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CONTENTS THIS MONTH

ON THE COVER: JACK WELDON

Fundraiser Supports Mental Health:

Tim Wilson knows all too well how easy it is to struggle with mental health so he is on a mission to help make a difference, arranging a fundraising event for Beyond Blue for Saturday, October 9, in the form of a roll-a-thon. Page 08

Taking a Step in the Tech Direction:

Jack Weldon is a 13-year-old regular attendee of The Lab Network in Caboolture, a tech and games based social experience for young people who identify as being on the autism spectrum and who share interests in a wide variety of activities such as gaming together, video creation and sharing, graphic design, programming and game development. Page 10

New PTSD Laws Benefit First Responders:

New laws were passed in Queensland Parliament in May which make it quicker and easier for first responders who experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to access necessary support and compensation. Page 12

Football Is In The Blood:

Zak Huntingdon has secured some massive achievements in Football recently. Not only was he chosen to represent the Sunshine Coast at the Queensland School Sport Football State Championships (17-19 years Boys) at the Highfield Sports Complex in Toowoomba in May, but he also snagged a lucrative spot in the Queensland Soccer team. Page 14

“I enjoy making friends and I've made heaps of

friends since coming [to The Lab, Caboolture]." Jack Weldon, Taking a Step in the Tech Direction, p10

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Don't Bet Against the House This Tax Time The Australian Taxation Office (ATO) is reminding property investors to beware of common tax traps that can delay refunds or lead to an audit costing taxpayers time and money. In 2019–20, over 1.8 million Australians owned rental properties and claimed $38 billion in deductions. Assistant Commissioner Tim Loh said that the most common mistake rental property and holiday homeowners make is neglecting to declare all their income. This includes failing to declare any capital gains from selling an investment property. “To put it simply, you should expect tax consequences for any property that you earn income from that isn’t your main residence.” “We are expanding the rental income data we receive directly from third-party sources such as sharing economy platforms, rental bond authorities, and property managers. We will contact taxpayers about income they’ve received but haven’t included in their tax return. This will mean they need to repay some of their refund. The ATO often allows taxpayers who have made genuine errors to amend their returns without penalty. But deliberate attempts to avoid tax on rental income will see the ATO take action,” Mr Loh said. “People should remember that there’s no such thing as free real estate when it comes to their tax returns. Our data analytics scrutinise returns for rental deductions that seem unusually high. We will ask questions, and this may lead to a delay in processing your return.” “So far we have adjusted more than 70% of the 2019–20 returns selected for a review of rental information.” “Most people we contact about their rental deductions are able to justify their claims. However, there are instances where we have to knock back claims where taxpayers didn’t keep receipts, claimed for personal use, or claimed for ineligible deductions,” Mr Loh said. The ATO often reject claims for interest charges on personal loan amounts and immediate claims for the full amount for capital works (for example, a kitchen renovation), so it is vital that you have good records. If you take out a loan to buy a rental property and rent it out at market rates, the interest on

Lock Your Car to Deter Vehicle Theft

that loan is deductible. However, if you redraw money from that mortgage for personal use, such as buying a boat, or going on a holiday, you can’t claim the interest on that part of the loan. The ATO also see taxpayers claiming capital works, as a lump sum rather than spreading the cost over a number of years. Capital works include a new building or an extension, renovations or structural improvements. The cost of repairs for wear and tear to the property are deductible immediately if they are to replace or fix existing items, such as curtains, without upgrading them. However, improvements or capital expenses, such as a kitchen renovation are not deductible immediately. The ATO has advice, guidance, and an online tool on their website to help taxpayers make these calculations. Taxpayers can also speak to a registered tax agent. Reduced rent during COVID-19 The ATO understand that residential rental property owners may be unsure about how COVID-19 has impacted their tax return. For example, you may have negotiated (at arm’s length) reduced or deferred rent. You only need to declare the rent you have received as income. If payments by your tenants are deferred until the next financial year, you do not need to include these payments until you receive them. Back payments for deferred rent or insurance for lost rent should be declared as income in the financial year in which you receive the amounts. While your rental income may be reduced, you can still claim normal expenses made on your property as long as the reduced rent is determined at arms’ length and considers current market conditions. Travel restrictions may have also affected demand for short-term rental properties. Generally, if your plans to rent a property in 2020–21 were the same as previous years, but were disrupted by COVID-19, you will still be able to claim the same proportion of expenses. This only applies where the property was not used privately. If you, your family or friends stayed at the property for free or at a reduced rate, you won’t be able to claim or will only be able to claim a portion of these expenses. For everything tax time, visit ato.gov.au/TaxEssentials

In response to these thefts, police have commenced Operation Tango Dartmouth to concentrate on preventing further offences and working towards locating offenders. Most of the reported offences are opportunistic-type offences where offenders are walking the streets trying the door handles of vehicles to identify unlocked cars. You can assist in preventing these types of crime – if you are in the habit of not locking your car, try setting an alarm to remind you each night to check that you have done so.

Last month Moreton Police received 49 complaints of theft from vehicles, including incidents where registration plates have been stolen from cars, within a twelve day period.

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Recently police attended a Pine Rivers public carpark where they observed vehicles with property in full view that included driver licences, passport, cameras, cash, backpacks, laptops and keys with addresses attached. Acting Superintendent Paul Ready is concerned residents are not taking vehicle security seriously.

September 2021

ALDI Signals Change is on the Horizon

Over the next five years, ALDI is embarking on a series of new initiatives that will see the business adopting smart and bespoke technology to expand the reach of its Good Different shopping experience while also achieving the ambitious goals to reduce the company’s environmental footprint. This year, ALDI implemented its first eCommerce trial in Australia. The business is now looking to expand the offering, after receiving positive feedback from the trial of a limited selection of Special Buys available for purchase online. Additionally, ALDI is undertaking a selfcheckout trial in 10 NSW stores to provide customers with quicker ways to shop and drive business efficiencies. The expectation is that pending the results of the trial, the selfcheckouts will be rolled out more widely. Last month ALDI opened the first ‘Corner Store’ in North Sydney, a new small-format store layout, offering a range of ready-to-go meals and an artisan bakery. The reimagined store layout maximises efficiency for cosmopolitan customers, with a modern interior design complemented by simple navigation, selfcheckouts and extended trading hours. There is potential to expand this offering to other heavily populated, urban areas in the future. Big changes are also planned for its distribution centres (DCs). In the years ahead, ALDI will be upgrading its DCs on the east coast. The existing six DCs spread across New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland will be replaced by three new larger, high-tech warehouses, that will leverage the benefits of high bay storage and automated picking. There will be one in each state. These plans are in their infancy and will not impact daily operations until at least 2025 in New South Wales and 2026 in Queensland and Victoria. “Police are concerned that people are not locking their cars and removing their valuables,” said Acting Superintendent Ready. “This is a simple way to ensure that you do not fall victim to this type of offence. “We are asking for your assistance to help reduce these types of offences.” Please help us make our great Moreton community a safer place. If you have information for police, contact Policelink by providing information using the online suspicious activity form 24hrs per day at www.police.qld.gov.au/reporting. Report crime information anonymously via Crime Stoppers. Call 1800 333 000 or report online at www.crimestoppersqld.com.au.

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Secret Weapon to Combat Illegal Dumping

IN BRIEF 2021 COVID-19 Business Support Grants: Applications are now open on the Queensland Rural and Industry Development Authority website. Successful applicants will receive the total value of the boosted grants ranging from $10,000 to $30,000 depending on the size of their annual payroll. Close Date: 16 November 2021. To view a full list of available COVID-19 grants visit www.business.qld.gov.au/startingbusiness/advice-support/grants/covid19support-grants Free Online Program for Mental Wellbeing: Emerald, is an evidence-based, eight-week online program developed by mental health experts at USC’s Thompson Institute offering personalised coaching and support through self-paced modules and one-on-one appointments with allied health clinicians. The program is free for community members, thanks to support from the Wilson Foundation. For more information visit www.usc.edu.au/ thompson-institute/clinical-services/emeraldwellbeing-program. Olympians’ Welcome Home Parade: Queensland’s inspirational Olympians and Paralympians will be welcomed home with a parade and reception through the Brisbane CBD on 8 October. The celebrations in Brisbane will mark one of Australia’s most successful Olympics yet with athletes bringing home a total of 13 gold, four silver and 11 bronze medals. Preparations are underway to have the Olympians travel down the Queen Street Mall to a stage at King George Square. They are dependent on continuing to contain the spread of COVID. Queensland has launched its first Closing the Gap Implementation plan — a key milestone in nationwide efforts to Close the Gap in life outcomes between Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous peoples. View the Queensland Closing the Gap Implementation Plan at www.qld.gov.au/ctg 264 Tonnes of Illicit Tobacco Destroyed: Since its establishment in July 2018, the llicit Tobacco Taskforce (ITTF) has seized and destroyed more than 264 tonnes of illicit tobacco and over 540 million cigarettes, with an estimated loss of revenue to the Commonwealth of over $870 million. Anyone with information on the importation of illicit tobacco is encouraged to contact Border Watch at www.australia.gov.au/ borderwatchExternal Link. This can be done anonymously.

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Moreton Bay Regional Council is fighting back against illegal dumpers who are costing ratepayers more than $6.5 million in clean-up fees every year, thanks to new technology purchased with State Government funding. Mayor Peter Flannery said the new MicroPhazir Asbestos Analyser was a game changer in the battle against irresponsible waste disposal as illegal dumping continues to rise in the Moreton Bay Region. “Last financial year (2020-21) we had 263 tonnes of waste illegally dumped across numerous sites in the Moreton Bay Region, which is a 24% increase from the previous year (2019-20), he said. “That’s roughly 7,000 wheelie bins worth of waste that includes hazardous waste like asbestos, which needs to be cleaned up and processed by Council at the cost of ratepayers. “The new MicroPhazir Asbestos Analyser will help reduce those costs and help manage the public health risk associated with asbestos found within illegally dumped waste. “Instead of waiting for laboratory testing for each individual dump site, we can now immediately identify asbestos onsite using the MicroPhazir Asbestos Analyser and begin managing this hazardous waste. “Construction and demolition waste is the single largest category of waste we encounter at illegal dump sites, which we expect will continue given the region’s projected growth over the coming years. “The fact that this problem even exists is disappointing to say the least - littering and illegal dumping can have huge adverse impacts on the environment and the health of residents, particularly when that waste contains hazardous material such as asbestos. “Council’s Waste Services and Customer Response teams are working together to combat the issue by installing signage and covert cameras in illegal dumping hotspots. “But there’s only so much Council can do. We’re not asking for much - we’re just asking residents and commercial customers to be responsible when it comes to disposing their waste. “We cannot afford to have waste end up in our beautiful bushlands and waterways and cause harm to our precious environment. This project is proudly supported by the Queensland Government. For more information regarding which materials in the home or workplace contain asbestos and to plan for safe and responsible home renovations, please visit Search where to recycle or dispose - Asbestos and Asbestos | WorkSafe.qld.gov.au. For more information about Council’s litter and illegal dumping programs, visit https://www. moretonbay.qld.gov.au/Services/Waste-Recycling/Litter-Illegal-Dumping.

Region’s Innovators Compete to Create New Solutions Using Open Data Local innovators were invited to hack into Moreton Bay Region Council’s open data to create new solutions for three regional challenges at the annual GovHack event last month. GovHack is the largest open data hackathon in the southern hemisphere and one of the largest in the world. Hosted by USC Moreton Bay, the event is open to people of all abilities and challenges them to make productive use of the wealth of open data available in everyday life. This year’s event was held online to ensure compliance with COVID-19 restrictions around Australia and in New Zealand. Moreton Bay Mayor Peter Flannery said Council enthusiastically supported this initiative as part of its ambition to give the region a competitive advantage in the digital age. A group of Moreton Bay business, education and government collaborators including Moreton Bay Regional Council and USC created three challenges for this year’s event:

Bite Markets Family Fun Festival is on September 3rd and 4th from 4pm to 10pm. You'll find rides, show bags, side show games & so much more! We're keeping it simple with no pre-purchased tickets & FREE parking. Adults - $3 entry& under 12 FREE! For more info visit https://www.bitemarkets.com.au/whatson/ family-fun-festival-sep.

1.

Jobs and Growth for Moreton Bay: A prosperous future for our youth. Ideas could include using Internet of Things (IoT) data to understand how Council facilities are used, what influences use of parks and pathways and how this might help local businesses, new technologies, and business ideas for the future.

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Sustainable Moreton Bay: Diverse and flourishing planet for generations to come ideas could include tracking and monitoring the health of our koalas, circular economy solutions, and climate change mitigation strategies.

Join the Free Mini Beast Safari on Setpember 28 from 9:30am to 11am and explore the secret life of insects and bugs. Suitable for ages 5 to 11 years. Please book all adults and children attending. CREEC, 150 Rowley Road, Burpengary 4505. Phone: (07) 3205 0555.

3.

Deadly choices for Moreton Bay: Supporting the development of social and cultural outcomes across our region Ideas could include ready supply of fresh fruit and vegetables for socio-economic disadvantaged groups, art trails, professional development and skills building.

Mayor Flannery said knowledge and innovation was a key pillar of the new Regional Economic Development Strategy, with a specific focus on developing young people’s entrepreneurial abilities.

September 2021

Feature


Roll Beyond Blue Days Fundraiser Supports Mental Health

Words: Sheree Hoddinett Photos: Contributed

Tim Wilson knows all too well how easy it is to struggle with mental health. He’s experienced life’s ups and downs and seen some of those closest to him also have their own struggles. With that in mind, Tim is on a mission to help make a difference. He’s organised a fundraising event for Saturday, October 9, in the form of a roll-a-thon. Infinity Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Pine Rivers will be hosting the Roll Beyond Blue Days event to support Beyond Blue and their work within Australia. Over a marathon of six hours, Tim and his coach will undertake Brazilian JiuJitsu rolls and sparring against any and all challengers who take to the mat with them. Growing up, Tim admits that he experienced the struggles most people do but found he had an amazing support network around him, much like he does today. But he knows it’s not the case for everyone, and now he wants to do his bit to help others who aren’t as fortunate as he has been. “I have a great desire to help battle mental health issues including anxiety, depression and suicide,” Tim says. “I’ve seen a lot of people in my past and even friends now who are having a hard time with things, and I really wanted to do something to help those people out. “But there are so many people out there who don’t have much in the way of support, and I wanted to try and do something to provide Beyond Blue with more resources to be that network for others who really need it.” Tim, who works as a firefighter, also sees firsthand the impact of mental health struggles within his community. “We respond to calls for people having mental health issues from time to time, like trying to commit suicide,” he says. “We go in and obviously try to stop that from happening. The more I see that through work, the more it reinforces for me exactly how important an issue it is to be addressed and try to do something about it.” With jiu-jitsu a big part of his life and also that of his two daughters, Tim decided to tie it in with the idea of a fundraiser. “My coach has become quite a good friend of mine, and I was talking one day about doing a fundraiser, and he suggested a roll-a-thon, so we can get a lot of people in and get some fundraising that way,” Tim says. “I’ve found it’s (jiu-jitsu) a really good platform for people to cope with and learn how to deal with things they are facing. So I wanted to try and incorporate something that I thoroughly enjoyed myself and use that as a platform to get the other side of things working for us too. That’s where it all stemmed from.” Along with Tim and his coach undertaking their marathon effort, there will also be an open mat where everyone is welcome to try out the sport and learn from experienced practitioners or challenge each other to rolling/ sparring contests. Kids will be there on the day to participate, so it is great for the whole family to attend, regardless of age, physical abilities or experience.

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Although Covid has thwarted his attempts a couple of times already, Tim is hopeful this idea can finally get off the ground and raise some much-needed funds. As an added bonus, the event on October 9 also falls in line with World Mental Health Day on the same weekend (October 10). “Mental health is still such a taboo subject, and it’s ridiculous that it’s still like this,” Tim says. “I’ve always thought that people don’t have an issue with going to a personal trainer or someone to help them with their physical fitness, but as soon as you talk about mental fitness or mental health, it’s a different story. “I just don’t understand why but it’s probably just as much, if not more important than your physical health because your mental health will dictate how a lot of other things in your life will pan out. “It’s so important to talk about it, and somehow that stigma needs to be broken down so people can feel more comfortable in talking to others about what’s going on for them.” Roll Beyond Blue Days will be held at Infinity Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Pine Rivers (near the Petrie roundabout) from 12-6pm on Saturday,

September 2021

October 9. There’s a small entry fee at the door ($5) and raffles taking place both on the day and online prior to the event. You can also make donations online if you wish. To find out more, you can find Roll Beyond Blue Days on Facebook and via the Beyond Blue website at https://fundraise.beyondblue.org. au/roll-beyond-blue-days.

Statistics Beyond Blue

y experiencing depression or 1 in 6 Australians is currentl anxiety, or both. ide. each day in Australia by suic • More than 9 people die nce e likely than males to experie • Females are moranx iety. depression and suicide 3 times more likely to die by • In Australia, men are than women. r experience depression in thei • 1 in 7 Australians will lifetime. iety tralians will experience an anx • One-quarter of Aus . ime lifet r thei in on conditi dly, with ears to be growing rapinow getting • Support-seekingallapp dition con a h wit le peop of around half nt. tme trea

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ack, along with fellow attendee Dean Curlis, has been heading along to sessions since it first started in Caboolture back in 2019. Although Covid has tried to put a dampener on the fun, it hasn’t lessened their spirit, with both boys candidly sharing their thoughts as they immerse themselves in their joint game. While Roblox Strongman Simulator may not feature in everyone’s daily lives, these boys certainly know what they’re doing with the main aim of the game to become really strong. “It’s more fun playing together because you can compare strengths and other things,” Jack says on gaming together rather than flying solo. “I do love playing games at home too, but this is one of the best and fun parts of my week.” The Lab’s approach is unstructured, so each session is different and there are no expectations of specific education or technology outcomes for those who participate. It’s about allowing participants to undertake activities because it interests them, not because they have to. This approach is deliberately unlike school because The Lab is designed to be a cool and accepting place to visit, hang out and learn while having fun. Another plus side to each session is the opportunity for those who go along to catch up with faces that have now become familiar in their lives. “I enjoy making friends and I’ve made heaps of friends since coming here,” Jack says. “Sometimes I don’t get to come here because I’m extremely tired from school,” Dean adds. “But it’s always good when I can make it. It’s different and fun.” With things not quite going to plan on his screen, Dean explains what’s happening in the game, a scenario completely out of this world, but one that makes sense to these guys. For Dean, gaming is a way of escaping Covid and his older sister.

“I do like to annoy my sister a lot when I’m not playing games,” he says smiling. “But then she annoys me too, so I need something to get away from her.” The Lab Caboolture organiser Alison Lyons is a big advocate for ensuring kids with autism have access to programs and services within the community that will benefit them in all aspects of their lives. Alison says she chose Caboolture as a location for The Lab Network as she sees it as a great place to live, work and play. “I want our kids to have friends and offer a safe space for them to learn about technology, play games and have fun,” she says. “I'm also proud to offer part time employment to our young IT mentors. “I was inspired by the inception of The Lab on the Gold Coast and started The Lab Caboolture with the wonderful help and support of June Wells (The Lab Gold Coast) and our national lab co-ordinator Alan Morgans.” At each two-hour Lab session, mentors are available to support activities or to work with participants on new projects of interest to them. Other useful tools gained through these sessions are social and personal skills. This includes learning about how to work with others, how to make friends and how to interact socially, as well as simply feeling accepted and valued by peers with common interests. The Lab is about technology skills too, but typically the programming and design skills come a little later once participants have settled in. This can take a little time and one of the essential aspects of The Lab is that kids find their own place and in their own time. Jack, who admits computers have been in his life since a very young age, also enjoys spending time on his dirt bike. But when it comes to games, if he had to pick a favourite?

The Lab Caboolture When: Tuesday 4:30-6:30pm and Saturday 10am-12pm during school terms Where: The Hub Caboolture (ground level) 4 Hasking Street. Who: For ages 10-16+ Further info: www.facebook.com/ thelabcaboolture OR thelab.org.au


“It would be a toss-up between Minecraft and Roblox,” he says. “In Roblox you can see what’s behind you but in Minecraft, the graphics aren’t as good.” “I don’t really have a favourite game, but I do like Roblox,” Dean adds. Although still quite young (Dean also turns 13 in October), the boys have their future somewhat planned out. If you guessed that gaming would be somewhere in the mix, you aren’t far off, although Jack has a bit of a mixed bag of ideas. “I want to be a truck driver, I’ve already got jobs lined up,” he says. “But I want to be a YouTuber as well and everyone can follow me on there.” Not only is Alison the face behind getting The Lab Caboolture up and running, but she’s also a mum, one who is hard-working albeit very humble, recently being awarded with a lifetime achievement award for her assistance to the autism community. “I'm mum to two of the most amazing young men on the autism spectrum aged 19 and 16,” she says. “It is for them and for my community at large who I work so hard for. “I founded a support group for families of children and adults in the Moreton Bay Region in 2012 and provide free interpersonal support to over 3000 members.”

Jack Weldon Taking a Step in the Tech Direction Words and Photo: Sheree Hoddinett

For Jack Weldon, playing computer games is a big part of his life. It’s not because of boredom or wanting to escape from the world, but merely a love of diving into the fun that the games bring to his life. The 13-year-old is a regular attendee of The Lab Network in Caboolture, a tech and games based social experience for young people who identify as being on the autism spectrum and love working with computers. With two sessions each week, The Lab provides an unstructured environment where participants can share their interests in a wide variety of activities such as gaming together, video creation and sharing, graphic design, programming and game development.


First Repsonders Benefit from New PTSD Laws Words: Sheree Hoddinett

Going to work can be a life-changing experience for those who work in and around the frontline. Exposure to traumatic and lifethreatening incidents can also have an impact on the physical and mental health of those striving to keep our community safe. Now, those who fill these roles have some reassurance if they experience any struggles as a result of their job. New laws were passed in Queensland Parliament in May which make it quicker and easier for first responders who experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to access necessary support and compensation. The Workers’ Compensation and Rehabilitation and Other Legislation Amendment Act 2021 went through with the backing of both sides of parliament. Although not having personally experienced trauma in the workplace, Member for Kurwongbah Shane King knows all too well how easily it can happen to anyone. He said the passing of these laws was welcome news to those working in frontline positions. “I have people come and talk to me all the time and in this role, we carry that around with us,” he says. “You can’t fix what has already happened…these poor people who have been broken by things that have happened in the workplace. But to see change now, it’s definitely long overdue. “Without being too political I’m pretty proud of how our government has done it. The good thing about this is it was a bipartisan, both sides spoke and no one really voted against it. It was pretty well agreed on by everyone.” Those who fall under the category of frontline/first responder workers can include: • Paramedics and ambulance officers. • Police officers and police recruits. • Firefighters (including volunteers) and members of the rural fire brigade. • State Emergency service personnel. • Doctors and nurses in emergency and trauma care, acute care, critical care and high-dependency care. • Corrective services officers. • Child Protection officers. • Mine workers involved in rescue roles. A 2018 report from Beyond Blue showed that there were substantially higher rates of psychological distress, mental health conditions and suicidal thinking and planning among first responders compared to the general population. It also revealed that rates related to mental health conditions or psychological injuries for first responders were 10 times higher than the Australian workforce During the Queensland parliament session about the bill, several members shared their own personal experiences on working in the frontline before entering politics. Mr King said although confronting, it was also surprising to see how many politicians had first-hand experience. “There’s so many members there who have been in these roles themselves and particularly were affected by what they saw and have been through and I can’t even begin to imagine what that would have been like,” he says. “In particular, listening to Aaron Harper (Member for Thuringowa) who was an ambulance officer - a paramedic - and Jason Hunt (Member for Caloundra) who was a prison guard were two very strong speeches about what this will mean. Hearing about Jason’s

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experience as a prison guard, some of the stuff is brutal. And Aaron doesn’t hold back on what it’s like to be an ambo either.” During his parliament speech, Mr Harper spoke of the time he was stationed in north Queensland where he saw graphic things happen to people as a result of accidents and watching people pass away describing it as “the stuff that a first responder goes to each day”. “We have some good coping mechanisms in the service these days,” Mr Harper said in Parliament. “I thank our peer supporters and the people who are there to provide support. People often wonder why I continue to be in the service. It is because I find it hard to let go. These are people you have shared experiences with, and I am very proud to be a part of an ambulance service.” Mr Hunt has also seen many acts of a gruesome nature after 21 years on the job, using his speech to cover the many things he had seen undertaken by serving inmates. “Custodial officers routinely deal with people with cognitive impairment and a vast range of psychological presentations,” Mr Hunt said during his speech. “Nearly every custodial officer in Queensland will have responded to a self-harm episode where the cell they enter is quite literally awash with blood. “The risks of other frontline workers are not any less, but they are also well known and easily identified and well documented too.” With parliament members sharing stories over two days of proceedings (May 11 and 12), Mr King described the moment the bill was looking likely to pass as fantastic news, given what everyone had heard. “There was a jubilance, particularly from those who had been through this and seen their colleagues go through stuff like this,” he says. “There was certainly a lot of emotion, especially from those who took the time to speak. There was an acknowledgement of what they shared because some of it was very difficult to share. “My view has always been one life taken is one too many. It’s never a waste whatever you spend to save that one life, it’s worth it.” The changes will now mean that those who work in impacted roles will be able to receive immediate treatment for PTSD and will no longer have to prove their injury was caused by their job when seeking compensation. To view full details, visit https://www.legislation.qld.gov.au/view/html/ asmade/act-2021-010

September 2021

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Zak Huntingdon Football is in the Blood Words: Sheree Hoddinett

Photos: Contributed

Forging a successful path in the world of football is something that came as easily as walking for Zak Huntingdon. So, it’s no surprise that he has secured some massive achievements in the sport in recent months. Not only was he chosen to represent the Sunshine Coast at the Queensland School Sport Football State Championships (17-19 years Boys) at the Highfield Sports Complex in Toowoomba in May, but he also snagged a lucrative spot in the Queensland Soccer team. Although the national competition had to be cancelled due to Covid, it hasn’t dampened Zak’s spirit or passion for a sport that he has a bright future in.

“The Player of the Tournament was awarded to me with the Bob Stopford trophy where my name will be inscribed on the trophy plaque with all the past winners. It’s quite an honour to be listed in such great company.” Zak first ventured onto the football field from pretty much the minute he was able to balance on two feet and he’s never looked back. Although his selection in the Queensland soccer team hasn’t panned out the way he had hoped, Zak still very much has a positive outlook and is looking forward to what lies ahead for him in the world of football. “I have been playing football for a long time now and I've always loved it and pushed to make it a career,” he says. “Being chosen for the Queensland team was an honour and something I've been striving towards over the past year. It’s a shame the national competition had to be cancelled, but due to Covid the teams weren’t able to cross state borders. You win some and you lose some. “My family have all expressed their joy and happiness and are proud of what I've achieved so far. Both they, and I, can’t wait to see what happens next.”

It seems no matter how busy life is, there’s always time for football (or soccer, if that’s your preferred term) for Zak. Knuckling down in the final months of year 12 at Narangba Valley State High School, the 18-year-old also plays for the Peninsula Power under 23 side in the National Premier League (NPL). It’s safe to say he has his sights set on a career in the sport and is very much looking forward to the day he can make it a reality. “I can't wait for school to finish, as I'd love to continue and focus on football next year,” he says. “I’m looking at making it a top priority and hopefully when the virus dies down, I can travel back to the UK, where I grew up, to play football over there.” Representing the Sunshine Coast in Toowoomba back in May was certainly a massive highlight in 2021 for Zak. Although his team didn’t quite hit the mark in the winning stakes after 4 days of tough competition, the Sunshine Coast side secured the runners up spot. Along with being named team captain, Zak was also awarded with Player of the Tournament, Coaches Player and received his nod in the Queensland Soccer team. Despite the final result not quite swinging in their favour, Zak has spoken very highly of his teammates and their achievements. “It was an absolute honour to be chosen as captain of the team,” he says. “I couldn't have been prouder of the boys and how they played from start to finish of every game throughout the competition and even going undefeated right up until the final. “It was a shame about losing the final on penalties, but to get there nevertheless is a massive achievement and we were all very happy.” For most players, just being a part of a championship competition is an achievement in itself. But for Zak, adding Player of the Tournament, the Coaches Player and an extra bonus of being named in the Queensland Soccer team was a lot more than he expected from being part of one tournament. “Being named Coaches Player for my team was a very prestigious award and I was honoured to receive it,” he says. “To be named Player of the Tournament is the biggest achievement at the competition and I was thrilled to receive the award along with being named in the Queensland team.

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September 2021

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Caboolture Fireballs Young, eager and ready to wipe you out of the rink! Words: Sheree Hoddinett

Photos: Contributed

Young, eager and ready to wipe you out of the rink, the Caboolture Fireballs Floorball Club could very well be the next champions of the sport. Having just made their way into the local sporting community a few months ago, the new club is already starting to grow in numbers and in strength. If you haven’t heard of Floorball before, it’ll likely soon become a sport you know and if curiosity gets the better of you, one you might even find yourself playing too. As an indoor game that is fast-paced, Floorball is a sport that combines the best elements of ice hockey, indoor hockey and waffle ball. As an outsider following the game, you’ll see a great likeness to hockey in style, with two teams of six players holding on to light carbon graphite sticks, taking aim at a plastic dimpled ball and battling it out over three periods that last 20 minutes each. While it’s not a complex sport to adjust to, club chairman Kevin Tart says there is a lot of focus on the development of skill and technique. “It’s a fast moving, high energy sport,” he says. “But it’s a great team sport and it’s about seeing that progression and development with the kids. So as we grow as a club, I spend the first half of every session continually growing skills and the understanding of the game, especially for those who haven’t been part of a sport before. You’re developing their skills all the time and they’re learning from each experience. “Kids tend to pick it up easy, they’re like sponges, they absorb it all. If you can run, use a stick, hit a ball, you’ll learn very quickly how to shoot and how to pass and it builds that confidence in the game.” For the Tart family, Floorball is very much ingrained in their sporting life. Kevin, who has a background in coaching other sports has relished the opportunity to further his coaching skills. Both of his sons now play and his wife assists in coaching and other aspects of the club. Originally hailing from the UK, they took up Floorball not long after moving to Australia.

“Floorball is actually a Scandinavian sport, so it’s very big in Scandinavia, Sweden and Finland, he says. “When we moved over to Australia six years ago, none of us had heard of the sport let alone played it. But my eldest son Ollie had friends from school introduce him to Floorball and it went from there with us all becoming involved. We were living in New South Wales at the time, but when we moved up to Queensland, they kept badgering me to start a club, so we started the process and now here we are. “My son was the big drive behind it and it was something for him to do, in a safe environment. He’d never play a ball and stick sport before. Both my sons have pretty much been brought up playing floorball now.” Although only a young sport here in Australia, it’s popularity continues to grow around the country. It’s also now officially an Olympic sport, which Kevin hopes will also encourage more people to take up Floorball.

“It makes me fit and I like how the game rolls. It’s a really fun sport and I enjoy being able to see my team mates. I can pass the ball more accurately and I enjoy learning how to be in goal.” - Harry Bennett, 8 “I love the sport because of the family like team we have. We all get along and love being with each other. I always come back to meet with my friends, keep active and most of all, have fun. I have met new people; my fitness level has risen a lot and my hand-eye coordination has improved.” - Ollie Tart, 11

What The Kids Think ... 16

“Making new friends. It is super fun. I have developed my skills since I started playing.” - Finn Tart, 7

“We now have a junior club of about 24 members playing, ranging in age from six to twelve at the moment,” Kevin says. “The plan is as we progress as a club and start to develop, we’ll create mini leagues within the club and then we’ll play once a month against Brisbane Floorball Club. “Eventually we’d like to create a seniors team and maybe have a social mixed men and ladies side as well.” Pitched as a secondary sport to those who take it up (usually after the more popular sports like NRL, AFL, Soccer and Rugby Union), Kevin says they endeavour to keep costs as low as possible to make it affordable to everyone. “We only charge $10 a session and I supply all the sticks unless they want to buy their own,” he says. “So, they can just turn up in trainers and shorts and a T-shirt and play. “Plus the first session is a come and try to see whether they like it or not and take it up from there.” Kevin also highlights the support they have had in the few short months of operation, both locally and from afar. “The community support here and even clubs further afield to get everything up and running has been tremendous,” he says. “We’ve also had great support from the council and also Caboolture Sports Club – they’re the ones who have been a really big help to get the sport going.

“The feeling of scoring a goal and my teammates cheering me along. I want to play Floorball in the next Olympics. My confidence has grown and my fitness is improving.” - Charlie Bennett, 11

“Plus we’ve had great support from the higher levels like Floorball Queensland and with the ethos of the sport to grow Floorball, that’s what we aim to do.”

“I like Floorball because it is a fast-paced fun sport, you get to make new friends and exercise and go to tournaments and verse other teams. I come back to see my friends, make new friends and to learn new tricks as well as have fun. I feel that with playing Floorball, my skills and sportsmanship has become better and you have to work as team. It has also made my ball control better.” - James Cole, 11

The Caboolture Fireballs Floorball Club is based at the Morayfield Sport & Event Centre – 298 Morayfield Road. They meet every Thursday 5pm-630pm. Visit www.caboolturefireballs. com.au, follow them on Facebook or phone 0426 600 994.

September 2021

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OPINION:

The World According to Kate My daughter has finished school, yet I recently contemplated the subjects offered by our education system and their relevance to the community. This moment of deep thought was inspired by a Facebook meme that pointed out how it would be nice if the same amount of time was spent teaching people to communicate with Autistic children as is spent on teaching Autistic children how to share with the rest of the world. Whilst I believe we have a great education system in Australia, I could not help but think about subjects that could be replaced with more beneficial topics. For example, if a student wants to learn Japanese, German or any other language, they can do that externally. This subject could be replaced with sign language. Could you imagine how much easier life would be for the deaf if learning to sign was considered as important as learning English? The possibilities it would open and the increase of strength within the community? After all, how many students are actually going to go to that Country? Perhaps instead of learning a language, it would be more apt to teach cultures, traditions, and respectful communication with those from other countries. So many things we do as Australians are highly offensive to different cultures, and whilst some have the belief that “they came to our Country, they need to adapt to us not the other way around”, the truth is, international business will be more dominate as we move into the future. Many countries learn to speak English. Others use translators; however, regardless of how well you speak the language, great respect can be earned and strong relationships formed if you simply do not show disrespect – and disrespect is displayed differently in each culture. Other subjects which, in my opinion, fall into this line of reasoning would be First Aid, basic Cognitive Behavioural and Neuro Linguistic Programming techniques to help with life and business success, the traits of dominant mental illnesses found in the community such as Bipolar, Schizophrenia, ADHD, Autism and others and what to consider when interacting with these people. Perhaps I am wrong. However, as a mother of a mildly Autistic child, I can confidently say that life would be so much easier for her if she entered an adult world where everyone had a basic level of understanding about why she behaves as she does and not be fearful of it. Would the increase of acceptance reduce the build-up of depression and exhaustion from someone trying so hard to understand a world that clearly does not want to understand them? How much more helpful would it be for our first responders if everyone knew First Aid and could stop at a scene of an accident to provide temporary assistance. How many more lives would be saved? All of these things can be taught regardless of age. Perhaps it is time for a rethink of our primary and secondary education curriculum.

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September 2021

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FAMILY:

It's a Girly World! Words: Sheree Hoddinett

Girls, girls, girls. Dresses and hair bows. Barbie dolls and make up kits. Sparkling shoes and lip gloss. Sassy attitudes and arguments over what they can wear (at the ages of 5 and 7 mind you!!). There’s a lot involved in raising girls. Kids in general, really. One of the hardest things I find about having two girls is I haven’t always been really girly myself. Although I grew up as a girl, doesn’t mean I know everything. I have my moments, but more often than not I’m most comfortable in shirt and shorts and my hair pulled back in a mum bun. Getting

dressed up is a rarity. Make up on my face is like hidden gold. It’s hard to come across. But when the occasion calls for it, sure I make an effort.

- The drama! So I have one daughter who is a bit (ahem, a lot) on the dramatic side. She trips and falls and the world ends. Her sister has her moments, but she seems to cope a lot better. When they’re tired and emotional, it’s all over. All bets are off and you just need to buckle in and sit back to enjoy the ride.

I’m definitely no expert on raising girls at all. While I was once their age, I was living it and that’s a whole other story in itself. But there’s many things I’ve learned (more like had to adapt to) and I’m still learning, in the short space of time my girls have been Earth side with me:

- Try not to sweat the small stuff. I have been told many times I’m hated and not liked. It hurts. But 5 minutes later I’m back at the top of the favourite list again.

- Girls can be gross too. From funny noises to bodily functions (I think you can guess what I’m talking about), little girls and boys can be just as bad as each other!

- The crying over absolutely nothing. Sadly as a woman, I do relate to that. But even with that in mind, it can still be hard to tolerate!

- Little girls can be tough creatures. My youngest daughter likes to be rough (she punches her older sister all the time, multiple times) and can climb, jump and wrestle with the best of them. I can say with a lot of certainty that she will likely handle herself pretty well.

- I thought I had better put something good in the list. The cuteness can make your heart swell. My girls have been through some tough times but their resilience does show, as does their soft side. They know how to lift Mummy’s spirit at the best of times but when I’m feeling a bit low, they can make things even better!

- Hair brushing can sometimes be a mission. There’s screaming, crying and lots of pain. I’m not just talking about the child having their brushed either, haha! - While we’re still talking about hair, when it comes time to washing it, especially in Summer when we’ve been sweating a lot and swimming, I cop more arguments than anything else. - Much like all other siblings, they love each other one second and the next a fight ensues over pretty much nothing. I already know this will continue for many, many years!

I’ll be the first to admit that although I feel fairly clueless with two girls, I’m not really sure how I would have dealt with boys. I have enough trouble dealing with the grown up version, haha! I keep hearing from friends that raising boys is just a whole other level in itself. They can have it, haha! As painful as it can be, and yes I know the worst is yet to come, I’ll stick with my sassy pair. They may drive me to the brink of insanity (and to drink) all the time but yeah I guess they’re alright. They’ll do, unless someone wants to swap? I’m kidding! Except when it’s an emotional meltdown and then they can go to whoever wants them! They’re free, I promise!

FINANCE:

Why Using a Mortgage Broker is in Your Best Interests Words: Vanessa Bragdon, Cornerstone Home Loans

As of 1 January 2021 Best Interest Duty (BID) came into effect for mortgage brokers. The best interests duty for mortgage brokers is a statutory obligation for mortgage brokers to act in the best interests of consumers (best interests duty), and to prioritise consumers’ interest when providing credit assistance (conflict priority rule).

This new legal duty offers customers peace of mind knowing that their mortgage broker is legally required to act in their best interests and put their interests first.

3.

More money in your pocket – a broker will identify opportunities to save you money where possible – they are working for you and not shareholders. They will do this for the life of the loan.

4.

These two obligations are collectively referred to as the Best Interests Duty.

Did you know that the Best Interests Duty doesn’t apply to banks?

No cost for their service – usually there are no direct costs for the service provided by a broker as they get paid a commission from the selected lender. In some cases they may charge a fee for service.

Based on the Royal Commission’s recommendations, it aims to align “consumers’ expectation and interest with that of the interest of the mortgage broker.”

Mortgage brokers are required to act in your best interests when recommending a home loan, whereas a lender sells you their products.

Looking for a home loan recommendation but don’t know whom to trust? Mortgage brokers put your best interests first.

ASIC, the industry regulator who’s been tasked with its implementation, released its regulatory guide (RG 273) on assessing the best interests of the consumer by: •

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Mortgage brokers now operate under an unrivalled Best Interests Duty when providing credit assistance to consumers, which provides yet another compelling reason to use a broker.

The cost of a product—such as interest rate, fees and charges and repayment size—as factors that should generally be prioritised during this assessment; however, cost is not the only matter relevant to whether recommending a product is in the consumer’s best interests. Where other non-cost considerations affect what is in the consumer’s best interests, brokers should assess whether those considerations or loan features have a realistic possibility of offering the consumer, good value or a net benefit relative to other options.

In addition to Mortgage Brokers being legally bound to act in a clients best interests here are a few other compelling reason to choose a mortgage broker to help you obtain a loan rather than going direct to a bank; 1.

Large lender selection – each lender has very different policies and your bank might not be the best fit for your circumstances. A broker can find the right lender for you BEFORE you go to application.

2.

Great service – you will have direct access to the person handling all aspects of your loan application and will often work after hours. They also will be able to offer flexible appointment options.

Ask Vanessa! Do you have a finance question that needs answering? Email Vanessa via editor@featuremagazine.com.au

September 2021

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HEALTH:

Pilates Benefits for Lower Back Pain

Lower back pain is extremely common within the Australian community, with statistics portraying that approximately 70-90% of Australian’s will experience some form of lower back pain throughout their lives. Pilates can have a variety of benefits in improving and preventing chronic lower back pain. Its key principles consist of core strengthening, general upper and lower limb muscle strengthening, improving flexibility and postural control. All of these combined can lead to long-term management and prevention of recurrences in lower back pain. Lower back pain can be caused by a multitude of different reasons, so it is worthwhile to be assessed by a physiotherapist prior to commencing a pilates class. The physiotherapist can deem whether pilates is a suitable treatment option based on your current symptoms, function and goals.

Words: Moreton All Body Care

Moreton All Body Care offers two different forms of pilates classes - matwork and reformer. These classes are run by either our Physiotherapists or Exercise Physiologists. All pilates classes start at the beginner level with progression to intermediate and advanced levels as appropriate. Initially, the beginner classes focus primarily on education, ensuring correct technique and core activation when performing the exercises. Reformer pilates involves using a moving carriage to perform exercises with springs as resistance. The exercises can be progressed in complexity, and the level of resistance can be increased as your strength and core control improves. Matwork pilates is completed using a mat, with the exercises isolating specific muscles and requiring slightly less coordination than the reformer. Matwork pilates places an emphasis on both core activation and increasing strength globally in the upper and lower limbs. You can book in for a Physiotherapist assessment prior to attending pilates classes at Moreton All Body Care by ringing 07 3888 6699.

BEAUTY:

How Well Do You Know Your Skin? Words: Monica Shanahan, La Bella Day Spa + Clinic

Our skin is the largest organ we possess and a very important one too, it covers and protects everything inside your body, but besides the physical indispensability, the skin plays a huge part in our emotions too, our confidence, our happiness and our overall well-being. How?

To avoid spending a lot of money on products and promises, booking a skin consultation with an experienced professional skin expert is the solution.

Well… did you ever wake up one morning and while you were washing your face you noticed a pimple? How distressing is that?

Have you ever bought a skincare product or had treatment without really know why?

Perhaps you are talking with a friend and all of a sudden you skin starts to flush and you realise that your skin is often red and irritable; how annoying is that?

A skin consultation will provide knowledge, information and advice on how best address your individual needs and concerns to achieve your desired results. You will gain a deeper understanding of your skin empowering you with knowledge, allowing you to make an informed decision on a course of treatment and products that are safe and effective.

I think you know where I am going…

5 tips to choose a good consultation

Even worse you notice a blotchy brown patch begin to appear; how devastating is that?

The way our skin feels and looks can affect our mood and self-confidence. There are many factors that can affect and change the way the skin looks and feels. Hormonal fluctuations, environment or stress can all cause changes in our skin or contribute to a skin condition you never had to deal with before, and that can be annoying and confusing. What to do? Who would you entrust with the care of your skin? You decide to do something meaningful for your skin but where do you start? Jump online? Go to a department store?

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Why a skin consultation?

The options are endless. We are bombarded with marketing hype about lotions and creams, this can be very overwhelming and confusing.

1.

Find a skin therapist that really knows about skin, not just products. Someone that inspires trust and confidence, someone who’s aim is not to sell you products but empower you with knowledge, an expert that can guide you along the way in the quest for healthy and beautiful skin.

2.

A good skin consultation needs to include a skin analysis and diagnosis.

3.

Discussion of your concerns and needs.

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Documented and researched explanations of all your questions.

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Personalised, well studied and informed skin treatment plan.

September 2021

Ask Monica! Do you have a beauty question that needs answering? Email Monica via editor@featuremagazine.com.au

Feature


Immune System Health with Emotional Freedom Technique Words: Sandra Meagher, EFT Practitioner, Zen Chi Natural Therapies

EFT or “Tapping” is a body/mind self-help method. It combines a gentle touch together with mindful and vocal attention to thoughts and feelings. EFT involves tapping with our fingertips on acupuncture points on the hands, face and body while focusing upon an issue we wish to resolve. Briefly, the immune system is a network of proteins, cells, organs and tissues which defend our bodies against disease each day. In most cases, your immune system is successful at preventing infections and keeping you healthy. However, sometimes vulnerabilities within the immune system can open you up to infection and illness. The cells involved with the immune response are the white blood cells. Several types of white blood cells collaborate to find and destroy any disease-causing organisms or substances that are a threat to the body. Needless to say, immune system health is crucial to overall health. Very often, there are emotional causes at play when the immune system is not functioning at its best. Cleaning up the emotions around the time in your life preceding an illness can go a long way in reducing drag on your immune system and restoring it to optimal functioning. Whether you are currently dealing with an illness or are looking to maintain your health, EFT can help pave the way for healing so that you can enjoy a healthier, happier, higher quality of life. If you would love to know more information or make an appointment, please contact Zen Chi Natural Therapies @ North Lakes on 07 3482 2549. Your immune system will thank you!

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SENIORS:

Paws for Effect Words: Susanne Jones, Just Better Care Brisbane North and CBD

More than mere companions, assistance dogs are often credited with offering hope in times of darkness. Sarah-Jane* enjoyed a life that some would dream of, as a fitness instructor she was paid to spend her days outdoors. After being admitted to hospital for a routine operation, Sarah-Jane found herself unable to move her legs. After months of rehabilitation, a black Labrador assistance dog by the name of Cozie entered Sarah-Jane’s life. Glued to Sarah-Jane’s side, Cozie helps with everyday tasks including collecting laundry from the washing machine, and opening doors. Cozie has proved himself an able companion and allowed Sarah-Jane the confidence to return to the outdoors. “The less I have to ask my carer or neighbours for help, the more I feel independent, which means the more normal my life feels. Cozie’s been huge in that,” she says.

Assistance Dogs Australia (ADA) is a not-forprofit organisation that offers accredited assistance dogs for people living with PTSD, physical disability, autism, and educational support. More than 550 dogs have been placed in homes since launching. CEO Richard Lord says fully accredited assistance dogs reduce stress and isolation for individuals and families, while improving relationships and allowing people with disabilities to save money on care. “Additionally, clients with our dogs are more likely to venture out with their buddy, increasing their physical activity and often reducing reliance on medication.” Assistance dogs are covered under many legislative access laws for public access rights when working with their handler who lives with a disability, whilst therapeutic, emotional support or companion dogs are not required to undertake a Public Access Test (PAT).

Capable of learning up to 50 different cues, assistance dogs retire around the age of 10-11, meaning most enjoy a working life of eight to nine years, Lord says. It costs up to $40,000 to get an assistance dog through training, including purchasing a puppy, food, vaccinations, training, and placement with the new owner. “Positive reinforcement techniques are used to motivate desired behaviours…assistance dogs learn basic obedience and experience appropriate socialisation activities in the community.” Lord says ADA receives “far many more than we can accommodate”. He urges anyone who is considering an assistance dog to go to an organisation accredited by Assistance Dogs International or their state government. Surname Withheld

*

Under Australian law, an assistance dog is a generic term for a guide, hearing, or service dog that is specifically trained to perform at least one task to mitigate the effects of an individual’s disability. Dogs formally trained to be assistance dogs can take many forms including guide dogs for the visually impaired, hearing dogs, diabetes alert dogs, seizure alert dogs, mental health dogs and autism assistance dogs.

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September 2021

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TERRY YOUNG MP

Federal Member for Longman Please contact my office if you need help or referrals with: Centrelink and Immigration and Medicare Visas NDIS and Aged Care NBN and Communications Federal Grants Unit 7, Level 1, 69 King Street, Caboolture QLD 4510 07 5432 3177

terry.young.mp@aph.gov.au

terryyoung.com.au

TerryYoungMP

Authorised by T. Young, Liberal National Party of Queensland, Unit 7, Level 1, 69 King Street, Caboolture QLD 4510.

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LANDSCAPE with Lawrie

Viewpoint

When walking through towns and cities around Australia and throughout the world it is obvious that the most memorable have a distinctive landscape character that is derived from and strongly influenced by the local climate, environment and soils of the surrounding region. The vegetation is always the most distinctive visual element of these urban landscapes, and when species that grow naturally and also thrive in local garden conditions are used extensively, they collectively contribute to and enhance a unique regional botanic character. There is always something distinctive in such individual local landscapes that immediately provides a specific feeling of ‘sense of place’ ensuring the location cannot be mistaken for other ‘places’ elsewhere. Consider the uniquely different visual character of just a few well known ‘places’: The distinctive gardens of Japan; the tropical exuberance of Singapore; the spikey cacti of Arizona; the sombre pine forests of Norway; the seasonal deciduous forests of Canada; or Australia’s outback wildflower plains. Our nation has been so recently colonised, only just over 200 years ago, by people from all over the world who have brought some plants of their birthplace with them to plant in their new gardens. Rather

than using the diverse native flora so useful and treasured by the aboriginal people for over 60,000 years, our pioneering settlers instead fought against and overwhelmed the native flora. As a consequence the Australian ‘built’ landscapes and gardens of today have become largely ‘multicultural’ to match the mix of our people. Fortunately in recent decades we have become much more aware of the beauty, diversity and suitability of the Australian flora. This growing acceptance of our unique national heritage in all walks of life is possibly best expressed through the ‘built’ landscape of our city, town and home gardens - “Aussie! Aussie! Aussie!” Australia’s unique flora is now being extensively appreciated and used to introduce the landscape of the bush into our parklands and home gardens of Moreton Bay.

Lawrie Smith AM

During his 40 year career as a Landscape Architect, Lawrie has designed amazing places like Roma Street Parkland & World Expo88, bringing the diversity and uniqueness of Australian native plants to the community. Do you have a question for Lawrie? Perhaps you would like to share your favourite walk? Email him via editor@featuremagazine.com.au.

A Good Place To Walk

GREEN THUMB CALENDAR:

Norfolk Lakes, Narangba

Open Native Garden in Gympie September 11, 2021 High above the terraces of the Mary River in Gympie on several fertile acres, a remarkable lady Carolle Gadd, has created a very special garden of native plants which she loves to share on rare occasions. This amazing garden named after its location ‘Brewery Hill’ at 1 McHugh Court, Gympie will be ‘open’ on Saturday, September 11 from 9am to 3pm. Don’t miss this rare opportunity to appreciate a colourful, diverse and uniquely Australian garden which showcases a carefully collected and displayed cross section of native species suited to this subtropical area. Here you will find many landscape ideas to personalise your Aussie home garden and maybe buy a few species not available from general nurseries.

Plant of the Month Coolamon Syzygium moorei

A distinctive avenue of four Coolamon Trees with a dark green, rounded canopy of large fleshy leaves, marches across the parkland at Norfolk Lakes. These attractive shade trees are a very rare species only found naturally near Mt Warning in northern NSW. An unusual factor of this tree is that the flowers and fruit form on the main stems or woody trunks (pictured below), rather than from the soft new growth. Consequently to see the flower display it is necessary to stand under the tree and look up under the leaf canopy and into the branches, which between November and February come dramatically alive clothed in masses of hot pink fluffy flowers. Large white berries follow, they germinate well and are useful in preserves.

Whether you take a long leisurely morning walk or a short afternoon jog, you will find many points of interest along the Norfolk Lakes parkway system (pictured above). Commence your walk from the picnic area along Macdonald Drive opposite McKenzie Avenue, and enjoy the lawns, shade trees and lakeshore wildlife. Continue upstream to Greenway Central Park (pictured below) with its three green ‘fingers’, passing shelters, playgrounds, skate arena, dog park, sports fields, creeks, lakes, billabongs and wetlands, all linked by interesting and shady natural forest environments, grassy fields and gardens of native plants – come, spend a day and enjoy this special park system.

So check out these specimens as there are still plenty of dried fruits on the ground ready to grow and plant in your garden.

Ask Lawrie! Do you have a garden question that needs answering? Email Lawrie via editor@featuremagazine.com.au

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September 2021

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Rev up your engines this weekend, it’s time to Show and Shine! Join us for our free event as we celebrate vintage cars and custom bikes in all their glory. It’s sure to be hit with enthusiasts both young and old!

PRIZES TO BE WON

Enjoy live entertainment from RPM! Artisan market stalls

Saturday 4 September • 2pm– 4pm 11 8 Pit t Road, Burpengar y RSVP by Monday 30 August on 1300 367 155 or Village Manager, Cheryl on 0409 644 046 *Appropriate safety policies and procedures will be in place during this event

1300 367 155

oaktreegroup.com.au


PUZZLES

SOLUTIONS ON PAGE 47

SUDOKU #61 Puzzle 11 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.52)

MEDIUM

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Puzzle 11 (Hard, difficulty rating 0.62)

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Sunnymeade Park is ____ owned (6) Susan and Kate's ____ (7) The way our skin feels can effect our ____ (4) Everyone deserves a quality ____ (8) Deter theft by locking your ____ (3) Start your own ____ business (6) Turner ____ (7) A good place to walk: ____ Lakes (7) BID stands for Best ____ Duty (8) ITTF Stands for Illicit ____ Taskforce (7) ____ Funerals (7) Finance Columnist: Vanessa ____ (7) Embracia in ____ (10) ____ King, MP (5) Burpengary Community Club has ____ gold (6) The Lab Caboolture supports youths with ____ (6) Tim ___ is raising money for Beyond Blue (6) Floorball Club: Caboolture ____ (9) BOQ North Lakes Owner-Manager, Jeff ____ (5) New ___ laws benefit First Responders (4)

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September 2021

Feature Magazine Editor: Darren ____ (4) Seasons provides more ____ in retirement (6) ____ Asbestos Analyser (11) Terry Young, Federal Member for ____ (7) Assistance Dogs Australia CEO: Richard ____ (4) On the cover: ____ Weldon (4) Oaktree's September Event: Show and ____ (5) Moreton All Body Care location (8) Mark Ryan, on your ____ (4) Largest Open Data Hackathon in SEQ (7) Beauty Columnist: Monica ____ (8) Just ____ Care (6) Australia Tax Office abbreviation ____ (3) Little girls can be ____ creatures (5) Olympian's Welcome Home Parade is scheduled for ____ (7) EFT stands for Emotional ____ Technique (7) It's a ____ world (5) CREEC is hosting a free Mini ____ Safari (5) Jack Weldon wants to be a ____ (8) Changes on the Horizon for ____ (4) Zak Huntingdon was awarded the Bob ____ trophy (8) ____ Electrical (5) Assistant Commissioner Mr Tim ____ (3) ALDI is trialling ____ checkouts (4)

Feature


CABOOLTURE SPORTS CLUB With three dining outlets, there’s something for all taste buds & budgets at Queensland’s 2019 & 2020 Club of the Year. Choose from The Mill Restaurant, Laneway Café or Tempo Lounge & Bar. Open Daily from 10am Ph: 5497 9711 19-27 Station Rd, Morayfield www.cabsports.com.au @cabsports

Light Shadow Beef Shreds by Susan & Kate's Kitchen

Ingredients One piece beef brisket (less fat) For Marinade: 20g Ginger pieces 1 can Tomato sauce 5g Five Spice power 30ml Light soy sauce 40g Sugar 40g For Frying Vegetable oil For Flavor (per 100g of beef brisket) 10ml Light soy 5ml Dark soy 10g Sugar Seasme seeds (few)

Click Here for more recipies

Method 1. Put beef brisket in a slow cooker or rice cooker for 6 hours with all the marinade ingredients. 2.

Pull the brisket to fine strings, the finer the better.

3.

Heat some oil and fry the beef strings until they become crunchy then remove from the oil.

4.

Combine all the flavor ingredients and heat until they become sticky.

5.

Mix with beef and serve.

Recipe contributed by the Multicultural Queensland Social Network

www.featuremagazine.com.au

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reliability of the information or that the information 2 6 1 4 3will be fit for any particular purpose or will 3 not 4 infringe 2 7any 8third party Intellectual Property rights.

1 Bureau's 5 8 liability 2 for 4 any loss, The damage, cost or expense 4 9 from 3 use 1 of,7or reliance resulting on, the information is entirely excluded. 8 7 5 9 6 Copyright of 6 8 7tables 3 isthe 1vestedtidal prediction in the Commonwealth of Australia 9 3 6 by the 5 National 2 represented Tidal Centre, Bureau of Meteorology.

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Feature


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Feature Magazine September 2021 Edition  

Free, monthly, print community magazine for Caboolture, Burpengary, Narangba, Morayfield, Kallangur, Mango Hill, North Lakes and Deception B...

Feature Magazine September 2021 Edition  

Free, monthly, print community magazine for Caboolture, Burpengary, Narangba, Morayfield, Kallangur, Mango Hill, North Lakes and Deception B...

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