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{ owensboro parent . november 2011 }

Publisher/Designer Jason Tanner jason@owensboroparent.com Editor Ashley Sorce

from the editor I can’t cook.

ashley@owensboroparent.com Sales Director Jonathan Tanner jonathan@owensboroparent.com Distribution Manager Robert Williams robert@owensboroparent.com

A lot of people will tell you they can’t cook. But their culinary skills are Iron Chef worthy, compared to my lackluster attempts in the kitchen. My noteworthy experiences with food include microwaving a metal pot, using olive oil instead of vegetable oil in a batch of brownies that I took to a potluck, mistaking a bottle of vinegar for oil to deep fry, and, my husband’s favorite, catching a side dish of carrots on fire. Who knew carrots were combustible?

Account Executives Jodi Tanner jodi@owensboroparent.com Jeff Sorce jeff@owensboroparent.com Contributors Christina Dalton Dean Ehrenheim

There’s no wonder why my family doesn’t allow me near Thanksgiving dinner. So our holiday meal is up to my husband, Jeff. He does it all—roasts a delicious turkey, makes creamy mashed potatoes, yummy vegetables… the entire feast.

Dr. Brian Gannon Libby Johnson Jaime Rafferty Jessica Weafer Matt Weafer Lora Wimsatt

Jeff, knowing how much I want to help with the big dinner, puts me in charge of one menu item: the cranberry sauce. Some may say it is the most forgettable item on the Thanksgiving dinner table, but for me, the cranberry sauce is the highlight of my day. I slave all day over my one contribution. I even give my family two options: a sauce made with fresh cranberries and the canned stuff for those traditionalists. This Thanksgiving will not be different than any other. Jeff will cook the entire meal, while I slave over one pot of berries. But all of our hard work seems worth it once our family gathers around the Thanksgiving table.

Contact Information Owensboro Parent Magazine PO Box 23237 Owensboro, KY 42304 (270) 314-5240 www.owensboroparent.com facebook.com/owensboroparent twitter.com/owensboroparent issuu.com/owensboroparent Cover Photography

We have a lot to be thankful for this year— our daughter, Avery, being our most blessed gift. This Thanksgiving season, I hope you look around the table and count your many blessings. Relish in the time with family and friends. Give thanks for all that 2011 has brought you. But most of all, enjoy the cranberry sauce.

Dream Copy Photography www.dreamcopyphoto.com Advertise Owensboro Parent is a FREE magazine because of community support.

Happy Turkey Day! Always,

Thank you to the great group of businesses & organizations who advertise with us. If you want to contribute to the

Editor, Owensboro Parent Magazine ashley@owensboroparent.com

success of our magazine, we would love to hear from you and will work to develop an advertising partnership that will not only benefit you, but also the parents of Owensboro.

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parent talk 7 these people, your family 8 holiday hidden dangers 10

18

4 steps to responsibility 13 so i went to college 15 advice from an ordinary dad 16 lucky number three 18 facebook photos 20 a mother’s battle of autism 22 cranberry sausage stuffing 24 thanksgiving dinner tips 25 building a future 26 make an oreo turkey cookie 29 november calendar 30

november features

20

10 26

8

29

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{ from our readers }

parent talk Our readers shared their favorite Thanksgiving memories on Facebook. These were the three that our fans liked most: On Thanksgiving morning, my husband, our eight children and I put our handprints on a “give thanks” tablecloth. Beside each handprint we write our name and what we are thankful for that year. This is by far one of our favorite holiday traditions. Our tablecloth is filling up fast. We are going to have to add to it very soon. We love comparing handprints and seeing how we grow in size and how our children change what they are thankful for as they get older. -

P.J. Meriwether Emmick

I will never forget my first Thanksgiving spent at my future in-law’s house. Most boyfriends and girlfriends can be nervous to encroach on family gatherings of their significant other, and I was already a little shy and reserved. When we sat down at the table and began prayer, my chair collapsed under me, breaking into pieces as I went tumbling to the floor. I laughed, but no one else really did. Turns out they just didn’t want to embarrass me. Now, eight years later, it is an annual story it seems. And now we have three little ones, who sit at that same table.

- Malena Gardner DeJarnette

I come from a family of 13. I started dating my now husband, Billy, not too long before Thanksgiving. I had spoken to Billy about my huge family before, but we had not all been together since he and I had met. He did not hesitate accepting my invitation to our family Thanksgiving that year. I always get to my parents house early to help prepare the meal. Billy and my father sat and talked while mom and I stirred around in the kitchen. Eventually, some of my family members started coming in with their spouses. Then another and another, then their children, their children’s children and some of their children’s, children’s children. I couldn’t even see my boyfriend anymore. Before long there was 60 or more people in my parent’s home. (You have to remember that Billy didn’t know these people.) Once dinner was ready to be served, I finally found a very stunned and nervous boyfriend in one of the corner chairs. I realized that if he had not snuck out the door by now, he wasn’t going anywhere. The very next Thanksgiving, guess who was in mom’s kitchen, cooking the turkey? Billy!

- Lesha Embrey

Owensboro Parent strives to be an essential companion for parents in Owensboro.

Learn more online: www.owensboroparent.com

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these people, your family

Thanksgiving brings families together.

{ by: lora wimsatt }

T

he huffiness has finally subsided following the conversations

a tattoo peeking out from under his sleeve?

– discussions? debates? Well, maybe “arguments” is the

You sure hope Grandma doesn’t see that, but she’s too busy

right word after all – about who would host the family gathering

noticing that the antique gravy boat has been chipped since last

this year.

year. Just when she had almost gotten over the fact that the lid to

the sugar bowl had been glued back together …

And now you look around and wonder if it was worth it.

Worth standing on the least-wobbly chair to get the good dishes

off the top shelf of the cabinet. Worth washing and pressing a real

are instead huddled over the sales flyers from the newspaper.

cloth tablecloth – the old one, the one Grandmother used to use.

Your tech-savvy big sis brought her latest techno-gadget and is

Worth scrubbing two bathrooms, vacuuming the whole house and

scouring Black Friday websites in one window, while in another,

raking leaves from the yard.

she creates a master schedule that would rival that of D-Day for

the big shopping trip to start at 0400 hours. At the moment, there

And Thanksgiving is expensive. Of course, turkey is on sale

Your sisters – who had promised to help in the kitchen –

– cheap – but that’s just to lure you in to buy the potatoes and

is much chattering about how they can divide and conquer to

green beans (don’t forget those crispy little onion things). You

take best advantage of the “early bird specials.”

hesitated at the frozen food department; would anyone really care

if the pumpkin pie wasn’t “from scratch”?

not necessarily a fraternal one.

And that doesn’t count the new seasonal potholders and dish

The men are circled around the TV, but even this cluster is Apparently some have not forgotten or forgiven Aaron

towels, or the cinnamon-scented air freshener that you can only

Rodgers’ concussion from last year. Tensions are high, and you

hope is stronger than the litter box and your son’s gym shoes.

are glad you decided not to prepare a cheese tray for the guys to

But now Thanksgiving is here.

enjoy as a pre-meal snack. That might have been like throwing a

And you look around.

can of gasoline on a fire.

Your teenaged nephew is slouched in the corner, sullen and

The twins are chasing the cat through a forest of adult legs.

silent, thumbs flying furiously as he texts his friends, no doubt

The toddlers are momentarily corralled in the play pen, but it’s

trading “my fam is so lame im booored!” messages. And – is that

nap time for one, play time for another, and tears are imminent.

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The new mother is nervously hovering over her baby

as he is passed from relative to relative, trying in vain to prepare the way with squirts of hand sanitizer. One of the uncles protests loudly that “a little dirt is good for kids.” You cringe and look away; you don’t want to be called as a witness if she whacks him with the bottle.

Papaw has fallen asleep in the big chair – already? – and

you realize you’ve been walking around with a corn casserole in your hands for 10 minutes, trying to figure out where to put it on an already overloaded table.

Your son tugs at your sleeve – nearly spilling the casserole

to the floor – and loudly informs you that the toilet won’t flush. You tell him to close the bathroom door and then go find Daddy; you just realized your husband never did go out to the garage to bring in the card table and chairs, and for goodness’ sake, dust them off first!

Somehow – someway – everyone finally migrates to the

dining room. The children are at the kids’ table, giggling and poking one another. Everyone pretends not to notice that two of the aunts have navigated so they are not sitting near one another. Papaw found his glasses (in his shirt pocket) and has taken his place at the head of the table.

“Let’s pray,” Papaw says.

There is an embarrassed clink at the end of the table

where Uncle Jim had already picked up his fork, and everyone bows his head.

Except you. You are looking around at these people who

come together only on occasions such as this. These people, your family.

And you are thankful.

OP

Lora Wimsatt is a mother, grandmother and writer. She enjoys the everyday blessings and adventures of life, especially her family.

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{ b y : d r. b r i a n g a n n o n ,

MD

}

protect your child from

holiday

hidden dangers Many of us have fond memories of holidays spent with family or friends, so we naturally want our children to enjoy the same warm and fuzzy experience. But Thanksgiving or Christmas may be more dangerous to your young child than you think. Parents of young children should consider a checklist of common dangers when visiting family or friends.

1 Even though your home may be an excellent example of childproofing, family members who don’t have young children still living with them may have medicines or other poisons stored in easy reach of toddlers, or other dangers you would never tolerate in your own home. It’s a good idea to arrive a little early for the festivities, so you can look through the house for hidden dangers.

is the same number nationwide. Parents should keep this number available anyway, but grandparents and other relatives may not keep such information handy. Poison Help provides advice about many different types of exposures, from medicines to animal bites. A simple call can be quite valuable, either by helping parents decide if they should go to the hospital, or by providing home-care advice.

2 Be sure to clean up right after a big meal or opening gifts. Toddlers often wake up earlier than the rest of the family, and they could easily choke on leftovers or wrapping materials. Items such as scissors or knives may be kept in easy reach for older relatives, but this would be a clear danger to young fingers.

4 Check doors and locks for security, as well as fencing around the home. Nobody wants a child wandering around an unfamiliar property. Many newer homes are handicappedaccessible, but this also means doorknobs that are easier for toddlers to open. Deadbolts at adult height are best. Be sure pools and other water sources are locked behind fences, and if not, keep your young children (below age 7) within arms’ reach during your visit.

3 Keep the Poison Help number available at all times: (800) 222-1222. The Poison Help number is available 24 hours and

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5 Check holiday decorations for risk of falling onto children if within their reach. Christmas trees should be behind baby gates or have some other barrier, or at least have child-safe, unbreakable ornaments on them. Children love bright colors and lights, and it is very tempting for them to touch and tug on dangling tree limbs. Even harvest-themed décor may be a fire or choking hazard, so watch your children closely to keep these items out of their reach. 6 Live Christmas trees can be a fire hazard if not properly watered or if lights are left on all night. Make sure candles and holiday lights are turned off before bedtime to prevent small fingers from getting burned early in the morning, before the adults wake up. The extra benefit is saving on the electric bill! 7 Stairs may seem like an obvious hazard, but require some extra attention when the child is unfamiliar with the home, or when there are no baby gates in place. Our family had a habit of taking two extra gates to my mother’s house at holidays, because her stairs have no carpet and really made me nervous when our twins were younger and more adventurous.

www.OwensboroParent.com www.Owensb

8 One last warning: those cute little cars and baby dolls may be perfectly appropriate for an older child, but could pose a huge choking risk to a child under 4. If you have a range of ages represented in the family, designate a safer area for the toddlers, and make that room hazard-free, with the older kids and their toys off-limits. The youngsters will feel special, you can select more age-appropriate toys for them, and there is less risk of an older child getting too rough with a little one. It also makes supervision easier for the adults, since you can rotate the role of “nanny” among the adults at the event, so none of them feels unfairly banished to toddler world.

With a little planning and a team effort on the part of the whole family, the holidays can be safe and pleasant for everyone, with lots of new memories just waiting to be made! OP

Dr. Brian Gannon is a pediatrician at Pediatric Partners in Owensboro. With four kids still in car seats and lots of family in the Deep South, he and his wife are real pros at traveling with young children for the holidays.

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{ by: christina dalton,

mssw, csw

}

4 steps to responsibility H

as anyone ever told you it’s good for

1 Give your child a task he can handle. I am going to use the example of studying,

children to make lots of mistakes? No,

but change the task to fit the appropriate age. Have the child tell you what studying is required of her for a test on Friday. You want her to describe how she will study and how that will help her on the test.

that wasn’t a misprint I meant to say good! We want our children to make as many mistakes as possible when the stakes are small.

Have you ever known parents who do their

very best to keep their children from making mistakes? Are you that parent?

Every time we fix a problem for a child

we are robbing them of an important lesson.

2 Hope and pray (that’s right) that the child blows it. This will be the hardest part because I don’t want you to remind her at all. So when she is lazy all week and does not study, bite your tongue and think about what a wonderful life lesson she will be learning. If your child can learn a life lesson now, when the stakes are small, think about how much more prepared she will be in the future. Stay strong!

Wouldn’t it be nice to be the parent who looks

3 Let equal parts of empathy and consequences do the teaching. It’s Friday afternoon

forward to their children making mistakes? I

and you ask your child the question, “How did you do on your test today?” She looks up at you with puppy dog eyes and says, “I forgot about it and I did terrible. My teacher said I’d have to do extra credit to bring my grade up!” Inside your head it’s OK to do the “happy dance!” Give her a heavy dose of empathy. Sarcasm will not work in this case. You can say, “I’m so sorry about that for you. Hopefully next time you’ll make better choices.” Give a little pat on back and walk away. Let me repeat: walk away. Don’t pour salt on the wound.

realize this sounds a little bit crazy, but just try this exercise from the DCPS Love and Logic Parenting Program and see how your child reacts. The parents who use Love and Logic not only look forward to their children making mistakes, but they also have children who make fewer mistakes.

If you apply these four steps to responsibility

4 Give the same task again. By doing this you are sending

correctly, it makes your child’s poor decisions

the message to your child that you think they are smart enough to learn from their mistakes.

the bad guy, not you! If you continue to use this, your children will be more prepared for the real world and make fewer mistakes. I know I want my child to make as many mistakes now, when she is older and the stakes are much

Christina Dalton, MSSW, CSW is the Family Resource Center Coordinator for Daviess County

more significant.

Public Schools.

when the consequences are small, versus

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OP

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so i went

to college { paid advertorial }

F

or Gwendolyn Ochoa, 28, being a single, working mom is

closed and you won’t ever learn anything,” Gwendolyn said. “With

nothing new.

a degree they can go anywhere and do everything they want.”

“I have seen the struggles of a single mother and income

firsthand,” said Gwendolyn, one of four daughters to a single

ideally like to see herself.

At 28, Gwendolyn admits she is behind in where she would

mother.

“Where I am now most people my age were 4 or 5 years ago,”

Raising two sons, Noah, 10, and Elijah, 8, and working many

Gwendolyn said. “So I feel as if my life has been on hold, and now I

unfulfilling jobs, Gwendolyn knew pursuing her education was

can finally get to living it.”

crucial.

But it’s not easy. Gwendolyn knows firsthand that being a single

“I do not discount experience at all,” Gwendolyn said. “But with a bachelor’s degree in the mix, I have many more opportunities and choices in careers and chances for advancement.” Currently, Gwendolyn is working toward a bachelor’s degree focused on communication. She hopes to work for a media company in public

mom and getting her degree is difficult.

“I wanted my kids to know how important education is and where all it can take you.”

relations in the future.

“The hard part is you are tired from the

day, go to class at night, come home late and need to eat, do laundry, pick up, see the kiddos and then once the bum hits the couch, the last thing anyone wants to do is more work,” Gwendolyn said. “It is tough to stay motivated. But when you know what this will get you and

Ready to “stand on her own two feet,” Gwendolyn believes her

where, and know you are doing this so you can be at home every

degree to be invaluable. But more than that, she is proud to show

night with the most important people in your life, then it is all

her boys the importance of education.

worth it.”

“I wanted them to know how important education is and where

Gwendolyn’s advice for other parents?

all it can take you--all the experiences in which it will provide,”

“You can do it,” Gwendolyn said. “Be patient and realize you

Gwendolyn said. “I wanted them to understand it is not ever too

will get it done. You will freak out, you will get frustrated, but you

late to finish anything.”

will get it finished.”

This mom also stresses the importance of learning and keeping

She justifies that the two to four years it will take someone to

an open mind to her sons.

complete a degree will be long period of time no matter what.

“When you think you know everything, the mind becomes

“So I went to college,” Gwendolyn said.

OP

Western Kentucky University in Owensboro has been educating students for over 40 years.

Learn more online: www.wku.edu/owensboro www.OwensboroParent.com

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advice from an

ordinary dad

living in the gap:

be thankful

As we celebrate the Thanksgiving season, it is a great time to move out of the Gap of your child’s life and give thanks for the person your child is becoming. { by: dean ehrenheim }

M

y wife tells this story of our second son, Trevor. It was an

more parenting experience than my wife and I, we were introduced

ordinary day in the life of a mom and her preschooler. After

to the Gap concept while our kids were still in high school.

a number of minutes caring for the mundane things of the day --

dishes, dusting and folding laundry -- Jeanette noticed complete

thinker, imagine a pie chart. The Gap is that place where our kids

silence upstairs.

have some shortcoming(s). The reality for most kids is that their

Gap is relatively small, perhaps just a sliver of the overall pie.

Normally silence is a parent’s greatest desire, while paying bills

Think about your child as a pie. If you are an accountant-type

or when your best friend calls for a good catch-up. But when silence

Be truthful now, as parents, don’t we can tend to spend an

exists when it’s not expected, “mom-radar” kicks in. Is he upstairs

inordinate amount of time living in the Gap of our kids’ lives. Is

fully covered in package peanuts? Has he found some medicines

there balance in recognizing and celebrating the great choices and

stashed away in drawers? Or could he be hurt and unable to call

victories they have made?

out?

She quickly ran to the bottom of the stairs and called up,

problems with grades, breaking curfew or texting too much. We

“Trevor, whatcha doin’?”

remind them, we tell them, we nag them, but sometimes they just

don’t get it.

Down from above came a simple response….“being gooooood.”

Sure our kids need to be pushed and corrected. It could be

After chuckling at such an innocent answer, she went to see first-

hand just what being good meant to a 3-year-old.

un-kept, it drove me crazy. Daily I would drop hints, suggest or

Even though our kids are older we still want to know what they

demand a change. The thing is, he was excelling in so many other

are up to. And as they grow, so do the concerns and worries. Our

areas of his life— spiritually, academically and athletically. I finally

tasks move from baby proofing to screening the latest PG-13 movie.

decided to move out of his Gap and celebrate the victories he was

From setting play dates to wondering if that new friend is a good

attaining in all the other areas of his life – the great stuff. Now he

influence. From teaching shapes and colors to nagging kids to get

is at college sharing a room with another guy and keeping his room

their homework finished. After all, there is a lot at stake.

neat and tidy.

Because there is so much at stake, there is a danger for parents

to live in the “Gap” of our kids. Thanks to a mentor couple with 16 OWENSBORO PARENT

. November 2011

For one of our sons, the Gap was his room. Cluttered and

But even if he didn’t keep a tidy room in college, his choice to be

engaged spiritually, academically and athletically are skills learned www.OwensboroParent.com


and adopted while he was home. With all the real-life challenges facing college students today, I wouldn’t trade a made bed for a balanced, self-assured young man.

The Bible even warns parents not to exasperate our children

(Ephesians 6:4). Any parent that has nagged their teenager knows just how effective that is.

To the point, living in the Gap means we are ignoring the great

stuff our kids do. And most of our kids have a vast amount of good and achievements that we can recognize daily. They enjoy pleasing us. Sometimes we need to choose our battles and just let the little things go.

As we celebrate the Thanksgiving season, it is a great time to

move out of the Gap of your child’s life and give thanks for the person your child is becoming, in all his or her gifts and shortcomings.

Even now, as Trevor is making the big decisions made by all

college students, his mother will still call and ask, “Trevor, whatcha doin’?” and without skipping a beat he’ll respond back…“being good.” And he is, and that is why this ordinary dad is so thankful.

OP

Dean Ehrenheim, with his wife Jeanette, is raising four great kids. He regularly writes about his experiences in parenting, coaching and wellness. His email is dmeymca@gmail.com.

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lucky

Photo by Dream Copy Photography

{ by: libby johnson }

3

no.

E

arly in her third pregnancy, Lenae Bell sat with her mother at a park, watching her two children play. As they watched the children, the mother and daughter couldn’t help but observe a woman who was at the park with triplets. Bell recalls looking at her mother and saying something to the effect of, “How does anyone do that?” Little did she know, she was about to find out exactly how. Lenae Bell, 35, and her husband David, 34, who moved to Owensboro in July 2011, were happy as a family of four. The question of whether or not to have a third child was one they ultimately left up to fate. In early 2009, the couple found out that their family would indeed expand. When the time came to hear the baby’s heartbeat, the couple took their daughter Emma, now 8, their son Carson, now 6, and David’s mother with them to the appointment. No heartbeat could be found, so the couple had an ultrasound. Having had ultrasounds with her previous pregnancies, Lenae thought she saw two fetuses on the monitor. “I don’t know how to read these,” she recalls reassuring herself. Then the technician asked a telltale question— “Did you use fertility treatments?” That day, the Bells, who had not undergone fertility treatments, found out they were having triplets. “I laughed and cried at the same time,” Bell said. After the initial shock wore off, Lanae Bell remembers, one of the first things she did was join a Mothers of Multiples (MOMs) group to seek advice. Her doctors and nurses helped prepare the couple for the possibilities of what could happen in conjunction with the triplets’ arrival and for the certainty of a prolonged stay in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The Bell triplets arrived on December 18, 2009, after a fairly uneventful pregnancy and three weeks of bed rest at Saint Mary’s (the Bells lived in Evansville at the time.) Lila, Julia and Clark, now 22 months old, each weighed

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. November 2011

approximately four pounds. “I remember looking at them and saying, ‘They don’t even look like preemies.’” Bell said. Though the triplets were bigger than the other babies in the NICU, and had no long lasting health effects, the three were on ventilators and did stay in the NICU for six weeks. “The hospital and doctors did such an excellent job at letting us know what to expect, that the triplets being in the NICU wasn’t the hard part,” the mother of five remembers. “It was feeling torn between the hospital and home, where my oldest two were.” Upon release from the NICU, the newest members of the Bell family moved into the family’s two bedroom, 1400-square-foot home. The triplets ate every three hours, but feeding all three (through a combination of nursing and bottle feeding) took an hour and a half from start to finish. “It was pretty much feeding around the clock,” said Lanae, who continued to homeschool her oldest child during this time.

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Through winter and early spring 2010, the Bells stayed housebound to avoid the risk of exposing the newborns to viruses. Their first outing was when the triplets were four months old. The Bells braved a dinner outing to Cracker Barrel. “We sat baby, adult, baby, adult, baby and took turns eating,” remembers the mother of 5, explaining that either she or David would hold a bottle in each hand while the other held a bottle and attempted to eat their meal. Systems and organization have been the Bell’s key to parenting multiples. “I want to be out of the house,” says Bell. This mother of multiples even does her grocery shopping with kids in tow by pushing a cart filled with children and pulling a cart for the items she buys. Naturally, the family gets frequent comments and reactions from the public. Bell smiles as she recounts the many comments she receives as the mother of triplets. “Most of the time, it’s something general, like ‘I bet your hands are full,’” she said, adding that it’s surprising how often people ignore the obvious and ask if the children are twins.

“People are really just very curious,” said Bell, explaining that some comments she receives, such as “are they natural?” are not hurtful to her, but are to other moms she knows, particularly those who have actually undergone fertility treatment. “When someone asks you that, you tend to think, ‘What difference does it make? They’re mine,’” Bell said. Another comment the mom hears often-“Super Mom.” Because only a mom with super hero powers is able to conquer such feats as managing the triplets at the older children’s athletic events, while still paying attention to the game and getting all five children dressed, fed and packed in the SUV for church. “I am no more a super mom than anyone else,” Bell said. “In twenty years, when they’re all living good lives, then people can tell me that. Until then, I’m just learning as I go like everyone else.”

3 suggestions

for mothers expecting multiples 1. Get connected-- It’s nice to see what worked and what didn’t work for others, and gives you ideas of things to try. 2. Keep the multiples on the same schedule-- They don’t have to do the same thing at the same time every day, but when one is asleep, they should all be asleep. It’s the only way you’ll get some down times.

OP

Libby Johnson is (in no particular order) a wife, mom to two boys, a teacher, freelance writer and former competitive swimmer. She enjoys being outside, sarcasm and well written sentences by teenagers. Her hobbies are reading, mommy guilt and dreaming about the day she’ll be able to attend classes at the gym again.

3. Be flexible. If something doesn’t work

(like

nursing)

don’t

beat

yourself up about it.

OP

www.OwensboroParent.com

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{ the bike doctor contest }

facebook photos Thanks to those parents who shared pictures of their little ones with Owensboro Parent on Facebook! These photos received at least 10 “likes” and we want to share them with you, our readers. Special congratulations to our randomly chosen winner, Gracie, who won a jogging stroller/bike trailer from The Bike Doctor. We hope you enjoy it, Gracie!

Gracie

Bryson

alisia

carson

emma

cayden

evan

emmitt

Landon & Lainey isabella 20 OWENSBORO PARENT

. November 2011

Emmitt ja’lynn www.OwensboroParent.com


facebook photos

jenna

mackenzie

mallory

jayden

jay & eva

nolan

tanner

Levi www.OwensboroParent.com

rae-lynn

weston

levi November 2011 . OWENSBORO PARENT

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{ by: jaime rafferty }

grieve, breathe & believe

a mother’s battle of autism Autism is a complex developmental disability that typically appears during the first three years of life and affects a person’s ability to communicate and interact with others. There is no known single cause for autism…

K

imberly “Berly” Tillman’s family may be new to Owensboro, but is no stranger to what brought them to town— autism. Berly resided in southern Indiana and chose to move because her son Jackson, 5, is affected by autism. Through much research and perseverance, she found that Daviess County Public Schools offered services not provided in Jackson’s home school and home state. This would be but one of many sacrifices Berly would make to see her son succeed, and not be held captive by autism. What is autism? According to the Autism Society of America (ASA), “Autism is a complex developmental disability that typically appears during the first three years of life and affects a person’s ability to communicate and interact with others. Autism is defined by a certain set of behaviors

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and is a ‘spectrum disorder’ that affects individuals differently and to varying degrees. There is no known single cause for autism…” ASA estimates that 1 in 110 births will result in a child diagnosed with autism. While pregnant, Berly dreamed of having a healthy child that would exceed at everything he/she attempted. She dreamed of play dates and baseball games, not hours of research and interventions. It wasn’t immediate or obvious that Jackson might have autism, as he was on the “tail end” of hitting milestones. But, in 2008 Jackson stopped communicating and making eye contact. At just over two years of age Berly felt like she lost Jackson to autism. Though sources cannot place blame on one factor that causes autism, Berly believes, “genetics loads the gun and the environment

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pulls the trigger.” She didn’t need a specialist, doctor or therapist to tell her that Jackson was on the spectrum. Berly knew Jackson better than anyone, and knew something wasn’t right. Receiving a diagnosis was more a formality for the Tillman family, not a relief. In Jackson’s treatment, Berly would not accept “no” or “it can’t be done” from anyone, regardless of their credentials. It is her mission to help recover Jackson from autism. Berly mobilized experts and vowed to work in partnership with the school system to see that he also thrives academically. Jackson then began traditional, dietary and medical interventions. As she experienced autism personally, Berly saw the need for families and communities to be further educated about this puzzling disorder. With a heavy burden and God calling, Berly committed herself to helping other parents who didn’t have the financial means to help their children the way she could help Jackson. She began lecturing in Evansville and shared common sense knowledge she obtained through parenting and research, as well as information from leading specialists in the field. Berly shares personal experiences but has made it a priority to use at least three credible sources audiences can later reference themselves and draw personal conclusions. She has become an expert on autism, especially on Jackson. Berly is also is the mother of Katherine, 4, a vivacious and beautiful little girl with normal development. With the children being 16 months apart in age, Berly lives a very active life she feels is very much like a balancing act. She says rearing Jackson and Katherine are like night and day. At times she is begging her son to speak, for what feels like 30 minutes, while on the other extreme, Katherine will give a 30 minute dissertation about an episode of Dora. Parenting a daughter with typical behavior and having one child with special needs affects the way she handles herself when accepting a play date for the family. Berly must take into consideration foods, behaviors and environmental factors. Each could play a role in Jackson’s success for that day. She admittedly doesn’t expect the host to know these things and personally takes precautions to help make visiting times fun. Her precautions, though minor, make a huge difference in the quality of that day (and every day). Berly is an optimist and firmly believes that knowledge is power. She encourages autism moms to “know your child and educate yourself on their need.” She offers practical advice to mothers: Grieve, Breathe and Believe.

Grieve

Allow yourself to grieve, but move forward.

Breathe

3 times before any action.

Believe

Believe in God, in your ability to parent and in the resiliency of your child!

OP

Jaime Rafferty enjoys writing, as a hobby. She lives is Owensboro with her husband, Paul and their two children.

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tasty family recipe!

cranberry sausage

stuffing { by: matt weafer }

Stuffing or dressing—or whatever your family calls it—has been a Thanksgiving staple for generations. But its roots run deeper than our autumnal holiday. Stuffing and its many variations has been around since before the Roman Empire. Stuffing is loosely defined as

Ingredients 8 cups day-old sourdough bread, torn into pieces 2 ½ cups low-sodium chicken stock 1 yellow onion, diced 4 large ribs of celery, sliced 2 medium leeks, chopped 3 garlic cloves, minced

1 lb. Italian sausage 2 ½ teaspoons dried sage 1 teaspoon. fresh rosemary, chopped ¾ cup dried cranberries ¾ cup pecans 4 tablespoon unsalted butter Extra virgin olive oil Salt and pepper to taste

starches, spices, herbs, chopped vegetables and occasionally meats stuffed into the cavity of an animal prior cooking. Though, there is not historical evidence that the pilgrims stuffed their turkeys, it is likely, as the practice was so common. But is it called stuffing or dressing? Before the 16th century, it was known as farce, from the

In a heavy sauté pan, break up the sausage with a fork over medium heat. Use whatever Italian sausage your family prefers. The recipe works just as well with turkey sausage or pork sausage. Add a little extra virgin olive oil to help expedite the browning. Once the sausage is beginning to brown, add the onions and celery. Cook for about 5 minutes, stirring regularly until the onions and celery are translucent and lightly caramelized. Add the leeks and cook until wilted. Add the garlic and sauté for another minute. And then add ½ cup of chicken stock, using a wooden spoon to scrape the browned bits off the bottom of the pan. Remove from heat.

Latin farcire, which means “to stuff.” However the upper echelon of society in the Victorian Era thought the word stuffing was rather uncouth, and perhaps too vulgar for their prim table settings. So the word “dressing” was substituted. Now the two words are virtually interchangeable in the U.S. This version of stuffing incorporates a little sweet with savory. The dried cranberries add

Toast the pecans over medium-low heat in a small sauté pan with 1 tablespoon of unsalted butter, tossing frequently to prevent burning. I prefer sourdough bread for stuffing, but you may use whatever you have. It is also very good with a mixture of rye and wheat breads. If you do not have dayold bread, place the torn pieces of bread on a sheet tray and toast in the oven at 350 degrees for about 7 minutes. Combine the bread with the sausage mixture and remaining ingredients. Toss until bread absorbs all of the liquid. Place in a greased baking dish and bake at 350 degrees for about 45 minutes or until golden brown on top. OP

pleasant bursts of tangy sweetness throughout the dish.

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Matt Weafer has a 1-year-old son, is a former restaurant chef and has been freelance writing since 2003.

. November 2011

www.OwensboroParent.com


thanksgiving dinner tips Brine Your Turkey

The sure-fire way for juicy, tender turkey is to brine it. Add 1 cup of salt and 1 cup of sugar to each gallon of water needed to fully submerge the turkey. Dissolve salt and sugar in boiling water but make sure the brine is cold when you add the turkey. Use any herbs, spices or citrus you like with your bird and let it sit a full 24 hours, or even 48. If you don’t have space in your refrigerator, use a cooler. If the temperature outside is 40 degrees or lower, but not freezing, you can keep it outside. Otherwise, use bags of ice to keep it cold.

Save Your Neck

Save the neck of the turkey. Simmer it very gently for an hour or so in low-sodium chicken stock while the turkey is baking, occasionally skimming impurities off the top of stock. And use that stock to make your gravy or for your stuffing.

Keep the Turkey Dry

Before cooking that is. Even if you brine your turkey, dry off the skin and leave it in the bottom of your refrigerator uncovered for 24 hours for crisper skin.

Precook Your Feast

Don’t Toss the Bones

Buy Fresh Cranberries

Rice the Potatoes

Prepare as much as you can in the days before Thanksgiving. Don’t slave your day away in the kitchen.

Cranberry sauce from a can and fresh cranberry sauce are two completely different things. Ditch the can. Simmer your cranberries with honey, orange juice, allspice, ginger and thyme—delicious every time. You can even add some chili flakes if you like it spicy.

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Once you’ve picked your turkey clean, save the bones and make turkey stock for delicious soups or sauces.

For silky smooth mashed potatoes, use a potato ricer or food mill to mash the spuds. These tools gently crush the potatoes and keep them light and airy. Then stir in the remainder of your ingredients. But don’t over stir; it will turn the potatoes into paste. OP

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{ by: jessica weafer }

building

a future habitat for humanity owensboro builds 100th home

F

or Lannie Chambers, setting an example for his kids is the only way he knows how to live. “I teach my kids morals and ethics,” he said. “If you want something, you have to work for it.” And that’s just what he’s been doing. Chambers is going to be the new owner of the 100th house built by Owensboro’s Habitat for Humanity (HFH), a project lead by Mike Ballard of Ballard Construction. A single father of two girls and two boys, Chambers has been working full time and logging 20 sweat equity hours a month as part of the Habitat for Humanity application process. “I didn’t have a clue how I was going to do it,” Chambers said. “I thought it would be impossible.” But Chamber has almost completed his required hours and his house is slated for completion in mid-November. Habitat for Humanity is an international Christian organization founded in 1976 with the huge goal of eliminating poverty housing around the world. Recently Habitat for Humanity International (HFHI) celebrated building its 500,000th house worldwide, building the last 200,000 homes around the globe in just three years. The Owensboro chapter of Habitat for Humanity was founded in 1988. Houses are sold at no profit and no interest to families that pass the application process. The materials and labor hours for each home are funded through donations, volunteers, grants and a 20-year, zero-

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interest mortgage that the homeowner pays. For Chambers, a new house means greater possibilities and a new future for his children. Living month to month, paying rent, Chambers attempted to purchase a home on his own. But with no credit card or loan since he was 24, he had poor credit. “I went through credit counseling and got a lot of stuff cleared up on the credit report,” he said. A credit coach instructed him on what to buy and how to handle his credit so that he could improve his rating. “I’m limited on my income with being a father of four and that’s what made me go through Habitat for Humanity.” The future looks a little brighter for Chambers as a new home will help bring financial security. “I will be able to do a lot more things I couldn’t as a renter,” Chambers said. “I can have a dog, pool, maybe one day a garage. Be able to get my kids more than they have now. Maybe help them through college. We can go out to eat more. Be able to go out and do more things more. You only live once.” Virginia Braswell, director of HFH said, “Families call about applying and we ask them some basic questions: Have you lived in Daviess County at least 12 months? You can be married, single or divorced just not separated because of legal homeownership issues. Do you own land or a house? If so, you are not eligible for our program. No large outstanding debt (over $5,000). No bankruptcy in the past two

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years, and we will do a police check.” Recipients of Habitat for Humanity homes vary greatly in their circumstances. But the one thing they all have in common is they have to work to receive their home. “You’re not going to get things handed to you,” Chambers said. Like all other applicants, Chambers has to log sweat equity hours. “Sweat equity is like a down payment,” he said. HFH applicants log hours, helping build houses and other tasks for the organization. “We partner with families to get their home and they partner by working 350 ‘sweat equity’ hours before moving into their new home,” Braswell said. “We work with handicapped persons so they can get the required hours by collecting aluminum cans for our can drives, working various fundraisers, newsletter mailings, and homeownership workshops.” Chambers said the toughest part is trying to work and pay your bills, and then work for them too. “They definitely mean sweat equity,” Chambers said. “You don’t just fill out an application and get a house.” He said you have to come up with lawyer’s fees, appraisal fees, inspector fees, first month’s payments, and homeowners insurance. Even though getting his “sweat equity” and money to move hasn’t been easy, Chambers said, “Every bit of it has been worth it.” For Chambers, there are definitely more pros than cons to working for a HFH house. “It’s a great deal,” he said. “You have a 20-year, zero interest mortgage.” Chambers did say that there are limits to the house. For example,

he has four kids, but can’t get a four-bedroom house. “You can’t have everything you want, but it’s a brand new home,” he said. For Chambers, the work was hard, but fulfilling. “I don’t mind to work and help,” he said. “You get a good feeling helping other people.” Chambers is also teaching his children by example, as his father taught him. “My kids have to work for what they want,” he said. “I’ve earned every bit of what I got. My dad was a millwright. He knew how to do everything. He could make cedar chests and trailers, work on lawn mowers, etc. When I was growing up, we would tear down and build houses and had a great time.” There is no lack of work at HFH for people looking for it, Chambers said. And he’s teaching his children to meet that type of hard work head on. “I’ll encourage them in anything they want to do,” he said. While Chambers was surprised that he and his family would be the recipients of a brand new home, he is nonetheless grateful. “To sum it all up, on behalf of me and my family,” Chambers said, “words can’t describe how much it means to me. If it wasn’t for God, I wouldn’t have been this far along. I appreciate everything I can get. Doesn’t matter what it is.” OP

Jessica Weafer is a stay-at-home mom and freelance writer. She lives in Owensboro with her 1-year-old son, husband and cat.

OP

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familyfun! make an oreo turkey cookie Prep: Put your peanut butter cups in the fridge to cool. If you have cold, hard chocolate to work with it makes it a lot easier.

Squeeze some of the white icing into a bowl. This will be your orange. Mix red and yellow food coloring with the icing to create your desired orange. Then put that into a plastic bag and set it aside for later.

what you will need: 9 candy corn 2 double stuffed Oreo cookies 1 Whopper 1 Reese’s peanut butter cup 1 tube of black piping gel 1 tube of white icing 1 yellow and red food coloring 1 plastic storage bag 1 sharp knife 1 pair of scissors 1 bowl

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Creating: First you will be creating the tail using 1 Oreo cookie and 6 candy corns. Gently, pull apart just one side of the Oreo. Don’t don’t break it! Put a good amount of icing in between the two sides. This will help the candy corn stay. Place 6 candy corn (white side down) in between the cookie. See picture. Take your white icing and squeeze a generous amount onto the top back of an Oreo cookie. Take the other Oreo and put the bottom into the icing to have it stand up. If it doesn’t stand, add more icing! Once you have it standing, put it up against something so it doesn’t fall until the icing is dry. I use a thick book. Remove your peanut butter cup from the fridge. Take your knife and cut off the very bottom so you have a

flat surface. Put icing on the bottom and place it up against the bottom and back of your Oreo cookies. See picture. Next take your Whopper and squeeze more icing on it on one side. Place the Whopper on top of the peanut butter cup to make your head. Find a piece of candy corn that has a nice big white end. Using your sharp knife, cut the color off leaving you with the white end. Place some icing on it and stick it on your Whopper as the beak to your Oreo Turkey. Hold for a moment. Put some frosting on the back of a candy corn and place it on the side of the peanut butter cup with the small end pointing up. Do this on each side for the wings. Make sure to hold for a moment to get them to stick! Take your icing and place two white dots as eyes. Get your tube of black piping gel and place a black dot on each eye to make them come alive. Grab your bag of already created orange icing. Cut a very small hole in the corner of the bag. Now, pipe feet. Now you are done! It is that simple!!

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{ owensboro parent }

november calendar

Informing parents about fun, local events is a priority for Owensboro Parent. Our magazine compiles events from across the city and county. So when your family is looking for something to do, check out the Owensboro Parent calendar, where you will find information on local events, including event descriptions, locations, dates, times and price. Want to include your event? Contact the editor at ashley@owensboroparent.com.

November 1

Midtown East Neighborhood Alliance; Owensboro Christian Church; 5 p.m.

U-Bounce Open Bounce Night; All must wear socks; $7 per child, children under 2 are free, unless they are the only child, adults always free; 5 - 8 p.m.; (270) 685-1255 or ubouncepartyhouse.com

Seven Hills Neighborhood Alliance; Trinity United Methodist Church; 7 p.m.

FREE Storytime Wee Read for ages 2 and younger and Circle Time

November 3

for ages 3-5; 10 – 10:30 a.m.; Daviess County Public Library, 2020 Frederica St.; dcplibrary.org.

Bluegrass Roots: Art From the Heart The Owensboro Museum of Fine Art features a multimedia exhibition featuring six artists whose works will celebrate the traditions of Bluegrass music through the lens of art. Museum open Thursday & Friday 10 a.m. – 8 p.m.; Saturday & Sunday 1 - 4 p.m.; OMFA, 901 Frederica Street; Adults $2, children under 13 $1; 270-685-3181 or omfa.us.

FREE ARTLAND An exciting new dimension in education, is an interactive art studio created especially for children ages 4 to 10. It is a special place designed to challenge and stimulate the imagination while allowing children to create works of art at their own pace. ARTLAND features an art laboratory fully equipped with supplies and materials for making works of art; Museum open Thursday & Friday 10 a.m. – 8 p.m.; Saturday & Sunday 1 - 4 p.m.; OMFA, 901 Frederica Street; 270-685-3181 or omfa.us.

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November 4 My Fair Lady Based on George Bernard Shaw’s 1912 play Pygmalion, MY FAIR LADY will transport audiences to Edwardian London and one of the most beautiful stories ever told about language and clash of cultures. It follows the relationship between Eliza Doolittle, a Cockney flower girl, and the snobbish and misogynistic Professor Henry Higgins, a phoneticist, who wagers that he can turn Eliza into a “proper lady” in three months’ time; RiverPark Center, 101 Daviess St.; 7 p.m.; $39.50; (270) 687-2787 or riverparkcenter.org.

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FREE ARTLAND See event description on November 3. Bluegrass Roots: Art from the Heart See event description on November 3.

U-Bounce Open Bounce Night; All must wear socks; $7 per child, children under 2 are free, unless they are the only child, adults always free; 5 - 10 p.m.; (270) 685-1255 or ubouncepartyhouse.com

November 5 Annual Veterans Parade This event gives all people the opportunity to honor those who have served and those who still serve and defend our country. The Parade consists of units from area veterans groups, local school bands, military units, and various local organizations. Independence Bank will feature mini parade cars and the Independence Express. The route this year will be straight down Second Street downtown and end with a ceremony at Mitch McConnell Plaza; 2 p.m.

Second City Comedy Team Chicago’s legendary comedy theatre will host a the benefit show, “It Takes a ..... ‘Boro?”, featuring skits from the company’s Laugh Out Loud Tour as well as a few laughs specifically designed around recent Owensboro events and people; Owensboro High School, 1800 Frederica St.; 7:30 p.m.; (270) 686-1000 or owensboro. kyschools.us.

FREE ARTLAND See event description on November 3. Bluegrass Roots: Art from the Heart See event description

November 6

FREE ARTLAND See event description on November 3. Bluegrass Roots: Art from the Heart See event description on November 3.

November 7 FREE Storytime Wee Read for ages 2 and younger and Circle Time for ages 3-5; 10 – 10:30 a.m.; Daviess County Public Library, 2020 Frederica St.; dcplibrary.org.

November 8 Old Owensboro Neighborhood Alliance; Owensboro Police Department Community Room; 6 p.m.

Shifley-York Neighborhood Alliance; Lewis Lane Baptist Church; 5:30 p.m.

Hillcrest Area Alliance; Owensboro Christian Church Community Room; 6:30 p.m.

U-Bounce Open Bounce Night; All must wear socks; $7 per child, children under 2 are free, unless they are the only child, adults always free; 5 - 8 p.m.; (270) 685-1255 or ubouncepartyhouse.com

on November 3.

November 9

FREE Saturday Morning Live! Visit the library every Saturday

Belle of Cincinnati Take a lunch or dinner cruise when BB Riverboat Cruises brings the paddle wheeler to Owensboro. Enjoy a delicious buffet meal and music; 800-261-8586 or bbriverboats.com.

morning for self-guided fun and educational activities with a focus on literacy and school readiness; 10 a.m. — 12 p.m.; Daviess County Public Library, 2020 Frederica St.; dcplibrary.org.

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November 10 FREE ARTLAND See event description on November 3. Bluegrass Roots: Art from the Heart See event description on November 3.

FREE Storytime Wee Read for ages 2 and younger and Circle Time for ages 3-5; 10 – 10:30 a.m.; Daviess County Public Library, 2020 Frederica St.; dcplibrary.org. Southeast Alliance; Newton Parrish Elementary School; 6:30 p.m.

November 11 11th Hour Live Music & Art Music and performance art featuring Aaron Kizer, Andy Brasher and guest McKenzie Gregg; RiverPark Center, 101 Daviess Street; 8-11 p.m.; (270) 687-2787 or riverparkcenter.org.

Bluegrass Roots: Art from the Heart See event description on November 3.

International Bluegrass Music Museum Fall Lessons The group lessons offered are fiddle, guitar, mandolin, and banjo. 45-minute lessons for beginners and intermediate musicians. Instruments are available free of charge for those participants that do not have one of their own; IBMM, 117 Daviess St.; $30 per person, $15 for any additional family member; (270) 926-7891.

Jesus The Musical Join Jeremy Calloway for “Jesus the Musical”, a Pop Praise Production; RiverPark Center, 101 Daviess St.; 7:30 p.m.; riverparkcenter.org.

Owensboro Youth Football “King of the Hill” Football tournament; Waymond Morris Park, 5200 Todd Bridge

FREE ARTLAND See event description on November 3.

Road; 800-489-1131 or 270-926-1100.

Bluegrass Roots: Art from the Heart See event description

FREE Saturday Morning Live! Visit the library every Saturday morning for self-guided fun and educational activities with a focus on literacy and school readiness; 10 a.m. — 12 p.m.; Daviess County Public Library, 2020 Frederica St.; dcplibrary.org.

on November 3.

Owensboro Youth Football “King of the Hill” Football tournament; Waymond Morris Park, 5200 Todd Bridge Road; 800-489-1131 or 270-926-1100.

U-Bounce Open Bounce Night; All must wear socks; $7 per child, children under 2 are free, unless they are the only child, adults always free; 5 - 10 p.m.; (270) 685-1255 or ubouncepartyhouse.com

November 12 FREE ARTLAND See event description on November 3.

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November 13 FREE ARTLAND See event description on November 3. Bluegrass Roots: Art from the Heart See event description on November 3.

Owensboro Youth Football “King of the Hill” Football tournament; Waymond Morris Park, 5200 Todd Bridge Road; 800-489-1131 or 270-926-1100.

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November 14

November 17

Audubon Bon Harbor Area Alliance; Audubon Church of

FREE ARTLAND See event description on November 3.

Nazarene; 6:30 p.m.

FREE Storytime Wee Read for ages 2 and younger and Circle Time for ages 3-5; 10 – 10:30 a.m.; Daviess County Public Library, 2020 Frederica St.; dcplibrary.org.

FREE Storytime Wee Read for ages 2 and younger and Circle Time for ages 3-5; 10 – 10:30 a.m.; Daviess County Public Library, 2020 Frederica St.; dcplibrary.org.

Dogwood Azalea Neighborhood Alliance; Edge Ice

November 15 FREE LEGO Block Party Lego free play for kids ages 6-12. Registration required! 6:30 – 7:30 p.m.; Daviess County Public Library Program Room,2020 Frederica St.; Please call 270-684-0211 to reserve a space, dcplibrary.org.

Sesame Street Live Elmo, Zoe, Big Bird and all their Sesame Street friends are taking to the stage to share their love of music; RiverPark Center, 101 Daviess St.; 7 p.m.; Tickets start at $13; riverparcenter.org.

Center; 5:30 p.m.

November 18 FREE ARTLAND See event description on November 3. We Need a Little Christmas Now Owensboro Community & Technical College Foundation ad JK Productions present a Holiday performance of dance and music; RiverPark Center, 101 Daviess St.; 7:30 p.m.; 270-687-2787 or riverparkcenter.org. U-Bounce Open Bounce Night; All must wear socks; $7 per child, children under 2 are free, unless they are the only child, adults always free; 5 - 10 p.m.; (270) 685-1255 or ubouncepartyhouse.com

U-Bounce Open Bounce Night; All must wear socks; $7 per child, children under 2 are free, unless they are the only child, adults always free; 5 - 8 p.m.; (270) 685-1255 or ubouncepartyhouse.com

November 16 Sesame Street Live Elmo, Zoe, Big Bird and all their Sesame Street friends are taking to the stage to share their love of music; RiverPark Center, 101 Daviess St.; 10:30 a.m. and 7 p.m.; Tickets start at $13; riverparcenter.org.

November 19 75th Christmas Parade; “75 Years of Christmas Cheer – A Diamond Celebration” will feature parade floats from various local organizations, including mini parade cars and the Independence Express from Independence Bank; downtown Owensboro; 4:30 p.m. FREE ARTLAND See event description on November 3. Santa Arrival Towne Square Mall; 10 a.m.; shoptownesquare.com. FREE Saturday Morning Live! Visit the library every Saturday

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morning for self-guided fun and educational activities with a focus on literacy and school readiness; 10 a.m. — 12 p.m.; Daviess County Public Library, 2020 Frederica St.; dcplibrary.org.

November 20 FREE ARTLAND See event description on November 3.

November 21 FREE Storytime Wee Read for ages 2 and younger and Circle Time for ages 3-5; 10 – 10:30 a.m.; Daviess County Public Library, 2020 Frederica St.; dcplibrary.org.

November 22 FREE Christmas in the Park Giant elves, trees, toys and figures, not to mention Santa in his sleigh, line Legion’s half-mile walking path; Legion Park, Byers Ave and JR Miller Blvd.; 5:30 p.m. Lighting Ceremony; Rides on the Independence Express 6:15 p.m.; owensboroparks.org.

Northwest Area Alliance; HL Neblett Center; 5:30 p.m. Dugan Best Neighborhood Alliance; Dugan Best Recreation Center; 6 p.m.

Wesleyan-Shawnee Neighborhood Alliance; Kentucky Wesleyan College’s Winchester Center; 6 p.m.

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Apollo Area Alliance; Century Christian Church; 6 p.m. U-Bounce Open Bounce Night; All must wear socks; $7 per child, children under 2 are free, unless they are the only child, adults always free; 5 - 8 p.m.; (270) 685-1255 or ubouncepartyhouse.com

November 23 FREE Christmas in the Park See event description on November 22.

November 24 - Thanksgiving! FREE Christmas in the Park See event description on November 22.

Winter Wonderland Watch the excitement on your child’s face

FREE Storytime Wee Read for ages 2 and younger and Circle Time for ages 3-5; 10 – 10:30 a.m.; Daviess County Public Library, 2020 Frederica St.; dcplibrary.org.

when they take a spin on the largest outdoor skating rink in the Tri-State, enjoy watching your favorite holiday movies on the giant 40ft movie screen, stroll through the grand lobby and gaze at thousands of twinkling lights or visit with Ole St. Nick himself; RiverPark Center, 101 Daviess St.; riverparkcenter.org.

November 25

U-Bounce Open Bounce Night; All must wear socks; $7 per child,

Black Friday Shopping at Towne Square Mall; Doors

children under 2 are free, unless they are the only child, adults always free; 5 - 10 p.m.; (270) 685-1255 or ubouncepartyhouse.com

open at 5 a.m.; shoptownesquare.com.

FREE Christmas in the Park See event description on November 22.

Christmas at Panther Creek Park An outdoor driving lighted tour with 250,000+ lights winding through Panther Creek Park; 5160 Wayne Bridge Road; $3 per carload; daviesscountyparks.com.

Owensboro Youth Football “Kentucky Cup” Football tournament; Waymond Morris Park, 5200 Todd Bridge Road; 800489-1131 or 270-926-1100.

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November 26 FREE Christmas in the Park See event description on November 22.

International Bluegrass Music Museum Fall Lessons The group lessons offered are fiddle, guitar, mandolin, and banjo. 45-minute lessons for beginners and intermediate musicians. Instruments are available free of charge for those participants that do not have one of their own; IBMM, 117 Daviess St.; $30 per person, $15 for any additional family member; (270) 926-7891.

www.OwensboroParent.com


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Owensboro Youth Football “Kentucky Cup” Football tournament; Waymond Morris Park, 5200 Todd Bridge Road; 800489-1131 or 270-926-1100.

ages 3-5; 10 – 10:30 a.m.; Daviess County Public Library, 2020 Frederica St.; dcplibrary.org.

Winter Wonderland See event description on November 25.

FREE Saturday Morning Live! Visit the library every Saturday morning for self-guided fun and educational activities with a focus on literacy and school readiness; 10 a.m. — 12 p.m.; Daviess County Public Library, 2020 Frederica St.; dcplibrary.org.

November 29

Winter Wonderland See event description on November 25.

November 22.

November 27

FREE Family Fun Night – Old Fashioned Christmas Tree Decorating Bring the family to the Daviess County Public Library to

FREE Christmas in the Park See event description on November 22.

Owensboro Youth Football “Kentucky Cup” Football tournament; Waymond Morris Park, 5200 Todd Bridge Road; 800489-1131 or 270-926-1100.

Winter Wonderland See event description on November 25.

November 28 FREE Christmas in the Park See event description on November 22.

join the United Daughters of the Confederacy for a presentation on pioneer style Christmas celebration and the opportunity to make old fashioned ornaments to decorate the library’s tree; DCPL, 2020 Frederica St.; 6:30-7:30 pm. 2020 Frederica St.; (270) 684-0211 or dcplibrary.org.

Winter Wonderland See event description on November 25. U-Bounce Open Bounce Night; All must wear socks; $7 per child, children under 2 are free, unless they are the only child, adults always free; 5 - 8 p.m.; (270) 685-1255 or ubouncepartyhouse.com

November 30 FREE Christmas in the Park See event description on November 22.

FREE Storytime Wee Read for ages 2 and younger and Circle Time for

38 OWENSBORO PARENT

FREE Christmas in the Park See event description on

. November 2011

Winter Wonderland See event description on November 25.

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November 2011 . OWENSBORO PARENT

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40 OWENSBORO PARENT

. November 2011

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Owensboro Parent - November 2011  

Owensboro Parent, the FREE guide to smart parenting in Owensboro, Kentucky. Featured Articles: Parent Talk, These People Your Family, Holi...

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