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proudly Serving Central Florida, North Central Florida & Volusia-Brevard

LONG-AWAITED NEXT STEP AT LAKE NONA When Deborah German, MD, first arrived in Central Florida at the end of 2006 to helm the development of UCF College of Medicine, she immediately expressed her view that a teaching hospital was key to the medical school.


CONTENTS || FEATURES

Reducing Maternal and Infant Healthcare Disparities Is On Us

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Marya “Meg” Prado, MD, MBA, FAAP shares a view on accessing infant care

FEATURES 4 COVER Long-awaited Next Step at Lake Nona 5 PHYSICIAN SPOTLIGHT Reducing Maternal and Infant Healthcare Disparities Is On Us 7 HEALTHCARE LEADER. Greg Osmond, MD, a Rising Leader in Digital Dermatopathology 8 EOCC Taking a Leap Forward to Full Blown Employee Benefits for Members 9 HEALTHCARE LEADER Taking the Reins, Looking to Grow

11 How Do Behavior Health Screenings Impact Real People? 13 The AMA Disability Plan is NOT Own Specialty 14 The Importance of AI and Resolution-Centered Customer Care in the Healthcare Industry 15 Pivotal Trial to Evaluate Cell Therapy for Treatment of Painful Knee Osteoarthritis 16 ORLANDO GRAND ROUNDS 17 NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA & VOLUSIA/BREVARD GRAND ROUNDS

10 The Psychology of Pain

PUBLISHER John Kelly | jkelly@orlandomedicalnews.com ——————————————————————————————— AD SALES John Kelly, 407-701-7424 ——————————————————————————————— EDITOR PL Jeter | editor@orlandomedicalnews.com ——————————————————————————————— CREATIVE DIRECTOR Katy Barrett-Alley | kbarrettalley@gmail.com ——————————————————————————————— CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Christi Campbell, Dorothy Hardee, Dr. Mary Catherine Segota, Nick Trawinski, Becky Watkins, William Cimino, PhD ——————————————————————————————— UCF INTERN Brianna Kirby ——————————————————————————————— CIRCULATION jkelly@orlandomedicalnews.com ——————————————————————————————— All editorial submissions and press releases should be emailed to editor@orlandomedicalnews.com ——————————————————————————————— Subscription requests or address changes should be emailed to jkelly@orlandomedicalnews.com

Orlando Medical News January 2021 is published monthly by K&J Kelly, LLC. ©2021 Orlando Medical News.all Rights Reserved. Reproduction in whole, or in part without written permission is prohibited. Orlando Medical News will assume no responsibility unsolicited materials.

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MARCH 2021


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Long-awaited Next Step at Lake Nona When Deborah German, MD, first arrived in Central Florida at the end of 2006 to helm the development of UCF College of Medicine, she immediately expressed her view that a teaching hospital was key to the medical school. “We needed a hospital to accomplish our goals to be one of the nation’s premier 21st century medical schools anchoring a Medical City that could one day be a global destination for education, research and patient care,” said German, vice president for health affairs and founding dean of the UCF College of Medicine. “Today, we celebrate the next step in creating a healthcare hub in Lake Nona that will increase economic development and improve health for all.” The first of March has seen the beginning of the next developing step for Lake Nona Medical City. “In addition to providing convenient access to outstanding healthcare services in Lake Nona, this hospital will provide important educational opportunities for tomorrow’s physicians and support the work of our UCF researchers seeking innovative treatments and cures,” said German. The center, located in the heart of Orlando’s Medical City at 6700 Lake Nona Blvd., is a result of a partnership between HCA Healthcare’s North Florida Division and University of Central Florida Academic Health. Leaders of both organizations were on hand to break ground in October 2018 for the, 64-bed, $175 million, 204,709-square-foot hospital which will provide 24/7 emergency care and a full range of healthcare services featuring luxury family birthing units, inpatient and outpatient surgery including minimally invasive and robotic technology, diagnostic imaging, laboratory services and a cardiac catheterization lab. The medical center will have room to expand to 80 beds based on community needs. It was designed for future expansion up to 500 beds. “The grand opening of UCF Lake Nona Medical Center is the realization of a vision that will impact the community for years to come,” said Wendy H. Brandon, FACHE, Chief Executive Officer. “With the rapid growth in Lake Nona, this community needed a hospital close to home. Our team looks forward to becoming more engaged in the region’s wellness and supporting Lake Nona’s commitment to health and well-being. Whether you need treatment for an acute injury or illness, or if you are seeking resources for advanced specialty care, our community can count on UCF Lake Nona Medical Center to provide high-quality, patientcentered care.” UCF Lake Nona Medical Center has invested in the

Dr. Deborah C. German, Vice President for Health affairs and Dean of the College of Medicineat UCF (l) and Wendy H. Brandon, FACHE, cut the ribbon to begin UCF Lake Nona Medical Center latest technology to support the commitment to superior quality care including noninvasive focused ultrasound incisionless brain surgery for the treatment of debilitating tremors and Parkinson’s disease. Patient safety has included systems for enhanced security and communication. In addition, the medical center boasts Sepsis Prediction and Optimization of Therapy (SPOT) technology, an automated 24/7 real-time algorithmic system that monitors patients to provide for early intervention. HCA Healthcare’s SPOT algorithm is informed by data from millions of patient care episodes. It sees signs of potential sepsis humans cannot see while excluding instances when humans inaccurately suspect sepsis. Hospital computers, through “machine learning,” are trained by ingesting millions of data points on which patients do and do not develop sepsis. Those computers monitor clinical data every second of a patient’s hospitalization. When a pattern of data consistent with sepsis risk occurs, it will signal an alert to technicians who call a “code sepsis.” The bedside nurse responds, begins evaluating the patient, and if sepsis is not “ruled out,” treatment begins immediately. Other technology to support quality patient-centered care and safety includes: • “Smart” nurse call system, • Digital display in every patient room provides real-time care plan and team information, • iMobile clinical communication tool, • MyHealthONE Patient Portal for online access to test results, patient registration and scheduling, • Real-Time Locating System to improves safety and workflow efficiency, • Digital newborn footprint identification safety system, • Electronic health record and computerized physician order entry. The medical center staff is committed to becoming en-

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gaged in the region’s wellness, whether for acute injury or illness or specialty care. The hospital will bring an estimated 350 jobs to the region with more than 250 physicians on the hospital’s medical staff in primary care, cardiology, colorectal surgery, general surgery, gastroenterology, orthopedic surgery, pulmonology, nephrology, OB/GYN, gynecologic oncology, infectious disease, nephrology, neurohealth sciences, spine and urology. Along with more convenient access to healthcare, the community will also benefit from the economic impact of new jobs and tax revenue. Annual economic impact is estimated at $1.4 million in local and state taxes and $13.8 million in charity care, uninsured discounts and other uncompensated care. Hospital executives expect to see 17,000 patients the first year. UCF has a 20 percent stake in the medical center’s ownership with HCA Healthcare-North Florida Division, but shares 50 percent of the governance responsibility. HCA Healthcare is comprised of more than 185 hospitals and 2,000+ sites of care in 21 states and the United Kingdom. Other HCA hospitals in the North Florida Division include Central Florida Regional Hospital (with Level II Trauma Center) in Sanford, Oviedo Medical Center, Osceola Regional Medical Center (with Level II Trauma Center) and Poinciana Medical Center. The UCF College of Medicine is a research-based medical school with a culture based on partnership and collaboration. The college’s medical and biomedical programs capitalize on UCF’s existing strengths in biological sciences, modeling and simulation, engineering, optics and photonics, psychology, chemistry, film and digital media, business and nursing. The college is a founding member of Orlando’s growing Medical City at Lake Nona.


PHYSICIAN || SPOTLIGHT PRESENTED BY

In Other Words...

Reducing Maternal and Infant Healthcare Disparities Is On Us Marya “Meg” Prado, MD, MBA, FAAP shares a view on accessing infant care This month we shine the spotlight on Dr. Meg Prado, President of Women’s and Children’s Services at Envision Healthcare, a leading national medical group. She is board certified in general pediatrics and neonatal-perinatal medicine and is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics. 

and their infants or children – this plague does not spare. When we examine clinical outcomes, it is clear that some Americans continue to receive inequitable attention and treatment based on race, ethnicity, religion, disability status, sexual orientation and the intersection of these identities. These disparities stem from a complex multitude of factors. To eradicate this problem, everyone – clinicians, hospitals, health systems, health insurance companies and federal and local governments – must work together.   Historically, healthcare disparities have been mistakenly attributed to pre-existing genetic factors and lifestyle choices. Genetics plays some role in outcomes but is not, by itself, the only culprit. Years of research and data show that factors beyond an individual’s genetic fabric, like socioeconomic status, whether they have health insurance coverage and which zip code they live in, play a major role in their ability to access care.   Social determinants of health, including inadequate prenatal care, are documented risk factors for premature birth and infant death as well as adverse outcomes for pregnant and postpartum women in the U.S. These social obstacles to healthcare and the corresponding outcome disparities are most evident in Black, American Indian and Alaska Native populations.   In the U.S., the preterm birth (less than 37 weeks ges-

Prado joined Envision in 2001, practicing as a neonatologist at Miami Children's Hospital until 2007. She then moved to Colorado, where for 10 years, she served as the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) Medical Director at St. Francis Medical Center in Colorado Springs. Returning to Florida in 2016, Prado was the Vice President of Women's and Children's at Envision and became President in November 2018. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Miami and her medical degree from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. She completed her internship and residency in general pediatrics, followed by a neonatal-perinatal fellowship, at the University of Miami Jackson Memorial Hospital.   She was the recipient of a National Institutes of Health training grant and conducted a year of basic science research in the area of molecular biology in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at the University of Miami School of Medicine. In 2019, Prado received a Master of Business Administration from Auburn University.   In this edition of In Other Words, Dr. Prado discusses how providers can reduce healthcare disparities, specifically among pregnant women and infants. 

In Other Words... As a mother, pediatric specialist and leader in women’s and children’s care, I have seen that the U.S. healthcare system does not treat expectant mothers of different backgrounds equitably. The fact that systemic racism has worked its way into how we deliver care, or fail to provide equitable care, is a harsh reality that clinicians caring for pregnant women, newborn babies and children must accept. Once we acknowledge this problem, we can begin to solve it. An individual’s ability to access healthcare is crucial to their long-term health and well-being and the overall health of our communities. Still, healthcare disparities exist in every specialty and aspect of the healthcare system. For the most vulnerable among us – mothers

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tation at time of birth) rate among Black women is 50 percent higher than all other women. In addition, the national infant mortality rate is 5.7 per 1,000 live births; for Black women, it is 10.8 per 1,000 live births – nearly double the national rate. For a developed nation, these infant death and prematurity rates are unacceptably high.   Systemic racism and the wealth gap in the U.S. deepen many health inequities. The COVID-19 pandemic has magnified and exacerbated these healthcare disparities, with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirming that people of color are disproportionately impacted by the virus. Some of this can be attributed to racial discrimination, lack of access to care and fact that these populations are more likely to be exposed to the virus.   The current health and economic crisis is compounding the issue, resulting in reduced incomes, lost health insurance coverage and postponed routine, preventative care like prenatal visits. We have yet to understand the full impact this will have on certain communities; however, we must act swiftly to try to mitigate it.  Clinicians are obligated to provide high-quality care regardless of a patient’s race, gender, ethnicity or socioeconomic status. It is also our responsibility and oath

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Celebrating YOU on National Doctors’ Day March 30, 2021

21-CHN-00953

Because you are incredible.

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HEALTHCARE LEADER

SPONSORED BY

Greg Osmond, MD, a Rising Leader in Digital Dermatopathology

specialized software and hardware requirements, IT infrastructure demands, and insufficient quality of digital slides. PatholologyWatch gives dermatologists the ability to harness the benefits of digital pathology by circumventing these barriers. Clients aren’t required to pay setup, storage, or licensing fees directly. With web-based delivery, the only requirement is a valid internet connection. This ensures ease of access during discussions with patients and the ability to share and review slides in real time. Digital dermatopathology also allows for increased interaction between dermatologists and dermatopathologists, opening the door for collaboration, education, and continued advancement. Arguably, with these advances in technology, there has never been a better time in the world of dermatology and dermatopathology. “The bottom line is that patients come first,” said Osmond. “The beautiful thing is that what improves care for patients also serves dermatologists.”

Meet Dr. Greg Osmond,a board-certified pathologist, dermatopathologist,and expert on cutaneous diseases. For over a decade, Dr. Osmond has studied the growing field of dermatopathology and accompanying forms of cancer. While completing his residency at Duke University, Dr. Osmond discovered the benefit of utilizing digital technologies in the early detection and diagnosis of skin cancer and other diseases. “I have been privileged to train under, work in, and consult with some of the best hospital systems and pathology departments in the country,” said Osmond. “Health systems and providers are looking for ways to enhance efficiencies in providing care while simultaneously improving quality.” To meet this need, Osmond, along with cofounders Dan Lambert and Michael Torno, created PathologyWatch to bring cutting-edge digital technology to pathology. We sat down with Dr. Osmond to discuss his view on the changing landscape of dermatology and the increasing importance of utilizing a digital dermatopathology workflow.

What’s next for Dr. Osmond? The underdeveloped world is of particular interest and concern for Osmond. “When you learn that 45 percent of the world doesn’t currently have access to diagnostics, largely due to the cost of care, you want to do something to change that,” he said. “Optimally developed algorithms working in tandem with an expert pathology service model will hopefully improve the quality of care and allow for the cost of care to drop to an affordable price point for all patients, both domestically and internationally. That’s our goal.” Gregory Osmond, MD, MPH, completed a pathology residency (AP/CP) at Duke University, where he developed an interest and expertise in digital pathology while completing a GME concentration track in health policy, law, and ethics focused on innovative business models and regulation associated with digital pathology. This was followed by a dermatopathology fellowship in the combined Harvard program (MGH, B&W, BID). In recent years, he has been involved with multiple pathology-related technology platforms and companies. He received a BS degree from Brigham Young University in neuroscience, a master’s degree in public health (MPH) from the University of Utah, and an MD from Duke University. He also has a significant interest in the implementation and utilization of diagnostic services in underdeveloped settings

Digital imaging has existed for decades. Why are dermatologists now becoming interested in this technology? There has never been a greater need for dermatopathologists to lend their talents and expertise to diagnose our growing populations. In the last decade alone, new cancer cases have risen 40 percent in the United States. Digital pathology has quickly proven itself as a viable option as diagnosis using digital slides has been shown to be equivalent to diagnosis from glass slides. Without question, modern advances are simpler, more efficient, and better at facilitating doctor–patient interaction.

What are the benefits of adopting digital dermatopathology? Keeping up with increasing demand underlines the need for dermatologists to look toward evolutionary innovations. Whole-slide imaging has introduced measurable advantages that modern practices can use to improve workflow, decrease turnaround time, reduce errors, experience the instant access of an EMR interface, and take advantage of academic-level dermatopathologist reads. Put simply, digital dermatopathology cuts down on physician time and error, resulting in a simpler, more streamlined workflow and a high level of patient care and satisfaction.

PathologyWatch is the groundbreaking leader of digital dermatopathology services. Through these services, dermatology clinics, hospitals, and laboratories can improve operational efficiency by speeding up workflow and enhancing patient outcomes by utilizing the PathologyWatch expert professional team and partner laboratory services. This can facilitate best-in-class reads and, in some cases, enable additional revenue to the practice by in-housing pathology. With an intuitive and easy-toimplement digital pathology solution that includes access to top-tier dermatopathologists and a streamlined clinical workflow that interfaces directly into the EMR, PathologyWatch brilliantly combines state-of-the-art technology and clinical decision-making to deliver unprecedented patient care. For more information, email info@pathologywatch.com or visit www. pathologywatch.com.

What are the current challenges, and how do we solve them? Currently, there are four main barriers to enter digital dermatopathology: high acquisition costs,

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EAST ORLANDO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

EOCC || MEDICAL CITY

PRESENTED BY

CALENDAR:

Taking a Leap Forward to Full Blown Employee Benefits for Members

Virtual Office Hours  EVERY MONDAY | 9AM – 10AM

Virtual Office Hours  MOST THURSDAY’S | 4PM – 5PM

Testimonial Tuesday  Featuring Shannon Rollins Hypnosis; W.M. Durham; Halifax Health & i9 Sports

BY DOROTHY HARDEE, CHAMBER ADMINISTRATOR 

TUESDAY, MARCH 9 | 9:00AM – 12:30PM

The mission of a Chamber of Commerce is to further the interests of businesses with two primary functions.

LIVE of Facebook

The Hybrid Member Academy: Roadmap to Member Success WEDNESDAY, MARCH 10 | 8:30AM – 10:30AM Hybrid Event - East Orlando Chamber office  12301 Lake Underhill Road, Ste. 245, Orlando, FL 32828 

The first is to act as a spokesperson for the business and professional community, translating the group thinking of its members into action.  Secondly it renders a specific product or services type that can most effectively be beneficial by a community or organization and its members.  For seventy-five years the East Orlando Chamber of Commerce (EOCC), with its dedicated stakeholders has worked diligently to further the interests of the business community throughout East Orange County. Several years ago, we announced the Health Benefits program offering three packages at our group rates.  EOCC members and their employees could enjoy the options of MDLive Telehealth, Allstate Accident, Allstate Cancer & 23 Specified Diseases plan, as well as the WellCard saving money on prescriptions, dental, vision and more.  These plans allowed a small business to offer an option of care to their full time, part time and 1099 employees without the liability with finance, payroll, or administration In 2019 we took it one step further with the introduction of our Direct Primary Care program offering unlimited direct primary care, telehealth, and chronic disease management for $77 a month.   This was an incredible addition helping our small business members attract and retain talent with this health benefits option at their fingertips. In the unprecedented times brought about by a world-wide pandemic we realized the important role employee benefits play to an organization and to all our individual members.  Constantly striving to add more value to membership, we sought to provide a resource of value to our members through providing a bonified employee benefits package, while also offering an educational resource for all our members.  Through these actions we have instituted a fullblown employee benefits offering that any employee of one of our member companies can enroll in this coverage offering on a 100 percent voluntary basis.  Our member companies can offer this coverage to their employees through a 100 percent voluntary basis while the company has no financial, service, or administrative responsibilities or liabilities.    Employers also can offer these coverage offerings on a more traditional employer platform being payroll deducted if they so desire and they may also contribute a portion or all the premium.  Employers also can custom design a traditional employer benefits package designed specifically for their unique culture, demographics, and needs. EOCC is extremely proud to work with our partner Joe Filice at Avalon Insurance Services to offer the greatest value to your membership,providing employee health benefits and educational resources. Joe said, “These are unprecedent times and the EOCC

Healthcare Council Collaborative Virtual Panel Discussing & Networking Three Things You Should Know: Healthcare Legislation 2021 & Impacts to Yourpractice

THURSDAY, MARCH 11 | 7:45AM – 9:00AM Virtual Event | Registration required | FREE for EOCC Members | $10 for nonmembers

OPTIC Presents: Teleworking | Tele-Managing: Inspiring Employees & Offering Leadership Virtual Panel Discussion

FRIDAY, MARCH 12 | 9:00AM – 10:00AM Virtual Event | Registration required | FREE for EOCC Members | $10 for nonmembers

EOCC Spark 365 Brain Trust After Hours TUESDAY, MARCH 16 | 4:00 – 5:30PM East Orlando Chamber office  12301 Lake Underhill Road, Ste. 245, Orlando, FL 32828  Member Exclusive with Limited Space

Coffee Club Nona (3rd Thursday of the month) 

THURSDAY, MARCH 18 | 8:30 – 9:30 AM  Sam’s Club Lake Nona  11920 Narcoossee Road, Orlando, FL 32832  FREE to EOCC Members | $10 for Non-Members 

Avalon park Group “The 5th Floor” Grand Opening & Ribbon Cutting THURSDAY, MARCH 18 | 10:00 – 11:00AM The 5th Floor 3801Avalon Park E. Blvd, Orlando, FL 32828

EOCC Spark 365 Brain Trust THURSDAY, MARCH 25 | 8:00 – 9:30AM East Orlando Chamber Office  12301 Lake Underhill Road, Ste. 245, Orlando, FL 32828  Member Exclusive with Limited space

Battle of the Businesses “After Hours Team Fun” THURSDAY, APRIL 1 | 5:00PM – 7:00PM BB&T Now Truist Drive Through 12301 Lake Underhill Road, Orlando, FL 32828 Registration required.

Please visit EOCC.org for a complete listing of March events

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is performing industry leading actions to continually meet and exceed the value of your membership.” The current plan will allow Chamber Members and their employees to take advantage of these great options: *EOCC Health Benefits being offered: Medical, Dental, Vision, Life,accident, Critical Illness, Cancer, Hospital and Telehealth. *Customizable Employee Benefit package Offerings: EOCC is offering employee benefits plans similar to what a traditional employer would offer and gives the member the opportunity to purchase what coverages offered best meet their unique personal and family needs. *Ease of enrollment: members can utilize a benefit administration system through an assigned website where all information regarding the benefits offered,plan designs and rates will be housed. On this benefit administration system, the member can research all benefits offered and enroll. *Educational Resource: The benefit administration system combined with the call center and the Services from avalon Insurance Services and the Meehan agency will bea resource for employee benefits surpassed by no other chamber in our area. Members will now have

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HEALTHCARE LEADER

SPONSORED BY

Taking the Reins, Looking to Grow Lora Parahovnik, PhD, named CEO at Accel Research Sites Arriving only a year ago just as the Covid-19 pandemic was ramping up, Lora Parahovnik, PhD, was named CEO of Accel Research Sites of Lake Mary after having served as the company’s vice president of clinical operations.

“I’m incredibly proud of what the Accel Research Sites team has accomplished, and I look forward to building on our strengths as CEO,” Parahovnik said. She plans to see the company expand organically and inorganically, develop the decentralized platform and hybrid models, bring the trial to the patient, and expand with more therapeutic areas. “Clinical trials are necessary for the development and improvement of all medical treatments offered to the public. We believe that expansion of locations comes in alignment with the services provided to our patients and customers and we would like to develop “patientcentered” trials with more available virtual access to any clinical trial at site,” she said. Parahovnik previously worked as a vice-president of clinical research with a global medical device company. She holds a Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Science degree from Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. She also earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Pharmaceuti-

Arriving only a year ago just as the Covid-19 pandemic was ramping up, Lora Parahovnik, PhD, was named CEO of Accel Research Sites of Lake Mary after having served as the company’s vice president of clinical operations. Parahovnik is a globally experienced leader in clinical research, clinical affairs and operations, translational and basic research, scientific writing, educational training and grants submission at a world-class level. She is a skilled clinical trials expert with over seven years of experience in full cycle clinical project management including administering, directing, supervising, and coordinating multiple projects concurrently from conception to completion. She has provided multi-regional and national leadership in the execution of the scope of work, objectives, the quality of deliverables and other clinical operations activities directly impacting the health care system. She joined the Accel team in March 2020, just as COVID-19 grew to global proportions, and she helped lead the team in multiple clinical trials for vaccine candidates across trial sites contributing to enrollment of a significant sample size for COVID-19 vaccine trials. As CEO, Parahovnik looks to grow connections with researchers, providers, and the community to focus on decentralized platforms and deliver high-standard patientcentered clinical research. “In addition to the Covid-19 prophylaxis, diagnostics, and treatment trials, Accel Research Sites is the multi-therapeutic multi-center for clinical research that provides therapeutic areas and expertise such as multitherapeutic family medicine, musculoskeletal, cardiology, dermatology, women’s and men’s health, gastroenterology, vaccine, endocrinology, immunology, pulmonary, healthy adult & elderly, ENT, CNS, psych, oncology and pediatrics,” she explained. “The fight against COVID-19 proves just how essential clinical trials are for the good of all people and the advancement of the medical field,” Parahovnik said. Demand for services doesn’t show signs of letting up any time soon. “The coronavirus pandemic brought some novel vaccines by major pharmaceutical companies to fight the virus, which has led to a rapid increase in clinical trial demand from 2020 onwards,” she said. Accel Research sites participate in Moderna, Pfizer, Novavax, Janssen (J&J) vaccine studies, as well as multiple COVID-19 diagnostic and treatment clinical trials at all sister sites – eight clinical research units and over 20 embedded sites network.

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cal Chemistry from Bar-Ilan University in Israel. And she serves as adjunct faculty in the science department at Valencia College, East Campus, Orlando. Accel Research Sites provides novel treatment options in all major therapeutic areas. It has more than 30 locations, including a 62-bed Phase 1 unit in Florida and units in Georgia and Alabama. Accel Research Sites has enrolled more than 12,000 patients in more than 1,000 trials since its inception in 1998.

For more information about Accel Research Sites, visit accelresearchsites.com


The Psychology of Pain can trigger muscle tension or muscle spasms that may increase pain. Managing emotions can directly affect the intensity of the pain.

BY DR. MARY CATHERINE SEGOTA

Pain is one of the leading reasons patients seek medical care. Estimates of chronic pain among adults range from 11 percent to 40 percent (Interagency pain Research Coordinating Committee, NIH 2016).

• Chronic pain can result in opioid addiction. a patient’s difficulty coping with pain can lead to a greater dependence on pharmaceuticals to which makes the pain condition ultimately more difficult to manage. Opioid addiction has great financial, social, and emotional costs for both the patient and their loved ones.

A NHIS 2016 survey revealed that 50.0 million adults experience chronic pain and 19.6 million experience high-impact chronic pain that limits work, social, recreational, and self-care activities. More adults suffer from common chronic pain conditions than the number affected by heart disease, diabetes, and cancer combined (Tsang et al., 2008). Chronic pain contributes to an estimated $560 billion in yearly direct medical costs, lost productivity, and disability programs (Institute of pain Medicine, 2011). Because of this impact, it is imperative that we have a greater depth of knowledge of the complexities of living with and treating chronic pain.

The psychological and emotional effects of chronic pain Chronic pain is complex and difficult to manage. Chronic pain can cause mood alterations such as anger, hopelessness, sadness, and anxiety, sleep disturbances, fatigue or lack of energy, neurocognitive changes (impaired attention, concentration, problems solving, task persistence etc.), and other vague symptoms including generalized diffuse pain. Mental health diagnoses are associated with a higher reported pain experience. Effective pain management treatment addresses each aspect of the physical, emotional and psychological aspects of chronic pain.

The impact of chronic pain The chronic pain experience is the interaction of the following factors: • Biological (injury, trauma, infection, illness, cancer, nerve damage)

Psychotherapy Treatment Medical treatments, including medication, surgery, rehabilitation and physical therapy, may be the first line of defense in treating chronic pain. However, psychotherapy can also be effective at relieving chronic pain because it can alter how the brain processes pain sensations.

• Psychological (sleep, fear, anxiety, depression, coping skills) • Social (work, family, social network) These factors affect the patient’s health-related quality of life such as their physical functioning, daily life activities, mental health, and social and family functioning.

Understanding and managing the thoughts, emotions and behaviors that accompany the discomfort can help the patient cope more effectively with their pain—and can actually reduce the intensity of their pain. Mental Health professionals trained in pain management help the patient gain insight into their physical and emotional health. They asses the patient’s pain experience, location, intensity, and location, and what factors exacerbate it or alleviate it. They assess anxiety, worry, stress, and depressive factors related to the pain experience. Mental Health professionals trained in pain management assess the patient’s lifestyle, and help the patient make changes that contribute toward improved physical functioning, work, or activities. They utilize standardized assessments, as well as subjective measures to gain a deeper understanding of the patient’s pain experience. Mental Health professionals are trained in a wide variety of techniques that have been used in the successful treatment of the chronic pain patients, including:

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• Chronic pain results in reduced physical activity, which is influenced by intensity, duration, or location of the pain. The patient’s ability to walk, get up and down, do physical exercise, perform household chores, participate in hobbies, and maintain an independent lifestyle are all affected.

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• Chronic pain results in impaired sleep quality. This results in increased levels of stress, impaired cognitive ability, and impaired emotional coping. There is an association between sleep and pain experience, whereby poor sleep result in higher pain reports, and higher pain results in poor sleep reports.

Read This Guide And You’ll Discover:

The 3 most common ways IT services companies charge for their services, and the pros and cons of each approach.

(And How To Get Exactly What You Need Without Unnecessary Extras, Hidden Fees And Contracts) A common billing model that putsBloated ALL THE RISK on you, the customer, when buying IT services;

• Chronic pain impacts personal work and career trajectories. Chronic pain results in higher absenteeism, decreased work efficiency, decreased work, productivity, and contributes to early retirement. This not only effects an individual’s financial position, but also business structure and functioning, and the larger scale economy.

Read This Guide And You’ll Discover:you’ll learn what it is and why you need to avoid agreeing to it.

The 3 most common ways IT services companies charge for their services, and the pros and cons of each approach. Exclusions, hidden fees and other

“gotcha” IT companies put in A common billing model that puts ALL THE RISKclauses on you, the their contracts that you DON’T want customer, when buying IT services; you’ll learn what to agree to. it is and why you need to avoid agreeing to it.

• Chronic pain affects the family. Family members undertake additional activities, such as care duties, supervision, participation in medical appointments, and become involved in evaluating treatments and decision making. as a results of family member’s changing and often challenging roles, they may experience depression, anxiety, and decreased socialization as a result.

Exclusions, hidden fees and other “gotcha” How clauses IT companies to make sure you know what to. you’re getting to avoid put in their contracts that you DON’T wantexactly to agree

disappointment, frustration and added

latergetting on that you How to make sure you know exactly whatcosts you’re to didn’t avoidanticipate. disappointment, frustration and added costs later on that you didn’t anticipate. 21 revealing questions to ask your IT

support firm BEFORE giving them access

21 revealing questions to ask your IT support firm BEFORE to your computer network, e-mail and data. giving them access to your computer network, e-mail and data.

• Chronic pain causes chronic stress. Chronic stress can contribute to many health problems including high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity, diabetes, depression and anxiety. In addition, stress

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How Do Behavior Health Screenings Impact Real people? BY CHRISTI CAMPBELL

screenings. Believe it or not, my involvement began with interest from an eye doctor. This doctor/ entrepreneur is always looking for ways to offer better patient care and supplement the, often low, payments received from patients with eye care plans. We implemented behavioral screenings at his practice and he quickly found that about one out of every fifty to sixty patients screened was struggling with depression and anxiety to the point that it required him to refer them to their pCp or a licensed counselor. While he was excited about the revenue the screenings were producing, helping his patients turned into a passion. a 15-year-old boy, sinking in the darkness of depression, unbeknownst to his parents or a 55-year-old man whose wife had left will forever be thankful for the care he provided at their optometrist visit. Of course, behavioral screenings are a natural fit in a primary care or internal medicine setting, but we have also seen great success with OB/GYNs, pediatricians, Sleep Clinics and pain Clinics. Because the COVID pandemic has caused such isolation and fear, patients need to be asked these questions by their providers. With over 22 screenings available, we can customize the screenings to your patient population. Screenings can be used to obtain patient medical history and provide a tangible method to meet your quality measures and to

A short time ago, I had never even heard of a behavioral health screening. A close friend of mine was an NP in partnership with another provider. I watched her struggling to stay afloat and maintain her independence as a practitioner. She eventually gave up her clinic and joined a hospital group but, in doing so, felt that she lost the ability to provide the personal touch that had caused her to want to be a doctor in the first place. Meeting quotas and working under time constraints was painful and demotivating. When we made the decision to join a health and wellness services company in 2017, we saw it as an opportunity to help physicians like my friend serve their patients and facilitate the best path to wellness while serving the physician by creating a business model that ensures the best care for patients, streamlines the work environment for staff, and allows the doctor to retire well. Over the last few years, I began to work with several of our providers using an electronic platform to streamline the collection of various behavioral

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increase your MaCRa/MIpS/HEDIS scoring. ask us how we can help with your Medicare annual Well Visits and Electronic Health assessments, too. Behavioral Health Screenings meet the nation’s mental health and opioid abuse crisis with a “front line” approach to early diagnosis and effective treatment for patients of all ages. RX2Live is a Health and Wellness Services Company positioned to advance healthcare through the BHS platform. We have been able to help our physicians open better paths of communication with their patients, limit hospital readmissions, diagnose and treat conditions that otherwise might have gone unnoticed and create an environment where the practice or facility can thrive and realize additional growth. We are passionate about providing our physicians with tools that better their patient outcomes and infuse the joy back into practicing medicine. Visit RX2Live or email John Fogarty at RX2Live locally at Jfogarty@RX2Live.com Before joining her husband as a regional developer for RX2Live Tennessee and Northern Georgia, Christi Campbell successfully worked as a special education teacher, mother, and wife. Since joining RX2Live, she has worked tirelessly to improve patient outcomes, increase practice revenues, and reduce overall Medicare costs. She specializes in helping practices setup and runs Behavior Health Screening programs. She can be reached at ccampbell@rx2live.com


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The Psychology of Pain

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Taking a Leap Forward to Full Blown Employee Benefits for Members

Reducing Maternal and Infant Healthcare Disparities Is On Us

• Behavioral approaches (relaxation training, diaphragmatic breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, autogenic training, visualization/guided imagery, sleep hygiene, activity monitoring, and activity pacing) • Operant Behavioral Techniques (graded activation, time contingent medication schedules, and fear avoidance)

to serve all patients and strive to improve outcomes. We can play a pivotal role in rebuilding and re-establishing trust within underserved communities, which will lead to a break-down of the systemic barriers that deter access to care, especially during pregnancy. Together, we must do better.   To start, clinicians should be educated on implicit and explicit biases and how to avoid them in daily practice. Sensitivity training and standardization of care, including standardized order sets, can also remove barriers to equitability in care delivery.   We also need to engage our communities and use the many resources available to address patients’ needs comprehensively. It’s plain and simple: Our communities, including mothers and their babies, are stronger and healthier when there is equal and equitable access to care. That is why approaches that leverage community involvement would be most effective at improving healthcare outcomes and reducing disparities. A community-level approach can show short-term improvements and address downstream disparities in healthcare access, which is likely to have the greatest benefits for mothers and babies in poor health and without access to quality care. It is important to note that community collaborations will require a level of commitment and organization that goes above and beyond current intervention models. However, the results show great promise in eliminating disparities. This approach can identify root causes, build on local resources and inspire robust research participation, leading to improved policies and meaningful changes. Even under perfect conditions, pregnancy and childbirth can be challenging. As we battle the COVID-19 pandemic, we must double-down on efforts started beforehand to address healthcare disparities and improve outcomes for all patients. This means we need to establish best practices – sometimes in real-time – for women, infants and children. Let us all strive to reduce these disparities so that every mother and child receives equitable healthcare and is able to live a happy, healthy and prosperous life. 

• Cognitive Behavioral Techniques (psychoeducation about pain and the patient’s particular pain syndrome, coping skills training, problem-solving training, thought monitoring, and cognitive restructuring, combined with behavioral interventions) • Acceptance Based approaches (acceptance, cognitive diffusion, being present, self as context, values, and committed action) • Biofeedback (teaching the patient how to control certain body functions including heart rate, breathing rate, skin temperature, and muscle tension, resulting in decreased pain experience) Tips to help your patients cope with pain: • Understand your condition. ask questions so you have a true understanding of your diagnosis and treatment options. • Manage your stress. pain is stressful, and stress can make everything feel worse. Learn and utilize new stress management techniques to help your coping. • Stay active. pain and the fear of pain can lead you to stop doing the things you enjoy. It’s important not to let pain take over your life. • Know your limits. Learn to assess your activity level. Be active in a way that acknowledges your physical limitations, but don’t push yourself to do more than you can. • Exercise. Stay healthy with low-impact exercise such as stretching, yoga, walking and swimming. • Be social. Research shows that people with greater social support are more resilient and experience less depression and anxiety. ask for help when you need it. • Have a pain plan. Learn what affects the intensity and duration of your pain, and what helps to make it better. • Manage Expectations. Be aware of “all or nothing thinking.” Seek help to learn different coping skills and ways to manage pain. • Use prescriptions carefully. Be sure to use medications as prescribed by your doctor to avoid possible dangerous side effects and reduce the chance of overuse. Pain patients with psychiatric comorbidities are often labeled “difficult patients” by healthcare providers. patient statements of I’m dying!, This will never get better!, This medication isn’t working! are often triggering for practitioners. Emotional reactions and labeling can lead to diminished quality of care, thus, it is critical for the healthcare provider to monitor their own thoughts and beliefs toward the patient to optimize patient-practitioner interactions. pain patients are also often unaware of their own thoughts and beliefs, as well how these affect their pain experience, behaviors, and ultimate outcomes. The motivation to change is one of the key predictors of behavioral modification. Thus, assisting the patient in developing their awareness of emotional, social, and physical factors, identifying their own thoughts and beliefs, and facilitating appropriate pain management expectations will result in a more successful treatment outcome. With a doctorate in clinical psychology and over 20 years of experience in the field, Dr. Segota has conducted university-based behavioral medicine research, acted as a consultant to professionals and organizations, and worked with a diverse number of psychological and medical conditions. By identifying unique needs, the source of distress, and what’s perpetuating the problem, she will help develop the tools to overcome seemingly insurmountable circumstances. She offers an environment where patients will become empowered and achieve maximum personal and professional growth, through therapy, testing, biofeedback, mediation, and coaching. Visit www.CounselingResourceServices.com

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the ability and resource to learn more about employee benefits and how they best meet their unique needs. *Industry Leading Service: members will have all benefit offering information available on the online benefit administration system and will also have a call center designed specifically for their plans. Members will have the options to go online or talk directly with a service representative assigned specifically for their group. The Federal Government Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates that while 88 percent of employers with more than 500 employees provide company health plans, only 55 percent of small business comprised of less than 100 employees, do the same. Some small business owners and entrepreneurs might feel most health insurance options are simply out of reach. We have a plan for you. The East Orlando Chamber is here to help with unique offerings to help elevate your businesses visibility and connect you with others helping your business thrive. Our upcoming Healthcare Collaborative, March 11th will address Healthcare Legislation for 2021 that may impact local practices and businesses. Guest panelists, Representative Carlos Guillermo Smith and Representative Geraldine Thompson will discuss the current legislation with Eric Gray, Executive Director of the Christian Service Center for Central Florida. We have an exciting lineup for 2021 including our OPTIC – Orlando professional Technical Innovation Council is virtual March 12th from 8:00aM – 12:00pM focusing on Teleworking | Tele-Managing: Inspiring Employees,and Offering Leadership at a Distance presented in partnership with Full Sail University. Avani Desai,president of Schellman & Co. will moderate this Virtual discussion with panelists Luz Hernandez, Cpa Chief accounting Officer with LSQ; Steve Stallard, Chief privacy Officer with Orlando Health and Heather Jones, Director of Human Resources for power DMS, Inc. For more information or to register call (407) 2775951 or visit our website at eocc.org.  The East Orlando Chamber of Commerce everywhere East of I-4. Dorothy Hardee is the administrator of the East Orlando Chamber of Commerce.


The AMA Disability Plan is NOT Own Specialty Prices for the AMA contract are less expensive in comparison to the “Big 7” disability carriers and you can obtain a quote instantly online. Underwriting is required and benefit amounts are capped at $15,000 per month of coverage.

BY NICK TRAWINSKI

AMA Insurance Website According to the AMA website, the AMA plan contains a preferred definition of disability called ‘ownspecialty.’ They explain that ‘Own-Specialty’ means a physician is eligible to receive benefits if unable to perform the duties of their medical specialty – even if he/ she has the ability to work in another field of medicine. During our review of the AMA website, the use of the word “ability” used in the AMA’s description of ‘Own-Specialty’ had us concerned. The ability to work in another field of medicine is different from being allowed to actually engage in another field of medicine. When shopping for disability insurance, physicians will describe ‘Own-Specialty’ as a policy that covers them from a sickness or injury that prevents them from working in their medical specialty, while still paying them their full disability benefit even if they elect to work in another occupation or field of medicine.

Are AMA Premiums Guaranteed? According to the AMA website, rates and premiums are reviewed and may change annually. Rates are based on your age on the effective date of coverage and your attained age on each renewal date. Premiums may change on the plan anniversary date (July 1) or your annual renewal date (whichever is later).

Is the AMA Contract Guaranteed? According to the AMA contract, their policy can be changed at any time, without consent of the policy holder. The contract also states that New York Life (the underwriting carrier for the AMA plan) can terminate the policy, after the first anniversary date, by giving written notice to the policyholder if the aMa no longer sponsors the insurance under the policy.

AMA's Actual Definition of Total Disability According to the actual AMA contract, which can be read by clicking here, total disability is defined as an incapacity from an injury or sickness, that completely and continuously prevents the insured person from doing the material and substantial duties of his or her regular occupation, provided he or she is not engaged in an alternate occupation for which he or she is qualified for by education, training or experience, for pay or profit. Although the AMA advertises their policy as a contract that provides physicians with a “preferred definition of disability, called ‘own-specialty,’ the plan they offer contractually prohibits a physician from being engaged in another field of medicine.

CONCLUSION OF THE AMA DISABILITY PLAN AMA Policy is Not Own-Specialty Because the AMA policy definition for “Total Disability” restricts you from being able to engage in an alternate occupation for wage or profit, it is not considered to be a True Own-Specialty plan. True OwnSpecialty policies will not restrict you from engaging in an alternative occupation.

AMA Premiums are Not Guaranteed

AMA Policy Costs

Even though the premiums from the AMA are significantly less than “The Big 7” True Own-Specialty carriers, the fact that the premiums are not guaranteed is important to consider. When considering disability

AMA premiums can be calculated online here. Price varies based on state, age, and whether you are an AMA member or not.

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insurance, it is important to find coverage that guarantees level premiums throughout the life of your policy.

The AMA Policy is Not Guaranteed Disability Insurance is the backbone to your financial well-being and when you purchase a policy to protect your income, it’s imperative that you are able to count on your policy when you need it most. The fact that the policy sponsored through the AMA clearly states that NY Life has the option to change your policy features, coupled with their exclusive right to terminate your policy if the AMA no longer sponsors the insurance, is extremely concerning. According to our review of the disability insurance policy offered through the AMA, our findings conclude that the NY Life policy offered through the AMA is not a recommended policy for physicians. True OwnSpecialty Disability policies should allow you to earn another income while still collecting your full benefit if a disability prevents you from working in your medical specialty. They should always offer guaranteed contract provisions, level premiums, and protection against termination by the carrier. If you are a physician who has not yet purchased True Own-Specialty Disability Insurance, or if you have already purchased a policy through the AMA, you should consider or reconsider a policy offered through the following carriers: ameritas, Guardian, MassMutual, Mutual of Omaha, Ohio National, principal or The Standard, because these are the carriers that currently offer physicians “True” Own-Specialty disability coverage with level premiums and guaranteed contracts. InsuranceMD is an independent insurance agency working exclusively with physicians advocating that every physician has True Own Specialty Disability coverage. We provide physicians with quote comparisons from all 7 carriers and we shop for any available discounts to ensure each physician is getting the best coverage at the best price. We care about your disability insurance; you can request quotes here and schedule a call with one of our experienced agents to help you determine how much Own-Specialty coverage you qualify for at the best rate available.


The Importance of AI and Resolution-Centered Customer Care in the Healthcare Industry critical that patients feel their experience was easy and helpful. Customer service teams are granted first-hand insight into unique patient circumstances, characteristics, and history – the ultimate opportunity to give patients exactly what they need and to enhance relationships. Today’s patients want customer service representatives to meet their unique needs and provide them with answers that serve as an extension of their medical providers’ offices. When a question needs to be answered, patients want assistance at their fingertips. To meet this need, healthcare providers are leveraging highly sophisticated customer service technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI), self-service and new, advanced chatbots to provide a resolution-centered, stress-free solution. During this time, tools that allow self-service customer response techniques are more important than ever. Expanding online options can help alleviate healthcare facilities’ high call volumes. Self-service is a rapidly growing customer care pathway that can make a significant impact on workforce load for hospitals and healthcare facilities. Self-discovery tools such as interactive tutorials, adaptive FAQs, interactive guides, and videos that contain the simple, DIY answers many patients are looking for reduce contact center volumes, reserving agents to address more complex customer inquiries. These tools allow the patient to solve most of their needs themselves, putting

BY BECKY WATKINS

The healthcare industry has seen a drastic shift in its operations and communications over the last seven months. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, many routine healthcare office visits quickly shifted to telehealth and need-based care. The need for virtual resources and customer service representatives to handle large call volumes drastically increased. Companies that were able to quickly adjust and adapt early on have seen greater success in the efficient management of patients and their customer service needs. The difference between a positive patient experience and a negative one can be easily swayed by an experience with a customer service representative and their ability to problem solve. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the federal government has made it easier for healthcare providers to service and invoice for telemedicine services. Under the circumstances, patients have been more open to treatment options that allow a medical visit from the comfort of their own home. With an influx of patients interacting with customer service representatives, it is

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the power back into their own hands. a patient can tap into multimedia-support materials for productive learning that mimics the experience of chatting with a live agent. Self-service tools such as interactive tutorials and videos can also aid patients in their customer care journey by visually showing them how to resolve a problem. In a fully AI-enabled customer support environment, not only are patients relying on self-service and FAQ tutorials themselves; contact center agents can also retrieve AI-curated content from the same source materials, creating a fast and personal experience for the patient versus agents relying on scripts. and in some instances, patients are seamlessly redirected from a chat bot to a live agent on more technical questions where a higher skillset level of expertise is required to field questions. In a time where the pandemic has propelled healthcare-centric operations into overdrive with far fewer customer servicing centers to be opened, AI-driven chatbot technology and self-discoverable information can fill in the gaps and augment the work of contact center agents to healthcare operations and ensure quality patient care. Becky Watkins is a Senior Vice president for Relationship Management with ResultsCX. She leads account operations for all healthcare support services and serves as the senior point of contact for our healthcare clients. She brings over 30 years’ experience in the BpO industry with 10 years dedicated to healthcare solutioning and outsourcing. She joined ResutsCX in 2017 following leadership roles at alorica and apaC Customer Services. Becky has earned a reputation for delivering personal and empathetic human connections between her “health advocate” agent teams and her clients’ customers and members. Visit Results-CX.com


GID BIO's SVF-2 technology platform uniquely isolates and concentrates a cellular implant from a patient's own adipose (fat) tissue that is administered by injection in a physician’s office under image guidance. The entire process is completed at point-of-care in less than two hours.

Pivotal Trial to Evaluate Cell Therapy for Treatment of Painful Knee Osteoarthritis BY WILLIAM CIMINO, PHD

The single-use point-of-care technology replaces the need for a costly and time-consuming tissue processing and manufacturing facility. patients require no post-procedure physical therapy or extended recovery from joint replacement surgery. Data published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine (March 2020) from an FDA-compliant, multi-site, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial using this technology showed that patients receiving the cellular therapy experienced a median 89 percent improvement in pain, stiffness and function for the high-dose treatment at one year.1 The treated subject results were statistically significant compared to the placebo control group at the six months efficacy evaluation endpoint. More than 27 million U.S. adults are affected by osteoarthritis.2 Chronic pain is one of the most debilitating effects of osteoarthritis of the knee. It can cause significant loss of mobility, lost productivity, and lead to serious mental health problems, including depression. It can interfere with a person’s sleep patterns and their ability to work and conduct daily activities. Osteoarthritis is one of the leading causes of work disability among adults, with total medical expenditures (insurer and outof-pocket expenditures) nearing $200BN annually.3 There are more than one million knee replacements performed annually in the US.4 This technology and therapy is being closely watched by payers, hospital leaders and providers due to its potential impact on both the therapeutic benefit for patients and the economic impact on health care costs. As past Chairman of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Board of Councilors Committee on professionalism, Dr. Shrock helped to create treat-

The combination of cellular medicine and minimally invasive techniques for delivery of therapy is creating a disruption in healthcare delivery for musculoskeletal disease. Cellular medicine is personalized and precision medicine, being unique for each individual based on use of a patient’s own cells for the therapeutic dose and maximized for effectiveness based on a patient’s genetic profile. Minimally invasive techniques deliver the therapeutic dose using an injection, rather than surgery. A new point-of-care cell therapy that is minimally invasive and performed in a two-hour outpatient procedure has shown promising results for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis, explains Ft. Lauderdale-based physician, Kevin Shrock, MD, FAAOS, CPI. Shrock Orthopedic Research is the first clinical trial site in Florida for the FDA-compliant pivotal/Phase III clinical trial. Shrock is a principal investigator for the clinical study and believes that the cell processing technology platform and therapy could represent a potential breakthrough in both interventional orthopedics and regenerative medicine. Cost pressures in healthcare are driving innovation for therapies that make healthcare more affordable while providing safe and effective results. Federal Medicare reporting and reimbursement programs are now weighted heavily toward precision medicine, according to a McKinsey & Company report. This direction is driven by the potential for precision approaches to healthcare – along with the appropriate balance between technology development, exploratory research, and clinical innovation – result in improved diagnoses, treatments and disease prevention, the report said. Future pharmaceuticals or biologics could be custom tailored to each patient. The field now encompasses targeted cancer drugs, immune therapy, and autologous cellular therapy. The ultimate precision medicine approach is the use of a person’s own cells (autologous cells), which maximize safety and leverage the powerful innate biologic functions of the therapeutic cells for a targeted response. The point-of-care cell therapy technology platform utilizes a person’s own stromal and vascular cells to form a personalized cellular implant, unique for each individual patient. If the clinical study shows the personalized cellular implant to be safe and effective for osteoarthritis pain, then this biologic therapy may give patients an early interventional alternative to total knee replacement surgery for osteoarthritis pain. The cellular implant is produced from a patient’s own stromal and vascular cells, isolated and separated from a small adipose (fat) tissue harvest, counted to produce the targeted cellular dose, and then injected into the knee under ultrasound image guidance. Stromal and vascular cells are innate healing cells derived from the stromal component of adipose tissue.

HEALTH CAREERS

ment guidance standards for regenerative medicine therapies for orthopaedists until the regenerative medicine technologies are proven. Many orthobiologic regenerative treatments including PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) and stem cell injections are now widely promoted yet have not been approved by the FDA as safe and effective for osteoarthritis pain and are not generally covered by insurance. In May of 2021, the FDA is ending its discretionary enforcement period, a time period allotted for providers of unapproved regenerative therapies to gain compliance with FDA regulations. For more information about the clinical study, visit www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT04440189). William Cimino, Ph.D., is CEO of GID BIO. He specializes in system design and medical device technology and has designed and introduced medical products for tissue processing, plastic surgery, ultrasonic surgery, and cardiac catheter systems. He has been issued over 40 U.S. patents, is published in several journals, and holds a Ph.D. in bioengineering from the University of Utah, an M.S. in mechanical engineering from purdue University and a B.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Colorado. Email him at cimino@gidbio.com or www.healingintelligently. com. Dr. Shrock can be reached at dockshrock@gmail.com or visit https:// www.ftlauderdaleortho.com/. References: 1. Garza, J. R., R. E. Campbell, F. p. Tjoumakaris, K. B. Freedman, L. S. Miller, D. Santa Maria and B. S. Tucker, 2020: Clinical Efficacy of Intraarticular Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for the Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis: a Double-Blinded prospective Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial. The american Journal of Sports Medicine, 48, 588-598 2. Kotlarz H, Gunnarsson CL, Fang H, Rizzo Ja. Insurer and out-of-pocket costs of osteoarthritis in the US: evidence from national survey data. arthritis Rheum. 2009;60(12):3546-3553. 3. Kotlarz H, Gunnarsson CL, Fang H, Rizzo Ja. Insurer and out-of-pocket costs of osteoarthritis in the US: evidence from national survey data. arthritis Rheum. 2009;60(12):3546-3553. 4. Large Joint Devices Market analysis, Size, Trends | United States | 2018-2024 | MedSuite. iData Research. 2018.

Join a growing organization with an energetic & mission driven spirit that offers great benefits.

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ORLANDO || GRAND ROUNDS

Nemours Mobile Free Well Child Checks and Vaccines* For uninsured children 17 years old and younger. Family income must be less than or equal to 200 percent of the federal poverty guidelines. Please call (407) 650-7715 for an appointment. *Not including the COVID-19 vaccine.

LOCATIONS & DATES: • SATURDAY, MARCH 6 | 9A.M. TO 1P.M. Hope CommUnity Center 800 S. Hawthorne Ave., Apopka, FL 32703 • SATURDAY, MARCH 13 |9 A.M. TO 1P.M. Consulate of Mexico in Orlando 2550 Technology Dr., Orlando, FL 32804 • SATURDAY, MARCH 20 9A.M. TO 1P.M. Community Hope Center 20 Old Vineland Road Kissimmee, FL 34746

AdventHealth is First in Central Florida to Perform Innovative Procedure for Treating Aggressive Brain Tumors An AdventHealth neurosurgeon and radiation oncologist became the first team in Central Florida to use a new and potentially life-extending technology called GammaTile during brain surgery for cancer patients. The tiny tiles, no bigger than postage stamps, contain radioactive seeds embedded in biodegradable collagen, and are placed inside the brain after as much as possible of the tumor is surgically removed. Nearly 84,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with a primary brain tumor every year. An additional 70,000-plus people develop secondary brain tumors (metastases) as a result of cancer elsewhere in the body, such as in the lungs or breast. “We are limited with what we can do for certain brain cancers, and even for some non-cancerous brain tumors,” said Dr. Melvin Field, co-director of AdventHealth Orlando’s neuro-oncology program. “GammaTile gives us yet another tool to fight cancer on behalf of our patients and their families.” GammaTile begins killing cancer cells right away through precise emission of radiation. The tiles last about six weeks before being naturally absorbed by the body. The radiation targets only the adjacent cancer-involved tissues and minimizes damage to healthy tissue. Individuals that are physically close to the patient do not have to worry about exposure to radiation. “GammaTile is uniquely helpful because it begins working immediately after placement into the brain. The patient does not have to wait to heal from surgery before beginning the next phase of treatment, which means the cancer has less time to regrow before starting radiation,” said neuro radiation-oncologist Dr. Imran Mohiuddin. “It is very focal,” he said. “We do an excellent job of precisely targeting a high dose of radiation to only the problem areas while sparing healthy brain tissue that is even millimeters away. This translates to higher rates of cure while also sparing patients from difficult side effects of treatment, such as brain damage or hair loss.” GammaTile, which was approved by the FDA less than two years ago, can be used as a first- or second-line treatment. Having already performed two procedures this month, Field and Mohiuddin have utilized GammaTile for patients with progressive brain tumors despite previous treatment with conventional therapies. Find more information about the brain tumor program at the AdventHealth Neuroscience Institute here.

Orlando Health Names New Corporate Director of Diversity and Minority Business Development With more than 23 years of healthcare experience, Graham has held leadership positions at Beth Israel Medical Center and Renal Research Institute in New York and across Orlando Health, including her current position as administrator of allied health and support services. As corporate director of diversity and minority business development, Graham will lead Orlando Health’s diversity, equity, inclusion and minority business program. The department has partnered with team members and community organizations to support diverse and minority populations since 2013. In addition to leading the health system’s commitment to supporting diverse and minority populations, Graham will also lead diversity, equity and inclusion education and training for Orlando Health team members. “I am both honored and excited by the opportunity to further the impact Orlando Health is having in the community,” said Quib Graham, MSPH, BSN, LHRM, corporate director, diversity and minority business development. “I’m looking forward to partnering with our team members and local organizations as we continue in our efforts to support minority populations.” Graham earned a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from Dillard University, a Master of Science in public health with a concentration in health services administration from Meharry Medical College and a bachelor’s degree in nursing from the University of Central Florida. A member of the Central Florida Black Nurses Association and the Orlando Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., Graham is active in the community. She currently serves on advisory boards for the Orlando Day Nursery, WOMEN Unlimited, Inc., IMPower and MedSpeed Advisory Council and is on the board of the Dr. P. Phillips YMCA of Central Florida where she currently serves as vice-chair and helped coordinate the inaugural Y Diversity & Inclusion Matter forums at the YMCA.

Orlando Health Announces President of Future Orthopedic Hospital Orlando Health has tapped one of its own to oversee the ongoing development of the new Orlando Health Jewett Orthopedic Institute. Carlos Carrasco has been named president of Orlando Health Jewett Orthopedic Institute and senior vice president, Orlando Health. Carrasco has been with Orlando Health for 25 years, serving in various roles, his most recent being chief operating officer, Orlando Health Orlando Regional Medical Center and vice president operations, Orlando Health ORMC. In his new role, Carrasco will oversee the strategic development, operational performance, and construction of the new 370,000 sq. ft. orthopedic medical complex under construction on Orlando Health’s main campus in downtown Orlando. The complex, featuring a 75-bed orthopedic specialty hospital with 10 surgery suites and a medical pavilion with an ambulatory surgery center to house an additional 12 operating rooms, is scheduled to open Summer 2023. Additionally, he will lead the planning efforts for future development and growth to integrate orthopedic patient care, medical education, research, and innovation initiatives. Carrasco earned a Bachelor of Science in occupational therapy from the Medical University of South Carolina and a Master of Business Administration from Webster University.

Nemours Children’s Health System’s Mobile Medical Clinic Brings Healthcare to Children in Low-Income Local Communities Nemours Children’s Hospital providers are going on the road to bring health care to uninsured children in central Florida communities, thanks to the generosity of the TD Charitable Foundation, the charitable giving arm of TD Bank, America’s Most Convenient Bank. At select sites each Saturday through March 13, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., free preventative care physical examinations and health screenings for underserved children, age 17 and younger, are taking place in Orange, Seminole, and Osceola counties, at partner organizations including Hope CommUnity Center in Apopka, Community Hope Center in Kissimmee, community centers in Orange County, and the Florida Department of Health in Sanford. These organizations are identifying up to 20 children each week whose family income is less than or equal to 200 percent of the federal poverty guidelines to receive well check visits from Nemours providers from throughout the health system, including participants in NCH’s pediatric residency program. The mobile clinic visits just one site each Saturday. “We know that the pandemic has meant children may be falling behind in their vaccinations,” said Dr. Laura Chilcutt, a second-year pediatric resident at Nemours Children’s Hospital, who spearheaded this pilot program. “This mobile clinic is

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designed to bring health care out to the neediest in our community, where they live.” Dr. Chilcutt had the idea to repurpose an underutilized vehicle at Nemours for this community initiative that will serve to take health care out to the greater community. This effort is one of many ways that Nemours Children’s Health System is addressing the issue of access and population health. At these well check visits, children will be screened for social issues that may impact their health, from homelessness and language difficulties to transportation and income barriers that would prevent children from getting to an appointment. “Nemours Children’s Health System is diligently working to create a healthier population that meets the needs of the broader population, and that begins with children,” said Kara Odom Walker, MD, Senior Vice President and Chief Population Health Officer of Nemours Children’s Health System. “Efforts like this mobile clinic bring care out to the neediest areas, helping elevate the health of our overall community.” Nemours volunteer health providers at the clinics, being scheduled each Saturday from 9 am to 1 pm, will conduct free checkups and screenings. For more information and to register for an appointment, call (407) 650-7715.

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UF Health Study Shows Patients Choose Home Dialysis When Educated about Kidney Disease

Randy Owens, of Ocala, has struggled with his failing kidneys for many years, enduring countless trips to an outpatient dialysis center. Home dialysis is less expensive and allows the patient a greater degree of independence and convenience than going to a hospital or dialysis center. And it’s just as safe and effective. A move toward home dialysis has been emphasized for years by the federal government. Yet among the 500,000 Americans with end-stage kidney failure, only 11% choose this method of receiving dialysis, according to the Alliance for Home Dialysis. If that number crept up to 15%, it would save Medicare $1.1 billion, a 2009 study showed. University of Florida Health nephrologists found in a recent study that patient education can make a crucial difference in whether someone chooses home dialysis, clearly demonstrating the usefulness of training programs about kidney disease. An analysis of Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services data by UF Health researchers shows the rate of home dialysis use doubles after patients receive education about kidney disease and different types of dialysis. The study, published Dec. 1 in the journal Peritoneal Dialysis International, also shows that between 2010, when the CMS first allowed physicians and hospitals to bill Medicare for renal education, and 2014, less than 1% of 369,968 of the Medicare recipients starting dialysis had received education. “We are grossly underutilizing home dialy-

sis,” said UF Health nephrologist Ashutosh M. Shukla, M.D., the study’s lead author. “One of the concerns nationally has been that medical professionals believe they don’t know how to offer education or they don’t have the resources. And what this paper shows is just the fact that education is delivered — we’re not talking about quality — just the fact that it was delivered literally doubles the rate of home dialysis.” Shukla, an associate professor in the UF College of Medicine’s division of nephrology, hypertension and renal transplantation, said the study clearly demonstrates a lost opportunity to offer patients an alternative. Additionally, the study shows that in the group of Medicare patients who did not receive education, 60% had seen a nephrologist in the six months before they began dialysis. Shukla said this demonstrates that physicians have the opportunity to educate this population of patients. In either case, patients are freed up from the thrice weekly, four-hour sessions at a dialysis center or hospital, which can often be distant from a patient’s home. Peritoneal dialysis is easy enough that it can be done while a patient sleeps. Both require special equipment that Shukla noted can easily be mastered after training, such as that provided by a UF Health educational program.

Ocala Regional Medical Center and West Marion Community Hospital Named America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Orthopedic Surgery Ocala Regional Medical Center and West Marion Community Hospital are one of America’s 100 Best Hospitals for orthopedic surgery according to research released by Healthgrades, the leading resource that connects consumers, physicians and health systems. The hospitals that have achieved the Healthgrades America’s 100 Best Hospitals for orthopedic surgery have demonstrated exceptional quality of care. “Now more than ever, consumers understand the importance of hospital quality and starting to become more diligent when researching where they receive care,” said Brad Bowman, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Healthgrades. “When selecting a hospital, consumers can feel confident in the America’s 100 Best Hospitals for

orthopedic surgery for their commitment to quality care and exceptional outcomes.” This commitment to quality care is showcased through the investment Ocala Health has put toward their orthopedic service line. West Marion Community Hospital has established itself as one of the premier joint care centers in the state of Florida, with over 19,000 total joint surgeries since 2009. “West Marion Community Hospital and Ocala Health are dedicated to our high quality, best in class orthopedic services and are excited to continue investing in facilities that match the premier level of orthopedic care given to our patients,” says Chad Christianson, CEO of Ocala Health.

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Halifax Health, UF Health Announce Urology Collaboration Halifax Health and UF Health are proud to announce another collaboration to bring the highest level of urologic care to East Central Florida residents, UF Health Urology at Halifax Health. The program is led by board-certified surgeons Shawn Thomas, D.O., and Bennett Scaglia, M.D. Before joining the UF Health Urology at Halifax Health team, Scaglia served as the medical director of the prestigious Urohealth Institute of Illinois and served as a faculty member of the University of Illinois College of Medicine. He graduated with honors from the New York Medical College in 1987 and went on to postgraduate training in general surgery and urology for seven years. The first year of training was at the Eastern Virginia Medical School and the remaining years at the New York Medical College. Thomas is a graduate of the Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. After his residency training in general surgery and urology at the Einstein Medical Center Philadelphia, Thomas completed his fellowship in urologic oncology at the Cleveland Clinic Florida in Weston, Florida. While in his resi-

dency training, Thomas presented research at the annual American Urological Association meeting and received the American College of Osteopathic Surgeons’ award for best scientific poster presentation in urology. The joint effort between Halifax Health and UF Health raises the bar for world-class patient care in this region. “We are excited and grateful for the opportunity to be a part of this collaboration between Halifax Health and UF Health. Our No. 1 goal is to always provide a positive patient experience every day and be the leaders in our community when it comes to urologic care,” said Scaglia. To learn more about the program, please visit halifaxhealth.org/urology or call 386.317.3960.

Halifax Health Breaks Ground on First of Four ExpressCare Locations at Belvedere Medical Park-Port Orange Halifax Health in partnership with Noon Development has broken ground on one of four ExpressCare locations in Volusia County. In addition to breaking ground on the ExpressCare locations, Noon Development and Halifax Health are also breaking ground on Belvedere Medical Park- Port Orange, a medical office park. Halifax Health is the anchoring tenant, and there is another 10,000 square

feet which can be developed and leased to other medical specialists. Noon Development and Halifax Health are working on sites in Deltona, Daytona Beach Shores and Ormond Beach to increase access to care for Volusia County residents. The total investment in the community will be over $10 million and will create more than 40 jobs. https://www. halifaxhealthexpresscare.com

Jorge Hurtado, M.D. Joins Halifax Health – Center for Oncology Jorge Hurtado, M.D., a medical oncologist, has joined Halifax Health – Center for Oncology. Dr. Hurtado is a graduate of St. Georges University School of Medicine, West Indies, Grenada. He completed his residency in internal medicine at the Nassau University Medical Center, East Meadow, New York. Dr. Hurtado has also completed a fellowship in hematology and medical oncology at Jacksonville Memorial Hospital, University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine in Miami, Florida, and is board-certified in internal medicine. Halifax Health – Center for Oncology is accredited by the American College of

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Surgeons Commission on Cancer and offers a full-range of diagnostic testing, aggressive treatment, clinical trials and support to cancer patients and their families at locations in Daytona Beach, Ormond Beach, Port Orange and New Smyrna Beach. For more information on the programs and services offered by Halifax Health – Center for Oncology, call 386.425.4211 or visit halifaxhealth.org/oncology.

Profile for Orlando Medical News

Orlando Medical News March 2021  

Long-awaited Next Step at Lake Nona When Deborah German, MD, first arrived in Central Florida at the end of 2006 to helm the development of...

Orlando Medical News March 2021  

Long-awaited Next Step at Lake Nona When Deborah German, MD, first arrived in Central Florida at the end of 2006 to helm the development of...