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27th Issue

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The Indian Pharmaceutical Association Students’ Forum

Panache -Live

The voice of Indian Pharmacy Students !!! November, 2013 Editor’s Choice Corals: The medicine cabinets of the 21st century

Our Mission: The Indian Pharmaceutical Association-Students’ Forum is a National body of pharmacy students under IPA. It is a platform to promote increased student interactions and activities bringing more co-operation at a national level. IPA-SF will also link the pharmacy students in India with the rest of the world through memberships and alliances with international organizations. The IPA-SF will serve as a unifying factor for the pharmacy students’ community in India bringing them under one umbrella and thus benefit in turn the profession and thus the future health of INDIA.

Cover Story: Self Defence Pharmaceuticals


2013-2014

PANACHE LIVE

Letter from the President, IPA

I take great pleasure to ink a short message for PANACHE-2013, the newsletter of the IPASF. I congratulate IPA Students Forum for successfully completing 5 years of its journey. I could recollect and remember the inaugural ceremony of IPA-SF during the very first Students Congress in the University of Mumbai, Kalina Campus in 2008, where Dr. Kalam inaugurated the Congress. I really appreciate the consistent efforts of the budding pharmacists in raising their voice on the students issues, round the year, across the country. I appreciate the entire team for their st success in winning the bid to host the 61 World Congress of International Pharmaceutical Students Federation, 2015. I congratulate IPA Education Division for their guidance and mentor ship in taking the IPASF to the right direction. I congratulate and wish everything best for IPA-SF team who were elected for the year 2013-14.

Dr. J. A. S. Giri President, The Indian Pharmaceutical Association


2013-2014

PANACHE LIVE

Letter from the Chairperson, IPA-SF

Greetings !!! Indian Pharmaceutical Association Students' Forum is doing its best to serve the Pharma student community across the country. I feel it as a honor to lead the team IPA-SF and to ink few lines for this issue of Panache Live, the mouth piece of SF. IPA-SF has a strong team with various departments like Public Health, Public Relations, International Students Exchange, Pharmacy Education, Professional Development, Editorial Board. I am sure that team SF is doing the best to serve the Pharma Student Comminity. I am glad to inform that "The World Pharmacist Day" was celebrated with great enthusiasm across the country by team SF. Cheers to all the IPA-SFers for their efforts in making the events successful. IPA-SF is gearing up for the arrangements of 61st World Congress of International Pharmaceutical Students Federation, 2015 at Hyderabad. I take the opportunity to welcome the student community to be a part of the Organizing Committee for this mega event. Team SF had raised its voice on various issues of students in the Annual Convention of Association of Pharmaceutical Teachers of India, held at Rajahmundry in October. Our Editorial team is doing its best to come out with a productive magazine, beneficial for the students. Congratulations to the Editor Jaie Karve and team. Happy Reading !!! Thank you,

Ranjith Reddy, Chairperson, Indian Pharmaceutical Association - Students' Forum


2013-2014

PANACHE LIVE

Note from the Editor, IPA-SF

Dear Readers, We at Panache strive to bring new and interesting information for you, in an attempt to promote pharmacy. I express gratitude for the response that I have received and I hope to keep on receiving more in the future. In India, the knowledge that we have in the form of Herbal remedies and the bounty of plants that we are blessed with, I urge you to explore our treasures and bring more information to Panache, which in turn will be shared with all our readers. The Indian Pharma field can and will flourish by exchange and revival of such information. Help us make this magazine better and student friendly. Any kind of feedback and Inputs are always welcome. The contact details are on the last page of this issue. All that you see before you is due to the collective effort of the publications team, and the strong support of team IPA-SF. I am positive that Panache will prove to be a good read. Yours Sincerely, Jaie Karve Editor Indian Pharmaceutical Association - Students’ Forum


2013-2014

PANACHE LIVE

INSIDE THIS ISSUE Editor’s Choice: Corals: The medicine cabinets of the 21st century

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65th IPC 2013, DELHI Report: World Pharmacists Day

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Report: World Pharmacists Day

Cover Story: Self Defense Pharmaceuticals

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Poem: “Passion”

Executive Council 2013-14

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Ashoka- a sacred plant and boon for uterine disorders Report: Leadership In Training Program 2013

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Call For Articles

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2013-2014

Editor’s Choice

PANACHE LIVE Corals: The medicine cabinets of the 21st century

The genetic diversity found in coral ecosystems is unparalleled and this diversity has proven beneficial for humans through the identification of potentially beneficial chemical compounds and through the development of medicines, both derived from organisms found in coral ecosystems. Many species found in coral ecosystems produce chemical compounds for defense or attack, particularly the slowmoving or stationary species like nudibranchs and sponges. Searching for potential new pharmaceuticals, termed bioprospecting, has been common in terrestrial environments for decades. In fact, nearly half of the medicines in use today have their origins in natural products, mostly derived from terrestrial plants, animals, and microorganisms. However, bioprospecting is relatively new in the marine environment and is nowhere close to realizing its full potential. Creatures found in coral ecosystems are important sources of new medicines being developed to induce and ease labor; treat cancer, arthritis, asthma, ulcers, human bacterial infections, heart disease, viruses, and other diseases; as well as sources of nutritional supplements, enzymes, and cosmetics. The medicines and other potentially useful compounds identified to date have led to coral ecosystems being referred to as the medicine cabinets of the 21st century by some, and the list of approved and potential new drugs is ever growing. However, this focus on coral ecosystems for medical properties is not unique to the 21st century. The unique medical properties of organisms found in coral reefs was recognized by Eastern cultures as early as the 14th century; tonics and medicines derived from seahorse extracts continue to be in high demand for traditional medicines. The gall bladder of several fish species was used in Palauan traditional medicine to treat venomous stings of other marine organisms, such as stonefish. While knowledge and use of some traditional medicines has been lost, there is renewed interest within modern medicine in researching some of these treatments of bone. Rates of rejection are much lower than with artificial grafting materials. Toxins provided by reef creatures are of particular interest in present day pharmaceutical research. Stonefish, sea snakes, box jellyfish, cone shells, and pufferfish contain some of the most toxic compounds presently known to man. These chemical compounds are being studied by researchers, and some have already been used to develop medicines or cosmetics. For example, cone snail neurotoxin is showing promise as a powerful painkiller.

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Editor’s Choice Other types of chemical compounds are also proving fruitful. The antiviral drugs Ara-A and AZT and the anticancer agent Ara-C, developed from extracts of sponges found on a Caribbean reef, were among the earliest modern medicines obtained from coral ecosystems. The anti-cancer properties of a number of additional compounds derived from organisms found in coral ecosystems are also being studied. Chemicals derived from Caribbean sea-whip corals have shown skincare, painkiller, and anti-inflammatory properties and a compound derived from a Pacific sponge has lead to testing of over 300 chemical analogs for anti-inflammatory properties. Kainic acid, which is used as a diagnostic chemical to investigate Huntington's chorea, a rare but fatal disease of the nervous system, was isolated from organisms on a Japanese reef. Australian researchers have developed a sun cream from a coral chemical that contains a natural "factor 50" sun block. A research team, including NOAA scientists at the Hollings Marine Laboratory, has discovered new compounds derived from a sea sponge and corals. One compound eats away at the shield bacteria use to protect themselves from antibiotics. The second discovery was compounds that fight some of the worst infectious bacterial strains. Besides being the source of potentially useful chemical compounds, the porous limestone skeleton of corals has been tested as bone grafts in humans. Pieces of coral set into a fracture act as a scaffold around which the healing can take place. The implant, with a low rate of rejection, eventually disappears, absorbed by the new growth. It should be noted that, aside from the compounds mentioned here, there are likely many other compounds under development which have not yet been disclosed to the wider public. It is safe to say that the published research is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the pharmaceutical possibilities presented by compounds derived from creatures found in coral ecosystems, including the corals themselves. Thus, it is nearly impossible to predict what the future economic benefits of bioprospecting will be, as more potentially valuable medical compounds are isolated from organisms found in coral ecosystems. This aspect of reef value was not incorporated into the estimated $5.5 billion total global value of coral reef biodiversity, but is certainly both a consideration for the economic value of coral reefs and the costs to society if reefs are lost.

Source: www.coralreef.noaa.gov

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PANACHE LIVE

“65th IPC, 2013, DELHI NCR” at AMITY UNIVERSITY, NOIDA 20th - 22nd DECEMBER, 2013 HOSTED BY

INDIAN PHARMACY GRADUATES ASSOCIATION Prof. (Dr) Arun Garg, Organizing Secretary- 65th IPC, 2013 Mob: 8470046553 E-mail: agarg333@hotmail.com visit: www.65ipcdelhi.com Early bird registration for 65th IPC upto 31st OCT’ 13 Extended Last Date for Submission of Abstracts 15 October 2013 for abstract submissions, Visit www.scientificipca.org The Best Paper from each session will be selected for oral Presentation For more information about abstract submission, contact: Dr. T.K. Ravi Email: ipcssc.abs@gmail.com, sscipa.info@gmail.com

Dr. S.S. Agrawal Email: ssagrawal@amity.edu

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2013-2014

PANACHE LIVE Report: World Pharmacists Day

As a part of "Pharmacits Day Celebrations", Ranjith Reddy, Chairperson, Indian Pharmaceutical Association Students' Forum (IPA-SF) gave a representation to Dr.P.Nagaraju, Registrar, Andhra Pradesh Pharmacy Council, demanding to speed up the process of Pharmacist Registration. The other demands include: 1. To speed up the process of Pharmacist Registration. 2. To clear all the pending applications of Registration (there are thousands of pending applications). 3. Exclude the industrial training verification for B.Pharm graduates. 4. To start an official website for Andhra Pradesh Pharmacy Council and carry out the registration process by online also. 5. To set up a help desk/ complaint desk to receive the quiries of the applicants whose registration was yet pending, so that they can find out the status of their application. 6. To organize interactive sessions or campaigns with the pharmacy students regularly. Hope all the above demands will be solved very soon. Indian Pharmaceutical Association Students' Forum (IPA-SF) is the mouth piece of Pharmacy students across the country. It represents student's voice

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2013-2014

PANACHE LIVE Report: World Pharmacists Day

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PANACHE LIVE Report: World Pharmacists Day

Ranjith Reddy, Chairperson, IPA-SF addressing the media at the Press Club of Hyderabad on the occasion of "World Pharmacist Day" with a demand to increase the carreer opportunities to Pharmacy graduates. Also can be seen in the picture Kranti Sri, Jointr Secretary; Samhitha Reddy, Professional Development Officer; Mohan Kumar, Coordinator, LIT..

Addressing the gathering at the State Pharmacy Council of Andhra Pradesh on the occasion of World Pharmacist Day.

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2013-2014

PANACHE LIVE Report: World Pharmacists Day

WORLD PHARMACIST’S DAY CELEBRATION Date:25/09/2013 At the 2009 Council meeting a the FIP Congress in Istanbul, Turkey, the Turkish Pharmacists Association suggested to annually celebrate a World Pharmacists Day, to be organized on September 25 (the day that FIP was founded in 1912).This proposal was unanimously accepted by the Council and since 2010, World Pharmacists Day has been coordinated by FIP and celebrated through the involvement of its Member Organizations’. The Indian Pharmaceutical Association has been an active member in FIP activities. The theme for 2013 year is- “Pharmacists - simplifying your medicines use, no matter how complex.” Indian Pharmaceutical Association Students’ Forum had organized a national level event of celebrating the WPD requesting all pharmacy schools to participate thereby lending a helping hand in expanding the horizons of pharmacy profession. The key motto was creating awareness through campaigns that educate patients and the general public on how pharmacists are the key to making all medicines and their use, more manageable. Mr. Kondeti Ranjith Reddy(chairperson,IPA-SF) & Mr Pratik Pangaonkar(Pharmacy Education Officer,IPA-SF). In response to it there were ample of entries flooded all around the nation including some of the highly renouned colleges. The following activities were carried out by the joint efforts of the students as well as Professors: 1) Street Play: College like L.H.H College of Pharmacy,Gahlot institute of Pharmacy etc had organized a street play which depicted the day to day problems of a common man while dealing with his medicines & how a pharmacist helps him. The acts received a great response by the people. 2) Power point presentation: This event was designed with a goal of understanding how well do the pharma students know their profession, which was displayed through PPTs presented by the students of colleges like Bombay college of Pharmacy, S.V.B’ 3) Bike rally: As a part of ‘Pharmacist’s Day celebration”, screening for blood sugar and blood pressure was arranged at six different locations of Mysore namely (i) Vijaya Dashami Park, Bannimantap (ii) Chamundi Vihar stadium, (iii) Near Lalith Mahal helipad,(iv) Kukkarahalli Lake, (v) Cheluvamba park , Yadavagiri (vi) Chamundi Hill footsteps was done. Around 620 people visited the camp which was followed by a bike rally.The event being organized by J.S.S College of Pharmacy,Mysore. 4) Poster presentation: Poster Presentation competitions were held at various college across various college at Mumbai, Hyderabad, Mysore etc. 5) Public Survey: Students actively carried out surveys at various cities all over the country including some of the remote places. A questionnaire was provided by IPA-SF covering general questions. Adjoining this a Press Conference was conducted addressing the media with the changing trends of pharmacy. To sum up ,the quality of response we received was sumptuous and it gave a sense of satisfaction and an assurance of belonging of the students towards their profession.

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PANACHE LIVE Report: World Pharmacists Day

SOME OF THE PHOTOGRAPHS OF VARIOUS EVENTS:

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PANACHE LIVE

Cover Story

Self Defense Pharmaceuticals

Pharmaceuticals for self defense may seem a bit weird to hear for the first time, but before you start imagining hitting someone with pills or threatening them with a spatula, read on.... Spray & Foam aerosols: 1) CN which is an abbreviation for chloroacetophenone was used by the military and police departments in the 60s and 70s, but is not used much anymore. This product is not really a gas, but rather crystals suspend in liquid and placed under pressure to create a vapor. Tear gas products such as MACE have proven to be less effective against violent attackers, especially those under the influence of narcotics and alcohol. Additionally, these tear gas products have a fairly slow reaction time of three to thirty seconds. 2) CS is short for orthochlorobenzalmalononitrile. It is a micro-pulverized irritant. It irritates the mucous membrane of the nose, throat, eyes, and the skin in high concentrations. It works better than CN, but is not readily available to the public. Both of these chemicals sprays can be toxic and cause serious vomiting, and choking. CN and CS are not all that effective against dogs because they lack lactimal glands. 3) OC is short for oleoresin capsicum, which is extracted from chili peppers and is commonly called Pepper Spray. This product is the most widely sold today and the spray of choice for police since 1977. Pepper spray is generally regarded to be the most distressing to experience, but it must be sprayed directly in the eyes or inhaled to be most effective. The product is an oily liquid that is not very soluble in water. The strongest concentrations are 15% active ingredients and rated at least two-million scoville heat units. The high scoville heat rating is more important than the percentage of ingredients. Direct facial contact and inhalation of the spray will induce coughing, choking, and nausea, as well as dilation of the eye capillaries resulting in temporary blindness. The mucous membranes will swell causing breathing difficulties and causing the assailant to be temporarily incapacitated. Skin contact will cause a burning sensation, which is further aggravated by rubbing the area. A one second burst can affect an attacker for up to 45 minutes without causing permanent damage. other ingredient is an invisible dye, which penetrates the skin cells and remains on the face, undetected by the attacker for up to two days. When the police find the offender, who will more than likely deny the offense, they can shine an ultra violet light on his face that will make the evidence of his guilt glow iridescent green. In India: Recently a Karnataka pharmacist has devised a protective ring which he says will sting any person attacking a woman like a honey bee.

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PANACHE LIVE

Cover Story "The gruesome (December 16) gang-rape in New Delhi last year prompted me to devise a safety ring that can be worn by women on their right index finger to defend themselves against a potential rapist or killer," device inventor Imran Khan told IANS here. What makes 30-year-old Khan's 'Sting Bee' silver ring a reliable armour for self defense is a liquid chemical compound (Capsaicin) in the head of the ring, which on releasing from its micro tank, weakens an offender and immobilizes him from attacking or assaulting any girl or woman. As Capsaicin is four times hotter than Bhut Jolokia (pepper) and 300 times more spicy than Guntur red chillis (from Andhra Pradesh), it stimulates chemoreceptor nerve endings in skin and causes shooting pain for 45-60 minutes in an offender when injected into his body from the ring's micro tank using a micro pump and a micro needle," Khan said at a preview of the 'Sting Bee'. A RFID (radio frequency identification) tag on top side and a dual lock mechanism prevents misuse of the ring, which can be made of any safe metal. "The device is tamper-proof and easy to operate, as its micro tank with 0.2ml of the drug (Capsaicin) can be injected into even five persons at a time by unlocking it before an assault her and gives the wearer sufficient time to escape," Khan asserted. He has tied up with a Mumbai-based jeweller to source the silver-made rings and with a city-based pharmacy to fill them with the drug concentrate. "A silver-made ring will cost Rs 1,999, excluding tax (5 percent) and delivery charges. It will be made to order on payment and delivered in a week across the country through courier. The price will gradually come done once sales volume picks up," Khan observed. Re-fill of the canister (micro-tank) with Capsaicin will cost Rs 1,000 per fill. Khan has set up a "Save My Sister Charitable Trust" to educate women and promote the device for their safety and security against sexual harassment and anti-social elements. He plans to distribute the ring free to economically deprived women. He has set up a call centre with a helpline number (080-6450-0112) to offer counselling to women in trouble and inform them about the safety ring. "As most women wear finger ring(s) for tradition or fashion, wearing an additional ring for safety should not be problem or burden. A woman wearing our compact ring can feel secure even in an adverse situation and anywhere, anytime," Khan observed.

References: www.crimedoctor.com www.articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com

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PANACHE LIVE ASHOKA- a sacred plant and boon for uterine disorders

Ashokah shitalistaktoh grahi varneya kashajayakah | Shoshapachitrishdah kribhishoth vishasrajitah || Ashoka Tree is used as one of the cardinal herbs recommended in the ayurvedic medicines and also has been mentioned in ancient Indian literature. It is one of the sacred trees distributed throughout the India and is popular for its foliage and medicinal values. Saraca indica- as the tree botanically referred belongs to Family- Fabaceae and has effect on umpteen gynecological problems in women. Ashoka is being often confused with Polyalthia longifolia Family- Annonaceae (The Mast tree, a long, tall, slender tree with hanging branches commonly found in front of schools). ASHOKA- “Sorrow-less” A= no; shoka= sorrow Family- Fabaceae/ Leguminoseae Sub-family- Caesalpiniaceae Genus- Saraca Species- indica Botanical Name- Saraca indica Sanskrit name-Sita ashoka, Anganapriya, Asupala Scientific name- Saraca asoca , Saraca indica DESCRIPTION [Habitat & Distribution] Ashoka is an evergreen tree, geographically distributed in India, Burma and Malaysia. In India, its found in the Deccan Plateau and the Western Ghats. The plant generally grows at an altitude of 750 ft. from the sea level, and can grow up to a height of 9 meters. The branches of the tree are glaborous, drooping, and the leaves measure up to 25 cm. Leaflets 2-6 pairs; paripinnate in nature, oblong to lanceolate, acute to acumunate apex, glabrous, red colour when young. Inflorescence- Compact Corymbose panicles, axillary, terminal. Flowers 2.5 cm long; bracteoles erect, embracing the calyx tube. Calyx is yellow, turning to orange and finally to red. Pod up to 25x 5cm, compressed, tapering at both ends. Moreover, it bears flowers throughout the year. The flowering season is February to April. The flowers are orange yellow in colour before wilting. Ashoka is prized for its beautiful foliage and fragrant flowers. Due to its beautiful flowers and also of the beautiful foliage ,the tree was referred in Sanskrit as “Anganpriya” . HISTORY: Ashoka plant is referred in Ramayana due to confinement of Sita in “Ashoka Vatika” , giving the valid evidence for existence of Ashoka plant from Ancient periods. There is also the reference of the Plant in Buddhism as Queen Maya gave birth to Buddha under it. VARITIES: ➢ Saraca cauliflora- It is an evergreen small flowering tree with whiskery light yellow flowers deep to rich yellow ➢ S. celebica- It's a species of legume in Fabaceae family and found in Indonesia ➢ S. declinata- It is the provincial tree of Yala province, Thailand belonging to Legume family. ➢ S. thaipingensis- It's a species native to south East Asia with Yellow flowers, borne on old wood, and is grown as Ornamental for floral effect.

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CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS: The stem bark is chiefly used in medicines and it has been reported to contain chemicals such as glycosides, flavonoids, tannins, saponins, alkanes, esters and primary alcohols. The alcoholic extracts present in the bark have showed a significant action against wide range of microorganisms. BIO ENERGETICS: ● Rasa: Tikta, Kasaya, Madhura; Guna: Laghu, Ruska; Virya: Sita; Vipaka: Katu; Karma: Hridaya, Vishaghna, Grahi, Varnya, Sothahara; Dosha : Kapha and Pitta; Dhatu (tissue): Blood, Muscle, Fat and Reproductive system; Srotas (channel): Circulatory and Reproductive system ACTIONS: Bark is strongly astringent and a uterine sedative. It acts directly on the muscular fibers of the uterus. It has a stimulating effect on the endometrium and the ovarian tissue. USES: Gynecology- It is being used in menstrual disorder associated with excessive bleeding congestion and pain and it can also be used for the benefits of abdominal pain and uterine spasm. It can be also used in preventing miscarriage. It is being used for clearing congestion of Medas dhatus and Mamsa. The products of Ashoka are used by the pregnant women from the fourth month of their pregnancy, who are sensitive to abortions and miscarriages. It is also being used for clearing fibroids and cysts from excess kapha and ama in Artavastrotas. Due to the beneficial property it called as “GARBHASAYA RASAYANA” meaning 'uterine tonic'. Diuretic- The seeds of ashoka are diuretic; it increases the quantity of urine. It is hence used in the treatment of urinary stones. Anti-bacterial properties- It can fight fever, cold and infection. Rheumatic arthritis- The methanol extract from Ashoka shows action against Rheumatic arthritis. Hemorrhoids – Ashoka bark has been traditionally used for internal hemorrhoid. Dysentery – The extract of Ashoka flower can be used for dysentery, Dose -15 -60 drops by grinding flower with water. Piles –Decoction of the Ashoka bark is given, Dose – 90g of bark boil with 360ml of water and 30ml of milk taken 2-3 times/day. Analgesic –The analgesic action of Ashoka is used in calming the nerves when they have been aggravated by vata. It is important to see that Ashoka has effective use in treatment, for its anti-venom action, against spiders and scorpion bites; The flower part of the plant is responsible for the anti-venom activity. Other action: ● Blood purifier ● Skin allergy ● Anti- diabetic Medicinal Preparations of Ashoka available in market ● Ban Labs Ovarian Syrup ● Ashokarishta ● Femohills capsules

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Bibliography: Reference Books: ● Indian Materia Medica Vol- I 3rd Ed. By Nadkarni ● Secret Of Indian Herbs By- Pathanjali Divyayog ● Study of Crude Drugs By- Iyengar ● Flora of Udupi By- K.Gopalakrishna Bhatt Websites: www.tamilnadu.com -By Raghuraman Maniraman, Rounak Biswas and Rohit Raj Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manipal University, Karnataka

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2013-2014

PANACHE LIVE Report: Leadership In Training Program 2013

Activity: Leadership In Training Program. Organizing Association: IPA-SF in association with Koringa College of Pharmacy institution. Country: India Date and time of the activity: 11th of october 2013 (10.00 – 17.30) Location of the activity : Koringa, Yanam Road , Kakinada, Andhrapradesh. Number of students taking part in the activity: 30 Description of the activity : The Leadership in Training Program was inaugurated by the Principal of Koringa College of Pharmacy The Trainers of the program were Mr. Satyanarayana Murty Chittoory, Honorary Life Member of Indian Pharmaceutical Association – Student's Forum, and Co-Trainee Mr.Ratna Geetardha Chittoory, Past President, Indian Pharmaceutical Association – Student's Forum. The morning session started with introduction of all participants and a glimpse of the program. The programme was designed in a manner to focus on team management and project management which is the need of the hour. All the participants enthusiastically responded to the activities of the trainer. It was an interactive session wherein students cleared their doubts by asking questions to the trainers. Different activities and training exercises were conducted by the trainers, out of which “hakka” was the best energizer and students enjoyed a lot. All the students were spellbound by the interactive session, which included discussion on various important topics useful for their successful life management. At the end of the program the students conveyed their feelings towards the training program. They expressed that they had learnt a lot through the training activities. The institution expressed their deep gratitude to the trainees for motivating their students.

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Expre

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Poem

“PASSION� Sparkling of the eyes , clenching of the fist Here I come whatever may resist As thou say the paths are jammed I will survive what may exist A desire to get along and sometimes more than that It keeps me alive and yeah sometimes more than that I undergo the anguish, undergo the pain It attempts to break me, but in vain Because somewhere in some corner I know I will survive, no matter what it takes. I encounter the harsh realities but don't surrender to them, Because this passion of mine is evoked time and again, It asks me to strive and fuels me into burning my bad past, I know I will survive and I know I will last. Who we are as people overall, The passion in our hearts and minds says it all A sweet victory kisses you at last People cheer you and indulge you amazingly fast But only you know the moments of strife and solitude past It was only your passionate self that made you last. So to declare at last, in this cycle of fall and rise, Never let your passions face demise, Never burn their effigies, neither sob on their scars Just keep pushing your limits, fueling the sparks All you have to do ,is to keep burning your past. -By Rajan Singh Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manipal University, Karnataka

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Mentors Dr.T.V.Narayana Dr.Divakar Goli Dr.T.K.Ravi

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL FOR THE YEAR 2013-14

Student Mentor: Ch. Ratna Geetardha

Position

Name

Contact Number 9553747697

Email Id ranjithreddykondeti@gmail.com

Chairperson

K. Ranjith Reddy

Vice Chaiperson

CH. Chandrashekar 8106322829

chanduVIPS@gmail.com

Vice Chaiperson

Mohit Dhurve

9920820009

durvester@gmail.com

Hon. Secretary

Forum Jalundhwala

9320422407

forum2407@gmail.com

Joint Secretary

Kranti Sri

8019963650

krantisrimulpuri@gmail.com

Treasurer

Bharat Viaks

9538138189

bharathvikas007@gmail.com

Contact Person

Rahul Lad

8080290405

2009rahulld@gmail.com

Student Exchange Officer - I

Shreyas Jhadav

9867999279

ipsfseo.india@gmail.com

Student Exchange Officer - II G. Keerthana

8019289075

ipsfseo.india@gmail.com

Editor

Jaie Karve

9920576505

jaiemk@gmail.com

Associate Editor

Kruttika Dabke

9920961825

dkruttika@gmail.com

Public Relations Officer

Mriganka Pal

9502954903

mriganka.peo.ipasfh@gmail.com

Associate Public Relations Officer Dhaval Sanchal

9869616607

nonmetalk@gmail.com

Public Health Officer

Monika Salkar

7208380228

monikasalkar6@gmail.com

A)National Blood Donation Coordinator B)National T.B Coordinator

Aditi Kharat

9167525006

aditi.khara101@gmail.com

B. Anusha Rao

9966116906

anupharmad@gmail.com

Profession Development Officer

Samhitha Reddy

9966090999

samhithareddy91@gmail.com

A) Pharmacy Profession Awareness Coordinator

Sanjana Sahetya

7829965204

sanjanasahetya@hotmail.com

B) LIT Coordinator

Mohan Kumar

9951999641

mohankumar1540@gmail.com

Pharmacy Education Officer

Pratik Pangaokar

9930646982

pup2492@yahoo.com

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CALL FOR ARTICLES 1. The selection of articles will solely be the discretion of the Publication Committee of IPA-SF. 2. Articles should be typed in any normal font (Times New Roman) and should have a font size 12 and sent to panachelive@gmail.com in Microsoft Word Format. 3. Articles should be the Author's original work. If the article has been directly picked up from some source then it may amount to plagiarism and such Author's will be barred from any future participation. 4.The names of any references used should be clearly mentioned. 5.The names of any Co-author/s should also be mentioned. 6.The name of the institution/company of the Author/Co-author’s should be mentioned. 7.The efforts of the Authors and Co-authors whose articles have been selected will be duly acknowledged.

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Panachelive vol 27 november issue  

We at IPA-SF promise to bring up the latest news, IPA-SF happenings, interesting campus updates, more student related articles and the recen...