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PaloAltoOnline.com

Vol. XXXIV, Number 27 N April 5, 2013

Should private developers pay for public art? Page 3

HAPPY TRAILS Michael Closson, Acterra’s executive director, steps down after 10 years Page 18

Spectrum 12

Title Pages 21

Movies 23

Living Well 33

Eating 42

Shop Talk 43

Puzzles 74

NSports Splashy sand volleyball debut

Page 28

NArts Capturing life on ‘Cancer Alley’

Page 38

NHome Greenwave: an intentional community

Page 45


G U I D E TO 2013 S U M M E R C A M P S F O R K I D S

For more information about these camps, see our online directory of camps at http://paloaltoonline.com/biz/summercamps/ To advertise in a weekly directory, contact 650-326-8210 YMCA of Silicon Valley

Academics Early Learning Camp Connection listing

Palo Alto

Write Now! Summer Writing Camps Emerson School of Palo Alto and Hacienda School of Pleasanton open their doors and offer their innovative programs: Expository Writing, Creative Writing, Presentation Techniques, and (new!) Test-Taking Skills. Call or visit our website for details. www.headsup.org

Emerson 650-424-1267 Hacienda 925-485-5750

Foothill College

Los Altos Hills

Two Six-Week Summer Sessions Beginning June 10. These sessions are perfect for university students returning from summer break who need to pick up a class; and high school juniors, seniors and recent graduates who want to get an early start. 12345 El Monte Rd. www.foothill.edu

650-949-7362

Harker Summer Programs

San Jose

K-12 offerings taught by exceptional, experienced faculty and staff. K-6 morning academics - focusing on math, language arts and science - and full spectrum of afternoon recreation. Grades 6-12 for-credit courses and non-credit enrichment opportunities. Sports programs also offered. www.summer.harker.org

408-553-0537

iD Tech Camps - Summer Tech Fun

Held at Stanford

Take interests further! Ages 7-17 create iPhone apps, video games, C++/ Java programs, movies, and more at weeklong, day and overnight programs held at Stanford and 60+ universities in 26 states. Also 2-week, teen-only programs: iD Gaming Academy, iD Programming Academy, and iD Visual Arts Academy (filmmaking & photography). www.internalDrive.com

1-888-709-TECH (8324)

iD Teen Academies Gaming, Programming & Visual Arts

Stanford

Gain a competitive edge! Learn different aspects of video game creation, app development, filmmaking, photography, and more. 2-week programs where ages 13-18 interact with industry professionals to gain competitive edge. iD Gaming Academy, iD Programming Academy, and iD Visual Arts Academy are held at Stanford, and other universities. www.iDTeenAcademies.com

1-888-709-TECH (8324)

ISTP’s Language Immersion Summer Camp

Palo Alto

ISTP Summer Camp is designed to give participants a unique opportunity to spend their summer break having fun learning or improving in a second language. Students are grouped according to both grade level and language of proficiency. Our camp offers many immersion opportunities and consists of a combination of language classes and activities taught in the target language. Sessions are available in French, Mandarin, Chinese and English ESL and run Monday through Friday, 8am-3:30pm, with additional extending care from 3:30-5:30pm. www.istp.org

650-251-8519

Mathnasium of Palo Alto-Menlo Park

Menlo Park

Prevent Summer Brain Drain with Mathnasium Power Math Workouts. During the summer months, many students lose 2 to 2.5 months of math skills learned during the school year. Mathnasium of Palo Alto-Menlo Park is offering 8 and 16-Session Flexible Summer Passes which will keep your child’s math skills sharp and provide a boost for the school year ahead. Open to grades 1st - 10th grade. Summer Passes on sale now and expire Sept. 7, 2013. Center located at 605 A Cambridge Avenue, Menlo Park (next to the Oasis, one block north of Stanford Shopping Mall). www.mathnasium.com/paloalto-menlopark

650-321-6284

Professional Tutoring Services of Silicon Valley Los Altos Academic camps offering Algebra I & II, Geometry, and Spanish I to III, small groups. Great for review or preview. Three sessions starting June 24 through August 2. Perfect for junior high students taking high school level courses. Register online or call us: www.ptstutor.com/Summer2013.htm

650-948-5137

Stratford School - Camp Socrates 17 Bay Area Campuses Academic enrichment infused with traditional summer camp fun--that’s what your child will experience at Camp Socrates. Sessions begin June 24 and end August 9, with the option for campers to attend all seven weeks, or the first four (June 24-July 19). Full or half-day morning or afternoon programs are available. www.StratfordSchools.com/Summer

Summer at Saint Francis

650-493-1151

Mountain View

Summer at Saint Francis provides a broad range of academic and athletic programs for elementary through high school students. It is the goal of every program to make summer vacation enriching and enjoyable! www.sfhs.com/summer

TechKnowHow Computer & Lego Camps

650-968-1213 x446

Palo Alto Menlo Park/Sunnyvale

Fun and enriching technology classes for students, ages 5-14 Courses include LEGO and K’NEX Projects with Motors, Electronics, NXT Robotics, 3D Modeling, and Game Design. Many locations, including Palo Alto, Menlo Park and Sunnyvale. Half and all day options. Early-bird and multi-session discounts available. Www.techknowhowkids.com

650-638-0500

Peninsula

What makes Y camps different? We believe every child deserves the opportunity to discover who they are and what they can achieve. Y campers experience the outdoors, make new friends and have healthy fun in a safe, nurturing environment. They become more confident and grow as individuals, and they learn value in helping others. We offer day, overnight, teen leadership and family camps. Financial assistance is available. Get your summer camp guide at ymcasv.org/summer camp. Youth camps (ages 5 - 17) run June 17 - Aug. 16 . Half-day and full-day options. Fees vary. 1922 The Alameda 3rd Floor, San Jose www.ymcasv.org

408-351-6400

Arts, Culture, Other Camps Busy Bees & Astro Kids Summer Adventure Camps

Mountain View

Join us for these half-day camps designed for 3-8 year olds as we have fun, participate in games and crafts, and go on fun field trips! Mountain View Community Center, 201 S. Rengstorff Avenue http://mountainview.gov

Community School of Music and Arts (CSMA)

Mountain View

50+ creative camps for Gr. K-8! Drawing, Painting, Ceramics, Sculpture, Musical Theater, School of Rock, Digital Arts, more! One- and two-week sessions; full and half-day enrollment. Extended care available. Financial aid offered. www.arts4all.org

DHF Wilderness Camps

650-917-6800 ext. 0

Rancho San Antonio Open Space Preserve

Children ages 6-14 can meet the livestock, help with farm chores, explore a wilderness preserve and have fun with crafts, songs and games. Older campers conclude the week with a sleepover at the Farm. Near the intersection of Hwy 85 and Hwy 280 mountainview.gov

Palo Alto

PAL offers morning and afternoon art camps in cartooning and comics, printmaking, glass fusing, mixed media and acrylic and watercolor painting for children 5-18 years. It is a great place to explore imagination and creativity in a supportive, encouraging and fun environment with a lot of personal attention. Scholarships are available. 227 Forest Avenue www.pacificartleague.org

650-321-3891

Palo Alto Community Child Care (PACCC)

Palo Alto

PACCC summer camps offer campers, grades kindergarten to 6th, a wide variety of fun opportunities! K-1 Fun for the youngest campers, Neighborhood Adventure Fun and Ultimate Adventure Fun for the more active and on-the-go campers! New this year: Sports Adventure Camp for those young athletes and Operation Chef for out of this world cooking fun! Swimming twice per week, periodic field trips, special visitors and many engaging camp activities, songs and skits round out the fun offerings of PACCC Summer Camps! Registration is online. Open to campers from all communities! Come join the fun in Palo Alto! 650-493-2361

Theatreworks Summer Camps

Palo Alto

In these entertaining camps for grades K-5, students enjoy juggling, clowning, puppetry, playwriting, acting, improvisation, music, and dance - present their own original pieces at the end of each session. www.theatreworks.org/learn/youth/camps

Western Ballet Children’s Summer Camp

650-493-7146

Mountain View

Students attend ballet class and rehearsal in preparation for the recital of either Peter Pan or The Little Mermaid at the end of the two week session. Separate Saturday classes are also offered. Ages 4-9. 914 N. Rengstorff Ave, Mountain View http://westernballet.org/documents/summerchildrens.html

Western Ballet Intermediate Summer Intensive

Mountain View

Students obtain high quality training in ballet, pointe, character, jazz, and modern dance, while learning choreography from the classical ballet Paquita. The students dance in featured roles in a final performance. Ages 9-12. Audition required 914 N. Rengstorff Ave, Mountain View http://westernballet.org/documents/summerpre-intermediate.html

Western Ballet Advanced Summer Intensive

Alan Margot’s Tennis Camps

Atherton

Alan Margot’s Tennis Camps provide an enjoyable way for your child to begin learning the game of tennis or to continue developing existing skills. Our approach is to create lots of fun with positive feedback and reinforcement in a nurturing tennis environment. Building self-esteem and confidence through enjoyment on the tennis court is a wonderful gift a child can keep forever! Super Juniors Camps, ages 3-6; Juniors Camps, ages 6-14. www.alanmargot-tennis.net

650-400-0464

City of Mountain View Recreation Division

Mountain View

Discover fun with us this summer through the many programs available with the City of Mountain View Recreation Division. From sports to traditional day camps, to cooking camps, dance camps and art camps... we have it all! Mountain View Community Center, 201 S. Rengstorff Avenue http://mountainview.gov

City of Mountain View Swim Lessons Rengstorff and Eagle Parks

Mountain View

Students obtain high quality training in ballet, pointe, character, jazz, and modern dance, while learning choreography from the classical ballet Paquita. The students dance in featured roles in a final performance. Ages 13-23. Audition required. 914 N. Rengstorff Ave, Mountain View

Mountain View

We offer swim lessons for ages 6 months to 14 years. Following the American Red Cross swim lesson program, students are divided into one of the 11 different levels taught by a certified instructor. Rengstorff Park Pool, 201 S Rengstorff Ave and Eagle Park Pool,650 Franklin St. http://mountainview.gov/

Club Rec Juniors & Seniors

Mountain View

Club Rec Juniors and Seniors is open for youth 6-11 years old. These traditional day camps are filled with fun theme weeks, weekly trips, swimming, games, crafts and more! Monta Loma Elementary School, 490 Thompson Ave. http://mountainview.gov

Foothills Day Camp

Palo Alto

What will you discover? Foothills Day and Fun Camps, for youth ages 8-10 and 5-7 respectively, includes canoeing, hiking, animal identification games, crafts, and more- all for less than $5 an hour. Registration begins February 15th for residents. (February 22nd for non-residents.) Hurry, spaces are limited! cityofpaloalto.org/enjoy

Pacific Art League of Palo Alto

www.paccc.org

Athletics

650-463-4900

J-Camp

Palo Alto

Exciting programs for kindergartners through teens include swimming, field trips, sports and more. Enroll your child in traditional or special focus camps like Surfing, Archery, Animal Adventure, Circus Camp and over 50 others! Oshman Family JCC, 3921 Fabian Way www.paloaltojcc.org/jcamp

Kim Grant Tennis Academy & Summer Camps

650-223-8622

Palo Alto Menlo Park/Redwood City

Fun and Specialized junior camps for Mini (3-5), Beginner, Intermediate 1&2, Advanced and Elite Players. Weekly programs designed by Kim Grant to improve players technique, fitness, agility, mental toughness and all around tennis game. Camps in Palo Alto, Menlo Park and Redwood City. Come make new friends and have tons of FUN!! www.KimGrantTennis.com

Nike Tennis Camps

650-752-8061

Stanford University

Dick Gould’s 43rd Annual Stanford Tennis School offers day camps for both juniors & adults. Weekly junior overnight & extended day camps run by John Whitlinger & Lele Forood. Junior Day Camp run by Brandon Coupe & Frankie Brennan. www.USSportsCamps.com/tennis

1-800-NIKE-CAMP (645-3226)

Spartans Sports Camp Spartans Sports Camp offers multi-sport, week-long sessions for boys and girls in grades 3-6 as well as sport-specific sessions for grades 6-9. There are also strength and conditioning camps for grades 6-12. Camps begin June 10th and run weekly through August 2nd at Mountain View High School. The camp is run by MVHS coaches and student-athletes and all proceeds benefit the MVHS Athletic Department. Lunch and extended care are available for your convenience. Register today! www. SpartansSportsCamp.com

Spring Down Camp Equestrian Center

650-479-5906

Portola Valley

Spring Down Camp teaches basic to advanced horsemanship skills. Ages 6-99 welcome! Daily informative lecture, riding lesson, supervised hands-on ski-ll practice, safety around horses, tacking/untacking of own camp horse, and arts/crafts. www.springdown.com

Stanford Water Polo Camps

650-851-1114

Stanford

Ages 7 and up. New to sport or have experience, we have a camp for you. Half day or Full day option for boys and girls. All the camps offer fundamental skill work, position work, scrimmages and games. StanfordWaterPoloCamps.com

650-725-9016

Summer at Saint Francis

Mountain View

Sports & Activity Camp (ages 6-12): This all-sports camp provides group instruction in a variety of field, water and court games. Saint Francis faculty and students staff the camp, and the focus is always on fun. The program is dedicated to teaching teamwork, sportsmanship and positive self-esteem. After camp care and swim lessons available. www.sfhs.com/summer

650-968-1213 x650

http://westernballet.org/documents/summer_int_adv.html

Summer at Saint Francis

Mountain View

Summer at Peninsula School

This is a child’s delight with trees to climb, rope swings, and unpaved open spaces. Our engaging and creative program includes time to play and make friends. Peninsula School, 920 Peninsula Way. Visit website for class listings.

Advanced Sports Camps (5th-9th grades): We offer a wide selection of advanced sports camps designed to provide players with the opportunity to improve both their skills and knowledge of a specific sport. Each camp is run by a Head Varsity Coach at Saint Francis, and is staffed by members of the coaching staff.

www.peninsulaschool.org/pensummerschool.htm

www.sfhs.com/summer

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Menlo Park

650-325-1584, ext. 39

650-968-1213 x650


Upfront

,OCALNEWS INFORMATIONANDANALYSIS

Palo Alto looks to welcome more public art

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Upfront QUOTE OF THE WEEK

450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 326-8210

EDITORIAL Editor Jocelyn Dong (223-6514) Associate Editor Carol Blitzer (223-6511) Sports Editor Keith Peters (223-6516) Express & Online Editor Eric Van Susteren (223-6515) Arts & Entertainment Editor Rebecca Wallace (223-6517) Assistant Sports Editor Rick Eymer (223-6521) Spectrum Editor Tom Gibboney (223-6507) Staff Writers Sue Dremann (223-6518), Chris Kenrick (223-6512), Gennady Sheyner (223-6513) Editorial Assistant/Intern Coordinator Elena Kadvany (223-6519) Staff Photographer Veronica Weber (223-6520) Contributors Andrew Preimesberger, Dale F. Bentson, Peter Canavese, Kit Davey, Tyler Hanley, Iris Harrell, Sheila Himmel, Chad Jones, Karla Kane, Kevin Kirby, Jack McKinnon, Jeanie K. Smith, Susan Tavernetti Editorial Interns Rebecca Duran, Ranjini Raghunath ADVERTISING Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Multimedia Advertising Sales Christine Afsahi (223-8582), Adam Carter (2236573), Elaine Clark (223-6572), Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571), Janice Hoogner (223-6576), Wendy Suzuki 223-6569), Brent Triantos (223-6577), Real Estate Advertising Sales Neal Fine (223-6583), Carolyn Oliver (223-6581), Rosemary Lewkowitz (223-6585) Inside Advertising Sales David Cirner (223-6579), Irene Schwartz (223-6580) Real Estate Advertising Assistant Diane Martin (223-6584) Legal Advertising Alicia Santillan (223-6578) ADVERTISING SERVICES Advertising Services Manager Jennifer Lindberg (223-6595) Sales & Production Coordinators Dorothy Hassett (223-6597), Blanca Yoc (223-6596) DESIGN Design Director Shannon Corey (223-6560) Senior Designers Linda Atilano, Diane Haas, Scott Peterson, Paul Llewellyn Designers Lili Cao, Rosanna Leung EXPRESS, ONLINE AND VIDEO SERVICES Online Operations Coordinator Ashley Finden (223-6508) BUSINESS Payroll & Benefits Susie Ochoa (223-6544) Business Associates Elena Dineva (223-6542), Mary McDonald (223-6543), Claire McGibeny (223-6546), Cathy Stringari (223-6541) ADMINISTRATION Receptionist Doris Taylor Courier Ruben Espinoza EMBARCADERO MEDIA President William S. Johnson (223-6505) Vice President & CFO Michael I. Naar (223-6540) Vice President Sales & Advertising Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Director, Information Technology & Webmaster Frank A. Bravo (223-6551) Major Accounts Sales Manager Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571) Director, Circulation & Mailing Services Bob Lampkin (223-6557) Circulation Assistant Alicia Santillan Computer System Associates Chris Planessi, Chip Poedjosoedarmo

May Fête Fair

at Heritage Park from 10am-1pm.

The Palo Alto Weekly (ISSN 0199-1159) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306, (650) 326-8210. Periodicals postage paid at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. Adjudicated a newspaper of general circulation for Santa Clara County. The Palo Alto Weekly is delivered free to homes in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, East Palo Alto, to faculty and staff households on the Stanford campus and to portions of Los Altos Hills. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 3268210. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302. ©2013 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. The Palo Alto Weekly is available on the Internet via Palo Alto Online at: www.PaloAltoOnline.com Our email addresses are: editor@paweekly.com, letters@paweekly.com, digitalads@paweekly.com, ads@paweekly.com Missed delivery or start/stop your paper? Call 650 223-6557, or email circulation@paweekly.com. You may also subscribe online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Subscriptions are $60/yr.

SUBSCRIBE! Support your local newspaper by becoming a paid subscriber. $60 per year. $100 for two years. Name: _________________________________ Address: ________________________________ City/Zip: ________________________________ Mail to: Palo Alto Weekly, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto CA 94306

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PUBLISHER William S. Johnson (223-6505)

My grandchildren will know my story from me as long as I am around; after that, it’s gone. —Judith Rabbie, a former “hidden child” from Hungary, on the diminishing numbers of Holocaust survivors. See story on page 5.

Around Town THE JOYS OF ART ... Art lovers, rejoice! On Monday night, City Manager James Keene announced grand plans to expand and enhance the city’s collection of public art. The eggshaped “Digital DNA” statue in Lytton Plaza will be enhanced with “hatching chicks” whose “cheeps” will be piped in through the sound system. The “Push” statue at Mitchell Park will be painted in the “Color of Palo Alto” (a shade of green) in a bid to make “other communities green with envy.” The new “Sofa Project” exhibition will put sofas throughout the Baylands to give weary travelers a place to rest and chat. Bol Park will get a 20foot glass sculpture that will both function as a rain gauge and stimulate conversation about water use. And the “Go Mama” statue on California Avenue will undergo modifications as part of the city’s new naming-rights partnership with website-hosting company GoDaddy.com. And Palo Alto firefighters will demonstrate their grace and agility with a series of ballet performances at King Plaza over the summer. Keene took the City Council through a slideshow of all these proposals at the April 1 meeting — before reminding them that it was April Fools’ Day. The proposals may have been a gag, but they may not be too far from the truth. On April 8, in what could be a case of life imitating art, the council will consider a broad proposal for greatly expanding the city’s public-art collection by requiring developers to set aside funds for art. ALL IN THE FAMILY ... What do a Paly journalism teacher, a Google executive and an expert in neutrinos have in common? Apart from the surname Wojcicki, each will get an award this month from the Commonwealth Club of California. Esther Wojcicki, a Palo Alto High School teacher who is also the founder of ClassBadges (a website that allows teachers to give online badges to student achievers), is set to receive the William K. Bowes Lifetime Achievement Award from the Commonwealth Club. Her husband, Stanley Wojcicki, a

retired physics professor from Stanford University, will also receive the prestigious award at the club’s annual dinner in San Francisco on April 10. Not to be outdone, the couple’s three daughters will each get their own awards. Susan Wojcicki, the senior vice president of advertising at Google; Anne Wojcicki, CEO and co-founder of the genetic-testing company 23andMe (and wife of Google co-founder Sergey Brin); and Janet Wojcicki, an adjunct professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco, are each set to receive the Distinguished Citizens Awards. The only non-Wojcicki who is set to be honored at the annual dinner is Jed York, the CEO of the San Francisco 49ers. SAVING SHOPS ... Fearing that a bustling block of restaurants and shops in downtown Palo Alto could turn into a too-quiet street full of offices, Palo Alto officials appear ready to protect the 600 block of Emerson Street from possible conversion to office use. The zone change, under consideration Monday by the City Council, would require all buildings on the block to have retail at street level, although buildings that already have ground-floor offices can keep them unless the space is vacant for 12 months, in which case the retail requirement would kick in. The 600 block currently boasts such businesses as Gordon Biersch, Tacolicious, the Empire Grill and Tap Room and Buca di Beppo. The recent replacement of Fraiche Yogurt with an office seemed to convince council members that the block is particularly vulnerable to office conversion. In a memo last November, then-Vice Mayor Greg Scharff, Councilman Greg Schmid and Councilwoman Karen Holman argued that Emerson “provides a rich retailrestaurant” corridor that needs to be protected. The proposal is, in some ways, a blast from the past. The city previously required ground-floor retail on this block, but the council removed this requirement in 2009 because of concerns over the economic downturn. N


Upfront %$5#!4)/.

New Gunn counseling survey suggests higher satisfaction level /FFICIALCITESGREATERAWARENESS NEWSTAFFINGASPOSSIBLEREASONSFORBETTERRESULTSTHANLASTYEAR by Chris Kenrick NEW SURVEY OF STUDENTS AT 'UNN (IGH 3CHOOL IN 0ALO !LTO SUGGESTS POSSIBLE IM PROVEMENT IN SATISFACTION LEVELS WITHTHESCHOOLSGUIDANCECOUNSEL INGPROGRAM WHICHHASBEENUNDER FIREBYSOMEPARENTSANDTHESUBJECT OFLENGTHYDISCUSSIONBYTHE"OARD OF%DUCATION )N A &EBRUARY SURVEY OF   'UNN FRESHMEN SOPHOMORES AND JUNIORS STUDENTSEXPRESSEDGREAT ER TRUST THAN THEY DID A YEAR AGO IN THEIR COUNSELORS ADVICEINTHE AREA OF ACADEMICS CLASSES AND SCHEDULES 4HEY ALSO EXPRESSED IMPROVED COMFORTLEVELSABOUTAPPROACHINGAN ADULTATSCHOOLSHOULDTHEYBESTRUG GLINGWITHPERSONALISSUES )NOTHERAREAS PRECISECOMPARI SONS WERE DIFFICULT BECAUSE THIS YEARS SURVEY QUESTIONS WERE NOT EXACTLYTHESAMEASLASTYEARS!S SISTANT0RINCIPAL4OM*ACOUBOWSKY SAID SOME SURVEY ITEMS WERE RE WORDEDTOANSWERTHEQUESTIONSOF

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#/--5.)49

Honoring life and loss 2EMEMBRANCESERVICECOMMEMORATESVICTIMSANDSURVIVORSOFTHE(OLOCAUST by Ranjini Raghunath

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Upfront #/--5.)49

Palo Alto moves to support same-sex marriage #ITY#OUNCILPASSESRESOLUTIONOPPOSING0ROPOSITION AUTHORIZINGTHEFLYINGOFRAINBOWFLAGAT+ING0LAZA by Gennady Sheyner

Veronica Weber

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OTHERCITIESINTHEAREASHOWEDTHEIR SUPPORT FOR SAME SEX MARRIAGE BY FLYINGRAINBOWFLAGS PASSINGRESO LUTIONS AFFIRMING SUPPORT FOR MAR RIAGEEQUALITYORJOININGTHELITIGA TIONCHALLENGING0ROPOSITION3AN &RANCISCO 3ANTA #RUZ AND 3ANTA -ONICAAREAMONGTHEPARTICIPANTS INTHELITIGATION ASARE3ANTA#LARA AND3AN-ATEOCOUNTIES !RAINBOWFLAGFLIESINTHEWINDOUTSIDEOF#ITY(ALLAFTERTHECITYPASSEDARESOLUTIONINSUPPORTOFSAME 7HILE 0ALO !LTO HASNT GONE AS SEXMARRIAGE FAR COUNCILMEMBERSMADEITCLEAR THIS WEEK WHERE THEY STAND ON THE YEARCAREERWITHTHECITYANDURGED ISSUE7ITHLITTLEDEBATEANDNODIS THECOUNCILTOSUPPORTTHEPROCLAMA SENT THEYENTHUSIASTICALLYAPPROVED TION "ETTS WHO MARRIED HIS PART A RESOLUTION THAT AUTHORIZES #ITY NEROFYEARSINTHEFALLOF -ANAGER *AMES +EENE TO FLY THE BEFORETHEPASSAGEOF0ROPOSITION RAINBOWFLAGAT+ING0LAZAINREC SAIDTHATTOHISKNOWLEDGE THEMAR OGNITION OF THE CITYS hOVERWHELM RIAGEHADNTCAUSEDTHEBREAK UPSOF INGREJECTIONOF0ROPOSITIONvAND ANY OTHER MARRIAGES OR THE BREAK ASASYMBOLFORITSSUPPORThFORTHE DOWNOFSOCIETY RESTORATIONOFMARRIAGEEQUALITYFOR 4HE RAINBOW FLAG HE SAID IS A GAYSANDLESBIANSIN#ALIFORNIAv SIGNOFDIVERSITYANDINCLUSIVENESS 'REG"ETTS DIRECTOROF0ALO!LTOS AWAYTOPROMOTEANOPENANDWEL #OMMUNITY 3ERVICES $EPARTMENT COMINGCOMMUNITY ADDRESSED THE COUNCIL AS A PRIVATE h4HERAINBOWFLAGISNOTAFLAGOF CITIZENFORTHEFIRSTTIMEINHIS ALLEGIANCE )T DOES NOT REPRESENT A CONSTITUTIONORACHARTER v"ETTSSAID h4HISFLAGISMERELYASYMBOLv &AITH "ELL OWNER OF "ELLS "OOKS ALSO SPOKE IN SUPPORT OF THE RESOLUTION AND SAID SHE WOULD 'REG"ETTS DIRECTOROFTHECOMMUNITYSERVICESDEPARTMENTFORTHE#ITY BEPROUDTOBEINACITYTHATFLEW OF0ALO!LTO RAISESTHERAINBOWFLAGAT+ING0LAZAON!PRILWHILE THERAINBOWFLAG -AYOR'REG3CHARFFLOOKSON /MAR#HATTY A3AN*OSERESIDENT WHO FREQUENTLY OPINES ON TRANS ,ARRY+LEINSAIDHEWAShVERYPROUDv h)FYOUWERETOLOOKBACKYEARS PORTATION ISSUES DISAGREED AND OFHISCOLLEAGUES!ND#OUNCILMAN TO "ROWN VS THE "OARD OF %DUCA ARGUED AGAINST FLYING THE RAINBOW -ARC "ERMAN AGREED WITH 3CHARFF TION ˆ EVERY CITY PROBABLY WISHES FLAG -EMBERS OF SOME RELIGIONS AND#OUNCILWOMAN,IZ+NISSABOUT ITHADPUTOUTARESOLUTIONABOUTTHE HE ARGUED COULD BE OFFENDED BY SAME SEXMARRIAGEBEINGTHEhCIVIL FACTTHAT@SEPARATEBUTEQUALISNOT THECITYSDECISIONTOREDEFINEhMAR RIGHTSISSUEOFOURTIMEv EQUAL v"ERMANSAIDN RIAGE vWHICHTOTHEMISAUNIONOFA MANANDAWOMAN(EASKEDTHECITY NOTTOFLYTHEFLAGUNTILTHE3UPREME #OURTCOMESOUTWITHADECISION "UT THE COUNCIL AGREED THAT ITS TIME TO TAKE AN OFFICIAL STANCE ON SAME SEX MARRIAGE PARTICULARLY GIVENTHEOPINIONOF0ALO!LTORESI DENTS PERCENTOFWHOMREJECTED A round-up of Palo Alto government action this week 0ROPOSITION MONDAY // April 8 4HEPROPOSALTOFLYTHEFLAGWAS INITIALLY PROPOSED BY -AYOR 'REG City Council (April 1) Recycled water: The council voted 4-2 to complete its study of the city’s Recycled 3CHARFFANDAGREEDUPONBY+EENE // Water Delivery System. Because the approval requires five votes, the council then 3CHARFFCALLEDFLYINGTHERAINBOW voted 4-2 to continue the discussion to April 8. Yes: Berman, Klein, Kniss, Price No: JOURNALIST, AUTHOR FLAG A hVERY IMPORTANTv ACTION FOR Holman, Scharff Absent: Burt, Schmid, Shepherd AND ROLLING STONE THECITYANDARGUEDTHATCOMMITTED Rainbow flag: The council authorized City Manager James Keene to fly the rainbow CONTRIBUTING EDITOR flag over City Hall and adopted a resolution signaling the city’s opposition to ProposiRELATIONSHIPS ˆ GAY OR STRAIGHT ˆ tion 8 and the federal Defense of Marriage Act. Yes: Berman, Holman, Klein, Kniss, MAKETHECOMMUNITYSTRONGER How to Cool the Planet: Price, Scharff Absent: Burt, Schmid, Shepherd h)SEENOPOSSIBLEARGUMENTWHY Geoengineering and PEOPLESHOULDNTBEALLOWEDTOMARRY the Audacious Quest to Utilities Advisory Commission (April 3) WHOMEVERTHEYWISH v3CHARFFSAID Power purchases: The commission approved three power-purchase-agreement Fix Earth’s Climate #OUNCILWOMAN +AREN (OLMAN contracts with suppliers of photovoltaic energy. Yes: Cook, Foster, Hall, Melton Absent: Chang, Eglash, Waldfogel ADDRESSED THE CRITICISM FROM RESI PaloAltoGreen: The commission voted 4-0 to approve a staff proposal to redesign SUBSCRIPTIONS DENTS THAT THE COUNCIL SHOULDNT PaloAltoGreen to support a community solar program that would be implemented (650) 854-7696 x310 MEDDLE IN THIS NATIONAL ISSUE 3HE in January 2014. The commission also voted 3-1 to pursue a second PaloAltoGreen www.openspacetrust.org/lectures NOTEDTHATTHECOUNCILISBOTHREP option centered on reducing greenhouse-gas emissions from natural-gas usage. Yes: Cook, Foster, Hall No: Melton Absent: Chang, Eglash, Waldfogel RESENTING THE VOTERS AND SHOWING SINGLE TICKETS Fiber: The commission discussed the current and projected revenues in the city’s SUPPORTFORTHOSEMEMBERSOF0ALO MVCPA Box OfďŹ ce Fiber Fund. Action: None !LTOS YOUTH COMMUNITY WHO MAY (650) 903-6000 BESTRUGGLINGWITHTHEIRIDENTITY Architectural Review Board (April 4) (ER COLLEAGUES AGREED #OUNCIL Ronald McDonald House: The board approved a proposed expansion of the Ronald Open Space Trust WOMAN'AIL0RICESAIDSHEWAShVERY McDonald House at 50 El Camino Real. The project would add 70 rooms to the facility. Yes: Lew, Malone, Popp, Prichard Absent: Lippert Recused: Alizadeh PLEASEDvWITHTHEACTION#OUNCILMAN Veronica Weber

ALO!LTOOFFICIALSENTHUSIASTI CALLYJUMPEDINTOTHENATIONAL DEBATE OVER SAME SEX MAR RIAGE ON -ONDAY NIGHT WHEN THEY PASSED A RESOLUTION OPPOSING STATE 0ROPOSITIONANDAGREEDTOFLYTHE RAINBOWFLAGINFRONTOF#ITY(ALL #ALLING IT THE hCIVIL RIGHTS ISSUE OF OUR TIME v MEMBERS OF THE #ITY #OUNCILVOTED  WITH6ICE-AYOR .ANCY 3HEPHERD AND #OUNCILMEN 0AT "URT AND 'REG 3CHMID ABSENT TOJOINAGROWINGCOALITIONOFCITIES IN THE AREA THAT ARE TAKING A STAND ON THE ISSUE OF SAME SEX MARRIAGE ˆTHESUBJECTOFTWOSEPARATECASES HEARD BY THE 53 3UPREME #OURT LASTWEEK/NEOFTHESECASESCON CERNS0ROPOSITION ALAWBANNING SAME SEX MARRIAGE THAT #ALIFORNIA VOTERSAPPROVEDIN.OVEMBER 4HE OTHER CHALLENGES THE LEGALITY OFTHEFEDERAL$EFENSEOF-ARRIAGE !CT WHICH DEFINES MARRIAGE AS A UNIONOFAMANANDAWOMAN "EFORE -ONDAY 0ALO !LTO HAS REMAINED ON THE SIDELINE WHILE



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Upfront

REAL ESTATE TRENDS by Samia Cullen

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Owner of JJ&F grocery store eyes Miki’s Market space !S-IKISLEAVES!LMA6ILLAGE ANOTHERGROCERLOOKSATTAKINGOVERTHESPOT by Sue Dremann OE+HOURY THEPATRIARCHOFTHE FAMILYTHATOWNS**&-ARKET IN0ALO!LTO SAYSHEISCONSID ERINGTAKINGOVERTHE!LMA6ILLAGE SPACE RECENTLY OCCUPIED BY -IKIS &ARM &RESH -ARKET WHICH CLOSED THISWEEKAFTERJUSTFIVEMONTHS -IKISOPENEDTOGREATFANFARELAST /CTOBER FOLLOWING SEVEN YEARS OF BLIGHTATTHEPLAZANEAR%AST-EAD OW$RIVE"UTAFTERMONTHSOFPOOR SALES -IKISCLOSEDON7EDNESDAY LEAVINGOWNER-ICHAELh-IKIv7ER NESSWITHMILLIONINDEBT **& A  YEAR OLD MARKET LO CATEDAT#OLLEGE!VE ISPARTOF THEPLANNED#OLLEGE4ERRACE#ENTRE REDEVELOPMENT AT #OLLEGE !VENUE AND %L #AMINO 2EAL 4HE CENTER WOULD INCLUDE   SQUARE FEET OF OFFICE SPACE   SQUARE FEET OFOTHERRETAILANDEIGHTUNITSOFAF FORDABLEHOUSING "UT THE ECONOMIC DOWNTURN BROUGHT THE PROJECT TO A STANDSTILL ACCORDINGTOPEOPLECLOSETOTHEDE VELOPMENT 0ROJECT ARCHITECT 4ONY #ARRASCOSAIDIN-ARCHTHATDEVEL OPER !DVENTERA )NC IS hSTILL TRYING TOGETITFINANCEDv

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THEPROJECT ANDSOMEWERERESOLVED NOTTOSHOPTHERE HESAID !SKEDON4UESDAYIFANYDEALHAD MATERIALIZED BETWEEN HIM AND THE +HOURYS HISANSWERWASSHORTAND TOTHEPOINT h.O)MFINISHED vHESAID SHAK INGHISHEAD 0ROPERTYOWNER*OHN-C.ELLISSAID INANEMAILTHATHEHASNTHEARDANY THINGABOUTTHE+HOURYSINTEREST h%VEN IF ) HAD ) WOULDNT COM MENTONIT ASWENEVERCOMMENTON LEASES OR POTENTIALS UNTIL A LEASE IS ACTUALLY SIGNED ˆ BAD LUCK TO DO OTHERWISE vHESAIDN 3TAFF 7RITER 3UE $REMANN CAN BEEMAILEDATSDREMANN PAWEEK LYCOM

Advice for Home Buyers in Today’s Market Buying or selling a home is ranked as one of the most stressful events in life. The local real estate market is hot; inventory is at an historic low and multiple offers on almost every property is the norm. Market conditions are putting buyers under pressure to buy a home before home prices and interest rates go higher. The stress that buyers experience can be alleviated with careful planning. There is more to home buying than ďŹ nding the right house. The process is complex with a myriad of issues that surface and need to be addressed promptly. Therefore once the decision to buy a house is made, you should soon after get the help of an experienced local real estate agent who can offer an insider’s advice. Experienced local agents have a strong sense of the precise actions that should be taken in different situations. When faced with decisions ask your agent for advice (including the

rationale behind their advice), and ask for data before making your ďŹ nal decision. If you are unsatisďŹ ed by the answers and truly feel that you cannot trust your agent, you have not found the right agent. A qualiďŹ ed agent will help you understand the process, explain the timeline, answer your questions and navigate through the complex process to avoid costly pitfalls or mistakes. A reputable local agent can also assist by suggesting different neighborhoods or properties that you may not have considered and by helping you prepare and negotiate the terms of offers and counteroffers. Finally, be proactive and do your own research. Go to the city building department to learn more about how the house has been modiďŹ ed over time. Talk to the neighbors about their experiences in the neighborhood. The more you know, the better off you are and the less likely you are to encounter bad surprises.

If you have a real estate question or would like a free market analysis for your home, please call me at 650-384-5392, Alain Pinel Realtors, or email me at scullen@apr.com. For the latest real estate news, follow my blog at www.samiacullen.com

Join today: SupportLocalJournalism.org/PaloAlto

Support Palo Alto Weekly’s print and online coverage of our community.

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Upfront

Art

(continued from page 3)

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Edgewood Eats (continued from page 3)





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Public Agenda A preview of Palo Alto government meetings next week CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to meet in closed session to discuss potential litigation relating to water-service charges to the Palo Alto Hills Golf and Country Club. The council also plans to pass a resolution expressing appreciation to Steve Emslie, consider zoning changes to the 600 block of Emerson Street, discuss an amendment to its contract for the El Camino Park reservoir project; and consider a colleagues’ memo advocating an expansion of the city’s Percent for Art program. The closed session will begin at 6 p.m. on Monday, April 8, at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). The rest of the meeting will follow in the Council Chambers. BOARD OF EDUCATION ... The board will hear recommendations from a citizens committee that has evaluated possible locations for opening a 13th elementary school. The board will also hear a report on raw data from a recent survey of students, parents and staff on satisfaction with the new academic calendar adopted this year, as well as an update on the district’s strategic plan survey. The meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 9, in the boardroom of school district headquarters (25 Churchill Ave.). POLICY AND SERVICES COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to discuss changes to the city’s recruitment process for commissioners, consider the quarterly report from the city auditor and discuss the fraud, waste and abuse hotline. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, April 9, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). PLANNING AND TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ... The commission is tentatively scheduled to consider approving the Housing Element and discuss a request from Freebirds World Burrito for a permit to sell alcohol. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, April 10, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). COUNCIL REGIONAL HOUSING MANDATE COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to discuss an update of Plan Bay Area and head an update on the Housing Element process and the city’s appeal regarding the Regional Housing Needs Allocation. The meeting will begin at 4 p.m. on Thursday, April 11, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). HUMAN RELATIONS COMMISSION ... The commission plans to hear a presentation from the Mountain View Day Worker Center and to hear another presentation from Martin Eichner, formerly of the Palo Alto Mediation Program, as part of a learning series about affordable housing. The commission will also consider approving a letter of support for the San Francisco Bay Area Water Trail grant application. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Thursday, April 11, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). BOARD OF EDUCATION ... The board will hold a study session on results of a community survey relating to the school district’s strategic plan. The meeting is tentatively scheduled for 12:30 p.m. on Friday, April 12, in Conference Room A of school district headquarters (25 Churchill Ave.).


Upfront

News Digest San Jose man charged with robberies in Palo Alto ! MAN WHO POLICE BELIEVE USED A HANDGUN TO ROB STORES AND BANKS THROUGHOUTTHEREGION INCLUDINGA7ALGREENSANDABANKIN0ALO!LTO WASARRESTEDIN-ILPITAS-ARCH (UNTER$4HOMPSON  WASARRESTEDANDCHARGEDWITHSEVERALCOUNTS OFROBBERYAFTERANINVESTIGATIONBY-ILPITASPOLICELINKEDHIMTOAROB BERYOFA#HASE"ANK!FOLLOW UPINVESTIGATIONLATERLED0ALO!LTOOFFI CERSTOTHECONCLUSIONTHATTHE3AN*OSERESIDENTWASALSOTHEMANBEHIND A$ECEMBERROBBERYIN7ALGREENSON5NIVERSITY!VENUEANDTHEROBBERY AT0ROVIDENT#REDIT5NIONIN*ANUARY )NBOTHOFTHOSECASES AMANFLASHEDAHANDGUNANDWALKEDAWAYFROM THESCENE)NTHE7ALGREENSINCIDENTON$EC THEMANALLEGEDLYASKED APHARMACISTFORASSISTANCE TOOKHERASIDE SHOWEDHERTHEHANDLEOFA GUNINHISMESSENGERBAG TOLDHERHEISADDICTEDTOOPIATESANDDEMANDED OXYCONTIN APAINRELIEVERLISTEDASACONTROLLEDSUBSTANCEIN#ALIFORNIA 4HEPHARMACISTGAVEHIMABOTTLEOFOXYCONTIN ANDTHEMANLEFT 4HE0ROVIDENT#REDIT5NIONAT%L#AMINO2EALWASROBBEDON *ANAFTERAMANWALKEDINTOTHEBANKWITHAHANDGUNANDDEMANDED MONEY(EESCAPEDONFOOTAFTERBEINGGIVENANUNDISCLOSEDAMOUNTOF CASH 4HOMPSONALLEGEDLYUSEDASIMILARAPPROACHINTHE-ARCHROBBERY IN-ILPITAS !NYONEWITHINFORMATIONABOUT4HOMPSONOREITHEROFTHE0ALO!LTO ROBBERIESISASKEDTOCALL0ALO!LTOPOLICEAT  !NONYMOUS TIPSCANBEEMAILEDTOPALOALTO TIPNOWORGORSENTVIATEXTMESSAGEOR VOICEMAILTO  N ˆ'ENNADY3HEYNER 4WO MEMBERS OF THE 4ALIBAN %AST 0ALO !LTO GANG ALLEGEDLY BEAT A PRESCHOOLER AND THREATENED TO SHOOT HIM BECAUSE HIS FATHER IS A RIVAL GANG MEMBER 3AN -ATEO #OUNTY $ISTRICT !TTORNEY 3TEVE 7AGSTAFFE HASSAID 4HEBEATINGANDTHREATSWERECAPTUREDONACELL PHONEVIDEOTHATONE OFTHEMENHAD 7ILBERT!RD  AND$WAYNE!NTHONY(ENRY  WEREARRESTED-ARCH FORVIOLATINGTHEIRPAROLEANDPROBATIONBYASSOCIATINGWITHEACHOTHER ASGANGMEMBERS +AREN'UIDOTTI CHIEFDEPUTYDISTRICTATTORNEY SAID !RDPOSSESSEDACELLPHONETHATHADNUMEROUSVIDEOS INCLUDINGONE THATSHOWEDBOTHMENALLEGEDLYROUGHINGUPABOYWHOISABOUTTO YEARSOLD 4HEMENALLEGEDLYSTRUCKTHEBOYINTHEHEADWITHALOADED ROUND HANDGUNMAGAZINEWHILETELLINGHIMTHEYWEREGOINGTOSHOOTHIMAND HISFATHERBECAUSETHEFATHERISARIVALGANGMEMBER4HEMENALSOAL LEGEDLYTHREATENEDTHEBOYWITHAHANDGUNASONEMANRACKEDAROUND INTHEWEAPON 'UIDOTTISAIDTHEBOYSFATHERISBELIEVEDTOBEAMEMBEROFA-ENLO 0ARKGANG4HECHILDANDFATHERREMAINUNIDENTIFIED&ORENSICANALYSIS OFTHEPHONEESTABLISHEDTHEVIDEOWASMADEON&EB !RD AND (ENRY WERE ARRAIGNED ON -ARCH  AND ARE SCHEDULED FOR APRELIMINARYHEARING!PRIL4HEYREMAININCUSTODYIN3AN-ATEO #OUNTY*AILON BAILN ˆ3UE$REMANN

Andre Zandona

Gang members allegedly beat preschooler

A pocketful of poppies #ALIFORNIAPOPPIESLINETHESIDEWALKON5NIVERSITY!VENUEIN0ALO!LTOON-ARCH THEFIRSTDAYOFSPRING

Sign up for the Palo Alto Citywide Yard Sale Saturday, June 8 from 8 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Cities look to install flood-warning system 2ESIDENTS NEAR THE 3AN &RANCISQUITO #REEK RECEIVED A WAKE UP CALL FROMTHEFICKLECREEKON$EC WHENAHEAVYRAINSTORMCAUSEDTHE CREEKTOSPILLONTO53(IGHWAYIN%AST0ALO!LTOANDNEARLYOVER FLOWTHE0OPE #HAUCER"RIDGEIN0ALO!LTO .OW OFFICIALS FROM 0ALO !LTO %AST 0ALO !LTO AND -ENLO 0ARK ARE TRYING TO MAKE SURE THAT THE NEXT RAIN STORM WILL HAVE LESS DRAMATIC RESULTS /N-ONDAYNIGHT !PRIL THE0ALO!LTO#ITY#OUNCILAUTHORIZEDA REQUESTFROMTHE3AN&RANCISQUITO#REEK*OINT0OWERS!UTHORITYWHICH INCLUDESTHETHREECITIESANDTHEWATERDISTRICTSIN3ANTA#LARAAND3AN -ATEOCOUNTIES TOAPPLYFORAGRANTTHATWOULDPAYFORNEWGAUGESIN THEUPPERSHEDOFTHECREEK)FTHEGRANTISAPPROVED THECITYWOULDBE ABLETOSIGNIFICANTLYIMPROVEITSFLOOD WARNINGSYSTEM WHICHCURRENTLY INCLUDESTHE#REEK-ONITORWEBPAGE4HEPAGEDELIVERSREAL TIMEDATA ON CREEK FLOWS NEAR BRIDGES )T DOES NOT HOWEVER MEASURE THE WATER LEVELUPSTREAM 4HEGRANTFUNDSWOULDBEUSEDTOCREATEWHATAREPORTFROMTHE0UBLIC 7ORKS$EPARTMENTCALLSANhENHANCEDREGIONALFLOOD WARNINGSYSTEMv FORTHECREEKSWATERSHED4HENEWEQUIPMENTWOULDBEINTEGRATEDWITH EXISTINGGAUGESINTOAhUNIFIEDMONITORINGSYSTEMvANDWOULDINCLUDEhA ROBUSTCOMMUNICATIONSSYSTEMTHATWILLOPTIMIZETHEAVAILABILITYOFTHE RAINFALLANDSTREAMFLOWDATATOEMERGENCYRESPONDERSANDTHEGENERAL PUBLICv )FTHEGRANTISAPPROVED THECREEKAUTHORITYHOPESTOHAVETHEFLOOD WARNINGSYSTEMINPLACEBEFORETHE WINTER STORMSEASON ACCORD INGTOTHE0UBLIC7ORKSREPORTN ˆ'ENNADY3HEYNER LET’S DISCUSS: Read the latest local news headlines and talk about the issues at Town Square at PaloAltoOnline.com

Helping the environment and making money has never been so easy. Reusing – whether you donate, buy or sell – is one of the best ways to reduce waste and keep usable stuff out of the landfill. Sign up to hold a yard sale and join the fun. Sign Up to Sell t Register online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com/yardsale or call (650) 496-5910. The registration deadline is May 10, 2013. t We’ll send you a fact sheet with tips for a successful sale and a list of reuse organizations. t Your address and sale merchandise will be included in a full-page map listing all participating sales. The map will be printed in the June 7, 2013 edition of the Palo Alto Weekly and online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com/yardsale

For more information about the Yard Sale www.PaloAltoOnline.com/yardsale zerowaste@cityofpaloalto.org (650) 496-5910

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Upfront

Online This Week

These and other news stories were posted on Palo Alto Online throughout the week. For longer versions, go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com/news or click on “News� in the left, green column.

Firefighters rescue man from creek For a complete list of classes and class fees, lectures and health education resources, visit pamf.org/healtheducation.

0ALO!LTOFIREFIGHTERSRESCUEDAMANWHOFELLDOWNANEMBANKMENT TOWARD3AN&RANCISQUITO#REEKON!PRILAFTERNOON(April 4, 12:12 p.m.)

April 2013

Medicare Updates and Changes Tuesday, April 9, 7 to 8:30 p.m. Mountain View Center 701 E. El Camino Real, Mountain View

Facebook reveals ‘Home’ launcher for Android h7ERENOTBUILDINGAPHONE v-ARK:UCKERBERGSAIDTODAY FINALLY PUTTINGTORESTMONTHSOFRUMORS7HAT&ACEBOOKHASDONE HOWEVER ISBUILDWHATTHEYBILLAShTHEBESTVERSIONOF&ACEBOOKTHEREISv(April 4, 11:21 a.m.)

Presented by Connie Corales Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program (HICAP)

Ronald McDonald House expansion scores victory

650-934-7373

9:56 a.m.)

Learn about the basics of Medicare for beneďŹ ciaries, as well as the aspects of Medicare that have changed as a result of the Affordable Care Act.

Mindful Eating

!PROPOSALTOMORETHANDOUBLETHESIZEOFTHE2ONALD-C$ONALD (OUSEIN0ALO!LTOSCOREDAMAJORVICTORY!PRILMORNINGWHENTHE CITYS !RCHITECTURAL 2EVIEW "OARD SIGNED OFF ON THE PROJECT (April 4,

Caltrain plans signal-safety upgrades at Palo Alto 4WOOF0ALO!LTOSMOSTIMPORTANT#ALTRAINCROSSINGSCOULDRECEIVE SAFETYIMPROVEMENTSTOTRAIN APPROACHWARNINGSYSTEMSASPARTOFA  MILLION PROJECT 4HE 0ENINSULA *OINT 0OWERS "OARD *"0 WILL VOTEONAWARDINGACONTRACTFORTHEIMPROVEMENTSTHISMORNING(April 4, 9:50 a.m.)

Presented by Toni Toledo, MPH, R.D. PAMF Nutrition Services

Tuesday, April 16, 7 to 8:30 p.m. Sunnyvale Public Library 665 W. Olive Avenue, Sunnyvale

No registration required.

Most ‘chronic dieters’ have found that their years of being on and off diets have actually been counter-productive. Dieting can often result in being even more detached from the guidance our bodies can provide on the path of healthy eating and weight loss. A Mindful approach to healthy eating is oriented toward being in touch with the wisdom of our bodies, rather than alienated from them. This session will offer the basic tenets of Mindful Eating and Intuitive Eating and provide strategies to incorporate them into our lives.

Food Is Your Medicine!

Palo Alto considers recycled water for irrigation $EPENDINGONWHICHMEMBEROFTHE#ITY#OUNCILISTALKING SWITCH INGTORECYCLEDWATERFORIRRIGATIONAT3TANFORD2ESEARCH0ARKWOULD EITHERBEAGIANTSTEPFOR0ALO!LTOSWATER CONSERVATIONEFFORTSORAN ILL ADVISEDMEASURETHATWOULDDEGRADETHECONDITIONOFTHESOIL(April 4, 9:42 a.m.)

President Obama fundraises in the Bay Area 0RESIDENT"ARACK/BAMAISINTHE"AY!REAFORASERIESOFFUNDRAISERS IN3AN&RANCISCOAND!THERTON!PRILAND!PRIL ANDPROTESTERSWITH AVARIETYOFMESSAGESAREMOBILIZINGTOGREETHIM(April 3, 4:52 p.m.)

Sandberg: ‘aim high, believe in yourselves’ !UTHORAND&ACEBOOK#HIEF/PERATING/FFICE3HERYL3ANDBERGEX HORTEDA3TANFORDAUDIENCE!PRILTOSTANDUPANDDOTHEhHARDWORKv OFENDINGGENDERSTEREOTYPES(April 3, 9:52 a.m.)

Alleged drunken driver strikes man Presented by Patricia Santana, M.D, and Linda Shiue, M.D. PAMF Internal Medicine

Monday, April 22, 7 to 8:30 p.m. San Carlos Library 610 Elm Street, San Carlos

To register, contact Rhea Bradley at 650-591-0347, extension 237. A discussion on nutrition with a cooking demonstration and tasting. Do you want to eat healthier but don’t know where to start? Do you feel like you don’t have the time or skills to cook? Drs. Santana and Shiue will describe and demonstrate how to use your most powerful tool, your fork, to make healthy choices. What you choose to eat has a direct impact on your health. Our hope is that you feel empowered in making healthy choices, and can taste for yourself that there is no need to compromise on taste!

!0ALO!LTOMANWASARRESTEDONSUSPICIONOFFELONYDRUNKENDRIVING AFTERHEALLEGEDLYHITANEMPLOYEEOFAMOVINGCOMPANYANDPLOWED INTOAHOMEON!PRILAFTERNOON(April 2, 6:48 p.m.)

Microsoft co-founder to open Palo Alto office 6ULCAN#APITAL WHICHMANAGESINVESTMENTSFOR-ICROSOFTCO FOUND ER0AUL!LLEN ANNOUNCEDTODAYTHATITWOULDOPENANOFFICEINDOWN TOWN0ALO!LTO(April 2, 9:48 a.m.)

St. Patrick’s employee accused of stealing *ENNIFER -ARGRET -ORRIS THE  YEAR OLD FINANCE DIRECTOR FOR 3T 0ATRICKS3EMINARYAND5NIVERSITYIN-ENLO0ARK HASBEENCHARGED IN THE THEFT OF   AND A  -ERCEDES FROM THE INSTITUTION (April 2, 8:58 a.m.)

Tesla announces first-quarter profitability

Advance Health Care Directive Tuesday, April 30, 7 to 8:30 p.m. Mountain View Center 701 E. El Camino Real, Mountain View

For information only. AHCDs will not be completed at this lecture.

Presented by Betsy Carpenter CertiďŹ ed Advance Care Planning Faciltator 650-934-7373

Whether you’re 18 or 80+, an Advance Health Care Directive provides a way for you to communicate your wishes to your family, friends and health care professionals and to avoid confusion later on. This lecture will discuss end-of-life decisions such as who will speak for you, what kinds of medical interventions you might want under different circumstances, as well as the different types of end-of-life documents. twitter.com/ paloaltomedical facebook.com/ paloaltomedicalfoundation

pamfblog.org

pinterest.com/ paloaltomedical youtube.com/ paloaltomedical

Scan this code with your smartphone for more health education information. Get the free mobile scanner app at http://gettag.mobi.

Page 10ĂŠUĂŠĂŠÂŤĂ€ÂˆÂ?ĂŠx]ÊÓä£ÎÊUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°Vœ“

4ESLA-OTORSTODAYANNOUNCED-ARCHTHATITWILLACHIEVEPROFIT ABILITYINTHEFIRSTQUARTERAFTERSELLINGMOREOFITS-ODEL3SEDANSTHAN ITPREVIOUSLYEXPECTED(April 1, 9:27 a.m.)

East Palo Alto skate park reopens !CEREMONYWASHELDATPM -ARCH TOMARKTHEREOPENING OFTHE  SQUARE FOOTSKATEPARKAT"ELL3TREET0ARKON5NIVERSITY !VENUEIN%AST0ALO!LTO(Sunday, 12:07 p.m.)

Solar Impulse embarks on historic flight 4HE3OLAR)MPULSE ANAIRPLANEPOWEREDENTIRELYBYENERGYHARVESTED FROMTHESUN WILLSOONTAKEOFFFROM-OFFETT&IELD KICKINGOFFTHE FIRSTLEGOFITSCROSS COUNTRYTOUR(Saturday, 3:17 p.m.)

Stanford Electric Works to move to Mountain View !FTERYEARSOFCALLING0ALO!LTOITSHOME 3TANFORD%LECTRIC7ORKS WILLMOVETO-OUNTAIN6IEWATTHEENDOF*UNE ACCORDINGTOTHESTORES OWNER(Saturday, 3:04 p.m.) Want to get news briefs emailed to you every weekday? Sign up for Express, our new daily e-edition. Go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com to sign up.


Upfront

FIT zones

(continued from page 3)

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Optimum Parenting Today’s Impact on the Future >>>>> A Two-Part Speaker Event

Monday, April 15 & Monday, April 22 7:00 – 8:30 p.m. Bethany Lutheran Church 1095 Cloud Avenue, Menlo Park (at the corner of Avy & Cloud Avenues, 1 block east of the Alameda)

Join Dr. Wes Pederson as he explores how to guide your child into a happy and healthy adulthood.

www.bethany-mp.org/optimum Reserve your seat by April 10 For more information, call 650-854-5897 This is an adult-only event. No childcare will be available.

Inspirations

a guide to the spiritual community

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, UCC £™nxʜՈÃÊ,œ>`]Ê*>œÊÌœÊUÊ­Èxä®ÊnxȇÈÈÈÓÊUÊÜÜÜ°vVV«>°œÀ}Ê

This Sunday: Can I Get a Witness? Rev. Dr. Eileen Altman preaching

     

        

An Open and Affirming Congregation of the United Church of Christ

ST. ANN ANGLICAN CHAPEL A TRADITIONAL E PISCOPAL

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Inspirations is a resource for ongoing religious services and special events. To inquire about or to reserve space in Inspirations, please contact Blanca Yoc at 223-6596 or email byoc@paweekly.com

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Editorial Symbolic actions matter in quest for civil rights As we await Supreme Court decisions on gay marriage and Boy Scout vote on membership policies, local actions can help demonstrate changing norms

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n the 1960s, political and community leaders in Palo Alto were among those who stepped up to publicly advocate for federal and state fair-housing laws against red-lining and other forms of racial discrimination in housing. It was bold and courageous, and it also reflected clear majority sentiment among Palo Altans. Similar actions across the nation helped demonstrate that it was time for the country to enact or repeal laws that would eliminate legalized racial discrimination. But as these and other efforts have shown, when it comes to the expansion of civil rights to those who have been historically denied, change does not come easy, quickly or without advocacy. It is no coincidence that today local governments and local Boy Scout councils across the country are grappling with how far the country is ready to go in granting equal rights to gays and lesbians, and Palo Alto is once again in a position to provide leadership, however symbolic. Like the civil rights debates of the 1960s, local actions can send powerful messages to state and federal legislators and judges about changing societal norms and expectations. So while some in the community complain about the appropriateness of the City Council taking an hour of its meeting Monday to endorse same-sex marriage and approving the flying of the rainbow flag at City Hall, signifying this community’s commitment to full rights for gays, we join with those who applaud the symbolism. Joining other progressive communities in flying the flag is a quiet yet powerful way to show support for achieving the current generation’s equivalent to eliminating racial discrimination. It required no investment of staff time and was efficiently and respectfully discussed Monday night and adopted on a unanimous vote of the six council members present at the meeting. With 76 percent of Palo Alto voters having rejected Proposition 8 on the November 2008 state ballot, there can be no question that today, more than four years later, the overwhelming majority of city residents support the legalization of same-sex marriage. Given the interest expressed by some Supreme Court justices on whether society is “ready” for gay marriage, it is entirely appropriate for local communities to convey their readiness and acceptance. Meanwhile, the Boy Scouts of America is set to make a decision on the issue of gay membership at its upcoming national council meeting next month, and it has asked local councils around the country to weigh in. In February the national council, consisting of 1,400 voting members from all over the U.S., put off a vote to allow more time to gauge sentiment from scouting families and their troops and councils. Locally, the Pacific Skyline Council, which encompasses the nearly 8,000 scouts ages 7 to 20 on the Peninsula, is holding closed meetings to gather input from its member families. According to those attending a meeting last week at the Boy Scout offices at the Lucie Stern Community Center in Palo Alto, there was strong agreement that the national membership policy should be changed to remove any barriers to participation by gay youth or adult leaders. The Boy Scouts nationally have had the equivalent of a “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy regarding both youth membership and scout leaders, but clearly prohibit those who are public with their gay sexual preference. Pressure is mounting, however, for the national council to either abolish its membership policies against gay scouts entirely or, at a minimum, grant local councils the freedom to establish their own rules. Interestingly, there is no record of how the national Boy Scout membership policy came to include a ban on gay membership, but it was part of a controversial evolution of the national organization taking more control away from local councils during the last few decades. Complicating matters is that local Boy Scout troops are chartered by sponsoring organizations that are bringing their own pressure. Here in Palo Alto, for example, the Barron Park Association charters local Boy Scouts Troop 52 and some association members want the affiliation to end if the scouting membership rules are not changed. Hopefully, the Pacific Skyline Council will be empowered by its member troops to send a strong message to the national leadership that discriminatory membership policies against gays must be repealed. The future of scouting, in this area at least, is at stake. And let us hope that by mid-summer, both the Supreme Court and the Boy Scouts of America will have reached decisions that achieve new and historic civil rights for our gay and lesbian community members of all ages.

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Spectrum Editorials, letters and opinions

Bag ban positives

The Miki’s Market saga

Editor, For the longest time now, I have been waiting for the city of Palo Alto to finally ban plastic bags in grocery and retail stores. I was also shocked that in the last two creek cleanups, 150 plastic bags were found. As well as towards the end of the article (“Plastic bags banned at stores, restaurants” from March 15) I was glad to find out that reusable bags no longer need to have the ecologically friendly labels on them. This was ruining the attractiveness of the bags. I’m sure this ban will motivate people to bring their own bags, since each bag will cost 10 cents. Plus, personally, I find the reusable bags a lot more fashionable. I think this will not only have a positive impact on creeks, but also have a positive affect on global warming, since the more bags produced, the more CO2 is put out into the atmosphere. This is my greatest concern. But don’t you think that this will not solve the whole problem? I believe that children at elementary schools should already be taught that in order to save the environment, it is important to reduce waste. Also, some explanation should be given about what is so bad about waste. Galina Romanovskaya Addison Avenue Palo Alto

Editor, As a neighbor who lives just behind the store, I have been following the Alma Plaza saga from the beginning. When Miki’s finally came to life, I was thrilled: Here was a nearby grocery with an interesting array of products, especially fresh produce, at reasonable prices. I became a regular customer and encouraged friends to patronize the store. So the announcement of its closure came as a stunner. I wondered how a businessman could start out without so little capital that he could not survive more than six months. Was he promised some incentives by the developer who, in his eagerness to get an occupant for the store, was willing to overlook Miki’s financial shortcomings and strike a deal that wasn’t going to be viable over the long term? Granted, the siting of the store is not ideal; its unattractive frontage on Alma is hardly inviting. And for neighbors, it still required a drive to the store, as pedestrian access has been blocked by construction. Miki did little in the way of advertising and PR; few people, I dis-

Schedule is better Editor, I think that what the Palo Alto Unified School District did to change the school calendar was the right thing to do. Instead of having finals two weeks after winter break they adjusted the calender so that finals fall before winter break. Now why is this a good idea? Many students would study during break for finals. This makes a less enjoyable break because they are studying and cannot spend time having fun with relatives and friends and enjoying the holidays. The school district put finals before winter break so the students can have a relaxing break. Also, in the old calendar, the break separates the last two weeks of the first semester. This gap in learning is not beneficial for students because they may have forgotten some concepts over the break. Many people would argue that this change is not for the best. Some students argue that they have plenty of time to study over the two weeks when they get back to school. Many families are also affected because their schedule is different from their relatives elsewhere and makes it harder to visit them. Overall the reduced stress and more relaxing break makes the change worth it. Rick Wytmar 9th grader at Gunn High School

covered, were aware of the store’s offerings. But as all good business people should know, it takes time to build familiarity and a following. One of my neighbors told me she still shopped at Piazza because she felt a loyalty there. For Miki’s to woo away customers would take time. Now, after all these years of planning and debate, it’s very unfortunate that we are left once again with a vacant property, with no viable prospects for the future. Ruthann Hammer Ramona Street Palo Alto

Sorry about Miki’s Editor, I am very sorry that Miki’s has closed. They had very good produce and pastries. And for the very first time, I could easily walk or bike to shop for groceries. I also feel very sorry for the nice people who worked there. I hope we have another good grocery store there soon. Soroor Ebnesajjad Florales Drive Palo Alto

WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Palo Alto Weekly encourages comments on our coverage or on issues of local interest.

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Should the City of Palo Alto get involved in national issues?

Submit letters to the editor of up to 250 words to letters@paweekly.com. Submit guest opinions of 1,000 words to editor@paweekly.com. Include your name, address and daytime phone number so we can reach you. We reserve the right to edit contributions for length, objectionable content, libel and factual errors known to us. Anonymous letters will generally not be accepted. Submitting a letter to the editor or guest opinion constitutes a granting of permission to the Palo Alto Weekly and Embarcadero Media to also publish it online, including in our online archives and as a post on Town Square. For more information contact Editor Jocelyn Dong or Editorial Assistant Eric Van Susteren at editor@paweekly.com or 650-326-8210.


Check out Town Square! Hundreds of local topics are being discussed by local residents on Town Square, a reader forum sponsored by the Weekly on our community website at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Post your own comments, ask questions, read the Editor’s blog or just stay up on what people are talking about around town!

On Deadline

Defining (and enforcing) ‘public benefits’ is a decades-old quandary by Jay Thorwaldson here are some challenges on which cities, and communities, never seem to be able to get a handle. One of those, for Palo Alto, is twopronged: first defining what a “public benefit” is when it comes to new developments that exceed zoning restrictions, then enforcing an agreed-to “public benefit” once the development is in place. Even defining such a benefit has proved impossible. There are some egregious examples of “public benefits” that have been whittled down to virtually nothing — as in a metal bench on a sliver of a “public plaza” — or completely subsumed into a private business, such as Caffe Riace’s outdoor eating area south of California Avenue or St. Michael’s Alley in downtown Palo Alto. City officials aren’t even sure how many public benefits exist as part of the numerous “planned community” zones the city has granted over the past five decades. One estimate is that there are about 140 such benefits attached to PC zones. But no one is quite sure of the overall number or even where they are. And when it comes to enforcement of those known to be in violation, the city thus far has declined that course of action — to the continuing consternation of some city watchdogs and neighborhood critics. Some in the past have even called for a moratorium on PC zones until the “public benefits” definition and enforcement policies are straightened out. Well, that could be a long

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moratorium, and few are actively pushing for that at the moment. The current effort is to define public benefit and then determine appropriate size relating to the extra size and impact (and profit) of a project. The Palo Alto Neighborhoods group has taken the issue up this year, discussing it at a meeting last week, and the Planning and Transportation Commission has designated it a top priority. The PC zone itself has an interesting history. It emerged from the “zoning battles” of the 1950s when it was still an open question as to how far cities and counties could regulate uses of private property. While zoning regulations date from the 1920s, as a reporter covering Palo Alto from the mid-1960s through the 1970s I recall discussions by planners in the mid-1960s of how the relatively new PC zone might liberate projects from straight-jacket zoning requirements so developers could be more creative. In the 1950s and 1960s teams of planning consultants roamed the state selling local communities on “general plans,” resulting in zonecolored maps that hung behind the local City Council dais but were most often ignored. In Palo Alto, then-new Planning Director Naphtali Knox in the early 1970s shifted the approach to the “Comprehensive Plan” process. He noted that general plans usually hit the rocks of reality when specific decisions needed to be made, so his new approach was to make those tricky ground-level decisions first (over months of meetings and community involvement) then fashion the plan itself based on those decisions. But that didn’t solve the problem of the PC zone and its attached “public benefits.” As it

evolved in Palo Alto, in many cases the zone became a mechanism by which developers could “push the envelope” to increase density, height or overall size of projects. Some type of “public benefit” added to the project was the trade-off that emerged in exchange for the extra size, etc., of the project. And the use of the PC zone, rather than as a special-case situation, became increasingly a way to submit larger projects for city review and approval. Some local developers became adept at reading the desires or needs of city officials and neighborhood leaders. The new wave of attention to the zone and public benefits has emerged over the past decade. The Palo Alto Weekly contributed an excoriating assessment in an editorial on Aug. 18, 2004. Resident Winter Dellenbach in 2005 raised specific concerns about how public benefits seemed to disappear from some PC developments. But progress — where any has occurred at all — has been glacial. Now there is a new initiative underway at several levels to address the concerns and, it is hoped, address them effectively. One aspect of that initiative is from the city staff. City Manager James Keene in December told the City Council that the staff will be studying the economic aspects of extra size or density of projects to provide a basis for determining the extent of public benefit to be attached. Curtis Williams, director of planning and community environment, is the point person for that study. Williams said this week that a consultant has been hired and the study will begin with the Jay Paul project, a 311,000square-foot office project proposed for the

former county transportation-system parking lot at Page Mill Road and El Camino Real. The “public benefit” would be the building of a new public-safety building (or police headquarters) nearby, revised from 60 percent of the building cost (sans furnishings or electronic communications equipment) to 100 percent. Other projects will follow, he said, including the large Arrillaga proposal for 27 University Ave. when it is finalized. Another facet of the new initiative is a focus by the influential Palo Alto Neighborhoods (PAN) group, consisting of neighborhood leaders from throughout the community. The PAN meeting last week focused almost exclusively on this subject. A third is a new 10-page colleague’s memo, dated March 27, by three members of the Planning and Transportation Commission that clearly defines the issues involved — an excellent read. Written by commission Chair Eduardo Martinez, Vice Chair Mark Michael and Commissioner Michael Alcheck, the memo outlines the grounds for a PC zone and carefully lays the groundwork for rationalizing “public benefits” attached. But Dellenbach remains skeptical, among others. Serious reform “feels like an issue that will never go anywhere,” she said this week. “I gave it my best shot. It seems to me the direction the horse is running right now is the initial foray of the planning commission — but look at the onslaught of development coming our way.” N Former Weekly Editor Jay Thorwaldson can be emailed at jthorwaldson@paweekly. com with a copy to jaythor@well.com. He also writes blogs posted on the Weekly’s community website, www.PaloAltoOnline. com (below Town Square).

Streetwise

What do you think of Palo Alto’s city council voting to fly the rainbow flag in front of City Hall? Asked at Whole Foods on Emerson Street in Palo Alto. Photos and interviews by Rebecca Duran.

Bob Gilmore

Unemployed Alma Street, Palo Alto “I’m ambivalent to it. I don’t care.”

Sheldon Kay

Retired Central Avenue, Menlo Park “Palo Alto seems to have its own way of doing things. It’s just a flag.”

Thomas Howell

Engineer Homer Avenue, Palo Alto “I think it’s OK, and for them to show support for gay marriage. I wouldn’t want to see the flag there forever. It’s not the main theme of the city.

Robert Eugene Johnson

Writer Emerson Street, Palo Alto “I think it’s a great idea. I’m 100 percent behind it.”

Philippe Davis

Lawyer Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto “It seems unnecessary. I’m not sure what the purpose would be.”

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NOTICE OF A PUBLIC MEETING of the City of Palo Alto Architectural Review Board (ARB) 8:30 A.M., Thursday, April 18, 2013 Palo Alto Council Chambers, 1st Floor, Civic Center, 250 Hamilton Avenue. Go to the Development Center at 285 Hamilton Avenue to review filed documents; contact Diana Tamale for information regarding business hours at 650.329.2144.

Pulse

A weekly compendium of vital statistics

POLICE CALLS Palo Alto

1845 El Camino Real [12PLN-00124]: Request by The Hayes Group, on behalf of 1845 ERC LLC, for Major Architectural Review of a new three story mixed use commercial/ residential condominium project. The project includes a Design Enhancement Exception request to allow a 16 foot driveway where 20 foot driveway is required. Zone Districts: CN and RM15. Environmental Assessment: Exempt from the provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) per CEQA Guidelines Section 15301. 537 Hamilton Ave [13PLN-00087]: Request by Korth Sunseri Hagey Architects, on behalf of Smith Equities III LLC, for Architectural Review of a new 14,567 square foot twostory commercial office building with below grade garage. Environmental Assessment: Exempt from the provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) per CEQA Guidelines Section 15332. Zone District: Commercial Downtown with Pedestrian combining district (CD-C(P)). Amy French Chief Planning Official

NOTICE OF A PUBLIC MEETING of the Palo Alto Planning & Transportation Commission Please be advised the Planning and Transportation Commission (P&TC) shall conduct a public meeting at 6:00 PM, Wednesday, April 10, 2013 in the Council Chambers, Ground Floor, Civic Center, Palo Alto, California. Any interested persons may appear and be heard on these items. Staff reports for agendized items are available via the City’s main website at www.cityofpaloalto.org and also at the Planning Division Front Desk, 5th Floor, City Hall, after 2:00 PM on the Friday preceding the meeting date. Copies will be made available at the Development Center should City Hall be closed on the 9/80 Friday. Public Hearing 1. Housing Element Update: Review and recommendation to City Council regarding the Draft Comprehensive Plan Housing Element for the 2007-2014 Housing Cycle. 2. Natural Environment Element Review - Review of the Draft Natural Environment Element of the Comprehensive Plan. 3. 2305 El Camino Real: Request by Dan Torres on behalf of Pepper Lane-Pender, LLC for a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) to allow the service of alcohol (Beer only) at Freebirds World Burrito. Zone District, Service Commercial (CC(2)). [12PLN00454] Questions. For any questions regarding the above items, please contact the Planning Department at (650) 329-2441. The files relating to these items are available for inspection weekdays between the hours of 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM. This public meeting is televised live on Government Access Channel 26. ADA. The City of Palo Alto does not discriminate against individuals with disabilities. To request accommodations to access City facilities, services or programs, to participate at public meetings, or to learn more about the City’s compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), please contact the City’s ADA Coordinator at 650.329.2550 (voice) or by e-mailing ada@cityofpaloalto.org. *** Curtis Williams, Director of Planning and Community Environment Page 14ÊUÊÊ«ÀˆÊx]ÊÓä£ÎÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

March 28 - April 3 Violence related Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Domestic violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Elder abuse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Theft related Commercial burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Credit card forgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Identity theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Petty theft 3 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

Attempted burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle related Abandoned bicycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Bicycle theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Driving with suspended license . . . . . . .6 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Lost/stolen plates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Misc. traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .4 Vehicle accident/property damage . . . .1 Vehicle impound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7

PALO ALTO CITY COUNCIL CIVIC CENTER, 250 HAMILTON AVENUE BROADCAST LIVE ON KZSU, FM 90.1 CABLECAST LIVE ON GOVERNMENT ACCESS CHANNEL 26 ***************************************** THIS IS A SUMMARY OF COUNCIL AGENDA ITEMS. THE AGENDA WITH COMPLETE TITLES INCLUDING LEGAL DOCUMENTATION CAN BE VIEWED AT THE BELOW WEBPAGE: http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/knowzone/agendas/council.asp (TENTATIVE) AGENDA – SPECIAL MEETING – COUNCIL CHAMBERS April 6, 2013 - 6:00 PM CLOSED SESSION 1. Potential Litigation SPECIAL ORDERS OF THE DAY 2. Resolution Expressing Appreciation to Steve Emslie CONSENT CALENDAR 3. Recommendation that the City Council Approve Amendment No. 1 to a Contract with BASE Energy, Inc. for the Administration of a Third-Party Non-Residential New Construction Efficiency Program 4. Approval of a 2010 Site and Design Review Permit Extension Request to May 2014 for 1700 Embarcadero Road (Mings Site) 5. Submittal of Mitchell Park Library and Community Center Bi-Monthly Construction Contract Report 6. Amendment to BMR Agreement between Moldaw Family Residences and the City of Palo Alto 7. Letter of Agreement Between Palo Alto Art Center Foundation and City of Palo Alto Memorializing Ongoing Financial Support of Children’s Programs at the Palo Alto Art Center 8. Approval of Letter to Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) to Transfer 200 Housing Units of Regional Housing Allocation (RHNA) from City of Palo Alto to Santa Clara County 9. Appointment of the Five Incumbents to the Library Bond Oversight Committee for Terms Ending on May 31, 2017 10. Appointment of the Three Incumbents to the Historic Resources Board for Terms Expiring on May 31, 2016 ACTION ITEMS 11. Public Hearing: Adoption of an Ordinance Amending the Zoning Map to Add the Ground Floor Combining District to the CD-C-P(and CD-S-P) Zoned Properties Fronting the 600 Block of Emerson Street 12. Approval of Amendment Number 2 to Contract #C10131396 in the Amount of $1,173,000 with CDM Smith Inc. to Provide Additional Services Associated With the Reservoir, Pump Station, and Well at El Camino Park and Mayfield Pump Station Augmentation Project WS-08002, for a Total Not to Exceed Amount of $6,300,802 (Continued From April 1, 2013) 13. Approval of a Water Enterprise Fund Contract with RMC Water and Environment, Inc. for a Total Not to Exceed Amount of $193,914 to Complete the Environmental Analysis of Expanding the City’s Recycled Water Delivery System (Continued From April 1, 2013) 14. Colleague’s Memo From Mayor Scharff and Council Members Burt, Price, and Schmid Regarding Expansion of Percent for Art and Public Art in Private Developments and Appropriate Maintenance of Our Existing and Future Public Art Collection STANDING COMMITTEE MEETINGS The Policy and Services Committee will be meeting on Tuesday, April 9, 2013 at 7:00 P.M. to discuss: 1)Board & Commission Recruitments, 2) Auditor’s Office Quarterly Report as of March 31, 2013 , and 3) Discussion of Fraud, Waste, and Abuse Hotline Pilot and the City Auditor’s Recommendation to Continue the Hotline Beyond the Pilot Phase. The Regional Housing Mandate Committee will be meeting on Thursday, April 11, 2013 at 4:00 P.M. to discuss: 1) One Bay Area Plan Update, and 2) Staff Update of: 1) Housing Element Process, and 2) Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA) Appeal.

Drunken driving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Sale of drugs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Under influence of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous Animal attack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Casualty/fall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Misc. penal code violation . . . . . . . . . . .7 Missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Other/misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Resisting arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Returned firearm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Warrant/other agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

Menlo Park March 28 - April 3 Violence related Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Domestic violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Residential burglaries 1 Vehicle related Auto recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Driving with suspended license . . . . . . .3 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle accident/non-injury . . . . . . . . . .6 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Alcohol or drug related Drug activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Drunken driving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Possession of paraphernalia. . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous Brandishing weapon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Coroner case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 CPS referral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Found property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Gang activity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Info. case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Probation arrest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Shots fired . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Violation of court order . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Warrant arrest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

Atherton March 28 - April 3 Theft related Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle related Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Misc. traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Suspicious vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Vehicle code violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Accident/no injury . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Miscellaneous Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Juvenile problem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Medical aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Shots fired . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Town ordinance violation . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Watermain break. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1

VIOLENT CRIMES Palo Alto Unlisted block El Camino Real/Ventura, 3/28, 9:35 p.m.; battery Unlisted block El Camino Real, 3/29, 2:15 p.m.; elder abuse/physical Unlisted block Charles Marx Way, 3/31, 9:45 a.m.; domestic violence/assault Unlisted block Hawthorne Ave. , 4/1, 12:10 p.m.; elder abuse/self-neglect

Menlo Park 1100 block Willow Road, 3/29, 4:30 p.m..; battery 500 block Market Place, 4/2, 8:50 a.m.; domestic violence


Transitions Woodside environmentalist Ollie Mayer dies at 94 by Jane Knoerle The Devil’s Slide tunnel groundbreaking in 2005 was a triumph for Olive Mayer of Woodside. She wasn’t there to cheer the tunnels completion at the party held March 25, 2013, however. Mayer died March 20 of heart failure. She was 94. Back in 1971, Mayer and the Sierra Club were proposing a tunnel to bypass the notorious section of Highway 1 around Devil’s Slide, between Pacifica and Half Moon Bay, according to an article in the May 18, 2005 issue of the Almanac. Instead, Caltrans planned to build a four-lane freeway bypass at Devil’s Slide. Mayer and the Sierra Club brought a lawsuit, the first of several, that stopped the highway bypass. “Without Ollie, we wouldn’t be getting a tunnel. The bypass would have happened,” said April Vargas, a Coastside leader in the campaign to build a tunnel, at the time. “She continues to inspire people. That is her great gift.” Olive Hendricks grew up in New Jersey and New York before attending Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania, where she was one of the first women to graduate with an engineering degree. While on a hiking vacation in Colorado, she met her future husband, Henry Mayer. They married in December 1941, three weeks after the attack on Pearl Harbor. After the war, the Mayers settled in Woodside and Dr.

Mayer started his medical practice in Redwood City. She learned to love San Mateo County’s rural Coastside, hiking its trails and absorbing its beauty. In the 1960s and 1970s, she led hikes of schoolchildren, scouts, and parents. “I saw erosion, logging, the terrible condition of streams,” she said. “Then I began to get interested in politics.” Her legacies stretch far beyond the Devil’s Slide tunnels. She founded the San Mateo County branch of the Sierra Club and fought for conservation on many fronts, including serving a term on the Woodside Town Council in the 1970s. In a 2003 statement, the Loma Prieta chapter of the Sierra Club said Ms. Mayer’s greatest missions included: preserving the San Mateo coastal resources; opposing illegal and highly destructive logging practices; and extending the trails in San Mateo County. In 1983 the national Sierra Club recognized her with its special achievement award. She is survived by her children, Judy O’Brien and Robert Mayer, and four grandchildren. Her husband, Dr. Henry Mayer, died in 2009. A private memorial is planned for May. Memorial contributions may be made to the Committee for Green Foothills, Loma Prieta chapter of the Sierra Club, or the Peninsula Open Space Trust.

Elsbeth Fox

Nov. 14, 1922 – March 31, 2013 Elsbeth McCollum Fox, who lived in Palo Alto for over 70 years, died March 31, 2013, in Denver, CO. Elsbeth graduated from Palo Alto High School in 1940 and Stanford University in 1944. In the 1950s, folk dancing was very popular, and she taught folk dance classes for the Palo Alto Recreation Department. During those years she couldn’t walk down University Avenue without running into friends from folk dancing, much to the impatience of her young daughters hanging onto her skirt. She left Palo Alto in 2004, but avidly followed the Palo Alto Weekly for hometown news. She is survived by her daughters, Janet Fox of Menlo Park, and Ellen Fox of Denver. PA I D

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Robert Smithwick memorial service A memorial service will be held Friday, April 19 at 2 p.m., for Robert Smithwick, a founding trustee of Foothill College who died March 22 at 92. The service will be in Smithwick Theatre at Foothill College, 12345 El Monte Road, Los Altos Hills. Parking passes

are not needed and Foothill will not issue parking citations during the service. Contributions in memory of Smithwick may be made to to the Foothill-De Anza Foundation (foundation.fhda.edu) or the Rotary Club of Palo Alto (www.rotarypaloalto.org.)

Lasting Memories An online directory of obituaries and remembrances. Go to:

PaloAltoOnline.com/ obituaries

Donald W. Schroeder Mr. Schroeder died of natural causes, with family present, on March 30, 2013. He was 95 years old. A long-time resident of Atherton and Menlo Park, he is survived by his beloved wife of 61 years, Mary Enneking Schroeder, and three sons, William [Wendy] of South Burlington, Vermont, and his children John Henry and Susie, David [Carmen Sofia] of Menlo Park, and his son Christian, and Stephen of Carson City, Nevada and his twin daughters, Baylee and Charlotte. Twin sons Mark and Tom preceded him in death. He was a native of Wisconsin, and after graduation from the Business School at the University of Wisconsin in 1943, he attended the Naval Midshipmen’s School at Tower Hall in Chicago, receiving his commission as an Ensign in late 1943. He served as an AntiSubmarine Warfare Officer until his discharge in 1946. He then took a position with the Chicago office of Price Waterhouse, and obtained his CPA certificate in 1950. While working in Chicago he met and married Mary, who also was employed by the Chicago Price Waterhouse office. She was from Madison, Wisconsin and had also attended the University of Wisconsin. In 1954, after holding an executive position in the Midwest, he and Mary decided to move to California, where he joined the staff of Lybrand, Ross Bros. & Montgomery [later known as Coopers & Lybrand, one of the Big Eight accounting firms] in its San Francisco office. He became a partner in the Lybrand firm in 1959 and remained a partner until he retired from Coopers & Lybrand in 1979. He was the managing partner of the San Francisco group of offices, serving in that position for ten years, and was elected to the firm’s Governing Council during that period of time. He was very active in the accounting profession, serving as the President of The California Society of Certified Public Accountants and on a number of committees and the governing council of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, the governing national body for CPAs. He gave freely of his time in these organizations. In 1978, he and Mary served as chairpersons of the AICPA’s annual meeting in San Francisco. He was a member of the Cercle de l’Union [The French Club] in the City for many years. One of his greatest joys was entertaining his friends there. He enjoyed billiard games at the Club with members of the French community, as well as a game of dominoes before lunch. He was also active in

the Rotary Club of San Francisco and the Stock Exchange Club. As a member of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, he was involved in many of that organization’s projects. His favorite project was serving on the Board of Directors for the Fort Point Museum Association, which developed that tourist attraction before turning it over to the National Park Service. He was an avid golfer and a long-time member of the Menlo Country Club. He also belonged to The Springs Golf Club in Rancho Mirage, California, where the family had a winter home. He played for many years in the California Seniors and the Northern California Seniors Golf Association tournaments until his health declined. He made numerous trips to Scotland to play the old traditional golf links. After his retirement he was appointed to the boards of directors of several corporations and served faithfully for many years, finally resigning from the last board at eighty years of age. During his retirement years, he and his wife also traveled extensively. They were both avid fishermen. They fished for marlin and sailfish off the Mexican, Costa Rican and Hawaiian coasts, and enjoyed salmon fishing in the Pacific near their Oregon beach house. Every year they would go to a fishing camp in Northern Wisconsin to fish for muskies, the world’s greatest fresh water game fish. Over the years, they had remarkably good luck, but his beloved Mary usually out-fished him, regularly catching the biggest fish. Throughout his lifetime, though there were many demands in his professional career, he always found time to devote to his family. The family made annual trips to a dude ranch in Northern California when the children were small and later, as they grew older, the family spent much time at the family beach house in Oregon, fishing and crabbing. His grandchildren added a great deal of pleasure to his later years and he loved them dearly. His family always came first in his life and he will be missed by them all. Burial arrangements will be private. A memorial mass will be held at St. Denis Church in Menlo Park at a date to be determined. Donations in Don’s memory may be made to St. Anthony’s Padua Dining Room, 3500 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 or to a charity of your choice. The family wishes to thank the folks at the Belmont Village in Sunnyvale and Vitas Hospice Care for taking good care of Don during this last year; they did a terrific job. PA I D

O B I T UA RY

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Cover Story

Veronica Weber

Michael Closson, who is stepping down as executive director of Acterra after 10 years, takes a walk along a trail that leads to the Palo Alto Baylands in early April. hen Michael Closson moved from New York to Palo Alto in 1972 to work at Stanford University, his new job as assistant dean of undergraduate studies was nothing to sniff at. Still, within four years he had left the school to codirect a local nonprofit. “I made good contacts, and it got me to the West Coast, but I realized even then that my personality and interests were really suited for working in small communities,” he

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Michael Closson, Acterra’s executive director, steps down after 10 years by Eric Van Susteren said of his job at Stanford. “Even though I studied sociology, I was always more interested in changing society than studying it.” He applied that principle first in 1976 by co-directing New Ways to Work, which would be the first in a long trail of nonprofits that would lead him up and down the West Coast and finally back to Palo Alto

to direct Acterra, a local environmental education and action organization. Now, after 10 years of running the organization, Closson is retiring, but he’s left his mark. Since he took the helm of the organization in 2003, its staff has doubled in size, from 11 to 22; its assets have increased from $600,000

Courtesy of Acterra

Palo Alto High School students Katie Ebinger, left, and Josefin Kenrick plant native grasses in Acterra’s serpentine test plots at the Pearson-Arastradero preserve in January. Page 18ÊUÊÊ«ÀˆÊx]ÊÓä£ÎÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

to $1 million; and the organization has implemented a host of new programs to get community members active in energy efficiency and environmental conservation. Acterra was formed in 2000 as the result of a merger between two environmental nonprofits, Peninsula Conservation Center Foundation and Bay Area Action. It aims to provide tangible lessons to develop environmental consciousness in the community by using activities and an education-based approach, according to its website. Environmentally focused organizations like Acterra gained special importance during the early 2000s, said Peter Drekmeier, an environmentalist and former mayor of Palo Alto. While there had previously been a lot of focus on the environmental policies of state and national governments, Drekmeier said “a lack of leadership” in Washington during the George W. Bush administration spurred local government and organizations to fill the void. Closson said budget crises and a gridlock in national-level politics make organizations like Acterra all the more important today. Besides, it’s just the kind of work he feels he’s cut out for. “I’m more of a local-focus kind of guy,” he said. “I like working with local people; I like the personal connection. It’s important to have new federal policies, but I’m not the person to work on that.”

He thinks Acterra and organizations like it can influence larger policy-making decisions by getting people involved in environmentalism at the local level, thereby building grass-roots momentum behind issues. “The big enchilada here is climate change — people are not giving it the lip service it deserves,” he said. “My analysis is we need new technology (and) new policies, and ultimately we’ll need hundreds of millions to change their behavior, and that’s the big thing: inducing, and convincing and nudging people to change our behaviors so we live more in harmony with our environment.��� cterra’s programs are aimed at influencing people to change their behavior, from governments to companies to people. The organization’s environmental awards celebrate businesses for being more sustainable or environmentally conscious. Acterra also recruits volunteers to help restore and protect habitats in such places as the Pearson-Arastradero Preserve and the San Francisquito watershed. It has several programs that train interested volunteers to become local environmental “leaders.” Possibly the most successful of these has been the Green@Home program. The program trains volunteers to conduct in-home energy audits so that they can educate homeowners to save energy and reduce their carbon footprint. This mostly involves instructing homeowners to unplug power-

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File photo/Sam Tenney

Yoriko Kishimoto, left, listens to volunteers with Acterra’s Green@Home program, Michael Mora and Gail Brownell, learning how she can save energy by having her heating ducts cleaned. draining amenities or replace aging appliances, but Closson said that’s only the superficial benefit of the program. He said the key of the educational components to programs is that they spur people to change the way they look at the environment and the way they treat it. “There’s a linear thinking that you educate people to change their consciousness and then they change their behaviors, but sometimes it happens in reverse,� he said, using the implementation of curbside recycling as an example. “Once it reached a critical tipping point of people putting their recycling on the curb, people started to think ‘I’d better start doing that, too,’ ... so their consciousness changes.� He’s looking forward to seeing Green@Home expanded even farther using an approach he describes as “high-touch and high-tech.� Acterra is partnering with High Energy Audits, a Los Altos Hills company that produces readouts of energy use based on information gathered from homeowners’ Smart Meters. With detailed data at their fingertips, volunteers can give more specific and informed advice to homeowners, but the program will also

save time and allow them to reach more clients, Closson said. “Right now it’s pretty labor-intensive,� he said. “Five hundred-plus volunteers go out in teams of two and do free home-energy audits. Now, you can be much more efficient about how you handle visits because 10 or 20 percent of homes you can do through email or phone conversations.

‘Even though I studied sociology, I was always more interested in changing society than studying it.’ – Michael Closson, executive director, Acterra “It’s a nice combination because we can do the customer relations and we can also play the honest broker because we don’t have a horse in this race,� he said. While the organization is making moves to use more technology, Closson, who earned his doctorate in sociology from Cornell, said he doesn’t have a technical

background or even a life-sciences background. “I just spent time in the woods and in the streams, screwing around and learning to love nature and not be scared of it,� he said. His affinity for nature may have been part of what motivated him to start trying to protect it. After co-directing New Ways to Work in Palo Alto for six years, he went to work converting military facilities to areas for civilian use. Often that meant scrubbing them of toxins to make them available as open-space preserves. As his work there began to wind down, he helped organize the 30th anniversary of Earth Day in Seattle, where he stayed for another three years as the executive director of Biodiversity Northwest, which works to preserve old-growth redwoods. He worked there until he was tapped to lead Acterra. losson says his work has been most fulfilling when Acterra has touched lives — particularly young ones — with its programs. “That’s the real exciting stuff: when 10, 15 or 20 percent start to get hooked and come back to regular programs and when high school and college interns go on to make their careers or major in ecological studies,� he said. Even though he’s beginning to see youth get involved in environmental issues, he said, overall the change isn’t happening nearly quickly enough. “I’m hopeful but not optimistic,� he said. “I have to say that about us avoiding the serious impacts of climate change. I don’t think we’ve realized the enormity of the threat because even though it’s rapid in geological terms, it’s slow in human terms.� Part of the reason Closson, 74, will leave the organization is to focus more on implementing new programs and less on the ins and outs of running a nonprofit. “I spend an awful lot of time do-

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www.restorationstudio.com

Ninth Annual

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Dates: Week 1: June 17-June 21 Week 2: July 29-August 2 Cost per week: sFORSPEECH/2DEBATE sFORSPEECH!.$DEBATE sFORBOTHWEEKS * Contact us for scholarships Contact us: (44033)4%3'//',%#/-3)4%0!,930%%#(!.$$%"!4%

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IL TROVATORE BY GIUSEPPE VERDI Betrayal

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File photo/Veronica Weber

Debbie Mytels, Acterra associate director, shows Green@Home volunteers the differences between energy usage in incandescent and compact fluorescent light bulbs during a training session.

Keith Kreiman, San Mateo City Times 02’ “Liliane Cromer, as Carmen with her beautiful lyric voice, dominates the stage in the most definitive interpretation since RĂŻse Stevens the great Met Diva...â€? Liliane Cromer returns to the Fox as a riveting Azucena

Sunday, April 28, 2013 at 2pm Tickets $22 - $24, 650 -Fox-7770 or <foxwc.com> Fox Theater, 2223 Broadway, Redwood City, 94063 Chamber Orchestra and English Supertitles verismoopera.org and bslopera.com Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°*>Â?Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;"Â&#x2DC;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;*>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;7iiÂ&#x17D;Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x160;ÂŤĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â?Ă&#x160;x]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;ä£Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160;U Page 19


Cover Story

Lease-Up Announcement - 801 Alma Apartments

For more information please go to www.edenhousing.org April 1, 2013 and click on “Now Leasing”. You may also contact Julissa Johnson, Management Agent at (650) 322-2061 or TDD/TTY 1-800-735-2929. *Income Limits, Preferences & Occupancy Standards Apply.

Palo Alto Unified School District Notice is hereby Given that proposals will be received by the Palo Alto Unified School District for bid package: Contract No. JLS-13 Jane Lathrop Stanford Middle School – New Landscape and Site Improvements DESCRIPTION OF THE WORK: Work includes but is not limited to: Construction of new landscaped areas and modernization of existing walkways , demolition, excavation, site work, irrigation, landscaping, fencing, concrete, miscellaneous metals, framing, lath and plastering , plumbing, finishes etc. Bid documents contain the full description of the work. There will be a mandatory pre-bid conference and site visit at 02:00 p.m. on April 17, 2013 at the Jane Lathrop Stanford Middle School, 480 East Meadow Drive, Palo Alto, CA 94306 Bid Submission: Proposals must be received at the District Facilities Office Building D, by 10:00 a.m. on April 30, 2013. PREVAILING WAGE LAWS: The successful Bidder must comply with all prevailing wage laws applicable to the Project, and related requirements contained in the Contract Documents. Palo Alto Unified School District will maintain a Labor Compliance Program (LCP) for the duration of this project. In bidding this project, the contractor warrants he/she is aware and will follow the Public Works Chapter of the California Labor Code comprised of labor code sections 1720 – 1861. A copy of the Districts LCP is available for review at 25 Churchill Avenue, Building D, Palo Alto, CA 94306. 1. 2.

3. 4. 5.

A pre-job conference shall be conducted with the contractor or subcontractors to discuss federal and state labor law requirements applicable to the contract. Project contractors and subcontracts shall maintain and furnish to the District, at a designated time, a certified copy of each payroll with a statement of compliance signed under penalty of perjury. The District shall review and, if appropriate, audit payroll records to verify compliance with the Public Works Chapter of the Labor Code. The District shall withhold contract payments if payroll records are delinquent or inadequate. The District shall withhold contract payments as described in the LCP, including applicable penalties when the District and Labor Commissioner establish that underpayment of other violations has occurred.

Bidders may examine Bidding Documents at Facilities Office, Building “D”. Bidders may purchase copies of Plans and Specifications at ARC Reprographics located at 1100 Industrial Rd. Unit 13, San Carlos, CA 94070. Phone: (650) 517-1895 All questions can be addressed to: Palo Alto Unified School District 25 Churchill Avenue, Building D Palo Alto, CA 94306-1099 Attn: Patrick Downey Phone: (650) 329-3927 Fax: (650) 327-3588 Page 20ÊUÊÊ«ÀˆÊx]ÊÓä£ÎÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

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ing administrative work — managing the staff, hiring, raising money — and it’s fun, but I’d like to spend more of my time actually doing programs that are focused on climate change and not as much on administrative activities,” he said. Drekmeier said the the role of executive director can be a taxing one, involving long hours and some certain sacrifices. “There’s a lot of pressure behind an executive director,” he said. “He’s a wonderful role model for living his passion. Sometimes there’s not a clear delineation between his work and social life — he carries it with him wherever he goes — and that makes him a great ambassador for Acterra.”

‘Michael is such a strong leader that they won’t find someone with his exact skills. That’s the challenge to make transition possible.’ – Peter Drekmeier, former mayor, Palo Alto With a burn rate of about $120,000 a month, the organization would run out of money after three months if it stopped fundraising, Closson said. That puts extra pressure on him as a fundraiser. “There’s always a low level of stress,” he said. “I’ve adjusted to it pretty well because I’ve been doing it so long. It’s not overwhelming — I don’t lose sleep over it or anything — but you’re always conscious of it.” While the organization looks for a replacement for Closson, he’s using the five months he has left trying to make the transition smooth. He thinks his replacement must have an entrepreneurial spirit and be able to develop new projects. The new director would also have to be adaptable as new climate-change issues come up. “Water is a big issue and is going to be a big issue, and I’m sure we’re only going to get more involved than we are already,” he said. Now that the organization has seen increased interest from businesses, it’s ready to become more Silicon Valley-focused. Acterra Board Chair Judith Steiner said she’s interested in seeing an executive director with experience in the corporate world or in working with corporations who can bridge the gap between nonprofit and corporate cultures. Drekmeier thinks Closson’s replacement will have big shoes to fill. “Organizations develop around leadership,” he said. “Michael is such a strong leader that they won’t find someone with his exact skills. That’s the challenge to make transition possible.” During his retirement, Closson hopes to continue to work in environmentalism on a local level and is particularly interested in promoting the use of distributed rather than

File photo/Veronica Weber

Construction is scheduled to be completed in July 2013. We will begin accepting applications for the lottery Monday, April 1, 2013 up until 5pm, Tuesday, April 30, 2013.

Michael Closson

Twana Karney, former director of Acterra’s Green@Home program, uses the Kill A Watt device to measure how many killowatt-hours are used by a hair dryer that’s left plugged in. centralized energy sources. While he’ll have fewer resources and won’t have the advantage of the credibility that being executive director of a nonprofit like Acterra lends, he said one can “do an awful lot just by talking to people.” Closson’s experience, skills and activities at Acterra have put him in an excellent position to consult with other nonprofits, Steiner said. “Basically he has a vast knowledge of players in the community; he works with local government; and he’s a good writer,” she said. Of course, retirement won’t be all work for Closson. Four days after he retires, he’ll be on a plane to the United Kingdom, where he’ll spend three weeks hiking from the Irish Sea to the Baltic Sea. He also hopes

to spend more time in his beloved Sierra Nevada mountains. “The ideal world is one where I can take projects for a couple months or do something where I’m only working 15 or 20 hours a week that I can space out to have some fun and relax,” he said. “I’m definitely going to play more.” N Online Editor Eric Van Susteren can be emailed at evansusteren@ paweekly.com. About the cover: Michael Closson, executive director of Acterra, is stepping down as executive director in August. Photo by Veronica Weber.

Veronica Weber

801 Alma is a brand new property of 49 affordable family apartments offering 1, 2 & 3 bedrooms. It is located at the corner of Alma Street and Homer Avenue on the combined Ole’s Car Shop site and the former City of Palo Alto Substation Site near shopping and public transportation.

Michael Closson, executive director of Acterra, stands next to a set of markers indicating the low elevations on which many developments along the shoreline are built.


Book Talk AN EVENING WITH AMY TAN ... Best-selling author Amy Tan of “The Joy Luck Club,” “The Kitchen God’s Wife” and others (including “The Bonesetter’s Daughter,” for which she also wrote the opera libretto), will speak at the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center at 3921 Fabian Way in Palo Alto on April 11. Tan will be in conversation with author Louann Brizendine at the event, which runs from 7:30 to 9 p.m. Tickets are $30 general, $25 for students and JCC members, and $22 for residents of the Moldaw complex at the center. Info: paloaltojcc.org or 650-223-8699 BECOMING A SUCESSFUL WRITER ...In this three-hour class, from 1 to 4 p.m., San Francisco agent, author and consultant Michael Larsen will be at Kepler’s to talk about “The Nine Keys to Becoming a Successful Writer,” including how to get a book published, making work “rejection proof,” finding an agent or publisher and choosing the best publishing option. Class fee is $99. Info: keplers. com or 800-838-3006

BOOKS INC. ... Future author talks at Books Inc. at Palo Alto’s Town & Country Village include: Harry Brod, “Superman is Jewish?” (April 10, 7 p.m.); Caroline M. Grant and Lisa Catherine Harper, “The Cassoulet Saved Our Marriage” (April 11, 7 p.m.); Jaina Sanga, “Silk Fish Opium” (April 16, 6 p.m.); Christina Schwarz, “The Edge of the Earth” (April 18, 7 p.m.); and Maria Semple, “Where’d you go, Bernadette” (April 22, 7 p.m.). Info: booksinc.net LOCAL POET ... Pearl Karrer’s new collection, “Balanced Between Water and Sky, Poems of the Everglades,” will be published this spring by Finishing Line Press. Karrer, a Palo Alto piano teacher, artist and poet, has two chapbooks, “Weathering” (Slapering Hol Press) and “The Thorn Fence” (Finishing Line Press). She is the managing editor for the poetry journal, California Quarterly. Cost of her latest book is $14. Info (and to preorder): www.finishinglinepress.com (continued on page 22)

A monthly section on local books and authors

1BSBEJTF lost and found

Ellen Sussman’s new novel explores closure and connection amidst a real-life tragedy Veronica Weber

MEET THE AUTHORS ... Upcoming authors and programs at Keplers, 1010 El Camino Real, Menlo Park, include: Amanda Coplin, “The Orchardist” (April 9, 7:30 p.m.); Roland Garrigue, “How to Demolish Dinosaurs” (April 10, 10:30 a.m.); Guy Kawasaki, “APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur - How to Publish a Book” (April 10, 7 p.m.); Caroline Paul and Wendy McNaughton “Lost Cat: A True Story of Love, Desperation, and GPS Technology” (April 11, 7:30 p.m.); Pam Houston, “Waltzing the Cat” (April 16, 7:30 p.m.); Jennifer Fosberry, “Isabella: Star of the Story” (April 17, 4 p.m.); Katherine Applegate, “The One and Only Ivan” (April 18, 7 p.m.); Adam M. Grant, “Give and Take: A Revolutionary Approach to Success” (April 24, 7:30 p.m.); and Mark Mazzetti, “The Way of the Knife: The CIA, a Secret Army, and War at the Ends of the Earth” (April 25, 7:30 p.m.). Info: keplers.com

Title Pages

by Karla Kane

Ellen Sussman read from her latest book, “The Paradise Guest House,” at Kepler’s on March 26.

“The Paradise Guest House,” by Ellen Sussman; Ballantine Books; 258 pages; $15

*

n the autumn of 2002, members of an Islamist terrorist group detonated three bombs in a tourist district on the Indonesian island of Bali. Hundreds were injured and 202 were killed, including seven Americans. “The Paradise Guest House,” local author Ellen Sussman’s latest novel, follows the lives of several fictional characters who’ve been irreparably impacted by the Balinese nightclub bombings. For much of the novel, the leading protagonist is Jamie, a 32-year-old Californian who works as an adventure guide for a Berkeleybased travel company. Jamie was visiting Bali with her Chilean boyfriend, scouting out potential tour opportunities, when she was caught up in the terrorist attacks. After risking her life

to help fellow victims and suffering injury, she was rescued by Gabe, an American ex-pat, and the two quickly formed a strong bond, only to lose each other soon after. One year later, Jamie, still traumatized by her experience, returns to Bali to seek closure, attend a memorial ceremony, confront her haunting memories and, she hopes, find Gabe. In flashbacks, the reader learns of Jamie’s childhood in Palo Alto (including references to local establishments such as the Stanford Park Hotel); how her father installed in her a love of adventure and then abandoned the family, leaving Jamie unwilling or unable to settle down; her overprotective but loving mother; her dissolving relationship with her beau, the doomed Miguel; and her close paternal relationship to her boss, Larson. When the book switches back to the present, Jamie meets her kindly Balinese host Nyoman (the owner of the titular guest house), who also suffered greatly in the attacks of the previous year, as well as the mischievous urchin Bambang, both of whom will help her

make her peace with the stunningly beautiful but now tragedy-tainted island. Midway through, the book’s perspective shifts to that of Gabe. In a similar mix of flashback and contemporary narrative we discover Gabe’s history as a Boston journalist and how family grief led him to leave the U.S. for a relaxed life as an elementary school teacher in Bali. Though he’s closed off his heart due to his past losses, and Jamie’s plagued by guilt over her survival in the face of others’ deaths, the two find their defenses dropping as their connection deepens. “The Paradise Guest House,” with its blend of romance, adventure, action and history, could easily work as a motion picture, so don’t be surprised to see it someday at a theater near you. Sussman is an effective writer who keeps the plot developing at a quick pace. When (spoiler alert) Jamie and Gabe finally have (continued on page 22)

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Title Pages

Sussman

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their long-awaited reunion the emotional payoff is sweet. Her dialogue is occasionally clunky, especially when an Indonesian is comparing Balinese and Western culture, but on the whole the book is a pleasure to devour easily in a short period of time. It feels a bit wrong to use words such as “pleasure,” “beach book” and so forth when the story deals with such tragic true events but, strange though it may seem, the gripping story nonetheless will make excellent summer reading. It is to Sussman’s credit that a book about a traveler’s trip gone so very wrong still made me wish to

Book Talk

(continued from page 21) READING, TEA AND COOKIES ... with chef Donia Bijan, author of “Maman’s Homesick Pie: A Persian Heart in an American Kitchen,” will take place at 7 p.m. on Thursday, May 9, at the City of Mountain View Public Library, 585 Franklin St., Mountain View. Bijan, who ran the French Bistro L’Amie Donia in Palo Alto from 1994 to 2004, uses the language of food to describe her journey — from Iran to California and France. Info: http://goo.gl/EfV3C and www.doniabijan.com

2013/2014

Groundwater Production and Surface Water Charges NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN: That on the 22nd of February 2013, a report of the SANTA CLARA VALLEY WATER DISTRICT’S activities in the protection and augmentation of the water supplies of the District has been delivered to Michele L. King, CMC, Clerk of the Board, in writing, including: a financial analysis of the District’s water utility system; information as to the present and future water requirements of the District; the water supply available to the District, and future capital improvement and maintenance and operating requirements; a method of financing; a recommendation as to whether or not a groundwater charge should be levied in any zone or zones of the District and, if any groundwater charge is recommended, a proposal of a rate per acre-foot for agricultural water and a rate per acre-foot for all water other than agricultural water for such zone or zones; That on the 9th day of April 2013, at 9 a.m., in the chambers of the Board of Directors of Santa Clara Valley Water District at 5700 Almaden Expressway, San Jose, California, a public hearing regarding said report will be held; that all operators of water producing facilities within the District and any persons interested in the District’s activities in the protection and augmentation of the water supplies of the District are invited to call at the offices of the District at 5750 Almaden Expressway, San Jose, California, to examine said report; That at the time and place above stated any operator of a water producing facility within the District, or any person interested in the District’s activities in the protection and augmentation of the water supplies of the District, may, in person or by representative, appear and submit evidence concerning the subject of said written report; and That based upon findings and determinations from said hearing, including the results of any protest procedure, the Board of Directors of the District will determine whether or not a groundwater production charge and surface water charge should be levied in any zone or zones; and that, if the Board of Directors determines that a groundwater production charge and surface water charge should be levied, the same shall be levied, subject and pursuant to applicable law, against all persons operating groundwater facilities and diverting District surface water within such zone or zones beginning July 1, 2013. 2/2013_AY_mtv

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travel to Bali. She captures Jamie’s adventurous spirit and wanderlust and paints an affectionate picture of Bali as a place, though troubled by corruption, poverty and Western exploitation, well worthy of investigation. At its heart, “The Paradise Guest House” is a lovely little novel about human connection in the face of humanity at its very worst. Since the bombings in Bali happened relatively quickly on the heels of the massive Sept. 11, 2001, attacks and on the other side of the world, American readers may not remember or know much of the events, and the novel serves as a poignant tribute and reminder to the lives lost and/or damaged in this faraway not-quite paradise. N

NEW FICTION ... “In Tremors: New Fiction by Iranian American Writers,” Erika Abrahamian, Anita Amirrezvani, Shideh Etaat, Zohreh Ghahremani, Persis Karim (co-editor), Gina Nahai, Ari Barkeshli Siletz and Sholeh Wolpé are featured at Kepler’s in an anthology of stories set in Iran before and after the revolution (April 14, 2 p.m.). N

Items for Book Talk may be sent to Associate Editor Carol Blitzer, Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 93202 or emailed to cblitzer@paweekly.com by the last Friday of the month.

City of Palo Alto ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Draft Negative Declaration has been prepared by the Palo Alto Department of Planning and Community Environment for the project listed below. In accordance with A.B. 886, this document will be available for review and comment during a minimum 20-day inspection period beginning April 6, 2013 through April 26, 2013 during the hours of 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. at the Development Center, 285 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, California. This item will be considered at a public hearing by the Planning and Transportation Commission, Wednesday, April 10, 2013 at 6:00 PM. in the Palo Alto City Council Chambers on the first floor of the Civic Center, located at 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, California. Written comments on the Negative Declaration will be accepted until 5:00 PM on April 26, 2013 in the Planning and Community Environment Department Civic Center offices on the fifth floor of City Hall. Housing Element Update: The project consists of the update of the City of Palo Alto’s Housing Element, a mandated element of the General Plan. The Housing Element provides policy direction for accommodating Palo Alto’s housing needs through 2014. The Association of Bay Area Government’s (ABAG) has assigned a Regional Housing Needs Allocation number of 2,860 housing units to the City of Palo Alto for the period from 2007-2014. During this period, the City has entitled 1,217 units however it still must plan to accommodate 1,643 housing units. The policies and programs in the updated Housing Element include recommendations for changes in the land use regulations pertaining to residential development, the creation of incentives to encourage the development of a variety of housing types, and an increase in density within certain residential and mixed use zoning districts. Curtis Williams, Director of Planning and Community Environment In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, listening assistive devices are available in the Council Chambers and Council Conference Room. Sign language interpreters will be provided upon request with 72 hours advance notice.


Movies MOVIE TIMES

All showtimes are for Friday through Sunday only unless otherwise noted. For other times, as well as reviews and trailers, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies.

Admission (PG-13) ((1/2 Century 16: 12:25, 4, 7:10 & 9:50 p.m. Century 20: 11:45 a.m. & 2:20, 5, 7:35 & 10:15 p.m. The Birds (1963) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: Fri 7:30 p.m. Sat-Sun 3:20 & 7:30 p.m. The Call (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:20 a.m. & 1:50, 4:10, 7:40 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: 12:40, 3:05, 5:30, 7:50 & 10:25 p.m. The Croods (PG) ((1/2 Century 16: 11 a.m. & 3:40 & 8:50 p.m. In 3D 1:20 & 6:10 p.m. Century 20: 11 a.m. & 1:30, 4, 6:30 & 9 p.m. In 3D 12:05, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40 & 10:05 p.m. Evil Dead (2013) (R) ((1/2 Century 16: 11:40 a.m. & 2:10, 4:30, 7:50 & 10:40 p.m. (Last show at 10:15 p.m. on Sun.) Century 20: 11:40 a.m. & 12:50, 2, 3:10, 4:20, 5:35, 6:50, 8, 9:15 & 10:25 p.m. From Up on Poppy Hill (PG) ((( Palo Alto Square: Fri and Sat 2, 4:30, 7:25 & 9:50 p.m. Sun 2, 4:30 & 7:25 p.m. G.I. Joe: Retaliation (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:30 a.m. & 2:20, 3:20, 5:20, 8:30 & 9:20 p.m. In 3D 11 a.m. & 12:30, 1:40, 4:20, 6:20, 7:30 & 10:40 p.m. (Last show 10:15 p.m. on Sun.) Century 20: 11:50 a.m. & 2:35, 5:30, 8:05 & 10:45 p.m. In 3D 11:15 a.m. & 12:45, 1:55, 3:25, 4:35, 6:10, 7:15, 8:50 & 9:55 p.m. The Godfather (1972) (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Wed 2 & 7 p.m. The Host (PG-13) 1/2 Century 16: 12:30, 3:35, 7 & 10 p.m. Sat 12:30, 3:35, 7 & 10 p.m. Century 20: 10:55 a.m. & 1:40, 4:40, 7:30 & 10:30 p.m. The Incredible Burt Wonderstone (PG-13) (( Century 20: 11:25 a.m. & 4:50 & 10:20 p.m. Jurassic Park (2013) (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11 a.m. & 5 p.m. In 3D noon & 2, 3:10, 7, 8:20 & 10:20 p.m. Life of Pi (PG) (((1/2 Century 20: 1:25 & 7:15 p.m. In 3D 4:20 & 10:10 p.m. No (R) (((1/2 Aquarius Theatre: 2:30, 5:30 & 8:30 p.m. Olympus Has Fallen (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 12:10, 3:50, 7:20 & 10:20 p.m. Century 20: 11:30 a.m. & 12:55, 2:15, 3:45, 5:05, 6:40, 7:55, 9:35 & 10:45 p.m. Oz the Great and Powerful (PG) ((1/2 Century 16: 2:40 & 9:10 p.m. In 3D 11:10 a.m. & 6:05 p.m. Century 20: 11:20 a.m. & 2:25, 5:25 & 8:25 p.m. In 3D 1:05, 4:05, 7:05 & 10:10 p.m. Psycho (1960) (Not Rated) (Not Reviewed) Stanford Theatre: 5:30 & 9:40 p.m. Quartet (PG-13) ((( Guild Theatre: 1, 3:30, 6 & 8:30 p.m. The Rocky Horror Picture Show (R) (Not Reviewed) Guild Theatre: Sat midnight. The Sapphires (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Aquarius Theatre: 1:30, 4:15, 7 & 9:30 p.m. Silver Linings Playbook (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: 1:55 & 7:25 p.m. Spring Breakers (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: noon & 2:30, 4:50, 8 & 10:30 p.m. Century 20: 1, 3:20, 5:50, 8:15 & 10:35 p.m. Starbuck (R) (( Palo Alto Square: Fri-Sat 1:45, 4:20, 7:15 & 9:45 p.m. Sun 1:45, 4:20 & 7:15 p.m. Tyler Perry’s Temptation: Confessions of a Marriage Counselor (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 12:20, 3:30, 6:50 & 9:40 p.m. Century 20: 11:55 a.m. & 2:35, 5:10, 7:50 & 10:30 p.m.

( Skip it (( Some redeeming qualities ((( A good bet (((( Outstanding Aquarius: 430 Emerson St., Palo Alto (266-9260) Century Cinema 16: 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View (800-326-3264) Century 20 Downtown: 825 Middlefield Road, Redwood City (800-326-3264) CinéArts at Palo Alto Square: 3000 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (4930128) Guild: 949 El Camino Real, Menlo Park (266-9260) Stanford: 221 University Ave., Palo Alto (324-3700) Internet address: For show times, plot synopses, trailers and more information about films playing, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies

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OPENINGS Evil Dead --1/2 (Century 16, Century 20) Let’s put it this way. There are two types of people in the world. Those who should never, under any circumstances, see the horror sequel/reboot “Evil Dead” and those who just gotta see it. In the former category, put formative and sensitive minds, as this hard “R” horror film will be outright traumatizing to many of them. In the latter category, put “Fangoria” subscribers who get off on trauma. Based on Sam Raimi’s charmingly raggedy 1981 debut film “The Evil Dead” (infamously funded by Detroit dentists and doctors), Fede Alvarez’s cover version is a different beast. Whereas Raimi’s initial “Evil Dead” gave off a sense of its filmmaker’s irrepressible fun in making it, Alvarez’s version gives off a vibe of ruthless efficiency, establishing its cred with the grimy grottiness modern viewers expect from remade ‘70s and ‘80s horror films, before moving on to gonzo horror with astonishingly disgusting imagery. The new “Evil Dead” also lays out its bona fides for Raimi fans, both onscreen and off. (Raimi, longtime confederate Rob Tapert and “The Evil Dead” star Bruce Campbell produced the remake.) The basic plot remains the same: Five friends abscond to a cabin in the woods, where a book of the dead unleashes demons determined to possess their souls and thereby unleash apocalypse. And Alvarez crams the movie with reverential references to the original (from Raimi’s “flying” camera move to a post-credits stinger that fans had better stick around for). The script by Uruguayans Alvarez and Rodo Sayagues, with an American polish by Diablo Cody (“Juno”), adds a layer of psychodrama by making two of the characters siblings. Mia (Jane Levy) needs a getaway to recover her sobriety after a recent near-fatal overdose, which keeps her brother David (Shiloh Fernandez) and friends Eric (Lou Taylor Pucci), Olivia (Jessica Lucas) and Natalie (Elizabeth Blackmore) worrisomely watchful. When high school teacher Eric curiously reads aloud from the skin-bound book he finds in the cabin, a “taker of souls” comes out to bring fresh hell. As newly plotted, the story looks at the fine line between heroism and stupidity, while suggesting an allegorical conflation of actual demons and the “demons” of addiction, and how easy it can be to innocently open the door to agents of evil. Mostly, though, this movie is about ruptured flesh and raining blood. Alvarez’s approach evokes not only “The Evil Dead,” but the freaky-deakiness of “The Exorcist”

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and the outrĂŠ â&#x20AC;&#x153;buckets of bloodâ&#x20AC;? stylization of pictures like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Suspririaâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Carrie.â&#x20AC;? Obviously, what Alvarezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Evil Deadâ&#x20AC;? inevitably lacks is originality, though it does announce the arrival of a highly competent artiste of gore, for those who like that sort of thing. Gore fans and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Evil Deadâ&#x20AC;? fans are likely to agree that, in an age where â&#x20AC;&#x153;PG-13â&#x20AC;? rules the multiplex, this horror picture delivers the goods. It easily qualifies as one of the most audaciously revolting movies ever made, one that keeps daring you not to look away. It may not be my idea of fun, but if it leads to a rumored return for Campbell in a Raimi-led follow-up, then we can talk. Rated R for strong bloody violence and gore, some sexual content and language. One hour, 31 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Peter Canavese

Starbuck -(Palo Alto Square) One logical conclusion to the genealogy trend of recent years has just made its way to American theaters: the French-Canadian film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Starbuck.â&#x20AC;? The high concept of Ken Scottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s comedy-drama is to reverse the curiosity about those linked to us by DNA, making the investigation not about ancestors but descendants. To be exact, 533 of them. Twenty-three years ago, David Wozniak (an amiably goofy Patrick Huard) deposited enough in a sperm bank to unwittingly sire hundreds of children. Now 142 of those pigeons have come home to roost in the form of a class-action lawsuit by those determined to uncover their fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s identity. The case captures the public imagination, and soon everyone in Quebec seems to have an opinion about David, pseudonymously known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Starbuck.â&#x20AC;? Davidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s frequent screw-ups as delivery man for the family butchery and his financial over-exten-

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nothing behind me, everything ahead of me, as is ever so on the roadâ&#x20AC;?

sion (which has creditors threatening bodily harm) establish a life of disappointing and being disappointed even before the sperm hits the fan. The disappointment extends to Davidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s girlfriend â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a cop he has impregnated the oldfashioned way â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who dumps him to raise the child on her own. When the lawsuit slaps him, David first enlists a borderline-inept lawyer buddy (Antoine Bertrand, a comic saving grace), then gradually allows his curiosity to get the better of him. He begins peeking in the files of his children of questionable legitimacy and arranging â&#x20AC;&#x153;chanceâ&#x20AC;? meetings with them. While never revealing his identity, he cannot help himself from becoming their â&#x20AC;&#x153;guardian angel.â&#x20AC;? This new sense of purpose and his innate generosity of spirit starts to chip away at his resolve to remain anonymous. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Starbuckâ&#x20AC;? initially shows some bite and reasonably strong comic and visual sensibilities, but it grows cutesier and cutesier, revealing director Ken Scottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mainstream instincts. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an intriguing point at the heart of the picture, about the ultimate responsibility of conceiving a child, but

Patrick Huard and Antoine Bertrand in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Starbuck.â&#x20AC;? the way in which itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s underlined with the fresh pregnancy emblematizes the filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unsubtle agenda,

ACADEMY AWA RDÂŽ NOMINEE BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM â&#x20AC;&#x153;WEIRDLY FUNNY AND ROUSING, BOTH INTELLECTUALLY AND EMOTIONALLY.â&#x20AC;? -Manohla Dargis, THE NEW YORK TIMES

HHHHH

WINNER CANNES FILM FESTIVAL

- Jack Kerouac, On the Road

C.I.C.A.E. AWARD

HIGHEST RATING

WINNER BEST PICTURE

-Joshua Rothkopf, TIME OUT NEW YORK

SAN PAULO FILM FESTIVAL

Gael GarcĂ­a Bernal A film by Pablo LarraĂ­n

NOW PLAYING

CHECK THEATRE DIRECTORIES OR CALL FOR SHOWTIMES

VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.NOTHEMOVIE.COM

FROM THE LEGENDARY

STUDIO GHIBLI

CREATORS OF SPIRITED AWAY AND THE SECRET WORLD OF ARRIETTY

   



-Peter Debruge, VARIETY

 

      



AO Scott,    

          

Rated R for sexual content, language and some drug material. One hour, 49 minutes.

Kenneth Turan, LOS ANGELES TIMES

++++

-Michael Phillips, CHICAGO TRIBUNE

 



Peter Rainer,     

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hurtling toward an unsurprisingly sentimental resolution. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help that Scott and cowriter Martin Petit are lazy, and deliberately hazy, when it comes to the pivotal plot point of the lawsuit, which Davidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lawyer insists will â&#x20AC;&#x153;go down in the history books.â&#x20AC;? They treat it as a comic MacGuffin, but an audience might reasonably expect to understand more specifically what the kids expect out of the suit. Their claim never seems remotely convincing either, since weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not made privy to the plaintiffsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; legal strategy and the law seems rather obviously on Davidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s side. Scott is content to treat the problem as one with a simple solution: Hug it out. And thus â&#x20AC;&#x153;Starbuckâ&#x20AC;? will appeal to those willing and able to be shamelessly manipulated at the movies (and, I suppose, why not?). If â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Intouchablesâ&#x20AC;? made you chuckle and wipe a tear away, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Starbuckâ&#x20AC;? is next in line to do the same for you ... or to you. Or you can just wait for the remake, written and directed by Scott and starring Vince Vaughn, which opens just six months from now and promises to be just as schmaltzy.

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Tickets and Showtimes available at cinemark.com


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Sports Shorts

PREP TRACK & FIELD

Gunn’s Robinson is among elite U.S. runners

NEW FOOTBALL COACH . . . Menlo College found a new head football coach close to home, hiring former San Jose SaberCats quarterback Mark Grieb to take over the program. Grieb also has ties with the Oaks’ football program, with two brief stints as an assistant coach. In 2003 he served as the team’s offensive coordinator and in 2011 he directed the receivers. Grieb spent 12 seasons with the SaberCats, helping them win three Arena Bowl championships and earning league MVP honors twice. He’s among the leaders in the AFL’s career record books; inking his name in the top-three in six career offensive categories including: Most passes completed in a career, completion percentage, passing yards, touchdown passes, most passes attempted, and most seasons as the league leader in passing yards. Grieb was the first player in AFL history to throw for more than 4,000 yards in seven straight seasons and the only player in league history to throw for 70-plus scores in nine straight seasons. Aside from playing professionally, Grieb has spent the past 10 years coaching in various capacities.

Friday College baseball: Stanford at USC, 6 p.m.; KZSU (90.1 FM)

Saturday Women’s water polo: UCLA at Stanford, 1 p.m.; Pac-12 Networks College baseball: Stanford at USC, 2 p.m.; KZSU (90.1 FM) College softball: Arizona St. at Stanford, 2 p.m. and 4:30 p.m.; Pac-12 Networks

Sunday College baseball: Stanford at USC, 1 p.m.; KZSU (90.1 FM)

READ MORE ONLINE

www.PASportsOnline.com For expanded daily coverage of college and prep sports, please see our new site at www.PASportsOnline.com

G

ever match in the sand, featuring Stanford’s 11 players from the indoor volleyball season. Four of Stanford’s five pairs earned wins in their debuts, while the fifth tandem pushed its opponents to extra points in the deciding third set. Stanford’s No. 1 doubles team of Jordan Burgess and Carly Wopat secured the first win of the afternoon defeating Santa Clara’s Taylor Milton and Dani Rottman, 21-18, 21-15. Wopat finished with 12 kills and nine digs, while Burgess turned in nine kills and 24 digs. “That was a lot of fun,” said Wopat. “I can’t wait to get back out there. “Coming into the first match, we (Jordan and I) were trying to have fun, and as we kept going we started to get better and better, noticing things and getting used to the game. I think if

unn High junior Sarah Robinson had a dream of some day playing soccer for the Stanford women’s team. If that dream comes true, it could start in the fall of 2014. The Stanford track coaches, however, might want to make Robinson a two-sport athlete after watching her compete at the annual Stanford Invitational last Saturday. Running in the talented girls’ mile field at Cobb Track & Angell Field, Robinson finished second, set a school record and ran one of the fastest times in the nation this season. Just two days after competing in a SCVAL De Anza Division dual-meet win over Mountain View, Robinson blazed to a 4:49.26 time while finishing second. That time, which converts to 4:47.58 for 1,600 meters, broke the 1982 Gunn record of 4:54.85 that Esther Berndt ran in the CIF State Meet finals. Robinson improved upon her previous best of 5:00.34 set last year while moving to No. 2 in the nation this season in the mile and No. 3 in the country in the 1,600, based on times listed on dyestat.com. She now also ranks No. 10 all-time in the Central Coast Section. “Sarah had an Sarah Robinson awesome race,” said Gunn first-year coach PattiSue Plumer, a former AllAmerican runner at Stanford and former assistant coach there. “We knew that it would be fast, and she executed the race plan perfectly. “We were both thrilled that she broke 4:50 in the mile. I felt confident that she was capable of racing that fast this season, but wasn’t sure that it would be today. This is the first competitive race she has been in this season, and I am very pleased with how she rose to the challenge.” Robinson, meanwhile, was a little surprised with her time. “It was my first really competitive race of the season, and I didn’t have any indication I’d do that well,” she said. “I was really surprised because it was a big PR. I was really happy with that.” The race plan was to stay relaxed and right behind the lead pack, but Robinson let a big gap open up and had to chase down the leaders. By the time the final lap arrived, it was just Robinson and Anna Maxwell of San Lorenzo Valley. Maxwell took off and Robinson followed. “Then it was instinctive,” said the highly competitive Robinson. Despite her fast time, Robinson isn’t the fastest in the Central Coast Section this season. That honor goes to Maxwell, who won Saturday’s race in 4:47.01. Maxwell leads the nation in the mile and ranks No. 2 in the country in the 1,600 with her converted time. “I’m glad I have a real good starting point for the rest of the season,” said Robinson. It was a season Robinson nearly didn’t have. After running in the first race of the cross-country season, Robinson was sidelined by a medical condition.

(continued on page 31)

(continued on page 30)

Keith Peters

ON THE AIR

by Keith Peters

Keith Peters

NATIONAL TEAMS . . . Three U.S. Soccer women’s national teams will have some local flavor when one heads off to a tournament and two others prepare for training camps in Southern California this month. Palo Alto High freshman Jacey Pederson is one of 20 players selected by head coach B.J. Snow for the U.S. Under-17 National Team that will travel to San Jose, Costa Rica, from April 21-29 for an international tournament featuring the host team and the USAís counterparts from Mexico and Japan. The roster for the upcoming women’s U-20 camp at The Home Depot Center (April 13-20) also has been announced and will include Stanford recruit Jane Campbell and current Cardinal freshman Laura Liedle. The U.S. is preparing for the 2014 FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup in Canada. The U.S. U-18 women’s team will hold its second training camp of the year from April 10-17 at The Olympic Training Center in Chula Vista. A total of 24 players have been invited, including Menlo School’s Jaye Boissiere and Menlo-Atherton’s Zoe Pacalin.

Junior ranks No. 2 in mile, No. 3 in 1,600 for outdoor season after big-time race

With Jordan Burgess (23) watching, Stanford’s Carly Wopat (2) goes for the block during a victory over Santa Clara on Tuesday. in the first-ever sand volleyball match for the two schools.

Stanford women’s sand volleyball debut has everything but Kerri Walsh by Keith Peters here was sun, sand, a volleyball net and even a host of spectators. The only thing missing was Kerri Walsh and maybe one of her Olympic medals. While Walsh, a Stanford graduate and beach volleyball star, would have been the perfect addition to the historic day, the first-ever sand volleyball match on The Farm came off without a hitch as the 10th-ranked Cardinal women’s team opened its inaugural season with a 4-1 win over Santa Clara on Tuesday at the ACSR Sand Volleyball Courts. “Adding a sport is a big deal,” said Stanford head coach John Dunning, “and so this is a big day for the Stanford sand volleyball team. This is big time; this is cool . . . It’s an amazing day out. It’s awesome that people decided to come out for the first day.” A good crowd turned out to watch the first-

T

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Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ogwumike heads to Final Four, for awards by Rick Eymer tanford junior forward Chiney Ogwumike will be in New Orleans this weekend for the NCAA Final Four of womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball. Instead of the Cardinal participating in its sixth straight national semifinals, however, Ogwumike will be a spectator. Ogwumike will be in town to accept a number of All-America awards she received this week. On Wednesday, she was named to the USBWA and John R. Wooden Award All-America teams. On Tuesday, she was one of five players selected to the Associated Press AllAmerica First Team. It was Ogwumikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second AllAmerica nod from the AP and the first time she has been voted to the first team. Last year she earned a spot on the second team. She was joined on the 2013 first team by Baylorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brittney Griner and Odyssey Sims, Delawareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Elena Delle Donne and Notre Dameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Skylar Diggins. Ogwumike also was named one of three finalists for the WBCAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Division I National Defensive Player of the Year award for the second straight year, being joined by Griner and Connecticutâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kelly Faris. The award will be presented at the WBCA Awards Show on Monday in New Orleans. By making the 10-woman USBWA All-America Team, Ogwumike is now a finalist for the USBWAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ann Meyers Drysdale Award for national player of the year. That award will be announced Sunday at the New Orleans Sports Arena. Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s announcement marks Ogwumikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first selection to both the USBWA and John R. Wooden Award All-America teams. Her nods also make her and older sister, Nnemkadi, the first sisters to make the organizationsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; honor squads. Ogwumike finished the 2012-13 season with 22.4 points and 12.9 rebounds a game and a 58.6 field-goal

S

percentage, along with 62 blocked shots. Her rebounding average, total rebounds (466) and 28 doubledoubles set Stanford single-season records while her scoring average and total points (805) are a close second in the record book behind Nnemkadiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 22.5 points per game and 809 total in 2011-12. Chineyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s efforts led Stanford to a 33-3 record, the programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sixth straight 30-win season and a 20th Sweet 16 appearance. The Cardinal, however, failed to advance to the Final Four after dropping a 61-59 decision to Georgia in the Sweet 16 on Saturday in Spokane, Wash. Ogwumike scored 26 points and grabbed 12 rebounds but Amber Orrange (17 points) was the only other player to make a significant offensive contribution. Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gymnastics Stanford, fresh off a spring break trip to Norway, heads to Colorado Springs for the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation championships, hosted by Air Force, on Saturday. The Cardinal returned to the U.S. with plenty of success. In team competition, Stanford finished with a score of 415.950, second to Italy and ahead of Norway. Senior Eddie Penev ranks second in the nation in all-around with a four-score average of 87.450. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first on the floor exercise (15.767) and tied for second on the vault (15.167). Sean Senters (15.083) ranks eighth on vault. No. 2 Oklahoma and No. 4 Stanford will battle for the team title, with the Sooners having the advantage. The Sooners are ranked among the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top six on all six apparatus. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gymnastics No. 11 Stanford earned a No. 2 seed in the NCAA Norman (Okla.) Regional, which gets underway Saturday. The Cardinal hopes to gain a bid

into the NCAA Championships. The top two finishers, which also include the host Sooners, Penn State, Washington, Iowa and Southern Utah, will gain automatic access to the NCAA Championships in Los Angeles on April 19. Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water polo Freshman Maggie Steffens earned her second consecutive MPSF Newcomer of the Week award after helping No. 2 Stanford go unbeaten in five matches in Hawaii last week. It will be a little tougher this weekend when UCLA comes to town for a conference game at 1 p.m. on Saturday (Pac-12 Networks). The

fourth-ranked Bruins have given the Cardinal (3-0, 22-1) trouble through the years. UCLA (3-1, 21-3) lost to Stanford, 8-5, in the Stanford Invitational on Feb. 3. The Bruins have also lost one-goal games to USC and Arizona State. The Cardinalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lone loss was to top-ranked and undefeated USC in the championship game of the UC Irvine Invitational. Stanford has won 10 straight since. Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game is Stanfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final home match. The Cardinal travels to USC, Loyola Marymount and California to conclude the regular season.

L U C I L E PA C K A R D

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(Volunteers Needed for Pet Visitation Program)

GRANDPARENTS SEMINAR

Stanford Hospital and Clinics, in conjunction with Pet Partners (formerly Delta Society) is holding a free orientation (about one hour) on Saturday, April 6, 2013 at 2 p.m. in Palo Alto. No pets please â&#x20AC;&#x201C; humans only. For more information, please contact Lyn Belingheri at labsite@sbcglobal.net and see the Stanford PAWS website: http://stanfordhospital.org/forPatients/ patientServices/pawsGuestServices.html RSVP required for the orientation.

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lacrosse No. 13 Stanford (2-0, 7-2) faces its toughest test of the MPSF season this week with a match at conference co-leader Denver (3-0, 11-1) on Friday. The Pioneers, winners of 10 straight, and California both share 3-0 conference records entering play this week. Stanford goalie Lyndey Munoz was named MPSF Defensive Player of the Week after recording a 6.50 goals-against average and .536 save percentage last week. N

C H I L D R E N â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S H O S P I TA L

CALLING ALL DOGS!!! Do you have a dog that would make a good therapy dog? If you feel your dog can demonstrate how to follow basic obedience commands, has the desire and aptitude to be around strangers and other animals, is comfortable in new environments and would pass a veterinarian health screening, then your dog may be the animal weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for! You would also have to meet volunteer guidelines.

Cal hosts the MPSF tournament beginning April 26.

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Sports

Prep track (continued from page 28) Springs); Ryan White (King’s Academy)

Aubrey Dawkins BASKETBALL ALL-SCVAL DE ANZA DIVISION Most Valuable Player: Aubrey Dawkins (Palo Alto) Sr. First Team Mathias Schmutz (Palo Alto); Aldis Petriceks (Palo Alto); Nick Wang (Mountain View) Brian Kaestner (Mountain View); Troy Whitford (Homestead); Mike Aguiar (Los Gatos); Christian Rita (Milpitas); Steve Berman (Saratoga) Second Team Justin Shayesteh (Homestead); Corey Olivet (Los Gatos); Max Saner (Los Gatos); Keller Chryst (Palo Alto); Alex Wang (Saratoga); Kyle Dozer (Saratoga) Honorable Mention Sammy Khidir (Mountain View); Adithya Reddy (Homestead); Marcus Rita (Milpitas); Jason Scremps (Milpitas); Jonathan Boldt (Saratoga) EL CAMINO DIVISION Most Valuable Player: Nate Viera (Los Altos) First Team Cole Lockwood (Fremont); Connor Smith (Fremont); Tecson Gacrama (Fremont); Joey Malgesini (Los Altos); Steven Garverick (Los Altos); Raj Singh (Wilcox); Ramana Keerthi (Monta Vista) Second Team Tayyab Khan (Santa Clara); Kevin Seubert (Fremont); Alex Bernauer (Fremont); Rupal Singh (Wilcox); Delshawn Mitchell (Wilcox); Cory Low (Monta Vista); Patrick Skelly (Gunn); Kevin Qian (Lynbrook) Honorable Mention Ronag Virdi (Santa Clara); Michael Burdett (Fremont); Nate Becker (Los Altos); Danny Rosenbaum (Los Altos); Johnny Chen (Los Altos); Mac Kliman (Los Altos); Kiernan Stolorz (Los Altos); Anthony Otey (Los Altos); Julian Jones (Wilcox); Jasen Wickliffe (Wilcox); Roland Luke (Wilcox); David Lai (Monta Vista); Adi Raju (Monta Vista); Tommer Schwarty (Monta Vista); Chris Russell (Gunn); Max Girod (Gunn); George Lu (Lynbrook); Victor Yu (Lynbrook) ALL-WEST BAY ATHLETIC LEAGUE Most Valuable Player: Bobby Roth (Menlo School) Jr. First Team Ricky Galliani (Sacred Heart Prep); Jack Heneghan (Menlo School); Nicholas Nguyen (Harker); Nikhil Panu (Harker); Ryan Young (Menlo School) Second Team Ian Bennett (Sacred Heart Prep); Daevon Bishop (Eastside Prep); Stephen Butelo (King’s Academy); Andy Isokpehi (Priory); Corbin Koch (Sacred Heart Prep) Honorable Mention Shane Barratt (Menlo School); David Bodine (Pinewood); Andy Dolezalek (Priory); Liam Dunn (Menlo School); Owen Lewis (Pinewood); Anthony Shao (Crystal

ALL-PAL BAY DIVISION Most Valuable Player: ==Conner Haupt (Burlingame) Sr. First Team Nick Frankel (Aragon) Sr.; Nick Loew (Burlingame) Sr.; Matt Wong (Mills) Jr.; Alex Manu (Aragon) Jr.; Angelo Bautista (Hillsdale) Sr.; Michael Costello (Carlmont) Jr. Second Team Joseph Worku (Mills) Jr.; Mitchell Hickman (Woodside) Sr.; Julian Bertero (Sequoia) Sr.; David Manoa (Aragaon) Sr.; Oliver Bucka (Menlo-Atherton) Jr.; Tyler Paratte (Burlingame) Sr.; Yash Malik (Carlmont) Sr. Honorable Mention Dante Fontenot (Hillsdale) So.; Jamar Gaddis (Menlo-Atherton) Sr.; Jonnathan Arevalos (San Mateo) Sr.; Mikel FlorioCruz (Burlingame) Sr.; Zack Kohtz (Capuchino) Sr.; Marquis Adkins (Mills) So.; Will Dobson (Burlingame) Sr.; David Lopez (Woodside) Sr.; Lucas Magni (Capuchino) Fr.; Trevor Lahoz (Aragon) Sr.

SOCCER ALL-SCVAL DE ANZA DIVISION Most Valuable Player: Emmanuez Hamlat (Santa Clara) Sr. Defensive MVP: Travis Pinker (Mountain View) Sr.; Garrett Canavero (Mountain View) Jr. Offensive MVP: Guillermo Burger (Mountain View) Jr. MVP Goalie: Logan Chapman (Los Gatos) Jr. First Team Brandon Perez (Santa Clara) Sr.; Derrick Eszlinger (Santa Clara) Sr.; Kelvin Skewes (Santa Clara) So.; Romeo Herrera (Santa Clara) Jr.; Austin Anaya (Los Altos) Sr.; Ed Sartor (Los Altos) Sr.; Tomo Nishizaxi (Los Gatos) So.; Garrett North (Los Gatos) Sr.; Paul Tolley (Los Gatos) Jr.; Nick Contarino (Los Gatos) Jr.; Boot Bullwinkle (Gunn) Sr.; Guy Kaznik (Gunn) So.; Keenan Zucker (Mountain View) Jr.; Brad Bumgarner (Mountain View) Jr.; Chris Barnes (Mountain View) Sr.; Logan Allen (Mountain View) Jr.; Justin Ruweler (Mountain View) Jr.; Riley Klein (Homestead) Sr.; Keaton Matusich (Saratoga) Sr.; Sam Guy (Saratoga) Jr.; Will Guy (Saratoga) Jr. ALL-SCVAL EL CAMINO DIVISION Most Valuable Player: Leonardo Siva (Fremont) Sr. Defensive MVP: Kirby Gee (Palo Alto) Sr. Offensive MVP: Bobak Ohadi (Monta Vista) Sr.; Chris Meredith (Palo Alto) Sr. MVP Goalie: Eduardo Saucedo (Fremont) Sr. First Team Andrew Bae (Lynbrook) Jr.; Alex Wong (Lynbrook) Jr.; Ben Leung (Milpitas) Sr.; Daniel Shak (Milpitas) Sr.; Daniel Galvin (Milpitas) Jr.; Joel Cambronero (Wilcox) So.; Baris Demirlioglu (Monta Vista) Sr.; Andrews Huang (Monta Vista) Sr.; Brad Ohadi (Monta Vista) So.; Alex Chin (Palo

Willy Lamb

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Alto) Sr.; Tony Maharaj (Palo Alto) Jr.; Cina Vazir (Palo Alto) Jr.; Paul Stefanski (Palo Alto) Sr.; Javier Angel (Fremont) Sr.; Manil Lakabi (Fremont) Sr.; Isreal Rojas (Fremont) Sr.; Levi Uraga (Fremont) Jr.; Miguel Morales (Fremont) So.; Paul Johnson (Cupertino) Sr.; Trevor Moore (Cupertino) Sr.; Ryan Caballereo (Cupertino) Sr. ALL-WEST BAY ATHLETIC LEAGUE Most Valuable Player: Willy Lamb (Sacred Heart Prep) Sr. First Team Grayson Burdon (Pinewood); Timmy Costa (Menlo School); Robert Hellman (Sacred Heart Prep); Ryan Karle (Menlo School); David Manning (Crystal Springs); Austin Mirabella (Priory); Kevin Moss (Harker); Max Parker (Menlo School); Carlos Rodriguez (Eastside Prep); Christian Rosales (Eastside Prep); Andrew Segre (Sacred Heart Prep) Second Team Kevin Barragan (Eastside Prep); Daniel Clui (Crystal Springs); Zack Conside (Crystal Springs); Simar Mangat (Harker); Tommy Meaney (Sacred Heart Prep); Kyle Perez (Menlo School); Nick Salzman (Sacred Heart Prep); Tony Sanchez (Eastside Prep); Brendan Spillane (Sacred Heart Prep); Michael Svozil (King’s Academy); Jeremy Tsui (King’s Academy); Justin Wang (Menlo School) Honorable Mention Jeremiah Anderson (Harker); Joe Callinan (Sacred Heart Prep); Denis Celik (Harker); Grant Chou (Sacred Heart Prep); Jams Colin (Eastside Prep); Oisin Coveney (Harker); Freddy Gonzalez (Eastside Prep); Sam Grinis (King’s Academy); Collin Gulesserian (Pinewood); Rapha Guzman (Eastside Prep); David Lindars (Harker); Bailey Marshek (Priory); Maverick McNealy (Harker); Sumit Minocha (Harker); Matt Myers (Menlo School); Isaac Need (King’s Academy; Frankline O (Crystal Springs); Cesar Perez (Priory); Colin Porter (King’s Academy); Jack Redman (Menlo School); Kyle Roter (Harker); Hugo Sanchez (Sacred Heart Prep); Derek Chou (Sacred Heart Prep); Tim Stiles (Crystal Springs); John Strong (Menlo School); David Theis (Priory); Kevin Tracy (Pinewood) ALL-PAL BAY DIVISION Forward of the Year: Michel Gonzalez (Carlmont) Sr. Midfielder of the Year: Ryan Onizuka (San Mateo) Sr. Defender of the Year: Carlos Ramos (Sequoia) Sr. Goalie of the Year: William Amaya (San Mateo) Sr. First Team Nick Chang (Sequoia) Jr.; Moises Vieyra Gallegos (Sequoia) Sr.; Fred Whitman (Hillsdale) Sr.; Kent Turtletaub (San Mateo) Sr.; Chris Flygare (Burlingame) Sr.; Larry Campbell (San Mateo) Sr.; Justin Harpster (Carlmont) Sr.; Zachary Wooster (Carlmont) Sr.; Ryan Freeman (Carlmont) Sr.; Luke Petersen (Carlmont) Sr.; Kevin Gutierrez (Menlo-Atherton) Sr.; Luis Mancilla (Woodside) Jr. Second Team Alex Golden (Hillsdale) Sr.; Fiston Kizunga (Sequoia) So.; Bryan Calles (Sequoia) Sr.; Teymur Lutvalyev (Burlingame) Sr.; Ricardo Molina (San Mateo) Sr.; Alejandro Mendoza (San Mateo) So.; Justin Quan (Carlmont) Sr.; Nick Monteiro (Carlmont) Sr.; Jared Fitzpatrick (Carlmont) Jr.; Ross Goffigon (Carlmont) Sr.; Marcos Amaral (Menlo-Atherton) Sr.; Salvador Godinez (Woodside) Sr. Honorable Mention Shayan Amini (Burlingame) Sr.; Jonah Snyder (Burlingame) Jr.; Edinson Gomez (Hillsdale) Sr.; Kleyton Bardon (Hillsdale) Sr.; Diego Medina (Sequoia) Sr.; Nick Polati (Sequoia) Sr.; Marco Zambrano (San Mateo) Sr.; Marco Amarillas (San Mateo) Sr.; Claudio Cortez (Carlmont) Sr.; Julian Smith (Carlmont) Jr.; Michael Perez (Menlo-Atherton) Sr.; Flint Mitchell (Menlo-Atherton) Sr.; Salvador Herrera (Woodside) Jr.; Octavio Jimenez (Woodside) Sr. All-league teams are selected by the coaches

While she continued to train on her own, she didn’t run for Gunn between October and December and she temporarily left the U.S. Soccer Under-17 National Team. When preseason track training began in January, Robinson returned to the Titans. “Mentally, to get back into it (running) was exciting,” Robinson said. Plumer was happy to have an athlete like Robinson to coach in her return to the high school coaching ranks. She also was the head coach at Los Altos for six years. “She’s a superbly talented young woman, and she was before I got here,” said Plumer, whose athletic career includes two NCAA titles at Stanford before embarking on a sterling post-collegiate career that was highlighted by an American record in the 5,000 meters in 1989 and a fifth place in the 3,000 in the 1992 Barcelona Olympics. Plumer still holds Stanford’s indoor record in the mile (4:23.5) and 3,000 (8:53.1). She ran on three NCAA runner-up teams in cross country during a career that was rewarded with induction into Stanford’s Athletics Hall of Fame. “What I can bring to the table is that I truly understand her ability,” Plumer said. “There are some things she can do at practice that I never saw at Stanford. The times she can hit in practice and the ease at which she can do them is stunning.” Speaking of stunning, both Plumer and longtime Cal coach Tony Sandoval were blown away with the times in the girls’ mile at the Stanford Invitational. “I can’t recall a time when anyone broke 4:50 at the meet, let alone two,” Plumer said. “Tony has been at just about every Stanford Invitational and he couldn’t recall a faster time.” Not only did the first two runners break 4:50, but the next three now make up the five fastest outdoor miles in the nation this season. Robinson accepts her time in a matter-of-fact way and looks forward to getting better. She’ll continue to run in the 400, 800 and 1,600 with the focus of improving her speed in the metric mile. “PattiSue has done a really good job,” Robinson said of her new coach. “She’s a really good resource for me.”

In addition to her track training, Robinson is back training with her soccer club team. As for re-joining the U.S. Soccer U-17 team, that decision will come, Robinson said, “when the time is right.” While Robinson was the individual standout among local athletes competing at Stanford, the Palo Alto boys’ 400 relay team and Sacred Heart Prep senior Nico Robinson both made significant improvements upon their CCS-leading marks during Saturday’s second day of the meet. The Vikings’ quartet of Matt Tolbert, Jayshawn Gates, Michael Johnson and Nick Sullivan finished third in 42.31, a season best and the fastest in the section this season. Castro Valley won Saturday’s race in 41.85, No. 3 in the state, with De La Salle was second in 42.00 (No. 5 in the state). Paly, which ranks No. 14 in the state now, had equaled its CCS-leading time of 42.53 in the prelims. Sullivan returned to the track for the open 400 and produced the fastest time of his life, 48.67, while finishing fourth overall. Sullivan’s time helped him win the second heat and lowered his previous CCS-leading time of 49.63. Sullivan now ranks No. 2 in Paly history, behind the 48.2 (48.34 converted) by Rod M. Green in 1980. SHP’s Robinson, meanwhile, continued his busy week by finishing third in the boys’ 110 high hurdles in 14.90. That lowered his previous CCS leader from 14.94. On Friday, Robinson unleashed his best long jump of the season (a legal 22-8 1/2) while finishing fifth. He also took sixth in the 400 intermediate hurdles while running it for the first time. Earlier in the week, Robinson won three events while helping the Gators win a West Bay Athletic League meet. One of the three wins was a 22-6 1/2 mark in the long jump. Robinson’s teammate, Cameron Van, also saw improvement Saturday as he recorded a 6-2 1/2 mark in the high jump while taking seventh. Menlo School junior Maddy Price also had a season best as she clocked 57.27 while finishing fifth overall in the girls’ 400. That moved her to No. 3 in the CCS this season. The next big invitationals for local athletes will be the Serra Top 7 on April 13 and the CCS Top 8 on April 19. N

2013 CCS TRACK AND FIELD LEADERS As of Tuesday, April 1 BOYS 400 relay — Palo Alto 42.31 1600 — Murphy (St Ignatius) 4:14.77c 110 HH — Robinson (SHP) 14.90 400 — Sullivan (Palo Alto) 48.67 100 — Minocha (Harker) 10.84 800 — Johnson (SLV) 1:54.76 300 IH — Biawogi (Prospect) 38.94 200 — Gates (Palo Alto) 22.38 3200 — Corvese (Sobrato) 9:17.74 1600 relay — Lynbrook 3:26.14 High jump — Silver (Watsonville) 6-6 3/4 Long jump — Wong (Mitty) 23-6 3/4 Triple jump — Wong (Mitty) 45-9 3/4 Discus — Ilaoa (Homestead) 174-9 Shot put — Beering (Serra) 58-11 Pole vault — Toney (St Francis) 14-11 1/2

GIRLS 400 relay — Los Gatos 48.38 1600 — Maxwell (SLV) 4:45.35c 100 hurdles — Delucci (Santa Cruz) 15.39 400 — Baynard (Piedmont Hills) 56.09 100 — Scholis (Seaside) 12.22 800 — Maxwell (SLV) 2:11.69 300 hurdles — Mount (ND-San Jose) 46.51 200 — Connell (Harker) 25.21 3200 — Maxwell (SLV) 10:30.02 1600 relay — Piedmont Hills 3:53.88 High jump — Fagan (Los Gatos) 5-10 3/4 Long jump — Buck (Leigh) 17-11 1/4 Triple jump — Kwiatkowski (Wilcox) 39-5 1/2 Discus — Tonga (Del Mar) 130-6 Shot put —Mendoza (Mills) 42-4 Pole vault — Wagner (Los Gatos) 13-0 1/4


Sports

Sand volleyball

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

(continued from page 28)

Charlotte Biffar

Erik Amundson

Palo Alto High

Menlo-Atherton High

The senior co-captain helped lead the Vikings to a pair of lacrosse victories over Pioneer and Los Gatos by scoring 12 goals as the Vikings remained perfect in the SCVAL at 8-0 and on the season at 10-0.

The junior helped cap a 5-0 week in baseball with five hits, two RBI, five runs scored in addition to tossing a complete-game threehitter with 10 strikeouts and no walks as the Bears won the Cordova Easter tourney.

we keep doing that, keep on improving, it’ll be great. And getting the first win feels awesome, it’s really exciting. Jordan and I were just super stoked and happy.” Madi Bugg and Brittany Howard followed up with a three-set win over Kat Douglas and Sarah Vocano (1721, 21-19, 15-9) to give the Cardinal the 2-0 lead in the match. Bugg put down an ace on match point to seal the win, totaling 10 kills, 19 digs and three aces. Howard added 15 kills, 12 digs and three aces. In arguably the most competitive match of the afternoon, Santa Clara’s No. 2 team of Haley Cameron and Alyssa Anderson posted a 23-25, 21-17, 17-15 win over Stanford’s Kyle Gilbert and Rachel Williams. Gilbert notched 10 kills and 14 digs, while Williams tallied 18 kills. Morgan Boukather and Megan McGehee clinched the win for the Cardinal with a 21-15, 21-19 decision over Kim Meyers and Lacey Maas.

Inky Ajanaku and Mary Ellen ing Stanford, have added the sport Luck also picked up a win for Stan- in 2013. ford, defeating Katy Schatzman and “We have some experience on Chloe Sliger, 21-16, 21our staff. Denise Cor13. Ajanaku tured in 19 lett, our associate head kills, 14 digs and three coach for the indoor aces, while Luck added team, has been around nine kills, 18 digs and (sand volleyball) a lot. three aces. Sara Dukes, our volunAmong those in atteer coach, played after tendance for the historic she played here as an match were Stanford indoor player,” Dunalums and Indianapolis ning told the Stanford Colts teammates AnDaily. “The main thing drew Luck and Coby that I’m concerned with Fleener, former Cardiis what this is doing to nal running back Stepmake our indoor team fan Taylor and former do better, as well. We’re Stanford women’s volcompeting to win here leyball player Cynthia and all 11 who are playBarboza, who was part ing here are on our inof the Pac-12 Networks Jordan Burgess door team as well, so it’s broadcasting crew. going to help make our Dunning said 30 teams from indoor team better, there’s no doubt around the country are playing this about it.” season. Sand volleyball was added The Cardinal next will travel to to the list of NCAA emerging sports the Sacramento State tournament on for women prior to the 2011-12 aca- Sunday. Stanford will face the host demic year. Fifteen schools com- Hornets at noon and St. Mary’s at peted in sand volleyball during the 3 p.m. The Cardinal will host SCU spring of 2012 and 15 more, includ- again on Tuesday at 3:30 p.m. N

Honorable mention Brooke Bullington Menlo lacrosse

Ally Howe Sacred Heart Prep swimming

Nina Kelty* Palo Alto lacrosse

Claire Klausner* Gunn softball

Maddy Price Menlo track & field

Sarah Robinson Gunn track & field

Austin Appleton Sacred Heart Prep lacrosse

Andrew Buchanan Menlo golf

Matt McGarry Menlo-Atherton baseball

Jack Redman Menlo baseball

Nico Robinson Sacred Heart Prep track & field

Nick Sullivan Palo Alto track & field * previous winner

To see video interviews of the Athletes of the Week, go to www.PASportsOnline.com

FILM SCREENING: GIRL RISING THURSDAY, APRIL 11 @ 7 P.M. Aquarius Theatre, Palo Alto (THIS EVENT IS A FUNDRAISER FOR DEBORAH’S PALM) Go to the Landmark Theatre website for tickets! (http://www.landmarktheaters.com/ market/SanFranciscoPeninsula/Aquarius Theatre.htm)

april highlights NEW FOR THIS MONTH: — Personal Creativity Workshops — Women’s Weekly Support Group — Smart Salary Negotiations — Job Search Strategy Team — Weekly Journaling Circle — Goal Setting Workshop For further details, visit our website: deborahspalm.org 555 Lytton Avenue, Palo Alto 650 /473-0664

debor ah’s palm

Palo Alto Garden Workshops Attend our FREE workshops to create a naturally beautiful garden using plants, techniques and products that are good for the environment and the gardener too. Please pre-register, space is limited. Compost Basics The foundation of a naturally beautiful garden is healthy soil. Adding compost to your soil improves its structure, helps it absorb and hold moisture, supplies slow-release nutrients to your plants, reduces erosion and allows your plants to develop better root structure which helps them grow bigger, stronger, and healthier. Learn how easy it is to compost at one of these workshops: April 20, 2013 10 am - 12 pm Cubberley Community Center, Room H-1 4000 Middlfield Road, Palo Alto

June 15, 2013 10 am - 12 pm The EcoCenter 2560 Embarcadero Road, Palo Alto

Compost bins, worm bins and composting accessories will be available for sale. To register for these workshops and for information on other upcoming workshops visit www.cityofpaloalto.org/workshops or call (650) 496-5910. ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÊ«ÀˆÊx]ÊÓä£ÎÊU Page 31


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Palo Alto Weekly 04.05.2013 - Section 1