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Congratulations to our Recent Award Winners

H THOMAS J. LYON AWARD IN WESTERN AMERICAN LITERARY AND CULTURAL STUDIES

H WILLA LITERARY AWARD WINNER CREATIVE NONFICTION WINNER

H MARY LEE SPENCE DOCUMENTARY BOOK AWARD

Western Literature Association

Women Writing the West

STOKING THE FIRE

MY RANCH, TOO

Edward Schieffelin’s Own Story

Nationhood in Cherokee Writing, 1907–1970

A Wyoming Memoir

By Edward Schieffelin

By Kirby Brown

By Mary Budd Flitner

Edited by R. Bruce Craig

$39.95 Hardcover

$24.95 Hardcover

$19.95 Paperback

978-0-8061-6015-3

978-0-8061-6058-0

978-0-8061-5773-3

Mining History Association PORTRAIT OF A PROSPECTOR

$24.95 Paperback 978-0-8061-6016-0

H BARBARA SUDLER AWARD

H RUPERT NORVAL RICHARDSON BEST BOOK PRIZE FOR WEST TEXAS HISTORY

H WEST-PACIFIC BEST REGIONAL NON-FICTION, BRONZE MEDAL

West Texas Historical Association

Independent Publisher Book Awards (IPPY)

African Americans on the Overland Trails, 1841–1869

COMANCHE JACK STILWELL

PAINTERS OF THE NORTHWEST

By Shirely Ann Wilson Moore

Army Scout and Plainsman

Impressionism to Modernism, 1900–1930

$29.95 Hardcover

By Clint E. Chambers and Paul H. Carlson

By John Impert

978-0-8061-5562-3

$24.95 Paperback

$45.00 Hardcover

978-0-8061-6278-2

978-0-8061-6034-4

History Colorado SWEET FREEDOM’S PLAINS

OUPRESS.COM

On the cover: (detail) Prayer Tower, Ted Matherly, Tulsa, Oklahoma, 2018.


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January Moon The Northern Cheyenne Breakout from Fort Robinson, 1878–1879 By Jerome A. Greene Historian Jerome A. Greene is renowned for his memorable chronicles of egregious events involving American Indians and the U.S. military, including Sand Creek, Washita, and Wounded Knee. Now, in January Moon, Greene draws from extensive research and fieldwork to explore a signal—and appallingly brutal—event in American history: the desperate flight of Chief Dull Knife’s Northern Cheyenne Indians from imprisonment at Fort Robinson, Nebraska. In the wake of the Great Sioux War of 1876–77, the U.S. government expelled most Northern Cheyennes from their northern plains homeland to Indian Territory, in present-day Oklahoma. Following mounting hardships, many of those people, under Chiefs Dull Knife and Little Wolf, broke away, seeking to return north. While Little Wolf’s band managed initially to elude pursuing U.S. troops, Dull Knife’s people were captured in 1878 and ushered into a makeshift barrack prison at Camp (later Fort) Robinson, where they spent months waiting for government officials to decide their fate. It is here that Greene’s riveting narrative edges toward its climax. On the night of January 9, 1879, in a bloody struggle with troops, Dull Knife’s people staged a massive breakout from their barrack prison in a last-ditch bid for freedom. Greene paints a vivid picture of their frantic escape, which took place under an unusually brilliant moon that doomed many of those fleeing by silhouetting them against the snow. A climactic engagement at Antelope Creek proved especially devastating, and the helpless people were nearly annihilated. In gripping detail, Greene follows the survivors’ dreadful experiences into their aftermath, including creation of the Northern Cheyenne Reservation. Carrying the story to the present day, he describes Cheyenne tribal events commemorating the breakout—all designed to ensure that the injustices of nineteenth-century U.S. government policy will never be forgotten. Jerome A. Greene is retired as a Research Historian for the National Park Service. He is the author of numerous books, including American Carnage: Wounded Knee, 1890 and Morning Star Dawn: The Powder River Expedition and the Northern Cheyennes.

APRIL $32.95 HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6478-6 320 PAGES, 6 X 9 24 B&W AND 3 COLOR ILLUS., 6 MAPS WORLD HISTORY/AMERICAN INDIAN

Of Related Interest

FORT ROBINSON AND THE AMERICAN WEST, 1874–1899 By Thomas R. Buecker $19.95 Paperback 978-0-8061-3534-2 FORT ROBINSON AND THE AMERICAN CENTURY, 1900–1948 By Thomas R. Buecker $19.95 Paperback 978-0-8061-3646-2 MORNING STAR DAWN The Powder River Expedition and the Northern Cheyennes, 1876 By Jerome A. Greene $24.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-3548-9

GREENE JANUARY MOON

Recounts one of the most tragic episodes of the western Indian Wars


MALONE, MALONE NASHVILLE’S SONGWRITING SWEETHEARTS

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“The story of Felice and Boudleaux Bryant is the story of towering artistic achievement wrapped in a love story so deep and so complete that the two are their own country song. Bobbie and Bill Malone are precisely the right match to tell this tale of love and genius.”

Ken Burns

Director, Country Music

“This book is a treasure. Nashville’s Songwriting Sweethearts uses the creative and familial partnership of Boudleaux and Felice Bryant to uncover larger transformations in country music and pop culture in the twentieth century. Authors Bobbie and Bill Malone fill every page with the same laughter, heartache, and joy that defines the Bryants’ legendary catalog.”

Charles L. Hughes

author of Country Soul: Making Music and Making Race in the American South

NASHVILLE’S SONGWRITING SWEETHEARTS The Boudleaux and Felice Bryant Story By Bobbie Malone and Bill C. Malone You might not know the names of Boudleaux and Felice Bryant, but you know their music. Arriving in Nashville in 1950, the songwriting duo became the first full-time independent songwriters in that musical city. In the course of their long careers, they created classic hits that pushed the boundaries of country music into the realms of pop and rock. Songs like “Bye Bye Love,” “All I Have to Do Is Dream,” “Love Hurts,” and “Rocky Top” inspired young musicians everywhere. Here, for the first time, is a complete biography of Nashville’s power songwriting couple. In Nashville’s Songwriting Sweethearts, authors Bobbie Malone and Bill C. Malone recount how Boudleaux and Felice, married in 1945, began their partnership as itinerant musicians living in a trailer home and writing their first songs together. In Nashville the couple had to deal with racism, classism, and in Felice’s case, sexism. Yet through hard work and business

acumen—and a dose of good luck—they overcame these obstacles and rose to national prominence. By the late 1990s, the Bryants had written as many as 6,000 songs and had sold more than 350 million copies worldwide. They were inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1972, and in 1991 they became members of the Country Music Hall of Fame—a rare occurrence for songwriters who were not also performers. In 1982 their composition “Rocky Top” was adopted as one of the official state songs of Tennessee. The Bryants were lucky enough to arrive in the right place at the right time. Their emergence in the early fifties coincided with the rise of Nashville as Music City, USA. And their prolific collaboration with the Everly Brothers, beginning in 1957, sparked a fusion between country and pop music that endures to this day.

Bobbie Malone is the author of Lois Lenski: Storycatcher; Rabbi Max Heller: Reformer, Zionist, Southerner, 1860–1979; and Striding Lines: The Unique Story Quilts of Rumi O’Brien. Bill C. Malone is the author of Country Music, USA, which has celebrated its 50th anniversary in print in a completely revised edition. His most recent books are Sing Me Back Home: Southern Roots and Country Music and Bill Clifton: Bluegrass Ambassador to the World. OPPOSITE (LEFT TO RIGHT): ALTHOUGH THE BRYANTS DID NOT REALLY WRITE WHILE SITTING ON THE STEPS AT THEIR GATLINBURG HOME, IT MADE FOR A FINE PUBLIC ITY SHOT. COURTESY HOUSE OF BRYANT PUBLICATIONS. FELICE AND BOUDLEAUX WERE INSTANTLY POPULAR AS PERFORMERS ON WBAY. COURTESY OF THE COUNTRY MUSIC HALL OF FAME® AND MUSEUM. WESLEY ROSE AND BOUDLEAUX WITH THE EVERLY BROTHERS AT THE HEIGHT OF THEIR CAREERS. COURTESY OF THE COUNTRY MUSIC HALL OF FAME® AND MUSEUM. BOUDLEAUX AND FELICE PERFORMING WITH ROY CLARK ON HEE HAW IN 1982. COURTESY HOUSE OF BRYANT PUBLICATIONS. “ROCKY TOP” MAY HAVE BEEN CONCEIVED IN TEN MINUTES, BUT IT WENT THROUGH VARIOUS REVISIONS, AS SHOWN HERE ON THE LEDGER PAGE. COURTESY OF THE COUNTRY MUSIC HALL OF FAME® AND MUSEUM.


★ ★

6,000 songs written

VOLUME 6 IN THE AMERICAN POPULAR MUSIC SERIES APRIL $24.95 HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6486-1 200 PAGES, 6 X 9 36 B&W ILLUS. BIOGRAPHY/MUSIC

Of Related Interest

SING ME BACK HOME Southern Roots and Country Music By Bill C. Malone $29.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-5586-9 TAKING A CHANCE ON LOVE The Life and Music of Vernon Duke By George Harwood Phillips $24.95s Paperback 978-0-8061-6435-9 MAPPING WOODY GUTHRIE By Will Kaufman $26.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-6178-5

350

million copies sold

★ ★

1972

Nashville songwriters hall of fame

1991

Country Music hall of fame


VINSON BLUFFING TEXAS STYLE

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2020

Examines the life, career, and mysterious death of rare book dealer, gambler, and forger

Bluffing Texas Style The Arsons, Forgeries, and High Stakes Poker Capers of Rare Book Dealer Johnny Jenkins By Michael Vinson In 1989 a woman fishing in Texas on a quiet stretch of the Colorado River snagged a body. Her “catch” was the corpse of Johnny Jenkins, shot in the head. His death was as dramatic as the rare book dealer’s life, which read, as the Austin AmericanStatesman declared, “like a bestseller.”

MARCH $45.00x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6495-3 $19.95 PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6542-4 240 PAGES, 6 X 9 10 B&W ILLUS. BIOGRAPHY/U.S. HISTORY

Of Related Interest

EDWARD EBERSTADT & SONS Rare Booksellers of Western Americana By Michael Vinson $29.95s Hardcover 978-0-87062-438-4 $19.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-5964-5 ROWDY JOE LOWE Gambler with a Gun By Joseph G. Rosa and Waldo E. Koop $19.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-3962-3 KNIGHTS OF THE GREEN CLOTH The Saga of the Frontier Gamblers By Robert K. DeArment $34.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-2245-8

In 1975 Jenkins had staged the largest rare book coup of the twentieth century—the purchase, for more than two million dollars, of the legendary Eberstadt inventory of rare Americana, a feat noted in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. His undercover work for the FBI, recovering rare books stolen by mafia figures, had also earned him headlines coast to coast, as had his exploits as “Austin Squatty,” playing high stakes poker in Las Vegas. But beneath such public triumphs lay darker secrets. At the time of his death, Jenkins was about to be indicted by the ATF for the arson of his rare books, warehouse, and offices. Another investigation implicated Jenkins in forgeries of historical documents, including the Texas Declaration of Independence. Rumors of million-dollar gambling debts at mob-connected casinos circulated, along with the rumblings of irate mafia figures he’d fingered and eccentric Texas collectors he’d cheated. Had he been murdered? Or was his death a suicide, staged to look like a murder? How Jenkins, a onetime president of the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America, came to such an unseemly end is one of the mysteries Michael Vinson pursues in this spirited account of a tragic American life. Entrepreneur, con-man, connoisseur, forger, and self-made hero, Jenkins was a Texan who knew how to bluff but not when to fold. Michael Vinson is a rare book dealer specializing in Texas and the West. He has appraised rare books for the Antiques Road Show and has been interviewed by the New York Times about rare book thefts. He is the author of Edward Eberstadt & Sons: Rare Booksellers of Western Americana.


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Attack at Chosin The Chinese Second Offensive in Korea By Xiaobing Li For members of U.S. Army’s “Task Force Faith” and the First Marine Division, the Battle of Chosin Reservoir is an epic story of survival, courage, and ingenuity. Their exploits are well known—woven into the storied histories of the U.S. Army and Marine Corps. Now, for the first time, Attack at Chosin recounts this battle from the Chinese perspective, describing the advance that forced General MacArthur to reorient his strategy, which not only marked a turning point in the Korean War but impacted events in Asia in ways that still resonate today. The Battle of Chosin Reservoir, as the Chinese commanders foretold, determined the fate and length of the Korean War. Author Xiaobing Li describes the fighting that began on November 27, 1950, when 150,000 soldiers from the Chinese Ninth Army Group attacked the First Marines and elements of the 7th Infantry Division in the remote mountains of North Korea. It was a calculated attempt to repel MacArthur’s “home-by-Christmas” offensive and to deter UN forces from further advances toward the Chinese border. The fierce fighting that followed, combined with the bitter cold, made Chosin one of the deadliest battles of the war. By December 17, after suffering more than 40,000 casualties and failing to achieve their campaign objectives to destroy the American divisions, the Ninth Army Group was forced to withdraw. One day later, on December 18, 1950, the remaining survivors were recalled to China. As the first book to explore the role of command and control, technology, and combat effectiveness from the point of view of the Chinese, and to examine cooperation and friction between Beijing and Pyongyang, Attack at Chosin sheds new light on the ultimate military success of the UN forces during the Korean conflict. Li also provides invaluable insights into Chinese military doctrine, strategy, and tactics that continue to influence foreign policy and American military institutions today. Xiaobing Li is Professor of History and Director of the Western Pacific Institute at the University of Central Oklahoma. He is the executive editor of the Chinese Historical Review and the author or coauthor of numerous books, including China’s Battle for Korea: The 1951 Spring Offensive and The Cold War in East Asia.

MAY $29.95 HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6499-1 272 PAGES, 6 X 9 9 B&W ILLUS., 7 MAPS, 2 CHARTS MILITARY HISTORY/WORLD HISTORY

Of Related Interest

INTO THE BREACH AT PUSAN The 1st Provisional Marine Brigade in the Korean War By Kenneth W. Estes $29.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-4254-8 BROTHERHOOD IN COMBAT How African Americans Found Equality in Korea and Vietnam By Jeremy P. Maxwell $29.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-6006-1 VICTORY AT PELELIU The 81st Infantry Division’s Pacific Campaign By Bobby C. Blair and John Peter DeCioccio $21.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-4680-5

LI ATTACK AT CHOSIN

The Battle of Chosin Reservoir told from the Chinese perspective


BAIRD CHURCHES OF CHRIST IN OKLAHOMA

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2020

The first history of a prominent Oklahoma religious denomination

Churches of Christ in Oklahoma A History By W. David Baird In the 1950s and 1960s, Churches of Christ were the fastest growing religious organization in the United States. The churches flourished especially in southern and western states, including Oklahoma. In this compelling history, historian W. David Baird examines the key characteristics, individuals, and debates that have shaped the Churches of Christ in Oklahoma from the early nineteenth century to the beginning of the twenty-first century.

JANUARY $24.95 PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6462-5 288 PAGES, 6 X 9 22 B&W ILLUS. RELIGION/U.S. HISTORY

Of Related Interest

DIVIDED HEARTS The Presbyterian Journey through Oklahoma History By Danney Goble and Michael Cassity $24.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-3848-0 THE SEMINOLE BAPTIST CHURCHES OF OKLAHOMA Maintaining a Traditional Community By Jack M. Schultz $24.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-3980-7

Baird’s narrative begins with an account of the Stone-Campbell movement, which emerged along the American frontier in the early 1800s. Representatives of this movement in Oklahoma first came as missionaries to American Indians, mainly to the Cherokees, Chickasaws, and Choctaws. Baird highlights the role of two prominent missionaries during this period, and he next describes a second generation of missionaries who came along during the era of the Twin Territories, prior to statehood. In 1906, as a result of disagreements regarding faith and practice, followers of the Stone-Campbell movement divided into two organizations: Churches of Christ and Disciples of Christ. Baird then focuses solely on Churches of Christ in Oklahoma, all the while keeping a broader national context in view. Drawing on extensive research, Baird delves into theological and political debates and explores the role of the Churches of Christ during the two world wars. As Churches of Christ grew in number and size throughout the country during the mid-twentieth century, controversy loomed. Oklahoma’s Churches of Christ argued over everything from Sunday schools and the support of orphan’s homes to worship elements, gender roles in the church, and biblical interpretation. And nobody could agree on why church membership began to decline in the 1970s, despite exciting new community outreach efforts. This history by an accomplished scholar provides solid background and new insight into the question of whether Churches of Christ locally and nationally will be able to reverse course and rebuild their membership in the twenty-first century. W. David Baird is Dean Emeritus of Seaver College and Howard A. White Professor of History at Pepperdine University in Malibu, California. He is the author of The Story of Oklahoma (with Danney Goble) and Quest for Distinction: Pepperdine University in the 20th Century.


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NEW IN PAPERBACK

NEW IN PAPERBACK

America’s Best Female Sharpshooter

My Ranch, Too A Wyoming Memoir By Mary Budd Flitner Foreword by Teresa Jordan

The Rise and Fall of Lillian Frances Smith By Julia Bricklin

Recollections on a lifetime of Wyoming ranching

Today, most remember “California Girl” Lillian Frances Smith (1871–1930) as Annie Oakley’s chief competitor in the small world of the Wild West shows’ female shooters. But the two women were quite different: Oakley’s conservative “prairie beauty” persona clashed with Smith’s tendency to wear flashy clothes and keep company with the cowboys and American Indians she performed with. This lively first biography chronicles the Wild West showbiz life that Smith led and explores the talents that made her a star.

In the end, as author Julia Bricklin shows, Smith cared more about living her life on her own terms than about her public image. Unlike her competitors who shot to make a living, Lillian Smith lived to shoot. Julia Bricklin, an independent historian and lecturer who focuses on the American West, has published in Wild West, Civil War Times, and Financial History. An editor of the journal California History, she lives in Los Angeles. JANUARY $24.95x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-5633-0 $21.95 PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6545-5 224 PAGES, 6 X 9 21 B&W ILLUS. BIOGRAPHY/U.S. HISTORY VOLUME 2 IN THE WILLIAM F. CODY SERIES ON THE HISTORY AND CULTURE OF THE AMERICAN WEST

A modern-day rancher with decades of experience, Mary has dealt with the hardships and challenges that come with this way of life. She has survived harsh conditions like the “winter of 50 below” and economic downturns that threatened her family’s livelihood. She has also wrestled with her role as a woman in a profession that doesn’t always treat her as an equal. But for all its challenges, Flitner has also savored ranching’s joys, including the ties that bind multiple generations of families to the land. My Ranch, Too begins with the story of her great-grandfather, Daniel Budd, who in 1878 drove a herd of cattle into Wyoming Territory and settled his family in an area where conditions seemed favorable. Four generations later, Mary grew up on this same portion of land, learning how to ride horseback and take care of livestock. When Mary takes the responsibility of gathering a herd of cattle or makes solo rounds at the crack of dawn to check on the livestock, we have no doubt that this is indeed her ranch, too. Mary Budd Flitner has been a prominent rancher in Wyoming for more than fifty years. She is the author of articles in High Country News as well as various Wyoming and Montana newspapers. Teresa Jordan is an artist and author of several books, including the memoir Riding the White Horse Home and Cowgirls: Women of the American West. FEBRUARY $24.95 HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6058-0 $19.95 PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6615-5 232 PAGES, 5.5 X 8.5 23 B&W ILLUS., 2 MAPS MEMOIR/U.S. HISTORY

FLITNER MY RANCH, TOO

Drawing on family records, press accounts, interviews, and numerous other sources, historian Julia Bricklin peels away the myths that enshroud Smith’s fifty-year career. Known as “The California Huntress” before she was ten years old, Smith was a professional sharpshooter by the time she reached her teens, shooting targets from the back of a galloping horse in Buffalo Bill Cody’s Wild West. Not only did Cody offer $10,000 to anyone who could beat her, but he gave her top billing, setting the stage for her rivalry with Annie Oakley.

For many outsiders, the word “ranching” conjures romantic images of riding on horseback through rolling grasslands while living and working against a backdrop of breathtaking mountain vistas. In this absorbing memoir of life in the Wyoming high country, Mary Budd Flitner offers a more authentic glimpse into the daily realities of ranch life— and what it takes to survive in the ranching world.

BRICKLIN AMERICA’S BEST FEMALE SHARPSHOOTER

The first full-length biography of the sharpshooter who rivaled Annie Oakley


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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2020

NEW IN PAPERBACK

NEW IN PAPERBACK

Mack to the Rescue

Lois Lenski

By Jim Lehrer

Storycatcher By Bobbie Malone

LEHRER MACK TO THE RESCUE

MALONE LOIS LENSKI

A new One-Eyed Mack novel takes on the politics of Middle America

When he’s not anchoring the NewsHour on PBS, Jim Lehrer may be found casting a satirical eye at America’s heartland in such books as Crown Oklahoma and The Sooner Spy. Mack to the Rescue is the latest of his successful One-Eyed Mack novels. Set in Oklahoma and tracing the exploits of a fictional lieutenant governor, the series allows Lehrer to address contemporary national issues with a unique blend of humor and insight. When Governor “Buffalo Joe” Hayman calls for privatizing state government, Mack decides to oppose Hayman’s reelection bid; but a medical mishap prevents Mack from running. While attending a lieutenant governors’ conference in Washington, he suddenly collapses. Hospitalized, he is given a heart bypass operation intended for another patient. Mack backs out of the race and throws his support behind his flaky friend and former state house speaker, Luther Wallace. Embroiled in a medical malpractice suit while following Luther’s questionable shenanigans, Mack finally has no choice but to come to the rescue when the governor’s race takes a particularly ugly turn. Jim Lehrer novelist, playwright, and award-winning journalist is best known as executive editor and anchor of the NewsHour with Jim Lehrer on PBS. JANUARY $19.95x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-3915-9 $16.95 PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6504-2 216 PAGES, 6 X 9 FICTION VOLUME 6 IN THE STORIES AND STORYTELLERS SERIES

The children’s book author who opened worlds through words and pictures

In Lois Lenski: Storycatcher, historian and educator Bobbie Malone takes us into Lenski’s own world to tell the story of how a girl from a small Ohio town became a beloved literary icon. Author and illustrator of the Newbery Award–winning Strawberry Girl and numerous other tales of children from America’s diverse regions and cultures, Lenski spent five decades creating stories for young readers. Lois Lenski: Storycatcher follows her development as a writer and as an artist, and it traces the evolution of her passionate belief in the power of empathy conveyed in children’s books. Understanding that youngsters responded instinctively to narratives rich in reality, Lenski turned her extensive study of hardworking families into books that accurately and movingly depicted the lives of the children of sharecroppers, coal miners, and migrant field workers. This first full-length biography tells how Lenski traveled throughout the country, gathering the stories that brought to life in words and pictures whole worlds that had for so long been invisible in children’s literature. In the process, her work became a source of delight, inspiration, and insight for generations of readers. Bobbie Malone is retired as Director of the Office of School Services at the Wisconsin Historical Society. She is the author of Rabbi Max Heller: Reformer, Zionist. JANUARY $26.95 HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-5386-5 $21.95 PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6560-8 336 PAGES, 6 X 9 36 B&W ILLUS. BIOGRAPHY


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Sand Creek and the Tragic End of a Lifeway By Louis Kraft Nothing can change the terrible facts of the Sand Creek Massacre. The human toll of this horrific event and the ensuing loss of a way of life have never been fully recounted until now. In Sand Creek and the Tragic End of a Lifeway, Louis Kraft tells this story, drawing on the words and actions of those who participated in the events at this critical time. The history that culminated in the end of a lifeway begins with the arrival of Algonquin-speaking peoples in North America, proceeds through the emergence of the Cheyennes and Arapahos on the Central Plains, and ends with the incursion of white people with a lust for land and gold. Beginning in the earliest days of the Southern Cheyennes, Kraft brings the voices of the past to bear on the events leading to the brutal murder of people and its disastrous aftermath. Through their testimony and their deeds as reported by contemporaries, major and supporting players give us a broad and nuanced view of the discovery of gold on Cheyenne and Arapaho land in the 1850s, followed by the land theft condoned by the U.S. government. The peace treaties and perfidy, the unfolding massacre and the investigations that followed, the devastating end of the Indians’ alreadycircumscribed freedom—all are revealed through the eyes of government officials, newspapers, and the military; Cheyennes and Arapahos who sought peace with or who fought Anglo-Americans; whites and Indians who intermarried and their offspring; and whites who dared to question what they considered heinous actions.

MARCH $34.95s HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6483-0 440 PAGES, 6.125 X 9.25 34 B&W ILLUS., 2 MAPS U.S. HISTORY/AMERICAN INDIAN

Of Related Interest

As instructive as it is harrowing, the history recounted here lives on in the telling, along with a way of life destroyed in all but cultural memory. To that memory this book gives eloquent, resonating voice. Writer, historian, lecturer, and blogger Louis Kraft is the author of seven books, including Ned Wynkoop and the Lonely Road from Sand Creek.

FINDING SAND CREEK History, Archeology, and the 1864 Massacre Site By Jerome A. Greene and Douglas D. Scott $19.95 Paperback 978-0-8061-3801-5 NED WYNKOOP AND THE LONELY ROAD FROM SAND CREEK By Louis Kraft $19.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-5188-5 THE SAND CREEK MASSACRE By Stan Hoig $19.95 Paperback 978-0-8061-1147-6

KRAFT SAND CREEK AND THE TRAGIC END OF A LIFEWAY

The complete story of the Sand Creek Massacre and its aftermath


GEELHOED DIPLOMACY SHOT DOWN

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2020

A behind-the-scenes look at the unmaking of history in the early Cold War

Diplomacy Shot Down The U-2 Crisis and Eisenhower’s Aborted Mission to Moscow, 1959–1960 By E. Bruce Geelhoed The history of the Cold War is littered with what-ifs, and in Diplomacy Shot Down, E. Bruce Geelhoed explores one of the most intriguing: What if the Soviets had not shot down the American U-2 spy plane and President Dwight D. Eisenhower had visited the Soviet Union in 1960 as planned?

MARCH $34.95s HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6485-4 304 PAGES, 6 X 9 20 B&W ILLUS. U.S. HISTORY

Of Related Interest

A MILITARY HISTORY OF THE COLD WAR, 1944–1962 By Jonathan M. House $45.00x Hardcover 978-0-8061-4262-3 J. ROBERT OPPENHEIMER, THE COLD WAR, AND THE ATOMIC WEST By Jon Hunner $24.95s Hardcover 978-0-8061-4046-9 $21.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-6308-6

In August 1959, with his second term nearing its end, Eisenhower made the surprise announcement that he and Soviet premier Nikita S. Khrushchev would visit each other’s countries as a means of “thawing some of the ice” of the Cold War. Khrushchev’s trip to the United States in September 1959 resulted in plans for a four-power summit involving Great Britain and France, and for Eisenhower’s visit to Russia in early summer 1960. Then, in May 1960, the Soviet Union shot down an American U-2 surveillance plane piloted by Francis Gary Powers. The downing of Powers’s plane was, in Geelhoed’s recounting of this Cold War episode, not just a diplomatic crisis. The ensuing collapse of the summit and the subsequent cancelation of Eisenhower’s trip to the Soviet Union amounted to a critical missed opportunity for improved U.S.-Soviet relations at a crucial juncture in the Cold War. In a blow-by-blow description of the diplomatic overtures, the U-2 incident, and the aftermath, Diplomacy Shot Down draws upon Eisenhower’s projected itinerary and unmade speeches and statements, as well as the American and international press corps’ preparations for covering the aborted visit, to give readers a sense of what might have been. Eisenhower’s prestige within the Soviet Union was so great, Geelhoed observes, that the trip, if it had happened, could well have led to a détente in the increasingly dangerous U.S.-Soviet relationship. Instead, the cancelation of Ike’s visit led to an escalation in hostilities that played out around the globe, and nearly guaranteed that the “missile gap” would reemerge as an issue in the 1960 presidential campaign. A detailed account of an episode that defined the Cold War for a generation, Diplomacy Shot Down is, in its insights and revelations, something rarer still—a behind-the-scenes look at history in the unmaking. E. Bruce Geelhoed, Professor of History at Ball State University, is coauthor (with Anthony O. Edmonds) of Eisenhower, Macmillan, and Allied Unity, 1957–1961 and coeditor (with Edmonds) of The Macmillan-EisenhowerCorrespondence, 1957–1969.


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The Mound Builder Myth Fake History and the Hunt for a “Lost White Race” By Jason Colavito Say you found that a few dozen people, operating at the highest levels of society, conspired to create a false ancient history of the American continent to promote a religious, white-supremacist agenda in the service of supposedly patriotic ideals. Would you call it fake news? In nineteenth-century America, this was in fact a powerful truth that shaped Manifest Destiny. The Mound Builder Myth is the first book to chronicle the attempt to recast the Native American burial mounds as the work of a lost white race of “true” native Americans. Thomas Jefferson’s pioneering archaeology concluded that the earthen mounds were the work of Native Americans. In the 1894 report of the Bureau of American Ethnology, Cyrus Thomas concurred, drawing on two decades of research. But in the century in between, the lie took hold, with Presidents Andrew Jackson, William Henry Harrison, and Abraham Lincoln adding their approval and the Mormon Church among those benefiting. Jason Colavito traces this monumental deception from the farthest reaches of the frontier to the halls of Congress, mapping a century-long conspiracy to fabricate and promote a false ancient history—and enumerating its devastating consequences for contemporary Native people. Built upon primary sources and first-person accounts, the story that The Mound Builder Myth tells is a forgotten chapter of American history—but one that reads like the Da Vinci Code as it plays out at the upper reaches of government, religion, and science. And as far-fetched as it now might seem that a lost white race once ruled prehistoric America, the damage done by this “ancient” myth has clear echoes in today’s arguments over white nationalism, multiculturalism, “alternative facts,” and the role of science and the control of knowledge in public life. Author and editor Jason Colavito researches and writes on the connections between science, pseudoscience, religion, and speculative fiction. He is the author of Jason and the Argonauts through the Ages and The Cult of Alien Gods: H.P. Lovecraft and Extraterrestrial Pop Culture. In his blog at JasonColavito.com, he continues his exploration of the way human beings create and employ the supernatural to alter and understand our reality and our world.

FEBRUARY $24.95s PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6461-8 344 PAGES, 6 X 9 13 B&W ILLUS. U.S. HISTORY/AMERICAN INDIAN

Of Related Interest

MOUND BUILDERS AND MONUMENT MAKERS OF THE NORTHERN GREAT LAKES, 1200–1600 By Meghan C. L. Howey $29.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-4288-3 LOOTING SPIRO MOUNDS An American King Tut’s Tomb By David La Vere $24.95 Paperback 978-0-8061-3813-8 MR. JEFFERSON’S HAMMER William Henry Harrison and the Origins of American Indian Policy By Robert M. Owens $21.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-4198-5

COLAVITO THE MOUND BUILDER MYTH

Why many Americans still don’t believe that ancient Native Americans built the mounds


CILELLA TILL DEATH DO US PART

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2020

Unveils the private life of a brilliant Civil War general during his tragically brief marriage

Till Death Do Us Part The Letters of Emory and Emily Upton, 1868–1870 Edited by Salvatore G. Cilella Jr. Major General Emory Upton (1839–1881) served in all three branches of the U.S. military during the American Civil War. Lauded as a war hero, he later earned acclaim for his influence on military reforms, which lasted well beyond his lifetime. An account of Upton’s life is not complete, though, without a look into his brief, yet passionate, marriage to Emily Norwood Martin (1846–1870). This edition of Emory and Emily’s letters unveils the private life of a brilliant Civil War personality. It also introduces readers to the devout young woman who earned the general’s fanatic devotion before her untimely death from tuberculosis.

MAY $26.95s PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6489-2 336 PAGES, 6 X 9 8 B&W ILLUS. U.S. HISTORY

Of Related Interest

Until now, only a few of the couple’s intimate letters have been published. During the years he spent editing and publishing Emory Upton’s correspondence, Salvatore G. Cilella Jr. deliberately set aside the general’s voluminous letters to his wife. Unfortunately, as Cilella explains in his editorial notes, Emily’s letters to Emory did not survive, but he is able to draw on the rich trove of letters Emily wrote to her mother and father while on her honeymoon and during her stays in Key West, Nassau, and Atlanta. Together, both sets of letters form a poignant narrative of the general’s tender love for his new wife and her reciprocal affection as they attempted to create a normal life together despite her declining health.

EMORY UPTON Misunderstood Reformer By David J. Fitzpatrick $39.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-5720-7

The life of an army wife could be grueling, and despite her declining health, Emily longed to perform the role expected of her. It was not meant to be. Unwittingly, she and Emory chose the worst places for her to recover—Key West and Nassau— where the high humidity and heat must have exacerbated her difficulty breathing. She died in Nassau, far away from her husband. Eleven years later, racked by a sinus tumor and likely still grieving from his lost love, Upton committed suicide at the age of forty-one.

A SURGEON WITH CUSTER AT THE LITTLE BIG HORN James DeWolf’s Diary and Letters, 1876 By James Madison DeWolf Edited by Todd E. Harburn $29.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-5694-1 $24.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-6310-9

Til Death Do Us Part offers a powerful—and poignant—tale of two star-crossed lovers against the backdrop of post–Civil War America. In addition, the volume gives readers a fascinating glimpse into gender roles and marital relations in the nineteenth century.

BY HIS OWN HAND? The Mysterious Death of Meriwether Lewis By John D. W. Guice and Jay H. Buckley Contributions by James J. Holmberg $19.95 Paperback 978-0-8061-3851-0

Salvatore G. Cilella Jr. is editor of the two-volume Correspondence of Major General Emory Upton and author of Upton’s Regulars: The 121st New York Infantry in the American Civil War.


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From Wounded Knee to the Gallows The Life and Trials of Lakota Chief Two Sticks By Philip S. Hall and Mary Solon Lewis On December 28, 1894, the day before the fourth anniversary of the massacre at Wounded Knee, Lakota chief Two Sticks was hanged in Deadwood, South Dakota. The headline in the Black Hills Daily Times the next day read “A GOOD INDIAN”—a spiteful turn on the infamous saying “The only good Indian is a dead Indian.” On the gallows, Two Sticks, known among his people as Can Nopa Uhah, declared, “My heart knows I am not guilty and I am happy.” Indeed, years later, convincing evidence emerged supporting his claim. The story of Two Sticks, as recounted in compelling detail in this book, is at once the righting of a historical wrong and a record of the injustices visited upon the Lakota in the wake of Wounded Knee. The Indian unrest of 1890 did not end with the massacre, as the government willfully neglected, mismanaged, and exploited the Oglala in a relentless, if unofficial, policy of racial genocide that continues to haunt the Black Hills today. In From Wounded Knee to the Gallows, Philip S. Hall and Mary Solon Lewis mine government records, newspaper accounts, and unpublished manuscripts to give a clear and candid account of the Oglala’s struggles, as reflected and perhaps epitomized in Two Sticks’s life and the miscarriage of justice that ended with his death. Bracketed by the run-up to, and craven political motivation behind, Wounded Knee and the later revelations establishing Two Sticks’s innocence, this is a history of a people threatened with extinction and of one man felled in a battle for survival hopelessly weighted in the white man’s favor. With eyewitness immediacy, this rigorously researched and deeply informed account at long last makes plain the painful truth behind a dark period in U.S. history. A fourth-generation South Dakotan, Philip S. Hall is a psychologist and author of To Have This Land: The Nature of Indian/White Relations, South Dakota, 1888– 1891. Mary Solon Lewis grew up on a badland ranch adjacent to the Pine Ridge Reservation and is an independent writer with a focus on South Dakota history.

MAY $24.95s PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6491-5 280 PAGES, 6 X 9 18 B&W ILLUS. BIOGRAPHY/AMERICAN INDIAN

Of Related Interest

NED CHRISTIE The Creation of an Outlaw and Cherokee Hero By Devon A. Mihesuah $29.95 Hardcover 978-0-8061-5910-2 BLACKFOOT REDEMPTION A Blood Indian’s Story of Murder, Confinement, and Imperfect Justice By William E. Farr $21.95s Paperback 978-0-8061-4464-1 CHOCTAW CRIME AND PUNISHMENT, 1884–1907 By Devon A. Mihesuah $32.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-4052-0

HALL, LEWIS FROM WOUNDED KNEE TO THE GALLOWS

The story of a wrongful execution in the aftermath of Wounded Knee


BEEBE, SENKEWICZ JUNÍPERO SERRA

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2020

Conveys the power and nuance of Serra’s voice and his impact on California and the American Southwest

Junípero Serra California, Indians, and the Transformation of a Missionary By Rose Marie Beebe and Robert M. Senkewicz Franciscan missionary friar Junípero Serra (1713–1784), one of the most widely known and influential inhabitants of early California, embodied many of the ideas and practices that animated the Spanish presence in the Americas. In this definitive biography, translators and historians Rose Marie Beebe and Robert M. Senkewicz bring this complex figure to life and illuminate the Spanish period of California and the American Southwest.

NEW IN PAPERBACK VOLUME 3 IN THE BEFORE GOLD: CALIFORNIA UNDER SPAIN AND MEXICO SERIES

APRIL $39.95 HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-4868-7 $29.95s PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6598-1 530 PAGES, 7 X 10 61 B&W ILLUS., 37 COLOR PLATES, 11 MAPS BIOGRAPHY

Of Related Interest

LANDS OF PROMISE AND DESPAIR Chronicles of Early California, 1535–1846 Edited by Rose Marie Beebe and Robert M Senkewicz $26.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-5138-0 TESTIMONIOS Early California through the Eyes of Women, 1815–1848 Edited and translated by Rose Marie Beebe and Robert M Senkewicz $26.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-4872-4 CONTEST FOR CALIFORNIA From Spanish Colonization to the American Conquest By Stephen G. Hyslop $39.95x Hardcover 978-0-87062-411-7 $26.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-6449-6

In Junípero Serra: California, Indians, and the Transformation of a Missionary, Beebe and Senkewicz focus on Serra’s religious identity and his relations with Native peoples. They intersperse their narrative with new and accessible translations of many of Serra’s letters and sermons, which allows his voice to be heard in a more direct and engaging fashion. Serra spent thirty-four years as a missionary to Indians in Mexico and California. He believed that paternalistic religious rule offered Indians a better life than their oppressive exploitation by colonial soldiers and settlers, which he deemed the only realistic alternative available to them at that time and place. Serra’s unswerving commitment to his vision embroiled him in frequent conflicts with California’s governors, soldiers, native peoples, and even his fellow missionaries. Yet because he prevailed often enough, he was able to place his unique stamp on the first years of California’s history. Beebe and Senkewicz interpret Junípero Serra neither as a saint nor as the personification of the Black Legend. They recount his life from his birth in a small farming village on Mallorca. They detail his experiences in central Mexico and Baja California, as well as the tumultuous fifteen years he spent as founder of the California missions. Serra’s Franciscan ideals are analyzed in their eighteenthcentury context, which allows readers to understand more fully the differences and similarities between his world and ours. Combining history, culture, and linguistics, this new study conveys the power and nuance of Serra’s voice and, ultimately, his impact on history. Rose Marie Beebe is Professor of Spanish Literature at Santa Clara University. Robert M. Senkewicz is Professor of History at Santa Clara University. Beebe and Senkewicz coeditors and translators of Testimonios: Early California through the Eyes of Women, 1815–1848.


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NEW IN PAPERBACK

NEW IN PAPERBACK

Beyond the American Pale

The Early Morning of War

Slaughter at the Chapel

The Irish in the West, 1845–1910 By David M. Emmons

Bull Run, 1861 By Edward G. Longacre

The Battle of Ezra Church, 1864 By Gary Ecelbarger

With vigor and panache, David M. Emmons describes how the West was not so much won as continually contested and reshaped. He probes the self-fulfilling mythology of the American West, along with the far different mythology of the Irish pioneers. The product of three decades of research and thought, Beyond the American Pale is a masterful, yet accessible, recasting of American history and the culminating work of a singular thinker willing to take a wholly new perspective on the past.

This crucial campaign receives its most complete and comprehensive treatment in Edward G. Longacre’s The Early Morning of War. A magisterial work by a veteran historian, The Early Morning of War blends narrative and analysis to convey the full scope of the campaign of First Bull Run—its drama and suspense as well as its practical and tactical underpinnings and ramifications.

In an account that refutes and improves upon all other interpretations of the Battle of Ezra Church, noted battle historian Gary Ecelbarger consults extensive records, reports, and personal accounts to deliver a nuanced hourby-hour overview of how the battle actually unfolded.

BEYOND THE AMERICAN PALE

NEW IN PAPERBACK

SERIES

MAY $26.95s HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-5499-2 $21.95s PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6607-0 288 PAGES, 6 X 9 8 B&W ILLUS., 11 MAPS U.S. HISTORY/MILITARY HISTORY

SLAUGHTER AT THE CHAPEL

JANUARY $34.95s HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-4128-2 $26.95s PAPER 978-0-8061-6458-8 484 PAGES, 6.14 X 9.21 7 TABLES U.S. HISTORY

JANUARY $34.95 HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-4498-6 $29.95s PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6534-9 680 PAGES, 6 X 9 30 B&W ILLUS., 12 MAPS MILITARY HISTORY VOLUME 46 IN THE CAMPAIGNS AND COMMANDERS

THE EARLY MORNING OF WAR

David M. Emmons is Professor of History Emeritus at the University of Montana, Missoula, and the author of The Butte Irish: Class and Ethnicity in an American Mining Town, 1875–1925.

Edward G. Longacre is a retired U.S. Department of Defense Historian and the author of numerous articles and books on the Civil War and U.S. military history.

Gary Ecelbarger is the award-winning author of seven books on the Civil War era, including The Day Dixie Died: The Battle of Atlanta and Three Days in the Shenandoah: Stonewall Jackson at Front Royal and Winchester.


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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2020

NEW IN PAPERBACK

NEW IN PAPERBACK

Deep Trails in the Old West

Agnes Lake Hickok

Stricken Field

A Frontier Memoir By Frank Clifford Edited by Frederick Nolan

Queen of the Circus, Wife of a Legend By Linda A. Fisher and Carolyn M. Bowers

The Little Bighorn since 1876 By Jerome A. Greene Foreword by Paul L. Hedren

In unveiling this work, Nolan faithfully preserves Clifford’s own words, providing helpful annotation without censoring either the author’s strong opinions or his racial biases. For all its roughness, Deep Trails in the Old West is a rich resource of frontier lore, customs, and manners, told by a man who saw the Old West at its wildest— and lived to tell the tale.

This account of a remarkable life cuts through fictions about Agnes’s life, including her own embellishments, to uncover her true story. Numerous illustrations, including rare photographs and circus memorabilia, bring Agnes’s world to life.

Jerome A. Greene has produced a compelling account of one of the West’s most hallowed and controversial attractions, beginning with the battle itself and ending with the establishment of an American Indian memorial early in the twenty-first century.

The late Linda A. Fisher was a public health physician, a documentary researcher, and the editor of The Whiskey Merchant’s Diary: An Urban Life in the Emerging Midwest. Carrie Bowers, who was Linda A. Fisher’s research assistant, holds an M.A. in American history.

Jerome A. Greene is retired as a Research Historian for the National Park Service. He is the author of numerous books, including Battles and Skirmishes of the Great Sioux War, 1876–1877: The Military View and Lakota and Cheyenne: Indian Views of the Great Sioux War, 1876–1877.

JANUARY $29.95s HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-3983-8 $24.95s PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6544-8 416 PAGES, 6 X 9 40 B&W ILLUS., 2 MAPS BIOGRAPHY/U.S. HISTORY

FEBRUARY $29.95x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-3791-9 $24.95s PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6592-9 384 PAGES, 6 X 9.5 101 B&W ILLUS., 6 MAPS U.S. HISTORY/MILITARY HISTORY

AGNES LAKE HICKOK

STRICKEN FIELD

NEW IN PAPERBACK

DEEP TRAILS IN THE OLD WEST

Frederick Nolan is a leading authority on outlaws and gunfighters of the Old West. His award-winning books include The West of Billy the Kid; The Wild West: History, Myth, and the Making of America; and The Lincoln County War: A Documentary History. He resides in England. APRIL $29.95x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-4186-2 $21.95s PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6506-6 336 PAGES, 5.5 X 8.5 27 B&W ILLUS. BIOGRAPHY/U.S. HISTORY


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NEW IN PAPERBACK

NEW IN PAPERBACK

NEW IN PAPERBACK

TWENTY THOUSAND MORNINGS

Moroni and the Swastika

William S. Hart

An Autobiography By John Joseph Mathews Edited by Susan Kalter Foreword by Charles H. Red Corn

Mormons in Nazi Germany By David Conley Nelson

Projecting the American West By Ronald L. Davis

A page-turning historical narrative, this book is the first full account of how Mormons avoided Nazi persecution through skilled collaboration with Hitler’s regime, and then eschewed postwar shame by constructing an alternative history of wartime suffering and resistance.

For the first time, readers are given insights into Hart’s somewhat lonely and tragic personal life, his quarrels with exploitive studios, and his association with such latter-day frontier legends as Charles M. Russell, Bat Masterson, and Wyatt Earp, who regarded him as a kindred spirit.

David Conley Nelson holds a Ph.D. in history from Texas A&M University. He served six years as an officer in the United States Marine Corps and is now an independent researcher.

Ronald L. Davis is Emeritus Professor of History at Southern Methodist University, where he was Director of both the Oral History Program on the Performing Arts and the De Golyer Institute for American Studies. He has written many books on the performing arts in America, including the best-seller Hollywood Anecdotes.

In her insightful introduction and explanatory notes, Susan Kalter places John Joseph Mathews’s work in the context of his life and career as a novelist, historian, naturalist, and scholar. Kalter draws on Mathews’s unpublished diaries, revealing aspects of his personal life that have previously been misunderstood. John Joseph Mathews (1895–1979), a mixed-blood Osage, is the author of Wah’Kon-Tah: The Osage and the White Man’s Road,Talking to the Moon, Sundown, Life and Death of an Oilman: The Career of E. W. Marland, and Twenty Thousand Mornings: An Autobiography. Susan Kalter is Professor of American Literature and Native American Studies at Illinois State University.

AND CRITICAL STUDIES SERIES

OCTOBER $29.95x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-3558-8 $21.95s PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6503-5 288 PAGES, 6 X 9 34 B&W ILLUS.

WILLIAM S. HART

APRIL $29.95x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-4253-1 $21.95s PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6574-5 360 PAGES, 6 X 9 10 B&W ILLUS. VOLUME 57 IN THE AMERICAN INDIAN LITERATURE

JANUARY $29.95 HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-4668-3 $24.95s PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6575-2 436 PAGES, 6 X 9 23 B&W ILLUS., 3 MAPS, 2 TABLE RELIGION/HISTORY

MORONI AND THE SWASTIKA

Twenty Thousand Mornings


GUIDO, PILAT, PERSON RENEGADES

18

Maps the contours of an American architecture

WE PREACH NO DOGMA THE CURRICULUM

Goff’s School of Architecture was a world where everything

the magical atmosphere of the time, to the extent that she

was possible. It was possible to design with a camera, paint

became a special student in many architecture courses.150

during the hours dedicated to the design courses, and use

It is hard to explain precisely the energy that Goff, his

music to explain architecture. Every sort of artistic experi-

staff, and the other professors were capable of conveying.

ment was encouraged. In an attempt to encourage a vision

Clearly, though, the drawings produced by the students

free from the prejudices of a formal or academic education,

of the School of Architecture at OU under his leadership

Goff organized unusual events in university classrooms.148

constituted a world of fantasy.

Jerri Hodges answered an ad for a secretarial position in the school. She later said that she “walked into a world I did

UNDER BRUCE GOFF

not know existed.”149 Hodges became a crucial cornerstone The turmoil of World War II presented an opportunity to

of the administrative organization and became involved in

change the curricula and introduce innovative teaching

LUCA GUIDO

methods in schools of architecture throughout the United States. When the fighting ceased, numerous young men returned home, university admissions increased, and thus was reached a turning point in how the teaching of archi-

What made the School of Architecture at the

tecture was organized. The passage from the Beaux-Arts to a modern approach,

University of Oklahoma so “different”? First we all

inspired by the architectural achievements of the previ-

agreed that Education should be a matter of bringing

ous twenty years, became decisive. Nevertheless, as the

something creative and individual out of a student instead of packing his head full of pre-fabricated

architectural historian Anthony Alofsin observed: “The vestiges of Beaux-Arts methods and sensibility did not vanish overnight.”1 For instance, the Beaux-Arts Institute of Design

“education” which would make him, at best, only

(BAID) in New York continued to offer its support to teaching,

a follower or imitative. We believed, with Thomas

though at ever decreasing levels as the years went by: “In

Carlyle, “the ideal is within yourself. Your condition is but the stuff you are to shape that same ideal out of.” Gustav Klimt, the great Viennese painter said: “There is only sense in being a teacher and that is if you can

1948–49 it sponsored thirty-six competitions, for which 5700 entries were submitted; a decade later it sponsored only eleven, with fewer than 500 entries submitted for jurying.”2 By the 1940s, the School of Architecture at the University of Oklahoma (OU) had undergone a period of transformation similar to those at other schools. The transition from the

liberate the genius in others.” That is what we tried

Beaux-Arts tradition to the modern approach was begun

to do at O.U. and it gave the school of architecture

by Henry Leveke Kamphoefner (1907–90). Still, a great deal

direction and discipline in freedom.

remained to be done. As it had in previous years, the School

Bruce Goff, “The School of Architecture at the University of Oklahoma 1947–56”

detail. Bruce Goff, Ruth Ford House,

2.40. Bruce Goff at University

2.41. Jerri Hodges’s and Bruce

2.42. University of Oklahoma

Aurora, Illinois, 1948. (See figure

of Oklahoma stadium office

Goff’s Christmas tree, School

School of Architecture (contact

3.12, page 79.)

67

58

LUcA gUidO

(contact sheet), ca. 1953. Bruce

of Architecture at University of

sheet), Robert L. Faust and His 3D

Goff Archive, Ryerson and

Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma,

Poster, Norman, Oklahoma, 1953.

Burnham Archives, The Art

ca. 1950s. Christopher C. Gibbs

Bruce Goff Archive, Ryerson

Institute of Chicago. Digital file

College of Architecture Collection,

and Burnham Archives, The Art

# 199001_190117-004.

American School Archive,

Institute of Chicago. Digital file

University of Oklahoma Libraries.

# 199001_190117-008.

The School of ArchiTec Ture AT The univerSiT y of okl AhomA

59


BRUCE GOFF AND THE AMERICAN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE Luca Guido, Stephanie Pilat, and Angela Person Foreword by Aaron Betsky Edited by

With contributions by Hans Butzer, Christian Dagg, Luca Guido, Robert McCarter, Christopher Curtis Mead, Angela Person, Stephanie Pilat, Mark Andrew White, and Thomas Woodfin

MARCH $50.00x PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6460-1 272 PAGES, 9.5 X 11 147 ILLU S. AND 47 COLOR PLATES ARCHITECTURE

Of Related Interest

BEAUTY, NEUROSCIENCE, AND ARCHITECTURE Timeless Patterns and Their Impact on Our Well-Being By Donald H. Ruggles $60.00 Hardcover 978-0-692-92862-2 BRUCE GOFF Architecture of Discipline in Freedom By Arn Henderson $45.00x Hardcover 978-0-8061-5610-1 AMERICAN SKI RESORT Architecture, Style, Experience By Margaret Supplee Smith $45.00 Hardcover 978-0-8061-4295-1

Like America itself, the architecture of the United States is an amalgam, an imitation or an importation of foreign forms adapted to the natural or engineered landscape of the New World. So can there be an “American School” of architecture? The most legitimate claim to the title emerged in the 1950s and 1960s at the Gibbs College of Architecture at the University of Oklahoma where, under the leadership of Bruce Goff, Herb Greene, Mendel Glickman, and others, an authentically American approach to design found its purest expression, teachable in its coherence and logic. Followers of this first truly American School eschewed the forms most in fashion in American architectural education at the time—those such as the French Beaux Arts or German Bauhaus schools—in favor of the vernacular and the organic. The result was a style distinctly experimental, resourceful, and contextual—challenging not only established architectural norms in form and function but also traditional approaches to instructing and inspiring young architects. Edited by Luca Guido, Stephanie Pilat, and Angela Person, this volume explores the fraught history of this distinctively American movement born on the Oklahoma prairie. Renegades features essays by leading scholars and includes a wide range of images, including rare, never-before-published sketches and models. Together these essays and illustrations map the contours of an American architecture that combines this country’s landscape and technology through experimentation and invention, assembling the diversity of the United States into structures of true beauty. Renegades for the first time fully captures the essence and conveys the importance of the American School of architecture.

Luca Guido, Associate Professor of Architecture at the University of Oklahoma, is a licensed architect, critic, and historian of contemporary architecture. Stephanie Pilat, Associate Professor and Director of the Division of Architecture at the University of Oklahoma, is the author of

Reconstructing Italy: The Ina-Casa Neighborhoods of the Postwar Era. Angela Person is Director of Research Initiatives and Strategic Planning for the Christopher C. Gibbs College of Architecture at the University of Oklahoma.

(ABOVE): HERB GREENE, PRAIRIE HOUSE, NORMAN, OKLAHOMA, 1960–61. ROBERT A. BOWLBY PHOTOGRAPHS, AMERICAN SCHOOL ARCHIVE, UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA LIBRARIES.


SOWARDS AN OPEN PIT VISIBLE FROM THE MOON

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2020

How environmental activism prevented copper mining in a scenic wilderness

An Open Pit Visible from the Moon The Wilderness Act and the Fight to Protect Miners Ridge and the Public Interest By Adam M. Sowards

VOLUME 2 IN THE ENVIRONMENT IN MODERN NORTH AMERICA SERIES

APRIL $34.95x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6501-1 248 PAGES, 6 X 9 11 B&W ILLUS., 2 MAPS ENVIRONMENT/U.S. HISTORY

Of Related Interest

COPPER STAIN ASARCO’s Legacy in El Paso By Elaine Hampton and Cynthia C. Ontiveros $29.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-6177-8 THE SIZE OF THE RISK Histories of Multiple Use in the Great Basin By Leisl Carr-Childers $34.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-4927-1 BITTER WATERS The Struggles of the Pecos River By Patrick Dearen $29.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-5201-1

Situated among the North Cascade Mountains of Washington State, in the Glacier Peak Wilderness Area, Miners Ridge contains vast quantities of copper. Kennecott Copper Corporation’s plan to develop an open-pit mine there was, when announced in 1966, the first test of the mining provision of the Wilderness Act passed by Congress in 1964. The battle over the proposed “Open Pit, Big Enough to Be Seen from the Moon,” as activists called it, drew the attention of both local and national conservationists, who vowed to stop the desecration of one of the West’s most scenic places. Kennecott Copper had the full force of the law and mining industry behind it in asserting its extractive rights. Meanwhile the U.S. Forest Service was determined to defend its authority to manage wilderness. An Open Pit Visible from the Moon tells the story of this historic struggle to define the contours of the Wilderness Act—its possibilities and limits. Combining rigorous analysis and deft storytelling, Adam M. Sowards re-creates the contest between Kennecott and its shareholders on one hand and activists on the other, intent on maintaining wilderness as a place immune to the calculus of profit. A host of actors cross these pages—from cabinet secretaries and a Supreme Court justice to local doctors and college students—all contributing to a drama that made Miners Ridge a cause célèbre for the nation’s wilderness movement. As locals testified at public hearings and writers penned profiles in the nation’s magazines and newspapers, the volatile political economy of copper proved equally influential in frustrating Kennecott’s plans. No law or court ruling could keep Kennecott from mining copper, but the pit was never dug. Identifying the contingent factors and forces that converged and coalesced in this case, Sowards’s narrative recalls a critical moment in the struggle over the nation’s wild places, even as it puts the unpredictability of history on full display. Environmental historian and writer Adam M. Sowards is Professor of History at the University of Idaho. He is the author of The Environmental Justice: William O. Douglas and American Conservation and editor of Idaho’s Place: A New History of the Gem State.


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Ruling the Waters California’s Kern River, the Environment, and the Making of Western Water Law By Douglas R. Littlefield When Europeans first arrived at what is now California’s San Joaquin Valley, they found a vast landscape of wetlands, small ponds, riparian forests, and grasslands surrounding three large swampland lakes. What greets a visitor to the region today is a dramatically different view of mile after mile of row crops, vineyards, orchards, and grazing acreage—some of the most fertile and productive agricultural land in the world. This remarkable transformation, with its enduring consequences, is at the center of Ruling the Waters, a legal, social, and environmental history of how western water law shaped, and was shaped by, the subjugation of the largest freshwater wetlands wildlife habitat in the West. At the heart of efforts to wrest arable land from the region was the Kern River, which rises in the Sierra Nevada and carries snowmelt to what was once a great network of lakes, sloughs, and marshes at the southern end of California’s Central Valley. In Ruling the Waters Douglas R. Littlefield describes how, over the course of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, pioneers and entrepreneurs diverted water out of this network of waterways to extract gold in the mountains and irrigate farms lower down the river, and how the law was made to accommodate these practices. Struggles over the Kern River’s water established one of the most important concepts in water law in some parts of the United States—that prior appropriation, dependent on the chronological order of diversions from waterways, could legally coexist with riparian rights, which restrict water usage to landownership directly next to a river or stream. Littlefield traces this concept to the 1886 California Supreme Court case of Lux v. Haggin—which pitted the giant farming and cattle company of Miller & Lux against a prominent land baron, James B. Haggin—and shows how the lawsuit profoundly shaped future waters issues, which in turn influenced water laws in other western states that were grappling with similar questions. Far from a dry legal history, Ruling the Waters tells a story with world-wide historical environmental ramifications, a tale of competing personalities and values and visions that forever changed both the economy and the ecology of the American West. Douglas R. Littlefield is founder and owner of Littlefield Historical Research and the author of Conflict on the Rio Grande: Water and the Law, 1879–1939.

VOLUME 4 IN THE ENVIRONMENT IN MODERN NORTH AMERICA

MARCH $45.00x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6490-8 352 PAGES, 6 X 9 10 B&W ILLUS., 8 MAPS U.S. HISTORY/ENVIRONMENT

Of Related Interest

CONFLICT ON THE RIO GRANDE Water and the Law, 1879–1939 By Douglas R. Littlefield $29.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-3998-2 HOOVER DAM An American Adventure By Joseph E. Stevens $19.95 Paperback 978-0-8061-2283-0 RESTORING THE SHINING WATERS Superfund Success at Milltown, Montana By David Brooks $34.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-4472-6

LITTLEFIELD RULING THE WATERS

A legal and environmental history of the river that shaped water law in the American West


22

The Arthur H. Clark Company P ublishers

of the

A merican W est

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1902

TATE THE GREAT MEDICINE ROAD, PART 4

Firsthand accounts of overland journeys to the West

The Great Medicine Road, Part 4 Narratives of the Oregon, California, and Mormon Trails, 1856–1869 Edited by Michael L. Tate With the assistance of Kerin Tate, Will Bagley, and Richard L. Reick Between 1841 and 1866, more than a half-million people followed trails to Oregon, California, and Utah in one of the largest mass migrations in American history. The Great Medicine Road, Part 4 collects the letters, diaries, and reminiscences of some of the emigrants who made this journey between 1856 and 1869, as a second generation of miners, farmers, town builders, and religious believers turned their adventurous eyes westward in search of new beginnings.

VOLUME 24 IN THE AMERICAN TRAILS SERIES

MAY $45.00x HARDCOVER 978-0-87062-434-6 328 PAGES, 6.125 X 9.25 18 B&W ILLUS., 4 MAPS U.S. HISTORY

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Here, in their own words, are the experiences of young men hoping to make their fortunes in mining operations that had sprung up as the gold rush wore down, in California but also now in the silver mines of Nevada’s Comstock Lode and the recently discovered gold mines of Colorado’s Denver and Pike’s Peak regions. Here also are families and farmers looking for land in the fertile Willamette Valley of Oregon, or joining the Mormon community in Utah. And here are the stories of intrepid sojourners traveling with—or without—military escorts as the Civil War, conflicts with Indians, and the Mormon stand against the U.S. government altered the circumstances of westward traffic. These documents, with an introduction and editorial notes written by historian Michael L. Tate to provide context and commentary, comprise the fourth and final installment in a documentary history of the Oregon, California, and Mormon Trails. They give a living voice to the history of the American experience at a time of westward expansion and profound, unprecedented change.

THE GREAT MEDICINE ROAD, PART 1 Narratives of the Oregon, California, and Mormon Trails, 1840–1848 Edited by Michael L. Tate $39.95x Hardcover 978-0-87062-428-5 THE GREAT MEDICINE ROAD, PART 2 Narratives of the Oregon, California, and Mormon Trails, 1849 Edited by Michael L. Tate $39.95x Hardcover 978-0-87062-437-7 THE GREAT MEDICINE ROAD, PART 3 Narratives of the Oregon, California, and Mormon Trails, 1850–1855 Edited by Michael L. Tate $45.00x Hardcover 978-0-87062-435-3

Michael L. Tate is Professor of History Emeritus at the University of Nebraska Omaha and author of The Frontier Army in the Settlement of the West and Indians and Emigrants: Encounters on the Overland Trail. Kerin Tate is an editor and researcher who specializes in western-U.S. history. Will Bagley is the author or editor of numerous books on the American West, including With Golden Visions Bright Before Them: Trails to the Mining West, 1849–1852 and South Pass: Gateway to a Continent. Richard L. Rieck is Professor Emeritus of Geography at Western Illinois University.


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War and Peace on the Rio Grande Frontier, 1830–1880 By Miguel Ángel González-Quiroga The historical record of the Rio Grande valley through much of the nineteenth century reveals well-documented violence fueled by racial hatred, national rivalries, lack of governmental authority, competition for resources, and an international border that offered refuge to lawless men. Less noted is the region’s other everyday reality, one based on coexistence and cooperation among Mexicans, AngloAmericans, and the Native Americans, African Americans, and Europeans who also inhabited the borderlands. War and Peace on the Rio Grande Frontier, 1830–1880 is a history of these parallel worlds focusing on a border that gave rise not only to violent conflict but also cooperation and economic and social advancement. Meeting here are the Anglo-Americans who came to the border region to trade, spread Christianity, and settle; Mexicans seeking opportunity in el norte; Native Americans who raided American and Mexican settlements alike for plunder and captives; and Europeans who crisscrossed the borderlands seeking new futures in a fluid frontier space. Historian Miguel Ángel González-Quiroga draws on national archives, letters, consular records, periodicals, and a host of other sources to give voice to borderlanders’ perspectives as he weaves their many, varied stories into one sweeping narrative. The tale he tells is one of economic connections and territorial disputes, of refugees and bounty hunters, speculation and stakeholding, smuggling and theft and other activities in which economic considerations often carried more weight than racial prejudice. Spanning the Anglo settlement of Texas in the 1830s, the Texas Revolution, the Republic of Texas , the US-Mexican War, various Indian wars, the US Civil War, the French intervention into Mexico, and the final subjugation of borderlands Indians by the combined forces of the US and Mexican armies, this is a magisterial work that forever alters, complicates, and enriches borderlands history. Miguel Ángel González-Quiroga is a transnational scholar who was born in Nuevo León, Mexico, and has taught Mexican and US history at the Facultad de Filosofía y Letras of the Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León. He has coauthored, coedited, or translated five books, including Texas y el norte de México (with Mario Cerutti).

VOLUME 1 IN THE NEW DIRECTIONS IN TEJANO HISTORY SERIES

MARCH $50.00x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6498-4 592 PAGES, 6.125 X 9.25 20 B&W ILLUS., 1 MAP U.S. HISTORY

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A CROOKED RIVER Rustlers, Rangers, and Regulars on the Lower Rio Grande, 1861–1877 By Michael L. Collins $29.95 Hardcover 978-0-8061-6008-5 COAST-TO-COAST EMPIRE Manifest Destiny and the New Mexico Borderlands By William S. Kiser $32.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-6026-9 CIVIL WAR IN THE SOUTHWEST BORDERLANDS, 1861–1867 By Andrew E. Masich $26.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-6096-2

GONZÁLEZ-QUIROGA WAR AND PEACE ON THE RIO GRANDE FRONTIER, 1830–1880

A sweeping narrative of the lower Rio Grande valley during a tumultuous half century


REIN THE SECOND COLORADO CAVALRY

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2020

The unlikely agents of empire who transformed the Central Plains

The Second Colorado Cavalry A Civil War Regiment on the Great Plains By Christopher M. Rein During the Civil War, the Second Colorado Volunteer Regiment played a vital and often decisive role in the fight for the Union on the Great Plains—and in the westward expansion of the American empire. Christopher M. Rein’s The Second Colorado Cavalry is the first in-depth history of this regiment operating at the nexus of the Civil War and the settlement of the American West.

VOLUME 69 IN THE CAMPAIGNS AND COMMANDERS SERIES

FEBRUARY $34.95x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6481-6 296 PAGES, 6 X 9 15 B&W ILLUS., 5 MAPS, 6 TABLES MILITARY HISTORY/U.S. HISTORY

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THE HARDEST LOT OF MEN The Third Minnesota Infantry in the Civil War By Joseph C. Fitzharris $34.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-6401-4 SOLDIERS IN THE ARMY OF FREEDOM The 1st Kansas Colored, the Civil War’s First African American Combat Unit By Ian Michael Spurgeon $29.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-4618-8 PRESIDENTS WHO SHAPED THE AMERICAN WEST By Glenda Riley and Richard W. Etulain $24.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-5907-2

Composed largely of footloose ’59ers who raced west to participate in the gold rush in Colorado, the troopers of the Second Colorado repelled Confederate invasions in New Mexico and Indian Territory before wading into the Burned District along the Kansas border, the bloodiest region of the guerilla war in Missouri. In 1865, the regiment moved back out onto the Plains, applying what it had learned to peacekeeping operations along the Santa Fe Trail, thus definitively linking the Civil War and the military conquest of the American West in a single act of continental expansion. Emphasizing the cavalry units, whose mobility proved critical in suppressing both Confederate bushwhackers and Indian raiders, Rein tells the neglected tale of the “fire brigade” of the Trans-Mississippi Theater—a group of men, and a few women, who enabled the most significant environmental shift in the Great Plains’ history: the displacement of Native Americans by Euro-A merican settlers, the swapping of bison herds for fenced cattle ranges, and the substitution of iron horses for those of flesh and bone. The Second Colorado Cavalry offers us a much-needed history of the “guerilla hunters” who helped suppress violence and keep the peace in contested border regions; it adds nuance and complexity to our understanding of the unlikely “agents of empire” who successfully transformed the Central Plains. Christopher M. Rein is a managing editor at Air University Press at Maxwell Air Force Base in Montgomery, Alabama, and the author of The North African Air Campaign: The U.S. Army Air Forces from El Alamein to Salerno and Alabamians in Blue: Freedmen, Unionists, and the Civil War in the Cotton State.


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An Honest Enemy George Crook and the Struggle for Indian Rights By Paul Magid Over the course of his military career, George Crook developed empathy and admiration for American Indians both as foes and as allies. As Paul Magid has demonstrated in the previous two volumes of his groundbreaking biography, this experience prepared Crook well for his metamorphosis from Indian fighter to outspoken advocate of Indian rights. An Honest Enemy is the third and final volume of Magid’s account of George Crook’s life and involvement in the Indian wars. Using rarely tapped information, including Crook’s own diaries, the work documents in dramatic detail the general’s arduous and dangerous campaigns against the Chiricahua Apaches and their leader Geronimo, action that forms a backdrop to the transformation in the general’s role vis-à-vis Native Americans. In a story by turns harrowing and tragic, Magid details the plight of Indians who, in the aftermath of their defeat, were consigned to reservations too barren to sustain them, where they were subjected to impoverishment, indifference, and in many cases, outright corruption. With growing anger, Crook watched as many tribes faced death from starvation and disease and, unwilling to passively accept their fate, desperately sought to flee their reservations and return to their homelands. Charged with the grim task of returning the Indians to such conditions, Crook was forced to choose between fulfilling his duties as a soldier and his humanitarian values. Magid describes Crook’s struggle to reconcile these conflicting concerns while promoting policies he regarded as essential to the welfare of the Indians in the face of a hostile public, jealous fellow officers, and an unsympathetic government that regarded his efforts as quixotic and misguided. Here is a tale that readers will not soon forget. Paul Magid is a retired attorney who worked with the Peace Corps, then served as General Counsel of the African Development Foundation. He is the author of George Crook: From the Redwoods to Appomattox and The Gray Fox: George Crook and the Indian Wars.

APRIL $39.95x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6500-4 536 PAGES, 6.125 X 9.25 22 B&W ILLUS., 4 MAPS BIOGRAPHY/MILITARY HISTORY

Of Related Interest

THE GRAY FOX George Crook and the Indian Wars By Paul Magid $29.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-4706-2 $26.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-6046-7 GEORGE CROOK From the Redwoods to Appomattox By Paul Magid $24.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-4441-2 GENERAL GEORGE CROOK His Autobiography Edited and annotated by Martin F. Schmitt $19.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-1982-3

MAGID AN HONEST ENEMY

The last campaigns and crusade of the Gray Fox


WOODSIDE FRONTIERS OF BOYHOOD

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2020

Where youth and the frontier myth met

Frontiers of Boyhood Imagining America, Past and Future By Martin Woodside When Horace Greeley published his famous imperative, “Go West young man, and grow up with the country,” the frontier was already synonymous with a distinctive type of idealized American masculinity. But Greeley’s exhortation also captured popular sentiment surrounding changing ideas of American boyhood; for many educators, politicians, and parents, raising boys right seemed a pivotal step in securing the growing nation’s future. This book revisits these narratives of American boyhood and frontier mythology to show how they worked against and through one another—and how this interaction shaped ideas about national character, identity, and progress.

VOLUME 7 IN THE WILLIAM F. CODY SERIES ON THE HISTORY AND CULTURE OF THE AMERICAN WEST SERIES

FEBRUARY $34.95x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6476-2 232 PAGES, 6 X 9 18 B&W ILLUS. U.S. HISTORY

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PIONEERS OF PROMOTION How Press Agents for Buffalo Bill, P. T. Barnum, and the World’s Columbian Exposition Created Modern Marketing By Joe Dobrow $32.95 Hardcover 978-0-8061-6010-8 THE POPULAR FRONTIER Buffalo Bill’s Wild West and Transnational Mass Culture Edited by Frank Christianson $32.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-5894-5

The intersection of ideas about boyhood and the frontier, while complex and multifaceted, was dominated by one arresting notion: in the space of the West, boys would grow into men and the fledgling nation would expand to fulfill its promise. Frontiers of Boyhood explores this myth and its implications and ramifications through western history, childhood studies, and a rich cultural archive. Detailing surprising intersections between American frontier mythology and historical notions of child development, the book offers a new perspective on William “Buffalo Bill” Cody’s influence on children and childhood; on the phenomenon of “American Boy Books”; the agency of child performers, differentiated by race and gender, in Wild West exhibitions; and the cultural work of boys’ play, as witnessed in scouting organizations and the deployment of massproduced toys. These mutually reinforcing and complicating strands, traced through a wide range of cultural modes, from social and scientific theorizing to mass entertainment, lead to a new understanding of how changing American ideas about boyhood and the western frontier have worked together to produce compelling stories about the nation’s past and its imagined future. Martin Woodside is a Philadelphia-based writer, poet, and scholar and a founding member of the book publisher Calypso Editions. He has written five children’s books, a collection of poetry, and numerous scholarly articles. Woodside holds a doctorate in childhood studies from Rutgers University–Camden.


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Rodeo An Animal History By Susan Nance “What would rodeo look like if we took it as a record, not of human triumph and resilience, but of human imperfection and stubbornness?” asks animal historian Susan Nance. Against the backdrop of the larger histories of ranching, cattle, horses, and the environment in the West, this book explores how the evolution of rodeo has reflected rural western beliefs and assumptions about the natural world that have led to environmental crises and served the beef empire. By unearthing behindthe-scenes stories of rodeo animals as diverse individuals, this book lays bare contradictions within rodeo and the rural West. For almost 150 years, westerners have used rodeo to symbolically reenact their struggles with animals and the land as uniformly progressive and triumphant. Nance upends that view with accounts of individual animals that reveal how diligently rodeo people have worked to make livestock into surrogates for the trials of rural life in the West and the violence in its history. Western horses and cattle were more than just props. Rodeo reclaims their lived history through compelling stories of anonymous roping steers and calves who inspired reform of the sport, such as the famed but abused bucker Steamboat, and the many broncs and bulls, famous or not, who unknowingly built an industry. Rodeo is a dangerous sport that reveals many westerners as people proudly tolerant of risk and violence, and ready to impose these values on livestock. In Rodeo: An Animal History, Nance pushes past standard histories and the sport’s publicity to show how rodeo was shot through with stubbornness and human failing as much as fortitude and community spirit. Susan Nance is Professor of History at the University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada, where she is also affiliated faculty with the Campbell Centre for the Study of Animal Welfare. She is the editor of The Historical Animal and author of Entertaining Elephants: Animal Agency and Business in the American Circus.

VOLUME 3 IN THE ENVIRONMENT IN MODERN NORTH AMERICA SERIES

APRIL $36.95x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6502-8 320 PAGES, 6 X 9 39 B&W ILLUS. SPORTS/U.S. HISTORY

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AS FAR AS THE EYE COULD REACH Accounts of Animals along the Santa Fe Trail, 1821–1880 By Phyllis S. Morgan $19.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-4854-0 TO SAVE THE WILD BISON Life on the Edge in Yellowstone By Mary Ann Franke $24.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-3683-7 LOVE CAN BE A Literary Collection about Our Animals Edited by Louisa McCune and Teresa Miller $19.95 Paperback 978-0-9996993-0-0

NANCE RODEO

Explores rodeo history through the lives of its animals


FIELDS DISCORDANT MEMORIES

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2020

A thought-provoking exploration of nuclear legacies

Discordant Memories Atomic Age Narratives and Visual Culture By Alison Fields On two separate days in August 1945, the United States dropped atomic bombs over the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. As the seventy-fifth anniversary of these cataclysmic bombings draws near, American and Japanese citizens are seeking new ways to memorialize these events for future generations. In Discordant Memories, Alison Fields explores—through the lenses of multiple disciplines— ongoing memories of the two bombings. Enhanced by striking color and blackand-white images, this book is an innovative contribution to the evolving fields of memory studies and nuclear humanities.

FEBRUARY $34.95x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6459-5 256 PAGES, 6 X 9 6 B&W AND 17 COLOR ILLUS. ART HISTORY/U.S. HISTORY

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PICHER, OKLAHOMA Catastrophe, Memory, and Trauma By Todd Stewart and Alison Fields $29.95 Hardcover 978-0-8061-5165-6 PLACING MEMORY A Photographic Exploration of Japanese American Internment By Todd Stewart and Karen J. Leong $24.95s Hardcover 978-0-8061-3951-7

To reveal the layered complexities of nuclear remembrance, Fields analyzes photography, film, and art works; offers close readings of media and testimonial accounts; traces site visits to atomic museums in New Mexico and Japan; and features artists who give visual form to evolving memories. According to Fields, such expressions of memory both inspire group healing and expose struggles with past trauma. Visual forms of remembrance—such as science museums, peace memorials, photographs, and even scars on human bodies—serve to contain or manage painful memories. And yet, the author claims, distinct cultures lay claim to vastly different remembrances of nuclear history. Fields analyzes a range of case studies to uncover these discordant memories and to trace the legacies of nuclear weapons production and testing. Her subjects include the Bradbury Science Museum in Los Alamos, New Mexico; the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum in Japan; the atomic photography of Carole Gallagher and Patrick Nagatani; and art works and experimental films by Will Wilson and Nanobah Becker. In the end, Fields argues, the trauma caused by nuclear weapons can never be fully contained. For this reason, commemorations of their effects are often incomplete and insufficient. Differences between individual memories and public accounts are also important to recognize. Discordant Memories illuminates such disparate memories in all their rich complexity. Alison Fields, Associate Director of the School of Visual Arts and Mary Lou Milner Carver Associate Professor of Art of the American West at the University of Oklahoma, is the coauthor of Picher, Oklahoma: Catastrophe, Memory, and Trauma and the author of Chickasaw Women Artisans.


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Through a Native Lens American Indian Photography By Nicole Strathman What is Native American photography? At the turn of the twentieth century, Edward Curtis began creating romantic images of American Indians, and his works—along with pictures by other non-Native photographers—came to define the field. Yet beginning in the second half of the nineteenth century, American Indians themselves started using cameras to record their daily activities and to memorialize tribal members. Through a Native Lens offers a refreshing, new perspective by highlighting the active contributions of North American Indians, both as patrons who commissioned portraits and as photographers who created collections. In this richly illustrated volume, Nicole Dawn Strathman explores how indigenous peoples throughout the United States and Canada appropriated the art of photography and integrated it into their lifeways. The photographs she analyzes date to the first one hundred years of the medium, between 1840 and 1940. To account for Native activity both in front of and behind the camera, the author divides her survey into two parts. Part I focuses on Native participants, including such public figures as Sarah Winnemucca and Red Cloud, who fashioned themselves in deliberate ways for their portraits. Part II part examines Native professional, semiprofessional, and amateur photographers. Drawing from tribal and state archives, libraries, museums, and individual collections, Through a Native Lens features photographs—including some never before published—that range from formal portraits to casual snapshots. The images represent multiple tribal communities across Native North America, including the Inland Tlingit, Northern Paiute, and Kiowa. Moving beyond studies of Native Americans as photographic subjects, this groundbreaking book demonstrates how indigenous peoples took control of their own images and distinguished themselves as pioneers of photography. Nicole Dawn Strathman is a lecturer in the Department of Art History at the University of California, Riverside.

VOLUME 37 IN THE CHARLES M. RUSSELL CENTER SERIES ON ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY OF THE AMERICAN WEST

MARCH $50.00x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6484-7 312 PAGES, 8 X 10 170 B&W ILLUS. PHOTOGRAPHY/AMERICAN INDIAN

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A NORTHERN CHEYENNE ALBUM Photographs by Thomas B. Marquis By John Woodenlegs Edited by Margot Liberty $29.95 Paperback 978-0-8061-3893-0 A RUSSIAN AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHER IN TLINGIT COUNTRY Vincent Soboleff in Alaska By Sergei Kan $39.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-4290-6 LANTERNS ON THE PRAIRIE The Blackfeet Photographs of Walter McClintock Edited by Steven L. Grafe $60.00x Hardcover 978-0-8061-4022-3

STRATHMAN THROUGH A NATIVE LENS

A groundbreaking exploration of early photography for and by indigenous peoples


McPHERSON TRADERS, AGENTS, AND WEAVERS

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2020

Explores cultural cooperation among Navajo Indians and Anglo-American settlers

Traders, Agents, and Weavers Developing the Northern Navajo Region By Robert S. McPherson For travelers passing through northern Navajo country, the desert landscape appears desolate. The few remaining Navajo trading posts, once famous for their bustling commerce, seem unimpressive. Yet a closer look at the economic and creative activity in this region, which straddles northeastern Arizona, northwestern New Mexico, and southeastern Utah, belies a far more interesting picture. In Traders, Agents, and Weavers, Robert S. McPherson unveils the fascinating—and at times surprising—history of the merging of cultures and artistic innovation across this land.

MARCH $39.95x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6479-3 368 PAGES, 6 X 9 21 B&W ILLLUS., 1 MAP AMERICAN INDIAN/U.S. HISTORY

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BOTH SIDES OF THE BULLPEN Navajo Trade and Posts By Robert S. McPherson $34.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-5745-0 PATTERNS OF EXCHANGE Navajo Weavers and Traders By Teresa J. Wilkins $19.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-4354-5 HUBBELL TRADING POST Trade, Tourism, and the Navajo Southwest By Erica Cottam $29.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-4837-3

McPherson, the author of numerous books on Navajo and southwestern history, narrates here the story of Navajo economic and cultural development through the testimonies of traders, government agents, tribal leaders, and accomplished weavers. For the first half of the twentieth century, trading posts dominated the Navajo economy in northwestern New Mexico. McPherson highlights the Two Grey Hills post and its sister posts Toadlena and Newcomb, which encouraged excellence among weavers and sold high-quality rugs and blankets. Parallel to the success of the trading industry was the establishment of the Northern Navajo or Shiprock Agency and Boarding School. The author explains the pivotal influence on the area of the agency’s stern and controversial founder, William T. Shelton, known by Navajos as Tall Leader. Through cooperation with government agents, American settlers, and traders, Navajo weavers not only succeeded financially but also developed their own artistic crafts. Shunning the use of brightly dyed yarn and opting for the natural colors of sheep’s wool, these weavers, primarily women, developed an intricate style that has few rivals. Eventually, economic shifts, including oil drilling and livestock reduction, eroded the traditional Navajo way of life and led to the collapse of the trading post system. Nonetheless, as McPherson emphasizes, Navajo weavers have maintained their distinctive style and method of production to this day. Robert S. McPherson is Professor of History Emeritus at Utah State University– Blanding Campus. He is the author or coauthor of numerous books, including Under the Eagle: Samuel Holiday, Navajo Code Talker (with Samuel Holiday) and Both Sides of the Bullpen: Navajo Trade and Posts.


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In League Against King Alcohol Native American Women and the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union, 1874–1933 By Thomas John Lappas Many Americans are familiar with the real, but repeatedly stereotyped problem of alcohol abuse in Indian country. Most know about the Prohibition Era and reformers who promoted passage of the Eighteenth Amendment, among them the members of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union. But few people are aware of how American Indian women joined forces with the WCTU to press for positive change in their communities, a critical chapter of American cultural history explored in depth for the first time in In League Against King Alcohol. Drawing on the WCTU’s national records as well as state and regional organizational newspaper accounts and official state histories, historian Thomas John Lappas unearths the story of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union in Indian country. His work reveals how Native American women in the organization embraced a type of social, economic, and political progress that their white counterparts supported and recognized—while maintaining distinctly Native elements of sovereignty, selfdetermination, and cultural preservation. They asserted their identities as Indigenous women, albeit as Christian and progressive Indigenous women. At the same time, through their mutual participation, white WCTU members formed conceptions about Native people that they subsequently brought to bear on state and local Indian policy pertaining to alcohol, but also on education, citizenship, voting rights, and land use and ownership. Lappas’s work places Native women at the center of the temperance story, showing how they used a women’s national reform organization to move their own goals and objectives forward. Subtly but significantly, they altered the welfare and status of American Indian communities in the early twentieth century. Thomas J. Lappas is Professor of History at Nazareth College in Rochester, New York.

FEBRUARY $36.95x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6463-2 344 PAGES, 6 X 9 15 B&W ILLUS., 1 MAP AMERICAN INDIAN/WOMEN’S STUDIES

Of Related Interest

RESERVATIONS, REMOVAL, AND REFORM The Mission Indian Agents of Southern California, 1878–1903 By Valerie Sherer Mathes and Phil Brigandi $36.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-5999-7 A CALL FOR REFORM The Southern California Indian Writings of Helen Hunt Jackson Edited by Valerie Sherer Mathes and Phil Brigandi $29.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-4363-7 RED BIRD, RED POWER The Life and Legacy of Zitkala-Ša By Tadeusz Lewandowski $29.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-5178-6 $21.95s Paperback 978-0-8061-6453-3

LAPPAS IN LEAGUE AGAINST KING ALCOHOL

Tells the story of how American Indian women promoted temperance in their communities


BRITTEN VOICE OF THE TRIBES

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2020

Offers a new look at intertribal politics during the height of American Indian activism

Voice of the Tribes A History of the National Tribal Chairmen’s Association By Thomas A. Britten Foreword by Charles Trimble The 1960s and 1970s were a time of radical change in U.S. history. During these turbulent decades, Native Americans played a prominent role in the civil rights movement, fighting to achieve self-determination and tribal sovereignty. Yet they did not always agree on how to realize their goals. In 1971, a group of tribal leaders formed the National Tribal Chairmen’s Association (NTCA) to advocate on behalf of reservation-based tribes and to counter the more radical approach of the Red Power movement. Voice of the Tribes is the first comprehensive history of the NTCA from its inception in 1971 to its 1986 disbandment.

VOLUME 20 IN THE NEW DIRECTIONS IN NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES SERIES

MAY $34.95x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6492-2 240 PAGES, 6 X 9 12 ILLUS. AND 2 TABLES AMERICAN INDIAN/U.S. HISTORY

Of Related Interest

CLYDE WARRIOR Tradition, Community, and Red Power By Paul R. McKenzie-Jones $29.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-4705-5 OJIBWA WARRIOR Dennis Banks and the Rise of the American Indian Movement By Dennis Banks $21.95 Paper 978-0-8061-3691-2 RED POWER RISING The National Indian Youth Council and the Origins of Native Activism By Bradley G. Shreve $34.95s Hardcover 978-0-8061-4178-7 $21.95x Paper 978-0-8061-4365-1

Scholars of Native American history have focused considerable attention on Red Power activists and organizations, whose confrontational style of advocacy helped expose the need for Indian policy reform. Lost in the narrative, though, are the achievements of elected leaders who represented the nation’s federally recognized tribes. In this book, historian Thomas A. Britten fills that void by demonstrating the important role that the NTCA , as the self-professed “voice of the tribes,” played in the evolution of federal Indian policy. During the height of its influence, according to Britten, the NTCA helped implement new federal policies that advanced tribal sovereignty, protected Native lands and resources, and enabled direct negotiations between the United States and tribal governments. While doing so, NTCA chairs deliberately distanced themselves from such well-known groups as the American Indian Movement (AIM), branding them as illegitimate—that is, not “real Indians”—and viewing their tactics as harmful to meaningful reform. Based on archival sources and extensive interviews with both prominent Indian leaders and federal officials of the period, Britten’s account offers new insights into American Indian activism and intertribal politics during the height of the civil rights movement. Thomas A. Britten is Professor of History at the University of Texas–Rio Grande Valley. He is the author of The National Council on Indian Opportunity: Quiet Champion of Self-Determination. Charles Trimble (Oglala Sioux) was a founder of the American Indian Press Association and served as Executive Director of the National Congress of American Indians from 1972 to 1978.


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Mapping Indigenous Land Native Land Grants in Colonial New Spain By Ana Pulido Rull Between 1536 and 1601, at the request of the colonial administration of New Spain, indigenous artists crafted more than two hundred maps to be used as evidence in litigation over the allocation of land. These land grant maps, or mapas de mercedes de tierras, recorded the boundaries of cities, provinces, towns, and places; they made note of markers and ownership, and, at times, the extent and measurement of each field in a territory, along with the names of those who worked it. With their corresponding case files, these maps tell the stories of hundreds of natives and Spaniards who engaged in legal proceedings either to request land, to oppose a petition, or to negotiate its terms. Mapping Indigenous Land explores how, as persuasive and rhetorical images, these maps did more than simply record the disputed territories for lawsuits. They also enabled indigenous communities— and sometimes Spanish petitioners—to translate their ideas about contested spaces into visual form; offered arguments for the defense of these spaces; and in some cases even helped protect indigenous land against harmful requests. Drawing on her own paleography and transcription of case files, author Ana Pulido Rull shows how much these maps can tell us about the artists who participated in the lawsuits and about indigenous views of the contested lands. Considering the mapas de mercedes de tierras as sites of cross-cultural communication between natives and Spaniards, Pulido Rull also offers an analysis of Medieval and Modern Castilian law, its application in colonial New Spain, and the possibilities it opened for the native population. An important contribution to the literature on Mexico’s indigenous cartography and colonial art, Pulido Rull’s work suggests new ways of understanding how colonial space itself was contested, negotiated, and defined. Ana Pulido Rull is Associate Professor of Latin American Art History at the University of Arkansas.

MAY $45.00x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6496-0 216 PAGES, 7 X 10 52 B&W AND 27 COLOR ILLUS., 2 MAPS, 3 CHARTS LATIN AMERICA

Of Related Interest

MAYA SACRED GEOGRAPHY AND THE CREATOR DEITIES By Karen Bassie-Sweet $50.00x Hardcover 978-0-8061-3957-9 VISUAL CULTURE OF THE ANCIENT AMERICAS Contemporary Perspectives Edited by Andrew Finegold and Ellen Hoobler $39.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-5570-8 HISTORICAL ATLAS OF CENTRAL AMERICA By Carolyn Hall and Hector Perez Brignoli $99.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-3037-8 $34.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-3038-5

PULIDO RULL MAPPING INDIGENOUS LAND

Examines how native maps were used for land negotiation in New Spain


LOVELL, LUTZ, KRAMER STRIKE FEAR IN THE LAND

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2020

The conquest of Guatemala told anew

Strike Fear in the Land Pedro de Alvarado and the Conquest of Guatemala, 1520–1541 By W. George Lovell, Christopher H. Lutz and Wendy Kramer The conquest of Guatemala was brutal, prolonged and complex, fraught with intrigue and deception, and not at all clear-cut. Yet views persist of it as an armed confrontation whose stakes were evident and whose outcomes were decisive, especially in favor of the Spaniards. A critical reappraisal is long overdue, one that calls for us to reconsider events and circumstances in the light of not only new evidence but also keener awareness of indigenous roles in the drama.

VOLUME 279 IN THE CIVILIZATION OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN SERIES

MAY $32.95x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6494-6 168 PAGES, 6 X 9 28 ILLUS., 1 MAP, AND 1 TABLE LATIN AMERICA

Of Related Interest

While acknowledging the prominent role played by Pedro de Alvarado (1485– 1541), Strike Fear in the Land reexamines the conquest to give us a greater appreciation of indigenous involvement in it and sustained opposition to it. Authors W. George Lovell, Christopher H. Lutz, and Wendy Kramer develop a fresh perspective on Alvarado as well as the alliances forged with native groups that facilitated Spanish objectives. The book reveals, for instance, that during the years most crucial to the conquest, Alvarado was absent from Guatemala more often than he was present; he relied on his brother, Jorge de Alvarado, to act in his stead. A pact with the Kaqchikel Maya was also not nearly as solid or long-lived as previously thought, as Alvarado’s erstwhile allies soon turned against the Spaniards, fomenting a prolonged rebellion. Even the story of the K’iche’ leader Tecún Umán, hailed in Guatemala as a national hero who fronted native resistance, undergoes significant revision. Written with literary flair, Strike Fear in the Land is an arresting saga of personalities and controversies, conveying as never before the turmoil of this pivotal period in Mesoamerican history.

INDIAN CONQUISTADORS Indigenous Allies in the Conquest of Mesoamerica Edited by Laura E. Matthew and Michel R. Oudijk $24.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-4325-5 “STRANGE LANDS AND DIFFERENT PEOPLES” Spaniards and Indians in Colonial Guatemala By W. George Lovell and Christopher H. Lutz $34.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-4390-3 MEXICO AND THE SPANISH CONQUEST By Ross Hassig $21.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-3793-3

W. George Lovell is Professor of Geography at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, and the author of A Beauty That Hurts: Life and Death in Guatemala. Christopher H. Lutz is the author of Santiago de Guatemala, 1541– 1773: City, Caste, and the Colonial Experience. Wendy Kramer is the author of Encomienda Politics in Early Colonial Guatemala, 1524–1544: Dividing the Spoils.


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Ancient Rome An Introductory History Second Edition By Paul A. Zoch In this revised and expanded edition of Ancient Rome, author Paul A. Zoch presents the history and mythology of Rome, from its legendary progenitor Aeneas to the death of the philosopher-emperor Marcus Aurelius in 180 c.e. Zoch guides readers through the military campaigns and political developments that shaped Rome’s rise from a small Italian city to the greatest imperial power the world had ever known, and he includes stories about its protagonists—such as Romulus and Remus, Horatius, and Nero—that are often omitted from more specialized studies. In Zoch’s retelling, the events and personalities of ancient Rome spring to life. We witness the long struggle against the enemy city of Carthage. We follow Caesar as he campaigns in Britain, and we observe the ebb and flow of Rome’s fortunes in the Hellenistic East. Emphasizing both the political and moral lessons to be learned from Roman history—and that remain relevant today—Zoch gives readers a narrative that is both entertaining and informative. An afterword takes the history to the fall of the Roman Empire in the West in 476 c.e.

MAY $26.95x PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6477-9 312 PAGES, 6 X 9 19 FIGURES, 3 MAPS, 2 TABLES WORLD HISTORY/CLASSICAL STUDIES

Of Related Interest

Paul A. Zoch, a Houston-based educator with thirty-one years of experience teaching Latin and ancient Roman history, is the author of Doomed to Fail: The Built-In Defects of American Education.

DAILY LIFE IN THE ROMAN CITY Rome, Pompeii, and Ostia By Gregory S. Aldrete $24.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-4027-8 CAESAR’S GALLIC WAR A Commentary By Herbert W. Benario $19.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-4252-4 COMMUNICATION, LOVE, AND DEATH IN HOMER AND VIRGIL An Introduction By Stephen Ridd $29.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-5729-0

ZOCH ANCIENT ROME

A contemporary retelling of the ebb and flow of Rome’s fortunes


SULPRIZIO, BLAKE GENDER AND SEXUALITY IN JUVENAL’S ROME

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2020

A fresh and student-friendly translation of two crucial ancient Roman texts

Gender and Sexuality in Juvenal’s Rome Satire 2 and Satire 6 Translated and edited by Chiara Sulprizio Introduction by Sarah H. Blake The poet Juvenal is one of the most important ancient Roman authors, and his sixteen satires have left a strong mark on western literature. Despite his great influence, little is known about the poet’s life, beyond unreliable details gleaned from his poetry. Yet Juvenal’s satires contain a wealth of information about the mentality of imperial-era Romans. This volume offers a fresh and student-friendly translation of two of Juvenal’s most provocative poems: Satire 2 and Satire 6. With their common focus on gender and sexuality, these two works are of particular interest to today’s readers. VOLUME 59 IN THE OKLAHOMA SERIES IN CLASSICAL CULTURE

FEBRUARY $29.95x PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6488-5 312 PAGES, 6 X 9 CLASSICAL STUDIES/WOMEN’S STUDIES

Both Satire 2 and Satire 6 target effeminate men and wayward women as objects of ridicule, and they ruthlessly mock their behavior in an effort to expose deep-seated problems in Roman society. The longer of the two works, Juvenal’s sixth satire, addresses a basic question, “Why get married?,” in a tone of spite and ferocity, and its details are disturbingly graphic. Satire 2 is a shorter but equally pointed tirade against effeminacy and passive homosexuality. Taken together, the poems compel readers to critique the discourse of gender stereotypes and misogyny.

Of Related Interest

For students and scholars of gender and sexuality, these poems are crucial texts. Chiara Sulprizio’s lively translation, perfectly suited for classroom use, captures the vivid spirit of Juvenal’s poems, and her extensive notes enhance the volume’s appeal by explicating the poems from a gendered perspective. An in-depth introduction by Sarah H. Blake places the satires within their broader literary, historical, and cultural context.

THE EROTICS OF DOMINATION Male Desire and the Mistress in Latin Love Poetry By Ellen Greene $19.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-4050-6

Chiara Sulprizio is Senior Lecturer in the Program in Classical and Mediterranean Studies at Vanderbilt University. Sarah H. Blake is Associate Professor of Classical Studies at York University, Toronto, Canada.

THE ARENA OF SATIRE Juvenal’s Search for Rome By David H. J. Larmour $34.95x Hardcover 978-0-8061-5156-4 PLATO’S APOLOGY OF SOCRATES A Commentary By Paul Allen Miller and Charles Platter $26.95x Paperback 978-0-8061-4025-4


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NEW IN PAPERBACK

NEW IN PAPERBACK

Wyoming’s Big Horn Basin to 1901

On the Drafting of Tribal Constitutions

Riding Buffaloes and Broncos

A Late Frontier By Lawrence M. Woods

By Felix S. Cohen Edited by David E. Wilkins Foreword by Lindsay G. Robertson

WYOMING’S BIG HORN BASIN TO 1901

NEW IN PAPERBACK

Lawrence M. Woods, an attorney and certified public accountant, resides in Worland, Wyoming. He is the author of several books, including British Gentlemen in the Wild West and Alex Swan and the Swan Companies.

David E. Wilkins is E. Claiborne Robins Distinguished Professor in Leadership Studies at the University of Richmond. Lindsay G. Robertson is Judge Haskell A. Holloman Professor of Law and Faculty Director of the American Indian Law and Policy Center at the University of Oklahoma.

LANDS AND WATERS SERIES MARCH $34.95x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-3806-0 $19.95x PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6606-3 200 PAGES, 5.5 X 8.5 1 B&W ILLUS. VOLUME 1 IN THE AMERICAN INDIAN LAW AND POLICY SERIES

Allison Fuss Mellis is Professor of History at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland. APRIL $29.95x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-3519-9 $21.95x PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6617-9 288 PAGES, 6 X 9 32 B&W ILLUS., 3 MAPS AMERICAN INDIAN/U.S. HISTORY

RIDING BUFFALOES AND BRONCOS

JANUARY $39.50x HARDCOVER 978-0-87062-267-0 $29.95x PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6576-9 288 PAGES, 6.14 X 9.21 15 B&W ILLUS., 1 MAP U.S. HISTORY VOLUME 18 IN THE WESTERN

On the Drafting of Tribal Constitutions shows that concepts of Indigenous autonomy and self-governance have been vital to Native nations throughout history. As today’s tribal governments undertake reform, Cohen’s memorandum again offers a wealth of insight on how best to amend previous constitutions. It also helps scholars better understand the historic policy shift brought about by the Indian Reorganization Act.

Mellis has mined archival sources and interviewed American Indian rodeo participants and spectators throughout the northern Great Plains, the Southwest, and Canada, including the Crow, Northern Cheyenne, and Lakota reservations. The book features numerous photographs of Indian rodeos from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and maps illustrating the allIndian rodeo circuit in the United States and Canada.

ON THE DRAFTING OF TRIBAL CONSTITUTIONS

Custer’s defeat at the Battle of the Little Big Horn did its part to win fame for the Big Horn Basin, and much has been written about the famous characters of Wyoming. But until now the region that was Wyoming’s last frontier has not received comprehensive treatment. This new study examines the Big Horn Basin during its frontier period.

Rodeo and Native Traditions in the Northern Great Plains By Allison Fuss Mellis


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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2020

NEW IN PAPERBACK

NEW IN PAPERBACK

Voices from the Oil Fields

Contested Empire

Edited by Paul F. Lambert and Kenny A. Franks

Peter Skene Ogden and The Snake River Expeditions By John Phillip Reid Foreword by Martin Ridge

Gangs, Pseudo-militaries, and Other Modern Mercenaries

VOICES FROM THE OIL FIELDS

CONTESTED EMPIRE

GANGS, PSEUDO-MILITARIES, AND OTHER MODERN MERCENARIES

NEW IN PAPERBACK

During the oil-boom days of the early twentieth century, a few lucky or shrewd individuals made millions of dollars virtually overnight. It is a familiar theme in the romantic mythology that sprang up about the era. In vivid, often poignant detail these men and women recall the grueling toil, primitive living and working conditions, and ever-present danger in a time when life was cheap and oil was gold. The early oil industry was built upon their toil, their pain, and their courage, all of which are evident in every word recorded here. Paul F. Lambert works as a consultant to the Chickasaw Nation and the Oklahoma Historical Society. He is the author or coauthor of thirteen books related to the history of Oklahoma and the petroleum industry. Kenny A. Franks has served as Director of Education and Publication at the Oklahoma Hall of Fame and is a historian of the oil industry. FEBRUARY $19.95x PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6480-9 276 PAGES, 6 X 9 42 B&W ILLUS. U.S. HISTORY

Failing to take legal culture into consideration, some previous accounts have depicted these conflicts as mere episodes of lawless frontier violence. Reid expands our understanding of the West by considering the unspoken sense of law that existed, despite the lack of any formalized authorities, in what had otherwise been considered a “lawless” time. John Phillip Reid is the author of numerous publications, including Forging a Fur Empire: Expeditions in the Snake River Country, 1809–1824. Martin Ridge is Senior Research Associate at the Huntington Library, Professor Emeritus of History at California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, and the author of Westward Expansion: A History of the American Frontier. MAY $26.95x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-3374-4 $21.95x PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-4932-5 272 PAGES, 6 X 9 3 MAPS

New Dynamics in Uncomfortable Wars By Max G. Manwaring Afterword by John T. Fishel Foreword by Edwin G. Corr Employing a case study approach and contending that shadows from the past often portend the future, Max G. Manwaring begins with a careful consideration of the writings of V. I. Lenin. He then scrutinizes the Piqueteros in Argentina, gangs in Colombia, private armies in Mexico, Hugo Chavez’s use of popular militias in Venezuela, and the looming threat of Al Qaeda in Western Europe. Max G. Manwaring, a retired US Army colonel, is Professor of Military Strategy at the US Army War College, where he holds the General Douglas MacArthur Chair of Research. He is the author of numerous books. John T. Fishel is Professor Emeritus of National Security Policy at the University of Oklahoma. Edwin G. Corr, a former US Ambassador and Professor of Political Science Emeritus at the University of Oklahoma, is Associate Director of the International Program Center. SEPTEMBER $45.00x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-4146-6 $26.95x PAPER 978-0-8061-6577-6 256 PAGES, 6 X 9 VOLUME 6 IN THE INTERNATIONAL AND SECURITY AFFAIRS SERIES


REC EN T R EL EASES 39

O R D E R O N L I N E AT O U P R E S S . C O M O R C A L L 8 0 0 - 8 4 8 - 6 2 2 4 E X T. 1

THE ARAPAHO WAY

THE WHITES WANT

TULSA, 1921

RECONSTRUCTION AND

WHAT IS A WESTERN?

Continuity and Change on

EVERY THING

Reporting a Massacre

MORMON AMERICA

Region, Genre, Imagination

the Wind River Reservation

Indian-Mormon Relations,

By Randy Krehbiel

Edited by Clyde A. Milner II

By Josh Garrett-Davis

By Sara Wiles

1847–1877

$29.95 HARDCOVER

and Brian Q. Cannon

$24.95x PAPERBACK

$39.95s HARDCOVER

Edited by Will Bagley

978-0-8061-6331-4

$34.95x HARDCOVER

978-0-8061-6394-9

978-0-8061-6290-4

$55.00x HARDCOVER

978-0-8061-6353-6

978-0-87062-442-1 $150.00nd LEATHER 978-0-87062-443-8

A MATTER OF TIME Route 66 through the Lens of Change Photographs by Ellen Klinkel Narrated by Nick Gerlich $34.95s HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6400-7

MAKING A DIFFERENCE

ART AND ADVERTISING IN

WASHINGTON’S

HOW AMERICA LOST ITS MIND

My Fight for Native Rights

BUFFALO BILL’S WILD WEST

REVOLUTIONARY

The Assault on Reason That’s

and Social Justice

By Michelle Delaney

WAR GENERALS

Crippling Our Democracy

By Ada Deer

$45.00s HARDCOVER

By Stephen R. Taaffe

By Thomas E. Patterson

With Theda Perdue

978-0-8061-6430-4

$39.95s HARDCOVER

$24.95 HARDCOVER

978-0-8061-6431-1

978-0-8061-6432-8

$26.95 HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6427-4

A MAN ABSOLUTELY

MASSACRE IN MINNESOTA

TAKING A CHANCE ON LOVE

WRECKED LIVES AND

LONE STAR SUBURBS

SURE OF HIMSELF

The Dakota War of 1862, the

The Life and Music of Vernon Duke

LOST SOULS

Life on the Texas

Texan George Washington Littlefield

Most Violent Ethnic Conflict

By George Harwood Phillips

Joe Lynch Davis and the Last

Metropolitan Frontier

By David B. Gracy II

in American History

$24.95s PAPERBACK

of the Oklahoma Outlaws

Edited by Paul J. P. Sandul

$34.95s HARDCOVER

By Gary Clayton Anderson

978-0-8061-6435-9

By Jerry Thompson

and M. Scott Sosebee

978-0-8061-6433-5

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978-0-8061-6434-2

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978-0-8061-6447-2


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RE CE N T R E L E A SE S

NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2020

TO THE MAX

HIDE, WOOD, AND WILLOW

INDIGENOUS FOOD SOVEREIGNTY

EAST TEXAS TROUBLES

VOICES FROM THE HEARTLAND

Max Weitzenhoffer’s Magical

Cradles of the Great Plains Indians

IN THE UNITED STATES

The Allred Rangers’ Cleanup

Volume II

Trip from Oklahoma to New

By Deanna Tidwell Broughton

Restoring Cultural Knowledge,

of San Augustine

Edited by Sara Beam, Emily Dial-Driver,

York and London—and Back

$32.95x HARDCOVER

Protecting Environments,

By Jody Edward Ginn

Rilla Askew, and Juliet Evusa

By Tom Lindley

978-0-8061-6227-0

and Regaining Health

$29.95s HARDCOVER

$24.95 PAPERBACK

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Edited by Devon A. Mihesuah

978-0-8061-6291-1

978-0-8061-6322-2

978-0-9858651-6-0

and Elizabeth Hoover $29.95x PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6321-5

HARDSHIP, GREED,

AREQUIPA SANATORIUM

RED DIRT COUNTRY

EASTERN CHEROKEE STORIES

BECOMING AMERICA’S

Field Notes and Essays on Nature

A Living Oral Tradition and

PLAYGROUND

By John Gifford

Its Cultural Continuance

Las Vegas in the 1950s

$19.95 PAPERBACK

By Sandra Muse Isaacs

By Larry D. Gragg

978-0-8061-6330-7

$39.95s HARDCOVER

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978-0-8061-6350-5

978-0-8061-6351-2

THIS AMERICAN AUTOPSY

McCARTHYISM VS.

THE HARDEST LOT OF MEN

SEEKING JUSTICE FOR

THE LIFE AND ART OF

Poems

CLINTON JENCKS

The Third Minnesota

THE HOLOCAUST

JOSEPH HENRY SHARP

By José Antonio Rodríguez

By Raymond Caballero

Infantry in the Civil War

Herbert C. Pell, Franklin D.

Edited by Peter H. Hassrick

$14.95 PAPERBACK

$29.95 PAPERBACK

By Joseph C. Fitzharris

Roosevelt, and the Limits

$25.00 PAPERBACK

978-0-8061-6396-3

978-0-8061-6397-0

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of International Law

978-0-931618-72-7

978-0-8061-6401-4

By Graham B. Cox

AND SORROW An Officer’s Photo Album of 1866 New Mexico Territory By Devorah Romanek $24.95x PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6393-2

$45.00x HARDCOVER 978-0-8061-6428-1

Life in California’s Lung Resort for Women By Lynn Downey $24.95s PAPERBACK 978-0-8061-6395-6


REC EN T R EL EASES 41

O R D E R O N L I N E AT O U P R E S S . C O M O R C A L L 8 0 0 - 8 4 8 - 6 2 2 4 E X T. 1

WESTERN ART,

AMON CARTER

PUEBLO SOVEREIGNTY

POLITICAL HELL-RAISER

ROSEBUD, JUNE 17, 1876

WESTERN HISTORY

A Lone Star Life

Indian Land and Water in

The Life and Times of Senator

Prelude to the Little Big Horn

Collected Essays

By Brian A. Cervantez

New Mexico and Texas

Burton K. Wheeler of Montana

By Paul L. Hedren

By Ron Tyler

$29.95 HARDCOVER

By Malcolm Ebright and

By Marc C. Johnson

$34.95x HARDCOVER

$65.00x HARDCOVER

978-0-8061-6198-3

Rick Hendricks

$34.95 HARDCOVER

$45.00x HARDCOVER

978-0-8061-4085-8

978-0-8061-6232-4 $29.95s PAPERBACK

978-0-8061-6180-8

978-0-8061-6616-2

978-0-8061-6199-0

COLORATURA

THE TEXAS RANGERS

THE MORMON HANDCART

BRIGHAM YOUNG AND

INDEPENDENCE IN

By Li Er

IN TRANSITION

MIGRATION

THE EXPANSION OF THE

CENTRAL AMERICA AND

$24.95 PAPERBACK

From Gunfighters to Criminal

“Tounge nor pen can

MORMON FAITH

CHIAPAS, 1770–1823

978-0-8061-4423-8

Investigators, 1921–1935

never tell the sorrow”

By Thomas G. Alexander

By Aaron Pollack

By Charles H. Harris III

By Candy Moulton

$29.95x HARDCOVER

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and Louis R. Sadler

$29.95 HARDCOVER

978-0-8061-6277-5

978-0-8061-6279-9

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978-0-8061-6261-4

978-0-8061-6260-7

WAR IN THE LAND

SMALL BOATS AND

FIGHTING INVISIBLE ENEMIES

PAINTING CULTURE,

OTHER MUSICS

OF TRUE PEACE

DARING MEN

Health and Medical Transitions

PAINTING NATURE

New Latina Poetry

The Fight for Maya Sacred Places

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Index A

G

Agnes Lake Hickok, Fisher/Bowers, 16 America’s Best Female Sharpshooter, Bricklin, 7 Ancient Rome, Zoch, 35 Attack at Chosin, Li, 5

Gangs, Pseudo-militaries, and Other Modern Mercenaries, Manwaring, 38 Geelhoed, Diplomacy Shot Down, 10 Gender and Sexuality in Juvenal’s Rome, Sulprizio, 36 González-Quiroga, War and Peace on the Rio Grande Frontier, 1830–1880, 23 Great Medicine Road, Part 4, The, Tate, 22 Greene, January Moon, 1 Greene, Stricken Field, 16 Guido/Pilat/Person, Renegades, 18, 19

Malone/Malone, Nashville Songwriting Sweethearts, 2,3 Manwaring, Gangs, Pseudo-militaries, and Other Modern Mercenaries, 38 Mapping Indigenous Land, Pulido Rull, 33 Mathews, Twenty Thousand Mornings, 17 McPherson, Traders, Agents, and Weavers, 30 Mellis, Riding Buffaloes and Broncos, 37 Moroni and the Swastika, Nelson, 17 Mound Builder Myth, The, Colavito, 11 My Ranch, Too, Flitner, 7

H

N

Hall/Lewis, From Wounded Knee to the Gallows, 13 Honest Enemy, An, Magid, 25

Nance, Rodeo, 27 Nashville Songwriting Sweethearts, Malone/Malone, 2,3 Nelson, Moroni and the Swastika, 17

B Baird, Churches of Christ in Oklahoma, 6 Beebe/Senkewicz, Junípero Serra, 14 Beyond the American Pale, Emmons, 15 Bluffing Texas Style, Vinson, 4 Bricklin, America’s Best Female Sharpshooter, 7 Britten, Voice of the Tribes, 32

C Churches of Christ in Oklahoma, Baird, 6 Cilella, Till Death Do Us Part, 12 Clifford, Deep Trails in the Old West, 16 Cohen, On the Drafting of Tribal Constitutions, 37 Colavito, The Mound Builder Myth, 11 Contested Empire, Reid, 38

D Davis, William S. Hart, 17 Deep Trails in the Old West, Clifford, 16 Diplomacy Shot Down, Geelhoed, 10 Discordant Memories, Fields, 28

E Early Morning of War, The, Longacre, 15 Ecelbarger, Slaughter at the Chapel, 15 Emmons, Beyond the American Pale, 15

F Fields, Discordant Memories, 28 Fisher/Bowers, Agnes Lake Hickok, 16 Flitner, My Ranch, Too, 7 From Wounded Knee to the Gallows, Hall/Lewis, 13 Frontiers of Boyhood, Woodside, 26

I In League Against King Alcohol, Lappas, 31

J January Moon, Greene, 1 Junípero Serra, Beebe/Senkewicz, 14

K Kraft, Sand Creek and the Tragic End of a Lifeway, 9

L Lambert/Franks, Voices from the Oil Fields, 38 Lappas, In League Against King Alcohol, 31 Lehrer, Mack to the Rescue, 8 Li, Attack at Chosin, 5 Littlefield, Ruling the Waters, 21 Lois Lenski, Malone, 8 Longacre, The Early Morning of War, 15 Lovell/Lutz, Strike Fear in the Land, 34

M Mack to the Rescue, Lehrer, 8 Magid, An Honest Enemy, 25 Malone, Lois Lenski, 8

O On the Drafting of Tribal Constitutions, Cohen, 37 Open Pit Visible from the Moon, An, Sowards, 20

P

Stricken Field, Greene, 16 Strike Fear in the Land, Lovell/Lutz, 34 Sulprizio, Gender and Sexuality in Juvenal’s Rome, 36

T Tate, The Great Medicine Road, Part 4, 22 Through a Native Lens, Strathman, 29 Till Death Do Us Part, Cilella, 12 Traders, Agents, and Weavers, McPherson, 30 Twenty Thousand Mornings, Mathews, 17

V Vinson, Bluffing Texas Style, 4 Voice of the Tribes, Britten, 32 Voices from the Oil Fields, Lambert/Franks, 38

W War and Peace on the Rio Grande Frontier, 1830–1880, González-Quiroga, 23 William S. Hart, Davis, 17 Woods, Wyoming’s Big Horn Basin to 1901, 37 Woodside, Frontiers of Boyhood, 26 Wyoming’s Big Horn Basin to 1901, Woods, 37

Pulido Rull, Mapping Indigenous Land, 33

Z

R

Zoch, Ancient Rome, 35

Reid, Contested Empire, 38 Rein, The Second Colorado Cavalry, 24 Renegades, Guido/Pilat/Person, 18, 19 Riding Buffaloes and Broncos, Mellis, 37 Rodeo, Nance, 27 Ruling the Waters, Littlefield, 21

S Sand Creek and the Tragic End of a Lifeway, Kraft, 9 Second Colorado Cavalry, The, Rein, 24 Slaughter at the Chapel, Ecelbarger, 15 Sowards, An Open Pit Visible from the Moon, 20 Strathman, Through a Native Lens, 29


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