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University of Oregon Ducks

NCAA STATUS 2011, 2012 and 2013 NCATA National Champions

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2014 Acrobatics & Tumbling Media Guide

NCAA EMERGING SPORTS CRITERIA Definition of an emerging sport: An emerging sport is a sport recognized by the NCAA that is intended to provide additional athletics opportunities to female student-athletes. Institutions are allowed to use emerging sports to help meet the NCAA minimum sportssponsorship requirements and also to meet the NCAA's minimum financial aid awards. Definition of a sport: For purposes of reviewing emerging sports for women proposals, a sport shall be defined as an institutional activity involving physical exertion with the purpose of competition versus other teams or individuals within a collegiate competition structure. Furthermore, sport includes regularly scheduled team and/or individual, head-to-head competition (at least five) within a defined competitive season(s); and standardized rules with rating/scoring systems ratified by official regulatory agencies and governing bodies. If an activity meets the definition of a sport, then a proposal and 10 commitment letters are submitted to the Committee on Women's Athletics (CWA). The proposal has to include documentation/supporting information that demonstrates that the sport meets the criteria received by the CWA when assessing the viability of the sport. The Criteria Addressed in the Proposal Must Include the Following: • There must be 20 or more varsity teams and/or competitive club teams that currently exist on college campuses in that sport. • Other data exists that demonstrates support for the sport. For example: o Collegiate recreation and intramural sponsorship. o High-school sport sponsorship. o Nonscholastic competitive programs. o Association and organization support. o U.S. Olympic Committee support (e.g., classified as an Olympic sport, National Governing Body support, grants). o Conference interest in sports sponsorship. o Coaches Association support. o Professional sports support. • There is a demonstrated understanding that once identified as an emerging sport, all NCAA institutions wishing to sponsor the sport at the varsity level must abide by all NCAA regulations, which include limits on playing and practice seasons, recruiting regulations and student-athlete eligibility. • Emerging-sport proposals must include information on general championship rules and format for the sport. In addition to the proposal, 10 letters of commitment must be submitted. The letters must be from 10 member institutions that sponsor or intend to sponsor the sport as an emerging sport and include the signatures of the president and the athletics director of those institutions. Additionally, the letters must be dated within one year of the submission of the proposal and letters. A sport that is removed from the list of emerging sports for women can seek reinstatement. At least twelve months must have passed since the effective date of removal from the list. The criteria for the proposal remain the same, except that 15 letters of commitment must be included and the proposal should explain why the circumstances for support of the proposal have changed since the sport’s removal from the list.

2011, 2012 and 2013 NCATA National Champions

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University of Oregon Ducks

NCAA EMERGING SPORTS HISTORY When the NCAA adopted the recommendations of its Gender-Equity Task Force in 1994, one of the recommendations was the creation of the list of emerging sports for women. Nine sports were on that first list. In the past 14 years, some have become championship sports, while others have been added to the list. NCAA bylaws require that emerging sports must gain championship status (minimum 40 varsity NCAA programs) within 10 years or show steady progress toward that goal to remain on the list. Institutions are allowed to use emerging sports to help meet the NCAA minimum sports-sponsorship requirements and minimum financial aid awards. Any sport, with proper, documented support, can self-identify as an emerging sport. In the years since the emerging-sports list was created, four have earned full-fledged championship status. Women’s rowing, which became a National Collegiate championship in 1997 and split into championships for each division in 2002, has seen the most growth — and had the longest time to see the impact of NCAA recognition. Women’s ice hockey and women’s water polo, which both earned NCAA championship status in the 2000-01 season, have experienced growth, too. Women’s bowling, a championship sport since 2003-04, is expected to see sponsorship numbers rise even higher in the upcoming season. Each of those sports has grown and succeeded uniquely. The NCAA Committee on Women’s Athletics is responsible for monitoring emerging-sport sponsorship and legislation. 1991: NCAA surveys its member institutions' expenditures for women's and men's athletics programs. Study results show undergraduate enrollment is about even (50/50), but male students constitute about 70 percent of the participants in intercollegiate athletics, their programs receive about 70 percent of athletics scholarship funds, 77 percent of operating budgets and 83 percent of recruiting funds. 1992: In response to the 1991 survey results, the NCAA Gender-Equity Task Force is established. 1993: The final report of the Gender-Equity Task Force is published. The Task Force recommends institutional standards and NCAA regulations to help achieve gender equity. Nine "emerging” sports (five team and four individual sports) are identified. 1994: The NCAA principle of gender equity is adopted at the NCAA Convention to create greater participation opportunities. 1994-95: Financial aid legislation and minimum contests and participants required for sports sponsorships applicable to emerging sports programs become effective. 1995-96: Amateurism legislation, seasons of competition legislation and awards and benefits legislation applicable to emerging sports programs become effective. 1996: A National Collegiate Championship for women's rowing is adopted at the NCAA Convention. Legislation to establish championships in emerging sports may be proposed during the second year in which 40 or more institutions sponsor the sport for two consecutive academic years. Financial aid legislation and minimum contest and participant requirements for some women's sports are revised for some emerging sports. 1996-97: Coaching limits and playing and practice legislation for emerging sports become effective. Institutions that sponsor an emerging sport must be in full compliance with all remaining NCAA legislation. [NOTE: Per NCAA Bylaw 14.01.6.2, the initial-, continuing- and general-eligibility legislation is only effective for student-athletes first entering the collegiate institution on or after August 1, 1996.] 1997: In April, the Council voted, effective August 1, 1997, to remove women's rowing from the list of emerging sports, inasmuch as the Association sponsored a national collegiate championship in that sport. 1998: Divisions I, II and III adopted noncontroversial legislation to identify equestrian as an emerging sport for women. However, the Division III Management Council decided to rescind equestrian as an emerging sport for women. 2000-01: Women’s ice hockey was removed from the list of emerging sports and the Association sponsored a national collegiate championship in that sport.

2011, 2012 and 2013 NCATA National Champions

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2014 Acrobatics & Tumbling Media Guide

NCAA EMERGING SPORTS HISTORY 2000-01: Women’s water polo was removed from the list of emerging sports and the Association sponsored a national 2000-01: Women’s water polo was removed from the list of emerging sports and the Association sponsored a national collegiate championship in that sport. collegiate championship in that sport.

2001-02: Division III established women’s ice hockey as a divisional championship. Division I and II still participate in a 2001-02: Division III established women’s ice hockey as a divisional championship. Division I and II still participate in a national collegiate championship. national collegiate championship.

2001-02: The women’s rowing national collegiate championship was reclassified and divisional championships were 2001-02: The women’s rowing national collegiate championship was reclassified and divisional championships were established for Divisions I, II and III. established for Divisions I, II and III.

2002-03: Rugby is added as an emerging sport for women in all three divisions.

2002-03: Rugby is added as an emerging sport for women in all three divisions.

2004: Women’s bowling was removed from the list of emerging sports and the Association sponsored a national 2004: Women’s bowling was removed from the list of emerging sports and the Association sponsored a national collegiate championship in that sport. collegiate championship in that sport. 2009: Women’s archery, badminton, synchronized swimming and and teamteam handball removed fromfrom the the list of sports 2009: Women’s archery, badminton, synchronized swimming handball removed listemerging of emerging sports in allinthree NCAA divisions for lack of growth. all three NCAA divisions for lack of growth. 2010: SandSand volleyball added to the sports for women in Division I and II. II. 2010: volleyball added to list theof listemerging of emerging sports for women in Division I and

Women's�Rowing

40

50

200 150 100 50 0

Women's�Bowling

37

60 40 20 0

5 23 25

39 43 42 45 44

49 52

1995�96* 1996�97* 1997�98* 1998�99* 1999�00* 2000�01* 2001�02* 2002�03* 2003�04* 2004�05* 2005�06* 2006�07* 2007�08*

32 20 23

56 59 61 61 6160 40 50 55

Sponsorship

Women's�Water�Polo 80 60 40 20 0

144 129138140141143141142144 90 98 111 122

1995�96* 1996�97* 1997�98* 1998�99* 1999�00* 2000�01* 2001�02* 2002�03* 2003�04* 2004�05* 2005�06* 2006�07* 2007�08*

21 22 30

72 74 75 7981 63 69 70

Sponsorship

100 80 60 40 20 0

1995�96* 1996�97* 1997�98* 1998�99* 1999�00* 2000�01* 2001�02* 2002�03* 2003�04* 2004�05* 2005�06* 2006�07* 2007�08*

Sponsorship

Women's�Ice�Hockey

Sponsorship

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2011, 2012 and 2013 NCATA National Champions

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University of Oregon Ducks

UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION Dr. Michael Gottfredson

Rob Mullens

President • Second Year

Director of Athletics • Fourth Year University of West Virginia, B.A., M.A.

Dr. Michael R. Gottfredson joined the University of Oregon as its 17th president in 2012. Previously, he was a professor of criminology, law, and society and of sociology at the University of California, Irvine, where he also served as executive vice chancellor and provost since 2000. Gottfredson holds a Ph.D. and an M.A. from the State University of New York, Albany, and an A.B. from the University of California, Davis. His research and teaching specialties are the causes of crime and delinquency and the criminal justice process. He (with Travis Hirschi) is well known for the development of the self-control theory of crime and delinquency and for the study of how these behaviors relate to age. The theory has stimulated a great deal of research, and their description of how and why age relates to crime has become central to research, theory, and policy about crime and delinquency. Gottfredson’s work on victimization led to the development of the “lifestyle/opportunity” theory of criminal victimization, a prominent explanation for differential risks from crime. His systematic study (with Don Gottfredson) of how arrest, prosecution, and sentencing decisions are made in criminal justice contributed to greater understanding of the use of discretion and to the widespread use of structured guidelines in the criminal law. As an administrator, he led a major expansion of the UC-Irvine infrastructure, blending state, campus, and private support. He helped to create the California Institute for Telecommunications and Technology, including the construction of a $55 million research facility, and the new public law school. Gottfredson is the author or editor (with others) of several books, including Control Theories of Crime and Delinquency (2003); Personal Liberty and Community Safety (1995); The Generality of Deviance (1994); A General Theory of Crime (1990); Decision-making in Criminal Justice (1988); Positive Criminology (1987); Policy Guidelines for Bail: An Experiment in Court Reform (1985); Understanding Crime (1980); and Victims of Personal Crime (1978). He has published numerous articles in journals, including Criminology, American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, Advances in Criminological Theory, and various law reviews. He has frequently consulted with state, county, and federal governments concerning criminal justice policy. Gottfredson is a Fellow of the American Society of Criminology and was the Andersen Consulting “Professor of the Year” in 1996 at the University of Arizona’s College of Business and Public Administration. Prior to joining UC-Irvine, Gottfredson served in several positions at the University of Arizona from 1985 to 2000, including interim senior vice president for academic affairs and provost, vice provost, and vice president of Undergraduate Education. Other academic positions Gottfredson has held include associate professor at the Claremont Graduate School, Claremont, California, from 1983-1985; associate professor of sociology, University of Illinois, Urbana, from 1981 to 1983; assistant professor at the Graduate School of Criminal Justice, State University of New York at Albany from 1977 to 1979; and director of the Criminal Justice Research Center in Albany, New York, from 1976 to 1979. He is married to Karol Gottfredson, who was the coordinator of the Intern Teacher Credential Program at UC-Irvine. The Gottfredsons have a daughter, Katherine, a son, Bryan, a daughter-in-law, Meghan, and two young granddaughters.

2011, 2012 and 2013 NCATA National Champions

Since being named the University of Oregon’s 12th director of intercollegiate athletics on July 15, 2010, Rob Mullens has wasted little time in putting his own stamp on the continual success of the Ducks’ athletics department while being the beneficiary of one of the most successful eras in school history. Mullens arrived at Oregon from the University of Kentucky, where he served as deputy director of athletics and managed day-to-day operations of Kentucky’s 22-sport athletics department, with an annual operating budget of $79 million. His background is in accounting and auditing, and he promoted sound fiscal management and self-sufficiency at the University of Kentucky. During his total of eight years at Kentucky, the athletic department’s operating budget expanded by nearly 70 percent. Fundraising for the department hit record levels each of the past seven years prior to his departure. In his brief tenure in Eugene, he has implemented his philosophy of financial effiency while overseeing an $87.8 million budget for the coming year, in addition to enhancing the department’s model of self-sufficiency. He also was at the helm as the Ducks opened their spectacular Matthew Knight Arena, witnessed the football team thrive in the BCS National Championship game as one of the school’s 12 programs advancing to post-season play, and proudly watched as the school claimed national championships in women’s indoor track & field and acrobatics and tumbling. Off the field, Mullens was just as excited to witness an accumulated graduation rate of 74 percent among all of the Ducks’ student-athletes, a single-season best six first-team Capital One Academic All-Americans and 105 academic allconference honorees. Prior to being named deputy director of athletics at Kentucky in 2006, Mullens began as the university’s executive associate director of athletics in 2002. He served at the University of Maryland from 1996 to 2002, starting as assistant director of athletics for business and ultimately as executive senior associate director of athletics and chief of staff. The West Virginia native was senior athletics business manager at the University of Miami (Fla.) from 1994 to 1996, and prior to that he was an accountant/auditor at Ernst & Young in Raleigh, N.C. Mullens (7/19/69) went to school at West Virginia University, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration and a master’s degree in sport management. He and his wife, Jane, have two sons, Cooper (9) and Tanner (6).

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