Feature Magazine November 2021 Edition

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CONTENTS THIS MONTH

ON THE COVER: PAUL SZEP

Living and Breathing a Life of Rugby League:

Darcy Roberts has been with the Pine Rivers Junior Leagues Club since the very beginning and he’s not going anywhere anytime soon.

“I’ve done everything in my life that I’ve ever wanted to do. I’ve travelled the world as a businessman on my own and wasn’t afraid to ask for help. I worked for the Army and I also received an Australia Day medal for my help to the blind. There are difficulties in life but it’s how you manage them”

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The Benefit of Bees:

When Greg North first became interested in beekeeping, he was surprised to find a lack of information available, until he discovered the Northside Bee Keepers Association.

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Rocking the Stage to Help Others :

Darryl Cini and The Plumbdogs are doing their bit for the community and having fun on the stage at the same time.

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Woolworths Introduces Quiet Hour :

Woolworths Central Lakes, Morayshire, Kallangur Fair, and Petrie now offers a low-sensory Quiet Hour shopping experience designed to reduce anxiety and sensory stress for customers with specific needs.

- Paul Szep, Changing Pitch in the World of Blind Cricket p10

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Greater Child Care Support Brought Forward

IN BRIEF Extra Support for Families Following Infant Loss: The Morrison Government is providing $400,000 to fund an extension of the highly regarded Red Nose Hospital to Home Program for a further six months, which provides intensive support to grieving families following the loss of a baby. Obstacle Sports Expo: Go head-to-head with professional ninjas, overcome obstacles like a spartan, or just sit back and enjoy the excitement at the Obstacle Sports Expo at North Harbour on Saturday, 6 November from 8am to 4pm. Free to enter, $10 per course to participate. Terry Young's Vision Builders: The next Vision Builders community event on Monday, November 15 at Caboolture Sports Club, 19-27 Station Road, Morayfield (not November 2 as previously suggested) 5.30pm arrival. $10 per person (for catering). Free Spring Fashion Show: Enjoy a springinspired fashion show with clothes presented by Portofino, a champagne on arrival and delicious canapes. November 12th, 2021 at 1.30pm. Dining Room in Building B at Seasons Mango Hill, 28 Akuna Way. This is a free event however RSVPs are essential by 5th November by contacting Sue on s.hilton@seasonsliving. com.au or calling 0411 654 026. Longman Seniors Expo: more than 100 exhibitors across two events - at Morayfield on November 12 and Bribie Island (Woorim) on November 17. This is a Covid-safe event with proceeds going to Leukaemia Foundation Morayfield. Entry is FREE and there will be Sample Bags, Lucky Door Prizes, Demonstrations and much more. For more information contact Terry Young's Office via phone 07 5432 3177. What's New: Have you heard of Tawny Trails? It’s the Creative Living Experience. A New once a month Arts and Lifestyle trail set in the Moreton Bay Region and only a hop skip and a jump from your readers. It’s not a business, nor run by council or any big entities, but locals supporting locals. Launch Day celebrations are starting on Sunday November 28. Be sure to check out some of the great insights into life as artists and creatives on the Tawny Trails website www.tawnytrails.com. Volunteers Needed: The Caboolture Neighbourhood Centre (CNC) is seeking volunteers. Preferably with experience in administration, basic Excel, Word, calendars and emails. CNC is located at 9 George St, Caboolture. Phone 5495 3818 for more information. New Focus for AFL Great Eddie Betts: Following his stellar career as a player and his ongoing advocacy for Indigenous communities, Eddie will help deliver and tailor the Coles Healthy Kicks program to Indigenous communities across Australia to help educate and motivate children aged between six and 12 to become more physically active, eat nutritious food and develop a healthy mind and body while having fun with others.

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Families will benefit from greater child care support sooner, with increased Child Care Subsidy (CCS) for multiple children brought forward from 7 March 2022, four months earlier than first expected. The increased subsidies were due to come into effect on 11 July 2022, but the Government has been able to work with Commonwealth agencies and service providers to make necessary technical changes sooner.

Minister for Education and Youth Alan Tudge said the changes would ease pressure on working families and encourage more parents into work. “These changes are good for families and great for the economy, and it’s significant that we are able to deliver them sooner,” said Minister Tudge.

“Removing the cap and increasing subsidies will allow more parents, particularly mothers, From 7 March 2022, families with two or to return to work or take on more hours if more children aged five years and under in they choose to. care will have their CCS rate increased by 30 percentage points for their second child and Federal Member Longman Terry Young said younger children, up to a maximum rate of 95 the support would be targeted at those that per cent. need it most. A family earning $110,000 a year with two “We know child care costs can really add up kids in care, four days a week will be better off when you have two, three or more children in by $100 a week. care and this package will help those families by significantly reducing out-of-pocket costs The $10,655 annual cap will also be for the second child and younger children,” scrapped on 10 December 2021 and applied Mr Young said. retrospectively for the whole 2021-22 financial year, meaning families who hit the cap before the date will receive a refund on any excess fees paid.

New Payment to Help Those Escaping Domestic Violence Situations Men and women who are leaving a violent to ending domestic, family and sexual violence.” relationship can now access to a one-off Mr Young said. payment of up to $5,000 to help establish a life free of violence. The Escaping Violence Payment is not considered taxable or reportable income and Under the two-year Escaping Violence will not impact on any other social security Payment trial, eligible people can receive payments a recipient may be receiving. financial assistance of up to $1,500 in cash with the remainder available for goods and Eligibility includes financial stress and evidence services or direct payments of bonds, school of domestic violence including, but not limited fees or other support to help establish a safe to, a referral from a family and domestic home. violence service provider with a risk assessment and safety plan, an AVO, court order or a police The UnitingCare Australia Consortium has report. been selected as the service provider to deliver the payments and will also support People can apply for the payment through people to engage with other relevant services UnitingCare Network effective immediately. that support them and their children. This includes other Commonwealth or state and More information is available at unitingvictas. territory government funded community org.au/escaping-violence-payment services. The Escaping Violence Payment will build on Minister for Women’s Safety Anne Ruston and complement existing programs offered said the payments would help address the by state and territories, as well as Australian financial barriers that may stop men and Government support offered to women women leaving violent relationships. experiencing violence, including: “We know that financial hardship as well as economic abuse, which may involve interfering with work or controlling or withholding money, reduces people’s ability to acquire and use money and makes it difficult to leave violent relationships,” Minister Ruston said.

Services Australia’s Crisis Payment for Extreme Circumstances of Family and Domestic Violence

No Interest Loan Scheme for Women Experiencing Domestic Violence

• Emergency Relief “The new Escaping Violence Payment aims to help address those issues so people have more • Keeping Women Safe in Their Homes. security when making that brave decision to leave any form of intimate partner violence – The two-year trial will be independently including physical violence, coercive control evaluated to assess the benefit of the payment, and financial abuse. including demand, eligibility criteria, needs of specific cohorts, and how it works with related Member for Longman Terry Young said the services. Escaping Violence Payments would assist people in the region who needed financial If you or someone you know is impacted by support to leave. sexual assault, domestic or family violence, call 1800RESPECT on 1800 737 732 or visit “This new program offers another tool in the www.1800RESPECT.org.au toolkit under the Morrison Government’s record $1.1 billion investment in women’s safety because we are absolutely committed

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Living and Breathing a Life of Rugby League Words: Sheree Hoddinett

Darcy Roberts is a name synonymous with rugby league. He’s played the game, coached and taken on every other role possible at his beloved club, the Pine Rivers Junior Leagues Club. He was also instrumental in getting the club started back in September 1969. There isn’t much he hasn’t done and would you believe he is still very much involved now, even marking the lines on the fields. Not bad for someone who’s 77 years young. He has no intention of packing up his footy anytime soon either. And why does he do it – because it’s all for the kids. Rugby league has been a big part of Darcy’s life since he was young. A born and bred Gympie boy, Darcy took a liking to the sport when he was in primary school. “I started playing when I was at school,” he says with a smile. “I started in the under 8s for school and we only used to play of a Friday. I was in grade 3 and we would go up against the grade 6 kids, because you only had one team. Back then was when rugby was first starting to get going in Queensland and look how far it’s come.” He proudly talks about his club as though it’s part of him, which is no real surprise, given he’s been around since long before day one. “How it all happened was we had a D grade here that was playing in the Brisbane competition, I

was playing for Redcliffe then and they asked me to coach,” Darcy says. “It was myself and my cousin, he was playing for Redcliffe too. But I ended up doing it all, he didn’t do anything and that went on for about 2 years. “There was 4 of us on the committee, I was the coach. I said to them at the time, the area is big enough - what we need if we really want to get into A grade - we need to have juniors. That was in 1969. So we formed a juniors committee and in 1970 we couldn’t get enough guys for D grade team so we ran out of blokes. I turned to coaching juniors and it’s all gone from there.” When you consider how long he’s been part of the club, Darcy has held a lot of different roles and recalls a lot of memories that cover a game which has changed phenomenally over the years. “I’ve been a coach and then I started refereeing in 1970 here,” he says. “I used to referee the open matches. “I’ve also done every role on the committee, been team manager and I used to mow the fields too, but that’s all done by the council these days. But I still mark the lines, it keeps me fit.” It seems not only does marking the lines keep Darcy fit, but he has also been known to use a bit of pedal power and squeeze in some time for bowls, but he’s not as keen on golf.

“I also ride a pushbike – I’ll do about 20-40km but Covid has slowed things down there in the last few months,” he says. “But I’ve ridden Bray Park to Bracken Ridge, Bray Park to Dakabin but I won’t go to Dayboro, there’s too many hills out there and a few idiots on the road too. “I play bowls too. I fit that in, that’s Thursdays, sometimes Friday mornings. The club is just up the road from home. Golf wasn’t something I really got into, I don’t mind playing socially and spending extra time at the 19th hole.” While running on to the field is definitely in the past for Darcy, it’s not as long ago as you might think. “When I was 64 I started playing International Masters and I did that for about 10 years, I represented Australia for 3 years,” he says. “If you don’t stay fit and if you don’t use it, you lose it.” Although the bear features prominently on team uniforms and on the side of the clubhouse, it’s never been a nickname they have gone by, so where did the idea for the bear come from? “After about 4 years in, the committee said we needed to have an emblem, something to represent the club,” Darcy says. “A man by the name of Jim Harvey, he used to be a butcher and he was a very good supporter of the club, he suggested a little honey bear. He was the one who actually took responsibility for it and drew it all up. “We were never called the bears, we just had the emblem which has remained mostly the same, with just a few little tweaks, since it was created.” With a memory that’s still pretty sharp – he can recall games of the days of greats like Johnny Raper and Peter Diamond when they listened on the radio – Darcy admits he has many favourite memories from his time with the club and is proud of what he has achieved, albeit very humble. “There’s that many but when you coach and get your first premiership, you’ll always remember that. It was in 1974, so very early on in the days of the club,” he says. “I enjoy being here, I wouldn’t do it otherwise.” So it begs the question, when will he bid farewell? “It’ll depend on things like my beautiful wife Clare and her health, I have to consider that,” he says. “Plus I know I’m not getting any younger and sooner or later I won’t be able to do as much, if you can’t do it, you can’t do it. For now though, I’m staying put.”

Above: Darcy with his Under 10 representative team in 1997

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November 2021

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Taking a Step in a New Direction Words: Sheree Hoddinett

When Rita-Marie Lenton first stepped into a new role 21 years ago, she never would have imagined where it would take her. Now as she moves forward into the next chapter of her life, she can look back at what she’s achieved with great fondness and pride. Some of you may have come across her at some stage, as Rita-Marie fulfilled the manager role at the Great Northern Garden of Remembrance and also as manager of the funeral branch for Alex Gow Funerals. She may be moving on but there’s still a very big chance you’ll see her in and around the community. Rita-Marie originally joined the team on April 17, 2000 as a receptionist/memorial sales consultant. Her foray into a more full on role as a funeral director may have come about accidently but it’s one full of many memories and great achievements. She’s seen and been a part of a lot of changes over the years, including the name change from Caboolture and Districts Crematorium and Memorial Gardens to the Great Northern Garden of Remembrance. But now it’s time to step back, Rita-Marie admits it’s time to hand over the reins. “The day I started, it was like I had come home, It was somewhere I was meant to be,” RitaMarie says. “I’m going to spend some time with my husband and also focus on some other family aspects of my life. Now it’s just time for us to sit and relax with each other and I’ve got grandbabies that I want to cuddle too. “I’ll still be around, I’ll still be involved but just on a different scale.” Back in 2010 when the company was being taken over by the Invocare brand, Rita-Marie spent time doing a marriage celebrant course. She was able to go on and complete it a couple of years ago and become an authorised celebrant in 2020. “I will still be doing some sort of work helping families, be it through weddings or funeral farewells,” she says. “It’s all just bringing people together. I suppose I’m the forever nurturer, I’ve got to help people in some way, shape or form, be that putting them together in a wedding ceremony or looking after them as the deceased, it’s really not that much different. People still need to be cared for.” Working in a role that involves those who have passed away can’t be easy, but for Rita-Marie, it came quite naturally. She finds the environment comforting and comfortable. “Cemeteries have never been a problem for me and death has never been a problem for me because as a young girl and growing up in the outback you see death around you all the time

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when animals die and things like that,” she says. “We would spend our Sundays going down to the cemetery to visit our loved ones so it’s always been something I’m comfortable with. “I was in grade 5 and there was a geography question asked in class – what is the dead centre of town? – I was the only one in class who got it right because I wrote down cemetery. Everyone else had a more technical answer but the teacher said I was the only one who got it right.” While it may take some time for the reality of change to sink in, Rita-Marie knows there’s a few things she will miss, including those with fur and feathers. “I’ve made some really endearing friends over the years and I’ve been involved with so many different people’s funerals plus their memorial sites, so I will definitely miss the people,” she says. “But I’ll really miss the staff I work with too and I always say when I go to networking groups that I’m out here with all my friends. “It’s really nice to walk out the back door and find the family of kangaroos sitting around the backyard. Our family of plovers, although they get very annoying and the ducks as they go wandering around all over the place and I’m even fond of the scrub turkey that likes to consume everything. “Then we’ve got our carpet snakes that terrorise people from time-to-time. I never thought I’d say that I would be comfortable around a snake but I can walk past them without feeling nervous because I know unless you do something to them they aren’t going to harm you. It’s having that appreciation of the nature of where I work. I really love it when you walk out in the twilight, you see everything so still and quiet. Like I said cemeteries for me have always been a comfortable spot to be in.” Although she’s hoping to spend some time enjoying a sleep-in here and there, Rita-Marie knows it won’t be long before she’ll be itching to do something. “I’ll no doubt find some way to keep busy because I’m just not the type of person to sit still,” she says. “I am sure I will continue to be involved with different networking groups and I am also part of the Disruptive Publishing’s authors group, who have asked me to contribute to published books by Trish Springsteen Touched by Breast Cancer and Forever Changed by Suicide. There is a third book I am contributing to that is in the pipeline due for release in late 2022 with a working title Without Consent.”

Above: Rita-Marie Lenton with new manager Tony Sargent

Taking over the role as new manager will be Tony Sargent. For any Great Northern Garden of Remembrance inquiries please phone 3888 6622 or visit www.gngor.com.au

November 2021

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FEATURE

Changing Pitch in The World of Blind Cricket Words: Sheree Hoddinett

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While a beeping ball might sound a little out of this world, it’s set to revolutionise the game of cricket for the blind and vision impaired. The man behind the idea is none other than Paul Szep, who is the president of Blind Bats Inc. (which is based in Morayfield) and also an avid cricket fan and player who is vision impaired. It’s all a dream come true for Paul, who has spent the better part of 4 years working behind the scenes to bring everything to fruition. For Paul, getting Blind Bats off the ground was about creating an environment that’s allinclusive and provides a platform for everyone to come and have a go. He knows all too well the challenges of navigating a world as a vision impaired person, but doesn’t let it get in the way of living as full a life as possible. “I only started playing cricket from the age of 38,” he says. “Up until then I hid my blindness and just did things. I went to a school that wasn’t a blind school and it was unusual for someone to do that. “I’ve done everything in my life that I’ve ever wanted to do. I’ve travelled the world as a businessman on my own and wasn’t afraid to ask for help. I worked for the Army and I also received an Australia Day medal for my help to the blind. There are difficulties in life but it’s how you manage them.” The creation of the beeping ball, which lets out sound to help vision impaired players locate the ball, came about after Paul noticed a need for players struggling on the field. He started doing his research online and came across a baseball with a similar idea and decided to fine tune it for cricket from there. Blind Bats worked with Sportscor on the Gold Coast who are responsible for the electronics inside the ball while Kookaburra Sport manufactured the ball itself. “They have done a really good job on the ball and it’s turned out better than we thought,” Paul says. “It’s definitely been a long time in the making. We were initially supposed to have it in January and there’s been all these delays, mainly because of Covid stopping the production line so ours went to the back of the queue.

“The brief was to make it as close as possible to a cricket ball, but with less bounce to make it easier for blindies to hit. The new beep ball is also not as hard as a regular cricket ball making it much safer for the players. Kookaburra have done such an excellent job on the ball. The players and I are really happy with it.” The beeping ball replaces a traditional rattle ball currently used in blind cricket. This traditional ball is made of a hard plastic filled with washers that emit noise through holes and only work as long as the ball is moving along the ground. The new beeping technology will be used for more than just cricket, with plans to expand into different sports including baseball, hockey, T-ball, basketball, netball, football and about 9 other ball related sports. “Cricket is just the start for us,” Paul says. “This is set to become a national thing using the Moreton Bay Region template and grow from there. Once we train and form a team, then we will hand them to a local club. So the teams we end up with here at Blind Bats will go on to be a beep cricket team at other local clubs. “We believe there will be huge sales of this ball all over the world and we think the US will definitely be interested in taking this up.” Working behind the scenes to have Blind Bats become a reality has been a long time coming for Paul. There has been massive support from different levels of government and also from the Caboolture Sports Club and Paul’s longtime cricket hero, Ian Healy. “Tony Clarke at the Caboolture Sports Club has been a big help in making things happen and we couldn’t have done this without him either,” Paul says. “Tony and the Caboolture Sports Club arranged for us to have these facilities (Devine Court Sportsground). Before this it was all working out of my own home. Once we needed to be active, Tony arranged for us to have the grounds and help cover costs. “Ian Healy was always my cricket hero. I always wanted to play wicketkeeper when trying to be a part of the regular backyard game, it was the safest place on the field for me, less chance of getting branded with the red ball that I just

could not see. So when I started playing blind cricket, I naturally went to wicketkeeper. “Ian Healy is one of Australia’s all-time best wicketkeepers, so when I watched cricket on TV, it was always Ian I was interested in. When Ian opened up Hoppy’s Car Wash at Morayfield, much to my surprise Tony arranged for me to meet him at the Caboolture Sports Club. Ian wanted to meet me and tell me he was making a large donation to Blind Bats. “It was one of those moments I nearly teared up. Ian has helped us all the way ever since. He’s done a great job with us and we couldn’t thank him enough.” As the Sport and Community Manager with Caboolture Sports Club, Tony Clarke says assisting groups like Blind Bats through their community support programs is all part of their commitment to making a difference within the community. “The vision and strategies of Blind Bats aligned well with the CSC Group so it was a natural connection for us,” Tony says. “It’s been really lovely to provide some financial support but particularly from my point of view on behalf of all CSC Group, just encouragement and the idea of saying to them, let’s give them some space and the “bats can fly” so to speak. They have proven themselves and taken off. Just giving them the field space and the clubhouse to set themselves up, it’s just demonstrated that the concept of what they want to achieve, works really well.” Tony highlights the importance of inclusive sport within our community and says it’s great to see what Blind Bats has been working hard on behind the scenes and this year it’s really taking traction. “We’re trying to make it known that the CSC Group has a really strong commitment to inclusive sport and getting more people more involved with it,” he says. “With the energy of Blind Bats, linking in 2 targeted sports, being Caboolture Football and Caboolture Cricket, and reaching out to get more people involved in blind/visually impaired football and cricket is just the beginning.

“For us, it’s the start of breaking down some barriers in sport. There’s still going to be time and energy and modification involved, but with a group like Blind Bats behind it and the openness and adaptiveness to change is what we’ve really been asking our clubs about. “We’re looking for them to be adaptive to change and to diversify their product and seek out new people that perhaps have traditionally not gotten involved in their sport. So many people don’t play sport because they may be blind or have another disability. “We’re trying to break that down, but it’s a difficult process and it’s programs like Blind Bats that will make a difference. We know that Paul and his group will help create that understanding of what’s required not just the modifications and simplicity of rules but also to get them out there and running around.” Paul hopes word gets around about the opportunities available to those who want to take up a sport more suited to their playing ability. “We hope people hear about what we’re doing and we want to bring the players in,” he says. “We also have transport to help get more people involved, it’s called the Bat Bus. “We’re also working with the Lions Club to get into different districts to play the game and get things up and running. Being all-inclusive is a big part of this sport and we want people to come along and give it a go.” For further information visit blindbats.org, follow them on Facebook or phone Paul on 0408 474 860. Above: Paul Szep, Blind Bats President with members Ben and Michael


The Benefit of Bees Words: Marnie Birch

When Greg North first became interested in beekeeping, he was surprised to find a lack of information available, until that is, he discovered NBKA, the Northside Bee Keepers Association; a group that has been supporting those interested in the management of European Honey bees and Native, (Stingless) bees for over 40 years. Now, as NBKA’s Liaison Officer, Greg explains why Beekeeping has become a kind of obsession for him. We know that bees make honey, but it is not widely known that bees are the major pollinators of our food crops. According to Greg, 70 % of what we put in our mouths has been pollinated by bees. He insists, “Mankind could not exist for more than four years without bees.” With that sobering thought, Greg describes how Native bees are stingless and often solitary, whereas the European honeybee lives in a highly regulated, but democratic society. Honeybee numbers are adjusted according to the needs of each colony and the Honeybee’s sole purpose is the continued survival of the Queen and the hive. An ageing, dying or underperforming Queen Bee will be swiftly replaced, more Drones will be raised to fertilize the new Queen and there are even particular bees whose job is to guard the entrance, to the hive, from intruders.

At this time of year, a bee colony will split, and the Queen Bee will leave with half of the bees from the hive, gathering in a swarm nearby, whilst Scout bees scope out a suitable new location. The bees won’t completely relocate until all the bees, in the swarm, agree on the suggested site. However, there’s one thing the bees can’t control and that’s the weather, which is critical to their food sources and, ultimately, their survival. Low rainfall correlates with lower honey yields and Greg has noticed how the presence of flowers doesn’t always guarantee enough food for the bees. When driving into Caboolture last year, he noticed that although the Forest Red and Blue Gums were flowering, there were few bees in the area. The trees had adapted to the extended drought by producing ‘dry flowers,’ that were devoid of nectar. Springtime flowering can sometimes be suppressed altogether, so without flowers and nectar, the bees are without food.

This is where homeowners can help, the bees, by incorporating bee-friendly plants into their gardens, particularly ones that flower in the months of September-December. Fruit trees, flowering shrubs such as Grevillea, Callistemon, (or Bottlebrush), and other herbaceous plants like Rosemary, Sage, Cosmos, and Marigolds make excellent food sources for bees. As bee numbers in agricultural areas decline, Greg explains how farmers are hiring beehives to pollinate their crops, with some hives being transported as far as Bundaberg and Cairns, for pollinating Macadamia and Almond trees. It’s not just bees that are in demand, as Australian beeswax is so pure it is sought after overseas, being exported for use in manufacturing cosmetics, moisturizers, lip balms and furniture polish. About Northside Bee Keepers Association With over 360 active members and up to 30 new members joining each month, it’s little wonder that the NBKA’s Beekeeping courses and mentoring programs are in high demand, as curiosity, in the community, about keeping bees grows. The group offers an annual Bio-Security Event on common Pest & Diseases in apiculture, which nicely complements field excursions and practical demonstrations of honey extractions and wax melts. And if that’s not enough, the group also provides a crucial, call-out service to the community, attending and managing bee swarms on north side properties. The high attendance at monthly meetings, (up to 120 people), means NBKA has outgrown the premises at Pine Rivers Special School and is urgently seeking larger meeting and training rooms with kitchen and storage facilities, as well as specialist extraction equipment. For more information on beekeeping or the Group, contact the Northside Beekeepers at nbkliaisonofficer@gmail.com or connect via the links below. The Northside Beekeepers Association Meet at 7.30 pm on the last Wednesday of every month at Pine Rivers Special School, 10 Lawnton Pocket Road, Lawnton. Guests and new members are welcome to attend. Field Days are held at Bellmere on the first Saturday after meeting and at Dayboro on the 2nd Saturday of the month and the last Sunday of the month.

Did you know? • • • • • • • • •

Bees establish new hives by swarming in spring Scout bees fly up to 70 sq. km in search of locations for a hive. Each female worker bee produces 1/8 teaspoon of honey in its life. A Queen Bee can lay up to 2,000 in a single day. Bees communicate with each other via a “waggle dance.” Bees maintain the brood or nursery area in the hive at 35 – 37 degrees C Australia has up to 16,000 varieties of Native bees – some are mistaken for bugs. Native (stingless) bees are more adaptable to drought than European bees but the hives do not reproduce as fast, nor do they produce the same quantity of honey. Council regulates the keeping of Honeybees on properties but Native bees are unrestricted.


STAGE 9 SELLING NOW!

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Call 3495 0192 to book a tour of the display village and clubhouse. liveinfreshwater.com.au www.featuremagazine.com.au

*Price is based on owning your home and leasing the land and is correct at time of printing and subject to change without notice.

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OPINION:

The World According to Kate The Fallon Respect for life. Respect for things. Respect for self. This is how I was raised and at the ripe old age of forty-four, I am sure I am stating the obvious when I say respect for anything is majorly lacking today. Lack of respect manifests itself many ways however recently I was introduced to a form of disrespect that was totally new to me. I call it… ‘The Fallon’. Yes, to those of you who are on top of your Netflix Dynasty shows and those who are more familiar with the 1980s drama, I am inspired by the character Fallon. For those unfamiliar with this character, we are talking about a person who intentionally manipulates situations to benefit their own needs. A person who firmly believes that anything goes so long as they get what they come out on top. The person that invites themselves over to dinner all the time because they are ‘poor’ yet are putting that money aside to purchase the latest model vehicle of their choice. The person that ‘needs help’ because their health is failing only to hear of them mountain bike riding whilst you’re cleaning their house and making meals. The person who asks to borrow money to get them through to their next pay day and then shows off their new $300 tattoo. The Fallon. I am sure you can add to this list. To date, my world hasn’t involved many of these people. Recently, however, after reconnecting with old friends – rather excitedly mind you – I was astounded as to the emotional damage these people do. I can’t help but understand why so many are happy to just stay in their homes and connect via electronic devices as opposed to deliver the old school respect of physically helping others – dropping of a meal, washing their car, mowing the lawn, walking the dog and the like. I am not going to focus too much on The Fallon people of the world – they would argue that they know what they want, and they are not afraid

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to get it. Imbeciles! Rather I write to those who have a Fallon in their lives or seek to expel one out of their life. You know you who they are. Egotistic, obsessed with self without any evidence that we (or the world’s view) matter. I can only speak for myself when I say that my recent ‘new’ experience with The Fallon left me unravelled. I was angry, hurt, exhausted yet at the same time felt guilty, confused, obliged to do more. This is part of the Fallon game. How else can they manipulate you to do more at your own cost whilst they do less and increase gains? So here are my conclusions on the matter, for what it is worth. If you feel like this, you are in The Fallon Trap and you must get out. How? Walk away. Learn to use the word No. People who put themselves first are rarely satisfied. Pity them but don’t help them. When it comes to their getting what they want, anything goes. If they can’t get what they want from you, they will move on - eventually. Keep a healthy attitude about yourself. I found it quite entertaining to see how many ways I could say that I was ‘disinclined to acquiesce their request’ (aka ‘no’), and the frustration that would follow and they would come back with another angle, another attempt. Afterall, with a 'Fallon'… anything goes.

November 2021

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Rocking the Stage to Help Others Words: Sheree Hoddinett

They may not be rock stars but having a bit of fun, playing some cool tunes and watching the smiles on people’s faces is all part of why Darryl Cini and The Plumbdogs hit the stage. Raising money for a chosen charity is definitely an added bonus. For the last 3 years, The Plumbdogs have helped raise a whopping total of $25,000 for local community organisations by hosting a gig on the last Sunday of every month at The Deception Bay Club. As an added bonus they have also been recognised for their amazing efforts to the local community after receiving a Longman Volunteer Award. The Plumbdogs first came to life about 9 years ago when a mate of Darryl’s was going through a tough personal experience. With both men playing musical instruments, they decided to get together and jam out some tunes. As Darryl is a plumber by a trade and his friend was a dog groomer, so the name The Plumbdogs was born. There has been many changes to the band line-up over the years but the main factor remains the same, to have fun. “We’re not going to release a number 1 hit, let’s face it,” Darryl says with a laugh. “We’re not going to line up recording contracts or tour Australia - you joke about it but it’ll never happen. It’s just about having fun. If we were trying to make money out of music we certainly wouldn’t be doing what we’re doing now. We’re all over 40, you can see when we’re performing, we’re all having a good time.” After realising a few years ago that people enjoyed listening to their performances, the group came up with the concept of putting on a gig afternoon at a pub and raising a few bucks for charity at the same time. They locked in the venue – The Deception Bay Club – and it all grew from there. “It’s an afternoon of entertainment, we charge $5 to get in, run a few raffles and whatever we raise goes to charity,” Darryl says. “Here we are 3 years on, still doing it. “We’re very grateful to our venue, as it’s all at no cost to us. It was originally the bowls club and now the Peninsula Fair Darts Association are in there so it’s run as a community club. They’re all

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volunteer staff and they make nothing (just bar and bistro takings) so all the money we raise goes to the charity. They’re not normally open on a Sunday and they help us otherwise we wouldn’t be able to run these events.” The Plumbdogs – also featuring Gary O’Brien on drums, Peter Lorman on bass and Al Salmon on lead guitar and vocals - play a varied calibre of songs ranging anywhere from the 60s through to the 90s. Darryl, who plays rhythm guitar, didgeridoo, harmonica and is also the lead singer, is chuffed the group has been recognised for their efforts with a Longman Volunteer Award, but says it’s so much more than that. “It’s nice to be recognised but you don’t do it for the accolades,” he says. “When we first started doing this we just wanted to help everyone that we could. “But it’s not just me, there’s a team behind me, the guys from the band, the guys in the other bands and other artists, my awesome wife Karen (who does so much behind the scenes) and all the other women behind us that help out too. Our chief entertainment officer Paul as well. He has been a big part of it all from the beginning.

musicians to get up on stage and wow the crowds.” Darryl admits he wishes they could help so many more charities, but do their best to assist the local, smaller groups. “To me, the music is only one part of all this, it’s the helping others,” he says. “If you can do one little deed every day, it all adds up. If I help this person and they help someone, it’s like a domino effect. “In November we’re doing Janina’s Costume Hire. So it’s not for the actual shop but for Christmas hampers. They do big Christmas hampers to help others in the community. We heard about it and thought maybe we can help raise a bit of money for it and help brighten up Christmas for others.” Head along to The Plumbdogs charity gigs at The Deception Bay Club - 32 Bayview Terrace, Deception Bay - on the last Sunday of every month (except December). They are always looking for sponsors and new artists to join the line-up. The Plumbdogs are also available to perform at other venues and gigs. For further information phone 0418 790 567 or follow them facebook.com/plumbdogsband

“So when I received the Longman Award, it was on behalf of everyone. I wouldn’t be able to do everything without everyone behind me.” Member for Longman Terry Young couldn’t speak more highly of Darryl and The Plumbdogs and commends them on their contribution to the community. He says Darryl was more than deserving of recognition in the 2021 Longman Volunteer Awards. “Darryl does an amazing job of balancing his time between his plumbing business and his music and fundraising activities,” Mr Young says. “Darryl and the other members of the Plumbdogs are true community stalwarts. They have turned their talent and passion for music into a passion for helping others. "Through their hard work and dedication, many local organisations have benefitted, and they have provided a platform for other local

November 2021

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Quiet Hour at Woolworths Woolworths Central Lakes, Morayshire, Kallangur Fair, and Petrie now offers a low-sensory Quiet Hour shopping experience designed to reduce anxiety and sensory stress for customers with specific needs. During Quiet Hour, Woolworths Central Lakes, Morayshire, Kallangur Fair, and Petrie will lower lights, turn down music or radio and turn off oven buzzers for an hour, every Tuesday between 10:30am and 11:30am. Following a successful trial in select stores, Quiet Hour will now be rolled out nationally. To date, there are already more than 750 stores nationwide which are already offering this initiative. Woolworths Operations Manager, John O'Dea said: “Our customers have told us there’s a need in the community for a low-sensory shopping experience in the area, so we’re pleased to expand Quiet Hour to Woolworths Central Lakes, Morayshire, Kallangur Fair, and Petrie. “Our team takes great pride in ensuring the store is quieter and less stressful for customers who want to shop during Quiet Hour and we look forward to welcoming them in store.” The low sensory initiative was developed in consultation with disability service providers at Life Without Barriers. Life Without Barriers Chief Executive Claire Robbs said: “Quiet Hour is a fantastic initiative by Woolworths that recognises the different needs of some customers. “It gives people a way to do their shopping and increase their independence in an environment that is not stressful and overwhelming to them.” Quiet Hour runs from 10:30am - 11:30am every Tuesday. During this hour, temporary changes are made to the store, including turning off bakery ovens or chicken cooker buzzers, reducing volume on store phones and registers on the trading floor, clearing store entry ways, reducing lighting and in store music, removing roll cages from the shop floor and stopping all PA announcements (excluding cases of emergencies)

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November 2021

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BEAUTY:

Ask

ca i n Mo

What Are The Ethics Surrounding Aestheticians, Cosmetic Nurses, And Beauty Therapists?

In today’s world, where more and more anti-ageing treatments are developing, new technologies and demand for non- surgical procedures and services are increasing, there has been a need for industry professionals to identify and question which practicing professionals can carry out certain procedures and who cannot. Every other salon is now a “clinic” offering anti-aging treatments, laser therapy, needling, Botox and many other modalities that are reaching deeper into the skin. All these changes require safety measures to protect the consumer, therefore the need to establish clear guidelines on training and education. That is how work ethics are coming to play a very important role. Considering the fact that ethics encompasses what actions are right or wrong in a particular situation it is useful to examine the principles that build the ethics to come up with a code of ethics. I can think of 5 principles that can guide us: 1. Professional Standard 2. Rights 3. Relationships 4. Responsibility 5. Safety For example, talking about professional Standards, of course we have to maintain knowledge and high skill levels to provide quality health care, but appropriate qualifications can vary, for example in case of a beauty therapist a diploma is required, compared to an aesthetician and cosmetic nurse the requirement is a bachelor degree. Rights, relationships and responsibilities can be summarized by saying that an aestheticians absolute duty of care is to the best interest of the client. Of course, cultivating qualities such as transparency, trust, respect, and honesty will enable the aesthetician to achieve a high level of duty of care. What I have just said links well with the safety principals where a professional will follow health and safety procedures, maintain indemnity insurance and definitely sanitation must be a top priority in this industry. In conclusion I strongly believe that proper education is the key to success and what will set a high quality service apart from the rest.

Ask Monica! Do you have a beauty question that needs answering? Email Monica via editor@ featuremagazine.com.au

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November 2021

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HEALTH:

Exercise and Diabetes Words: Moreton All Body Care

Did you know exercise plays a vital role with managing diabetes? Diabetes is a condition characterised by high blood glucose, from a problem with the hormone insulin. Insulin helps the body take the glucose from the blood to use as energy. Diabetes can involve your body’s immune system destroying the cells that produce insulin (type 1), or affecting your body’s response to insulin leading to insulin resistance (type 2 and gestational). For individuals with diabetes, exercise should be an essential part of their lifestyle. It is important to note that there are special considerations to ensure it is done safely as there are potential complications due to the condition. So why is exercise so important for this? • Firstly, if you do not have diabetes, exercise plays an important role in reducing your risk of getting some types of diabetes. • Or if you have recently been diagnosed, or are struggling with being able to control your blood glucose levels then exercise can improve the way your muscles

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• •

respond to insulin; thus helping regulate the levels of glucose in your blood, even for a few hours after you have stopped exercising! Exercise can also increase the uptake of glucose from the blood, without even requiring insulin If you are pregnant and develop gestational diabetes - exercise helps reduce insulin resistance

Why is it important to control blood glucose levels? • To reduce the risk of complications and health concerns associated with diabetes including cardiovascular disease as well as damage to organs and nerves. What do I need to consider if I have diabetes? • To avoid potential problems, blood glucose levels need to be checked before, during and after exercise (especially as you are getting into a new program / activity) • Avoid injecting insulin into exercising limbs (if required for your condition) • Wear supportive shoes and comfortable

November 2021

• • •

socks Find the best time of the day for you to exercise and try to stick to a routine Regular exercise is the most important thing - try not to have 72 hours without doing some physical activity! Both cardio and resistance exercises exercises are beneficial → ensure regular breathing and avoid heavy, static holds to reduce risk of a high blood pressure response

Health professionals like Exercise Physiologists can assist with working with anyone interested in starting an exercise program or wanting advice on appropriate exercise for their situation. At Moreton All Body Care both our Burpengary and Narangba practices offer Exercise Physiology services - call us on 07 3888 6699 for more information. For further reading or information about exercise and diabetes - https://exerciseright.com.au/ diabetes/ or https://www.diabetesaustralia.com. au/

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Divine Woman’s Intuitive Massage Words: Deb Howcroft-Miles @ Zen Chi Natural Therapies & Wellness Centre

Are you feeling disconnected from family, friends, lovers, nature, or community? Are you pushing away people that you love? Are you feeling a sense of emptiness in your life? Does the beauty of nature seem dull and boring? Often, we will seek the answers to these questions outside of ourselves and yet reconnecting inwards is what we need. But sometimes it starts with outside support. At Zen Chi, we believe a holistic approach can reconnect us to our inner world so that the outer world is perceived with truth and beauty once more. Body work, meditation, breath practices and diving deep within your heart and soul holds many answers. Our Divine Woman Intuitive Massage is a deep ritualistic practice designed specifically for reconnecting you to your inner world, allowing a complete mind, body, soul experience. If you are struggling to connect with your inner self, feeling out of alignment or seeking answers that seem to be constantly alluding you a Divine Woman Intuitive Massage is the holistic approach for you. Dive deep into the rich velvety space of the Woman Within, connect with the divine and Relax into your inner knowing to heal yourself, build strong relationships and see beauty all around.

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SENIORS:

Using Your Green Thumb For Good Health Words: Susanne Jones, Just Better Care Brisbane North and CBD

be washed carefully. Only eat flowers in salads if they are organically grown and free of pesticides and other garden sprays. Some flowers, seeds and leaves can be toxic, so if you’re not sure, do further research. When working outside remember to wear adequate sunscreen and protective clothing including a hat, correct footwear and gloves. Always bend at the knee when lifting something heavy and don’t use your back. When using potting mix, or spraying fertilisers observe safety instructions and ideally wear a mask. Be realistic When planning to plant an edible garden the most important thing you can do is to be realistic about the time you will actually have to tend to your vegetables, fruits or herbs as this will likely influence what type of garden you plant.

There are few things in life more satisfying than filling your plate with items you have grown in your own garden. Aside from the enjoyment of gardening, research shows there are numerous physical and psychological benefits from working in the garden, including improved endurance, strength, flexibility, mobility and general wellbeing. A pot or two is all that’s needed to create an interesting and edible garden. Which space is best? The beauty of an edible garden is that they don’t require a significant amount of space. Courtyards, balconies, porches and even living rooms are all ideal spots in which to place a pot or container to grow your produce of choice. To make your garden a talking point try upcycling an old bath or laundry tub or even stacking a

few old car tyres in which to grow your plants. Unless you have access to a raised garden bed, the area you select should be flat and sheltered but also receive reasonable amounts of sunlight. What to plant? Common options include: edible flower types such as chamomile, fuchsia, lavender, honeysuckle and violet; herbs such as rosemary, basil, chives, sage, thyme and mint; vegetables such as lettuce, silver beet, tomato or corn; and fruits such as kiwifruit, strawberries or passion fruit. Planting times will vary for different vegetables, herbs or fruits depending on their growing seasons. A good rule of thumb is to plant warmseason vegetables in spring and cool-season veggies in winter. Safety comes first Remember, everything you pick to eat should

Tips for success There can be no guarantee of success but try the following tips to ensure a flourishing and productive garden space. •

Monitor regularly for weed growth, ensuring that when weeds appear you remove them from the root and not just the top foliage. Check the health of the plants. Do not leave old fruit, vegetables and pruning material underneath the plants as these can harbour disease. Where possible, undertake minor pruning to keep shrubs and trees in shape. This removes dead growth and encourages new growth. Pests and diseases are a natural part of nature, and it is not always possible to eliminate them. Consider using nonchemical solutions like garlic, chilli spray or milk to ward off any unwanted pests.

FINANCE:

6 Ways To Get Your Home Loan Paid Off Sooner Words: Vanessa Bragdon, Cornerstone Home Loans

Wondering how to pay off your home loan sooner? We look at some things you could do. Australian home loan interest rates remain at historic lows, and the opportunities for paying off a mortgage early are better than ever. Used in conjunction with low rates, here are some extra steps that can speed up loan repayments and reduce your loan balance. 1. Make higher repayments One of the easiest ways to quickly reduce the balance of your mortgage is to make larger loan repayments. The minimum repayments required on a loan are calculated on the amount owing and the prevailing home loan interest rate. Repaying more than the minimum can cut the overall term of the loan and save you thousands of dollars in interest. Some lenders may charge you an early payment cost for paying your loan in advance so it pays to ensure you can make additional repayments. 2. Make more frequent repayments Home loans are often structured so that you make monthly repayments. But making fortnightly repayments instead can reduce the term of a loan and save interest. By making fortnightly repayments, you are paying the equivalent of half of your monthly repayment every two weeks. This allows you to make the

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equivalent of one extra monthly repayment per year.

Extra payments can often be made on the fixed loan too, up to a limit specified by the lender.

3. Seek out lower rates Although obvious, many borrowers take out a mortgage and then stop following the home loan market. With interest rates constantly changing, it pays to monitor the latest rates. If rates go down, contact your lender or broker and ask if they can reduce the rate on your loan.

With just a few easy steps, borrowers can significantly reduce the length of their mortgage and save thousands of dollars in the process. A mortgage broker can assist you in setting everything up.

4. Don’t reduce repayments with a rate cut When a lender reduces the interest rate on its home loans, usually in line with a cut in official interest rates, your first thought may be to reduce your loan repayments accordingly. However, by maintaining your loan repayments, you effectively repay more than the minimum loan repayment and will reduce your loan term.

For more information on how you can pay off your home loan sooner, contact your local mortgage broker.

5. Use your home equity As home prices rise, you build more equity in your property. Redrawing funds from a home loan to pay for renovations and other costs can be a much cheaper source of funds than others. 6. Set up a split loan A split loan, sometimes referred to as a combination loan, enables borrowers to divide their mortgage into both variable and fixed components. By doing this, you can not only make extra payments on the variable component, but also lock in a lower fixed rate.

November 2021

Ask Vanessa! Do you have a finance question that needs answering? Email Vanessa via editor@featuremagazine.com.au

Feature


LONGMAN SENIORS EXPO ! POSTPONED DUE TO COVID RESTRICTIONS ! NEW DATES:

MORAYFIELD - NOVEMBER 12 BRIBIE ISLAND - NOVEMBER 17 • • •

Free Entry • 100+ stalls • Demonstrations •

Lucky Door Prize Free Sample Bags Guest speakers

Hosted by

TERRY YOUNG MP Federal Member for Longman

RSVP here: Or Phone 5432 3177 Office: Unit 7. Level 1, 69 King Street, Caboolture QLD 4510 Phone: 07 5432 3177 Email: terry.young.mp@aph.gov.au Website: terryyoung.com.au Facebook: TerryYoungMP

Supported by

Authorised by T. Young, Liberal National Party of Queensland, Unit 7, Level 1, 69 King Street, Caboolture QLD 4510.

Keep our community safe.

Get vaccinated. * * *

Walk in at any of our local Queensland Health vaccination clinics. Find one at metronorth. health.qld.gov.au/ coronavirus/vaccinations; Book a vaccination with your GP, or; Get in touch with your local pharmacist.

Chris Whiting MP Vaccination 2021 Ad.indd 1

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20/10/2021 10:27:50 AM

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LANDSCAPE with Lawrie

MY VIEWPOINT Our Natural Legacy

It is not often that you find a new park that is significant in terms of first nation history, pioneering heritage, botany, landscape and recreation. The expansive Heritage Park on the banks of the Caboolture River at Morayfield celebrates all of these interests. The developers of North Harbour deserve strong congratulations for the sympathetic and interesting way they have preserved the site and artefacts of “Moray Fields” one of Queensland’s most significant early homestead properties.

Plant of the Month

Flame Tree Brachychiton Acerifolius November is exam time for most students and three trees signal a reminder that it is time to study. The purple Jacaranda, the red Flame Tree and the golden Silky Oak all bust into flower at the same time each year. Of the three the Flame Tree Brachychiton acerifolius is the most suitable for the home garden or street. This is a medium

More than 160 years ago, George Raff a prominent citizen, local businessman and member of the second Queensland Parliament established the property. With the help of the South Sea Islanders known as Kanakas, grew cotton then later sugarcane for the production of molasses and rum. He introduced steam power to drive the farm machinery and built a tramway loop around the fields.

size specimen tree which develops a formal upright canopy supported on a thick trunk. Usually deciduous in late winter to early spring, the brilliant red flowers are massed over the canopy contrasting against an azure blue sky. Suitable for almost all soils and aspects, it is tolerant of drier conditions and can be termed ‘Water Wise’.

A Good Place To Walk North Harbour Heritage Park

This unique park is certainly well worth a visit. You will need plenty of time to follow the pathway network linking the extensive lagoon side relics of the homestead, the river wharf and landing site, remnants of the dairy and other outbuildings, a tramway and much more. Interpretive signage is placed along all pathways to tell this fascinating story of early settlement.

The Picnic Area

Road access to early Brisbane was difficult, so a wharf was built on the Caboolture River to allow small vessels to convey goods and produce to another wharf on the Brisbane River near his city home ‘Moray Bank’ at New Farm. This is a fascinating area with a remarkable story about the early development of our area that has been long overlooked, and until recently hidden by extensive pine plantations established for the Petrie Paper Mill. Now the forests are cleared and our generation can see and understand how this extensive settlement was established and thrived for so many decades. North Harbour Heritage Park is now listed as a place of Queensland State significance and protected on the Queensland Heritage Register.

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Bunya Nut Forest Be astounded by the unexpected groves of towering Bunya Nut Trees. For many generations the aboriginal peoples gathered here, then walked between the coast and the Bunya Mountains to feast on the nutritious nuts, bringing many back which grew rapidly in the local fertile soils.

November 2021

Everything you need for an enjoyable day out is here at the Heritage Park – shelters, barbecues, toilets, shady areas, open lawns and trails to explore. For those energetic health conscious readers take your hiking boots and discover the forests along the Caboolture River. Or take your bike and test your cycling skills around the tree shaded circuit. Set aside a full day to enjoy everything you will find here.

Ask Lawrie! Do you have a garden question that needs answering? Email Lawrie via editor@ featuremagazine.com.au

Feature


SUPER SATURDAY! Looking to downsize without compromise? Oak Tree Burpengary is hosting a Super Saturday event! Experience the companionship of like-minded people in the safety of a gated community, combined with the lifestyle benefits of a boutique, purpose-built village. Come and discover the many reasons why our residents love to call Oak Tree home.

Saturday 20 November 9am – 3pm

118 Pitt Road, Burpengary Call 1300 367 155 oaktreegroup.com.au


PUZZLES

SOLUTIONS ON PAGE 30

SUDOKU #63 MEDIUM

HARD

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Plant Of The Month: ____ Tree (5) Sports Central Caboolture Features a Tasty ____ Menu (6) Flexible, ____ in-home support, Just For You (10) New: ____ Chicken Tenders (7) Oak Tree Super ____ (5) Page 8; "A More Full On Role As A Funeral ____" (8) Landscape: Lawrie's ____ (9) North Lakes Sports Club Hosting Quizzy Pop Music ____ (6) In Brief: ____ Sports Expo (8) Opinion: The ____ (6) Mooncake Ingredients: ____ Oil (6) Seniors: Try Planting ____ Flowers (6) ____ To Us! (5) Feature; ____ Cricket (5) Alex Gow, Pre-____ Funerals (8) Leolec ____ (10) Finance: Extra ____ can often… (8) Clarity Pools ____ Packages (7) The Benefit Of Bees, ____ Honey Bees (8) ____ On Page 28 (7)

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____ by Ingenia Lifestyle (10) Seasons, ____ Hill (5) New ____ Precinct, Narangba Heights (10) ____ Where The Jobs Are Right Now (10) Next Issue: ____ (8) Zen Chi, ____ Woman (6) ____ Your Home (10) Chris Whiting; Book a ____ (11) Sunstate ____ Reports (4) Mark Ryan, State Member For ____ (10) ____ Is Offering New Residents $5000 (7) Great Northern Garden Of Remembrance; Still ____ Owned (6) What's On! Caboolture; ____ Pay Day (7) Shane King, ____ And Delivering (9) Rugby League, ____ Roberts (5) Moreton All Body Care Offers ____ (7) Your ____ Business, Our ____ Rate (5) Sports Club, Pink ____ Tribute (4) On The Cover: Paul ____ (4)

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CABOOLTURE SPORTS CLUB With three dining outlets, there’s something for all taste buds & budgets at Queensland’s 2019 & 2020 Club of the Year. Choose from The Mill Restaurant, Laneway Café or Tempo Lounge & Bar. Open Daily from 10am Ph: 5497 9711 19-27 Station Rd, Morayfield www.cabsports.com.au @cabsports

Savoury mooncake by Susan & Kate's Kitchen

Ingredients Filling 320g pork belly(no skin) 80g preserved veg(榨菜)Zhacai White pepper 2g Sesame oil 10g Salt 5g pastry Part 1 Plain flour 150g Water 55g Butter 60g Part 2 Cake flour 120g Butter 75g

Click Here for more recipies

Method 1. Chopped pork and Zhacai together til fine but not mince, add seasonings. separate to 16 pieces 2. Mix pastry part 1 together and separate to 16 pieces. 3. Blended part 2 together or general mix together. Keep it still powery. separate to 16 pieces 4. Put part 2 in side part 1 5. Gently roll it to ovel shape then roll back rest 15mins 6. Repeat it again 7. 8. 9.

Press it down and roll to round shape Fill the meat to the pastry and add bit colour for dacarate Oven baked 190 mins for 25mins or pan grill for10 mins

Recipe contributed by the Multicultural Queensland Social Network

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Brisbane Bar Tide Times – QUEENSLAND LONG 153° 10’ E Nov 2021 High and Low Waters

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0.50 1.76 0.59 2.26

0.54 1.84 0.60 2.25

OPINION:

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accordingly. Fashion, habits,

Cryptic Critic

TH 1405 0.53 FR 1457 0.69 into pages of history books and are 2025the 1.81 1943disappear 2.12

forgotten. A classic example of this is the apparent

8 0213 0804

0.36 2.04 O 1411 0.47 2016 2.26

0.29 2.21 WE 1423 0.42 2015 2.30

18 0237 0852

9 0247 0843

0247 0854 TH 1515 2059

0.22 2.36 0.37 2.25

19 0307 0927

0 0318 0917

5 0327 0940

0.17 2.48 FR 1607 0.36 2144 2.15

20 0335 1000

1 0345 0951

0404 1026 SA 1700 2230

0.17 2.56 0.39 2.02

21 0403 1033

2 0412 1024

0443 1114 SU 1753 2319

0.21 2.57 0.45 1.86

22 0433 1107

3 0437 1057

0522 0.29 1203 2.53 MO 1851 0.53

23 0504 1143

4 0503 1130

0.40 2.24 U 1752 0.68 2324 1.72

0013 0606 TU 1257 1955

1.71 0.41 2.44 0.60

24 0538 1221

0.55 2.23 WE 1858 0.77

that nursery rhymes, origins in 16th and 000717th 1.73century 0524Britain, 0.50 are irrelevant today and 1203 2.35 0555point 0.40 to `Goosy Goosy, Gander`, which relates 0.70 King Henry the Eighth was WE 1242to 2.54 TH 1843 the 1500’s when 1942 0.54 hunting and beheading Catholic priests. `Three 0104Blind 1.68Mice` 0010 1.69 Mary, Queen of Scots in the is about 0646 0.53 0604 0.57 1600’s and `Jack and Jill` refers to the beheading TH 1333 2.41 FR 1242 2.31

0531 1205 O 1830 2358

0115 0659 WE 1356 2103

1.59 0.55 2.33 0.64

0023 0618 TH 1304 1948

0206 0745 FR 1428 2130

0.33 2.13 U 1453 0.46 2052 2.20

0.32 2.20 E 1532 0.48 2124 2.13

0.32 2.24 H 1608 0.51 2155 2.05

0.32 2.27 R 1644 0.56 2224 1.95

0.35 2.27 A 1717 0.61 2253 1.84

5

0.47 2.19 0.76 1.60

0.57 2.11 U 1914 0.83

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0.32 2.35 FR 1552 0.60 2125 1.89

0.33 2.38 SA 1629 0.61 2157 1.82

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0.40 2.34 MO 1739 0.68 2303 1.68 0.47 2.29 TU 1816 0.73 2340 1.62

25

1.56 0.64 2.17 0.80

1538 0.66 0.47 SAcurriculums. FR 1504children’s 2102 1.78 2034 2.05

Who of us over the age of fifty couldn’t remember some of the words 0256of 0.19 `Jack and0307 Jill`, 0.38 `Humpty Dumpty` or `Baa Baa 0923Black 2.62 Sheep`. 0942Up2.42 until the 1950’s the parental SA 1600 0.43 SU 1616 0.65 and singing nursery rhymes to 2127practice 1.98 of reciting 2138 1.76 their children was relatively common. They never 0339 0.19 0340 0.39 1013knew 2.68 the meanings 1016 2.42 or the origins of them, but 0.42 MO 0.66speaking world over, would the1653 English SU 1656parents 2219recite 1.89 them2214 1.74children almost as a nightly to their surveys among modern 0422ritual. 0.22 But more 0414 recently 0.41 1101day 2.69 2.41 parents1051 point to a significant majority not 0.44 TU 1729 0.67 MO 1751even of the 2313 1.81knowing 2249 1.73 existence of nursery rhymes, let alone the words of any.

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1.65 0.67 2.28 0.61

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1.68 0.65 2.27 0.69

Puzzle Solutions

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7 0039 0642

12 0351 0928

27 0225 0812

Puzzle 13 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.53) 0423 1.76 0301 1.73 12MEDIUM 1008 0.84 27 0852 0.80

8 0135 0733

13 0504 1049

28 0345 0929

13 0527 1120

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1.41 0.78 H 1431 1.99 2129 0.88

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15 0051 0655

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1.52 0.79 SA 1454 2.11 2151 0.73

1.59 0.81 SU 1557 2.12 2251 0.63

1.74 0.77 MO 1659 2.15 2347 0.51

30 0600 1156

1.93 0.70 TU 1756 2.16

1 0541 1128

1.65 0.71 The Bureau of Meteorology gives U 1750 2.16 no warranty of any kind whether

express, implied, statutory or otherwise in respect to the availability, accuracy, currency, Bureau of Meteorology completeness, quality or reliability of the information or de the information will be fit TC +10:00) that for any particular purpose or First will Quarter not infringe any Full thirdMoon party Intellectual Property rights. The Bureau's liability for any loss, damage, cost or expense resulting from use of, or reliance on, the information is entirely excluded. Copyright of the tidal prediction tables is vested in the Commonwealth of Australia represented by the National Tidal Centre, Bureau of Meteorology.

1.68 0.77 SA 1525 2.15 2222 0.60

9 2.05 5 SU 1623 2313 0.57 8

26 0155 0745

1.69 0.73 SU 1413 2.21 2102 0.65

2 1509 1 2.15 8 MO 2159 0.60

7 1.88 0.85 1 1.97 6 MO 1720

28 0415 1008

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29 0525 1126

1 0.52 2.02 6 0.83 2 TU 1225 1813 1.91 7

3 0.47 2.15 5 0.78 9 WE 1322 1900 1.87

15 0044 0708 3

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Puzzle 14 F (Medium, difficulty F L Arating M E0.51)

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Puzzle 13 16 (Hard, (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49) HARD Puzzle difficulty rating 0.68)

5 4 3 3

8 8 1 5 2 2 9 9 4 Last 7 Quarter 6 4 5 6 1 8

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Puzzle 16 19 (Hard, (Medium, difficulty rating 0.48) Puzzle difficulty rating 0.67)

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Therefore should we compose new nursery rhymes with modern themes and recite and sing them to our children? Current world happenings such as Covid 19, China, Donald Trump, Prince Harry and Meaghan Markle or even the State of Origin rugby league series could provide a rich source of subject matter for nursery rhymes of the future!

1925 0.71

0058 0650 SA 1325 2011

26 0115 0707

1.56 0.75 FR 1610 2.17 2312 0.58

However many speech psychologists believe that reciting and singing nursery rhymes can speed up a child’s communication, memory, language and reading skills. A British education institute showed that children, whose parents sang or read nursery rhymes to them, progressed better at school in spatial reasoning, which aids mathematical skills.

0507 0.30 0447 0.45 1151 2.64 1127 2.38 0.49 WEeducators 1804 0.69 argue TU 1846Modernist 2328 1.71 many of which had their

11 0230 0805

1.50 0.68 E 1331 2.04 2012 0.88

1.52 0.72 FR 1355 2.13 2047 0.79

0234 0.38 0.23 children’s nursery rhymes from 3 0212 0834disappearance 2.50 18 0906of2.40

6 0603 1245

1.53 0.68 TH 1500 2.23 2210 0.63

of the French king Louis the 14th and his wife Marie Antoinette during the French Revolution in 1789. Baa Baa Black Sheep written around 1740 allegedly relates either to the slave trade or the medieval wool tax and Hickory Dickory Dock tells of the Exeter Cathedral Clock which contained a door with a small hole in it, through which a resident cat would go through, to catch mice. So there is little disagreement that most if not all of these rhymes have hidden sinister meanings. Katherine Elwes wrote in the 1930’s that the rhymes were coded historical propaganda or protest and she did not believe that they were written for children’s entertainment.

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C I 7S 2 T R5 O 6 3 8 1 A 4 9 R N E R E S P O N S I V E 1 9 6 2 7 4 3 5 8 D S G E 8 H3 Y 1 5 9 7 O 6 2 U 4N C K S 2 4 W8 7 9 5 D6 1 3 F T A S U P E R R 9 3 1 8 4 6 5 2 7 R E C T O R C O I 6 5 E7 3 E 2 V 1I E8 W 9P O4 I N T E5 1 T R4 I 9 V I 8 A 7 M2 3E 6 T S I C B S M 8 6 2 4 1 3 9 7 5 O B S T A C L E T O S3 7 9 5 A 6 I 2 R4 8 1 R E F A L L O N P A Puzzle 14 17 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.50) Puzzle A A (Hard,I difficulty A rating 0.73) U Y 7A M 1 6 3 5 8 4 2 9 S T T F S6 E 2 5 1 7 9 4 8 3 O3 9I E D I B L E T I 8 5 2 8 4 2 1 7 7 9 6 6 5 1 4 3 N L O W R I T E 4 2 7 5 3 6 9 7 3 1 8 S8 9 Y B L I 4 N 6D 1 5 2 N L 1 8 4 9 3 6 5 7 2 I A R R A N G E D 5 6 9 8 3 1 2 7 4 9 8 5 4 7 7 4S 2 1 5 2R 6 8 1 3 9 6 3 E L E C T R I C A L 2 7 6 1 3 9 8 6 7 4 5 5 9 3 4 8 1 2 E Y S G 6A 3 7 9E 6 5N T5 2S 7 3 9 1 2 8M 1 4 P4 Y M8 A I Z H E A T I N G 8 4 1 7 6 9 2 5 3 7 1 2 4 9 8 3 6 5 A R 5O 3 P E2 A 1 N 8 E 4 6 9L 7 9 5 6 2G 1 3 8 4 7 P U Z Z L E S Puzzle 17 20 (Hard, (Medium, difficulty rating 0.45) Puzzle difficulty rating 0.69)

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