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Brigham Young and the Expansion of the Mormon Faith By Thomas G. Alexander As president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Utah’s first territorial governor, Brigham Young (1801–77) shaped a religion, a migration, and the American West. He led the Saints to Utah, guided the establishment of 350 settlements, and inspired the Mormons as they weathered unimaginable trials and hardships. Although he generally succeeded, some decisions, especially those regarding the Mormon Reformation and the Black Hawk War, were less than sound. In this new biography, historian Thomas G. Alexander draws on a lifetime of research to provide an evenhanded view of Young and his leadership. Following the murder in 1844 of church founder Joseph Smith, Young bore a heavy responsibility: ensuring the survival and expansion of the church and its people. Alexander focuses on Young’s leadership, his financial dealings, his relations with non-Mormons, his families, and his own deep religious faith. Brigham Young and the Expansion of the Mormon Faith addresses such controversial issues as the practice of polygamy (Young himself had fifty-five wives), relations and conflicts between Mormons and Indians, and the circumstances and aftermath of the horrific events of Mountain Meadows in 1857. Although Young might have done better, Alexander argues that he bore no direct responsibility for the tragedy. Young relied on the counsel of his associates, and at times, the Mormon people pushed back to prevent him from implementing changes. In some cases, such as the doctrine of blood atonement, the church leadership eventually rejected his views. Yet on the whole, Brigham Young emerges as a multifaceted human figure, and as a prophet revered by millions of LDS members, an inspired leader who successfully led his people to a distant land where their community expanded and flourished. Thomas G. Alexander is Lemuel Hardison Redd Jr. Professor Emeritus of Western American History at Brigham Young University and the author of numerous articles and books on Mormon history and the American West, including Mormonism in Transition: A History of the Latter-day Saints, 1890–1930 and Things in Heaven and Earth: The Life and Times of Wilford Woodruff, a Mormon Prophet.

VOLUME 31 IN THE OKLAHOMA WESTERN BIOGRAPHIES

MAY $29.95 CLOTH 978-0-8061-6277-5 344 PAGES, 5.5 X 8.5 28 B&W ILLUS., 3 MAPS BIOGRAPHY/U.S. HISTORY

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THE MOUNTAIN MEADOWS MASSACRE By Juanita Brooks $19.95 Paper 978-0-8061-2318-9 MORMONS AT THE MISSOURI Winter Quarters, 1846–1852 By Richard E. Bennett $19.95 Paper 978-0-8061-3615-8 DOING THE WORKS OF ABRAHAM Mormon Polygamy—Its Origin, Practice, and Demise By B. Carmon Hardy $29.95s Paper 978-0-8061-5906-5

ALEXANDER BRIGHAM YOUNG AND THE EXPANSION OF THE MORMON FAITH

A new biography of a nineteenth-century colossus


CERVANTEZ AMON CARTER

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2019

The first thoroughly documented biography of the newspaperman, civic booster, and philanthropist

Amon Carter A Lone Star Life By Brian A. Cervantez Foreword by Bob Ray Sanders Raised in a one-room log cabin in a small North Texas town, Amon G. Carter (1879–1955) rose to become the founder and publisher of the Fort Worth StarTelegram, a seat of power from which he relentlessly promoted the city of Fort Worth, amassed a fortune, and established himself as the quintessential Texan of his era. The first in-depth, scholarly biography of this outsize character and civic booster, Amon Carter: A Lone Star Life chronicles a remarkable life and places it in the larger context of state and nation.

MARCH $29.95 CLOTH 978-0-8061-6198-3 272 PAGES, 6 X 9 17 B&W ILLUS. BIOGRAPHY/U.S. HISTORY

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OIL MAN The Story of Frank Phillips and the Birth of Phillips Petroleum By Michael Wallis $19.95 Paper 978-0-8061-4676-8 FATHER OF ROUTE 66 The Story of Cy Avery By Susan Croce Kelly $24.95 Cloth 978-0-8061-4499-3 J. C. PENNEY The Man, the Store, and American Agriculture By David Delbert Kruger $29.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-5716-0

Though best known for the Star-Telegram, Carter also established WBAP, Fort Worth’s first radio station, which in 1948 became the first television station in the Southwest. He was responsible for bringing the headquarters of what would become American Airlines to Fort Worth and for securing government funding for a local aircraft factory that evolved into Lockheed Martin. Historian Brian A. Cervantez has drawn on Texas Christian University’s rich collection of Carter papers to chart Carter’s quest to bring business and government projects to his adopted hometown, enterprises that led to friendships with prominent national figures such as Franklin D. Roosevelt, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Will Rogers, H. L. Mencken, and John Nance Garner. After making millions of dollars in the oil business, Carter used his wealth to fund schools, hospitals, museums, churches, parks, and camps. His numerous philanthropic efforts culminated in the Amon G. Carter Foundation, which still supports cultural and educational endeavors throughout Texas. He was a driving force behind the establishment of Texas Tech University, a major contributor to Texas Christian University, a key figure in the creation of Big Bend National Park, and an art lover whose collection of the works of Frederic Remington and Charles M. Russell served as the foundation of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art. Amon Carter: A Lone Star Life testifies to the singular character and career of one man whose influence can be seen throughout the cultural and civic life of Fort Worth, Texas, and the American Southwest to this day. Brian A. Cervantez is Associate Professor of History at Tarrant County College, Northwest Campus, in Fort Worth, Texas.


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The Mormon Handcart Migration “Tounge nor pen can never tell the sorrow” By Candy Moulton In 1856 the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints employed a new means of getting converts to Great Salt Lake City who could not afford the journey otherwise. They began using handcarts, thus initiating a five-year experiment that has become a legend in the annals of Mormon and North American migration. Only one in ten Mormon emigrants used handcarts, but of those 3,000 who did between 1856 and 1860, most survived the harrowing journey to settle Utah and become members of a remarkable pioneer generation. Others were not so lucky. More than 200 died along the way, victims of exhaustion, accident, and, for a few, starvation and exposure to late-season Wyoming blizzards. Now, Candy Moulton tells of their successes, travails, and tragedies in an epic retelling of a legendary story. The Mormon Handcart Migration traces each stage of the journey, from the transatlantic voyage of newly converted church members to the gathering of the faithful in the eastern Nebraska encampment known as Winter Quarters. She then traces their trek from the western Great Plains, across modern-day Wyoming, to their final destination at Great Salt Lake. The handcart experiment was the brainchild of Mormon leader Brigham Young, who decreed that the saints could haul their own possessions, pushing or pulling two-wheeled carts across 1,100 miles of rough terrain, much of it roadless and some of it untrodden. The LDS church now embraces the saga of the handcart emigrants—including even the disaster that befell the Martin and Willie handcart companies in central Wyoming in 1856—as an educational, faith-inspiring experience for thousands of youth each year. Moulton skillfully weaves together scores of firsthand accounts from the journals, letters, diaries, reminiscences, and autobiographies the handcart pioneers left behind. Depth of research and unprecedented detail make this volume an essential history of the Mormon handcart migration. Candy Moulton is the award-winning author of more than a dozen books on western history, including Chief Joseph: Guardian of the People and Valentine T. McGillicuddy: Army Surgeon, Agent to the Sioux. Moulton traveled the Mormon Trail in 1997 with the Mormon Trail Sesquicentennial Wagon Train, pulling a handcart herself for part of the journey.

APRIL $29.95 CLOTH 978-0-8061-6261-4 296 PAGES, 6 X 9 31 B&W ILLUS., 3 MAPS U.S. HISTORY/RELIGION

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SO RUGGED AND MOUNTAINOUS Blazing the Trails to Oregon and California, 1812–1848 By Will Bagley $34.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-4103-9 $34.95s Paper 978-0-8061-5979-9 BEST OF COVERED WAGON WOMEN By Kenneth L. Holmes $19.95 Paper 978-0-8061-3914-2 AN ARCHAEOLOGY OF DESPERATION Exploring the Donner Party’s Alder Creek Camp Edited by Kelly J. Dixon, Julie M. Schablitsky, and Shannon A. Novak $34.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-4210-4

MOULTON THE MORMON HANDCART MIGRATION

An all-new history of the Mormon overland trek to Zion


JOHNSON POLITICAL HELL-RAISER

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2019

The first complete biography of the influential maverick senator

Political Hell-Raiser The Life and Times of Senator Burton K. Wheeler of Montana By Marc C. Johnson Burton K. Wheeler (1882-1975) may have been the most powerful politician Montana ever produced, and he was one of the most influential—and controversial—members of the United States Senate during three of the most eventful decades in American history. A New Deal Democrat and lifelong opponent of concentrated power—whether economic, military, or executive—he consistently acted with a righteous personal and political independence that has all but disappeared from the public sphere. Political Hell-Raiser is the first book to tell the full story of Wheeler, a genuine maverick whose successes and failures were woven into the political fabric of twentieth-century America.

MARCH $34.95 CLOTH 978-0-8061-4085-8 496 PAGES, 6.125 X 9.25 31 B&W ILLUS. BIOGRAPHY/U.S. HISTORY

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ALFALFA BILL A Life in Politics By Robert Dorman JAMES J. HILL Empire Builder of the Northwest By Michael P. Malone $19.95 Paper 978-0-8061-2860-3 PRESIDENTS WHO SHAPED THE AMERICAN WEST By Glenda Riley and Richard W. Etulain $24.95s Paper 978-0-8061-5907-2

Wheeler came of political age amid antiwar and labor unrest in Butte, Montana, during World War I. As a crusading United States attorney, he battled Montana’s powerful economic interests, championed farmers and miners, and won election to the U.S. Senate in 1922. There he made his name as one of the “Montana scandalmongers,” uncovering corruption in the Harding and Coolidge administrations. Drawing on extensive research and new archival sources, Marc C. Johnson follows Wheeler from his early backing of Franklin D. Roosevelt and ardent support of the New Deal to his forceful opposition to Roosevelt’s plan to expand the Supreme Court and, in a move widely viewed as political suicide, his emergence as the most prominent spokesman against U.S. involvement in World War II right up to three days before Pearl Harbor. Johnson provides the most thorough telling of Wheeler’s entire career, including all its accomplishments and contradictions, as well as the political storms that the senator both encouraged and endured. The book convincingly establishes the place and importance of this principled hell-raiser in American political history. Marc C. Johnson has worked as a broadcast journalist and communication and crisis management consultant and served as a top aide to Idaho’s longest-serving governor, Cecil D. Andrus. His writing on politics and history has been published in the New York Times, California Journal of Politics and Policy, and Montana The Magazine of Western History and appears regularly on the blog and podcast Many Things Considered.


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The Texas Rangers in Transition From Gunfighters to Criminal Investigators, 1921–1935 By Charles H. Harris III and Louis R. Sadler Newly rich in oil money, and all the trouble it could buy, Texas in the years following World War I underwent momentous changes—and those changes propelled the transformation of the state’s storied Rangers. Charles H. Harris III and Louis R. Sadler explore this important but relatively neglected period in the Texas Rangers’ history in this book, a sequel to their award-winning The Texas Rangers and the Mexican Revolution: The Bloodiest Decade, 1910–1920. In a Texas awash in booze and oil in the Prohibition years, the Rangers found themselves riding herd on gamblers and bootleggers, but also tasked with everything from catching murderers to preventing circus performances on Sunday. The Texas Rangers in Transition takes up the Rangers’ story at a time of political turmoil, as the largely rural state was rapidly becoming urban. At the same time, law enforcement was facing an epidemic of bank robberies, an increase in organized crime, the growth of the Ku Klux Klan, Prohibition enforcement—new challenges that the Rangers met by transitioning from gunfighters to criminal investigators. Steeped in tradition, reluctant to change, the agency was reduced to its nadir in the depths of the Depression, the victim of slashed appropriations, an antagonistic governor, and mediocre personnel.

APRIL $34.95 CLOTH 978-0-8061-6260-7 560 PAGES, 6.125 X 9.25 25 B&W ILLUS., 1 MAP LAW/U.S. HISTORY

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Harris and Sadler document the further and final change that followed when, in 1935, the Texas Rangers were moved from the governor’s control to the newly created Department of Public Safety. This proved a watershed in the Rangers’ history, marking their transformation into a modern law enforcement agency, the elite investigative force that they remain to this day. Charles H. Harris III and Louis R. Sadler are professors emeriti of history at New Mexico State University, Las Cruces. This is the seventh of the books they have coauthored, which include The Secret War in El Paso: Mexican Revolutionary Intrigue, 1906–1920; The Plan de San Diego: Tejano Rebellion, Mexican Intrigue; and The Great Call-Up: The Guard, the Border, and the Mexican Revolution.

A CROOKED RIVER Rustlers, Rangers, and Regulars on the Lower Rio Grande, 1861–1877 By Michael L. Collins $29.95 Cloth 978-0-8061-6008-5 TEXAS DEVILS Rangers and Regulars on the Lower Rio Grande, 1846–1861 By Michael L. Collins $19.95 Paper 978-0-8061-4132-9 TEXAS A Historical Atlas By A. Ray Stephens $29.95 Paper 978-0-8061-4307-1

HARRIS, SADLER THE TEXAS RANGERS IN TRANSITION

Traces a crucial turning point for the famed law enforcement agency


CHAMBERS, CARLSON COMANCHE JACK STILWELL

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2019

The first comprehensive biography of this colorful and significant Western character

Comanche Jack Stilwell Army Scout and Plainsman By Clint E. Chambers and Paul H. Carlson In 1863, the thirteen-year-old boy who would come to be called Comanche Jack was sent to the well to fetch water. Instead, he joined a wagon train bound for Santa Fe. Thus began the exploits of Simpson E. “Jack” Stilwell (1850–1903), a man generally known for slipping through Indian lines to get help for some fifty frontiersmen besieged by the Cheyenne at Beecher Island in 1868. Daring as his part in the rescue might have been, it was only one noteworthy episode of many in Comanche Jack Stilwell’s life—a life whose rollicking story is finally told here in full.

MARCH $24.95 PAPER 978-0-8061-6278-2 288 PAGES, 6 X 9 26 B&W ILLUS., 2 MAPS BIOGRAPHY/MILITARY HISTORY

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In his later years, Stilwell crafted his own legend as a celebrated raconteur. Authors Clint E. Chambers (whose grandfather was Stilwell’s nephew) and Paul H. Carlson scour the available primary and secondary sources to find the unvarnished truth and remarkable facts behind the legend. In a crisp, fast-paced style, the narrative follows Stilwell from his precocious start as a teenage runaway turned teamster on the Santa Fe Trail to his later turns as lawyer, judge, U.S. Marshal, hangman, and associate of Buffalo Bill Cody. Along the way, he learned Spanish, Comanche, and sign language, scouted for the U.S. Army, and became a friend of George A. Custer and an avowed, if failed, avenger of his kid brother Frank, an outlaw killed by Wyatt Earp. Unfolding against the backdrop of the Civil War, cattle drives, the Indian Wars, the Oklahoma land rush, and the rough justice of the Wild West, Comanche Jack Stilwell takes a true American character out of the shadows of history and returns to the story of the West one of its defining figures.

TOM HORN IN LIFE AND LEGEND By Larry D. Ball $24.95 Paper 978-0-8061-5175-5 WHEN LAW WAS IN THE HOLSTER The Frontier Life of Bob Paul By John Boessenecker $29.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-4285-2 BANDIDO The Life and Times of Tiburcio Vasquez By John Boessenecker $24.95s Paper 978-0-8061-4681-2

Clint E. Chambers is a graduate of the University of Oklahoma School of Medicine, a retired colonel in the U.S. Air Force, and Clinical Associate Professor of Surgery at Texas Tech University School of Medicine. Paul H. Carlson is Professor Emeritus of History at Texas Tech University and author, co-author, or editor of more than twenty books, including The Cowboy Way: An Exploration of History and Culture and Pecos Bill: A Military Biography of William R. Shafter.


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Hit Your Brights Stories By Constance Squires Hit Your Brights captures people in tough spots, often of their own making. Fusing humor and tragedy, these thirteen gritty stories keep readers in suspense. Danger lurks, the needle skips, the bomb goes off, and the empties pile up. Outcomes are unpredictable, but the car always starts, and, sometimes, love wins. Constance Squires casts the diminished circumstances of her characters with authentic detail familiar to any reader who has spent time in flyover country—a swath of boom-and-bust middle America that often seems forgotten. Here, marriages, families, and friendships all hit crisis points in a mutable world of army bases, casinos, truck stops, churches, and bars. Hit Your Brights showcases a virtuosic range of styles and perspectives. The title story, told in second person, excavates the rationalizations of an alcoholic stumbling through the inexorable progress of her disease. After downing nine Rolling Rocks and three tequila shots, she races her car to the nearest liquor store before it closes, turning on her high beams to ease her double vision. In “Dopamine Agonistes,” a family man, recently diagnosed with Parkinson’s, ventures out to a casino and meets a child he tries to help. Other stories focus on people who find themselves in difficult, potentially violent situations. In “Wounding Radius,” two young women are checking on their marijuana crop in the Wichita Mountains outside of Fort Sill when they are discovered by a troubled soldier who has gone AWOL. And in “An Unscheduled Stop,” a mother traveling with her baby encounters diners at a roadside McDonald’s who might—or might not—be child traffickers. Beautifully crafted, with a distinctly modern edge, the stories in Hit Your Brights give voice to women and men, young and old, overlooked and disenfranchised, who inhabit worlds that feel at once strange and familiar. Constance Squires is the award-winning author of the novels Along the Watchtower and Live from Medicine Park. Her numerous short stories have appeared in Guernica, Shenandoah, Atlantic Monthly, and other magazines. She teaches creative writing at the University of Central Oklahoma.

JANUARY $19.95 PAPER 978-0-8061-6247-8 184 PAGES, 5.5 X 8.5 FICTION

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LIVE FROM MEDICINE PARK By Constance Squires $19.95 Paper 978-0-8061-5733-7 BONELAND Linked Stories By Nance Van Winckel $16.95 Paper 978-0-8061-4391-0 STRANGE BUSINESS By Rilla Askew $14.95 Paper 978-0-8061-4028-5

SQUIRES HIT YOUR BRIGHTS

A riveting collection of short fiction about the down-and-out in flyover country


CRUZ OTHER MUSICS

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2019

The first anthology to feature Latina poets exclusively

Other Musics New Latina Poetry Edited by Cynthia Cruz Latina poets occupy an important place in today’s literary landscape. Coming from diverse backgrounds, they share an understanding of what it means to exist within the margins of society. As artists, they possess a dedication to their craft and a commitment to experimentation. Their voices—sometimes lyrical, sometimes autobiographical, sometimes politically charged—are distinctly female. Whereas previous anthologies have merged the works of Latino and Latina poets, this collection is the first to showcase Latina poetry on its own terms.

VOLUME 22 IN THE CHICANA AND CHICANO VISIONS OF THE AMÉRICAS SERIES

APRIL $19.95 PAPER 978-0-8061-6288-1 160 PAGES, 5.5 X 8.5 15 B&W ILLUS. POETRY/LITERATURE

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POEMS FROM THE RÍO GRANDE By Rudolfo Anaya $16.95 Paper 978-0-8061-4866-3 ALPHABET OF THE WORLD Selected Works by Eugenio Montejo Edited by Kirk Nesset $19.95s Paper 978-0-8061-4148-0

For years readers have admired the poetry of prominent Latina authors Cherrie Moraga, Ana Castillo, and Sandra Cisneros. Building on their inspirational legacy, Other Musics heralds a new generation of Latina poets whose work blends traditional forms and styles with postmodern innovations. These poets do not fit neatly into one category. They come from all walks of life, from remarkably varied class, ethnic, occupational, and educational backgrounds. Their topics and concerns are wide-ranging. All of the poets, according to volume editor Cynthia Cruz, are creating “a new kind of music,” one that embraces the “in-between” and bicultural world that Latina women must constantly straddle. The fifteen poets featured in this anthology are Desirée Alvarez, Karen Bradway, Xochiquetzal Candelaria, Diana Maria Delgado, Natalie Diaz, Carolina Ebeid, Sandy Florian, Carrie Fountain, Leticia Hernández-Linares, Ada Limón, Sheryl Luna, Kristin Naca, Deborah Paredez, Emmy Pérez, and Carmen Giménez Smith. Along with an ample selection of each of their poetry, Other Musics features an artist statement by each poet, in which she discusses her work, her writing practice, how she became a writer, and her views on the purpose and mission of poetry in the contemporary world. Cynthia Cruz is the author of five collections of poetry: Dregs, How the End Begins, Wunderkammer, The Glimmering Room, and Ruin. A recipient of fellowships from Yaddo, the MacDowell Colony, and a Hodder Fellowship from Princeton University, she teaches creative writing at Sarah Lawrence College.


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Coloratura By Li Er Translated by Jeremy Tiang Li Er, whose innovative works of fiction have earned the admiration of scholars and critics—and a passionate fan base of readers—is one of China’s most prominent writers. This landmark publication of his Coloratura, a tour de force of literary innovation, marks the first translation of the author’s novels into English. Set against the turbulent backdrop of the Chinese Civil War, Coloratura revolves around the mysterious Ge Ren, whose story is told by three narrators and a host of other voices. Who was Ge Ren really? Just about the only thing anyone can agree on is that he is dead. But how he died, and who he was when alive, are less than certain. Was Ge Ren a hero, a Nationalist or Communist, a poet, translator, scholar, or spy—or some combination of all these identities? And how much of his story is merely fanciful “coloratura” nonsense? As different factions fight for control of China, Ge Ren traverses the political and intellectual life of the country, managing to affect countless lives. Years later, in the present day, his final surviving descendant, the intriguing “compiler” of the novel, pieces together the stories of her enigmatic ancestor from a patchwork of narrators, reliable or otherwise, and historical documents, real or invented. But readers also will wonder if she has an agenda of her own. The search for Ge Ren takes us from Chairman Mao’s stronghold at Yan’an to a barren People’s Commune, and then farther afield, with excursions into Russia, Japan, and even a small town in England. Many of the characters and incidents are actual historical figures and events, woven seamlessly into the fictional storyline. Told with swashbuckling brio and painstaking historical detail, Coloratura is both an illuminating journey through twentieth-century Chinese history and a profound exploration of the elusive nature of truth. Li Er is the author of five story collections, two novels, and approximately 50 novellas and short stories. His work appears regularly in a variety of Chinese mainland literary journals. Jeremy Tiang, a playwright, novelist, and short-story writer, is the award-winning translator of more than 10 books from Chinese.

VOLUME 8 IN THE CHINESE LITERATURE TODAY BOOK SERIES

MAY $24.95 PAPER 978-0-8061-4423-8 306 PAGES, 6 X 9 FICTION/LITERATURE

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RECORD OF REGRET A Novel By Dong Xi $24.95 Paper 978-0-8061-6000-9 RUINED CITY A Novel By Jia Pingwa $29.95 Paper 978-0-8061-5173-1 SANDALWOOD DEATH A Novel By Mo Yan $24.95 Paper 978-0-8061-4339-2

LI ER COLORATURA

A masterwork by one of China’s most accomplished contemporary novelists


NOEL, ZUBER-MALLISON COLORADO

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2019

An unsurpassed cartographic exploration of the Rocky Mountain State NEW IN PAPERBACK

Colorado A Historical Atlas By Thomas J. Noel Maps by Carol Zuber-Mallison This is a thoroughly revised edition of the Historical Atlas of Colorado, which was coauthored by Tom Noel and published in 1994. Chock-full of the best and latest information on Colorado, this new edition features thirty new chapters, updated text, more than 100 color maps and 100 color photos, and a best-of listing of Colorado authors and books, as well as a guide to hundreds of tourist attractions. JANUARY $39.95 CLOTH 978-0-8061-4184-8 $29.95 PAPER 978-0-8061-6229-4 368 PAGES, 12 X 9.5 112 COLOR MAPS, 109 COLOR ILLUS., 7 CHARTS, 1 TABLE U.S. HISTORY/REFERENCE

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OFF TRAIL Finding My Way Home in the Colorado Rockies By Jane Parnell $19.95 Paper 978-0-8061-5900-3 COLORADO GHOST TOWNS AND MINING CAMPS By Sandra Dallas $26.95 Paper 978-0-8061-2084-3 MINING THE SUMMIT Colorado's Ten Mile District, 1860–1960 By H. Stanley Dempsey $19.95s Paper 978-0-8061-4541-9

Colorado received its name (Spanish for “red”) after much debate and many possibilities, including Idaho (an “Indian” name meaning “gem of the mountains” later discovered to be a fabrication) and Yampa (Ute for “bear”). Noel includes other little-known but significant facts about the state, from its status as first state in the Union to elect women to its legislature, to its controversial “highest state” designation, elevated by the 2013 legalization of recreational cannabis. Noel and cartographer Carol Zuber-Mallison map and describe Colorado’s spectacular geography and its fascinating past. The book’s eight parts survey natural Colorado, from rivers and mountains to dinosaurs and mammals; history, from prehistoric peoples to twenty-first-century Color-oddities; mining and manufacturing, from the gold rush to alternative energy sources; agriculture, including wineries and brewpubs; transportation, from stagecoach lines to light rail; modern Colorado, from the New Deal to the present (including politics, history, and information on lynchings, executions, and prisons); recreation, covering not only hiking and skiing but also literary locales and Colorado in the movies; and tourism, encompassing historic landmarks, museums, and even cemeteries. In short, this book has information—and surprises—that anyone interested in Colorado will relish. Thomas J. Noel is Professor of History and Director of Public History, Preservation, and Colorado Studies at University of Colorado Denver. He appears regularly on Denver’s Channel 9 (NBC) as “Dr. Colorado,” writes a Sunday Denver Post column, and is the author or coauthor of more than 42 books, including Colorado: A History of the Centennial State (coauthored with Carl Abbott and Steve Leonard) and Colorado: A Liquid History and Tavern Guide to the Highest State. Carol Zuber-Mallison is an award-winning freelance artist specializing in maps and informational graphics. For 14 years she was an editor and artist for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram and the Dallas Morning News. She created the maps and graphics for the Texas Almanac and Texas: A Historical Atlas.


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Eanger Irving Couse The Life and Times of an American Artist, 1866–1936 By Virginia Couse Leavitt Eanger Irving Couse (1866–1936) showed remarkable promise as a young art student. His lifelong interest in Native American cultures also started at an early age, inspired by encounters with Chippewa Indians living near his hometown, Saginaw, Michigan. After studying in Europe, Couse began spending summers in New Mexico, where in 1915 he helped found the famous Taos Society of Artists, serving as its first president and playing a major role in its success. This richly illustrated volume, featuring full-color reproductions of his artwork, is the first scholarly exploration of Couse’s noteworthy life and artistic achievements. Drawing on extensive research, Virginia Couse Leavitt gives an intimate account of Couse’s experiences, including his early struggles as an art student in the United States and abroad, his study of Native Americans, his winter home and studio inin New York City, and his life in New Mexico after he relocated to Taos. In examining Couse’s role as one of the original six founders of the Taos Society of Artists, the author provides new information about the art colony’s early meetings, original members, and first exhibitions. As a scholar of art history, Leavitt has spent decades researching her subject, who also happens to be her grandfather. Her unique access to the Couse family archives has allowed her to mine correspondence, photographs, sketchbooks, and memorabilia, all of which add fresh insight into the American art scene in the early 1900s. Of particular interest is the correspondence of Couse’s wife, Virginia Walker, an art student in Paris when the couple first met. Her letters home to her family in Washington State offer a vivid picture of her husband’s student life in Paris, where Couse studied under the famous painter William Bouguereau at the Académie Julian. Whereas many artists of the early twentieth century pursued a radically modern style, Couse held true to his formal academic training throughout his career. He gained renown for his paintings of southwestern landscapes and his respectful portraits of Native peoples. Through his depictions of the domestic and spiritual lives of Pueblo Indians, Couse helped mitigate the prejudices toward Native Americans that persisted during this era. Virginia Couse Leavitt is the granddaughter of E. I. Couse, founding member of The Couse Foundation, and author of Eanger Irving Couse: Image Maker for America.

VOLUME 34 IN THE CHARLES M. RUSSELL CENTER SERIES ON ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY OF THE AMERICAN WEST

JANUARY $59.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6102-0 400 PAGES, 9 X 11 96 B&W AND 80 COLOR ILLUS. ART/U.S. HISTORY

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ERNEST L. BLUMENSCHEIN The Life of an American Artist By Robert W. Larson $29.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-4334-7 A STRANGE MIXTURE The Art and Politics of Painting Pueblo Indians By Sascha T. Scott $45.00s Cloth 978-0-8061-4484-9 THE EUGENE B. ADKINS COLLECTION Selected Works Contributions by Jane Ford Aebersold, Christina E Burke, James Peck, B. Byron Price, W. Jackson Rushing III, Mary Jo Watson, and Mark Andrew White $60.00 Cloth 978-0-8061-4100-8 $29.95 Paper 978-0-8061-4101-5

LEAVITT EANGER IRVING COUSE

Explores the life and work of an important American artist and founding member of the Taos Society of Artists


FUR PAINTING CULTURE, PAINTING NATURE

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2019

Explores indigenous and immigrant experiences in the development of American Indian art

Painting Culture, Painting Nature Stephen Mopope, Oscar Jacobson, and the Development of Indian Art in Oklahoma By Gunlög Fur In the late 1920s, a group of young Kiowa artists, pursuing their education at the University of Oklahoma, encountered Swedish-born art professor Oscar Brousse Jacobson (1882–1966). With Jacobson’s instruction and friendship, the Kiowa Six, as they are now known, ignited a spectacular movement in American Indian art. Jacobson, who was himself an accomplished painter, shared a lifelong bond with group member Stephen Mopope (1898–1974), a prolific Kiowa painter, dancer, and musician. Painting Culture, Painting Nature explores the joint creativity of these two visionary figures and reveals how indigenous and immigrant communities of the early twentieth century traversed cultural, social, and racial divides. MAY $34.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6287-4 352 PAGES, 6 X 9 15 COLOR AND 22 B&W ILLUS., 3 MAPS ART/AMERICAN INDIAN

Of Related Interest

PICTURING INDIAN TERRITORY Portraits of the Land That Became Oklahoma, 1819–1907 Edited by B. Byron Price $34.95 Cloth 978-0-8061-5577-7 A WORLD UNCONQUERED The Art of Oscar Brousse Jacobson By Anne Allbright $15.95s Paper 978-0-9851609-8-2

Painting Culture, Painting Nature is a story of concurrences. For a specific period immigrants such as Jacobson and disenfranchised indigenous people such as Mopope transformed Oklahoma into the center of exciting new developments in Indian art, which quickly spread to other parts of the United States and to Europe. Jacobson and Mopope came from radically different worlds, and were on unequal footing in terms of power and equality, but they both experienced, according to author Gunlög Fur, forms of diaspora or displacement. Seeking to root themselves anew in Oklahoma, the dispossessed artists fashioned new mediums of compelling and original art. Although their goals were compatible, Jacobson’s and Mopope’s subjects and styles diverged. Jacobson painted landscapes of the West, following a tradition of painting nature uninfluenced by human activity. Mopope, in contrast, strove to capture the cultural traditions of his people. The two artists shared a common nostalgia, however, for a past life that they could only re-create through their art. Whereas other books have emphasized the promotion of Indian art by EuroAmericans, this book is the first to focus on the agency of the Kiowa artists within the context of their collaboration with Jacobson. The volume is further enhanced by full-color reproductions of the artists’ works and rare historical photographs. Gunlög Fur is Professor of History and Dean of Arts and Humanities at Linnaeus University, Sweden. A member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Letters, History, and Antiquities, she is the author of A Nation of Women: Gender and Colonial Encounters among the Delaware Indians.


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Western Art, Western History Collected Essays By Ron Tyler For nearly half a century, celebrated historian Ron Tyler has researched, interpreted, and exhibited western American art. This splendid volume, gleaned from Tyler’s extensive career of connoisseurship, brings together eight of the author’s most notable essays, reworked especially for this volume. Beautifully illustrated with more than 150 images, Western Art, Western History tells the stories of key artists, both famous and obscure, whose provocative pictures document the people and places of the nineteenth-century American West. The artists depicted in these pages represent a variety of personalities and artistic styles. According to Tyler, each of them responded in unique ways to the compelling and exotic drama that unfolded in the West during the nineteenth century—an age of exploration, surveying, pleasure travel, and scientific discovery. In eloquent and engaging prose, Tyler unveils a fascinating cast of characters, including the little-known Russian-German artist Louis Choris, who served as a draftsman on the second Russian circumnavigation of the globe; the exacting and precise Swiss artist Karl Bodmer, who accompanied Prince Maximilian of Wied on his sojourn up the Missouri River; and the young American Alfred Jacob Miller, whose seemingly frivolous and romantic depictions of western mountain men and American Indians remained largely unknown until the mid-twentieth century. Other artists showcased in this volume are John James Audubon, George Caleb Bingham, Alfred E. Mathews, and, finally, Frederic Remington, who famously sought to capture the last glimmers of the “old frontier.” A common thread throughout Western Art, Western History is the important role that technology—especially the development of lithography—played in the dissemination of images. As the author emphasizes, many works by western artists are valuable not only as illustrations but as scientific documents, imbued with cultural meaning. By placing works of western art within these broader contexts, Tyler enhances our understanding of their history and significance. Ron Tyler is retired as director of the Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas. He is the contributor to and author of numerous books on art and photography of the American West, including Alfred Jacob Miller: Artist as Explorer,Visions of America: Pioneer Artists in a New Land, and Prints of the West: Prints from the Library of Congress.

VOLUME 35 IN THE CHARLES M. RUSSELL CENTER SERIES ON ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY OF THE AMERICAN WEST

MARCH $65.00s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6180-8 328 PAGES, 9.5 X 10.5 49 B&W AND 119 COLOR ILLUS. ART HISTORY

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VISIONS OF THE BIG SKY Painting and Photographing the Northern Rocky Mountain West By Dan Flores $45.00 Cloth 978-0-8061-3897-8 PLAINS INDIAN ART The Pioneering Work of John C. Ewers Edited by Jane Ewers Robinson $39.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-3061-3 ALBERT BIERSTADT Witness to a Changing West Edited by Peter H. Hassrick $60.00s Cloth 978-0-8061-6004-7 $35.00s Paper 978-0-8061-6005-4

TYLER WESTERN ART, WESTERN HISTORY

A renowned historian of western American art portrays eight western American artists


PRESCOTT PIONEER MOTHER MONUMENTS

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2019

Explores the history and significance of American pioneer statues

Pioneer Mother Monuments Constructing Cultural Memory By Cynthia Culver Prescott For more than a century, American communities erected monuments to western pioneers. Although many of these statues receive little attention today, the images they depict—sturdy white men, saintly mothers, and wholesome pioneer families— enshrine prevailing notions of American exceptionalism, race relations, and gender identity. Pioneer Mother Monuments is the first book to delve into the long and complex history of remembering, forgetting, and rediscovering pioneer monuments.

APRIL $39.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6197-6 408 PAGES, 6 X 9 50 B&W AND 16 COLOR ILLUS., 7 MAPS ART/WOMEN’S STUDIES

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RAINBOW BRIDGE TO MONUMENT VALLEY Making the Modern Old West By Thomas J. Harvey $34.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-4190-9 $19.95s Paper 978-0-8061-4321-7 SHAPING THE WEST American Sculptors of the 19th Century Contributions by Thayer Tolles, Peter H. Hassrick, Andrew Walker, and Sarah E. Boehme $10.95 Paper 978-0-914738-66-4 THE WEST OF THE IMAGINATION By William H. Goetzmann and William N. Goetzmann $65.00 Cloth 978-0-8061-3533-5

In this book, historian Cynthia Culver Prescott combines visual analysis with a close reading of primary source documents. Examining some two hundred monuments erected in the United States from the late nineteenth century to the present, Prescott begins her survey by focusing on the earliest pioneer statues, which celebrated the strong white men who settled—and conquered—the West. By the 1930s, she explains, when gender roles began shifting, new monuments came forth to honor the Pioneer Mother. The angelic woman in a sunbonnet, armed with a rifle or a Bible as she carried civilization forward—an iconic figure—resonated particularly with Mormon audiences. While interest in these traditional monuments began to wane in the postwar period, according to Prescott, a new wave of pioneer monuments emerged in smaller communities during the late twentieth century. Inspired by rural nostalgia, these statues helped promote heritage tourism. In recent years, Americans have engaged in heated debates about Confederate Civil War monuments and their implicit racism. Should these statues be removed or reinterpreted? Far less attention, however, has been paid to pioneer monuments, which, Prescott argues, also enshrine white cultural superiority—as well as gender stereotypes. Only a few western communities have reexamined these values and erected statues with more inclusive imagery. Blending western history, visual culture, and memory studies, Prescott’s pathbreaking analysis is enhanced by a rich selection of color and black-and-white photographs depicting the statues along with detailed maps that chronologically chart the emergence of pioneer monuments. Cynthia Culver Prescott is Associate Professor of History at the University of North Dakota. She is the author of Gender and Generation on the Far Western Frontier and numerous articles on western history, the anthropology of commemoration, and quilt studies.


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FENN, MILBURN LEON GASPARD

The life and work of the Russian-born artist who found creative inspiration in Taos, New Mexico

Leon Gaspard The Call of Distant Places By Forrest Fenn and Carleen Milburn Leon Shulman Gaspard (1882–1964) was an interesting addition to the New Mexico arts scene when he arrived in 1918. A Russian-born, French-trained veteran of the airborne campaigns of the Great War, he arrived physically diminished from a horrific plane crash that had put him in a French hospital for two years. Seeking a more hospitable climate, he arrived in Taos to find a vibrant arts community and an exotic blend of native, western, and Hispanic cultures. Having traveled widely throughout Russia, China, Mongolia, Tibet, Morocco, and Northern Africa as a fur trader, painter, army pilot and spy, Gaspard had a love of exotic cultures and a desire to document them artistically. Taos allowed him just such an opportunity, and he set out to paint the Native Americans in much the same way he had painted the native peoples of North Africa and Asia while in Paris. A pariah of sorts when he first arrived, Gaspard was saved socially when Herbert Dunton, one of the founding members of the Taos Society of Artists, took a liking to him and began to bring him around to meet his colleagues. A kindly and gregarious man, Gaspard eventually became accepted and well liked, and one of the most important of the many distinguished artists that made Taos their home in the early part of the twentieth century. Forrest Fenn is the founder and former proprietor of the renowned Fenn Gallery in Santa Fe, New Mexico. He is the author of ten books, including the best-selling The Thrill of the Chase, which is both an autobiography and the story of a hidden treasure in the mountains north of Santa Fe. Carleen Milburn is a writer and rancher who lives in Montana.

DISTRIBUTED FOR THE TIA COLLECTION

JANUARY $85.00s CLOTH 978-0-9914792-1-4 408 PAGES, 10.5 X 12 165 COLOR AND 106 B&W ILLUS. ART/BIOGRAPHY

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A PLACE IN THE SUN The Southwest Paintings of Walter Ufer and E. Martin Hennings By Thomas Brent Smith $45.00s Cloth 978-0-8061-5198-4 PAINTED JOURNEYS The Art of John Mix Stanley By Peter H. Hassrick $54.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-4829-8 $34.95s Paper 978-0-8061-5155-7


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WILSON-POWELL NEW BEGINNINGS

From representation to Modernism, works of art inspired by the land and people of northern New Mexico

New Beginnings An American Story of Romantics and Modernists in the West By MaLin Wilson-Powell Introduction by Laura Finlay Smith Santa Fe and Taos were among the most important national and international art communities during the 1920s and 1930s; this book explores their similarities, differences, and connections. Legions of American and European artists found new beginnings in the physical and cultural landscapes of northern New Mexico, resulting in a new and deeply rooted orientation for modern art in America. DISTRIBUTED FOR THE TIA COLLECTION

JANUARY $65.00s CLOTH 978-0-9914792-3-8 $40.00s PAPER 978-0-9914792-4-5 248 PAGES, 9.5 X 11 162 COLOR AND 72 B&W ILLUS. ART

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RAY STANFORD STRONG, WEST COAST LANDSCAPE ARTIST By Mark Humpal $45.00s Cloth 978-0-8061-5770-2 PAINTERS OF THE NORTHWEST Impressionism to Modernism, 1900–1930 By John Impert $45.00s Cloth 978-0-8061-6034-4 CENTERING MODERNISM J. Jay McVicker and Postwar American Art By Louise Siddons $45.00s Cloth 978-0-8061-6033-7

Produced on the occasion of the New Beginnings traveling exhibition, this lavishly illustrated catalogue presents 111 objects by 72 artists from the Tia Collection, including paintings, drawings, prints, photographs, and sculptures. To encourage a fresh view of the shift from representation to diverse branches of Modernism, the artworks are grouped into three sections: by the four seasons, by the vibrant mixture of Native American, Hispano, and Anglo themes, and by studio-made still lifes and portraits. Work by artists such as Ernest L. Blumenschein, E. Irving Couse, Stuart Davis, Leon Gaspard, Robert Henri, John Marin, John Sloan, and Walter Ufer are juxtaposed with lesser-known or virtually unknown works by William Verplanck Birney, Richard Crisler, Katherine Levin Farrell, Jan Matulka, Arthur Musgrave, Polia Pillin, and Beulah Stevenson. The exhibition will travel to the Scottsdale Museum of the West, Scottsdale, Arizona; Booth Western Art Museum, Cartersville, Georgia; Dayton Art Institute, Dayton, Ohio; Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento, California; and the Yellowstone Art Museum, Billings, Montana. MaLin Wilson-Powell has served as Curator of the New Mexico Museum of Art in Santa Fe and the McNay Art Museum in San Antonio, Texas, as well as director of the Jonson Gallery at the University Art Museum in Albuquerque, New Mexico. She is an independent curator and author of numerous publications, including Mabel Dodge Luhan and Company: American Moderns and the West (Museum of New Mexico Press, 2016), which she coedited with Lois Rudnick. Laura Finlay Smith is the curator of the Tia Collection.


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Fighting Invisible Enemies Health and Medical Transitions among Southern California Indians By Clifford E. Trafzer Native Americans long resisted Western medicine—but had less power to resist the threat posed by Western diseases. And so, as the Office of Indian Affairs entered the business of health and medicine, Native peoples reluctantly began to allow Western medicine into their communities. Fighting Invisible Enemies traces this transition among inhabitants of the Mission Indian Agency of Southern California from the late nineteenth century through the mid-twentieth century. What historian Clifford E. Trafzer describes is not so much a transition from one practice to another, but a gradual incorporation of Western medicine into Indian medical practices. Melding indigenous and medical history specific to Southern California, his book combines statistical information and documents from the federal government with the oral narratives of several tribes. Many of these oral histories—detailing traditional beliefs about disease causation, medical practices, and treatment—are unique to this work, the product of the author’s close and trusted relationships with tribal elders. Trafzer examines the years of interaction that transpired before Native people allowed elements of Western medicine and health care into their lives, homes, and communities. Among the factors he cites as impelling the change were settler-borne diseases, the negative effects of federal Indian policies, and the sincere desire of both Indians and agency doctors and nurses to combat the spread of disease. Here we see how, unlike many encounters between Indians and non-Indians in Southern California, this cooperative effort proved positive and constructive, resulting in fewer deaths from infectious diseases, especially tuberculosis. The first study of its kind, Trafzer’s work fills gaps in Native American, medical, and Southern California history. It informs our understanding of the working relationship between indigenous and Western medical traditions and practices as it continues to develop today. Clifford E. Trafzer, Distinguished Professor of History at the University of California, Riverside, is the author or editor of numerous books, including Death Stalks the Yakama: Epidemiological Transitions and Mortality on the Yakama Indian Reservation, 1888–1964 and A Chemehuevi Song: The Resilience of a Southern Paiute Tribe.

MAY $34.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6286-7 368 PAGES, 6 X 9 41 B&W ILLUS., 4 MAPS, 6 TABLES AMERICAN INDIAN/HISTORY

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IMPROVING AMERICAN INDIAN HEALTH CARE The Western Cherokee Experience By William C. Steeler $24.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-3356-0 RESERVATIONS, REMOVAL, AND REFORM The Mission Indian Agents of Southern California, 1878–1903 By Valerie Sherer Mathes and Phil Brigandi $36.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-5999-7 CHIEFS AND CHALLENGERS Indian Resistance and Cooperation in Southern California, 1769–1906 By George Harwood Phillips $26.95s Paper 978-0-8061-4490-0

TRAFZER FIGHTING INVISIBLE ENEMIES

How Southern California Indian communities combined Western and Native medicine in fighting infectious disease


EBRIGHT, HENDRICKS PUEBLO SOVEREIGNTY

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2019

Showcases Pueblo Indian resilience despite colonial and national pressures

Pueblo Sovereignty Indian Land and Water in New Mexico and Texas By Malcolm Ebright and Rick Hendricks Over five centuries of foreign rule—by Spain, Mexico, and the United States— Native American pueblos have confronted attacks on their sovereignty and encroachments on their land and water rights. How five New Mexico and Texas pueblos did this, in some cases multiple times, forms the history of cultural resilience and tenacity chronicled in Pueblo Sovereignty by two of New Mexico’s most distinguished legal historians, Malcolm Ebright and Rick Hendricks.

MARCH $45.00s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6199-0 280 PAGES, 6 X 9 21 B&W ILLUS., 3 MAPS AMERICAN INDIAN/LAW

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PUEBLOS, SPANIARDS, AND THE KINGDOM OF NEW MEXICO By John L. Kessell $19.95 Paper 978-0-8061-4122-0 NEW MEXICO A History By Joseph P. Sanchez, Robert L. Spude, and Arthur R. Gomez $19.95 Paper 978-0-8061-4663-8 INDIAN RESERVED WATER RIGHTS The Winters Doctrine in Its Social and Legal Context By John Shurts $24.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-3210-5 $24.95s Paper 978-0-8061-3541-0

Extending their award-winning work Four Square Leagues, Ebright and Hendricks focus here on four New Mexico Pueblo Indian communities—Pojoaque, Nambe, Tesuque, and Isleta—and one now in Texas, Ysleta del Sur. The authors trace the complex tangle of conflicting jurisdictions and laws these pueblos faced when defending their extremely limited land and water resources. The communities often met such challenges in court and, sometimes, as in the case of Tesuque Pueblo in 1922, took matters into their own hands. Ebright and Hendricks describe how—at times aided by appointed Spanish officials, private lawyers, priests, and Indian agents—each pueblo resisted various non-Indian, institutional, and legal pressures; and how each suffered defeat in the Court of Private Land Claims and the Pueblo Lands Board, only to assert its sovereignty again and again. Although some of these defenses led to stunning victories, all five pueblos experienced serious population declines. Some were even temporarily abandoned. That all have subsequently seen a return to their traditions and ceremonies, and ultimately have survived and thrived, is a testimony to their resilience. Their stories, documented here in extraordinary detail, are critical to a complete understanding of the history of the Pueblos and of the American Southwest. Malcolm Ebright is a historian, an attorney, and the director of the Center for Land Grant Studies. He is a coauthor with Rick Hendricks of the award-wining Four Square Leagues: Pueblo Indian Land in New Mexico. Rick Hendricks is the New Mexico State Historian. He is coauthor with Malcolm Ebright of the awardwinning The Witches of Abiquiu: The Governor, the Priest, the Genízaro Indians, and the Devil.


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Native Southerners Indigenous History from Origins to Removal By Gregory D. Smithers Long before the indigenous people of southeastern North America first encountered Europeans and Africans, they established communities with clear social and political hierarchies and rich cultural traditions. Award-winning historian Gregory D. Smithers brings this world to life in Native Southerners, a sweeping narrative of American Indian history in the Southeast from the time before European colonialism to the Trail of Tears and beyond. In the Native South, as in much of North America, storytelling is key to an understanding of origins and tradition—and the stories of the indigenous people of the Southeast are central to Native Southerners. Spanning territory reaching from modern-day Louisiana and Arkansas to the Atlantic coast, and from present-day Tennessee and Kentucky through Florida, this book gives voice to the lived history of such well-known polities as the Cherokees, Creeks, Seminoles, Chickasaws, and Choctaws, as well as smaller Native communities like the Nottoway, Occaneechi, Haliwa-Saponi, Catawba, Biloxi-Chitimacha, Natchez, Caddo, and many others. From the oral and cultural traditions of these Native peoples, as well as the written archives of European colonists and their Native counterparts, Smithers constructs a vibrant history of the societies, cultures, and people that made and remade the Native South in the centuries before the American Civil War. What emerges is a complex picture of how Native Southerners understood themselves and their world—a portrayal linking community and politics, warfare and kinship, migration, adaptation, and ecological stewardship—and how this worldview shaped and was shaped by their experience both before and after the arrival of Europeans. As nuanced in detail as it is sweeping in scope, the narrative Smithers constructs is a testament to the storytelling and the living history that have informed the identities of Native Southerners to our day. Gregory D. Smithers is Professor of History at Virginia Commonwealth University and author of The Cherokee Diaspora: An Indigenous History of Migration, Resettlement, and Identity.

MAY $29.95s PAPER 978-0-8061-6228-7 264 PAGES, 6 X 9 9 B&W ILLUS., 8 MAPS, 1 TABLE AMERICAN INDIAN/HISTORY

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AMERICAN INDIANS IN U.S. HISTORY Second Edition By Roger L. Nichols $29.95 Paper 978-0-8061-4367-5 THE PEOPLE WHO STAYED Southeastern Indian Writing after Removal Edited by Geary Hobson, Janet McAdams, and Kathryn Walkiewicz $24.95s Paper 978-0-8061-4136-7 MYTHS AND TALES OF THE SOUTHEASTERN INDIANS By John R. Swanton $19.95s Paper 978-0-8061-2784-2

SMITHERS NATIVE SOUTHERNERS

A concise history from an indigenous perspective


BROUGHTON HIDE, WOOD, AND WILLOW

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2019

The first full-length reference book about Plains Indian baby carriers

Hide, Wood, and Willow Cradles of the Great Plains Indians By Deanna Tidwell Broughton For centuries indigenous communities of North America have used carriers to keep their babies safe. Among the Indians of the Great Plains, rigid cradles are both practical and symbolic, and many of these cradleboards—combining basketry and beadwork—represent some of the finest examples of North American Indian craftsmanship and decorative art. This lavishly illustrated volume is the first fulllength reference book to describe baby carriers of the Lakota, Cheyenne, Arapaho, and many other Great Plains cultures.

VOLUME 278 IN THE CIVILIZATION OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN SERIES

JUNE $32.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6227-0 224 PAGES, 7 X 10 31 COLOR AND 45 B&W ILLUS. AMERICAN INDIAN/REFERENCE

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GIFTS OF PRIDE AND LOVE Kiowa and Comanche Cradles By Barbara Hail $29.95 Paper 978-0-8061-3604-2 ARAPAHO WOMEN’S QUILLWORK Motion, Life, and Creativity By Jeffrey D. Anderson $21.95s Paper 978-0-8061-5583-8 FROM THE HANDS OF A WEAVER Olympic Peninsula Basketry through Time Edited by Jacilee Wray $24.95s Paper 978-0-8061-4471-9

Author Deanna Tidwell Broughton, a member of the Oklahoma Cherokee Nation and a sculptor of miniature cradles, draws from a wealth of primary sources— including oral histories and interviews with Native artists—to explore the forms, functions, and symbolism of Great Plains cradleboards. As Broughton explains, the cradle was vital to a Native infant’s first months of life, providing warmth, security, and portability, as well as a platform for viewing and interacting with the outside world for the first time. Cradles and cradleboards were not only practical but also symbolic of infancy, and each tribe incorporated special colors, materials, and ornaments into their designs to imbue their baby carriers with sacred meaning. Hide, Wood, and Willow reveals the wide variety of cradles used by thirty-two Plains tribes, including communities often ignored or overlooked, such as the Wichita, Lipan Apache, Tonkawa, and Plains Métis. Each chapter offers information about the tribe’s background, preferred types of cradles, birth customs, and methods for distinguishing the sex of the baby through cradle ornamentation. Despite decades of political and social upheaval among Plains tribes, the significance of the cradle endures. Today, a baby can still be found wrapped up and wide-eyed, supported by a baby board. With its blend of stunning full-color images and detailed information, this book is a fitting tribute to an important and ongoing tradition among indigenous cultures. Deanna Tidwell Broughton, a retired schoolteacher and principal and an enrolled member of the Oklahoma Cherokee Nation, has used her interest in her heritage to learn about and craft miniature Native baby cradles.


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Coming Full Circle The Seneca Nation of Indians, 1848–1934 By Laurence M. Hauptman The disastrous Buffalo Creek Treaty of 1838 called for the Senecas’ removal to Kansas (then part of the Indian Territory). From this low point, the Seneca Nation of Indians, which today occupies three reservations in western New York, sought to rebound. Beginning with events leading to the Seneca Revolution in 1848, which transformed the nation’s government from a council of chiefs to an elected system, Laurence M. Hauptman traces Seneca history through the New Deal. Based on the author’s nearly fifty years of archival research, interviews, and applied work, Coming Full Circle shows that Seneca leaders in these years learned valuable lessons and adapted to change, thereby preparing the nation to meet the challenges it would face in the post–World War II era, including major land loss and threats of termination. Instead of emphasizing American Indian decline, Hauptman stresses that the Senecas were actors in their own history and demonstrated cultural and political resilience. Both Native belief, in the form of the Good Message of Handsome Lake, and Christianity were major forces in Seneca life; women continued to play important social and economic roles despite the demise of clan matrons’ right to nominate the chiefs; and Senecas became involved in national and international competition in long-distance running and in lacrosse. The Seneca Nation also achieved noteworthy political successes in this period. The Senecas resisted allotment, and thus saved their reservations from breakup and sale. They recruited powerful allies, including attorneys, congressmen, journalists, and religious leaders. They saved their Oil Spring Reservation, winning a U.S. Supreme Court case against New York State on the issue of taxation and won remuneration in their Kansas Claims case. These efforts laid the groundwork for the Senecas’ postwar endeavor to seek compensation before the Indian Claims Commission and pursuit of a series of land claims and tax lawsuits against New York State. Laurence M. Hauptman is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History at the State University of New York at New Paltz. A recipient of the Archives Lifetime Achievement Award for his research and publications on New York State, he is the author of In the Shadow of Kinzua: The Seneca Nation of Indians since World War II.

VOLUME 17 IN THE NEW DIRECTIONS IN NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES SERIES

APRIL $34.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6269-0 304 PAGES, 6 X 9 25 B&W ILLUS., 5 MAPS, 3 TABLES AMERICAN INDIAN/POLITICAL SCIENCE/LAW

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THE PEQUOTS IN SOUTHERN NEW ENGLAND The Fall and Rise of an American Indian Nation By Laurence M. Hauptman and James D. Wherry $21.95 Paper 978-0-8061-2515-2 THE ONEIDA INDIANS IN THE AGE OF ALLOTMENT, 1860–1920 By L. Gordon McLester III $34.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-3752-0 FREE TO BE MOHAWK Indigenous Education at the Akwesasne Freedom School By Louellyn White $29.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-4865-6 $19.95s Paper 978-0-8061-5154-0

HAUPTMAN COMING FULL CIRCLE

The defining era that prepared the Senecas for confronting future threats to their sovereignty


HEDREN ROSEBUD, JUNE 17, 1876

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2019

One of the greatest battles between Indians and U.S. troops to occur in the American West

Rosebud, June 17, 1876 Prelude to the Little Big Horn By Paul L. Hedren The Battle of the Rosebud may well be the largest Indian battle ever fought in the American West. The monumental clash on June 17, 1876, along Rosebud Creek in southeastern Montana pitted George Crook and his Shoshone and Crow allies against Sioux and Northern Cheyennes under Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. It set the stage for the battle that occurred eight days later when, just twenty-five miles away, George Armstrong Custer blundered into the very same village that had outmatched Crook. Historian Paul L. Hedren presents the definitive account of this critical battle, from its antecedents in the Sioux campaign to its historic consequences.

APRIL $34.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6232-4 488 PAGES, 6.125 X 9.25 63 B&W ILLUS., 6 MAPS MILITARY HISTORY/AMERICAN INDIAN

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POWDER RIVER Disastrous Opening of the Great Sioux War By Paul L. Hedren $34.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-5383-4 $24.95s Paper 978-0-8061-6189-1 THE GRAY FOX George Crook and the Indian Wars By Paul Magid $29.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-4706-2 $26.95s Paper 978-0-8061-6046-7 GREAT SIOUX WAR ORDERS OF BATTLE How the United States Army Waged War on the Northern Plains, 1876–1877 By Paul L. Hedren $19.95s Paper 978-0-8061-4322-4

Rosebud, June 17, 1876 explores in unprecedented detail the events of the spring and early summer of 1876. Drawing on an extensive array of sources, including government reports, diaries, reminiscences, and a previously untapped trove of newspaper stories, the book traces the movements of both Indian forces and U.S. troops and their Indian allies as Brigadier General Crook commenced his second great campaign against the northern Indians for the year. Both Indian and army paths led to Rosebud Creek, where warriors surprised Crook and then parried with his soldiers for the better part of a day on an enormous field. Describing the battle from multiple viewpoints, Hedren narrates the action moment by moment, capturing the ebb and flow of the fighting. Throughout he weighs the decisions and events that contributed to Crook’s tactical victory, and to his fateful decision thereafter not to pursue his adversary. The result is a uniquely comprehensive view of an engagement that made history and then changed its course. Rosebud was at once a battle won and a battle lost. With informed attention to the subtleties and significance of both outcomes, as well as to the fears and motivations on all sides, Hedren has given new meaning to this consequential fight, and new insight into its place in the larger story of the Great Sioux War. Paul L. Hedren retired in 2007 after serving nearly four decades as a National Park Service historian and superintendent successively in five states. A lifelong student of the Old Army and the Indian wars of the American West, he is author of some sixty articles and eleven books, including the award-winning After Custer: Loss and Transformation in Sioux Country and Powder River: Disastrous Opening of the Great Sioux War.


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Politician in Uniform General Lew Wallace and the Civil War By Christopher R. Mortenson Lew Wallace (1827–1905) won fame for his novel, Ben-Hur, and for his negotiations with William H. Bonney, aka Billy the Kid, during the Lincoln County Wars of 1878–81. He was a successful lawyer, a notable Indiana politician, and a capable military administrator. And yet, as history and his own memoir tell us, Wallace would have traded all these accolades for a moment of military glory in the Civil War to save the Union. Where previous accounts have sought to discredit or defend Wallace’s performance as a general in the war, author Christopher R. Mortenson takes a more nuanced approach. Combining military biography, historical analysis, and political insight, Politician in Uniform provides an expanded and balanced view of Wallace’s military career—and offers the reader a new understanding of the experience of a voluntary general like Lew Wallace. A rising politician from Indiana, Wallace became a Civil War general through his political connections. While he had much success as a regimental commander, he ran into trouble at the brigade and division levels. A natural rivalry and tension between West Pointers and political generals might have accounted for some of this, but many of his difficulties, as Mortenson shows us, were of Wallace’s own making. A temperamental officer with a “rough” conception of manhood, Wallace often found his mentors wanting, disrespected his superiors, and vigorously sought opportunities for glorious action in the field, only to perform poorly when given the chance. Despite his flaws, Mortenson notes, Wallace contributed both politically and militarily to the war effort—in the fight for Fort Donelson and at the Battle of Shiloh, in the defense of Cincinnati and southern Indiana, and in the administration of Baltimore and the Middle Department. Detailing these and other instances of Wallace’s success along with his weaknesses and failures, Mortenson provides an unusually thorough and instructive picture of this complicated character in his military service. His book clearly demonstrates the unique complexities of evaluating the performance of a politician in uniform. Christopher R. Mortenson is Associate Professor of History at Ouachita Baptist University and holds a PhD in History from Texas A&M University, College Station.

JANUARY $34.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6195-2 298 PAGES, 6 X 9 14 B&W ILLUS., 5 MAPS MILITARY HISTORY/U.S. HISTORY

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EMORY UPTON Misunderstood Reformer By David J. Fitzpatrick $39.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-5720-7 GEORGE CROOK From the Redwoods to Appomattox By Paul Magid $24.95s Paper 978-0-8061-4441-2 THE COMMANDERS Civil War Generals Who Shaped the American West By Robert M. Utley $29.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-5978-2

MORTENSON POLITICIAN IN UNIFORM

Provides an instructive picture of a complicated military career


HART, HART BLUECOAT AND PIONEER

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NEW BOOKS SPRING 2019

Offers a unique perspective on events long fixed in the historical imagination

Bluecoat and Pioneer The Recollections of John Benton Hart, 1864–1868 Edited by John Hart By John Benton Hart In 1918, urged on by his son Harry, John Benton Hart began to tell stories of a three-year period in his youth. He recalled his days as a trooper in the Eleventh Kansas Cavalry, fighting in Missouri and on the frontier, and his time as a civilian jack-of-all-trades doing risky work for the U.S. Army on the Wyoming-Montana Bozeman Trail in the middle of the Indian resistance campaign known as Red Cloud’s War. Once started, John Benton Hart became an enthusiastic raconteur, describing events with an almost cinematic vividness, while his son, an aspiring writer, documented his father’s testimony in what became several manuscripts. Compiled and reproduced here, edited by historian John Hart, John Benton Hart’s great-grandson, this memoir is a singular document of living history. JANUARY $32.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6175-4 240 PAGES, 6 X 9 32 B&W ILLUS., 6 MAPS MEMOIR/MILITARY HISTORY

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EYEWITNESS TO THE FETTERMAN FIGHT Indian Views Edited by John H. Monnett $29.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-5582-1 $21.95s Paper 978-0-8061-6188-4 AN AIDE TO CUSTER The Civil War Letters of Lt. Edward G. Granger By Edward Granger $39.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-6018-4 THREE YEARS ON THE PLAINS Observations of Indians, 1867–1870 By Edmund B. Tuttle $19.95s Paper 978-0-8061-3494-9

As a young Kansas cavalryman, John Benton Hart participated in two momentous episodes of the Civil War era—Sterling Price’s Missouri Expedition of 1864, including the Battle of Westport, and such engagements in the Plains Indian Wars as the Battle of Platte Bridge in July 1865 and the Hayfield Fight near Fort C. F. Smith in 1867. In the engaging style of a natural storyteller, Hart re-creates these events as he experienced them, giving readers a rare glimpse at moments of historical import from the point of view of the “ordinary” soldier. In arresting detail, he also tells of crossing the Plains as a bullwhacker, carrying the mail between the beleaguered forts on the Bozeman Trail, and befriending scout Jim Bridger and Mountain Crow Chief Blackfoot. Framed and supplemented with the editor’s biographical, historical, and explanatory notes, Hart’s memoir offers a new perspective on events long fixed in the historical imagination. As history writ large or on a personal scale, Bluecoat and Pioneer tells a remarkable story. John Hart is an independent historian specializing in environmental policy and history. His articles have been widely published, and he is the author of sixteen books, including Storm over Mono: The Mono Lake Battle and the California Water Future and San Francisco Bay: Portrait of an Estuary.


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Selling Sea Power Public Relations and the U.S. Navy, 1917–1941 By Ryan D. Wadle The accepted narrative of the interwar U.S. Navy is one of transformation from a battle-centric force into a force that could fight on the “three planes” of war: in the skies, on the water, and under the waves. The political and cultural tumult that accompanied this transformation is another story. Ryan D. Wadle’s Selling Sea Power explores this little-known but critically important aspect of naval history. After World War I, the U.S. Navy faced numerous challenges: a call for naval arms limitation, the ascendancy of air power, and budgetary constraints exacerbated by the Great Depression. Selling Sea Power tells the story of how the navy met these challenges by engaging in protracted public relations campaigns at a time when the means and methods of reaching the American public were undergoing dramatic shifts. While printed media continued to thrive, the rapidly growing film and radio industries presented new mediums through which the navy could connect with politicians and the public. Deftly capturing the institutional nuances and the personalities in play, Wadle tracks the U.S. Navy’s at first awkward but ultimately successful manipulation of mass media. At the same time, he analyzes what the public could actually see of the service in the variety of media available to them, including visual examples from progressively more sophisticated—and effective— public relations campaigns. Integrating military policy and strategy with the history of American culture and politics, Selling Sea Power offers a unique look at the complex links between the evolution of the art and industry of persuasion and the growth of the modern U.S. Navy, as well as the connections between the workings of communications and public relations and the command of military and political power. Ryan D. Wadle is an Associate Professor of Comparative Military Studies at the eSchool of Graduate Professional Military Education, Air University, Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama.

MARCH $34.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6280-5 304 PAGES, 6 X 9 24 B&W FIGS. MILITARY HISTORY/POLITICAL SCIENCE

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BATTLESHIP OKLAHOMA BB-37 By Jeff Phister, Thomas Hone, and Paul Goodyear $29.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-3917-3 $19.95 Paper 978-0-8061-3936-4 EMORY UPTON Misunderstood Reformer By David J. Fitzpatrick $39.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-5720-7

WADLE SELLING SEA POWER

Examines the industry of persuasion and the growth of the modern U.S. Navy


HENNING HARNESSING THE AIRPLANE

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2019

How traditional ground units responded to early aeronautical innovation

Harnessing the Airplane American and British Cavalry Responses to a New Technology, 1903–1939 By Lori A. Henning At its dawn in the early twentieth century, the new technology of aviation posed a crucial question to American and British cavalry: what do we do with the airplane? Lacking the hindsight of historical perspective, cavalry planners based their decisions on incomplete information. Harnessing the Airplane compares how the American and British armies dealt with this unique challenge. A multilayered look at a critical aspect of modern industrial warfare, this book examines the ramifications of technological innovation and its role in the fraught relationship that developed between traditional ground units and emerging air forces.

JANUARY $29.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6184-6 240 PAGES, 6 X 9 2 B&W ILLUS., 4 TABLES MILITARY HISTORY

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FLYING TO VICTORY Raymond Collishaw and the Western Desert Campaign, 1940–1941 By Mike Bechthold $34.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-5596-8

Cavalry officers pondered the potential military uses of airplanes and other new technologies early on, but preferred to test them before embracing and incorporating them in their operations. Cavalrymen cautiously examined airplane capabilities, developed applications and doctrine for joint operations, and in the United States, even tried to develop their own, specially designed craft. Throughout the interwar period, instead of replacing the cavalry, airplanes were used cooperatively with cavalry forces in reconnaissance, security, communication, protection, and pursuit—a collaboration tested in maneuvers and officially blessed in both British and American doctrine. This interdependent relationship changed drastically, however, during the 1930s as aviation priorities and doctrine shifted from tactical support of ground troops toward independent strategic bombardment. Henning shows that the American and British experiences with military aviation differed. The nascent British aviation service made quicker inroads into reconnaissance and scouting, even though the British cavalry was the older institution with more-established traditions. The American cavalry, despite its youth, contested the control of reconnaissance as late as the 1930s, years after similar arguments ended in Britain. Drawing on contemporary government reports, memoirs and journals of service personnel, books, and professional and trade journals and magazines, Harnessing the Airplane is a nuanced account of the cavalry’s response to aviation over time and presents a new perspective on a significant chapter of twentieth-century military history. Lori A. Henning is Assistant Professor of History at St. Bonaventure University in St. Bonaventure, New York.


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Small Boats and Daring Men Maritime Raiding, Irregular Warfare, and the Early American Navy By Benjamin Armstrong Two centuries before the daring exploits of Navy SEALs and Marine Raiders captured the public imagination, the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps were already engaged in similarly perilous missions: raiding pirate camps, attacking enemy ships in the dark of night, and striking enemy facilities and resources on shore. Even John Paul Jones, father of the American navy, saw such irregular operations as critical to naval warfare. With Jones’s own experience as a starting point, Benjamin Armstrong sets out to take irregular naval warfare out of the shadow of the blue water battles that dominate naval history. This book, the first historical study of its kind, makes a compelling case for raiding and irregular naval warfare as a key element in the story of American sea power. Beginning with the Continental Navy, Small Boats and Daring Men traces maritime missions through the wars of the early republic, from the coast of modern-day Libya to the rivers and inlets of the Chesapeake Bay. At the same time, Armstrong examines the era’s conflicts with nonstate enemies and threats to American peacetime interests along Pacific and Caribbean shores. Armstrong brings a uniquely informed perspective to his subject; and his work—with reference to original naval operational reports, sailors’ memoirs and diaries, and officers’ correspondence—is at once an exciting narrative of danger and combat at sea and a thoroughgoing analysis of how these events fit into concepts of American sea power.

VOLUME 66 IN THE CAMPAIGNS AND COMMANDERS SERIES

APRIL $34.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6282-9 296 PAGES, 6 X 9 12 B&W ILLUS., 1 MAP MILITARY HISTORY

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A critical new look at the naval history of the early American era, the book also raises fundamental questions for naval strategy in the twenty-first century. Benjamin Armstrong is Assistant Professor of War Studies and Naval History at the U.S. Naval Academy. He is the editor of 21st Century Mahan and 21st Century Sims and the author of numerous articles on naval history, national security, and strategy.

REDISCOVERING IRREGULAR WARFARE Colin Gubbins and the Origins of Britain’s Special Operations Executive By A. R. B. Linderman $29.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-5167-0 FATAL SUNDAY George Washington, the Monmouth Campaign, and the Politics of Battle By Mark Edward Lender and Garry Wheeler Stone $26.95s Paper 978-0-8061-5748-1 THE MAN WHO CAPTURED WASHINGTON Major General Robert Ross and the War of 1812 By John McCavitt and Christopher T. George $29.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-5164-9

ARMSTRONG SMALL BOATS AND DARING MEN

A critical new look at maritime missions of the early republic


CARPENTER SOUTHERN GAMBIT

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2019

Restores a critical but little-studied chapter to the narrative of the Revolutionary War

Southern Gambit Cornwallis and the British March to Yorktown By Stanley D. M. Carpenter In a world rife with conflict and tension, how does a great power prosecute an irregular war at a great distance within the context of a regional struggle, all within a global competitive environment? The question, so pertinent today, was confronted by the British nearly 250 years ago during the American War for Independence. And the answer, as this book makes plain, is: not the way the British, under Lieutenant General Charles, Earl Cornwallis, went about it in the American South in the years 1778–81. Southern Gambit presents a closely observed, comprehensive account of this failed strategy. Approaching the campaign from the British perspective, this book restores a critical but little-studied chapter to the narrative of the Revolutionary War—and in doing so, it adds detail and depth to our picture of Cornwallis, an outsized figure in the history of the British Empire. VOLUME 65 IN THE CAMPAIGNS AND COMMANDERS SERIES

FEBRUARY $34.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6185-3 328 PAGES, 6 X 9 30 B&W ILLUS., 8 MAPS MILITARY HISTORY/U.S. HISTORY

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FATAL SUNDAY George Washington, the Monmouth Campaign, and the Politics of Battle By Mark Edward Lender and Garry Wheeler Stone $26.95s Paper 978-0-8061-5748-1

Distinguished scholar of military strategy Stanley D. M. Carpenter outlines the British strategic and operational objectives, devoting particular attention to the strategy of employing Southern Loyalists to help defeat Patriot forces, reestablish royal authority, and tamp down resurgent Patriot activity. Focusing on Cornwallis’s operations in the Carolinas and Virginia leading to the surrender at Yorktown in October 1781, Carpenter reveals the flaws in this approach, most notably a fatal misunderstanding of the nature of the war in the South and of the Loyalists’ support. Compounding this was the strategic incoherence of seeking a conventional war against a brilliant, unconventional opponent, and doing so amidst a breakdown in the unity of command. Ultimately, strategic incoherence, ineffective command and control, and a misreading of the situation contributed to the series of cascading failures of the British effort. Carpenter’s analysis of how and why this happened expands our understanding of the British decision-making and operations in the Southern Campaign and their fateful consequences in the War for Independence. Stanley D. M. Carpenter is Professor of Strategy and Policy and Naval War College Command Historian at the Naval War College, Newport, Rhode Island. He is the author of Military Leadership in the British Civil Wars, 1642–1651: “The Genius of This Age” and the editor of The English Civil War.


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Mapping Woody Guthrie By Will Kaufman “I ain’t got no home, I’m just a-roamin’ round,” Woody Guthrie lamented in one of his most popular songs. A native of Oklahoma, he was still in his teens when he moved to Pampa, Texas, where he experienced the dust storms that would play such a crucial role in forming his identity and shaping his work. He later joined thousands of Americans who headed to California to escape the devastation of the Dust Bowl. There he entered the West Coast stronghold of the Popular Front, whose leftward influence on his thinking would continue after his move in 1940 to New York, where the American folk music renaissance began when Guthrie encountered Pete Seeger and Lead Belly. Guthrie kept moving throughout his life, making friends, soaking up influences, and writing about his experiences. Along the way, he produced more than 3,000 songs, as well as fiction, journalism, poetry, and visual art, that gave voice to the distressed and dispossessed. In this insightful book, Will Kaufman examines the artist’s career through a unique perspective: the role of time and place in Guthrie’s artistic evolution. Guthrie disdained boundaries—whether of geography, class, race, or religion. As he once claimed in his inimitable style, “There ain’t no such thing as east west north or south.” Nevertheless, places were critical to Guthrie’s life, thought, and creativity. He referred to himself as a “compass-pointer man,” and after his sojourn in California, he headed up to the Pacific Northwest, on to New York, and crossed the Atlantic as a merchant marine.

VOLUME 4 IN THE AMERICAN POPULAR MUSIC SERIES

JANUARY $26.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6178-5 178 PAGES, 6 X 9 10 B&W ILLUS., 2 MAPS MUSIC/U.S. HISTORY

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Before his death from Huntington’s disease in 1967, Guthrie had one more important trip to take: to the Florida swamplands of Beluthahatchee, in the heart of the South. There he produced some of his most trenchant criticisms of Jim Crow racism—a portion of his work that scholars have tended to overlook. To map Guthrie’s movements across space and time, the author draws not only on the artist’s considerable recorded and published output but on a wealth of unpublished sources—including letters, essays, song lyrics, and notebooks— housed in the Woody Guthrie Archives in Tulsa, Oklahoma. This trove of primary documents deepens Kaufman’s intriguing portrait of a unique American artist. Will Kaufman is Professor of American Literature and Culture at the University of Central Lancashire, England, and author of American Culture in the 1970s; Woody Guthrie, American Radical; and Woody Guthrie’s Modern World Blues.

WOODY GUTHRIE’S MODERN WORLD BLUES By Will Kaufman $32.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-5761-0 SING ME BACK HOME Southern Roots and Country Music By Bill C. Malone $29.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-5586-9 TALKING MACHINE WEST A History and Catalogue of Tin Pan Alley’s Western Recordings, 1902–1918 By Michael A. Amundson $34.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-5604-0

KAUFMAN MAPPING WOODY GUTHRIE

Explores the impact of time and place on Guthrie’s life and work


GLASRUD, WINTZ, BLACK AMERICANS AND THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT IN THE WEST

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2019

A state-by-state exploration of civil rights activism in the West

Black Americans and the Civil Rights Movement in the West Edited by Bruce A. Glasrud and Cary D. Wintz Foreword by Quintard Taylor

VOLUME 16 IN THE RACE AND CULTURE IN THE AMERICAN WEST SERIES

FEBRUARY $29.95s PAPER 978-0-8061-6196-9 320 PAGES, 6 X 9 2 MAPS, 2 TABLES U.S. HISTORY/LAW

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BLACK COWBOYS IN THE AMERICAN WEST On the Range, on the Stage, behind the Badge Edited by Bruce A. Glasrud and Michael N. Searles $24.95s Paper 978-0-8061-5406-0 LOREN MILLER Civil Rights Attorney and Journalist By Amina Hassan $26.95 Cloth 978-0-8061-4916-5 BLACK SPOKANE The Civil Rights Struggle in the Inland Northwest By Dwayne A. Mack $26.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-4489-4

In 1927, Beatrice Cannady succeeded in removing racist language from the Oregon Constitution. During World War II, Rowena Moore fought for the right of black women to work in Omaha’s meat packinghouses. In 1942, Thelma Paige used the courts to equalize the salaries of black and white schoolteachers across Texas. In 1950 Lucinda Todd of Topeka laid the groundwork for the landmark Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education. These actions—including sit-ins long before the Greensboro sit-ins of 1960—occurred well beyond the borders of the American South and East, regions most known as the home of the civil rights movement. By considering social justice efforts in western cities and states, Black Americans and the Civil Rights Movement in the West convincingly integrates the West into the historical narrative of black Americans’ struggle for civil rights. From Iowa and Minnesota to the Pacific Northwest, and from Texas to the Dakotas, black westerners initiated a wide array of civil rights activities in the early to late twentieth century. Connected to national struggles as much as they were tailored to local situations, these efforts predated or prefigured events in the East and South. In this collection, editors Bruce A. Glasrud and Cary D. Wintz bring these moments into sharp focus, as the contributors note the ways in which the racial and ethnic diversity of the West shaped a specific kind of African American activism. Concentrating on the far West, the mountain states, the desert Southwest, the upper Midwest, and states both southern and western, the contributors examine black westerners’ responses to racism in its various manifestations, whether as school segregation in Dallas, job discrimination in Seattle, or housing bias in San Francisco. Together their essays establish in unprecedented detail how efforts to challenge discrimination impacted and changed the West and ultimately the United States. Bruce A. Glasrud, Professor Emeritus at California State University, East Bay, and retired Arts and Sciences Dean, Sul Ross State University, is the author or editor of more than thirty books. Cary D. Wintz is Distinguished Professor of History at Texas Southern University and the author or editor of fifteen books, including Texas: The Lone Star State.


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Copper Stain ASARCO’s Legacy in El Paso By Elaine Hampton and Cynthia C. Ontiveros “The convertors would spew it out,” employee Arturo Hernandez recalled, referring to molten metal. “You’d see the ground, the dirt, catch on fire. . . . If you slip, you’d be like a little pat of butter, melting away.” Hernandez was describing work at ASARCO El Paso, a smelter and onetime economic powerhouse situated in the city’s heart just a few yards north of the Mexican border. For more than a century the smelter produced vast quantities of copper—along with millions of tons of toxins. During six of those years, the smelter also burned highly toxic industrial waste under the guise of processing copper, with dire consequences for worker and community health. Copper Stain is a history of environmental injustice, corporate malfeasance, political treachery, and a community fighting for its life. The book gives voice to nearly one hundred Mexican Americans directly affected by these events. Their frank and often heartrending stories, published here for the first time, evoke the grim reality of laboring under giant machines and lava-spewing furnaces while turning mountains of rock into copper ingots, all in service to an employer largely indifferent to workers’ welfare. With horror and humor, anger, courage, and sorrow, the authors and their interviewees reveal how ASARCO subjected its employees and an unsuspecting public to pollution, diseases, and early death—with little in the way of compensation. Elaine Hampton and Cynthia C. Ontiveros weave this eloquent testimony into a cautionary tale of toxic exposure, community activism, and a corporate employer’s dubious relationship with ethics—set against the political tug-of-war between industry’s demands and government’s obligation to protect the health of its people and the environment. Elaine Hampton’s long career in education and research encompasses both sides of the U.S.-Mexican border. Retired as Associate Professor at the University of Texas at El Paso, she has written five books, including the award-winning Anay’s Will to Learn: A Woman’s Education in the Shadow of the Maquiladora. Cynthia C. Ontiveros has served as a science teacher and administrator in the El Paso Independent School District. She is the founding principal of the Young Women’s STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics) Research and Preparatory Academy.

VOLUME 1 IN THE ENVIRONMENT IN MODERN NORTH AMERICA SERIES

JANUARY $29.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6177-8 200 PAGES, 6 X 9 2 B&W ILLUS., 1 MAP, 1 CHART, 9 TABLES ENVIRONMENT/U.S. HISTORY

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THE SIZE OF THE RISK Histories of Multiple Use in the Great Basin By Leisl Carr-Childers $34.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-4927-1 BITTER WATERS The Struggles of the Pecos River By Patrick Dearen $29.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-5201-1 DISAPPEARING DESERT The Growth of Phoenix and the Culture of Sprawl By Janine Schipper $19.95 Cloth 978-0-8061-3955-5

HAMPTON, ONTIVEROS COPPER STAIN

An examination of labor history and environmental history through the prism of environmental justice


GUTFREUND SPEAKING AMERICAN

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NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2019

How immigrants in Los Angeles used language learning to shape twentieth-century debates about U.S. citizenship

Speaking American Language Education and Citizenship in Twentieth-Century Los Angeles By Zevi Gutfreund

VOLUME 15 IN THE RACE AND CULTURE IN THE AMERICAN WEST SERIES

MARCH $45.00s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6186-0 304 PAGES, 6 X 9 21 B&W ILLUS. EDUCATION/U.S. HISTORY

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RADICAL L.A. From Coxey’s Army to the Watts Riots, 1894–1965 By Errol Wayne Stevens $34.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-4002-5 RACE AND THE WAR ON POVERTY From Watts to East L.A. By Robert Bauman $34.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-3965-4 LOREN MILLER Civil Rights Attorney and Journalist By Amina Hassan $26.95 Cloth 978-0-8061-4916-5

When Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Bilingual Education Act of 1968, language learning became a touchstone in the emerging culture wars. Nowhere was this more apparent than in Los Angeles, where elected officials from both political parties had supported the legislation, and where the most disruptive protests over it occurred. The city, with its diverse population of Latinos and Asian Americans, is the ideal locus for Zevi Gutfreund’s study of how language instruction informed the social construction of American citizenship. Combining the history of language instruction, school desegregation, and civil rights activism as it unfolded in Japanese American and Mexican American communities in L.A., this timely book clarifies the critical and evolving role of language instruction in twentieth-century American politics. Speaking American reveals how, for generations, language instruction offered a forum for Angelino educators to articulate their responses to policies that racialized access to citizenship—from the “national origins” immigration quotas of the Progressive Era through Congress’s removal of race from these quotas in 1965. Meanwhile, immigrant communities designed language experiments to counter efforts to limit their liberties. Gutfreund’s book is the first to place the experiences of Mexican Americans and Japanese Americans side by side as they navigated debates over Americanization programs, intercultural education, school desegregation, and bilingual education. In the process, the book shows, these language experiments helped Angelino immigrants introduce competing concepts of citizenship that were tied to their actions and deeds rather than to the English language itself. Complicating the usual top-down approach to the history of racial politics in education, Speaking American recognizes the ways in which immigrant and ethnic activists, as well as white progressives and conservatives, have been deeply invested in controlling public and private aspects of language instruction in Los Angeles. The book brings compelling analytic depth and breadth to its examination of the social and political landscape in a city still at the epicenter of American immigration politics. Zevi Gutfreund holds a Ph.D. in history from the University of California, Los Angeles, and is Assistant Professor of History at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge.


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War in the Land of True Peace The Fight for Maya Sacred Places By Brent K. S. Woodfill For the ancient and modern Maya, the landscape is ruled by powerful entities in the form of geographic features like caves, mountains, springs, and abandoned cities— spirits who must be entreated, through visits and rituals, for permission to plant, harvest, build, or travel their territories. Consequently, such places have served as points of domination and resistance over the millennia—and nowhere is this truer than in Guatemala’s Northern Transversal Strip, the subject of Brent K. S. Woodfill’s War in the Land of True Peace. This strategic region with its wealth of resources—fertile soil, petroleum, and the only non-coastal salt in the Maya lowlands—is the site of some of the most sacred Maya places, and thus also the focus of some of the signal struggles for power in Maya history. In War in the Land of True Peace Woodfill delves into archaeology, epigraphy, ethnohistory, and ethnography to write the biographies of several of these places, covering their histories from the rise of the Preclassic Maya through the spread of transnational corporations in our time. Again and again the region, known since Spanish conquest as Vera Paz, or True Peace, has seen incursion by a foreign group—including the great Maya cities of Tikal and Calakmul, the Hapsburg Empire, Guatemalan military dictatorships, and contemporary corporations—seeking to expand its power. Each outsider, intentionally or not, used the Maya need for access to these places to ensure loyalty. And each time, local Maya pushed back to reclaim the sacred places for their own. From early struggles to remove foreign influence to present-day battles over land tenure and indigenous-run ecotourism parks, this book documents a continuity in Maya culture over several thousand years—and illuminates the world view, with its sense of personhood and religion so different from the West’s, that informs this enduring culture. Brent K. S. Woodfill is assistant professor at Winthrop University and research associate at the Smithsonian Institution. He is the author of Ritual and Trade in the Pasión-Verapaz Region, Guatemala.

MAY $39.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6281-2 280 PAGES, 6 X 9 30 B&W ILLUS., 14 MAPS, 1 GRAPH, 1 TABLE ARCHAEOLOGY/LATIN AMERICA/HISTORY

Of Related Interest

MAYA SACRED GEOGRAPHY AND THE CREATOR DEITIES By Karen Bassie-Sweet $50.00s Cloth 978-0-8061-3957-9 CRISIS OF GOVERNANCE IN MAYA GUATEMALA Indigenous Responses to a Failing State Edited by John P. Hawkins, James H. McDonald, and Walter Randolph Adams $19.95s Paper 978-0-8061-4345-3 “STRANGE LANDS AND DIFFERENT PEOPLES” Spaniards and Indians in Colonial Guatemala By W. George Lovell and Christopher H. Lutz $34.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-4390-3

WOODFILL WAR IN THE LAND OF TRUE PEACE

The Maya’s millennia-long struggle to protect their sacred landscape


YAHALOM CARING FOR THE PEOPLE OF THE CLOUDS

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A study of Oaxacan social life through the lens of caregiving

Caring for the People of the Clouds Aging and Dementia in Oaxaca By Jonathan Yahalom Foreword by Xavier E. Cagigas In rural Mexico, people often say that Alzheimer’s does not exist. “People do not have Alzheimer’s because they don’t need to worry,” said one Oaxacan, explaining that locals lack the stresses that people face “over there”—that is, in the modern world. Alzheimer’s and related dementias carry a stigma. In contrast to the way elders are revered for remembering local traditions, dementia symbolizes how modern families have forgotten the communal values that bring them together.

APRIL $55.00s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6268-3 $24.95s PAPER 978-0-8061-6304-8 280 PAGES, 6 X 9 17 B&W ILLUS., 1 TABLE, 3 CHARTS LATIN AMERICA

Of Related Interest

HEALTH CARE IN MAYA GUATEMALA Confronting Medical Pluralism in a Developing Country Edited by Walter Randolph Adams and John P. Hawkins $19.95s Paper 978-0-8061-3859-6 "I CHOOSE LIFE" Contemporary Medical and Religious Practices in the Navajo World By Maureen Trudelle Schwarz $50.00s Cloth 978-0-8061-3941-8 $26.95s Paper 978-0-8061-3961-6 WEAVING CHIAPAS Maya Women’s Lives in a Changing World Edited by Yolanda Castro Apreza, Charlene Woodcock, and K’inal Antsetik, A.C. $29.95s Paper 978-0-8061-5983-6

In Caring for the People of the Clouds, psychologist Jonathan Yahalom provides an emotionally evocative, story-rich analysis of family caregiving for Oaxacan elders living with dementia. Based on his extensive research in a Zapotec community, Yahalom presents the conflicted experience of providing care in a setting where illness is steeped in stigma and locals are concerned about social cohesion. Traditionally, the Zapotec, or “people of the clouds,” respected their elders and venerated their ancestors. Dementia reveals the difficulty of upholding those ideals today. Yahalom looks at how dementia is understood in a medically pluralist landscape, how it is treated in a setting marked by social tension, and how caregivers endure challenges among their families and the broader community. Yahalom argues that caregiving involves more than just a response to human dependency; it is central to regenerating local values and family relationships threatened by broader social change. In so doing, the author bridges concepts in mental health with theory from medical anthropology. Unique in its interdisciplinary approach, this book advances theory pertaining to cross-cultural psychology and develops anthropological insights about how aging, dementia, and caregiving disclose the intimacies of family life in Oaxaca. Jonathan Yahalom is a psychologist at the Department of Veterans Affairs in Los Angeles. He holds a PhD in clinical psychology from Duquesne University. Xavier E. Cagigas is Associate Director of the Hispanic Neuropsychiatric Center of Excellence and Co-Director of the Cultural Neuropsychology Program at the UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior.


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The Fifteenth Month Aztec History in the Rituals of Panquetzaliztli By John F. Schwaller The Mexica (Aztecs) used a solar calendar made up of eighteen months, with each month dedicated to a specific god in their pantheon and celebrated with a different set of rituals. Panquetzaliztli, the fifteenth month, dedicated to the national god Huitzilopochtli (Hummingbird on the Left), was significant for its proximity to the winter solstice, and for the fact that it marked the beginning of the season of warfare. In The Fifteenth Month, John F. Schwaller offers a detailed look at how the celebrations of Panquetzaliztli changed over time and what these changes reveal about the history of the Aztecs. Drawing on a variety of sources, Schwaller deduces that prior to the rise of the Mexica in 1427, an earlier version of the month was dedicated to the god Tezcatlipoca (Smoking Mirror), a war and trickster god. The Mexica shifted the dedication to their god, developed a series of ceremonies—including long-distance running and human sacrifice—that would associate him with the sun, and changed the emphasis of the celebration from warfare alone to a combination of trade and warfare, since merchants played a significant role in Mexica statecraft. Further investigation shows how the resulting festival commemorated several important moments in Mexica history, how it came to include ceremonies associated with the winter solstice, and how it reflected a calendar reform implemented shortly before the arrival of the Spanish. Focused on one of the most important months in the Mexica year, Schwaller’s work marks a new methodology in which traditional sources for Mexica culture, rather than being interrogated for their specific content, are read for their insights into the historical development of the people. Just as Christmas re-creates the historic act of the birth of Jesus for Christians, so, The Fifteenth Month suggests, Panquetzaliztli was a symbolic re-creation of events from Mexica myths and history. John F. Schwaller is Professor of History at the University at Albany (SUNY) and serves as the Latin American editor for the journal Ethnohistory. He is contributor to The Directory for Confessors, 1585: Implementing the Catholic Reformation in New Spain.

MAY $39.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6276-8 280 PAGES, 6 X 9 13 COLOR AND 18 B&W ILLUS., 2 MAPS, 1 TABLE LATIN AMERICA/HISTORY

Of Related Interest

TLACAELEL REMEMBERED Mastermind of the Aztec Empire By Susan Schroeder $29.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-5434-3 PRIMEROS MEMORIALES, PART 2 Paleography of Nahuatl Text and English Translation By Fray Bernardino de Sahagun $39.95s Paper 978-0-8061-5749-8 BERNARDINO DE SAHAGUN First Anthropologist By Miguel León-Portilla $24.95s Paper 978-0-8061-4271-5

SCHWALLER THE FIFTEENTH MONTH

Explores a key month in the Aztec calendar associated with warfare and trade


POLLACKK INDEPENDENCE IN CENTRAL AMERICA AND CHIAPAS, 1770–1823

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Explores the origins and processes of Central America’s detachment from Spain

Independence in Central America and Chiapas, 1770–1823 By Aaron Pollack Translated by Nancy Hancock

APRIL $29.95s PAPER 978-0-8061-6279-9 328 PAGES, 6 X 9 8 MAPS LATIN AMERICA/HISTORY

Of Related Interest

INDIANS AND THE POLITICAL ECONOMY OF COLONIAL CENTRAL AMERICA, 1670–1810 By Robert W. Patch $36.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-4400-9 THE CH’OL MAYA OF CHIAPAS Edited by Karen Bassie-Sweet $45.00s Cloth 978-0-8061-4702-4 HISTORICAL ATLAS OF CENTRAL AMERICA By Carolyn Hall and Hector Perez Brignoli $99.95s Cloth 978-0-8061-3037-8 $34.95 Paper 978-0-8061-3038-5

Central America was the only part of the far-reaching Spanish Empire in continental America not to experience destructive independence wars in the period between 1810 and 1824. The essays in this volume draw on new historical research to explain why, and to delve into what did happen during the independence period in Central America and Chiapas. The contributors, distinguished scholars from Central America, North America, and Europe, consider themes of power, rebellion, sovereignty, and resistance throughout the Kingdom of Guatemala beginning in the late eighteenth century and ending with independence from Spain and the debate surrounding the decision to join the Mexican Empire. Their work reveals that a “conflict-free” separation from Spain was more complex than is usually understood, and shows how such a separation was crucial to later nineteenth-century developments. These essays tell us how different groups seized on the political instabilities of Spain to maximize their interests; how Latin American elites prepared elaborate rituals to legitimize power dynamics; why the Spanish military governor Bustamante’s role in Central America should be reconsidered; how Indian and popular uprisings had more to do with tax burdens than with independence rhetoric; how the scholastic thought of Thomas Aquinas played a role in political thinking during the independence period; and why Mexico’s Plan de Iguala, the independence program promoted by Agustín de Iturbide, finally broke Central American elites’ ties to Spain. Focusing on regional and small-town dynamics as well as urban elites, these essays combine to offer an unusually broad and varied perspective on and a new understanding of Central America in the period of independence. Aaron Pollack is professor/researcher at the Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social (CIESAS) Sureste in Mexico. He is the author of Levantamiento K’iche’ en Totonicapán, 1820: Los lugares de la política subalterna. Nancy Hancock is the director of Language Company Translations.


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Thucydides’s Melian Dialogue and Sicilian Expedition A Student Commentary By Martha C. Taylor Best known for his account of the Peloponnesian War, Thucydides (c. 454–c. 395 b.c.) was an Athenian general and historian. This valuable commentary addresses the most famous part of Thucydides’s narrative: the Sicilian Expedition (books 6–8.1), which resulted in a major defeat for Athens. Designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students of Greek, Martha C. Taylor’s student-friendly text is the first single volume in more than a century to focus on the expedition and the first to include the Melian Dialogue (5.84–116), considered the “prelude” to the invasion. Many beginning readers of Thucydides require assistance with the author’s often difficult constructions. In her notes to the text, Taylor breaks down Thucydides’s convoluted sentences and explains them piece by piece. Her notes also explain the author’s many historical and literary references. In her in-depth introduction, Taylor provides students with all the information they need to begin reading Thucydides. She discusses what we know about the Greek author—and what we do not—and she analyzes his unique language and style. To place the Sicilian Expedition in historical context, she summarizes the events leading up to and following the Sicilian Expedition, and she examines important aspects of Athenian democracy, including Thucydides’s presentation of the Athenian boule, the city’s advisory citizen council.

VOLUME 57 IN THE OKLAHOMA SERIES IN CLASSICAL CULTURE

JANUARY $34.95s PAPER 978-0-8061-6194-5 486 PAGES, 6 X 9 3 MAPS GREEK/EDUCATION

Of Related Interest

In addition to textual and historical commentary, this volume includes three maps; an appendix addressing the epitaph of Perikles (2.65.5–13), in which Thucydides appears to contradict his later presentation of the Sicilian Expedition; source suggestions for student term papers on relevant topics; and a general bibliography. Thucydides’s Melian Dialogue and Sicilian Expedition is designed for use with the Oxford Classical Text of Thucydides, which is available online.

HERODOTUS, HISTORIES, BOOK V Text, Commentary, and Vocabulary By Philip S. Peek

Martha C. Taylor is Professor of Classics at Loyola University Maryland. She is the author of Thucydides, Pericles, and the Idea of Athens in the Peloponnesian War.

PLATO’S APOLOGY OF SOCRATES A Commentary By Paul Allen Miller and Charles Platter $26.95s Paper 978-0-8061-4025-4 VIEWS OF ROME A Greek Reader Edited by Adam Serfass $29.95s Paper 978-0-8061-5793-1

TAYLOR THUCYDIDES’S MELIAN DIALOGUE AND SICILIAN EXPEDITION

A student-friendly commentary spanning the entire Sicilian Expedition and its prelude


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NEW IN PAPERBACK

NEW IN PAPERBACK

The Conquest of Texas

Frank Little and the IWW

Ethnic Cleansing in the Promised Land, 1820–1875 By Gary Clayton Anderson

The Blood That Stained an American Family By Jane Little Botkin

ANDERSON THE CONQUEST OF TEXAS

BOTKIN FRANK LITTLE AND THE IWW

A new look at Texas’s early years reveals a history of violent ethnic conflict

The life and family legacy of a tireless labor organizer

This is not your grandfather’s history of Texas. Portraying nineteenth-century Texas as a cauldron of racist violence, Gary Clayton Anderson shows that the ethnic warfare dominating the Texas frontier can best be described as ethnic cleansing. The Conquest of Texas is the story of the struggle between Anglos and Indians for land. Anderson tells how Scotch-Irish settlers clashed with farming tribes and then challenged the Comanches and Kiowas for their hunting grounds. By confronting head-on the romanticized version of Texas history that made heroes out of Houston, Lamar, and Baylor, Anderson helps us understand that the history of the Lone Star state is darker and more complex than the mythmakers allowed.

Franklin Henry Little (1878–1917), an organizer for the Western Federation of Miners and the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), fought in some of the early twentieth century’s most contentious labor and free-speech struggles. Following his lynching in Butte, Montana, his life and legacy became shrouded in tragedy and family secrets. In Frank Little and the IWW, author Jane Little Botkin chronicles her great-granduncle’s fascinating life and reveals its connections to the history of American labor and the first Red Scare. Botkin melds the personal narrative of an American family with the story of the labor movements that once shook the nation to its core. In doing so, she throws into sharp relief the lingering consequences of political repression.

Gary Clayton Anderson, George Lynn Cross Professor of History at the University of Oklahoma, is the author of Ethnic Cleansing and the Indian: The Crime That Should Haunt America and Gabriel Renville: From the Dakota War to the Creation of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Reservation, 1825–1892.

Jane Little Botkin taught history in public schools for thirty years before turning to historical investigation and writing. As a high school teacher, she supervised the compilation of fifteen volumes of the student publication A History of Dripping Springs and Hays County (1993–2008), a valuable resource for Texas researchers.

FEBRUARY $29.95 CLOTH 978-0-8061-3698-1 $26.95s PAPER 978-0-8061-6306-2 508 PAGES, 7 X 10 42 B&W ILLUS., 3 MAPS AMERICAN INDIAN/U.S. HISTORY

APRIL $34.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-5500-5 $26.95s PAPER 978-0-8061-6307-9 516 PAGES, 6 X 9 30 B&W ILLUS., 1 CHART BIOGRAPHY/U.S. HISTORY


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NEW IN PAPERBACK

NEW IN PAPERBACK

Cherokee Narratives

Banking in Oklahoma, 1907–2000

A Linguistic Study By Durbin Feeling, William Pulte, and Gregory Pulte Foreword by Bill John Baker

By Michael J. Hightower Foreword by Frank Keating The story of banking in the Sooner State through the twentieth century

The stories of the Cherokee people presented here capture in written form tales of history, myth, and legend for readers, speakers, and scholars of the Cherokee language. Assembled by noted authorities on Cherokee, this volume marks an unparalleled contribution to the linguistic analysis, understanding, and preservation of Cherokee language and culture. Cherokee Narratives spans the spectrum of genres, including humor, religion, origin myths, trickster tales, historical accounts, and stories about the Eastern Cherokee language.

Durbin Feeling is a linguist for the Cherokee Nation and a former Cherokee Language Instructor at the University of Oklahoma. William Pulte is Associate Professor Emeritus in the Department of Teaching and Learning at Southern Methodist University. Gregory Pulte is a graduate student in education administration at the University of Texas at Austin. Bill John Baker is Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation. JANUARY $32.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-5986-7 $19.95s PAPER 978-0-8061-5987-4 240 PAGES, 6.125 X 9.25 AMERICAN INDIAN/LANGUAGE

An independent historian and principal researcher for the Oklahoma Bank and Commerce History Project of the Oklahoma Historical Society, Michael J. Hightower is the author of Banking in Oklahoma before Statehood. Frank Keating served as the twenty-fifth governor of Oklahoma (1995–2003) and is past president and CEO of the American Bankers Association in Washington, D.C. JANUARY $29.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-4495-5 $24.95s PAPER 978-0-8061-6323-9 504 PAGES, 6.125 X 9.25 21 B&W ILLUS. U.S. HISTORY

HIGHTOWER BANKING IN OKLAHOMA, 1907–2000

The narratives and their linguistic analysis are a rich source of information for those who wish to deepen their knowledge of the Cherokee syllabary, as well as for students of Cherokee history and culture.

The story of banking in twentieth-century Oklahoma is also the story of the Sooner State’s first hundred years, as Michael J. Hightower’s book demonstrates. Oklahoma statehood coincided with the Panic of 1907, and both events signaled seismic shifts in state banking practices. Much as Oklahoma banks shed their frontier persona to become more tightly integrated in the national economy, so too was decentralized banking revealed as an anachronism, utterly unsuited to an increasingly global economy. With creation of the Federal Reserve System in 1913 and subsequent choice of Oklahoma City as the location for a branch bank, frontier banking began yielding to systems commensurate with the needs of the new century. Through meticulous research and personal interviews with bankers statewide, Hightower has crafted a compelling narrative of Oklahoma banking in the twentieth century.

FEELING, PULTE, PULTE CHEROKEE NARRATIVES

An unparalleled contribution to the preservation of Cherokee language and culture


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NEW IN PAPERBACK

NEW IN PAPERBACK

A Cheyenne Voice

Field of Honor

The Complete John Stands in Timber Interviews By John Stands In Timber and Margot Liberty Foreword by Raymond J. DeMallie Commentaries by Michael N. Donahue

A Novel By D. L. Birchfield

STANDS IN TIMBER, LIBERTY A CHEYENNE VOICE

BIRCHFIELD FIELD OF HONOR

A vast resource of ethnographic and historical information about the Cheyenne Indians With A Cheyenne Voice, readers now have access to a vast ethnographic and historical trove about the Cheyenne people—much of it previously unavailable. The diverse topics that Stands In Timber addresses range from traditional stories to historical events, including the battles of Sand Creek, Rosebud, and Wounded Knee. Replete with absorbing, and sometimes even humorous, details about Cheyenne tradition, warfare, ceremony, interpersonal relations, and everyday life, the interviews enliven and enrich our understanding of the Cheyenne people and their distinct history. John Stands In Timber served as tribal historian for the Northern Cheyennes. Margot Liberty, widely known as an anthropologist specializing in Northern Plains Indians and ranching culture, is the author, coauthor, or editor of numerous books. Raymond J. DeMallie is Chancellor’s Professor of Anthropology and American Indian Studies at Indiana University. Michael N. Donahue is the author of Drawing Battle Lines: The Map Testimony of Custer’s Last Fight. FEBRUARY $36.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-4379-8 $59.95s PAPER 978-0-8061-6305-5 552 PAGES, 7 X 10 25 B&W ILLUS., 3 COLOR MAPS AMERICAN INDIAN/U.S. HISTORY VOLUME 270 IN THE CIVILIZATION OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN SERIES

In D. L. Birchfield’s Field of Honor, a secret underground civilization of Choctaws, deep beneath the Ouachita Mountains of southeastern Oklahoma, has evolved into a high-tech culture, supported by the labor of slaves kidnapped from the surface. Underground, long yellow rows of corn stand tall and ripe in immense, brightly lit greenhouses, and great games of stickball are played in the dark in huge stadiums with glowing balls. Into this idyllic underground Choctaw world stumbles P. P. McDaniel, a half-blood Choctaw Marine Corps deserter from the Vietnam War. Reeling from culture shock and struggling for his own survival, McDaniel becomes entangled in political intrigue and an unlikely romance in this rich satire. D. L. Birchfield was a member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma. His Oklahoma Basic Intelligence Test won the North American Native Authors First Book Award from the Native Writers’ Circle of the Americas and the University of Oklahoma. FEBRUARY $19.95s PAPER 978-0-8061-6314-7 246 PAGES, 5.5 X 8.5 FICTION VOLUME 48 IN THE AMERICAN INDIAN LITERATURE AND CRITICAL STUDIES SERIES


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NEW IN PAPERBACK

Tonkawa Texts

Stoking the Fire

A New Linguistic Edition By Harry Hoijer Translated and edited by Thomas R. Wier

Nationhood in Cherokee Writing, 1907–1970 By Kirby Brown Explores the vitality of a Cherokee national presence when there was no Cherokee state

A crucial resource for scholars and general audiences

Thomas R. Wier teaches linguistics at the Free University of Tbilisi in the Republic of Georgia. His research focuses on some of the world’s least-documented languages, including Tonkawa, Fox (Meskwaki), Nahuatl, and other indigenous languages of the Americas.

Kirby Brown, Assistant Professor of English at the University of Oregon, has published articles in the Routledge Companion to American Indian Literatures, Studies in American Indian Literature, and Texas Studies in Language and Literature.

MARCH $45.00s CLOTH 978-0-8061-5899-0 $34.95s PAPER 978-0-8061-5988-1 312 PAGES, 6.125 X 9.25 1 MAP, 21 TABLES AMERICAN INDIAN/LANGUAGE

MARCH $39.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6015-3 $24.95s PAPER 978-0-8061-6016-0 312 PAGES, 6 X 9 4 B&W ILLUS., 1 MAP AMERICAN INDIAN/LITERATURE

BROWN STOKING THE FIRE

For both the language it preserves and the stories it tells, Tonkawa Texts is an invaluable repository of Tonkawa culture.

The years between Oklahoma statehood in 1907 and the 1971 reemergence of the Cherokee Nation are often seen as an intellectual, political, and literary “dark age” in Cherokee history. In Stoking the Fire, Kirby Brown brings to light a rich array of writing that counters this view. Avoiding the pitfalls of both assimilationist resignation and accommodationist ambivalence, Stoking the Fire recovers this period as a rich archive of Cherokee national memory. More broadly, the book expands how we think today about Indigenous nationhood and identity, our relationships with writers and texts from previous eras, and the paradigms that shape the fields of American Indian and Indigenous studies.

HOIJER, WIER TONKAWA TEXTS

Although tribal traditions survive among the Tonkawa people, now located in northern Oklahoma, the Tonkawa language has been extinct for more than 75 years. Much of what is known about Tonkawa—an “isolate” language, related to no others—comes to us through the stories collected and translated by twentieth-century anthropologist Harry Hoijer. These texts, constituting the entire remaining oral literature of the Tonkawa people, are edited and presented here in the original Tonkawa and newly translated into English, along with a new and up-to-date grammatical description.


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NEW IN PAPERBACK

A Surgeon with Custer at the Little Big Horn

Viewing the Ancestors

DEWOLF, HARBURN A SURGEON WITH CUSTER AT THE LITTLE BIG HORN

MCPHERSON VIEWING THE ANCESTORS

James DeWolf’s Diary and Letters, 1876 By James Madison DeWolf Edited by Todd E. Harburn Foreword by Paul Andrew Hutton

Perceptions of the Anaasází, Mokwic, and Hisatsinom By Robert S. McPherson A revealing pairing of the archaeological record with the oral traditions of Native peoples

The most complete annotated edition of the physician’s eyewitness accounts In spring 1876 a physician named James Madison DeWolf accepted the assignment of contract surgeon for the Seventh Cavalry. Killed in the early stages of the Battle of the Little Big Horn, he might easily have become a mere footnote in the many chronicles of this epic campaign— but he left behind an eyewitness account in his diary and correspondence. A Surgeon with Custer at the Little Big Horn is the first annotated edition of these rare accounts since 1958, and the most complete treatment to date. Todd E. Harburn, an independent scholar, orthopedic surgeon, and doctor of sports medicine, is coauthor of A Most Troublesome Situation: The British Military and the Pontiac Indian Uprising of 1763–1764. Harburn and his wife, Shirley, reside at the Straits of Mackinac, Michigan. Paul Andrew Hutton is Professor of History, University of New Mexico, and Executive Director of the Western History Association. His books include the prize-winning Phil Sheridan and His Army. MAY $29.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-5694-1 $24.95s PAPER 978-0-8061-6310-9 288 PAGES, 6 X 9 40 B&W ILLUS., 2 MAPS BIOGRAPHY/U.S. HISTORY

The Anaasází people left behind marvelous structures, the ruins of which are preserved at Mesa Verde, Chaco Canyon, and Canyon de Chelly. But what do we know about these people, and how do they relate to Native nations living in the Southwest today? Archaeologists have long studied the American Southwest, but as historian Robert McPherson shows in Viewing the Ancestors, their findings may not tell the whole story. McPherson maintains that combining archaeology with knowledge derived from the oral traditions of the Navajo, Ute, Paiute, and Hopi peoples yields a more complete history. Robert S. McPherson is Professor of History at Utah State University–Eastern and author, coauthor, or editor of numerous books on Navajo and Southwest history, including Under the Eagle: Samuel Holiday, Navajo Code Talker. JANUARY $34.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-4429-0 $26.95s PAPER 978-0-8061-6311-6 260 PAGES, 6 X 9 20 B&W ILLUS. U.S. HISTORY/AMERICAN INDIAN VOLUME 9 IN THE NEW DIRECTIONS IN NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES SERIES


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NEW IN PAPERBACK

J. Robert Oppenheimer, the Cold War, and the Atomic West

The Real Roadrunner

A Perfect Gibraltar

By Martha Anne Maxon

By Jon Hunner

The roadrunner, an icon of the Southwest and one of the most beloved birds of the United States, is also one of the least understood. In The Real Roadrunner, Martha Anne Maxon offers the most thorough natural history of the greater roadrunner species to date, revealing how the adaptable nature of the bird has allowed it to survive throughout the centuries and even to thrive today, when many other bird species are in decline. The author has assembled and analyzed information both from scientific and popular literature and from other researchers. This and her years of field observation and experience with raising young roadrunners in captivity have yielded new and intriguing facts on the species’ courtship and nesting behavior and on the development of the young.

The Battle for Monterrey, Mexico, 1846 By Christopher D. Dishman

J. ROBERT OPPENHEIMER, THE COLD WAR, AND THE ATOMIC WEST

NEW IN PAPERBACK

Jon Hunner, Professor of History and Public History Director at New Mexico State University, is author of Inventing Los Alamos: The Growth of an Atomic Community.

BIOGRAPHIES

Martha Anne Maxon, a retired zoologist and environmental consultant who grew up in southern Texas, lives in Arizona.

Christopher D. Dishman is Chief of the Border Security Branch of the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Intelligence and Analysis. He has published numerous articles on military history, homeland security, terrorism, and crime.

MARCH $26.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-3676-9 $24.95s PAPER 978-0-8061-6309-3 158 PAGES, 7 X 10 24 COLOR ILLUS., 18 B&W ILLUS., 5 TABLES OUTDOORS AND NATURE VOLUME 9 IN THE ANIMAL NATURAL HISTORY SERIES

APRIL $24.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-4140-4 $21.95s PAPER 978-0-8061-6313-0 292 PAGES, 6 X 9 27 B&W ILLUS., 7 MAPS MILITARY HISTORY/U.S. HISTORY VOLUME 26 IN THE CAMPAIGNS AND COMMANDERS SERIES

A PERFECT GIBRALTAR

MARCH $24.95 CLOTH 978-0-8061-4046-9 $21.95s PAPER 978-0-8061-6308-6 268 PAGES, 5.5 X 8.5 28 B&W ILLUS. MILITARY HISTORY/BIOGRAPHY VOLUME 24 IN THE THE OKLAHOMA WESTERN

For three days in fall 1846, U.S. and Mexican soldiers fought fiercely in the picturesque city of Monterrey, turning the northern Mexican town into one of the nineteenth century’s most gruesome battlefields. In this vivid narrative, Christopher D. Dishman conveys the intensity and drama of the Battle of Monterrey, which marked the first time U.S. troops engaged in prolonged urban combat. Canvassing a wide range of Mexican and American sources, Dishman’s research also included walking Monterrey with maps and period illustrations in hand. This skillfully written history will interest scholars, history enthusiasts, and everyone who enjoys a true war story well told.

THE REAL ROADRUNNER

In 1922, the teenage son of a Jewish immigrant ventured from Manhattan to New Mexico for his health. It was the first of many trips to the Sangre de Cristo Mountains for J. Robert Oppenheimer. Interwoven into this atomic tale are insights into the physicist’s troubled growing-up years, his marriage and family life, the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and Oppenheimer’s eventual downfall. Against the backdrop of the physicist’s life twining with the history of the American West, Jon Hunner explores the promise and peril of the Atomic Age.


44

NEW BOOKS SPRING/SUMMER 2019

NEW IN PAPERBACK

NEW IN PAPERBACK

A Whirlwind Passed through Our Country

Voices from the Delaware Big House Ceremony

Assassination and Commemoration

Lakota Voices of the Ghost Dance By Rani-Henrik Andersson Foreword by Raymond J. DeMallie

By Robert S. Grumet

JFK, Dallas, and The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza By Stephen Fagin With a new preface by the author

A WHIRLWIND PASSED THROUGH OUR COUNTRY

VOICES FROM THE DELAWARE BIG HOUSE CEREMONY

ASSASSINATION AND COMMEMORATION

NEW IN PAPERBACK

The inception of the Ghost Dance religion in 1890 marked a critical moment in Lakota history. Yet, because this movement alarmed government officials, culminating in the infamous massacre at Wounded Knee of 250 Lakota men, women, and children, historical accounts have most often described the Ghost Dance from the perspective of the white Americans who opposed it. In A Whirlwind Passed through Our Country, historian Rani-Henrik Andersson instead gives Lakotas a sounding board, imparting the multiplicity of Lakota voices on the Ghost Dance at the time. Rani-Henrik Andersson is a Core Fellow at the University of Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies. He has published a number of scholarly articles about topics in Native American history. Raymond J. DeMallie is Chancellor’s Professor Emeritus in the Department of Anthropology at Indiana University. MARCH $39.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-6007-8 $29.95s PAPER 978-0-8061-6019-1 432 PAGES, 6 X 9 9 B&W ILLUS. AND 1 MAP AMERICAN INDIAN/U.S. HISTORY

Voices from the Delaware Big House Ceremony examines and celebrates the Big House ceremony, the most important Delaware Indian religious observance to be documented historically. Edited by Robert S. Grumet, this compilation of essays offers diverse perspectives, from both historical documents to contemporary accounts, all of which illuminate the ceremony and its role in Delaware culture. The volume’s contributors and consultants include John Bierhorst, Ruthe Blalock Jones, Marlene Molly Miller, Michael Pace, Bruce L. Pearson, Terry J. Prewitt, James A. Rementer, and Darryl Stonefish. Robert S. Grumet, anthropologist and retired National Park Service archaeologist, is a Senior Research Associate with the McNeil Center for Early American Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. His numerous publications include The Munsee Indians: A History and First Manhattans: A History of the Indians of Greater New York. JANUARY $19.95s CLOTH 978-0-8061-3360-7 $21.95s PAPER 978-0-8061-6312-3 240 PAGES, 7 X 10 17 B&W ILLUS., 4 MAPS AMERICAN INDIAN/U.S. HISTORY

The shots that killed President John F. Kennedy in November 1963 were fired from the sixth floor of a nondescript warehouse at the edge of Dealey Plaza in downtown Dallas. That floor in the Texas School Book Depository became a museum exhibit in 1989 and was designated part of a National Historic Landmark District in 1993. This book recounts the slow and painful process by which a city and a nation came to terms with its collective memory of the assassination and its aftermath. Stephen Fagin is Curator and Oral Historian at The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza. Conover Hunt, author of the foreword, served as the museum’s original project director and is its former Chief Curator and Historian. Edward T. Linenthal, who wrote the preface, is the author of Preserving Memory: The Struggle to Create America’s Holocaust Museum. JANUARY $29.95 CLOTH 978-0-8061-4358-3 $19.95s PAPER 978-0-8061-6326-0 272 PAGES, 6 X 9 39 B&W ILLUS. U.S. HISTORY


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Index A

E

K

Alexander, Brigham Young and the Expansion of the Mormon Faith, 1 Amon Carter, Cervantez, 2 Anderson, The Conquest of Texas, 38 Andersson, A Whirlwind Passed through Our Country, 44 Armstrong, Small Boats and Daring Men, 27 Assassination and Commemoration, Fagin, 44

Eanger Irving Couse, Leavitt, 11 Ebright/Hendricks, Pueblo Sovereignty, 18

Kaufman, Mapping Woody Guthrie, 29

F

Leavitt, Eanger Irving Couse, 11 Leon Gaspard, Fenn/Milburn, 15 Li Er, Coloratura, 9

B Banking in Oklahoma, 1907–2000, Hightower, 39 Birchfield, Field of Honor, 40 Black Americans and the Civil Rights Movement in the West, Glasrud/Wintz, 30 Bluecoat and Pioneer, Hart/Hart, 24 Botkin, Frank Little and the IWW, 38 Brigham Young and the Expansion of the Mormon Faith, Alexander, 1 Broughton, Hide, Wood, and Willow, 20 Brown, Stoking the Fire, 41

C Carpenter, Southern Gambit, 28 Caring for the People of the Clouds, Yahalom, 34 Cervantez, Amon Carter, 2 Chambers/Carlson, Comanche Jack Stillwell, 6 Cherokee Narratives, Feeling/Pulte/Pulte, 39 Cheyenne Voice, A, Stands in Timber/Liberty, 40 Colorado, Noel, 10 Coloratura, Li Er, 9 Comanche Jack Stillwell, Chambers/Carlson, 6 Coming Full Circle, Hauptman, 21 Conquest of Texas, The, Anderson, 38 Copper Stain, Hampton/Ontiveros, 31 Cruz, Other Musics, 8

D DeWolf/Harburn, A Surgeon with Custer at the Little Big Horn, 42 Dishman, A Perfect Gibraltar, 43

Fagin, Assassination and Commemoration, 44 Feeling/Pulte/Pulte, Cherokee Narratives, 39 Fenn/Milburn, Leon Gaspard, 15 Field of Honor, Birchfield, 40 Fifteenth Month, The, Schwaller, 35 Fighting Invisible Enemies, Trafzer, 17 Frank Little and the IWW, Botkin, 38 Fur, Painting Culture, Painting Nature, 12

G Glasrud/Wintz, Black Americans and the Civil Rights Movement in the West, 30 Grumet, Voices from the Delaware Big House Ceremony, 44 Gutfreund, Speaking American, 32

H Hampton/Ontiveros, Copper Stain, 31 Harnessing the Airplane, Henning, 26 Harris/Sadler, The Texas Rangers in Transition, 5 Hart/Hart, Bluecoat and Pioneer, 24 Hauptman, Coming Full Circle, 21 Hedren, Rosebud, June 17, 1876, 22 Henning, Harnessing the Airplane, 26 Hide, Wood, and Willow, Broughton, 20 Hightower, Banking in Oklahoma, 1907–2000, 39 Hit Your Brights, Squires, 7 Hoijer, Tonkawa Texts, 41 Hunner, J. Robert Oppenheimer, the Cold War, and the Atomic West, 43

I Independence in Central America and Chiapas, 1770–1823, Pollack, 36

J Johnson, Political Hell-Raiser, 4 J. Robert Oppenheimer, the Cold War, and the Atomic West, Hunner, 43

L

M Mapping Woody Guthrie, Kaufman, 29 Maxon, The Real Roadrunner, 43 McPherson, Viewing the Ancestors, 42 Mormon Handcart Migration, The, Moulton, 3 Mortenson, Politician in Uniform, 23 Moulton, The Mormon Handcart Migration, 3

N Native Southerners, Smithers, 19 New Beginnings, Wilson-Powell, 16 Noel, Colorado, 10

O Other Musics, Cruz, 8

P Painting Culture, Painting Nature, Fur, 12 Perfect Gibraltar, A, Dishman, 43 Pioneer Mother Monuments, Prescott, 14 Political Hell-Raiser, Johnson, 4 Politician in Uniform, Mortenson, 23 Pollack, Independence in Central America and Chiapas, 1770–1823, 36 Prescott, Pioneer Mother Monuments, 14 Pueblo Sovereignty, Ebright/Hendricks, 18

Stands in Timber/Liberty, A Cheyenne Voice, 40 Stoking the Fire, Brown, 41 Surgeon with Custer at the Little Big Horn, A, DeWolf/Harburn 42

T Taylor, Thucydides’s Melian Dialogue and Sicilian Expedition, 37 Texas Rangers in Transition, The, Harris/Sadler, 5 Thucydides’s Melian Dialogue and Sicilian Expedition, Taylor, 37 Tonkawa Texts, Hoijer, 41 Trafzer, Fighting Invisible Enemies, 17 Tyler, Western Art, Western History, 13

V Viewing the Ancestors, McPherson, 42 Voices from the Delaware Big House Ceremony, Grumet, 44

W Wadle, Selling Sea Power, 25 War in the Land of True Peace, Woodfill, 33 Western Art, Western History, Tyler, 13 Whirlwind Passed through Our Country, A, Andersson, 44 Wilson-Powell, New Beginnings, 16 Woodfill, War in the Land of True Peace, 33

Y Yahalom, Caring for the People of the Clouds, 34

R Real Roadrunner, The, Maxon, 43 Rosebud, June 17, 1876, Hedren, 22

S Schwaller, The Fifteenth Month, 35 Selling Sea Power, Wadle, 25 Small Boats and Daring Men, Armstrong, 27 Smithers, Native Southerners, 19 Southern Gambit, Carpenter, 28 Speaking American, Gutfreund, 32 Squires, Hit Your Brights, 7

On the front and above: J. T. Bowen after John James Audubon, Lepus Sylvaticus, Grey Rabbit. Natural Size. Old and Young, 1843. Courtesy New York Public Library.


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