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[ Introd uction ]

Oxfordshire is now the sportiest county in the

I am very pleased to introduce Oxfordshire Sports Partnership’s annual report which once again highlights a great year of sport and physical activity development within Oxfordshire.

country...

With the significant changes to funding nationally and locally it has become increasingly important to avoid any duplication of what we and our partners do and to maximise our efficiencies and the value we create from working together. This integral approach which the Partnership has adopted has led on to considerable success in the past with particular highlights being:

▼ Oxfordshire comes out as the sportiest and most active county ▼ Launch of Sportivate within the county with television coverage ▼ 109 coaches attended a multi-sport coaching conference with former Olympian guest speaker David Hemery CBE

▼ The Launch of the £600,000 Active Women project within Oxfordshire

▼ Getting the School Games project started within Oxfordshire ▼ The first National Sport Makers convention held at the Kassam

I would like to thank all partners and stakeholders for their hard work for creating these successes. The efforts of both individuals and partnership working have combined to help increase participation in sport and physical activity in Oxfordshire, resulting in some fantastic Active People Survey results this year. Finally, I would like to thank the Board for their hard but unglamorous work over the year in providing solid governance for the multi-agency work of the Partnership.

Mike Walker Chairman of the Oxfordshire Sports Partnership

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Stadium, Oxford.

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[ Key Achievements ] customers ▼ Oxfordshire is now the sportiest county in the country. Sport England’s annual Active People survey reported that people in Oxfordshire are more active and do more sport than any other county

▼ Sportivate launched by Sport England Regional Champion, John Cove and covered by BBC Oxford TV news. Oxfordshire’s Sportivate project is one of the top performing schemes nationally

▼ GO Active participation target of 6,500 exceeded. 7,296 new participants attended courses throughout the year

▼ Launch of the £600,000 Active Women project by England and Arsenal Football player Rachel Yankey, covered by BBC Radio Oxford

▼ Parallel Youth Games held at Blackbird Leys for able-bodied and disabled athletes.

operations ▼ ▼ ▼ ▼ ▼ ▼

E-News database compiled with 4,000 subscribers 24 partner e-Bulletins and e-News distributed Incorporation research started Public Health offer developed Dr Len Almond presents new National Physical Activity Guidelines to partners 6th Oxfordshire Sports Awards the best attended to date.

people ▼ 620 Coaches attended Coach Development Workshops ▼ First national Sportmakers convention held at the Kassam stadium ▼ 109 coaches attended this year’s Coaching Conference - the highest attendance so far. Former Olympian David Hemery CBE was the key note speaker

▼ Oxfordshire RFU achieved recognition as the first county body to be awarded a Seal of Approval (Clubmark) with Core Team Support

▼ Agreements put in place with 28 NGBs ▼ Coaching-Mentoring team established with Oxfordshire Basketball.

investment ▼ £428,280 Sportivate project launched in Oxfordshire ▼ £70,000 funding confirmed for School Games ▼ £27,000 Small Grants funding for Cheney Rowing Club, Bicester Go Ride Club, Didcot Devil Basketball Club

▼ £30,000 funding secured from Primary Care Trust to support physical activity within Oxfordshire ▼ South East efficiency project supported. 4


attended this year’s Coaching

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Conference

109 coaches

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[ Cus tom ers ]

Satisfying customers & stakeholders

Active people Survey (ApS) results Oxfordshire is officially the most active county in England. Sport England’s annual survey of sport and activity around the country reported that 27.2 % of Oxfordshire’s population, nearly 165,000 people, are taking part in sport and active recreation for at least 30 minutes, on 3 or more days a week. This is an increase of nearly 4% on figures published in 2005 when the survey began which showed 23.5% as active and engaging in sport. We’d like to congratulate everyone in the Oxfordshire Sports Partnership for their hard work and efforts that are contributing to the fantastic increase in the number of people doing more sport and supporting our shared vision - “'Everyone more active and achieving their potential in sport'

Go Active (Get oxfordshire Active) GO Active (Get Oxfordshire Active) was set up in 2008 with funding from Sport England, Leisure Providers, Local Authorities and the Oxfordshire NHS to increase adult participation in sport and physical activity in Oxfordshire. After delivering successful programmes such as Nordic Walking, Two Left Feet and beginner jogging groups, Sport England funding came to an end in November 2011. After a positive independent evaluation and on target key performance indicators (KPIs), partners came together to find a solution that would ensure that GO Active could continue until March 2012 and beyond.

“I normally need crutches to walk. I did the nordic exercise and the poles really help. The other week I did a nine mile walk for charity and couldn’t believe it!”

Participant quotes from the evaluation: “I’m diabetic and was overweight. My nurse has told me to exercise, which I try and do three times a week. I’ve lost two stone. It’s helped bring my diabetes under control. My nurse is now really happy with me which is really reassuring to know. This is important to me especially as I lost my husband a few years ago.” “I’m 73 years old and probably the oldest person in the group. I had five fractures in my arm and couldn’t lift it above my head. I was doing rehabilitation for ages and nothing seemed to work. Since coming here it’s been great. My arm seems to be mending as I can now lift it much higher. The instructor is brilliant. She keeps an eye on me so that I don’t over do it. I also suffer from a chest infection and breathing problems but the exercise helps that too.”

Funding was initially found for the continuation of the project until March 2012. This included a successful bid to Sport England to continue to deliver a beginner running programme, called Run England Oxfordshire. £47,670 allowed GO Active to continue to train and develop jog leaders and run a series of jog groups for beginners. As well as jogging, GO Active has continued to deliver it’s most successful programmes. By March 2012 it had engaged a total of 18,900 people since its launch in April 2009. It had deployed and developed 327 coaches and 317 volunteers, all of whom have contributed to the success of the programme.

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The Project Management Group went on to secure funding for GO Active to continue until March 2013. This has included funding from local partners, the Sports Partnership, and national funding from the Community Games programme in addition to Sport England running funding. Community Games, funded by the Cabinet Office Social Action Fund, will help communities to stage their own 2012 Games, providing people in Oxfordshire with their own Olympic or Paralympic moment.

Bury Knowle health Walk – one year on

“Over the last ye ar I have met so man y nice people, lead ers and walkers alik e, it's a really enjoyable and wor thwhile way of spending a Frida y morning.”

case Study In November 2011, Bury Knowle Health Walk celebrated one year of encouraging people to get out walking in their local community. Since starting a year before, the group has delivered 50 walks and got 50 people out walking at least once a week. So far the group has managed to attract 434 walkers and by walking at least 1 mile together each week they have already walked the equivalent of the distance from Oxford to Scarborough and back! Walkers past and present were invited to celebrate this occasion by joining the walk leaders for a Bring and Share lunch at Headington Baptist Church between 12-2pm on Friday 25th November.

The popularity of the health walks led the team to branch out into other additional ‘event’ type walks. Utilising the walk leader’s fantastic local knowledge, a couple of CS Lewis themed walks were delivered during the summer which drew a total of 54 people. There was also a special Boxing Day Walk planned for Shotover Country Park which drew in festive walkers from across the city. Councillor Mark Lygo, Board Member for Parks and Sports, says: “Health Walks are a great way of keeping fit and doing some gentle exercise. They have proved really popular in Oxford and have been a great success.” Bridget Doole from Headington, Health Walk Leader for Bury Knowle, says: “I first got involved with leading local Health Walks because I've always enjoyed walking and it seemed such a good way of encouraging people who don't walk to try it. It's very rewarding to see how people's level of ability can improve over the weeks.” “Apart from walking being physically good for you, you can see how people benefit from the social aspects too; we always go for coffee together at the end of the walk, and sometimes spend almost as long chatting in the coffee shop as we do walking”.

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The Oxford Health Walks were set up as a pilot project in November 2010 by GO Active and Oxford City Council after receiving some funding from Walk for Life. The pilots soon grew into a thriving ongoing project and weekly walks are now being offered from Hinksey Park every Wednesday at 10am and from Bury Knowle Park every Friday at 10am.

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Health Walks are a great way to start or get back into some gentle exercise; whether that is for physical, mental or social benefits. It can be all be done by stretching your legs in the great outdoors! All Health Walks offer a 1 mile route each week, but as people progress the walk leaders will aim to offer a range of additional routes and distances that will be taken at a pace to suit the group. The walk’s focus is on making getting active more sociable, so the groups all enjoy meeting for a tea, coffee and a chat afterwards. The success of the walks was recognised earlier in the year when the programme was accredited by Natural England as meeting the requirements to become part of the national Walking for Health programme. This success is owed to the fantastic team of 4 volunteer walk leaders that give their time, energy and enthusiasm every week; without them the walks simply could not be delivered. One of these leaders started off as a walker herself, but she found that her enthusiasm for walking and enjoyment in being part of the group made her the perfect candidate for a volunteer walk leader, so she quickly trained up. There is still free training available to anyone interested in becoming a walk leader in their community. It is crucial for the continuation of the Oxford Health Walks for this cycle of development to become established.

Just Jog

case Study Cliff Baker jogs with his local running group who meet every Wednesday evening in East Oxfordshire.

“I feel that I am managing my stress a lot better and that my self esteem and confidence have improved.”

“I hadn’t exercised regularly for well over a year and had put on nearly 2 stone in weight. My energy and fitness were at an all time low. I felt stressed from my work as a Health Service manager and was not sleeping well. I had been signed off work for a week, when the group started. I thought the group could help kick start my fitness and was keen to join.”

“It was good to meet people who were in a similar position to myself and to encourage each other. The sessions had a mixture of stretching, fitness and running. I enjoyed catching up with the others at the start of sessions and seeing how we had got on in between times. There was a real sense of commitment to each other and a lot of warmth and good humour.” “I now run 3 times a week and have set myself the target of completing a 10k run on the 26th September. I’ve really benefited from the running and exercising and I have lost weight too.” “The benefit that I had not expected is that I have made new friends, and look forward to the evening as being some quality time for myself. The group have started to meet and run on a Sunday and a group of us are running a 10k together.” “The course is well run, enabling people to feel they can set their own goals but achieve them as a team.”

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Zumba

“My health and fitness have really benefited...”

case Study Maureen has been attending Salsa Fit and Zumba for the last 12 months and was introduced to the activities through her local activator Lisa Booth. In the past Maureen enjoyed horse riding and tried to attend local dance classes once a week when she had time. Swimming and the gym didn’t really appeal to her, and general life demands didn’t really allow enough time to explore other avenues. Maureen found that once she had retired she could once again focus on trying new activities. She joined her local Nexus Leisure centre in Witney and was quickly enjoying both the social and physical rewards of the activities that were on offer. She now attends up to 5 different activities a week. Salsa Fit, Tai Chi, Zumba and Community Health walks.

“My health and fitness have really benefited, along with my social life. I have made new friends and look forward to attending each week. If anything I’d struggle to squeeze much more in! The centre in Witney is the hub of the community and prices are kept very reasonable, compared to other leisure providers in the county”. “In the future I would be really interested in trying Nordic Walking. I have a friend who has already completed a course through GO Active. Lisa has mentioned that she will be running a new course in this area in the New Year, so I guess I’ll be giving that a go too”.

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Maureen became aware of Salsa Fit and Zumba through the GO Active notice board and has never looked back since; she also attended the “Put your heart into it” sponsored Zumbathon in February to raise money for the British Heart Foundation. She says “GO Active tries really hard to introduce new activities into the community that everyone can enjoy whatever their age.

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Active Women After an award of £371,000 from Sport England to Oxfordshire Sports Partnership to increase the number of women taking part in sport and active recreation, England and Arsenal Football player Rachel Yankey officially launched Oxfordshire’s Active Women project in Oxford City’s Bonn Square in May 2011. From left top to right : Cath Dale, Participation Officer, South Oxfordshire District Council and Vale of White Horse District Council, Debbie Cameron, GO Active Activator, Nexus Community, Hendriette Thorn, GO Active Co-ordinator, South Oxfordshire District Council, Councillor Janet Carr, Vice Chairman, South Oxfordshire District Council, Rachel Yankey, England and Arsenal Football Player, Councillor Bill Service, South Oxfordshire District Council and Oxfordshire District Council, Councillor Alison Thomson, Chairman of the Vale of White Horse District Council and Sue Blackshaw, coach at Kidlington Netball Club. From bottom left to right : Vicky Bonham, Women and Girls Football Development Officer, OFA, Sean Christie, GO Active Co-ordinator, West Oxfordshire District Council, Antonia Bridges, Active Recreation Manager, Oxfordshire Sports Partnership, James Craggs, Disability and Inclusion Sports Development Officer, Oxfordshire Sports Partnership and Nina Bridge, Regional Development Officer Badminton England.

Oxfordshire Active Women is a Partnership project between Oxfordshire’s Local Authorities, Leisure Providers and six National Governing Bodies of Sport (NGBs) (England Netball, Badminton England, Oxfordshire Football Association, British Gymnastics, the Lawn Tennis Association and England Athletics), led by the Oxfordshire Sports Partnership Core Team.

Back to Badminton, thame

case Study “We had just started playing again and booking a court on a Sunday evening and playing as a family. We saw the posters for the Active Women Back to Badminton and were really keen to come along and learn some new shots and refresh the scoring. The sessions were really good fun and we really liked the fact that as mother and daughter we could go along to the same session. This really motivated us to keep going and was also the reason we encouraged our friends to come along. It is rare to find a session which we can both take part in. We brought along one of our friends and her daughter who hadn’t played badminton for a long time. They were really nervous at first but came along each week and as a result their game has really improved. We are all still playing badminton once a week and really enjoyed being able to play badminton together.” Amy and Holly, Mother and Daughter

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Sportivate Sportivate forms part of Places People Play, the £135 million mass participation legacy plans unveiled by the Government in November 2010. Sportivate is a four-year programme that captures the excitement of sport and London 2012 to provide attractive and sustainable community opportunities in sport for participants between 14 and 25 year olds. The Oxfordshire programme aims to help young people by removing barriers that might prevent them from taking part in regular sport, keep them involved in their coaching sessions (minimum 85% attendance) and to help them progress beyond sportivate coaching sessions by joining clubs and participating in sport regularly.

Year 1 April 2011 to March 2012 In Year 1 £73,000 in funding was made available by Sport England for Sportivate. As the Oxfordshire programme was one of the top performing schemes nationally, an extra £15,000 was awarded to the Partnership in Year 1. The key performance indicator was to retain young people in the programme, by attending at least 85% of the sessions provided. The retained target in Year 1 was 1088 young people. This target was exceeded. 1585 young people were engaged in the programme in total and 1340 were retained in the programmes, attending at least 85% of the sessions provided.

Sport

No. of Projects

Engaged Participants

Retained Participants

Badminton Basketball Boxing Canoeing Cheerleading Cycling Dance Fencing Football Golf Gym/Fitness Lacrosse Netball Disability Sport Rowing Rugby Union Squash Swimming Table Tennis Tennis Trampolining Volleyball

6 7 1 3 1 6 1 1 10 6 7 6 2 2 1 13 4 1 2 3 1 4

151 167 17 47 9 7 100 9 313 58 111 91 38 19 34 259 31 7 38 20 11 48

112 157 17 47 9 7 75 8 280 50 81 82 30 15 34 227 22 2 24 20 11 30

Total

88

1585

1340

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LAs, NGBs, Further Education Colleges and Higher Education Institutions (FE & HE) and Schools Sports Partnerships (SSPs) all received funding. Between them 88 Sportivate programmes were delivered allowing young people to participate in 22 different sports.

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projects engaging the local community oxford city Street Basketball 3v3 Sportivate recently supported a highly successful basketball project in Oxford. The 3v3 Basketball project came about following discussions between Oxford City Council Sports Development Team and the Oxfordshire Sports Partnership Core Team regarding participation figures for basketball in Oxford. The Sports Development Team utilised local demographic data and the Sport England Market Segmentation tool to develop a project that would have the highest impact in terms of physical numbers playing the sport. However, during initial discussions organisers realised that the target audience could be prevented from taking part due to cost, time, work commitments and limited language skills. With this knowledge, the idea was formed to potentially develop a 3v3 league addressing the above barriers and working in specific areas of the city where there was a large community of people who may be interested in Basketball including; Eastern Europeans and the Chinese and Asian communities. Key partners involved in the project included; Oxford City Council Sports Development Team, Oxford City Council Street Sports Team, England Basketball, Oxford Hoops Basketball Club, Oxfordshire Sports Partnership Core Team. Between them these partners provided coaches, facilities, equipment, finance and experience. The project was set up in Multi Use Games Areas around the city. Research showed that the sport would be best offered as a 3v3 league split into two age groups and offered in 4 areas of the city. Sportivate funding allowed the project to be well marketed which generated a lot of interest. 3v3 Basketball proved to be a great success. Of the audience targeted for the project, 112 signed up to take part. 94 (83%) of the 112 attended 6 out of the 7 coaching sessions provided and the overall attendance for the project was 80%. As a result of the success of Sportivate’s Street Basket ball project, Oxford Hoops Basketball team recruited 50 new players and created 3 new teams.

community – club link oxfordshire touch rugby programme Sportivate has enabled the Oxfordshire Rugby Football Union (ORFU) to work with its member clubs to create a Touch Rugby programme that has assisted the direct development needs of the rugby clubs that have run the project. The RFU carried out an audit of its clubs at the start of 2011 to find out in which specific areas they needed support to develop and grow Touch Rugby within Oxfordshire. Three clubs were keen to work with the Touch programme in year one. These included; Witney RFC (WODC), Oxford RFC (VOHW) and Wallingford RFC (SODC). Each were keen to develop the game for both adult men and women, which offered a chance to boost recruitment of adult women into the game. The Community Rugby Coaches (CRCs) were given responsibility for each of the clubs and were given the job of finding new players from non-rugby backgrounds - a condition of the Sportivate funding. ORFU then worked together with In 2 Touch and GO Active to run and market the Touch Rugby programme. 12


The GO Active programme was a key partner in the project. Its organisers were able to reach out and put us in touch with community groups and local business that the RFU CRC’s would not otherwise have had access to. CRC’s then visited local schools, colleges and businesses within the local community to introduce the project, explain its aims, generate interest and encourage potential players to sign up. ORFU’s County Development team were given the challenge of finding one entire new team per club in Oxfordshire - 18 new teams in total. They achieved full numbers in both Wallingford and Oxford. Player recruitment was lower in Witney, but a different style of pitch up and play worked well. In return for getting involved clubs were offered a bursary to help with the cost of the upkeep of their grounds. Each member of the Touch Rugby programme was awarded a social membership to the club where they were involved, encouraging them to either play or to continue coming to the club as a supporter. Overall the programme proved a great success with each of the 3 clubs recruiting new players and supporters too.

engaging with targeted Groups Freedom Football

Target Group included young people involved in crime or anti social behaviour, needing positive engagement, with an interest in club football and those involved in the Positive Futures project who have competitive football potential. The project achieved its objectives and its key success included engaging a total of 40 young people in competitive football on Saturday evenings. There was a reduction in the amount of anti-social behaviour and vandalism reported whilst the project was taking place. Children and young people’s parents were keen to start local football teams as a result of the success of the projects. And there was also improved integration between local estates.

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The aim of the Freedom Football project was to work with two particular target groups in Oxford City, children under 16 and young people under 19 involved with the Positive Futures, a project that reaches out to young people from deprived areas of the city and gets them involved them in football. The project offers young people a more structured and professional football environment and hopes to encourage them to get involved in competitive football.

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Sporting offer South oxfordshire School Sports partnership (SoSSp) 226 young people have taken part in a programme led by the SOSSP. There were 18 projects in total, which included; Boxing, Canoeing, Cheerleading, Cycling, Dance, Fencing, Golf, Rowing, Squash, Tennis, Yoga and Zumba. Early indications show that 43% of the young people have continued to play sport with a local club or leisure centre. As a result of the project, SOSSP have made strong links with local organisations. They have agreed with them to offer young people activities at reduced rates, putting them on at times to fit the young people’s lifestyles. Clubs involved have also reported that their junior sections are now full as a result of the project.

New provision oxford Brookes University inter-University Sports competitions Oxford Brookes University Sport (OBUS) provides training and organises competitions for British Universities and Colleges Sport (BUCS) athletes. It also has a general sports complex that is open to all students. After discussions with the Core Team, OBUS began using Sportivate funding from the Sports Partnership from September 2011 onwards to introduce sports competitions for all students between university faculties and departments. The Sportivate funding allowed OBUS to set up 9 projects in 8 different sports; Football (11 a-side), Football (5 a-side), Basketball, Netball, Badminton Rugby, Cricket, Cycling and Squash. The cost of the Sportivate sessions to students was £3 each. The competitions ran for six weeks. They then continued on a self-financing basis. Sessions were run by students, often those involved in the BUCS sport teams, who were given free membership as an incentive to support the competitions throughout the year. The projects were marketed in a variety of ways through Freshers Fairs, posters, emails and social media campaigns using Facebook and Twitter. The project proved highly successful. It introduced 9 new informal sports programmes to the University. Its organisers engaged with 500 18-25 year olds and 457 (91.4%) of the those recorded 80% attendance. The project put an increased focus on more casual forms of sport and led to a greater use of the University’s sports facilities.

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Disability participation The annual Active People Survey (APS) which measures the number of people taking part in some form of activity 3 or more times as week, showed that in 2011-2012 the percentage of people with a limiting disability taking part in sport and active recreation increased by 0.4% to 13.7%. Below are examples of successful projects that the core team and partners worked on throughout the year that contributed to this increase: Working to develop disability and inclusive sport sections in sports clubs, e.g. Oxford City Football Club and OXSRAD Boccia Club Ongoing support of Oxfordshire Special Olympics based at OXSRAD but with satellite venues throughout the county Good partnership working with Hinksey Heights Golf Club to promote the All Abilities Golf Day, a disability golf day event that was fully subscribed with 30 people attending.

The successful co–ordination of the 2011 Oxfordshire Playground to Podium programme. The Playground to Podium project led by Sport England (in Partnership with the English Federation of Disability Sport), the Youth Sports Trust and Paralympics GB, saw 48 talented athletes from across the county attend the County Assessment Day held at Iffley Road, Oxford. At the event, coaches identified athletes level of talent and directed them on the correct pathways which were fast-tracking, club or social players. The selected sports for 2011 were Athletics, Football, Table Tennis, Boccia and Wheelchair Basketball. The Parallel Youth Games for secondary aged pupils took place at Black Bird Leys Leisure Centre, Oxford in July 2011. The event saw over 80 pupils with a range of disabilities take part in Tag Rugby, Golf, Boccia, Athletics, Table Cricket and New Age Kurling. Some of those involved were taking part in these activities for the very first time.

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Working with leisure providers through the Fit for All programme to welcome people with disabilities and develop sport opportunities. Partners involved in the two pilot projects included Core Team, Oxfordshire County Council, Oxford City Council, West Oxfordshire District Council, Fusion Lifestyle and Nexus Community. The pilot projects took place at two leisure centres, Windrush Leisure Centre in Witney, West Oxfordshire and Black Bird Leys Leisure Centre in Oxford.

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The core team and partners worked together with the Oxfordshire Learning Disability Partnership through the Fighting Fit Group to stage the “Have A Go” sports day, for adults with learning disabilities. The event was fully inclusive and gave some participants their first experience of running on an athletics track. The event also included Football, Boccia, New Age Kurling and Kwik Cricket. 80 people took part, and planning began for expanding the event for the following year. In addition to the “Have A Go” Sports Day, the Fighting Fit Group promoted opportunities for adults with learning disabilities to play more sport and take part in physical activity. Planning for the Oxfordshire School Games 2012 began in 2011 and encompassed the development of inclusive sport opportunities in Boccia, Goalball and Sitting Volleyball for disabled and non-disabled young people. One of the main aims for the event was to make it as inclusive as possible with non-disabled and disabled young people taking part together in certain sports. A series of Boccia Leaders courses were delivered to train partner staff and volunteers enabling them to run and coach Boccia sessions to participants. Courses were delivered to staff from a range of organisations including day centres, leisure centres and schools, giving people of different ages the opportunity to take up the sport. September saw the launch of “Wheels for All” in the county which is part of a national inclusive cycling for young people and adults. Funding towards this project for disabled young people was received from Oxfordshire County Council from its Aiming High Short Breaks fund.

the “Wheels for All” oxfordshire project

case Study The “Wheels for All” Oxfordshire project is an inclusive cycling project, forming part of the national Wheels for All scheme co-ordinated by the national charity, Cycling Projects. It involved staging a number of open days, giving opportunities for young people and adults from 4 yrs upwards, with a wide range of disabilities, to take part in cycling on adapted bikes in a safe environment. The project included the provision of training for volunteers and enabled the progression of regular sessions that were managed by these newly trained volunteers, as well as the development of a fleet of adapted bikes.

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“lots of different bike s to see. Everyone very helpful, made me determined to ride”

Participant at a taster session “Fantastic opportunity to try all sorts of bikes, my boys really enjoyed it”

testimonials “The Wheels for All project has already proved itself to be one of the most popular and effective health initiatives for people with a learning disability. The taster sessions have been well attended and the bikes were by far and away the most popular activity at the Have A Go Sports Day. The Learning Disabilities Community team physiotherapists have been inundated with requests of further opportunities to ride bikes, be outdoors, meet friends, have fun and to keep fit.” Hans Edwards, Physiotherapist, Ridgeway Partnership

Mother of participant

National Governing Bodies of Sport Support The Sport England Core Offer provides a framework of support by County Sports Partnerships to National Governing Bodies (NGBs) in the delivery of their Whole Sport plans. Oxfordshire Sports Partnership Core Team provides a generic supporting offer to all 46 NGBs and engages and supports those who are focusing on Oxfordshire as an area for development. In 2011-12, working relationships were put in place with 28 NGBs that were ready to network locally with connections made with another 6.

Some examples include: ▼ Delivery of the Oxfordshire Sports Partnership’s Active Women project with Athletics, Badminton, Netball, Football, Gymnastics, Tennis Rugby and Cricket

▼ Core Team helping to promote NGB products and enabling local connections across the county, e.g. Rush Hockey

▼ Promotion of activities and events including “No Strings” Badminton, Canoe trails and the “Back to” schemes such as Netball

▼ Support to local infrastructure (Archery) through helping to set up clubs and Development Groups

▼ Networking for new sports such as Baseball and Lacrosse, enabling the brokering of relationships and making introductions

▼ The Sport Group is a forum that allows the targeting of certain agreed work areas and the sharing of good practice. 4 events were held during 2011/12, with 28 NGBs attending at least one event.

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▼ Support to local development groups such as Athletics, Cycling,

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NGB highlights ▼ ▼ ▼ ▼ ▼

Recognised Models of Good Practice The Archery Development Group Blackbird Leys “No Strings” Badminton programmes Brookes Intramural Sports scheme Oxfordshire Athletics Network

▼ Regional and national Awards for coaching awarded to Jock Murray, Alan Vincent, Ian Warland, Franky Marulanda.

Sport Forums Two Sports Partnership Forums were held in 2011/12. Both aimed to provide opportunities for partner and stakeholder learning, sharing good practice, networking and influencing the future priorities of the Partnership. The May 2011 Forum at Oxford Town Hall aimed to look at the changes that are happening in the sports and physical activity landscape and key note speakers included: Hannah Bladen, Sport England Regional Lead; Simon Kearey, Head of Strategy and Transformation, Social and Community Services, Oxfordshire County Council and Sports Board Member.

Topics included:

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NHS and Health update ‘In it for the Long Run’ toolkit - what it is and how it could be of benefit? 2012 - sharing what is going on and opportunities for joint working ‘Places People Play’ and Sportivate within Oxfordshire Strategic Commissioning – its introduction and its increasing importance Maximising benefits in a partnership - via collaborative planning Adult participation - growing participation in sport Developing quality volunteers.

The December 2011 Forum was held at Chinnor Rugby Club with Key Note Speaker: Dr Len Almond - Visiting Professor at the Centre for Workplace Health at St. Mary's University College in London. He is also the Foundation Director of the BHF National Centre for Physical Activity and Health.

Topics included:

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Updates from Physical Activity and Sports sectors National Physical Activity guidelines Oxfordshire’s Physical Activity Offer Sport England update from Andrew Hanson, Strategic Lead, Sport England Culture and Sport Improvement Toolkit School Games update and looking at 2013 Planning workshop.


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[ Operations ] Supporting the development of excellent operations Safeguarding planning for Safeguarding event “crossing the line” Planning began in March 2012 to organise a Safeguarding event in partnership with the Oxfordshire Safeguarding Children Board (OSCB). The event is to involve the Geese Theatre Company to perform “Crossing the Line”, a powerful and interactive performance which explores safeguarding issues in a sporting context. The plan for the performance is to involve the audience in a learning style event that considers a range of issues including; the way in which perpetrators of abuse can use sport to groom potential victims; the role of the welfare officer; whistleblowing; the impact of abuse on the individual and the benefits of a pro-active rather than reactive approach to safeguarding.

oxfordshire Sports Awards 2011 – raising the profile of sport in oxfordshire The Oxfordshire Sports Awards 2011 continued to honour the sporting best in Oxfordshire and to raise the profile of sport and physical activity. The much anticipated award ceremony, now in its 6th year, took place at the Kassam Stadium, Oxford on Friday 9th December. The event was attended by some of Oxfordshire’s finest sporting talent, local dignitaries, Oxfordshire Sports Partnership partners, local clubs and the media. The Oxfordshire Sports Partnership Core Team has organised and managed the Oxfordshire Sports Awards for the last 6 years. The event grows year on year, with more people attending, increasing numbers of nominations and greater coverage of the awards in the media. The strong partnership with local media has continued again this year, with Oxford Mail and BBC Oxford committing and supporting the awards from the planning stage through to the big night. BBC Oxford’s presenters, Jerome Sale, Brennan Nicholls and Jo Thoenes built up the excitement on the night, presenting the glamorous awards ceremony and announcing the winners. The Oxfordshire Sports Awards are one of Oxfordshire Sports Partnership’s flagship events that help to raise the profile of sport and physical activity in Oxfordshire. They also play a part in ensuring that very deserving sporting individuals, clubs, teams and unsung heroes are recognised for their achievements and commitment to the sports they love. We receive overwhelming valuable support each year from sponsors which enables the event to take place. 20


Active Inspiration Award, sponsored by GO Active & Active Women Jacob Ibbotson Club of the Year, sponsored by Oxford City Council Abingdon Vale Swimming Club Coach of the Year, sponsored by The Community Arena at Oxford City FC Scott Farnell, Abingdon Vale Swimming Club Junior Sports Team of the year, sponsored by BRITA Henley U16s Rowing Team Sports Team of the Year, sponsored by BRITA Shipton-under-Wychwood Cricket Team

2011

2011 oxfordshire Sports Awards Winners:

Young Volunteer, sponsored by Reside in Oxford Rhiann Todd, Freeland Cricket Club

Junior Sportsperson of the Year, sponsored by Nexus Community Hollie Roberts Disabled Sportsperson of the Year, sponsored by Parkwood Andrew Gardiner Sportsman of the Year, sponsored by Fusion Lifestyle John Paul, Track Cycling Sportswoman of the Year, sponsored by Oxford Brookes University Sports Department Hannah England, Athletics

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Unsung Hero, sponsored by Fullflight Franky Marulanda, Oxford Hoops Basketball Club

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oxfordshire physical Activity plan Since 2009 the Sports Partnership has also been the Strategic Partnership for physical activity within the county. The Oxfordshire Physical Activity Group, chaired by the Oxfordshire NHS, continued to meet throughout 2011-12 to provide strategic co-ordination for the development of physical activity in Oxfordshire. This year the group played a key role in advocating for the inclusion of physical activity within the new Oxfordshire Health and Wellbeing Board’s priorities and targets for 2012-13. The group continues to focus on increasing physical activity levels in the least active and in children and young people. Key members of the group are; GLL and Fusion Lifestyle, Oxfordshire County Council, Oxfordshire NHS, the Oxfordshire Play Association, Age UK and Oxfordshire’s district Local Authorities.

Volunteering Part of the work of the Partnership is to recruit volunteers to support the activities of sports clubs, organisations and events across the county as well as supporting and encouraging people to lead sport and physical activity informally in their communities. Oxfordshire Archery Coaching and Development Group The Oxfordshire Archery Development Group was instigated by the core team. The group has an open invitation to all clubs and individuals wishing to develop Archery in Oxfordshire. During 2011-12 the group has achieved a number of successes through working in partnership. These include:

▼ A record turnout at the county championships, attended by archers from all six Oxfordshire clubs, including RAF Brize Norton, thanks to better promotion and the involvement of previously distant clubs in the Development Group

▼ An indoor league has been set up to encourage new archers to try out the sport. This has resulted in new people taking out Archery GB membership so they can take part

▼ A new club was formed and supported in Banbury. All courses for both adults and juniors fully subscribed ▼ A successful proficiency scheme, which enables participants with different bow types to compare themselves against others, was developed by one club and shared with others

▼ The group put in a joint bid to host the Archery GB Series Grand Final in the centre of Oxford in 2012 with beginner “Have a Go’s” staffed by archers from across the clubs involved in the Development Group

▼ New School Club Links exploration began with schools in Oxford to provide winter indoor facilities in return for coaching. Oxfordshire now has a constituted group to handle coaching where previously it relied on Berkshire. It has already doubled the number of qualified coaches in the county. At the 2011 Archery GB conference, the Oxfordshire Coaching and Development Group were presented with the ontarget Partnership Award. Jock Murray, chair of Oxford Archers, received the ontarget Volunteer of the Year for all his work in coaching and supporting newly formed club, Banbury Cross Archers. Jock was nominated by the committee of Banbury Cross Archers who have been established for less than a year. In that time the club grew to 55 members of which 30 were new to Archery. The club then received a £7,500 grant from Sport England Small Grants and is set to grow further with over 40 people on a waiting list for beginners courses. 22


Sport Makers Oxfordshire Sports Partnership leads the way for Olympic Legacy Project, Sport Makers Sport Makers was launched by Sport England in the summer of 2011 as a key part of its Olympic legacy plans, Places, People, Play. Oxfordshire Sports Partnership took on the role of Lead CSP for the South East and led the way by organising the first of nine national pilots. Sport Makers workshops, sessions were facilitated at the Kassam Stadium, one of Oxfordshire’s iconic sporting venues. Olympic Gold medallist Ben Hunt-Davies joined the launch event as an inspirational ambassador to help inspire participants to give 10 hours of their time to help make sport happen, whether in a club, at an event or completely informally. The successful event was attended by 40 participants. Opportunities to volunteer in sport were promoted at the event and representatives were on hand to talk directly with potential volunteers from GO Active, England Squash and the Blenheim Half Marathon. At the Oxfordshire launch event, all participants were asked to complete a pledge card with what they intended to do following the completion of the workshop. The pledge cards proved a useful resource and were then introduced as a key part of all future workshops nationally. Early 2012 saw the Sport Makers project finding it’s feet and establishing a solid foundation from which a concerted campaign could be launched in the months leading up to the London 2012 Olympics. The Partnership tested various ways of delivering the project to reach new audiences. The first national case study of a Sport Maker attending a workshop and going on to make sport happen in their community came from Dan Gee who was supported by GO Active in Oxford to set up a regular tennis group in Headington. Oxfordshire also provided an example of good practice in partnership working through their work with Run England. To launch Run England Oxfordshire, Sport Makers and GO Active teamed up to organise a Sport Makers workshop that was targeted at those interested in promoting running. It was promoted through existing networks, the Sport Makers website and advertised in Oxfordshire newspapers. The workshop involved a good mix of existing jog leaders and people interested in leading future groups.

Dan Gee approached GO Active with an interest in finding people to play tennis with on the courts in Bury Knowle Park, Headington. He had played tennis when he was younger but had given up. He wanted to start again to help him get fitter. Dan was invited to attend a Sport Makers workshop organised by the Oxfordshire Sports Partnership at The Oxford Academy. The workshop helped Dan to identify how best to promote his activity. As part of the wider Olympic Legacy, it made Dan committed to making it work and a long term project. The tennis sessions Dan started quickly grew from a couple of people turning up each, to closer to 16, meaning that all four courts were in use. Dan’s story has also been an inspiration to others with. A video was made of Dan and his group which was put on the Sportmakers website and used to promote the programme nationally. The video has also been played at many other workshops in Oxfordshire to show other participants what Sport Makers is about.

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case Study

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[ People ] Supporting the development of the Oxfordshire workforce targeted Development of coaches The Partnership has established links with Oxford Brookes University through which it is adding value to degree studies by developing vocational and work placement opportunities for sport and coaching study students. Placements were also brokered with clubs and LA sports development teams and Mentor Training was delivered to 18 placement hosts. Targeted Development of Coaches The Partnership again facilitated the organisation of an NGB led Coaching Conference 109 Coaches attended the conference altogether 85% of attendees rated the quality of tutors as ‘very good’ 100% rated their overall satisfaction with the conference as ‘good’ or ‘very good’ 76% said they would come again next year 97% said they would recommend it to a friend. A key feature to the success of the Conference was the Coaching Lead role in brokering relationships, bringing partners together and creating "buy-in" from all involved. The Conference was a great example of what can be achieved through partnership working. Coach Manager Training was provided for 17 partners during 2011/12. Four editions of Coaching Matters (online coaching newsletter) were produced during the year for the Partnership’s database of 1,100 coaches.

Stakeholder Survey results 2011 100% of partners were satisfied or very satisfied with the Oxfordshire Sports Partnership for:

▼ Promoting local funding sources and providing advice and support including Sport England Lottery Funding opportunities

▼ Enabling partners to share information and knowledge through meetings, workshops and electronically through the Partner Portal

▼ Developing links between sport and physical activity with health partners ▼ Providing wider support for clubs & volunteers 97% of partners were satisfied or very satisfied with the Oxfordshire Sports Partnership for:

▼ Level of support provided ▼ Professionalism and helpfulness of staff

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95% of partners were satisfied or very satisfied with the following:

▼ Satisfaction with the Core Team of the Oxfordshire Sports Partnership ▼ Co-ordinating and promoting coach and volunteer development opportunities 93% of partners were satisfied or very satisfied with the Oxfordshire Sports Partnership for:

▼ Providing a lead role for sport and physical activity in Oxfordshire ▼ Adding value to the services that you provide Priorities for partners coming into 2012 include:

▼ Increasing Participation in Adult Sport ▼ Maximising the legacy of London 2012 ▼ Sustainability of projects / sports development ▼ School Games ▼ Coach/ Volunteer Development ▼ Building Partnerships and improving links with health sector, local clubs and NGBs ▼ Club development Challenges being faced by partners included:

▼ Funding and sustainability of projects ▼ Marketing brand and products ▼ Brokering relationships with local partners And finally opportunities for partners in 2012 included:

▼ Potential links with health and ▼ Supporting NGBs and promoting new products

▼ Coach Development

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physical activity

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in the Zone In the Zone is Oxfordshire’s Education for Sport and Physical Activity directory. From April 2011 to March 2012 the Oxfordshire Sports Partnership ran 60 workshops as part of the In the Zone programme.

Workshops Total Number of Learning Opportunities 60 workshops were run as part of the programme and 810 places were sold to a total of 602 coaches. Safeguarding and Protecting Children and First Aid form the basis of our programme as they are minimum standards of deployment for most coaches. The Partnership ran 17 Safeguarding and 21 First Aid workshops. 21 other workshops took place which included workshops specifically for coaches and also for clubs. There were also more general workshops aimed at all those working in sport and physical activity such as Business and Marketing Essentials plus specific workshops such as Boccia Leaders and Wheels for All training.

Workshops by District In the Zone aims to provide an equal spread of learning opportunities across the county. In 2011/12 the breakdown of workshops by district was relatively even. West Oxfordshire has a higher percentage than expected as the figures include the workshops from the coaching conference that took place at Cokethorpe School, Witney. Understandably, Oxford also had a high percentage of workshops as it is the most central part of the county. A workshop was also organised for an NGB in Berkshire.

club workshops It was our aim after 2010/11 to run more workshops that were specifically aimed at clubs and would support their development. We ran 4 workshops in 2011/2 for this purpose, including 2 funding related workshops. The main success was the Sport England Small Grants workshop which was very well attended and has led to 3 clubs submitting applications for funding. We are running 2 further club workshops which fall in 2012/13 which include; Developing Partnerships with Clubs and Schools and Right People, Strong Club and Making the Most of Volunteers.

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Workshop

Type

Location

District

No. attended % full

DNA

Small Grants

Open

Abingdon

Vale

19

95

0

Funding for your Club

Open

Thame

South

13

65

1

Community Amateur

Open

Abingdon

Vale

8

40

2

Closed

Thame

South

14

70

0

54

Ave.

3

Sports Clubs Asset Transfers

67.5

coach Workshops

Workshop

Type

District

No. attended % full

DNA

Sports Nutrition

Open

Oxford

16

80

3

Guide to Mentoring Sports Coaches

Open

Oxford

15

75

1

How to Coach Disabled People in Sport

Open

West

15

75

0

FUNdamentals Taster

Open

Oxford

6

30

0

Coach Mentoring

Open

West

18

Biomechanics

Open

West

18

“Possession for the Modern Game” “Linking the way children ‘play’ to their development in football”

Open

West

24

Essential Movement Skills for Netball

Open

West

12

Rugby Ready

Open

West

21

Teaching Games for Understanding

Open

West

24

Speed Agility and Quickness

Open

West

25

Football

195

Ave. 65 4

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In 2011/12 we ran the following workshops for coaches:

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open and closed Workshops Two types of workshops, open and closed, were offered. Open workshops are open to all members of the public with no restrictions. Closed workshops are offered where a club, NGB or county association want to organise a workshop for their members. It allows the organisation to host the workshop in a convenient location and tailor the content to suit their audience. It is also a more cost-effective way of training coaches and volunteers and the savings made can be passed on to the delegates. The majority of workshops that were organised in 2011/12 were open. Cricket clubs and the Oxfordshire Cricket Board have benefited greatly from this process and have provided Safeguarding and First Aid training for over 110 coaches and volunteers during 2011/12.

District The delegates were located mostly in Cherwell and South Oxfordshire. There were half the number of delegates from Oxford, Vale and West.

Local Authorities

Sport The majority of delegates were from cricket and rugby closely followed by football, swimming, hockey and netball.

No. of Delegates

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[ Investment ] Sufficient resouces to support partners

The Partnership produced the following chart for the Oxfordshire Chief Leisure Officer meeting on the funding secured by the Partnership for Local Authorities. Explanations for the funding split was discussed, for example each Local Authority secured what it had requested from the Sportivate fund. Additional funding was also secured for the wider variety of partners.

Funding

Cherwell Oxford West South Vale Countywide

Sportivate

GO Active

Active Women

Community Coaches

Sport Unlimited

TOTALS

13994 10666 0 11841 0 7440

46758 19375 83183 25800 48237 5000

15434 19123 0 3832 6669 3000

0 0 0 3750 1250 0

11168 0 0 0 0 0

87354 49164 83183 45223 56156 15440 336520

Website – google analytics

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18,388 people visited the Sport Partnership’s main website in 2011/12, compared to 14,773 in 2010/11     30  




2011-12 Accounts Income Sport England funding

Project and capacity funding

609343

Other

Partners funding

188380

Fees/sponsorship

In the Zone/Sports Awards etc

42200

TOTAL INCOME

839923

Salaries

Total salaries/training/transport

361745

Services

Hosting and accommodation

32995

General services

59860

Partner funding

375207

TOTAL EXPENDITURE

829807

Carry Forward

10116

Contributions

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Expenditure

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[oxfordshire Sports Partnership] The Board...

The Oxfordshire Sports Board meets 4 times a year under the Independent Chairmanship of Mike Walker. The Board’s purpose is to provide strategic direction for joint working within the county and to agree monitor and review strategic plans, policies and budgets.

Board’s role Leadership – inspire partners and provide clear direction Advocacy – champion the benefits of sport and the role of the Partnership Influence – represent Oxfordshire’s interests at regional and national levels Strategic Direction - develop the Partnership’s strategy and business plan Delivery – agree the Partnership’s plans and policies and monitor progress and impact Governance – ensure the Partnership and Board operates to the highest standards Partnership working – maintain high levels of partner commitment and satisfaction Financial – monitor progress and agree strategic priorities for funding. Promoting and protecting the Partnership’s position – values, integrity, image and reputation

Good Governance Standard The Board has adopted the Voluntary Code of Good Governance for the Sport and Recreation Sector which has been produced by the Sport and Recreation Alliance. It also self assesses against the Code criteria each year. Board members are non-executive and are expected to act in the best interests of the Partnership (not their respective organisation) and have a 2 year period of office which can be extended by Board approval. In line with good governance and Sport England funding conditions, there is no one sector that controls the Board. An effective mix of Members are recruited for their skills and representation from key sectors, which include Clubs, Health, Education, and the ability to influence.

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Board Member profiles for 2011-12 Oxfordshire Sports Board - Member profiles

Ian Pickford- Vice Chairman Previous career teaching PE and currently Director of Mazars (5th largest firm of accountants in UK) responsible for sales, training, recruitment and product development. Chairman of Oxford Cricket Club, the largest cricket club in Oxfordshire. Kevin Robinson Managing partner Robin Oxford International wines. 12 years Chairman of Chinnor Rugby Club, 2 years President Oxfordshire RFU and presently Chairman of Oxfordshire Rugby Partnership. Level 3 Rugby Coach and County Welfare Manager. Chris Ellis Development Manager for the Youth Sport Trust. Previously Chris worked in Local Authority Sports Development Councillor Bill Service A keen ex-rugby player Bill is a County Councillor, District Councillor for South Oxfordshire and a Town Councillor. He is also the Portfolio Holder for Leisure at South Oxfordshire District Council Councillor Nicholas Turner Lived in Banbury for over 40 years, educated at Cheltenham College. Now runs the family farm and golf centre on the outskirts of Banbury. Following in his father's footsteps on the County Council, also on Banbury Town and Cherwell District Councils. Played rugby for Oxfordshire. Past Chairman of the Banbury National Farmers' Union.

Chris Tyson Presently Head of Economy, Leisure and Property at Vale of White Horse District Councils and South Oxfordshire District Councils. Jon Roycroft Director of Sport at Oxford University. Angela Baker Angela is a Consultant in Public Health, Prevention & Protection for NHS Buckinghamshire & Oxfordshire Cluster. Jessica Cook Jessica is the Regional Manager for the English Federation of Disability Sport. She is a keen swimmer and has progressed to be an international paralympian. Claire Furlong Claire is presently Head of Communications at UK Athletics and has previously been a journalist as well as previously Head of Media for the English Institute of Sport. Ian Brooke Ian is Head of Service for City Leisure (Sport, leisure, Parks & Open Spaces) at Oxford City Council. A keen triathelete Simon Kearey Simon is a Level 2 Football Coach and Head of Strategy and Transformation at Oxfordshire County Council. Previously Senior Manager at the BBC and Epson. Colin Taylor Managing Director of Oxford City Football Club. Passionate about disability sport through an involvement with OXSRAD

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Chairman: Mike Walker Mike Walker directs the Win Tennis Academies throughout the UK & Europe. Mike has worked very closely for many years with the LTA, Sport England, The English Institute of Sport, The British Olympic Association and The International Tennis Federation. Mike is a former world ranked player and former LTA National Training Senior Manager. He has trained more than 100 world ranked tennis players and is a television commentator for Asian TV & Sky Sports

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[oxfordshire Sports Partnership] The Core Team

Chris Freeman, Managing Director

Steve Kemp, Sports Development Manager

Chris started his Managing Director role with the Oxfordshire Sports Partnership in 2006 after being seconded from Cherwell District Council. His role involves developing and managing the Partnership's strategy, performance framework, governance structure, partnerships, finance, projects and overall management of the core team. His interests include reading autobiographies, gardening and golf.

Steve is the Sports Development Manager for the Core Team. His areas of personal interest are club and coach development. Development is a complex issue, with many different and sometimes contentious definitions. Steve’s particular interest focuses on each area of human development. Development, therefore, is empowerment and he believes it is about local people taking control of their own lives, expressing their own demands and finding their own solutions to their problems.

Toni Flanders, Active Recreation Manager After graduating from Brighton University with a Sports Science degree, Toni started her career working in public relations and marketing communications for organisations in the health industry. After various roles in this industry and a career break to travel, Toni worked at Rushcliffe Primary Care Trust in Nottingham where she worked in public health evaluating the districts exercise referral scheme. After setting up various health and physical activity projects while at Broxtowe Borough Council in Nottingham, she moved to the Oxfordshire Sports Partnership as Active Recreation Manager. Her current role includes managing the GO Active and Active Women projects, overseeing disability sport and coordinating the Oxfordshire Physical Activity Group. Michelle Oxley, Development Manager, Marketing and Administration After graduating from Swansea University with a degree in Social Anthropology and Sociology, Michelle began her career in television as a researcher before moving into the Publishing industry where she worked in events and marketing, including the organisation of award shows and then later on producing European conferences, forums and seminars. She relocated to Oxfordshire to join the Oxfordshire Sports Partnership Core Team in October 2006 as Development Manager – Marketing and Administration. Michelle undertook postgraduate studies and gained the CIM Professional Diploma in Marketing during her time in this role.

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She returned from maternity leave in 2011 and now works part-time. Her current role includes strategic marketing and communications, media, overseeing business administration and finance and line-management responsibilities and support to the Sports and Finance Administrator.

His main works areas include; providing support to NGBs to connect to local networks for the delivery of their Whole Sport Plans, leading delivery of the Places People Place Legacy project, Sportivate. His line-management responsibilities include supporting the Coaching Development Officer and Sports Development Officer within the Core Team. He is also Lead Safeguarding Officer for the Oxfordshire Sports Partnership. Denise Brown, Coaching Development Officer Denise Brown is the Coaching Development Officer for the Core Team. She has been involved in sports coaching and teaching throughout her career, working initially as a PE teacher and then as a Development Officer for Ulster Squash in Northern Ireland. She joined the Core Team in 2006 as a Workforce Development Officer and is now the Partnership’s Coaching Development Officer. Denise is responsible for; coordinating and managing the Coaching Systems Support Network (CSSN) on behalf the Partnership’s stakeholders; leading on the organisation of the Partnership’s annual coaching conference; is responsible for supporting an increase in the number of qualified coaches within the Partnership (based on the workforce development needs of NGBs), for increasing the number of NGB active coaches accessing needs led CPD opportuities (in line with NGB plans and Sport England’s objectives) and for establishing a Support Network for coaches within Oxfordshire Sports Partnership, and to provide a “commuity of learning”.


Lucy joined the core team in 2006 and in her current role as Disability and Inclusive Sports Development Officer she works to increase participation rates amongst people with disabilities. She returned from maternity leave in October and her role includes promoting and enhancing existing opportunities as well as developing new ones with partners such as the newly formed Wheels for All Inclusive Cycling project. Lucy particularly enjoys the wide ranging nature of the role, developing relationships with partners from the disability, sport and physical activity sectors. As well as this she likes seeing the positive impact sport has on people’s lives. James Craggs, Disability and Inclusive Sports Development Officer (maternity cover) and Active Recreation Officer James has been employed in two roles within the Core Team. He originally joined in December 2010 providing maternity cover in the Disability and Inclusive Sports Development Officer role. Following the Disability and Inclusive Sports Development Officer’s return, James became the Active Recreation Officer in the Core Team. In that role he project-managed the first Oxfordshire School Games festival, which included event managing the two day county final, as well as playing a leading role in developing the sub-committees which supported the event. He also supported the Active Women project through central marketing and the co-ordination of county events. He was also a member of the Physical Activity group, supporting meetings and promoting news from the physical activity sector. Zoe O’Neill, Sports and Finance Administrator Having spent 10 years working within the NHS in the Medical Personnel field, Zoe joined the Oxfordshire Sports Partnership in 2009 as the Core Team’s Sports & Finance Administrator. Her areas of expertise include; finance, budget sheets, workshop bookings and supporting the Core Team with individual projects. In her role as Sports and Finance Administator, Zoe is responsible for; supporting the team with the In the Zone: Coach Education Programme, for managing

administration of the Partnership’s finances - dealing with Oxford City Council’s accounts department, processing invoices and purchase orders, and for project managing and running the Partnership’s prestigious annual Oxfordshire Sports Awards. Tristan Hale, Sports Development Officer Tristan graduated with a degree in Mathematics before going on to complete his MSc in Sport Management. He brings experience with technical systems to the team. His main area of interest is the management of volunteers in sport and his role includes providing advice and support to clubs, organisations and events. He is also responsible for the management of the Sport Makers project in Oxfordshire. Tristan has extensive experience with Fencing as a coach, referee and administrator and is also responsible for liaison with Archery. Graham Hurst, Sports Project Officer Graham joined the Core Team as Sports Project Officer. His role includes using the power of sport in helping people and developing local communities. Prior to coming to Oxfordshire he spent a significant time overseas and in particular India. He recently spent time in Africa as a volunteer with Cricket Without Boundaries, a world leading Cricket Development and AIDS awareness charity. He was also involved in various informal sporting activities such as Badminton and Tennis and is keen to try new sports such as Rush Hockey. His main work areas include; support to clubs to access funding for their development work, leading on In the Zone Club and Coach Education Programme, data analysis to provide insight to partners on delivery and development areas, providing website and communications support to core team members and Deputy Lead Safeguarding Officer for the Oxfordshire Sports Partnership.

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Lucy Tappin, Disability and Inclusive Sports Development Officer

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oxfordshire Sports partnership partners and Stakeholders Age UK

Oxfordshire Community and Voluntary Action

Active Nation

Oxfordshire Cricket Board

Amateur Boxing Association of England

Oxfordshire Football Association

Amateur Swimming Association

Oxfordshire Lawn Tennis Association

Angling Development Board

Oxfordshire NHS

Archery GB

Oxfordshire Partnership

Badminton England

Oxforshire Play Association

Baseball and Softball UK

Oxfordshire Playing Fields Association

Berks, Bucks, Oxon Golf Partnership

Oxfordshire Rugby Football Union

British Cycling Federation

Oxfordshire's Sports Clubs

British Equestrian Federation

OXSRAD

British Fencing

Parkwood Community Leisure

British Gymnastics

Ridgeway Partnership

British Judo Association

Rounders England

British Orientation Federation

Royal Yachting Association

British Rowing

Rugby Football League

British Triathlon

Rugby Football Union

British Canoe Union

SEEDA

Cherwell District Council

Skills Active

CSPN

SOLL Leisure

England Athletics

South Oxfordshire District Council

England Basketball

South Oxfordshire School Sports Partnership

England Golf Union

Sport England

England Hockey Association

Sportscoach UK

England Netball

The Golf Foundation

England Squash and Racketball

Vale of White Horse District Council

England Table Tennis Association

Vale PE and School Sports Partnership

English Federation of Disability Sport

West Oxfordshire District Council

English Lacrosse

West Oxfordshire School Sports Partnership

Football Association

Youth Sport Trust

Fusion Lifestyle GLL Health and Well-Being Partnership Henley College Lawn Tennis Association North Oxfordshire School Sports Partnership Oxford and Cherwell College Oxford and Thame School Sports Partnership Oxford Athletic Network

Bury Knowle House I Bury Knowle Park

Oxford Brookes University

North Place I Headington I Oxford I OX3 9HY

Oxford City Council

Tel: 01865 252 676 I Fax: 01865 761 251

Oxford University

Email: info@oxfordshiresport.org

Oxfordshire Badminton Association

www.oxfordshiresport.org

Oxfordshire County Council

Twitter @oxsport


Oxfordshire Sports Partnership Annual Report 2011/12