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West Edition Serving Britannia, Carlingwood, Westboro, Island Park and surrounding communities Year 2, Issue 7

December 8, 2011 | 24 Pages

www.yourottawaregion.com

TAKING ACTION Premier Dalton McGuinty was at Glebe Collegiate to reveal the provincial government’s plan to deal with bullying in schools.

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TRASH TROUBLES The final part of Metroland’s three-part series on Ontario’s waste worries looks at sustainable trash solutions.

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Photo by Kristy Wallace

BRINGING DATING AND PAINTING TOGETHER Chipo Shambare, right, a relationship coach and Elaine Comeau, owner and instructor at Wild Pigments Art Studio, are teaming up for a dating and painting workshop designed for singles. For the full story, turn to page 13.

A HELPING HAND A former foster child is using his experiences with the system to advocate for both current and past participants.

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Westboro residents oppose condo towers LAURA MUELLER

OUR / NOTRE

laura.mueller@metroland.com

Katherine Hobbs (613) 580-2485 / katherine.hobbs@ottawa.ca

The latest battle in the war on intensification is a trade-off for Westboro residents. When it comes to a proposal for condos at 335 Roosevelt Ave., the number of future residents who can live there is unchanged (or rather, the “density” of people per metre). But the size and shape of the building they will inhabit is a different question, and neighbours don’t like the sounds of the answer.

A highly charged group of residents made impassioned pleas to the city’s planning committee on Monday, Dec. 5, but in the end, their wishes were ignored and the committee unanimously approved a rezoning to allow Uniform Urban Developments to build two towers – a 14-storey and a 16-storey structure – instead of one, large seven-storey building. The rezoning boosts the allowable building height from 19 metres to 53 metres. That’s what the existing zoning permitted, but the developer and the city’s plan-

ning staff wanted to “re-shape” what was allowed to be built on the former Fendor Glass and Aluminum site from a sprawling, squat building into two towers that open up a view down Wilmont Avenue and leave a 0.4-hectare area for green space and a public square around the towers. The arguments made by about a dozen residents at the meeting hinged on the hope that just because a developer was allowed to build a vast, lower building across the entire site, doesn’t mean they would. See ROOSEVELT on page 5

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MAKING SENSE OF INVESTING


OTTAWA THIS WEEK - WEST - December 8, 2011

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News

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December 8, 2011 - OTTAWA THIS WEEK - WEST

Photo by Laura Mueller

Ottawa lawyer Guy Giorno, an expert on issues like lobbyist registries, was questioned at length by members of the city’s governance renewal subcommittee on Dec. 1 as the committee met to discuss a sweeping new lobbyist registry for Ottawa.

LAURA MUELLER laura.mueller@metroland.com

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A city policy that proposed grouping community volunteers alongside paid lobbyists in a registry of contacts made with city officials is being revised. Mayor Jim Watson gave that direction at a Dec. 1 meeting of the governance renewal subcommittee, which met to discuss a sweeping new lobbyist registry aimed at increasing the transparency of how decisions are made at city hall. “My intention was not to cast the net so far and wide … that a community association would have to classify themselves as a lobbyist,” Watson said. “We are pioneers and we don’t exactly have a road map to follow.” But the draft rules, which go further than any other jurisdiction in Canada according to one expert, were met with some disdain from community members who felt they would be labeled as “lobbyists” if they advocated for their communities as volunteers. Marita Killen, president of the Centretown Community Health Centre’s board of directors, articulated the thoughts of many members of the public who spoke at the meeting. She said the lobbyist registry is as good idea, but including unpaid advocacy work in the definition of a lobbyist would discourage people from contributing to their community associations and non-profit groups. “We feel strongly that this initiative will be of benefit,” Killen said. “I’m here because of the unintended consequences with concern to citizen engagement.” Killen said the registry would limit her board’s ability to advocate to the city on behalf of the health centre’s clients. Guy Giorno, an Ottawa lawyer and expert who penned an analysis of the draft lobbyist registry in the Lobbying Law Bulletin, told members of the governance renewal subcommittee the city shouldn’t try to define the difference between “advocacy” and “lobbying.” Instead, it should

focus on which activities need to be made more transparent. Watson responded by asking city staff to redefine what a lobbyist is. College Coun. Rick Chiarelli also wanted some clarification, including a definition of a “bona fide” community association. Committee members questioned Giorno for his opinion at length. Giorno pointed out that there were a couple potential holes in the draft policy, including how it applies to individuals acting in their own financial interest and how it would relate to professional organizations such as unions. Giorno also suggested the city look at further punishments for lobbyists themselves. While elected officials would be fined for breaking the lobbyist bylaw, lobbyists themselves would merely have their names revealed. There should also be a higher standard for lobbyists to disclose their activities, because they are the ones who know when they are lobbying, Giorno said. It will be difficult to fault a councillor for not knowing that a resident in their ward who wants a road repaved actually works for a paving company, for example. Gloucester-Southgate Coun. Diane Deans made a similar point. The way the guidelines are drafted, “I have to get myself into the mind of the lobbyist and determine what their intention is,” she said. Land-use planner Ted Fobert of FoTenn Consulting noted the registry’s potential impact on his profession. While Fobert and his contemporaries appear before city council and committees as paid consultants on behalf of their developer clients, they are required to adhere to a professional planning standard in the advice they give, Fobert said. Planners’ advice is in the interest of the public good and professional standards, not the paycheque they get from a developer, he said. “It’s a subtle but important difference,” he said, adding that he supports the idea of a registry.

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Mayor wants community volunteers out of registry

Look for the Bells Corners BIA supplement in selected papers this week!

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News

Ontario Liberals, PCs take action against bullying EDDIE RWEMA eddie.rwema@metroland.com

Bullies in Ontario schools could face expulsion under a new provincial bill introduced by the Liberal government last week at Queen’s Park. Premier Dalton McGuinty was at Glebe Collegiate on Dec. 1 to promote the Accepting Schools Act, which would give more power to schools in the province to punish bullies while also ensuring schools can engage in early intervention to stop aggressive behaviour.

McGuinty told a group of Glebe students, many of whom were part of the school’s anti-bullying committee, the legislation was necessary because the government wanted to make such behaviour culturally unacceptable in the same way that drinking and driving or smoking have become. “It is going to ensure that all our schools and school boards take concrete measures to identify bullying, intervene, prevent and ensure that they are progressive consequences all the way including expulsion,� said McGuinty.

Public Meeting To discuss the future of the former St. Thomas elementary school and lands at 9 Leeming Drive

When: Monday, December 12, 2011 Where: Nepean Sailing Club 3259 Carling Avenue (Dick Bell Park) City ofďŹ cials will make a brief presentation at 7 p.m. and will be available to answer questions in English and French. For more information on this meeting contact: Josee Helie 613-580-2424 ext. 24385 Josee.Helie@ottawa.ca

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OTTAWA THIS WEEK - WEST - December 8, 2011

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He said through the legislation his government wanted to send a stronger signal that bullying would not be tolerated under any circumstances. “We need to send a strong message to students in our schools that bullying is a very serious offence – serious misbehaviour, so serious that it can merit the most serious consequence that we have in our schools, which is expulsion,� he stressed. He said the proposed legislation was geared towards making sure that all schools across the province provide a safe and secure environment that accepts all “our students regardless of their background.� “We want to say no as a society to bullying and that begins in our schools,� McGuinty said. Expelling a student who engaged in serious bullying was necessary, he said, to send a clear message that the behaviour was unacceptable. This would only happen as a last resort, however. “Young bullies could turn into more dangerous older bullies which is why it is important that we provide necessary support for both bullies and the victims while they are still young in our schools,� McGuinty said. “In the most serious cases, bullying can lead tragedies where young people feel so helpless and hopeless that they take their own lives and we experienced that in our own community here in the case of Jamie Hubley.� Hubley, the 15-year-old son of Kanata South Coun. Allan Hubley, had been bullied in school and struggled with depression before taking his own life in October. Progressive Conservative MPP Elizabeth Witmer, a former education minister, tabled her own private member’s bill on bullying the same day as the Liberals theirs.

Photo by Eddie Rwema

Premier Dalton McGuinty met student’s leaders at Glebe Collegiate on Dec. 1 to promote the Accepting Schools Act, which would give more power to schools in the province to punish bullies. Though McGuinty admitted not having gotten a chance to read through the Witmer bill, he said he was looking forward to working with them. “The most important thing is that they are both informed by the same objective,� he said. “There is a lot that we have in common and I am convinced we can find a lot of common ground here.� His comments were supported by PC MPP Lisa MacLeod, who represents Nepean-Carleton. “The premier spoke about co-operation and we are speaking of co-operation and I think it can be done,� said MacLeod. She said she was proud the two parties were all on the same page. “We just need to continue to keep up that good will to get their bill and our bill together,� she said. With files from Blair Edwards

Raising a horse’s weight in food KRISTY WALLACE

could do that would show the community that we were part of it,â€? said Desaulniers, the manager of visitor experience at the museum. “The Agriculture Museum is Feasts are a big part of what the holiall about food, and we it’s a shame that day season is all about, and Marie-Sophie people go without.â€? Desaulniers of the Canada Agriculture This year, the museum’s goal is to raise Museum wants to make sure everyone in 500 kilograms of food, roughly the size of Ottawa gets enough to eat as part of the their new horse, Flint. The community museum’s second annual food drive. will be able to check updates on the muse“We were discussing together what we um’s website as to how much it has raised with a drawing of Flint. If the museum has raised an amount equivalent to Flint’s leg, the leg of the drawing will be shaded in. 1',!# “We wanted to make it fun, and  try to get a target that represents something,â€? said Desaulniers, In 3 Easy Steps... adding that the museum’s newest MAKE YOUR barnyard addition would be a perCOMMERCIAL QUALITY fect way to get people involved. WINES AT OUR PLACE The museum is looking for nonfor as per batch perishables, but also hygienic (yields 29 btls) little as items and things like diapers. The OR Save even more & museum will be donating the items Make Your Own Beer to food bank both on the Ontario & Wine at Home and Quebec side since visitors of1*#-,,-5 ten come from both provinces. 435 Moodie Drive, Bells Corners 613-721-9945 The food drive will run at the 957 Gladstone Ave. W., Ottawa 613-722-9945 2030 Lanthier Drive, Orleans 613-590-9946 Canada Agriculture Museum from Dec. 1 to 31. ABC>I@LTFKBP@LJ kristy.wallace@metroland.com

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News

From WESTBORO on page 1 Resident Cathleen Bryden said the idea the neighbourhood will see one or the other – a large, shorter building or two taller towers – is a myth. She said if the city were to stand by the current zoning, a developer would eventually bring forward a proposal the area residents would consider more appropriate for the site. “It lends a coercive tenor to the tone of the documents,” she said. But Alta Vista Coun. Peter Hume, chairman of the planning committee, provided a reality check. He stopped short of calling the residents naïve, but Hume said he had never seen a developer waste development potential on a site. The planning committee heard from approximately a dozen public delegates for about three hours, and many shared the same concerns about such things as the shadows taller buildings would cast, the potential negative impact on neighbouring property values and the additional traffic and parking concerns resulting from 194 new residents moving in to the former industrial site. Those delegates represented

the concerns of about 150 of their neighbours – some of whom are members of a newly formed group called Westboro Citizens for Appropriate Development – to the meeting. Another resident, Gary Stinson, repeated his neighbours’ understanding that the density allowed on the site would mean approximately the same number of residents even without the rezoning, but for him, the buildings’ height was the big problem. “This is about height. Sheer height,” Stinson said. “Just say ‘no’ to this proposal.” Jim Everts, a neighbouring resident, pointed out that people invested in their homes with the expectation that the city would enforce the zoning at 335 Roosevelt Ave., and changing the rules of the game will negatively affect the value of their homes. Céo Gaudet of the nearby Westboro Beach Community Association agreed. He said the planning committee’s decision would set a precedent of telling developers that the zoning on their properties is just the “starting point for negotiations.” Others were worried about the “right to light” and the amount of shadow their homes would be

cast in from the new buildings, but representatives from Uniform Urban Developments said their studies show that only a few homes would be in shadow for part of December. ROOSEVELT AVENUE REBUILD Along with the rezoning, Kitchissippi Coun. Katherine Hobbs was able to secure a $200,000 payment from the developer that will be used to rebuild Roosevelt Street and assuage some of the neighbours’ traffic concerns. “This street wouldn’t likely be improved in our lifetime,” Hobbs said. “This is a groundbreaking street proposal for Ottawa. It has a European feel to it.” The money will be used to calm traffic on Roosevelt at the north end, at Richmond Road. The intersection will be realigned and the pedestrian crossing raised for safety, and the area will be “extensively” landscaped, Hobbs said. The cash-in-lieu of parklands money the city will receive from the development will be put towards a new city square to honour veterans at the corner of Richmond Road and Winston Avenue, beside the Westboro Legion.

Roads in need of salt diet, summit hears LAURA MUELLER laura.mueller@metroland.com

If the city wants to reduce the amount of road salt in its diet, it needs to get private property owners on board as well. That was the message heard at a “salt summit” held at city hall on Nov, 29, when approximately 50 commercial building owners, industry representatives and the Smart About Salt Council gathered to share ideas about how to keep salt use to a minimum. It’s a strategy the city has recently subscribed to as the next step in its efforts to reduce the environmental impact and cost of dumping salt onto city roads, parking lots and sidewalks. But the city can only control how much salt it uses on its own properties, and far more salt is used on private parking lots and paved areas, said GloucesterSouth Nepean Coun. Steve Desroches. In fact, about half of the salt that hits the ground in Ottawa each winter is on private property, said Bob Hodgins, the Smart

About Salt Council’s executive director. The city is taking the lead by experimenting with a “brine” solution for de-icing sidewalks that contains organic compounds, including beet juice, Desroches said. Dean Karakasis, executive director of the Building Owners and Managers Association for the Ottawa area, said he hopes his members follow in the footsteps of the city, which he called an “early adopter” of the salt-reduction program. Karakasis said most of the people in attendance were enthusiastic about the concepts presented, especially because reducing salt use can lead to lower insurance rates because there is less chance of salt eroding structures on the property and making them unsafe or requiring more frequent, costly repairs. The Smart About Salt program is based out of southern Ontario, but Hodgins said a city-hosted event for the industry and property owners is something that’s “unique” to Ottawa.

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Roosevelt to receive major upgrade

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News

Coalition wants to ensure violence no longer hidden KRISTY WALLACE kristy.wallace@metroland.com

When Stephanie Lomatski saw recent research findings about violence against in women in Ottawa, it proved a few things to her. “We aren’t seeing change. We are still seeing women being victimized, and children who are unsafe,” said Lomatski, who’s executive director of the Hintonburg-based Ottawa Coalition To End Violence Against Women. “It’s repeating itself ... it’s important for our community to know and to act on it.” The coalition held its annual general meeting at the City of Archives Building on Nov. 30, where a new report, called Hidden from Sight: A Look at the Prevalence of Violence Against Women in Ottawa Volume 2, was launched. The first part was done in 2009 and looked at trends in violence against women in Ottawa. Holly Johnson and Peter Jupp, researchers from the University of Ottawa who conducted the study, were at the meeting and discussed the trends they saw in the second round of the project. The researchers collected data from police, shelters and agencies that help abused women.

They found that during a 12-month period from 2009 to 2010, more than 2,500 domestic violence occurrences happened in Ottawa and of that number, more than 2,200 men were charged in the cases from. Those numbers indicate that 86 per cent of all domestic violence cases in Ottawa involved a male perpetrator. This is higher than Canada’s average of 83 per cent of cases. “I think that agencies won’t find this surprising, but the public will find the volume of cases to be surprising,” said Johnson. “The volume is quite substantial.” Housing issues are also a big problem, she said, and that many women choose not to leave abusive households because there aren’t enough resources available to them. In addition, she said women who are recent immigrants are also a disadvantage because of language barriers. “I’m hoping this project will raise public awareness about the nature of the problem in our community,” Johnson said. “Resources are badly needed and services in the community are badly needed. And as a community, we need to recognize the nature of the problem.” Lomatski said it’s hard to know where

Photo by Kristy Wallace

Holly Johnson, a professor of the University of Ottawa, helped conduct a study of trends in violence against women in the city. Data from the report was released on Nov. 30. Ottawa stands compared to other communities when it comes to violence against women. “Provincially we need to be able to (compare),” said Lomatski. “We need to facilitate and fund these sorts of projects so we can understand the prevalence.” A document like Hidden from Sight is important in making people understand the issues and help them understand

that violence against women is still very much a concern, she said. “It’s called Hidden from Sight for a reason,” Lomatski said. “If we can give people information and they’re able to learn, they’re able to act and take the next step.” For more information on the coalition, visit the website at www.octevawcocvff.ca/ .

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OTTAWA THIS WEEK - WEST - December 8, 2011

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Special Feature

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The importance of finding sustainable alternatives for dealing with our garbage RECYCLING: What the numbers mean The recycling code printed on plastic containers indicates the type of resin used in the material. Some resins are easier to recycle than others or are useable in a wider range of recycled products. The City of Ottawa currently accepts all of the following products.

THIRD IN A THREE-PART SERIES BY DON CAMPBELL, THANA DHARMARAJAH AND LAURA MUELLER A tattered basketball shoe, a Donald Duck plastic toy, VHS tapes and a championship trophy sit scattered in a sorting room at Canada’s largest waste recovery plant. These are some of the more unusual items that sorters have pulled off the production lines of the Material Recovery Facility (MRF) in Brampton, where Peel Region’s residential blue box items arrive to be separated, sorted and bundled. “If you stand around here long enough you will see all sorts of things,” said Peel waste supervisor Kevin Mehlenbacher. Only about 45 per cent of recyclable items from households across Ontario ever make it to one of these plants. More than half of municipal garbage goes to landfills instead. Peel sells much of the material that comes to this plant in Brampton to China and the United States, where it is reused in new products like aluminum cans or plastic bottles. The region’s total take is roughly $10 million a year. In Ottawa, with a population of approximately 300,000 fewer people, that revenue was around $8.4 million last year. But the city estimates that an additional $535,000 in lost revenue went into the landfill because people throw recyclables into the garbage. If households started recycling more, municipalities could strike deals with a new breed of entrepreneurs who understand that garbage equals dollars. The North American waste stream contains about $8 to $10 billion worth of valuables, said Wes Muir of Waste Management Canada, a private recycling and disposal company. A major challenge for municipalities is finding markets for recyclable materials. ”Recycling has been around for three decades, but the problem is that end markets have not been established for many materials,” said Muir. Thirty to 40 per cent of North American recycled materials are going to China, India and South America, where demand is growing. There is a booming market for aluminum cans — which fetch the highest price of all materials — as well as PET and HDPE plastics, Muir said. (See recycling marks graphic, far right) There’s a move in the municipal waste sector to find new ways of making money for towns and cities by encouraging companies to tap into the value of what society is throwing away. The more waste a municipality can sell, the less it has to spend of taxpayer dollars to manage garbage. Hopefully consumers would buy in as well, leading to higher recycling rates — relieving the pressure on landfills. Ottawa is positioning itself as a global leader in that regard, said Coun. Maria McRae, the chair of the city’s environment committee. The city is preparing to sign a contract with Plasco Energy Group pending council approval on Dec. 14. The deal, which will require the city to ship 300,000 tonnes of garbage to the Trail-Road plant for 20 years, will see Ottawa become home to the first such facility in the world that uses plasma gasification to turn trash into electricity. “It’s a solution to a very bad problem globally, but it also represents extra revenue, and, I think, bragging rights,” McRae said. “It would be great for Ottawa to say, ‘This is a made-in-Ottawa solution.’” The locally-owned company and the city have been working together since 2005, and Plasco is currently oper-

1 PET (or PETE) Used for soda, water, and some beer and liquor bottles, containers for mouthwash, medicine, drugs, peanut butter, vegetable oils. Recycled into fiberfill for clothing, rope, car bumpers, tennis ball felt, carpets, boat sails, shopping bags and furniture.

2 HDPE (high-density polyethylene) The opaque plastic used for toys, milk jugs, juice bottles, bleach, detergent and shampoo bottles, butter and yogurt tubs. More stable than PET and safer from hormone-like chemicals, it can be recycled into plastic lumber and Tyvek mailing envelopes.

3 PVC (polyvinyl chloride) The least recyclable plastic, releasing dioxin in manufacture and as it ages. It is used in plumbing, shower curtains, wire jackets, siding, windows, dashboards, outdoor furniture, and jungle gyms. PVC items are generally one-use, becoming trash when discarded.

4 LDPE (low-density polyethylene) Used for wrapping films, dry-cleaning, sandwich and tote bags as well as condiment squeeze bottles, clothing, furniture, and carpets. Recycling uses more energy than producing plastics from new materials so most LDPE ends up in landfills.

5 PP (polypropylene) Does not contain Bisphenol A. It is used in yogurt and margarine tubs, condiment squeeze bottles, bottle caps, drinking straws, medicine bottles, Tupperware, and new BPA-free baby bottles. It can be recycled into relatively few products and few recyclers accept it.

6 PS (polystyrene/styrofoam) Made into take-out food containers, coffee cups, egg cartons, disposable plates, cups, meat trays and insulation. Readily leaches toxins into foods when heated even moderately. Styofoam is an environmental hazard that can kill animals and birds who eat it.

7 Other This category is a “catch-all” that includes non-numbered plastics. Packaging material in this category is now being collected by the City of Ottawa.

SOURCES: DAVID SUZUKI FOUNDATION, AMERICAN CHEMISTRY COUNCIL Donald Campbell, Dean Tweed // THE HAMILTON SPECTATOR

ating as a demonstration facility that can process up to 88 tonnes of trash each day. If Plasco and the city strike a deal and if Plasco gets the proper approvals from the Ministry of the Environment, it could be the first commercial plasma gasification facility in the world. It’s also a safer alternative to incinerating waste, which is done elsewhere, including in the southern Ontario region of Durham, McRae said. Only about one per cent of waste in Ontario is incinerated now. The only residential incinerator is the Algonquin Power Energy From Waste Facility in Brampton. The plant burns about 500 tonnes of mostly residential waste and generates 9 megawatts of continuous energy -- enough to power 5,000 to 6,000 homes. Advocates say incineration is an acceptable solution because it generates energy from material that would otherwise be landfilled. Critics say incinerators cause air pollution and that the most energy efficient materials to burn — such as paper and plastic — are also highly

recyclable. “I am not saying (incineration) is a good idea, but it’s maybe something you will see more of,” added Philip Byer, a University of Toronto professor whose specialty is municipal waste management. Other companies are taking regular household consumer waste and flipping it. Terracycle, founded in 2001 by Princeton University freshman Tom Szaky, produces more than 1,500 products ranging from duffel bags made out of old Kool-Aid and Del Monte drink pouches to park benches and tables made from plastic containers. But these industries are in their infancy and municipalities need solutions now. Incineration may be a route more communities are willing to take, said Byer. Over in the U.S., Texas-based Terrabon is developing technology that converts organic materials and commercial food wastes into organic salts, which is then made into a high-octane gasoline. They are using what’s in our green bins. “In a world of diminishing landfill space it’s important to find sustainable alternatives in dealing with waste,” said Malcolm McNeill, the chief financial officer. The technology exists only on a demonstration scale, but when commercially ready has the potential to process 800 tonnes of wet waste a day — the type of system that could some day pay to get Ontario’s organic waste. The push to view waste as a resource — instead of as a problem — has also seen companies convert trash into new products, a model known as up-cycling. Toronto-based Therma Green Innovative Foam Technologies uses a byproduct of the manufacturer E.F. Walter Inc. to develop products such as holding ponds for irrigation, synthetic turf, landfill covers and liners as well as green roofs. They are made in part from the high-density polyethylene foam waste generated by E.F. Walter for a range of industrial products. Therma Green is an example of how waste that’s currently being landfilled could be profitably reused. SOLUTIONS Experts say one of the most important solutions to today’s landfill problems is to force manufacturers to create more reusable products, an approach known as extended producer responsibility (EPR). “EPR is effectively making what goes into the waste stream the problem of the people who put the products into the market in the first place,” said York University environmental studies professor Mark Winfield. This is done by forcing manufacturers to redesign products so they can be reused or requiring manufacturers and businesses to pay a government imposed fee on hard-to-recycle products. Winfield said Ontario could legislate EPR policies similar to the European Union, which forced producers to make cars and packaging easier to take apart in pieces that can be reused. But there is no move toward that kind of policy in Ontario at the moment. Just before the recent provincial election, the Ontario Zero Waste Coalition sent 10 recommendations for Ontario’s waste management future to each candidate. The group’s top priority was to see politicians develop a coherent reduction strategy. “Diversion is nice, but the first thing everyone likes to forget is reduction,” said coalition founder Liz Benneian. She said the government is “leery” about even mentioning reduction because of the potential consumer backlash, but added environmental entrepreneurialism could be a boon to the Ontario economy. “Everyone needs to be honest about the situation,” she said. “We are not going to get anywhere with this problem unless we start looking seriously at reduction.” That message will also be part of Ottawa’s 30-year waste master plan, which is currently in the formative stages. “We used to talk about ‘reduce, reuse, recycle,’” McRae said. “We have gotten into a situation as consumers where we have stopped thinking about the first two ‘R’s as more important than the last ‘R.’”

December 8, 2011 - OTTAWA THIS WEEK - WEST

Seeing waste in a different light


EDITORIAL

Occupiers shifted discourse

W

hat, exactly, did the Occupy Movement accomplish? We saw thousands of people across North America and around the world spend weeks camped out in parks. For what, exactly? A lot. To begin with, Occupy brought together people from disparate groups with a common cause. One, to fight for social and economic equality, and two, to speak over the heads of the politicians, who regardless of their party have often disappointed the 99 per cent by siding with the one per cent. They took the protest to those who hold genuine power and influence in our democracy: the ultra-rich and their corporations. It’s a powerful phrase: “We are the 99 per cent.” It says everything to those willing to hear, and nothing to those who refuse to listen. To sympathizers on the left it means social justice; to the moderate right it means the restoration of capitalism by the dismantling of monopolies and oligarchies. Occupy has made it impossible to ignore growing inequalities and related social injustices. The subject is now discussed with some depth in work-

places, universities and, yes, even newspapers. Even the business-friendly Conference Board of Canada is heeding the warning, pointing out income inequality has risen more in Canada than in the U.S. since the mid-1990s and awarding Canada a C grade for its equality of income. The inequality gap was huge by the end of the 19th century, which helped spur the rise of communism. Today, the moderate right understands that by allowing middle class incomes to stagnate over the past 30 years, the consumer spending that drives the economy was bound to fizzle. Keep squeezing the middle class and we’ll see more than simple verbal demands for wealth distribution. Setting aside these types of discussions that took place regularly at Occupy protests, critics pretended to be baffled by the apparent lack of a central message. Yet they were fully aware that should some such catch-phrase as “down with capitalism” take hold, it would be ease to vilify. But the occupiers never fell for it. They insisted everyone had a unique and legitimate beef to pick with the one per cent. And by doing so they prolonged the discourse. That there is now a chance to restore balance is an accomplishment the Occupy Movement can be proud of.

COLUMN

Why paying for hospital parking is good for you

A

mong the many arguments presented so far in the Great Hospital Parking debate is this one: If hospital parking were free, everyone would use it – doctors, nurses, volunteers, friends of people in the neighbourhood and people stashing their cars before catching the bus downtown. This would mean no parking left for patients and people visiting them. If you turn the argument on its head, it means this: The only way to ensure that there is parking for hospital patients and visitors is to charge for it. We have developed an extremely advanced and sophisticated society if we can come up with theories like this. In fact, it is a sure sign that we have moved well past Nineteen Eighty-Four, our slogan now being not “Freedom is Slavery” but “Free Parking is No Parking.” A further 1984ish argument has also been published: namely that making parking free would encourage more people to drive, thus causing damage to the environment. “Paying for Parking Means Cleaner Air,” the slogan could read. All of this comes about because the Canadian Medical Association Journal printed an editorial advocating the elimination of hospital parking fees,

CHARLES GORDON Funny Town on the grounds that they constituted a barrier to health care, a hidden user fee and, therefore, a possible violation of the Canada Health Act. Predictably, everyone has reacted because nothing gets Canadians more riled up than parking, with the possible exception of snow removal. And perhaps cable TV costs. Horror stories abound, and you will have lived through some of them, particularly if a loved one has spent an extended time in hospital and you visited frequently. Doctors quoted by the Journal tell of patients who are more focused on parking fees than on what the doctor is telling them, or who even rush off before a full consultation because they don’t want to pay another hour’s worth of parking fees. The hospitals say that they need the

revenue. It is a tidy sum, although a small fraction of their overall costs. That it is necessary is the result of the province not giving them enough money. The provinces, meanwhile, won’t give hospitals the money because the feds won’t give the provinces enough money. So, to reduce that to terms we can all understand, we are paying $13 for parking because the provincial and federal governments want to balance their budgets. Not that they are having any success with that. The conclusion to be drawn is that if we want hospitals to give us free parking we will have to help them find ways to raise more money. But how? They’re already selling handicrafts in the lobby, renting out space to donut shops, putting donors’ names on stuff, running galas and who knows what else. Perhaps they could sell chocolate bars. Perhaps they already do. It is probably out of the question to bring back pay toilets. The irony of it all is that many of the complaints about paying for hospital parking spaces would disappear if it were actually possible to find them. True, at some hospitals, such as the Riverside, parking seems ample, but at others, such as the Civic, parking is literally and figu-

80 Colonnade Rd. N., Ottawa, Unit #4, ON K2E 7L2 T: 613-224-3330 • F: 613-224-2265 • www.yourottawaregion.com Editor in Chief Deb Bodine deb.bodine@metroland.com • 613-221-6210

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Editorial Policy Ottawa This Week welcomes letters to the editor. Senders must include their full name, complete address and a contact phone number. Addresses and phone numbers will not be published. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and content, both in print and online at www.yourottawaregion.com. To submit a letter to the editor, please email to patricia. lonergan@metroland.com , fax to 613-224-2265 or mail to Ottawa This Week, 80 Colonnade Rd. N., Unit 4, Ottawa, ON, K2E 7L2.

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ratively at a premium. If you could find a spot, and fairly close, you probably wouldn’t mind as much paying for it. There are places you pay to park and places you don’t and there is not much sense in it. As some have pointed out, you don’t pay to park at the church or synagogue. Or the shopping centre – yet. On the other hand, they charge you to park at the airport and the train station. Why do they do that? Answer: Because they can. The hospital is in the same position. Going there isn’t optional. You go there because you have to and you pay whatever. Don’t forget that it helps the environment.

Classified Advertising Danny Boisclair danny.boisclair@metroland.com • 613-221-6225

Distribution: 28,234 Homes Weekly Advertising Deadline Monday 10 am Classified Deadline Monday 10 am Editorial & Community Calendar Deadline Friday 5 pm

Publisher’s Liability: The advertiser agrees that the publisher shall not be liable for any damages whatsoever arising from errors in advertisements beyond actual amount paid for space used by the part of the advertisement containing the error. The publisher shall not be liable for non-insertion of any advertisement. the publisher will not knowingly publish any advertisement which is illegal, misleading or offensive. The contents of this newspaper are protected by copyright and may be used only for your personal non-commercial purposes. All other rights are reserved and commercial use is prohibited. Permission to republish any material must be sought from the relevant copyright owner.

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OTTAWA THIS WEEK - WEST - December 8, 2011

8


OPINION THIS WEEK’S POLL QUESTION Are the actions being taken at the provincial level enough to solve the problem of bullying in schools?

A) Yes. Both the Liberals and Progressive Conservatives are on the right track towards putting an end to bullying.

B) It will help, but it will still take years for the message of tolerance to fully seep into our education system.

C) I’m worried the minority government situation at Queen’s Park will water down any useful legislation.

D) Bullying has always been a problem and I doubt it will ever go away, regardless of what politicians do.

LAST WEEK’S POLL SUMMARY With the holiday season approaching, how do you look to give back to your community?

A) I always look to give the gift of a meal by

0%

volunteering to serve supper or donating to the food bank.

14%

B) I try to put a smile on a child’s face by purchasing a gift for a toy drive.

C) Every year I make a special donation to a

21%

particular charitable organization.

D) Times are tough for me, too, so I won’t be able to give back this year.

65%

To participate in our web polls, review answers, and read more articles, visit us online at www.yourottawaregion.com

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MUGS

M

ost parents want to see their children succeed. But as a parent, I’m never more proud than when my kids fail and blame themselves for it. This is due to a very simple folly of human nature that has been proven time and again in psychology, and transported to many academic disciplines: Individuals have a tendency to attribute success to themselves and blame failure on others (or on external forces). Forcing children to become problem solvers is one half of the solution to overcoming this folly. The other is to let them fail and to talk about that failure in a way that’s not self-defeating, but one that demonstrates failure as a learning experience. This is not an easy task in my house. If a Christmas card is “not working”, my eldest son has been known to blame the paper, run out of the room in tears, and shout about paper and how it’s all “horrible!” If he can’t get the string tied around his teddy’s neck, my younger son has been reputed to break down in a heap on the floor, kick his legs like a toddler, curse the shredded string and wonder who, in their right mind, would

BRYNNA LESLIE Capital Muse have given him that type of string to make a collar in the first place. As outside forces go, even inanimate objects don’t have a chance in our house. But there’s one area of their lives where I find failure occurs frequently, and problem-solving more so: During music practice. As they practice the piano each week, the boys have to figure out patterns in music, and how to read notes on a scale. It’s uber-frustrating, especially at the beginning of the week. As the coach, it’s my job to keep them on the bench – the piano bench, that is – for a minimum of 10 minutes each day, or however long it takes them to get through their weekly list of songs. Music is meant to be fun, so their books tell me. We have to keep everything positive and light during practice time. But that is easier said than done. Still, with a bit of routine, a

strong cup of orange pekoe for mom, and an after school snack for the boys before they begin each day, I see them reaping the rewards of this practice. It’s not just that they’re becoming maestros. (That remains to be seen.) It’s that each week I see the development from failure and blaming – “the piano’s not tuned,” “you didn’t give me enough to eat first,” or “the book isn’t straight” – through persistent problem-solving that eventually leads to success and self-confidence. At the end of the week, if they attribute the success to themselves, well, they deserve it, because they have worked hard to figure out each note, each rhythm, and each bar on their own. But perhaps more importantly, as time goes on, I can see that they’re becoming more likely to attribute their early week “failures” to their own lack of experience. In other words, they blame themselves for their mistakes. And even if their success has nothing to do with me, I couldn’t be more proud.

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Teaching kids to fail

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Community

OTTAWA THIS WEEK - WEST - December 8, 2011

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Standing up for current, former foster kids KRISTY WALLACE kristy.wallace@metroland.com

When John Dunn was only 18 months old, he was taken away from his mother who had attempted suicide. He and his siblings were split up, and Dunn was put into the foster care system. The first home he lived in until he was five years old was pretty good. But in later homes, he faced years of abuse from his foster parents. Fast forward to 2002 and Dunn was 32 years old. He found himself suffering post-

traumatic stress disorder and emotional issues. He lived an unstable life, and by age 32, he had held about 60 jobs and had moved around more than 40 times. He was looking for some sense of stability, so he got help from a mental health professional and asked the Catholic Children’s Aid Society of Toronto to send him copies of his personal records from his time in the system, but to this day, he still doesn’t have those records. That’s why the west-end resident started the Foster Care Council of Canada, a group that helps former foster children

ING ARE HELP E W R A E THIS Y RE S OUT THE A T N A S E ALL TH

Y! E N O M E V SA UR

YO BRING IN LL ARS & O D T D A T KUNS

find their own personal records and promote foster care system awareness campaigns. “We’re focused on issues that need to be fixed,” said Dunn. “We’re trying to look at things we know of that are in need of repair or need work.” Since the organization started about 10 years ago, Dunn said he and members have tried to make several changes at the provincial level to help former and current foster children. Also, he said the group has helped create guidance books and manuals for foster kids who might feel like they’re in an unsafe situation. In addition, he said the group helps provide support to current and former foster children who want to file complaints and make criminal injury compensation claims resulting from their time in foster care. Dunn knows this abuse first hand, which he describes in a documentary he made back in 2002. Living at a foster home in Trout Creek Ontario, near North Bay, until he was nine years old, he remembers the abuse he suffered at the hands of the home’s father figure.

He was a bed wetter, and as punishment his foster father would make him sit on the surface of the family’s wood burning stove when he had an accident. One night, his foster father opened the door of the stove and pushed Dunn head-first into the burning coals, until he begged and screamed that he wouldn’t do it again. Dunn also witnessed his biological brother, who was also living in the house, being abused. While he remembers the bad stories and wants to help former foster kids who were in similar situations, he also fondly remembers the first foster home he lived in. “There’s definitely good stories out there too,” Dunn acknowledged. “We’re not an anti-Children’s Aid group. But we try and look at things that we know need repair.” Today, the west-end resident is executive director of the Foster Care Council of Canada and he has kept in touch with his siblings. “ It’s a great family relationship, and we get along amazingly,” Dunn said. “Emotionally now I feel fine, but it’s taken a lot of work.”

! G I B E V SA

N O I T A I C E R P P A R E M O T S U C www.kunstadt.com

Valid until January 31, 2012

Valid until January 31, 2012

Photo submitted Valid until May 1, 2011

John Dunn is a former foster child and is executive director of an organization that advocates for current and former participants in the children’s aid system.

Rideau water levels still critically low OTTAWA THIS WEEK STAFF Valid until January 31, 2012

Valid until January 31, 2012

Valid until May 1, 2011

Valid until May 1, 2011

GLEBE 680 Bank Street 613-233-4820 KANATA 462 Hazeldean Road 613-831-2059 OTTAWA SOUTH 1583 Bank Street 613-260-0696 R0011206710

The Rideau Valley Conservation Authority has said the Rideau River still has critically low water levels, despite the rain and snow that fell over the past week. The conservation authority declared the river to be a Level One Low Water Condition on Sept. 27. In the past three months rainfall has been 80 per cent less than normal. Although 42 millimetres fell in the last week of November alone, that was almost all that fell through the month, according to an RVCA release. Furthermore, in October, nearly three weeks passed with barely any rainfall at all. The low water levels could be harmful for aquatic animals to find sites to hibernate during the winter. If water levels sink too low, animals like frogs risk being

frozen in the mud. The authority said that last week’s rain will hopefully make it somewhat easier for aquatic creatures to find suitable hibernation sites, although the forecasted rainfall will still not be enough to bring the watershed out of its Level One status. “To get out of the Level I Low Water Condition, a generalized rainfall of 20 millimeters over the entire watershed is needed,” the release said. Authority staff will continue to monitor conditions and report new information as it becomes available. Any individuals or business in the Rideau Watershed who may be experiencing unusual problems or hardships due to low water are encouraged to contact the Conservation Authority by calling 613-692-3571 or 1-800-267-3504, ext. 1128 or 1132.


Arts and Culture

11 December 8, 2011 - OTTAWA THIS WEEK - WEST

Bluesfest announces 2012 dates, new title sponsor EDDIE RWEMA eddie.rwema@metroland.com

Bluesfest will run from July 4 to 15 next year at Lebreton Flats and will have a new title sponsor for 2012, according to festival officials. The festival will be called the RBC Royal Bank Ottawa Bluesfest, after it was announced the bank would be taking over from Cisco Systems as the popular event’s title sponsor. Mark Monahan, Bluesfest’s executive director, said the new partnership means the festival will continue to operate as one of the biggest festivals in North American. “This will advance the festival to a new level,” said Monahan. “It will allow us to have the resources to bring in bigger names, continue to have great quality acts and ensure the future of the event in the next five years.” Cisco, which has been a sponsor since 2001, will remain with

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the festival in a smaller capacity, looking after its technological needs. “Cisco is now going to focus on a lot of the technological side of the festival,” said Monahan. While he declined to discuss the financial details of the deal, Monahan said it is the most significant title sponsorship deal they have done in the history of the festival. According to Bluesfest officials, the lineup for the 2012 edition of the event will be revealed on April 24.

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Arts and Culture

13 December 8, 2011 - OTTAWA THIS WEEK - WEST

Making perfect match between dating, painting KRISTY WALLACE kristy.wallace@metroland.com

Chipo Shambare is combining her skills as a dating coach with her friend Elaine Comeau’s artistic talents to bring singles together and help them discover how they react to dating. On Dec. 9, the pair will be hosting a dating and painting workshop for singles at Comeau’s Wild Pigments Art Studio. “We met two years ago, and we wanted to do something together, but we didn’t know what,” said Shambare, who also works as an intuitive healer, public speaker and workshop facilitator on top of being a dating coach. Over the summer, she and Comeau started talking seriously about how to combine their passions and skills, and the workshop was born. “I think it’s brilliant,” said Comeau. “It’s a fun and interesting way to meet people, but it also gives you insight into how you look at relationships.” As part of the workshop, Comeau will give participants

three to four abstract painting exercises. Since it’s a social atmosphere, participants will be communicating with each other and Shambare will be paying attention to what the participants’ reactions are to each other.

‘It’s a fun and interesting way to meet people, but it also gives you insight into how you look at relationships.’ Elaine Comeau “It’s about being conscious of when you meet somebody, and what goes on inside of you,” said Shambare. “When you meet ... there’s an alternative conversation going on inside of you. It’s about self discovery, and how you react when you meet someone.”

Dating is very much like art, said Shambare: when you meet someone, you’re painting a picture of them in your mind. It’s also an education, she said. “I want people to be more conscious, and have a plan,” she said. “It’s like when you look for a job – you don’t just walk in and give them your resume. We plan, we go to school ... this is what you want, and you have it planned.” Comeau said it was important for the workshop to have painting exercises that are more abstract so nobody feels self-conscious if they don’t have painting skills. “What I want is for people not to feel intimidated,” she said. “We’re throwing paint on canvass on purpose. We’re also going to be rotating around the room, so everybody will be able to talk and communicate with each other.” In the future, the pair would also like to have these workshops for married couples or those in relationships. Shambare said it would be interesting to look at how couples

Photo by Kristy Wallace

At left Chipo Shambare, a relationship coach and Elaine Comeau, owner and instructor at Wild Pigments Art Studio, are teaming up for a dating and painting workshop designed for singles. we have one woman signed up,” said Comeau. The workshop will take place at 174 Colonnade Rd. in the art studio at unit 32 on the upper floor of the building. It will go from 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. For more information on the Wild Pigments Art Studio or to contact Comeau, visit the website at www.wildpigments.com . For more information on Shambare or to contact her for more details, visit her website at chiposhambare.com .

react if they see their partner talking to another man or woman, or if one of the partners might feel guilty talking to another person. “You’re discovering yourself and clearing that up,” Shambare said. “It’s about facing what’s going on inside yourself.” Comeau said she has about 10 spots in the Dec. 9 workshop, and the majority of people who signed up so far are men. “I would’ve thought it was the other way around, but right now

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Arts and Culture

KRISTY WALLACE kristy.wallace@metroland.com

If you’re looking for a 2012 calendar, would like the chance to win cash prizes each day of the year while giving back to the community, Alan Bowles thinks the Rotary Club of West Ottawa has a deal for you. Now in its eighth year, the Rotary Club’s cash calendar offers the chance to win prizes while supporting the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre. The club has pledged $75,000 over three years towards the construction of a new facility in Carp, and $25,000 of that will come from the 2012 calendar. “Youth are the future, and we like to help youth whenever we can,” said Bowles, who’s past president of the club. The calendar is now on sale, he said, and is supported by 70 businesses that have bought sponsorships-of-the-month. Photographs of Ottawa feature in each month of the calendar and were donated by area photographers. People purchasing the calendar have the chance to win a share of $20,000 in cash prizes, with 5,000 calendars produced every year. Bowles said the Rotary Club of West Ottawa wanted to help the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre this year because the organization helps reduce youth crime on the streets of Ottawa. “We want to get them off the street, and it’s the best way of preventing crime,” Bowles said.

Family pitches in to make Suzart’s Hairspray a hit KRISTY WALLACE kristy.wallace@metroland.com

Photo by Kristy Wallace

Alan Bowles, left, past president, Linda Flynn, immediate past president and Graeme Fraser, president, show off the Rotary Club of West Ottawa’s 2012 cash calendar that will see money go towards a variety of charities including the Dave Smith Youth Treatment Centre. In the past, he said money has also gone to the Rotary Centennial Playground for Children of All Abilities in Brewer Park across from Carleton University, which received $75,000 in total. The chief beneficiaries of the cash calendar are based on need, Bowles said. However, other organizations across Ottawa also benefit too and none of the money raised goes to the Rotary Club or its administrative costs. Calendars can be purchased for $20 by contacting a member of the Rotary Club or visit the Rotary Club of West Ottawa’s website at www.rcwo.org for more information.

Marion Parry has worked on a wide range of production costumes – from orphan’s rags for Oliver Twist to oompa loompa and giant blueberry costumes for Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. Now, the Nepean mother is working on costume designs for Suzart Productions’ upcoming performance of Hairspray, which will be performed at St. Paul High School on Dec. 9, 10 and 11. “Starting tonight, it’s going to be a sewing blitz,” said Parry about a week before the production. “With 198 glorious costumes, it’s going to be a huge, huge endeavour.” Parry is on a team of about six other women who will be cutting, designing and sewing the production’s costumes. She slowly became involved in Suzart Productions when her daughter joined the non-profit musical theatre company about five years ago. “I wanted to encourage her and make sure she fulfilled her volunteer hours,” said Parry. “I sort of gradually have been seduced into it.” Sylvain Quilliam, her husband, is also involved in the set’s design and this production will be the third time he’s acted as master carpenter for a Suzart produc-

tion. “Each set is different and will bring their own challenges,” he said. “For Hairspray, a team of volunteers will have put in some 200 hours in putting the set together ... generally speaking it will take some 10 hours to assemble the set and get it ready for the show.” As part of the production, Quilliam said he built a giant hairspray can that is 3.6 metres tall, about a metre in diameter and produces fog. “For Hairspray the challenge was twofold: First, was the sheer number of pieces that needed to be built, and the second was the hairspray can,” he said. “A lot of thought and time went into building that piece.” Parry said Suzart’s production of Hairspray will be “incredible,” and audiences will be impressed by the actors’ talents. “It’s an economical way to be entertained,” said Parry, adding that working on the set has an extra benefit. “Families get strengthened by doing this together. We run like crazy in December, but it’s worth the family time.” Hairspray will run at St. Paul High School on Dec. 9 at 7 p.m., Dec. 10 at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m., and Dec. 11 at 2 p.m. Tickets can be purchased by calling the box office at 613-828-3500, or by visiting the website at www.suzart.ca .

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LAURA MUELLER Laura.mueller@metroland.com

Photo by Kristy Wallace

Hintonburg artist Patrick John Mills will be holding his annual Art of Giving exhibit where artists will display their work at his gallery, but also donate work to Bruce House. The art above was done by participating artist Adam Davidson.

Hintonburg’s Patrick John Mills gallery making a gift of art this holiday season KRISTY WALLACE kristy.wallace@metroland.com

With the holiday season is upon us, December is a time many residents look to open their hearts and wallets, making monetary donations to the charity of their choice. But donating works of art means more to Patrick John Mills, a Hintonburg-area artist who is owner of the Patrick John Mills Contemporary Fine Art Gallery. That’s why throughout the month of December, he is holding the Art of Giving exhibition – where participating artists will show their work to the public, and give away a piece of work to a local home for people living with HIV and AIDS. “This is for charities that really never have funding, but would really benefit tremendously from having art on their walls,” said Mills, who thought of the idea about four years ago.

This year, a work displayed by participating artists in the Art of Giving exhibit will go to Bruce House - which providing housing and support for people living with HIV and AIDS in Ottawa. Previously Mills said he has given to the Salvation Army’s Grace Manor on Wellington Street West, Rideauwood Addiction and Family Services, and the Bronson Centre which houses the Elizabeth Fry Society’s J.F. Norwood House, a transitional housing centre offering supportive living for women and families. “The art has created a positive atmosphere and vibe, and (employee morale has) been tremendously increased,” said Mills. “It’s like a facelift. It’s great for the staff, and way of telling (clients) that we care. It’s also a way of letting staff and clients feel nurtured, and it makes them feel like they’re in a better place.”

Mills also said the work is matched with the charities, so those using the organization can relate more to the artwork. “I try and match it so they’ll relate to the raw nature of what’s being shown,” he said, adding that more “vulnerable” art work is appropriate for some of the organizations. It’s important for him to donate art to organizations that normally don’t get as much attention or funding, he said. “I kind of select the places that are never going to have money set aside to put art on the walls,” Mills said. “The last thing they’ll have money for is art.” Donating art every December is also a great way to get art more into the community, he said. For more information on the Art of Giving exhibit or the Patrick John Mills gallery, visit the website at www.patrickjohnmills.com/ .

The city’s proposed deal with Plasco would give Ottawa control over how much garbage it delivers to the facility to turn into electricity, and it wouldn’t require the city to invest in building the plant. Councillors, including environment committee chairwoman Maria McRae, applauded the draft deal released on Friday, Dec. 2. It would see Ottawa-based Plasco Energy Group build the world’s first plasma gasification facility in Ottawa, near the Trail Road landfill site. “It’s great to see us back here today with this potential breakthrough for waste in Ottawa,” McRae said. The deal will be debated by the environment committee on Dec. 12 and by council just two days later. It would see the city agree to supply the facility with 300 tonnes of leftover garbage each day for 20 years. The facility could be up and running as soon as June of 2013, which would make it the first of its kind in the world. The terms of the agreement state it would have to be operational by June of 2016 at the latest. The city wouldn’t be on the hook for the capital investment of constructing the facility. The money would start to flow when Plasco’s operations get underway, and it would cost the city around $9.1 million a year to send waste to Plasco. That means the tipping fee is $83.20 per tonne of garbage, compared to the $105 Durham Region will spend to send a tonne of garbage to its new incinerator. It costs the city around $4.7 million net to operate the Trail Road landfill each year, but without reducing the amount of garbage Ottawa residents produce, that landfill will be full by 2035. Diverting trash through more recycling could add seven more years to the landfill’s life, but Plasco could add an additional 28 years, making the landfill useable until 2070, said Dixon Weir, the city’s manager of environmental services. Plasco stands to generate 1.4 megawatt hours of electricity per tonne of garbage. The city stands to earn revenue from the project, too, if all goes well. If Plasco makes more than $34.1 million, the city receives the first $822,000 of that. If the company makes more than $37.4 million, the city receives 25 per

Photo by Laura Mueller

Plasco CEO Rod Bryden addressed city councillors and the media during a Dec. 2 briefing on the company’s proposed deal with the city. cent of those additional revenues. Because the city has partnered in the development of the technology since 2005, it will also receive a $5 “marketing fee” for every tonne processed at any other Plasco plant constructed in North America, up to a maximum of $3 million per year and a total of $18 million over the life of the contract. The contract is the best deal the city could negotiate, according to city manager Kent Kirkpatrick. “My opinion is that this contract has benefits in it for the City of Ottawa that other municipalities that follow won’t have, quite frankly,” he said. After the plant is up and running, there would be a “rampup” period of three years, during which Plasco could reduce the amount of trash it takes from Ottawa. While Plasco only has one chance to do that, the draft contract would allow the city to change the amount it must deliver to Plasco 15 times over the 20-year contract. The plant will take all of Ottawa’s leftover residential garbage, and it doesn’t have to be sorted or contain certain percentages of different types of waste. Plasco recently received a certificate of approval for its process from the provincial ministry of the environment. A more detailed report will be released on Dec. 5, with a lengthy presentation to follow at the Dec. 12 environment committee meeting. Plasco CEO Rod Bryden said it is unlikely the company would choose to keep its headquarters in Ottawa if the city rejected the deal.

December 8, 2011 - OTTAWA THIS WEEK - WEST

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STEEL BUILDINGS END OF SEASON DEALS! Overstock must go - make an offer! FREE DELIVERY to most areas. CALL TO CHECK INVENTORY and FREE BROCHURE 1-800-668-5111 ext. 170.

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MOTOR VEHICLE dealers in Ontario MUST be registered with OMVIC. To verify dealer registration or seek help with a complaint, visit www.omvic.on.ca or 1-800-943-6002. If you’re buying a vehicle privately, don’t become a curbsider’s victim. Curbsiders are impostors who pose as private individuals, but are actually in the business of selling stolen or damaged vehicles.

HOUSES FOR SALE

1029 HUMPHRIES RD, RENFREW

GET PAID TO LOSE WEIGHT. $5,000 For Your Success Story. Personal Image TV Show. Call to Qualify: 416-730-5684 ext. 2243. Joanna@mertontv.ca. www.mertontv.ca.

BIG BUILDING SALE... “CLEARANCE SALE YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS!” 20X26 $4995. 25X34 $6460. 30X44 $9640. 40X70 $17,945. 47X90 $22,600. One end included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca. A-Z Technical Bldg. Systems Inc.: Pre-Engineered Steel Buildings. Since 1978! Stamp drawings & leasing available. Ask for Wally: Toll-Free at 1-877-743-5888, Fax (416) 626-5512. www.a-ztech.on.ca.

DOG SITTING. Experienced retired breeder providing lots of TLC. My home. Smaller dogs only. References available. $17-$20 daily. M a r g 613-721-1530. Quality Australian Shepherd Puppies. CKC Reg, Vet checked/Vacc and Guarantee. Home raised, parents on site. 613-826-0494

NEW P R IC E

A MUST SEE HOME!! Move in today, go fishing tomorrow. This home offers you the opportunity to move in and live now. 2 Km to the Ottawa River boat launch. Absolutely maintenance free for the next 20 years. Poured and insulated concrete finished basement with rec room, wet bar, cold storage, office and mud room entrance from oversized 2 car garage. Main floor boasts hardwood and ceramic floors with main floor laundry and green material custom kitchen, not to mention the large pantry for all your storage needs. Interlocking walkway and perennial gardens out front can be enjoyed from the front porch swing, or sit on the maintenance free composite deck out back and watch the turkeys and deer play in the huge back yard. Bring the kids, this home has 3 large bedrooms on main floor, 2 of which boast custom, built-in desks. Plug in the generator if the hydro goes out, or surf the high speed internet when you’re bored. Who Could Ask for more!! Call 613-432-3714 to view

Looking for Love in All the Wrong Places? Find your answer in the Classifieds in print & online!

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KANATA DRYWALL & RENOVATIONS TAPING & REPAIRS. Framing, painting, electrical, full custom basement renovations. Installation & stippled ceiling repairs. 25 years experience. Workmanship guaranteed. Chris,613-839-5571 or 613-724-7376

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Typical Duties: Communications systems planning for WAN, LAN, Telephony, Internet/Intranet and wireless. Hardware/Software specification, acquisition and implementation for Canadian and International offices. Administration of WAN/LAN/VPN/Wireless, Backups, Servers, Desktops, Laptops, Printers, PBX phone system, voice mail, cellphone and conferencing systems.

Must have skills or work experience in the following areas: Windows 2000/2003/2008 Active Directory, DNS, DHCP, TCP/IP, Remote Desktop Services, Citrix. Implementatin of Group Policy, Application Program Deployment, Data Backups, Disaster Recovery. Troubleshooting of HP, DELL desktops, laptops, servers and network security.

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OTTAWA THIS WEEK - WEST - December 8, 2011

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CARPENTRY, REPAIRS, Rec Rooms, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates, 25 years experience. SAWMILLS from only 613-832-2540 $3997 - MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill CERTIFIED MASON - Cut lumber any dimen- 10yrs exp., Chimney sion. In stock ready to Repair & Restoration, ship. FREE Info & DVD: cultured stone, parging, www.Nor woodSaw - re pointing. Brick, block m i l l s . c o m / 4 0 0 O T & stone. Small/big job 1 - 8 0 0 - 5 6 6 - 6 8 9 9 specialist. Free estimates. Work guaranExt:400OT. teed. 613-250-0290. ARTICLES 4 SALE

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Business & Service Directory


Events

OTTAWA THIS WEEK - WEST - December 8, 2011

22

Community Calendar We welcome your submissions of upcoming community, non-profit events. Please email events to OTWevents@metroland.com by 4:30 p.m. Friday.

St. Basil’s Church, Maitland, just north of the Queensway. Tickets are $10, children under 12 are free. For more information visit: bytownvoices.com or call 613-521-4997.

• DECEMBER 1 TO 31

• DECEMBER 16

The Canada Agriculture Museum team is taking on a big challenge. How big? As big as a horse! From December 1 to December 31, we want to gather 1,000 pounds (455 kg) in non-perishable food goods. This target was chosen as it happens to be the weight of Flint, the retired RCMP horse that the Museum adopted this past summer! Come by the museum to visit the animal barns with your donation and help us to be a heavy weight in this year’s food drive. The collected goods will be distributed to the Ottawa Food Bank and Moisson Outaouais. For more information visit: agriculture.technomuses.ca or call 613-991-3044.

The Ottawa-Carleton Choristers with musical guests from Canterbury High School present “My Heart Goes Home for Christmas.” Under the direction of Laurie Hamilton, Head of Music at Canterbury High School, the choristers will sing a blend of holiday music to warm your heart at 7:30 p.m. Dessert reception to follow. The event takes place at Woodroffe United Church, 201 Woodroffe Ave. Admission for adults is $10, children under 12 are free.

• DECEMBER 9 Bean & Spaghetti supper takes place from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., organized by the Knights of Columbus, Council 8585 at Saint-Sébastien Church hall, 1000 Frances St. (near Donald). For more information call 613-842-0910.

• DECEMBER 11 Bytown Voices present a collection of Spanish and Southwestern American carols and lullabies and seasonal favourites from around the world with Ken Simpson, marimba, Garry Elliott, guitar and Brenda Beckingham, Accompanist under the direction of Bob Jones. The event takes place at 3 p.m. at

ern and is co-sponsored by the Hintonburg Economic Development Committee (HEDC) and the many “Friends of the Carleton”. We are seeking donations of turkeys, ham and baked goods for the meal as well as new gifts for adults, especially for men, (ie: sweaters, warm socks, mitts, gloves, hats, gift certificates, bus tickets, telephone cards) as well as gifts for women, teens, children and pet food. Please leave gifts unwrapped but we appreciate gift bags. Gifts can be dropped at the Carleton Tavern the week before Christmas. Make this a Christmas for everyone to remember. For information or to donate contact: Cheryl or Vance at 613-728-7582 or carletonxmasdinner@hotmail.ca before Christmas and call 613-728-4424 on Christmas Day.

• DECEMBER 20 At 1:30 p.m., the Ottawa Orchid Society (OOS) is pleased to present André Couture of the OOS who will deliver a talk on the amazing Vandaceous plants, at the Tom Brown Arena, 141 Bayview at Scott. Visitors welcome. Admission is $5 at the door. For more information, contact ek345@ncf.ca or call 613-237-0494.

• DECEMBER 25 The Community of Hintonburg invites you to join them for a free Christmas meal at the Carleton Tavern, 223 Armstrong Street, (Armstrong at Parkdale right next to the Parkdale Market). The meal is from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Christmas Day. This 11th annual Christmas Day meal is generously sponsored by the Saikaley Family, owners of the Carleton Tav-

The Elvis Sighting Society proudly presents their 19th annual Christmas Day dinner. Be our guest for entertainment, food and followship on Christmas Day! Donations or baked goods, food and cash accepted with thanks, and can be dropped off any time at the Newport Restaurant. The dinner will take place at 334 Richmond Road from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. For more information visit: http:// www.elvissightingsociety.org

• ONGOING Looking for an inexpensive gift? Friends of the Farm offer the perfect solution - two informative and entertaining books for the naturalist or historian on your Christmas list. For the Love of Trees celebrates the heritage collection of trees in the Central Experimen-

tal Farm Arboretum. Ottawa’s Farm is about the men and women who lived and worked at the farm during its first hundred years. Both are available on site, by calling 613-2303276 or visit: www.friendsofthefarm.ca for more information. Winter Hours at the Canada Agriculture Museum go from December to February. Exhibitions are closed from December 1 to end of February. The Animal Barns are opened daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. except December 25. Admission by voluntary donation. For more information, visit: agriculture. technomuses.ca or call 613-991-3044. The Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre’s 25th annual Christmas tree sale kicks off Saturday, Dec. 3. Nova Scotia balsam firs will go on sale Saturday and the fundraiser continues until the trees are sold out. All profits are used to provide activities and experiences to the patients and families supported by The Royal. The activities have included the provision of food vouchers, additional funds to support recreational activities, crafts and outings which enhance the quality of life for our clients. Since it started in 1986, the Christmas tree sale has raised more than $270,000. The sale takes place at the Royal Ottawa Mental Health Centre, 1145 Carling Avenue, Monday to Friday: 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The sale will go to Friday, Dec. 24 or until the trees are sold out. Last year, thanks to tremendous community support, we sold out Dec. 18.

Johnston keeps Raider streak alive with player of the month honour OTTAWA THIS WEEK STAFF As their domination of the Central Canada Hockey League standings continues, defenceman Ryan Johnston made sure the Nepean Raiders continue to rule the monthly player awards as well. Johnston, in his second year in the league, picked up nine goals and 13 assists to lead the Raiders to an 8-1-2-1 record in November. Johnston also leads all league defencemen with 14 goals and 26 assists so far this season. Unlike the Raiders sweep at the October monthly awards, the goaltender and rookie of the month honours went to Patrick Martin of the Cumberland Grads and Alexandre Boivin of the Gloucester Rangers, respectively. In his first year with the Grads, Martin went 5-3 in November with a .912 save percentage. He currently leads the league with .920 save percentage. Boivin notched five goals and 11 assists for the Rangers. The centre also leads rookies in scoring so for this season with 11 goals and 16 assists.

JR. SENATORS TRADE WINGER TREVOR PACKARD TO PEMBROKE The Ottawa Jr. Senators traded winger Trevor Packard and their 2nd round pick in the 2012 CCHL draft to the Pembroke Lumber Kings in exchange for defenceman Derek Brown and centre Ryan Crosson on Dec. 2. Packard, acquired from the Smiths Falls Bears last season, played in 27 games for the Jr. Senators this season, accumulating nine goals and 11 assists. Ottawa also traded forward Jonathon Buttitta to Blind River of the Northern Ontario Junior Hockey League.

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PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Roadshow is coming to Ottawa For complete information see ad below TERRY INKLER Canadian Collectors Roadshow Staff Writer After very successful shows in Newmarket and Burlington, The Roadshow is coming to to Barrie. Ottawa.SoSoyou youhad hadbetter better search search through your attics and garages, go through your lock boxes and jewellery, because you may be sitting on a small fortune and not even know it! Roadshow experts are here to examine all your antiques, collectibles, gold and silver.

Local Roadshow Expert Examines Some Gold Jewellery

During a show near Toronto, a woman came in with a jewellery box that she had just inherited from her late aunt. “I don’t wear jewellery,” explained Barbara Engles, “so it was an easy decision to come down to the Roadshow to sell it”. She was very excited when she was able to walk away with a cheque for over $2,100 for jewellery she was never going to wear anyway. Expert Elijah Gold explains, “We have no-

ticed a substantial increase in the amount of precious metals such as gold and silver coming to the Roadshow, which makes sense considering how high it’s currently trading at. He added, “The Roadshow is great because it puts money in people’s pockets, especially during such hard times. Lots of items that are just sitting around collecting dust in basements and jewellery boxes can be exchanged for money, on the spot!” At another Roadshow event, a woman, named Mira Kovalchek, walked in with a tin full of hundreds of old coins that were given to her as a young child by her grand-

father. She finally decided to come in to the Roadshow and see what he had given her. She was ecstatic to learn she had coins dating back to the late 1800’s, some of which were extremely rare. Roadshow consultant Perry Bruce explains “We had uncovered an 1871 Queen Victoria 50 Cent piece, valued at over $2,000!! She had a

nice assortment of coins that were not rare dates, but she was able to sell them for their silver content”. She explains, “I never would have thought that my old tin

of coins was worth so much! I can finally afford to renovate my kitchen”. Perry Bruce continued, “Canadian coins prior to 1967, and American coins prior to 1964 are all made with silver, and we have noticed a large increase of customers coming to the Roadshow with coins and cashing them in for their silver value”. Experts at the Roadshow will evaluate and examine your items, FREE OF CHARGE, as well as educate you on them. The Roadshow sees hundreds of people during a one week event, and they have been travelling across Canada to different cities and towns, searching for your forgotten treasures. Trains, dolls, toys, old advertising signs, pocket watches, porcelain and bisque dolls, pretty much everything can be

sold at the Roadshow. Any early edition Barbie’s are sought after by the Roadshow collectors, as well as a variety of Dinky Toys and Matchbox cars. Lionel Trains and a variety of tin toys can also fetch a price, especially if they are in their original box or in mint condition. If a collector is looking for one of your collectibles, they can always make an offer to buy it. A man brought in a 1950’s Marx Tin Toy Robot, in fairly good condition, still in its original box. They were able to locate

a collector for that specific toy within minutes, and that gentleman went home with over $700 for his Toy Robot and a few other small toys. So whether you have an old toy car, a broken gold chain, or a Barbie sitting in the closet, bring it down to the Roadshow, they will take a look at it for FREE and it could put money in your pocket!

See you at the roadshow!

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HERE’S HOW IT WORKS • Gather all your collectibles and bring them in • FREE admission • NO appointment necessary • We will make offers on the spot if there is interest in the item • Accept the offer & get paid immediately • FREE coffee • Fully heated indoor facility

Gold Jewellery, Gold Coins, Silver Coins, Sterling Silver, Collectibles THE ITEMS WE MAKE AN OFFER ON MAY INCLUDE: • sets, charm bracelets, jewellery & anything marked Sterling or 925 • COINS: Any coins before 1967 (Silver Dollars, Half Dollars, Quarters, Dimes, Half Dimes, Nickels, Large Cents and all others) collectible foreign coins, rare coins & entire collections • GOLD COINS: All denominations from all parts

of the world including Gold Olympic coins • INVESTMENT GOLD: Canadian Maple Leaf, Double Eagle, Gold Bars, Kruggerands, Pandas, etc

• WAR ITEMS: WWI, WWII, War Medals, Swords, Daggers, Bayonets, Civil War Memorabilia, etc.

• SCRAP GOLD: All broken gold, used jewellery, any missing pieces (Earrings, Charms, gold Links etc), Dental Gold, Class Rings, Charm Bracelets, etc

• JEWELLERY: Diamond Rings, Bracelets, Earrings, loose Diamonds, All Gem Stones etc • PAPER MONEY: All denominations made before 1930, Confederation bills, Large Bills

• PLATINUM: Jewellery, Dental, Wiring and anything else made of Platinum

• OTHER COLLECTIBLES: Toys, Train Sets, Dolls, Advertising, Cast Iron Banks, Pottery, etc.

GOLD ITEMS OF INTEREST: SCRAP GOLD • GOLD COINS • GOLD OUNCES • GOLD PROOF SETS • DENTAL GOLD NOT SURE IF IT’S GOLD? Bring it in and one of our experts will be glad to examine it for you!

We represent thousands of collectors who are all looking for a variety of collectibles! We have purchased a wide selection of items for our group of collectors. The CCG (Canadian Collectors Group) are a private group of collectors who are looking for unique items in a wide variety of categories.

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Ottawa This Week - West  

December 8, 2011

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