kaplan to put into motion some of these new experiences. The biggest change was that I began to combine drawings to make horizontality instead of drawing the entirety in one sitting.

BK:  Color plays such a whimsical and sometimes confounding element in your forms. Can you tell us a little more about how you think about that relationship and what mediums you employ to achieve this effect?

MR: Color is something I have to work diligently at since I am a red/ green color-blind person. I work on color with my co-conspirator Bengü. We have been collaborating on color since 1997. We use a plentitude of techniques to coax out color choices. These usually unfold from the moment I choose which work to make and continue through the duration of its making. We often use color as a mode of misdirection, to deepen the comprehension of the piece. Color choices range from structural and logical to emotional and intuitive. Color is a parallel association with the feeling of the form. To accomplish this, we have a set of dyed wood swatches that we arrange on white paper towels and then read each other’s body language as they enter the arena of possibility. Although there are many other procedures, it would be too tedious to read about those here.

BK:  How has working in a long, linear format sculpturally changed the way you worked—conceptually, formally, and on this project from gestation to installation?

MR: The process of linking sculptures has allowed me to investigate and cultivate combinations of objects that alone might not have worked as discrete sculptures. A small minority of the drawings I make become sculptures. When some of the discarded drawings are connected to other drawings, they create a richer whole. Working on this project has allowed me to look back at many, many hundreds of drawings with a new lens. Drawings that I loved but could never bring myself to produce as sculptures suddenly have a new attractive quality. I found that when I began drawing horizontally a few years ago, I often filled in horizontal space with ornamental flourishes. I love ornament, but it can leave me with a slight emptiness, so I settled on the additive approach of finding drawings of single works

that fit together, both formally and intuitively, and I combine them.

BK:  How does your practice of drawing relate to how your sculptures progress? What is it like to add a third dimension—or an unseen texture or detail—from your drawing to final realized form?

MR: The sculptures are the progeny of the drawing and the maker. Drawing commences in order to take samples of an evolving visual language I am stalking. I’m very rigorous when portraying in wood exactly what a drawing is saying. One extra wrinkle is that the drawings mostly portray one side of a sculpture, so my sculpting mind has an outlet when defining all other parts of a sculpture that were not outlined in the drawing. The beauty of quick drawings is that they are reckless and free, decisions are made at a rapid pace without any real ramifications. If a drawing doesn’t give me that feeling I’m looking for, I just start another. Object making shares some of these qualities too; a little more or less pressure with the tool teases out forms previously unknowable.

BK:  From our conversations and your entertaining—and often hilarious— lectures, it’s obvious you have a of love of language. Tell me what role words play for you and how you arrive at your titles?

MR: Reading is major. I’m reading everything from lowly gossip to Guy Davenport. All of my consumption text allows me to experience my associations. Text on the internet is especially fruitful as the links are actual. One thought flows into the next with a click. During the lifetime of a sculpture, from its birth as a drawing, to its life as a thing, and its final resting place in my memory, I match it to a parallel system of thought and feeling. This is especially true at the moment I choose a title. Every image, word, sound, etc. carries an association. Associations can go like this: A sculpture is short and has some sort of tendrils…It looks low and fat…I remember a paper on dwarves in Renaissance painting that I wrote in college…I look up dwarf on Wikipedia or Wiktionary…I look at etymology… I start reading the history of dwarves in royal courts…I look at Las Meninas…This takes me to a page where it discusses dwarves in German folklore…I find the word Kobold on Wiktionary…title is Kobold . The word goes hand in glove. Text is texture. P

All images: Matthew Ronay, The Crack, the Swell, an Earth, an Ode (detail), 2022, basswood, dye, gouache, flocking, plastic, steel, cotton, epoxy, HMA, 37.75 x 284 x 13 in.© Matthew Ronay. Courtesy of the artist and Casey Kaplan, New York.
CONTEMPORARIES

War rages on in Ukraine, with the first trial of a Russian soldier charged with rape in June. In Uvalde, 19 schoolchildren and two teachers were lost in a senseless one-man slaughter over an unimaginable 80-some minutes. An onstage slap, in a room of privilege, was felt the world over and left the global population speechless. Violence is ever the quotidian, but Gabrielle Goliath wants to change that. The multidisciplinary South African artist dedicates her practice to remembrance and hope through immersive installations, haunting and lingering.

Within the outsized Dallas Contemporary, in a modestsized soundproof room, Goliath’s Chorus, an elegiac 23-minute two-channel video and sound installation, remembers the 19-year-old student Uyinene Mrwetyana from the University of Cape Town. It was near campus in 2019 when Mrwetyana was savagely raped, tortured, and murdered inside a post office— an ordinary, utilitarian place, often annoying at times but, one assumes, entirely safe. Underscoring South Africa’s epidemic of violence against women, children, and LGBTIQ people, the fatal act sparked national and international outrage. But is this really so far from home?

Chorus marks Gabrielle Goliath’s US debut at Dallas Contemporary VOICES IN UNION BY TERRI PROVENCAL Gabrielle Goliath. Courtesy of the artist. Gabrielle Goliath, Chorus, 2021, two-channel video and sound installation. Courtesy of Goodman Gallery Cape Town. Photograph by Hayden Phipps.
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“It’s a global issue,” says Dallas Contemporary curator Emily Edwards. Since 2018, she’s been in conversations with Goliath regarding her “lifework of mourning” confronting social concerns and gender-based violence specifically among black, brown, femme, and queer lives. “With an artist-centered and values-driven approach, Dallas Contemporary aspires to serve as a launchpad for emerging and mid-career artists,” says Edwards.

Edwards is in touch with artists for multiple years prior to exhibition and was moved by Goliath’s earlier work, Elegy, an ongoing performance project, which, the artist says, “took the form of a lament” to sound the alarm of rape culture in her homeland. “The timing felt right to present Chorus,” says Edward, noting that her “curatorial mission aims to work with artists who seek substantive social change and propose solutions through their practice.”

A father’s love of music, a mother’s love of reading, “ordinary family ritualistic practices,” spurred the artist in Goliath. A devastating event, however—the death of Berenice, a childhood friend shot during a “domestic incident” in 1991—carries through her practice today. Following the death, her mother took a young Gabrielle to her friend’s home to grieve. Berenice’s mother beckoned nine-year-old Gabrielle, calling her by her own daughter’s name instead of hers, and in that moment, she understood that any victim of gun violence could bear Berenice’s name. Goliath carried the inexplicable loss with her.

Years later she memorialized her friend’s life unlived through Berenice 10-28 (2010), where nineteen brown women, each representing a single lost year, offer themselves as surrogate presences, stand-ins for Berenice. “Berenice was such an important and pivotal moment for me as an artist,” says Goliath.

“I was beginning to think around the ethics of representation. What does it mean to me to speak about these issues in my work?”

Mrwetyana’s death “instigated a moment of national ire,” says Goliath, who was compelled to bring voice to the tragedy. Elegy and Berenice feel familiar in Chorus, where Goliath looked to the University of Cape Town Choir to sustain “a solitary emission of breath,” a collective hum—one note that spreads across their whole vocal range. Mrwetyana’s friends are among these voices standing on a choir rostrum. The other block features a projected vacant choir rostrum, its silence marking the absence of women, children, and LGBTIQ individuals killed in South Africa. First on view at the Goodman Gallery in Cape Town, South Africa, Chorus recalled the names of 463 victims on a commemorative roll within the exhibition space, covering the period of August 2019 to August 2021, which Goliath describes as “the singular experience in relationship to the ongoing roll call of names of these individuals.”

For Dallas Contemporary, Goliath’s installation will include an updated list—as femicide is an ongoing crisis in South Africa. The work encourages mourners to take part in a long, collective, and transformative process. “Chorus embodies the power of art to create a positive ripple effect throughout our Dallas community,” says Edwards, who plans to arm staff with resource material for viewers affected by the work. She also plans to include open conversations with local nonprofit organizations supporting women impacted by domestic violence.

“It is about working with the transformative and affective capacities of art, of beauty, to create a space of reverence. These are words I claim. Reverence. Beauty. Ritual,” avows Goliath. P

Gabrielle Goliath, Chorus, 2021, two-channel video and sound installation. Courtesy of Goodman Gallery Cape Town. Photograph by Hayden Phipps.
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CONTEMPORARIES

BY ANY STRETCH OF THE IMAGINATION

Late summer, the African American Museum in Fair Park opened Fire! The Resurrection of Mr. Imagination, on view through January 7, 2023, composed of the late artist’s selftaught oeuvre. Using the detritus of everyday life, Gregory Warmack, known as Mr. Imagination, investigated the boundaries of art through tragic circumstances, coming out on top through spirituality and mythic compositions.

African American Museum curator Phillip E. Collins speaks with Chris Byrne about his legacy.

Chris Byrne (CB): It’s exciting that the African American Museum is hosting Gregory Warmak‘s important retrospective. Fire! The Resurrection of Mr. Imagination features approximately 80 works— how did the exhibition come about?

Phillip Collins (PC):  Fire: The Resurrection of Mr. Imagination came about through a series of interviews with the artist based on the theme of his public persona and private life’s changes.

CB: I had the opportunity to meet Gregory in New York City. Jim Gold, the then president of Bergdorf Goodman, and I organized window installations featuring his work as well as other artists from the collection of the American

Above: The altar from Mr. Imagination's home and studio. Below: Mr. Imagination’s mixed-media Jumper. The singular oeuvre of Mr. Imagination enlivens the African American Museum.
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CONTEMPORARIES

Visionary Art Museum — I learned that it was during a hospitalization in 1978, Gregory had a vision which encouraged his focus on art, adopting the moniker Mr. Imagination. And in January 2008, his home and studio were destroyed in a fire...

PC: Yes — the 2008 house and studio fire he experienced in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, allowed him to expand his spiritual world view. And during his hospitalization in 1978 (while in a coma) he had visions of himself living in other times as gods, kings, and royalty. He declared the experience prophetic and he a prophet, which encouraged his focus on art as a messenger, adopting the moniker, Mr. Imagination.

CB: Can you describe “visual literacy” as it relates to viewing his work?

PC: Gregory was a deeply religious person. He had an extraordinary ability to interpret meaningful art forms and compositions by utilizing various historical religious texts with inconographic images embellished with a variety of found objects such as bottle caps, industrial sandstone, nails, jewelry, plaster, house paint, and putty.

CB: The show includes various self-portraits...

PC: All masks and faces in the exhibition are representations or portraits of Mr. Imagination.

CB: And the installation of the altar from his home and studio in Atlanta is incredible...

PC: Yes— Head of God (located on altar wall above the burnt door) is a head representing Mr. Imagination as a sun god as well as representing the biblical god of Ezekiel’s vision. Self Portrait is a head resting on a metal plate, representing Mr. Imagination as well as representing the biblical John the Baptist with a hair style suggesting the Nemes Crown of Egyptian pharaohs. P Fire! The Resurrection of Mr. Imagination installation views.

Fire! The Resurrection of Mr. Imagination installation views.
71OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2022

SPEND MONEY. SAVE LIVES.

Monies raised during TWO x TWO benefit AIDS research through amfAR.

Kevin Robert Frost joined the staff of amfAR, The Foundation for AIDS Research, in 1994 and was appointed chief executive officer in 2007. Here Kevin discusses amfAR’s goals and priorities and explains how amfAR invests the funds it raises through renowned fundraising galas such as TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art.

Andrew McInness (AM): What are amfAR’s current research priorities?

Kevin Robert Frost (KRF): We’re laser focused on developing a cure for HIV that’s safe, affordable, and accessible to the 38 million people worldwide who are living with HIV. We’re pursuing a range of promising strategies, including various types of cell and gene therapies, immunotherapy, and pharmacologic approaches. At the amfAR Institute for HIV Cure Research in San Francisco, researchers are in the midst of a complex HIV cure trial that involves a combination of agents. Right now, the big scientific challenge is the persistent reservoir of virus that’s able to evade attack by antiHIV drugs and the immune system. Unfortunately, HIV is a very complex and wily virus, and finding a way to eliminate this reservoir has proven extremely difficult. But if we can achieve it, we could be well on our way to a cure.

AM: Will you summarize some of the recent grants amfAR has awarded?

KRF: In July we awarded $1.6 million to five research teams working on various cure strategies. Three teams are investigating gene therapy approaches, including the use of CAR T cells—cells that have been genetically engineered to target and kill HIVinfected cells. This approach has been used successfully and quite dramatically in the treatment of certain types of cancer, and there is some optimism that it can be adapted to cure HIV. But the biggest grant was awarded to a team at Massachusetts General Hospital that’s investigating the possibility that some people on long-term treatment may have cleared the virus without knowing it. This could potentially change the game for people who today assume they’ll be on treatment for life. We expect our board of trustees to approve a new round of grants when it meets later this month.

AM: Have there been major advances or breakthroughs lately?

KRF: This year alone there have been two new cases of a cure, bringing the number of confirmed cases to five. All have resulted from stem cell transplantation—a high-risk and costly procedure that’s only an option for a very small number of individuals with both HIV and certain types of cancer. These cases have confirmed the central importance of a genetic mutation common to all of the stem cell donors that makes them resistant to HIV. Now we have to find a way to exploit or replicate this mutation, called CCR5 delta32, in a way that’s far less invasive and more widely applicable.

AM: Did amfAR have any involvement in research on COVID-19?

KRF: At the start of the outbreak, many HIV researchers pivoted immediately to COVID-19. Their expertise in virology, immunology, and other specialties would prove critical to characterizing this novel virus and developing vaccines and therapeutics. As an infectious disease organization with years of experience, we quickly launched the amfAR Fund to Fight COVID-19 to support the research effort. Through the fund we awarded a number of grants investigating areas such as COVID-associated kidney disease, antibodies, and the intersection between HIV and COVID-19. At the same time, our policy team led the way, through its research and analysis, in highlighting the stark racial disparities in the COVID response.

AM: What other work is amfAR supporting?

KRF: We’re very interested in the phenomenon of elite control, i.e. the small number of people who are able to keep their HIV in check in the absence of treatment. What is it about their immune systems that makes this possible? Our researchers are working hard to figure this out so that perhaps we can replicate this powerful immune response in other—maybe all—people living with HIV.

AM: What are your hopes for the next couple of years?

KRF: First and foremost, we want to see rapid progress towards a cure. To a large extent, a cure for HIV is now a problem of technology. We have a pretty good understanding of the scientific questions that stand in the way of a cure. We need to develop and refine the tools needed to answer these questions. Scientific progress is typically incremental, but we’re working towards, and hoping for, major breakthroughs that could truly bring a cure within our grasp. P

TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art 2021 auction highlights. Photograph by Kevin Tachman. A spectacular TWO x TWO evening. Photograph by Exploredinary. Kevin Robert Frost. Courtesy of amfAR.
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CONTEMPORARIES
Price and availability subject to change. Information deemed reliable, but not guaranteed.A Berkshire Hathaway Affiliate 5robledo.daveperrymiller.com 5 Robledo Drive 4 BEDROOMS | 4.2 BATHS | 8,382 SQ. FT. | $5,299,000 Patricia Massey 214.697.7871 patricia@dpmre.com Jennifer Haddock 214.762.6213 jh@dpmre.com 3401lee1403.daveperrymiller.com The Mayfair #1403 2 BEDROOMS | 2.1 BATHS | 3 LA | 4-CAR | 4,620 SQ. FT. | $2,195,000 Sharon S. Quist 214.695.9595 sharonquist@dpmre.com SOLD OFF-MARKET, Represented Seller The House Condominiums #1004 2 BEDROOMS | 2.1 BATHS | 2,128 SQ. FT. | PRICE UPON REQUEST Claudine King 214.789.0101 claudine@dpmre.com 3831turtlecreek8G.daveperrymiller.com The Warrington #8G 2 BEDROOMS | 2 BATHS | 1,597 SQ. FT. | $895,000 Emily Ray-Porter 214.544.5698 emily@dpmre.com

IN GLORIOUS BLACK AND WHITE

There was an ineffable, but unmistakable, hush in the main gallery of Cris Worley Fine Arts on my recent visit. As I communed with Nishiki Sugawara-Beda: Pot of Soot at the End of The Rainbow, the Japanese American artist’s sumi ink paintings seemed to whisper a language beyond the need for words, evoking a reverential catch-your-breath quiet that’s typically the province of cathedrals, temples, and shrines. Take this all in. Slow down. This moment, now this moment, and now this one…

The exhibition, which ran from July 9 through August 20, marked the artist’s first show with Cris Worley, and, indeed, her first in Dallas. It was an auspicious local debut, with SugawaraBeda’s black-and-white abstract paintings spiritualizing the temperament of the room as the room embraced the work—it felt like an inevitable, symbiotic homecoming. “She’s been able to get, in a black-and-white show, a lot of color in just the black,” gallerist Cris Worley comments with a laugh. “There are so many variables of gray.” And Worley adds that while the artist’s materials are centuries old and unmistakably representative of her culture, this is something new: “She’s using sumi in ways that are nontraditional; she’s turning it into a different kind of art form, a contemporary art form.”

Leaving the sanctuary of the gallery behind, I’m off to visit Sugawara-Beda at her SMU studio; she’s just begun her fifth year teaching painting and drawing at SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts following a hiatus year of research leave. The studio is a new one for her, and she’s only been in it for about a month. And while

Nishiki Sugawara-Beda’s practice utilizes traditional ancient materials to explore and imagine, captivating viewers today.
Nishiki Sugawara-Beda: Pot of Soot at the End of the Rainbow, installation view at Cris Worley Fine Arts. Photograph by Kevin Todora. Nishiki Sugawara-Beda in her studio. Photograph by Victoria Gomez.
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the space is minimal, spartan, evincing a Zen-like asceticism, it’s nonetheless conducive to creativity. She’s especially happy with the depth of the room, the way it allows her to get a long perspective on her developing paintings. On this occasion her first-grader is in the studio as well, hard at work; she tells me she’s just finished her own first painting, and she’s decided to do 99 more—stay tuned. The studio’s walls are festooned with recent work, some completed, some in progress, and the myriad tools of the artist’s trade are close at hand: a variety of sumi ink sticks, brushes, paper, panels, mortar and pestle, and mixing vessels, imbuing the work space with a meditative sense of ritual and discovery.

Earlier this year, Nishiki Sugawara-Beda was one of three artists awarded the DMA’s annual Otis and Velma Davis Dozier Travel Grant. Established in 1990, the grant is designed to fund travel for questing Texas-based professional artists, and Sugawara-Beda has already put the award to good use with a two-week trip to Poland last spring; it’s her husband’s country of origin. “I was searching about some sort of origins, conceptual origins, or technical origins, or cultural, or materials’ origins,” she explains. “I just happen to come from Japan, so my way of tracing back was naturally a path through Japanese culture. But my hope, my ultimate goal, my aim is the core of humanity—we all share something. That’s something I’m thinking about.” With her husband, artist Bartosz Beda, being Polish American, and Nishiki being Japanese American, their daughter is Japanese Polish American, and Sugawara-Beda’s decision to visit Poland was partly a nod to her triple-hyphenate identity; Sugawara-Beda is very interested in bringing some of that Eastern European DNA to her work.

“The Japanese sumi ink I usually use is made of soot and animal glue—those are the main ingredients,” she continues. “But going to a different place, for example Poland, I found wood or other materials to burn and collect the soot as my pigment. So in a way I

could paint about the Polish landscape, the Polish people, and my experience using its materials.” She returned to Dallas with a lot of Poland-sourced soot, and it’s destined to become pigment for future works exploring her Polish travels.

Her paintings, whether large or small-scale, command a room, and the artist’s command of her materials is absolute. Her varied brushstrokes can range from near-microscopic precision to bold, exclamatory huzzahs, a testament not only to her expertise but also to sumi’s versatility as a timeless, and timely, expressive medium. The artist’s reverence for sumi is boundless, as evidenced by her obsession to understand her materials and their origins. The vast majority of Japanese sumi comes from the city of Nara, and Sugawara-Beda has visited on several occasions, meeting makers and merchants, forging spiritual connections that ultimately inform the work. “Understanding the materials is partly me going back to the origin, to really understand it.” she says. “I’ve gotten really interested in who made the materials I’m dealing with. And this tradition has its own culture—sumi, by itself, doesn’t do anything…but with water it becomes ink…” And in the hands of sumi alchemist Nishiki Sugawara-Beda, black-and-white becomes gold. P

Studio view of completed work by Nishiki Sugawara-Beda. Photograph by Victoria Gomez. Nishiki Sugawara-Beda works with sumi ink in her studio. Photograph by Victoria Gomez. Myriad tools of the artist’s trade. Studio view. Photograph by Victoria Gomez.
75OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2022 STUDIO

The Curse of Exile Within the Limits of a Particular Landscape

Quite often we are told something about a stranger before we meet them in the flesh. Rarer to be told about the stories that they will tell when we become acquaintances. Ever the finer beat are we then friends and interminably waiting for them to finish their story or quest so that it may be published and then we can read it and share it with others. Writer and curator Gavin Morrison is no exception to this rule of threes.

Raised in Edinburgh, Scotland, Morrison left straight out of high school to try his footing at rock climbing in the South of France, as one does. He later returned to attend the University of Stirling, then on to Edinburgh to get his MA in mental philosophy with a focus on epistemology and phenomenology. Once you get a sense of his scrambling-about curiosity and conceptual gymnastics, this certain avenue makes perfect sense. Naturally, it also would follow suit that he doesn’t take part in our car commutes and rather insists on long, rural bicycle-riding routes.

All traveling Scotsman asides, Morrison is an ardent follower of proverbial rabbits and their juxtaposed holes. Usually tracing the arc of a larger-than-life personality—typically a hubristic male— caught in some form of expulsion (self or forced), set against a stark landscape whilst trying to both reclaim history through an understanding of its recorded stories and yet also obliterate it by implementing a perverse sense of dramatic staging and obsessivecompulsive behaviors.

Minimalist Donald Judd first came to Marfa, Texas in 1971. Leaving New York mid-decade and settled down south by the close. Judd ventured to Iceland initially seeking solace and the possibilities there in the early ’80s. According to Morrison, Judd also had a deep affinity for the Sagas of Icelanders: heroic, historic narratives that date to the 9th through early 12th centuries. These familial tales also described the landscape in simple terms.

Vernacular architecture was another aspect of Judd’s newfound interest abroad, and he was working with an Icelandic photographer to document the structures set in the primal landscape with hopes of mounting an exhibition in the future. “Architecture, land, literature,” Morrison states simply. He then goes on to describe a heroic farce of a scene in which Judd is on a boat up north in the fjords and orders everyone else to go below deck so that he may ponder the panorama at the bow all alone.

During his time visiting Iceland and exhibiting art there in the ’80s and ’90s, Judd befriended artist Ingólfur Arnarsson, eventually inviting him for an artist residency and a permanent installation at the Chinati Foundation in Marfa in 1992. Morrison and Arnarsson met in 2001 and became friends, and the looping starts to knot as

Gavin Morrison’s Bound Curation of Napoleonic Foodstuffs, Judd in Iceland, and Discarded Photographs.
Gavin Morrison with a painting of Napoleon by François Gérard installed in the French Room Bar at the Adolphus Hotel. Jeff Ferrell, Last Picture . MA: Atopia Projects, 2022.

the author locates a new thread. Morrison initially wrote an essay about Judd’s time in Iceland for the Chinati Foundation magazine in 2018 and will weave together chapters as standalone essays regarding “Judd in Iceland” for a book from the Swiss publisher Lars Müller in the near future.

When embarking on his first visit to Texas in 2001, Morrison did a stopover in Iceland at the suggestion of his friend, Edinburgh artist Alan Johnston. Morrison was on his way to a yearlong fellowship at the Core Residency Program at the Glassell School of Art, part of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. In 2007, he returned to Texas for a curator position with TCU’s Fort Worth Contemporary Arts and produced a number of stellar exhibitions there. From 20182020, Morrison was the director of Skaftfell – Center for Visual Art in East Iceland, where he had curated some shows in the two years previous as an artistic director. During his time in Seyðisfjörður, Morrison learned of Swiss artist Dieter Roth’s influence living there during his last decade of life. Morrison is also currently working on an oral history, framed as a dual portrait of the famed eccentric artist and his unlikely adopted home, told by its inhabitants and brought to life through Roth’s art and bookmaking and absurd yet sincere gestures.

Morrison and his longtime friend, artist/educator Fraser Stables started Atopia Projects over two decades ago with aims to produce curated exhibitions and publications that function as a type of a nonspace, occurring periodically, with unforeseen future collaborations and locations. On this the venture delivers handily with thoughtprovoking exhibitions like American Dirt at The Reading Room (2016), a selection of found photographs by TCU professor of cultural criminology and dumpster diver Jeff Ferrell. Six years later the collaborators reconvened to produce an exquisite and poignant artist’s book of found photography entitled Last Picture

Looming large behind the framing of Morrison’s current projects—in these pages quite literally—is the shadow of the exiled emperor, Napoleon. With an article in the local paper a few years ago, the writer piqued interest in the robed portrait of the famous Frenchman by his court painter, François Gérard, located in the City Hall Bar Room of the Adolphus Hotel. Additionally, as part of The Salon Series at the French Room just adjacent—and curated by Lucia Simek—Morrison charted out the culinary exploits and inventions riding alongside “The Little Corporal,” mapping legends and exaggerations alike, from the etymology of pumpernickel bread to the invention of food rations that could travel to the front lines without spoiling.

Tellingly, Morrison once recounted a story of Napoleon “using food as a means to avoid certain social situations, sometimes even tipping dishes over onto people.” Feeling caught, the emperor is now able to flee elsewhere, free of expectations while upending social codes. As a nod to the sprawling Alexandre Dumas’ Dictionary of Cuisine, Morrison hopes to illuminate tales both true and tall whilst with many amuse-bouche in the form of accompanying drawings by Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson in a yet another forthcoming publication.

At the end of the journey, one can only hope to have stories told about a deposed emperor twice exiled whose horse perhaps had something to do with the naming of a rather divisive, slightly sweet rye bread found mainly in Germany. Or was it that the pattern or coloration of vegetables planted in the garden plot tended by the man himself hinted at a plan for escape from the island of exile just north of his native Corsica? Either or neither way around, Morrison states that he’s always attuned to “stories slightly outside of the main narrative that illuminate another history, perhaps even an apocryphal one.” Sounds like a recipe for a future publication. P

DJ-Þjóðveldisbærinn. Donald Judd at Þjóðveldisbærinn i Þjórsárdalur. Image courtesy of Pétur Arason and Ragna Róbertsdóttir. Warhol and the Shared Subject. Fort Worth Contemporary Arts, TCU. December 2008 – February 2009. Andy Warhol, Rineke Dijkstra, Douglas Gordon, C.S. Leigh, and Tony Scherman. Skaftfell – Center for Visual Art, Seyðisfjörður, Iceland.
77OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2022 VOLUMES

RASHID JOHNSON’S SPACE OF SOVEREIGNTY AND OF CONTEMPLATION

The TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art 2022 Artist Honoree speaks of cultivating a body of work.

This page: Rashid Johnson, Seascape “Jitter Bug,” 2022, oil on linen, 72 in x 96.12 in x 1.68 in. Photograph by Stephanie Powell; Opposite, above: Rashid Johnson, Black and Blue [Film still], 2021, 35 mm film transferred to video, 7:50 minutes. Photograph by Rashid Johnson. ©Rashid Johnson. Courtesy of the artist and David Kordansky Gallery. Below: Performance view of Rashid Johnson: The Hikers at the Aspen Art Museum, 2019. Photograph by Tony Prikryl. ©Rashid Johnson. Courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth.

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79OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2022

In advance of In Focus: Rashid Johnson, opening October 22 at the Dallas Museum of Art, Hoffman Family Senior Curator Anna Katherine Brodbeck connected virtually with TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art 2022 Artist Honoree Rashid Johnson. Here they discuss his practice, both making art and facilitating the projects of others, and how the past few tumultuous years have shaped how he conceives of his work and the field as a whole.

Anna Katherine Brodbeck (AKB): We are so excited to have your work presented at the DMA on the occasion of your role as honored artist for this year’s TWO x TWO benefit auction. And we’re really lucky to have a representative selection of works made in the last decade on view. I’ve been thinking of them a lot lately in the context of the pandemic, which has colored so much of our recent perspective. And even with these early works in particular, I’ve been interested in how you recreate scenes of intimate domesticity, and how the objects around us say so much about our identity, since we’ve been spending so much time at home with such objects. I was wondering if you could speak a little bit about your decision to incorporate objects of symbolic resonance into your work.

Rashid Johnson (RJ): I came by using domestic materials and signifiers that represent kind of domestic space quite honestly. Those were oftentimes things that were in my studio, so I was exploring other themes, concepts, and ways of establishing marks on surfaces, etcetera, and I would often come back to the things that were in the studio. And at one point, I started building shelves to house the things that were there.

I was looking at that kind of ramshackle group of shelves that I’d organized, and looking at how I filled them, and I realized that that assemblage, that kind of collection, that index of materials, was actually the thing I was most interested in. And so giving them an opportunity to best capture what it is they meant to me in my thinking and how they were informing the other things that I was doing, it really started to be this process of marrying the signifiers and the tools that informed my thinking, and then also the marks and gestures and ways that I was approaching surface.

And so the dichotomy that is born of those things coming together became the best way for me to capture my thinking at a certain time.

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Clockwise from above left: Rashid Johnson, Cosmic Dojo, 2009. Photograph by Martin Parsekian. ©Rashid Johnson. Courtesy of the artist; Rashid Johnson, Our People, Kind of, 2010. Photograph by Martin Parsekian. ©Rashid Johnson. Courtesy of the artist and MoMA; Installation view of Rashid Johnson: Fly Away at Hauser & Wirth, New York, 2016. Photograph by Martin Parsekian. ©Rashid Johnson. Courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth.
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AKB: Another very obvious resonance the pandemic has with your work is with the Anxious Man series. I love how these works seem to project a sense of existential dread, which of course we’re feeling even more in our psyches as of late. But the fact that when you repeat these forms, both in individual works, but also when you show a series of them in the room, it challenges the idea of an individual experience of subjectivity in the work. And recently you’ve incorporated new colors in the series, including red, and then black and blue. I wondered if you could speak about the role of both seriality and color in your work.

RJ: Series and seriality are enormously important to how I approach art making, in that it gives me space to grow a body of work or to grow a theme through the process of meditation, or through facing it over and over again, allowing a construction of a theme or a concept to be the armature for how I work, and produce, and learn through it.

And the ideas that exist in the project—whether around sovereignty, or autonomy, or independence—are the collective, right? They really all share equal footing in my project. And to be able to unpack them is really assisted by them being conjured over and over again by me in my studio space. And that space of sovereignty and of contemplation that is my studio, being

able to conjure and face and be distracted by and employ it as a meditative tactic, the opportunity for repetition and then, you know, the natural evolution that’s born of that, in a micro sense as well as macro.

Color and the mobility of color and symbolism and the potential iconography that’s born of color are also really central to how the work evolves and grows, whether it’s suggested in the red that I consider to be so urgent—in the Anxious Red Paintings of 2020, or the blue that’s kind of the sister work to those red paintings, which I call Bruise Paintings, which carries with it all of our understanding of the color, and thinking about bruising, and thinking about symbols and signifiers and all the things that can be conjured in the way that we consider color, whether from a collective discourse or from an individual one. AKB: You’ve spoken a lot about your process and the meditation that occurs within the studio, but your work is also so generous for including spectators, be it through your use of mirrors, which allows the viewer to literally enter your work, or through your creation of stages for performers and other collaborators to share their own work. I wonder if you could speak a bit more about how you balance those two things, about your role as artist and author, but also what you see as the role of spectators and collaborators in

Rashid Johnson, Anxious Red Painting August 17th, 2020. Photograph by Martin Parsekian. ©Rashid Johnson. Courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth.
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your practice.

RJ: I love the dichotomy. I love the opportunity to effectively address both my autonomy and individual space as an artist, and then the space where artists feel a real agency too, and I’m not an exception to that rule. I love that I get to be the author. I love that my ideas and concerns get to be amplified through my project.

Simultaneously, I love the potential that art gives to collaboration, and the opportunity that an artwork can become a stage or a generous platform for not only my critical concerns, but those of others—some of whom I have a tremendous amount of respect and appreciation for, and others with whom I’m just familiarizing myself, as well as folks with whom maybe I don’t necessarily share a lot of the same thinking.

So the opportunity that an artwork can create space is simultaneously important to me with the fact that I’m creating space for myself. And so stages and spaces where musicians can perform, and/or people can just speak out loud, or find their voices, you know, share equal footing with the spaces that I provide for myself to be amplified.

AKB: This is a really amazing opportunity to speak with an artist who, as a board member of the Guggenheim, is so involved in institutional practice at this moment, because the pandemic has also brought about a delayed

reckoning for our field in thinking about our role in including voices from the community. As you’ve had opportunities to reflect deeply about the role of the institution in this way, I wondered if there are any lessons that you might share about how we can deal with greater urgency with the kind of responsibility that we have towards the public.

RJ: We’re living in incredibly complicated times, in particular when we think about inclusion and a reference I just made to making space. And I think the thing that I’m learning most about is that what institutions need to continue to evolve their relationships to communities that have traditionally felt less included in what cultural institutions make available to their patrons—and to folks who step into the spaces—is changing criteria, right? And thinking a little bit differently about how our gatekeeping functions, who those gatekeepers are, who and how we make decisions, and thinking about what and how we imagine people to be qualified in that kind of decision-making.

And once we start challenging the roots of those criteria, then I think we’re going to find ourselves in an advantageous position to be more inclusive in ways that we hadn’t previously. So it’s not so much about pandering or assuming what certain communities need to be active in a space, but it’s actually giving them space to tell you and to be involved and invested in the educational programs, the curatorial programs—giving them

Installation view, Rashid Johnson: Black and Blue at David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles. 2021. Photograph by Martin Parsekian ©Rashid Johnson. Courtesy of the artist and David Kordansky Gallery.
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space and agency and allowing them to be functioning partners in the gatekeeping, to some degree, more so than just imagining what it is that those communities need.

AKB: I also want to take the opportunity to of course thank you for participating in this event. It’s such an honor for us to have you as our honored artist this year because it brings such an important voice, someone really prominently engaged in the most pressing issues of our time, to Dallas, to share not just your work but your thoughts with us. I wondered if there was anything that you wanted to share about what these experiences mean for you, when you travel to new cities and talk with new communities and participate in this way.

RJ: You know, it’s really rewarding to feel the urgency of cities engaged in the cultural discourse and its prescience. So for me, it’s an opportunity to learn as much as it is to bring my own sense of what’s happening and my value system. Places like Dallas have done an incredible job, especially the institutions, of building a group of patrons who have a significant investment in cultural institutions, and I’m a huge believer in what cultural institutions are capable of.

I grew up in Chicago, and my early experiences were at the Art Institute of Chicago, and it changed my life, seeing the work of Clyfford Still and the laundry list of artists that I was exposed to—it’s too long to share. But those spaces taught me that there was a place for me in this broader conversation around art and the way that we canonize and make available opportunities for historical significance. And so I’m just happy to be included and to be recognized amongst a cadre of artists who’ve successfully navigated some of these spaces before me.

AKB: Thank you so much, Rashid, for sharing with us. My final question is: What are you working on now that you’re really excited about?

RJ: I’m just excited to be working. I’m always excited to have the space to work. I’m working on a couple of small exhibitions that I’m excited about, and I have a little relationship to film—short art films as well as feature-length storytelling—so I’m working towards some things in those spaces. I’m just excited to have the space to be in my studio every day and to continue to evolve my concerns into things that are illustrated. P

Rashid Johnson, Falling Man, 2015. Photograph by Martin Parsekian. ©Rashid Johnson. Courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth.
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Rashid Johnson, Stage, 2020. Installation view at MoMA PS1 COURTYARD, 2021. Rashid Johnson, Red Stage . Installation view at Astor Place, New York, June 2021. Photograph by Filip Wolak. ©Rashid Johnson. Courtesy of the artist and Creative Time.
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Matthew Wong, See You On the Other Side, 2019, oil on canvas. Matthew Wong Foundation. © 2022 Matthew Wong Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

FALLEN STAR BURNS BRIGHT

DALLAS MUSEUM OF ART PRESENTS THE FIRST MUSEUM RETROSPECTIVE OF THE LATE CONTEMPORARY ARTIST’S WORK.
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Matthew Wong was a comet, briefly blazing through the art world firmament. This month, Matthew Wong: The Realm of Appearances will open at the Dallas Museum of Art. It is fitting that this is Wong’s inaugural museum exhibition in the US. At the 2017 Dallas Art Fair, Karma presented his painting, The West, which was selected by the Dallas Art Fair Acquisition Fund for the DMA. It was Wong’s first work to enter a museum collection.

The details of Wong’s biography are well documented: Born in Toronto, he was raised in Canada and Hong Kong. After his family’s return to Canada in the late 1990s, he attended the University of Michigan. In 2010, he enrolled in City University of Hong Kong’s School of Creative Media, where, in 2012, he received a master of fine arts degree in photography. He lived in Hong Kong and Guangdong Province until 2016, after which he settled in Edmonton, Alberta. In October 2019, Wong took his own life. He was 35 years old.

A completely self-taught painter, Wong drew inspiration from everything around him. In addition to poetry and music, he undertook an intensive study of art history and was particularly inspired by the art movements of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Contemporary artists such as David Hockney, Lois Dodd, Charline von Heyl, Yayoi Kusama, and Alex Katz, among many others, also served as inspirations. In Hong Kong, Wong came face-to-face with Chinese art and culture, where he particularly admired early Qing dynasty ink painting. Perhaps the scholarly Chinese tradition of writing poetry also inspired him to practice this literary art form.

By 2014 Wong had embraced landscape painting. According to the exhibition’s curator, Vivian Li, The Lupe Murchison Curator of Contemporary Art at the DMA, “He saw landscape as a wide genre for emotional and psychological explorations.” Sanctuary and River at Dusk are among the works from this early period that will be included in the exhibition of 45 paintings. Here, his riotous palette

Matthew Wong, Blue Rain, 2018. Collection of KAWS, promised gift of KAWS, inspired by Julia Chiang, to the Metropolitan Museum of Art. © 2022 Matthew Wong Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

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explores tonal ranges, from the muted greens in Sanctuary to the ebullience of yellows in River at Dusk . “Sanctuary is monumental and very painterly,” Li says. With a lone figure nestled among the growth, it also presents a contemplative moment of quiet serenity.

While his work continued to progress, in Hong Kong he found the doors to critical recognition to be formidable. Fortuitously, when Wong returned to Canada in 2016, he found the door to social media to be wide open. It transformed his life and, in many ways, the art world.

With Facebook as the dominant platform at the time, he was able to connect with influential art critics. These connections led to unprecedented access to contemporary artists, many of whom became mentors and friends. He probed them with questions about materials and techniques while actively participating in discussions. “He was honestly curious and wanted to learn as fast as possible,” Li notes, adding, “Facebook was his classroom.”

By 2017, the art world had migrated to Instagram, where Wong regularly posted images of his work. Through this highly prolific period he found his own voice. “He was progressing every day, and people were giving him feedback. Everyone felt connected to him,” says Li. One of these new friends was the

Matthew Wong, Banishment from the Garden, 2015, oil on canvas (left panel), oil on panel (right panel). Matthew Wong Foundation. © 2022 Matthew Wong Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Matthew Wong, The Performance, 2017, ink on rice paper. Matthew Wong Foundation. © 2022 Matthew Wong Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
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Matthew Wong, The West, 2017, oil on canvas. Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas Art Fair Foundation Acquisition Fund, 2017.28. © 2022 Matthew Wong Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
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Matthew Wong, The Realm of Appearances , 2018. Private collection. © 2022 Matthew Wong Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Matthew Wong, Once Upon a Time in the West, 2018. Martin and Rebecca Eisenberg. © 2022 Matthew Wong Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

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painter Scott Kahn, who felt a deep connection with the young artist. Initially seeing Wong’s work online, Kahn muses, “They were a curious combination of Asian traditional ink drawings and Western abstract expressionism.”

Wong’s use of space and his placement of figures on the canvas began to change by 2018. In some of these works, such as The Kingdom, Li suggests that the figure could be a self-portrait. “The Chinese character for Wong means king, and he often depicts a king (or else his regalia) in his paintings. It is usually a lonely, crowned figure, such as in the center of The Kingdom,” Li explains.

The change in physical environment, from the bustle of Asia to the calmness of Edmonton, marks another noticeable shift in Wong’s work. Li notes that this slower pace comes through in works such as Somewhere, which she describes as “a beautiful melancholy black-and-orange forest scene populated with figures and animals. If you look closely, [it] shows his brilliant sense of the emotional and psychological capacity of color.”

The exhibition also explores Wong’s reuse of canvases. Studies of these are being carried out by Laura Hartman, the DMA paintings conservator. “In some ways it was a practicality, in others it was a deliberate editing of his work,” notes Li.

Wong’s final series reflects a growing sense of social isolation. In The Realm of Appearances, the serenity of the night sky occupies the top quarter of the image while the frenetic forest pulsates

below. One lone figure in the foreground seems lost amid the intense energy of dense foliage.

Painting provided Wong an avenue for wrestling his demons. Diagnosed early in life with autism and Tourette’s syndrome, he also constantly battled depression. And in spite of the universal admiration of those who knew him, this darkness, combined with the rapid rise to fame, became overwhelming. “It was almost a burden on him to have the world encroach on his world and his life,” says Kahn.

Since Li never had the chance to meet Wong, she had hoped that combing through his exuberant presence on social media would be illuminating. Instead she discovered that he had deleted everything. “He was very deliberate. He just wanted his art to speak for itself,” Li says.

And it does just that. “His paintings have hope. They are overwhelmed by beauty and the possibility of the world,” suggests Li.

“He made sense of the world through the act of painting, not just through its subject matter. He found doing painting to be very cathartic,” Kahn adds.

Li hopes that this exhibition will help demystify Matthew Wong, saying, “Many of his works speak to the universality of the human experience that he taps into over and over again.” Finally, she concludes, “I am happy that the DMA was part of the story early on.” P

Matthew Wong, Old Town, 2017, oil on canvas, 96 x 72 in. TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art 2017. Courtesy of the Matthew Wong Foundation; Green Family Art Foundation; Galerie Frank Elbaz, Paris; and Karma, New York.
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This page: Richard Prince. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian. Photograph by Gordon M. Grant/The New York Times/Redux. Opposite: Richard Prince, Untitled (portrait), 2015, ink jet on canvas, 65.75 x 48.75 in. Photograph courtesy of Sotheby’s and The Karpidas Collection.

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PICTURE SHOW

The Karpidas Collection investigates the enfant terrible of appropriation in an unprecedented show.

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Acowboy in a white hat on a horse fords a stream, reins in hand, cloaked in a rugged masculine mystique, stepping out of his Marlboro ad context, treading not so much through water as through the mythos of the American West. A grid of vintage publicity photos shows women preening, looking coyly over their shoulders out of the grid and toward us. An Instagram influencer’s portrait is reproduced and enlarged, her purple unicorn tresses wild, unruly, and tousled, with “likes” tallied and comments scrolling—including one by richardprince1234 (making an off-color, non-sequitur quip about Christ).

Such is the work of Richard Prince, enfant terrible of appropriation, who reminds us that all is images, but also that we are all vulnerable, exposed.

As a figure, Prince has loomed large in 20th-century art and has, over the course of his career, immortalized not so much himself or his subjects but cultural moments, by framing and invading a seductively private/public space.

In witty and incisive series ranging from the 1970s to today, his oeuvre creates uneasy, provocative slippages without mirrors or reckonings but instead purloined visual artifacts that force us to question What is real? What does it mean to borrow? And Where, in our constituted world, do we live in our myths?

The exhibition Richard Prince: Selections from The Karpidas Collection, which runs October 21 to January 29, 2023, at the Karpidas family’s private art space, highlights and gathers the works described above.

What is most striking about the show is its completeness, spanning decades and most of the artist’s major bodies of work (more than 40 works in all), a sampling the likes of which is hard to imagine outside of what constitutes one of the largest and most comprehensive collections, private or public, of the artist’s work. It is also the first major solo show in Texas of Prince’s work.

A long-standing collector-artist relationship exists between Pauline Karpidas and Prince, who is one of the most deeply collected artists in the Karpidas holdings. The summer workshops that Karpidas held on the Greek island of Hydra, in collaboration with prominent London gallerist Sadie Coles, were the locus for the exhibition of Prince’s Publicity series in 2003 (which will also feature in Dallas). To see so much of his work together—including pieces that have never been shown in public—is a rare, precious glut.

“Prince forever changed what it means to make an original work of art,” says Sara Hignite, who manages The Karpidas Collection and organized the exhibition.

He was not alone. Born in 1949, Prince belonged to the loosely knit group of artists working primarily in New York’s East Village that became known as the Pictures Generation—rebellious, paradigm-smashing artists like Barbara Kruger, Louise Lawler, Sherrie Levine, and Cindy Sherman, whom Karpidas also collected. Fed by the wellsprings of postmodernism’s ironic stance toward originality and objective reality and influenced by the tenets of Roland Barthes’ The Death of the Author, they mocked notions of universal truth, pioneered new methods of art making, and put forth

This page: Richard Prince, Untitled (watch and eyelashes), 1982, Ektacolor, 30 x 40 in. Photograph by Kevin Todora. Image courtesy of The Karpidas Collection. Opposite: Richard Prince, Untitled (cowboy), 1980–1984, Ektacolor photograph, ed. 1/2 + 1 AP, 60 x 40 in. Photograph by Kevin Todora. Image courtesy of The Karpidas Collection.
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What is real? What does it mean to borrow? Where, in our constituted world, do we live in our myths?

Above: Richard Prince, Washington Nurse, 2002, inkjet print and acrylic on canvas, 73 x 45 in. Photograph by Kevin Todora. Image courtesy of The Karpidas Collection. Left: Richard Prince, Good News, Bad News , 1988, acrylic and silkscreen on canvas, 75 x 58 in. Photograph by Kevin Todora. Image courtesy of The Karpidas Collection.
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a radical, critical assessment of popular culture.

A particular mythology surrounds Prince’s own path. For a decade—a time he describes as akin to a J.G. Ballard dystopian novella—he worked in the tear-sheet department of Time Life. What was left after he had snipped articles from magazines for staff writers were the gleaming, glossy ads, which he isolated and captured again on film. He called them rephotographs. Laying bare artifice, they exposed the grid of our longings and aspirations, recontextualized by us, the viewer. Their filmy veils of luxury were both surface and abyss.

In an interview surrounding his solo 2007–08 exhibition at the Guggenheim in New York (Richard Prince: Spiritual America), Prince remarked that “making art is nothing more than a continuation.” He knew that in his rephotographs lived, arguably, no aesthetic risk. There was none of Henri Cartier-Bresson’s “decisive moment.” And yet, that, to him, was new. Like Andy Warhol’s soup cans or Dada’s readymade urinals or bicycle wheels, he offered these artifacts that teetered on the brink of reality and artifice, blurring fact and fiction (and authorship) in a new hyperreality.

Since then, Prince has plumbed the cache of clichéd American tropes—pulp fiction, muscle cars—such that the exhibition is a froth: It erupts from his major series. And so there is the Marlboro cowboy, fording a stream, plucked out of our collective unconscious of nostalgic virility. In a painting from the Nurse series, a nurse in a surgical mask is held against the sinister, engulfing backdrop of a cheap pulp fiction cover. In a vast array of joke and cartoon

paintings, Prince plunders the text of schlocky one-liners, leaving us both squirming and drawn in with false intimacy. Or there is also the extraordinary work, such as an extremely rare collaboration with fellow artist Christopher Wool (titled My Name, one of two pieces in 1988)—stark, stenciled words on metal which rumble with wry, sardonic irony.

We realize with a frisson we are staring at the Rolodex of our desires and fears. Or is this a Rorschach test of the American psyche?

Prince’s borrowings place him in the role of capturer or collector or curator more than original creator, an uneasy position that has drawn controversy. There have been lawsuits around authorship, and censure. Critics ask pointed questions. Is the work facile? Is it exploitative, stripping subjects of their agency? Is he not, in loading the pyre for the bonfire of the vanities, engaging in voyeurism?

But that blithe thieving and re-producing or reframing of (often uncomfortably) existing imagery, in a gallery context, Hignite sees as exactly how Prince is “able to make us think about American culture and societal issues without overtly critiquing or moralizing or being pedantic about it. In the same way, I don’t want to overexplain the works in the exhibition.” Prince’s genius, she says, is that “he trusts us to finish the job.”

Our collective banal, cliché tropes exist. The prince of appropriation makes us confront their likenesses, and we can either question or recoil. Drawing on its lush holdings, the Karpidas Collection has the luxury of—like Prince—stepping away and letting the chips fall where they may. We can look, or we can turn away. P

Cover of forthcoming exhibition catalogue, Richard Prince: Selections from The Karpidas Collection, edited by Sara Hignite and designed by Travis LaMothe. Image courtesy of The Karpidas Collection. Richard Prince, Girlfriends , 1984–1985. Ektacolor photograph, ed. 2/2. 86 x 47 in. Photograph by Kevin Todora. Image courtesy of The Karpidas Collection.
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A Visual History Lesson in Color

Japan-based curator Dexter Wimberly brings Black Abstractionists: From Then ‘til Now to life.

There is a sense of wonder when one realizes something that is obviously true but was previously out of reach as a form of personal revelation. For me the hit Jay-Z and Kanye West song N***s in in Paris was one of those moments. Because of course there are Black people in Paris, as there are Black people everywhere. But the charm of the song, at least for me as a young Black American, was that I too could potentially be a Black person in Paris, as opposed to a Black person in Dallas, Texas; or America; or anywhere else.

In a similarly obvious way, it should come as no surprise that Black artists make abstract art. Because of course, if there are Black people making visual art, there are Black people making abstract art, as well as any other style of art one can think of. But for some viewers, the charm of Black Abstractionists: From Then ‘til Now will be that it will help one conceive of Black art outside of the realm of realism and figuration.

The exhibition is curated by Dexter Wimberly, a Black American curator based in Japan, and serves as the inaugural show of the new Green Family Art Foundation exhibition space in the Dallas Arts District. Wimberly is well aware that the dynamic between Black abstraction and Black figuration is not a new one. In fact, part of what makes Black Abstractionists so compelling is that it offers a rare visual history lesson of the progression of Black abstraction from the 1950s to the present.

Alma Thomas, Alma’s Flower Garden, 1968-70, acrylic on canvas, 34.25 x 50 in. Courtesy Ortuzar Projects, New York. Photography by Timothy Doyon; Virginia Jaramillo, Untitled, 1969, acrylic on canvas 72 x 72 in. ©Virginia Jaramillo. Photography by JSP Art Photography; Charles Alston, Untitled (Cityscape at Night), c. 1950-55, oil on canvas, 20 x 24.32 in. ©Estate of Charles Alston. Courtesy The Johnson Collection, Spartanburg, South Carolina. Photography by The Johnson Collection, Spartanburg, SC.
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Clockwise from top left: Theaster Gates, A Study in Red 1, 2021, wood and decommissioned fire hose 71.93 x 109.75 x 4.75 in.; Kevin Beasley, Untitled (Halo Rags), 2019, polyurethane resin, raw Virginia cotton, Virginia soil, Virginia twigs, Virginia pinecones and needles, housedresses, kaftans, du-rags, altered garments, 78 x 60.5 x 5.5 in. ©Kevin Beasley. Courtesy of the artist and Casey Kaplan Gallery, New York; Photograph by Kevin Todora; Mark Bradford, Q2, 2020, mixed media on canvas 72 x 96 in. ©Mark Bradford; Norman Lewis, Aspiration, 1966, oil on canvas, 37.5 x 60.125 in. ©Estate of Norman Lewis; Courtesy of Michael Rosenfeld Gallery LLC, New York, NY; Fred Eversley, Untitled (parabolic lens), 1978, cast polyester, 19.5 x 19.5 x 2.5 in. Courtesy of David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles; Leonardo Drew, Number 212T, 2021, wood and paint, 68 x 84 x 34 in. ©Leonardo Drew. Courtesy of Talley Dunn Gallery and the artist.
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Clockwise from top left: Jack Whitten, Untitled I, 1974-75, acrylic on canvas, 41.75 x 41.75 in. ©Estate of Jack Whitten; Stanley Whitney, Untitled, 2006, oil on linen, 12.13 x 12.12 in.; Howardena Pindell, Untitled #42, 1974, thread, acrylic, watercolor, punched paper, and gouache on mat board, 8 x 7.38 in. Asheville Art Museum, gift of Ladene and Russell Newton in honor of Rebecca Lynch. ©Howardena Pindell. Courtesy the artist and Garth Greenan Gallery, New York. Image David Dietrich, courtesy Asheville Art Museum; Sam Gilliam, Untitled, 1968, acrylic on canvas, 62 x 66.5 x 3.5 in. ©Sam Gilliam/Artist's Rights Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy of David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles. Photograph by Jeff McLane; Rick Lowe, Fire #3, 2021, acrylic and paper collage on canvas, 48 x 36 in. ©Rick Lowe Studio. Courtesy of artist and Gagosian; Jadé Fadojutimi, My Pathetic Fallacy, 2019, oil on canvas, 70.8 x 86.6 in. ©Jadé Fadojutimi. Courtesy Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne.

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This show is in some ways the inverse of the 2021 Green Family Art Foundation exhibition Black Bodies, White Spaces: Invisibility and Hypervisibility curated by Aindrea Emelife. That show focused on Black figurative forms and seemed very much a commentary on the popularity of Black art in the contemporary art world at the time. This exhibition feels more like an investigation of the canon than a highlight reel of Black abstract painters of today.

Scanning through the images of the show felt like viewing an alternative version of art history. If you like Helen Frankenthaler, can I interest you in Alma Thomas? Georges Braque? Meet Charles Alston. Did you know that Beauford Delaney also found refuge in France, alongside James Baldwin? The history and the rhymes come effortlessly.

And so too does the defiance—the unapologetic Blackness of the work. In case one didn’t know, the prerequisite for Black art is that it be made by a Black artist. The exhibition is full of some of the most important living Black artists, such as Glenn Ligon, Rick Lowe, Theaster Gates, Mark Bradford, Melvin Edwards, and Leonardo Drew.

The Green Family Art Foundation was founded by art collectors Debbie and Eric Green alongside their son Adam Green, who runs an art advisory service. Bailey Summers is the current director of the foundation. The move to Flora Street doubles the exhibition space they were operating out of in the Design District, and it adds more accessibility for both local Dallasites and out-of-town visitors alike.

Black Abstractionists shows that the foundation intends to assemble big, museum-quality shows that could be at the neighboring Dallas Museum of Art and Nasher Sculpture Center. If this continues, it will be a worthy addition to the Dallas Arts District, filling an important gap with its focus on BIPOC, queer, and women artists.

This exhibition feels more like an investigation of the canon than a highlight reel of Black abstract painters of today.
David Hammons, Untitled (coat), 2007, mixed media and American mink fur, 72.5 x 15.5 x 10 in. ©David Hammons. Photography ©White Cube.
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Kimbell at 50 opens with Murillo's masterful renderings of secular subjects.

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Four Figures on a Step, c. 1655–60, oil on canvas. Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth.
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The Extraordinary Ordinary

Murillo: From Heaven to Earth starts the Kimbell Art Museum’s 50th-anniversary celebration. This unique museum of masterpieces in Fort Worth isn’t shy about wrestling enigmas. Its exhibition about Bartolomé Esteban Murillo (1618-1682) focuses on Four Figures on a Step, painted between 1658 and 1660. It belongs to the Kimbell and is one of the most curious Old Master paintings anywhere.

The picture raises questions about poverty, the vulnerability of children, and Christian duty in Seville in the mid-1600s. “The painting’s a great one, but it’s also a mystery,” Kimbell director Eric Lee said. “As an anniversary project, we wanted to draw the curtain on it but also look at Murillo overall.” The tart, gorgeous exhibition is the first big Murillo show in America in a generation.

Four Figures on a Step is indeed strange. Three adults look directly at us. On the right, a veiled old woman with Philip Johnson–style glasses sits. In the center is a much younger woman, possibly smirking, her face possibly part paralyzed, her look definitely weird, raising her own veil in a gesture that’s more bold than demure. At the picture’s left is a boy flapper, a charismatic teen with a jaunty pose, high-style hat, and a big, marquee-idol smile.

The pièce de résistance, or main course, or mystery guest is a child, back to the viewer, with the most enigmatic and flagrant pair of ripped trousers in the history of art. His little butt, exposed for all of Seville and now the world to see, has launched dissertations, smutty jokes, and furrowed brows. What does this painting mean?

Though Murillo was predominantly a painter of religious subjects, his depictions of children in everyday Seville are remarkable and

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, San Diego de Alcalá Feeding the Poor, c. 1645–46, oil on canvas. Museo de la Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando, Madrid.
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Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Three Boys, c. 1670, oil on canvas. Dulwich Picture Gallery, London. Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, The Toilette, c. 1655–60, oil on canvas, 56 .62 x 42.87 in. © Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen, Alte Pinakothek, Munich.
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Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Saint Thomas of Villanueva Dividing His Clothes Among Beggar Boys, c. 1667, oil on canvas. Cincinnati Art Museum. Bequest of Mary M. Emery. Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, The Prodigal Son among the Swine, 1650–55, oil on canvas, 63 5/8 x 41.12 in. The Hispanic Society Museum and Library, New York.
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at the heart of From Heaven to Earth. Coming from a family of 14 children, and himself the father of ten, Murillo certainly brought experience to the subject, as well as empathy and concern.

Aside from baby Jesus, whom Murillo painted in droves, the artist seems to have looked for religious scenes with children. San Diego de Alcala Giving Food to the Poor, from 1646, is part of Murillo’s biggest early multi-picture commission, and children are front and center. St. Thomas of Villanueva Dividing His Clothes Among Beggar Boys, from 1667, puts a good child in charge. Both are among From Heaven to Earth ’s biggest hits.

The exhibition looks at class stratification among children. Three Boys, from around 1670, for instance, is a mixed-race painting. African slavery was a big part of Seville’s economy in Murillo’s time. Three Boys shows a Black boy, standing, asking a white boy, seated on the ground, for a piece of pie. The seated boy seems to refuse. Another white boy, sitting next to him, smirks. These two boys are barefoot and bedraggled. The Black boy, probably an errand boy and likely a slave, is far better dressed and, slave or not, is at least at work. The other boys are carefree but goofy, selfish, and off to a feckless life. Three Boys is one of Murillo’s beggar-boy pictures. He painted about twenty of these scenes of everyday life among Sevillian boys. Depending on how we count them, about eight are in the exhibition.

Three Boys is a teachable moment. There are good and bad poor. The idle, condescending boys denying a working slave a treat are

among the bad. They won’t share. Did they steal their pie? Murillo also painted barefooted boys in rags playing dice. Yes, life’s a gamble, Murillo tells us, but don’t depend on lucky, freak chance. The Toilette from the late 1650s, a lovely picture from a Munich museum, shows a contented child munching on a piece of bread while a woman, possibly his grandmother, picks lice from his hair. There’s no substitute for care and concern from adults.

Where does Four Figures on a Step fit? First of all, it’s not pedophilic. The very thought would have filled the ultra-Catholic, father-of-ten Murillo with horror. It’s a big painting, nearly five feet wide, so it’s not a private fetish picture.

Guillaume Kientz, the curator of the exhibition, offers another view. “It seems likely—evident, really—that what the artist is depicting, or questioning, is moral judgment,” he says. “The three adults look searchingly at us, the viewer, and we’re the ones who see the hole in the boy’s trousers.” The boy’s vulnerable. He’s anonymous, which means he could be anyone. He’s exposed and disheveled like lots of impoverished children in Seville, but he’s wearing shoes, which means he’s not a beggar. There’s Every Man. Then there’s Every Child. Every child depends on we adults for guidance and comfort.

Kientz sees the painting as proposing two adult responses. “The old lady offers care and concern,” he says. “We can identify with her, or join the two figures on the right,” in ignoring the boy or, worse,

Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, The Marriage Feast at Cana, c. 1672, oil on canvas. © The Henry Barber Trust, The Barber Institute of Fine Arts, University of Birmingham.
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laughing at his exposure. “A child’s soul is up for grabs.”

The key, Kientz, says, is Murillo’s 1658 visit to Madrid, which we think is the only time he left Seville. Murillo went there to see the latest Royal Court style. He must have visited Velázquez, fellow Sevillian and Philip IV’s chief court painter. He probably saw Las Meninas, which Velázquez finished in 1656. This work enlisted the direct, critical inclusion of the viewer in activating the picture, Kientz says. Murillo took the concept and applied it to Four Figures on a Step

Heaven and Earth might highlight the Kimbell’s Four Figures on a Step, but an anniversary is a celebration. Why not go all out? The exhibition is a Murillo mini retrospective. The Marriage Feast at Cana from 1672, peak Murillo, comes to Fort Worth from Birmingham in the UK. Three of his Prodigal Son paintings, among them the great Prodigal Son among the Swine, come from the Hispanic Society in New York. There are fantastic portraits by Murillo, too.

The splendid Meadows Museum in Dallas sent Jacob Laying Peeled Rods before the Flocks of Laban from 1660. At nearly 14 feet, it’s immersive. Murillo stayed a realist all his career. He never lost his documentarian skill, in big and small formats. His style after his Madrid trip, though, turns ever so gauzy. His contours soften, his figures lighten, and his palette adds pastel touches. His famous Assumptions are subtly aerodynamic.

Murillo was an astute artist. He catered to a high-end clientele, part Sevillian but also from all over Europe. He was attentive to styles and trends beyond Andalusia. This makes not a mishmash of looks but art that’s anticipatory. In some of the beggar boys paintings, The Marriage Feast at Cana, and especially the Meadows painting—part figural, part landscape—Murillo seems to have looked in a crystal ball and seen Fragonard and Boucher in the distance. P

Above: Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, The Flower Girl, 1665–70, oil on canvas. Dulwich Picture Gallery, London; Below: Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Jacob Laying Peeled Rods before the Flocks of Laban (Jacob pone las varas al ganado de Labán), c. 1665, oil on canvas, 87.75 x 142 in. Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas. Algur H. Meadows Collection. Photograph by Michael Bodycomb.
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This page: The Way of the Rain—Voices of Hope for Brushwood Center at Ryerson Woods / 2018 June 1. From left: Tim Janis, Sibylle Szaggars Redford, Floyd Thomas McBee, Robert Redford. Photograph by Karsten Staiger. Opposite: Sibylle Szaggars Redford, Santa Fe October, 2018, watercolor on Arches watercolor paper, 15 x 11 in. Photograph by John Baker.
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Sibylle Szaggars Redford’s Conservation Cry

The multidisciplinary artist brings The Way of the Rain —Hope for Earth to Dallas Symphony.

Some say the world will end in fire, Some say in ice.

From what I’ve tasted of desire I hold with those who favor fire. But if I had to perish twice, I think I know enough of hate To say that for destruction ice Is also great And would suffice.

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Robert Frost, when he wrote this, might well have had a premonition of the end-times we are facing if dramatic action isn’t taken soon to save the planet. That is the urgent energy propelling Sibylle Szaggars Redford, who is bringing the latest version of her production, The Way of the Rain—Hope for Earth, to the Meyerson Center October 22. Initiated by Trammell S. Crow, Michael Cain and EarthxFilm, A Festival for our Future, with the Dallas Symphony Orchestra plus choir, film, art, and spoken word by her husband Robert Redford, this will be the US premiere of a work that was first mounted in Monaco a year ago under the aegis of HSH Prince Albert II.

It is as if Szaggars Redford were born for this moment. For years SSR, as can be found writ large on some of her paintings, has married nature to art, but now, in a great apotheosis, she has deployed her art, with unmistakable immediacy, to glorify Mother Earth so forcefully that rescue can be postponed no longer. From chaos to the Big Bang to the Milky Way and the ascendancy of the sun, she charts the improbable appearance of the Earth, so beautiful, she says in a phone interview, “so tiny…there is nothing like it.” The narration she crafted with Robert Redford for him to read rings with wisdom, some of it indigenous, such as this: “I do not believe we go up to the sky unless it is to come down again, with the rain.”

As a seasoned environmental artist, Szaggars Redford felt she needed a stronger voice to promote awareness and open up conversations about environmental consciousness. “I decided to create a staged, live, and moving painting through the addition of other art forms—music, sound, light, dance, film, and the spoken word. This underlined my concern for our planet, and through collaboration with my rain-painting process, I envisioned The Way of the Rain,” she emphasizes.

The show in Dallas is a continuation of earlier iterations, which began in 2013 through collaborations with diverse composers who embraced her originality and story line. Five years ago, at Carnegie Hall, the performance featured Al Gore and novelist N. Scott Momaday among others, some of them singers, some

instrumentalists, all highly gifted. Tim Janis composed the music and Floyd Thomas McBee assembled the art film. By then Szaggars Redford had “created a little team” she relates, including McBee and Gregory Leon Baird, now managing director of The Way of the Rain, Inc., a nonprofit into which this group has gradually grown.

By the time he joined forces with Szaggars Redford, Janis already had moved from Maine to Santa Fe with his wife, film producer Elizabeth Demmer. He found something “soothing, peaceful” in New Mexico, which is what he pursues in the music he writes and conducts throughout the US and Europe. Even so, he tells me by phone, growing up in Maine shaped his life in important ways since he “has always gravitated to water.” But Santa Fe is definitely the place to be if working with Szaggars Redford, water or no water, since meetings with “Mrs. Redford,” as he unfailingly refers to her, were essential while creating Rain. He had to be sure the music was “conveying her inspiration.”

McBee, the video artist, also was at those meetings, but not before he would “hide in a cave for a while,” collecting images, with no music at all, to go on at first. Then, with reactions from the group in hand, plus the beginnings of work from Janis, which soon would outpace his pictures, back to the cave he went.

McBee found his way to Santa Fe from Tennessee, where he attended two colleges as a home-state guy before decamping to Dresden to continue the music studies he had begun at Belmont University in Nashville, exploring monophonic tones such as Gregorian chants. From there he moved on to the avant-garde in Germany, building sound “from the ground up…dissecting it to the nanosecond” with computers—definitely polyphonic—then to St. John’s in Santa Fe to immerse himself in “the great thinkers.” He points out by phone that “Beethoven would have studied Euclid, Shakespeare. I realized I was deficient in that area” and did not have “that exposure to depth and inspiration.” After teaching English in Japan, he returned to a job at St. John’s College and met Szaggars Redford, whom he calls Bylle. An early convert to her environmentalart movement, he took up creating visual images and worked with her

Sibylle Szaggars Redford, Santa Fe October Rain #3, 2016, watercolor on Arches watercolor paper, 11 x 15 in. Photograph by John Baker. Sibylle Szaggars Redford, March 10, 2016, Early Morning Rain in Saint Helena, 2016, watercolor on Arches watercolor paper, 22 x 30 in. Photograph by John Baker. Sibylle Szaggars Redford, Royal Torarica Hotel, Paramaribo, Suriname, May 7, 2016, 2016, watercolor on Arches watercolor paper, 11 x 15 in. Photograph by John Baker.
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on projects from Santa Fe and Albuquerque to Miami and Monaco.

“Life” he avers, “is a process of production.” Janis holds to a similar view: “Life is a forward journey.” For them, both the process and the journey led to Szaggars Redford, who spent her early life on a farm near Hamburg, which had been “totally destroyed by firebombs” during the Second World War. “A major factor for myself,” she notes, “was a focus on nature.” When her father took a job in Hamburg and moved the family there (“there was no there there for me,” she laments), the young Sibylle “would sit in my room and create farm trees and animals—it was an escape for me.”

She did not go to art school, however. “I applied for it,” she says, but, “I was a tomboy; my grades were not good enough.” Instead, she pursued hotel management. At 21 she set out for London and, in time, worked to take Cats to Germany, plus two other hits by Andrew Lloyd Webber: Starlight Express and Phantom of the Opera . When all that came to an end, she moved to the US, where a skiing invitation landed her in Utah. “It was a nice getaway from London,” she recalls, and she decided, “I’ll stay and paint for a year.” She never left. Instead, she fell in love with the land, with Native American history, and with Robert Redford.

When the two of them moved to Santa Fe she turned to the pivotal invention of her life: rain painting. Inspired by the monsoons of Northern New Mexico, she found a way to put pigment on dry paper— not wet which is usual for watercolors—and put those papers out to catch the showers that used to pour in the afternoons— alarmingly, less

so now. Visitors to Santa Fe in recent years have met admonishments to use as little water as possible because of the drought. She found more rain, however, in Suriname, where the American ambassador asked her to make art as part of a program for embassies. The rain paintings are unexpectedly radiant, not damaged at all by the elements but rather resplendent in primary hues vivid enough to bring the hope that she is working to generate.

Szaggars Redford is a renowned practicing artist who has mastered a variety of mediums while keeping the environment at the forefront of her work. Her nontraditional application to wood fragments and other natural materials informs her oeuvre. Over the course of her career, her work has been exhibited in Europe, Monaco, Peru, Singapore, Japan, and throughout the United States. Concertgoers and patrons will have the opportunity to view her work through a solo exhibition at the Christopher Martin Gallery in Dallas from October 18 to November 4.

As for Robert Redford, here is part of an email from him: “… The urgency I feel about the threat of climate change is at an all-time high...Increased drought, fires, more severe storms, a warming and rising ocean, flooding, and deadly heat waves continue to mount… Scientists warn that our planet is approaching an irreversible tipping point…So yes, I feel a heightened sense of urgency, but I also have optimism and hope that we can come together and use the tools available to reduce greenhouse gas emissions before it is too late. We can’t stop trying.” P

The Way of the Rain—Voices of Hope Carnegie Hall Benefit Concert – Stern Auditorium – Perelman Stage / 2017 December 1. Photograph by Karsten Staiger.
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PHOTOGRAPHY AND COLLAGE
DIVISION CREATIVE DIRECTION AND STYLING
SEEING DOUBLE Overemphasizing the great looks of the season.

This page: Markarian dress; Kwiat diamond earring; Jeffrey Levinson gold clutch. All Saks Fifth Avenue, saksfifthavenue.com. Opposite: LaQuan Smith gold mesh dress; Bulgari gold shoulder bag; Amina Muaddi rhinestone sandal; Bulgari hoop earring. All Saks Fifth Avenue, saksfifthavenue.com Hair and makeup, Michael Thomas, Seaminx; Styling assistant Kendel Bolton; Models Mimi Roche, Kim Dawson Agency, and Drea, Wallflower Management.

This page: Akris long sequin gown, Akris, Highland Park Village; Jeffrey Campbell suede over-the-knee boot, Nordstrom, NorthPark Center.

Opposite: David Yurman 18k gold Renaissance Color bracelet; 18k gold and diamond Modern Renaissance bracelet; sterling silver Cable bracelet; Châtelaine pendant necklace; Madison necklace with 18k gold; Châtelain sterling silver ring, all at David Yurman, NorthPark Center; Gabriela Hearst bodysuit and skirt, The Conservatory, Highland Park Village.

This page: Dolce & Gabbana puff crop jacket and skirt; DG logo earrings; patent leather sandal with palladium-plated carbon DG heel, Dolce & Gabbana, NorthPark Center. Opposite: Mugler stretch fluid jersey mini dress, The Conservatory, Highland Park Village

IMAGE CATPOIN
Taller Marmo asymmetrical fringe halter dress. Available at Tootsies, Plaza at Preston Center.

Mach and Mach purple iridescent leather double-bow square-toe mules, Nordstrom, North Park Center; Carolina Herrera brocade dress, Carolina Herrera, Highland Park Village; Manhattan bezel-set emerald-cut amethyst pendant on 18k gold chain; 18k gold, diamond, and amethyst oval cabochon bracelet; 18k gold, diamond, and amethyst cabochon ring, all at Eiseman Jewels, NorthPark Center.

A POWERFUL FORCE

Maxine Trowbridge and Samudra Hartanto come together to create Eve & Max, an art-driven fashion label.

Eve & Max Collection Twenty Three features a signature work by Dallas artist Zeke Williams. Here we caught up with co-creative directors Maxine Trowbridge and Samudra Hartanto on the release.

Terri Provencal (TP): Max, you’ve successfully blended your careers in fashion, media, art, and philanthropy. Why was it important to you to come back to your roots of fashion design, where, again, you’ve integrated an art component? Maxine Trowbridge (MT): These past few years I’ve been soul searching for various reasons, and as I analyzed my career journey, I realized I really wanted to return to design. When I lived in London, I was a designer; when I moved to the States, that all changed. It finally feels right to get back to my career roots. Art has always been a personal passion, to learn and educate myself and to enjoy collecting. Fashion and art are symbiotic, so I wanted to emphasize this relationship within Eve & Max. While this is a new business, I’ve thought about this fashion-and-art concept for many years.

TP: Samudra, you’ve enjoyed a fruitful career as a designer with Louis Vuitton under Marc Jacobs, then as senior women’s wear designer for Hermes, helmed by Jean Paul Gaultier, who ultimately took you with him to his own eponymous house. What insights did these rich experiences provide you with when developing Eve & Max?

Samudra Hartanto (SH): The rich experiences of those years taught me about embracing tradition and updating it for today’s lifestyle. Both of my masters, Marc Jacobs and Jean Paul Gaultier, have great knowledge about art and fashion history and craftsmanship, and at the same time they are fully aware of street style. These opposite

dialogues and open-minded spirits influence me enormously. For Eve & Max, we love timelessness, playfulness, ease—always conscious of quality and sustainability.

TP: The two of you met at the Royal College of Art in the ’90s, and both flourished in your individual careers in fashion as well as in the art community. Eve & Max was introduced with the mindset that fashion should be ethical, beautiful, and artful, all while navigating a historically tragic time in history. How did you persevere?

SH: Maxine and I started the conversation about Eve & Max before this historically tragic time. Maxine’s vision for fashion that is more caring and her passion for art really resonated with me. I must admit that it was very hard to work on the first collection in between lockdowns while the reality around the world was so devastating, but what we were working towards helped me to stay creative and look forward to brighter days.

TP: Max, the Eve & Max Collection Twenty Three is informed by Zeke Williams’ digital painting Blue Inferno, in which this Dallas artist embodies the beauty yet fragility of nature, which transcends as a powerful force. Tell us about this collaboration with Zeke Williams for your second collection and why you selected him and this work.

MT: For the second collection, I wanted to work with a local artist, and Erin Cluley at Erin Cluley Gallery, whom I’ve known since our time together at Dallas Contemporary, made the introduction to Zeke Williams. I’ve watched Zeke’s work over the years, with his ongoing interest in fashion and using digital tools in his artistic practice. We looked through his library of work, and specifically, Samudra and I gravitated towards his work during 2015–2016, which I remembered

Eve & Max co- creative directors Samudra Hartanto and Maxine Trowbridge at Hôtel de la Marine. Courtesy of Eve & Max.
120 PATRONMAGAZINE.COM
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well, with Zeke’s use of stenciled forms, spray paint, and abstract florals. Given Zeke’s interest in digital, the selected work, originally an acrylic painting on canvas, underwent a digital metamorphosis, creating Blue Inferno. Referencing the floral abstraction and emphasis of spray paint as a symbolic oceanic print, Blue Inferno represents the fragility of nature as a powerful force.

TP: Silk has a mixed record on sustainability and environmental impact. Though it is natural, biodegradable, and reusable, the production of silk requires a lot of energy, water, and sometimes harsh chemicals. How do you navigate these aspects of sustainability in your collections?

SH: Less silk for the future. We realize that silk has a mixed record on sustainability and environmental impact. Cotton, which we all love, has a very mixed environmental and social record too. We are considering and constantly searching for other materials, better alternatives for the future, like linen, since it requires far less water than cotton. Why silk? Zeke Williams’ Blue Inferno on silk illustrates the perfect contrast between the force and fragility of nature. The spray-paint digital effect on a natural delicate fabric is like luxurious graffiti.

TP: Your run cycle is slowed and pared down, with twelve looks this season, which does wonders for negating the excesses that fast-fashion produces. How does scale play into your business practice? In other words, is there a cap on the number of garments you can produce sustainably?

SH: We believe in growing steadily, building a solid foundation with our suppliers and our clients.

It’s a big challenge between the desire to offer a larger collection for all women and respecting sustainability issues. Hopefully the twelve-look season we offer is short and sweet, confident, and caring.

TP: A portion of Eve & Max sales will benefit Mission Blue, founded by the distinguished oceanographer Dr. Sylvia Earle. How did you become interested in Mission Blue’s message?

MT: After watching the Netflix documentary Mission Blue , I discovered Dr Sylvia Earle; I couldn’t believe I did not know about this fascinating and inspiring soul. While I was researching environmentally focused nonprofits for the second collection, Mission Blue appeared again, and I knew this organization made perfect sense. Earle has spent her life and career focused on the ocean; she is a legendary environmentalist, marine biologist, and oceanographer, and is absolutely inspiring. Through the work of Mission Blue, a global network of protected marine areas known as Hope Spots have been saved to help restore the ocean and ultimately protect the planet.

TP: Garments can be produced sustainably, ethically, and empower the many hands that take a flat sketch to full-scale production. We know that the environmentally conscious buyer knows that it not sustainable if the clothing is only worn by the buyer once. How do you manage versatility in your designs that make people want to wear garments over and over again?

MT: Versatility comes with timeless creativity. We think style is like collecting art. Much like collecting and curating an art collection, selecting a garment is like curating your wardrobe: each design should complement existing pieces and should be carefully considered to last far longer than a season. Our silhouettes are timeless and seasonless and not about trends; instead, it’s about longevity and quality and collecting styles that will remain in your wardrobe. The design concept flirts between minimalist and maximalist; conceptually, Samudra and I are drawn towards opposites. We love a clean, minimalist look, all navy and all black, but we love a splash of vibrant color and an inspiring print too.

TP: What are your favorite silhouettes? We love how you pair solids with prints.

SH: This collection is also about the new twinset: tailored jacket and bustier (instead of jacket and waistcoat), kimono and bustier, printed shirt with a matching triangle bikini top; lace shirt and a matching triangle bikini top. I love the black bustier silhouette. I love the printed lounge suit silhouette and matching bikini top. P

Sasha, a full-skirt trenchcoat dress in Reef, in Tencel. Photograph by Nick Glover. Eve & Max, Harlow, a bustier in black satin with the Hepburn straight-leg pant in black wool crepe. Photograph by Nick Glover. Eve & Max, Amelia, a silk charmeuse shirt with Marie bikini top in silk charmeuse and Boudica track pant in silk charmeuse. All in Blue Inferno print. Next to Zeke Williams’ Blue Inferno at Erin Cluley Gallery. Photograph by Nick Glover.

PALETTE PLEASERS

TWO x TWO Gala preserves culinary traditions while keeping them current.

Picture a parfait inside an elegant glass dome—egg mousse on the bottom, a layer of crème fraiche with chives, another layer of crispy onions, and a crown of Regiis Ova caviar—the caviar company of Michelin-starred Chef Thomas Keller of The French Laundry fame. Beside the dome, placed over white china, a lemon cream cheese cannoli sits atop a perfect black circle of leek and onion “ash” adorned with tiny, bright flowers. It is a plating masterpiece, a feat of negative space calling to mind a painting palette. Now picture 500 of these colorful dishes and there you have a signature caviar course prepared by Chef Juan Garrido of Art 2 Catering at the TWO x TWO for AIDS and Art’s annual gala dinner and art auction, an event that has raised over a hundred million dollars for AIDS research and the Dallas Museum of Art.

TWO x TWO is an incomparable event based on culinary traditions known for its aesthetically pleasing and delicious multicourse dinner. “Much thought, planning, and research go into the food every year,” says Lisa Runyon of the art advising and management firm Runyon Arts, who co-hosts the gala with her husband and business partner John Runyon and TWO x TWO founders Cindy and Howard Rachofsky, owners of the renowned contemporary home where the event is held. “We try to keep the menu exciting, not redundant, but we do have a crowd favorite: the caviar course provided by Regiis Ova Caviar out of Napa Valley, California. The guests have grown to expect it. I’m sure we’d hear about it if we ever omitted it.” Cassandra Moses of Art 2 Catering concurs: “If you cut the caviar course, there would be a riot.”

Each year Chef Garrido aims to outdo the previous year’s caviar course. “We love the challenge,” says the talented chef, who prepares this top-drawer course out of a field kitchen in

Art 2 Catering serves a signature caviar course each year at TWO x TWO. Guests will be able to taste the new Casa Dragones Reposado Tequila this year. Courtesy of Casa Dragones.
122 PATRONMAGAZINE.COM
MORSEL

a tent with a staff of 30 line cooks. He’s gone several times to The French Laundry as a guest of Chef Keller to work in the kitchen for a couple of weeks and glean inspiration for the TWO x TWO menu. Last year he served the caviar with onion dip, buttermilk-chive waffle creme fraiche, and onion gel; another year with sea urchin custard. “Caviar is a unique item,” Garrido says. “Either you love it, or you don’t. And anyone who loves it has his favorite way of eating it. A big dollop, straight. With toast points. With feta. Cindy [Rachofsky] loves it with potato chips.”

This year’s gala will include a more recent tradition of cocktails by Casa Dragones tequila, among the most elite tequilas in the world, a brand so painstaking in their approach, they spent 14 years making four expressions of sipping tequila. They employ touches like aging their product in barrels made from the wood of a Japanese tree that takes 200 years to mature. They’re also the most sustainable tequila producer in the industry, known for using less water, less energy, and less waste than their competitors. And thanks to an enduring partnership with Moët Hennessy, Belvedere cocktails and Veuve Clicquot La Grande Dame are always flowing at the ever-inventive bars designed by Todd Fiscus.

Though the full menu for this year’s gala is still a surprise, previous years’ menus have included such delicacies as burgundy, black truffle risotto with king trumpet mushrooms and Parmigiano Reggiano cheese, and duck confit with tagliatelle and truffle jus. “We’re going for drama and excitement,” Chef Garrido says. “Last year we served a whole dover sole, head off, split in half at the belly, the bones left inside. Then we seared it and served it with butter sauce.” The visual effect was striking—bones fanning out like a crown adorned with flowers. “This group is an art crowd,” Moses says. “So the food has to have a tremendous visual appeal.”

The evening would not be complete without one more TWO x TWO institution. After exiting the geodesic tent extraordinaire, guests are greeted by servers with trays of after-dinner Brandy Alexanders, a sweet cocktail made of Hennessy, crème de cacao, and cream. “One year the theme was ‘Green’,” Moses recalls, “so we did Grasshoppers instead of Brandy Alexanders. People were mortified.” She adds, “TWO x TWO sells out a year in advance, and then there’s a waiting list. These guests count on the traditions.” P

Veuve Clicquot La Grande Dame is an evening highlight. Photograph by Bruno Regiis Ova caviar and potato chips is a crowd favorite. Photograph by Bruno. A signature bar keeps Belvedere and Veuve Clicquot La Grande Dame flowing. Photograph by Bruno.
123OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2022
Robin N. Wilson at Green Family Art Foundation. Photograph by Victoria Gomez

PATRON MAGAZINE'S 2022 ART INFLUENCERS

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Jeffery Bryant Moffit, Alison Caldwell Isis Kazadi and RaSun Kazadi David-Jeremiah, Evita Tezeno Bailey Summers PHOTOGRAPHY BY VICTORIA GOMEZ Emmanuel Gillespie, Valerie Gillespie, Jeffrey Bryant Moffit, Allison Caldwell, Christian Cruz, Daisha Board, Carolina Alvarez-Mathies, Ludwig Schwarz, Majorie Schwarz Thomas Feulmer Daisha Board, Kenny Goss Marjorie and Ludwig Schwarz Darryl Ratcliff, Marlena and Brent English Ramiro Garcia, Pablo Arellano Joaquin Zihautenejo
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Kaleta Blaffer Johnson Michael Thomas Matthew Gilley, Carrie White Michael McCray, Gonzalo Bueno Brian Bolke, Marguerite Hoffman, Faisal Halum John and Marlene Sughrue Nic Nicosia Larry Whiteley John Runyon, Lisa Runyon
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OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2022 127 Get 10% off your tickets with promo code PATRON10 (505) 988-2282 desertchorale.org WINTER FESTIVAL 2 0 22 DEC 10 - DEC 22 A CEREMONY OF CAROLS Featuring Professional Vocalists from Across the Nation
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THE CONVERSATION RECLAIMED

Speaking With Light brings extraordinary examples of Indigenous photographs to the Carter.

While the art community overall needs to do a better job of amplifying the work of Indigenous artists, the Amon Carter Museum of American Art is the exception. Speaking with Light: Contemporary Indigenous Photography, from October 30 to January 22, 2023, brings together an incomparable survey through the work of 30 Indigenous artists who use their lenses to forge identity, resistance, and belonging.

“Speaking with Light recognizes the wave of diverse and vibrant photographs created over recent decades and today by contemporary Indigenous artists,” says John Rohrbach, Carter Senior Curator of Photographs and co-curator of Speaking with Light: Contemporary Indigenous Photography

Mining ancestral ties to the land, Cara Romero looks to strengthen visibility for contemporary Natives beyond the timeworn narrative through her photography practice. In Water Memory, corn dancers—beautiful and mystical—cause alarm. Do we need to save them? Water plays an important role in Romero’s investigation of tribal lands flooded to construct US dams, and the extraction of resources from Native soils. Her tribe was driven out of ancestral lands by the Army Corps of Engineers, which dragged people out of their deluged homes to create Lake Havasu in the ’30s. Deep beneath swimmers and boaters today lies a watery grave—the vestiges of the life and homes of the Chemehuevi.

Poverty assailed Romero’s youth. She grew up in the Chemehuevi

Valley Indian Reservation, near Lake Havasu on the California shoreline The artist’s trajectory was shaped by Water Memory, and alongside the Carter’s holdings and those of the Smithsonian and LACMA, Romero’s work is currently on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art as part of Water Memories, a nod to Romero’s title and extrapolated through protest fashion, handcarved children’s toys, glass lamps, oil paintings, photographs, and video.

Other exhibition highlights include Nicholas Galanin’s (Tlingit/Unangax) Get Comfortable, also from the Amon Carter’s collection, which reclaims Indian River as Indian Land through a single tag on a road sign; and Alan Michelson’s (Mohawk member of Six Nations of the Grand River) Mespat, 2001, comprised of turkey feathers, feathers, monofilament, and digital video with sound from the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution.

Through 70 photographs, videos, three-dimensional pieces, and digital activations, the Carter’s exhibition aims to reinstate representation and affirm existence, perspectives, and trauma. Notes Rohrbach, “These artists take back the conversation over how their cultures and lives are depicted. In sharing their anger, challenges, and joys, and in their embrace of responsibility to their communities, they suggest pathways to healthier relationships for humanity and the Earth,” P

Cara Romero (Chemehuevi) (b. 1977), Water Memory, 2015, inkjet print, Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas. © Cara Romero. All rights reserved.
128 PATRONMAGAZINE.COM FURTHERMORE

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Articles inside

PALETTE PLEASERS article cover image

PALETTE PLEASERS

4min
pages 124-125
THE CONVERSATION RECLAIMED article cover image

THE CONVERSATION RECLAIMED

2min
pages 130-132
A POWERFUL FORCE article cover image

A POWERFUL FORCE

6min
pages 122-123
SEEING DOUBLE article cover image

SEEING DOUBLE

1min
pages 114-121
SIBYLLE SZAGGARS REDFORD’S CONSERVATION CRY article cover image

SIBYLLE SZAGGARS REDFORD’S CONSERVATION CRY

7min
pages 110-113
THE EXTRAORDINARY ORDINARY article cover image

THE EXTRAORDINARY ORDINARY

7min
pages 104-109
A VISUAL HISTORY LESSON IN COLOR article cover image

A VISUAL HISTORY LESSON IN COLOR

5min
pages 100-103
PICTURE SHOW article cover image

PICTURE SHOW

6min
pages 94-99
RASHID JOHNSON’S SPACE OF SOVEREIGNTY AND OF CONTEMPLATION article cover image

RASHID JOHNSON’S SPACE OF SOVEREIGNTY AND OF CONTEMPLATION

11min
pages 80-87
FALLEN STAR BURNS BRIGHT article cover image

FALLEN STAR BURNS BRIGHT

6min
pages 88-93
THE CURSE OF EXILE WITHIN THE LIMITS OF A LANDSCAPE article cover image

THE CURSE OF EXILE WITHIN THE LIMITS OF A LANDSCAPE

6min
pages 78-79
IN GLORIOUS BLACK AND WHITE article cover image

IN GLORIOUS BLACK AND WHITE

4min
pages 76-77
SPEND MONEY. SAVE LIVES article cover image

SPEND MONEY. SAVE LIVES

4min
pages 74-75
BY ANY STRETCH OF THE IMAGINATION article cover image

BY ANY STRETCH OF THE IMAGINATION

2min
pages 72-73
VOICES IN UNION article cover image

VOICES IN UNION

3min
pages 70-71
IT’S ALL IN WITH FRIENDS INDEED article cover image

IT’S ALL IN WITH FRIENDS INDEED

5min
pages 62-63
A TRIBUTE TO A LEGENDARY COWGIRL article cover image

A TRIBUTE TO A LEGENDARY COWGIRL

3min
pages 64-65
BIDDING THAT COUNTS article cover image

BIDDING THAT COUNTS

6min
pages 60-61
DOUBLE TAKE article cover image

DOUBLE TAKE

4min
pages 66-67
AMORPHOUS BODY STUDY CENTER article cover image

AMORPHOUS BODY STUDY CENTER

5min
pages 68-69
PATRONMAGAZINE.COM article cover image

PATRONMAGAZINE.COM

1min
pages 16-17
Editor’s Note article cover image

Editor’s Note

3min
pages 14-15
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