Old Towne Orange Plaza Review | Issue 107 | Jan-Feb 2022

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C e l e b r a t i n g 9 Ye a r s in O l d Tow n e !

Enjoy a made-to-order Husband & Wife:

meal featuring fresh produce,

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USDA premium Ranchero meats &

the season’s

freshest shrimp & fish. General & Cosmetic Dentistry

227 East Chapman Ave #C Old Towne Orange, CA 92866 / 714 - 538-6424

743 East Chapman Ave. 714-997-5495

Orange, CA 92866

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714.628.0633 Old Towne Orange / 11 am - 9 pm

121 North Lemon St.

Available for Private Events

Explore Your Creativity in the New Year! Check Out Our Calendar for Current Classes: dragonflyshopsandgardens.com

260 North Glassell St. Wed-Fri: 11 - Dark / Sat: 9-5 / Sun: 11- 4

Tel: 714- 289-4689

OrangeReview.com

Resident Old Towne Specialist

Since 1949

Orange’s #1 Home Seller O ra n g e R e a lty .com Old To w n e O r an ge .com

714- 997-0050 x 101

“News for the Neighborhood”

January / February 2022


I N S I D E A RT : S t o r y o n p a g e 2 6

“ S a i n t C h r i s t o p h e r P ra ye r ” by Michael Johnson (Capio Lumen) / Digital, 2021 F i n d o u t W h a t ’s H a p p e n i n g i n t o w n e a t :


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Your Neighborhood Realtors DOUG WILLITS / CALBRE #01787611

SUSIE WILLITS / CALBRE #01852527

BEN WILLITS / CALBRE #0185881

# 1 BROKERAGE IN ORANGE *

Visit us at our Old Towne Orange Location at 229 North Glassell St. for Professional Representation. Call us today: 714-315-8120

Buy / Sell / Lease Specializing in Orange & Surrounding Communities * Results based on production from office located in zip code displayed. Data provided by California Regional Multiple Listing Service and its member Associations of REALTORS, who are not responsible for its accuracy. Analysis dates are 12/01/19 though 11/30/2020. Does not reflect all activity in the Marketplace. Analysis results © 2020 Real Data Strategies, Inc., under license to Lalapoint, LLC and named MLS member firms. All rights reserved. License #00745605

dougw@sevengables.com • swillits@sevengables.com • benw @ sevengables.com 4

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Since 2001

Old Towne Orange PLAZAREVIEW

From the Publisher I especially enjoy how Old Towne Orange effortlessly combines the past with the present and future. Stand on any corner in the Plaza, and you’ll see establishments harkening back to the past next door to contemporary businesses. It’s this unique blend of old and new that I have so enjoyed about being the publisher of the Old Towne Orange Plaza Review these past 20 years. At the Plaza Review, while we honor the past, we also share exciting new offerings and upcoming events via our much-loved “old school” print edition, as well as online. The print issue you’re holding in your hands will likely get tucked away once read, but the online version with our vast archive of stories is always available on our website at www.OrangeReview.com. This includes 2012 issues of a decade ago—the covers of which you will see in this issue. As I look back at the Plaza Review over the last two decades, I see many familiar faces. This includes all our wonderful advertisers, without whom the Plaza Review would not be in existence. Some of those advertisers have been with us from the beginning, while others have come along in more recent years. These advertisers include Jadtec Security, Villa Ford, Chapman University, the Hilbert Museum, Blaze Pizza, Rutabegorz, Summerhill Ltd., Paris in a Cup, Guardian Roofs, Shafer Plumbing, O SEA, the Orange Chamber of Commerce and Skin Care by Cristina. There’s something about a new year and the new beginnings and fresh perspectives brought forth that create a rush of excitement. I look forward to seeing what unfolds in 2022 and sharing the news with you, our muchappreciated reader!

What’s Happening

. . .

JANUARY 2022 Fri / Jan 14 / 3 - 4:30 pm Orange Art Association Artist Reception Juried Member Art Show, through Jan 28. View the finest works of art by members of the Orange Art Association, with many artworks for sale. Tustin Area Senior Center 200 South ‘C’ St / 714-356-6478 cbnorris45@yahoo.coml Sat / Jan 15 Chapman College of Performing Arts Music Camp Registration Opens $100 early bird discount ends Mar 15 Instrumental Music Camp, Jun 13-17 Choral Music Camp, Jun 20-24 View ad on page 6 Chapman.edu / 714-997-6871 Sat / Jan 22 / 3 - 4:30 pm Orange Public Library Foundation Robotics Roundup A class featuring a custom curriculum designed to teach engineering fundamentals for grades 6 to 12. Orange Public Library 407 East Chapman Ave / 714-288-2418 www.oplfoundation.org

Sat / Jan 29 / 6 - 8 pm Hilbert Museum of California Art Opening Reception for Winter Exhibits “Bradford Salamon: Forging Ahead” and “California Water Color Society: The First Fifty Years” (on view through May 7). Free with online registration at www.hilbertmuseum.com/contact-1 167 North Atchison St / 714-516-5880 www.HilbertMuseum.org Sun / Jan 30 / 5 pm Musco Center for the Arts An Evening with John Leguizamo Lessons he’s learned, characters he’s encountered, his passion for education, his own struggles against racism and poverty within an extraordinary career. 415 North Glassell St / 844-626-8726 www.MuscoCenter.org Mon / Jan 31 / 6 - 8 pm Orange Chamber of Commerce “An Evening of Wine” Mixer Enjoy Villa Antinori wines and a fivecourse gourmet Italian meal. $135 per person. Pre-registration by Jan 24. Da Bianca Trattoria: 7448 East Chapman 714-538-3581 / orangechamber.com

Sincerely, Mike Escobedo 134 South Glassell St. / Orange, CA 92866 714 - 771 - 6919 Mike@OrangeReview.com

“ News For The Neighborhood ” Old Towne Orange Plaza Review © 2021 Mike Escobedo Design. All rights reserved. The material herein contained cannot be reproduced in whole or in part without the written permission of Mike Escobedo Design.

www. OrangeReview .com

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!

Around the Plaza FEBRUARY 2022

ONGOING

Thu / Feb 10 / 6 pm Community Foundation of Orange “Give Where You Live” Gala An invitation to Orange residents & businesses to make a difference. Honoring the Orange Elks Lodge. Grand Gimeno Event Center 146 North Grand St / 714-288-9909 www.communityfoundationoforange.org

Every Fri / 9:30 - 11:30 am Orange Home Grown Educational Farm Volunteer Farm Friday Plant, harvest, compost, mend soil. For all ages, with new volunteers paired with seasoned volunteers. 356 N Lemon / OrangeHomeGrown.org

Every Sat / 2 - 5 pm Marinus Welman Open Studio Visit the working studio of artist Marinus Welman. Ad on page 27. 2402 North Glassell St #A MarinusWelman.com / 714-998-8662

134 South Glassell St / Orange 92866

Jan/Feb 2022

Publishing Team

Publisher Mike Escobedo Mike@OrangeReview.com

Fri / Feb 11 / Opening Night Sat / Feb 12 / Gala Night Chapman University Chapman Celebrates A Broadway-style extravaganza that is the university’s largest fundraising event of the year. Article on page 24 415 North Glassell St / 714-997-6812 www.chapman.edu/events Sat / Feb 19 / Noon - 5 pm Musco Center for the Arts Ballet Folklórico Fest The Heartbeat of Mexico program takes flight in full glory with this premier Mexican-American dance group. 415 North Glassell St / 844-626-8726 www.MuscoCenter.org

Every Sat / 9 am - 11 am Woman’s Club Events Center Open House Tours Tour an ideal Old Towne location to host your next event. View ad on page 8. 121 South Center St / 714-605-3753 www.OrangeWC.com Every Sat / 9 am - 1 pm Orange Home Grown Farmers Market A great way to begin your day, with quality produce & fresh healthy foods. 2nd Sat Free Cooking Demo 3rd Sat Kids Club / Seed Lending 303 West Palm / OrangeHomeGrown.org Every Sat / 10:30 - 11:30 am Naranjita Flamenco Adult Beginner Class Easy-to-follow instruction. Ad on page 26. naranjitaflamenco.com / 714-400-2939

1st & 3rd Wed / Noon - 1 pm Orange Chamber of Commerce Business Networking Group An opportunity to share business info. Colleary’s Bistro / 2143 North Tustin St 714-538-3581 / orangechamber.com

Editor/Writer Julie Bawden-Davis julie@juliebawdendavis.com Writer Karen Anderson 123karen@earthlink.net Writer Yuki Klotz-Burwell

Jan - Feb Seeds Fine Art Fine Art Exhibit Paintings by muralist/designer Tom Clark. Full Circle Meaningful Marketplace 140 South Glassell St / 714-225-5695 www.SeedsFineArt.org Dragonfly Shops & Gardens Monthly Workshops Including Mosaic Tiling, Kokedamas, Fairy Gardens, Baubles & more. 260 North Glassell St / 714-289-4689 www.DragonflyShopsandGardens.com Through May 7 Hilbert Museum of California Art Fine Art Exhibitions Capio Lumen, Chuck Jones, Forging Ahead, California Water Color Society 167 North Atchison St / 714-516-5880 www.HilbertMuseum.org

klotz105@mail.chapman.edu Writer Marianne Lauren jmhss@aol.com Writer Mary Platt platt@chapman.edu Photographer Kristin Smetona info@smetonaphoto.com Digital Artist Clyde San Juan crookedtrails@hotmail.com Web Developer Chase Higgins chasehiggins@me.com Printed by SCNG Printing estella@scngprinting.com Processed by Mailing Pros, Inc. MPI@MailingProsInc.com Distributed by the US Postal Services www.usps.com

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NEW TO THE NEIGHBORHOOD by Yuki Klotz-Burwell

Serving the City

Modern Wealth Design

Big Enough to Provide the Capacity Needed

Small Enough to Assure Individual Attention

FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED

/

SmetonaPhoto.com

As the last chapter of the year closes, the Orange community looks toward opening a new page in 2022. The folks and establishments featured here, Elizabeth Holloman of the Orange Chamber of Commerce, Modern Wealth Design and Ruby’s Diner & Streamliner Lounge, all aim to find new ways to serve the city this upcoming year.

PHOTO BY KRISTIN SMETONA

If your New Year’s resolution is to take control of your budget, stop by Modern Wealth Design, a financial services company that moved its office to Old Towne at the end of November. Although the firm has been around for almost eight years, Modern Wealth Design partners Adam Carr and Nicole Letarte just moved their practice to Orange from Irvine. “Our team has always loved downtown atmospheres, and Orange just checked every single box,” says Carr. “It’s ideal to be right in the heart of the city.” Modern Wealth Design offers a variety of financial planning services for customers, including investing advice, debt strategizing, insurance solutions and retirement planning. At Carr and Letarte’s practice, you’ll find a team of passionate, experienced financial planners who truly enjoy making a difference. “Even in the second grade I knew I wanted to do something in finance,” says Carr. “This combination of being able to work with numbers and have a huge impact on people is something that’s hard to find anywhere else.” Letarte is also keen on using her financial savviness as a method for changing lives. “Growing up, I always wanted to help women and families because I feel it’s very important for women to always have that financial background,” she says. “Now, I love to create customized plans for our clients and show them how to be successful in the future.” The team at Modern Wealth Design also focuses on an oftenneglected clientele of financial planning: younger adults. The duo’s mindset is that you’re never too young to start preparing for retirement, and they’re eager to

of Orange

From left, Partner and Financial Planner Adam Carr, Partner and Financial Planner Nicole Letarte and Financial Planner Hannah Sullivan are here to serve all types of clients in Orange. They hope to strengthen their bond with the community. Carr and his wife are even searching for a historic Old Towne house to call home.

help young professionals in every aspect of their finance journey. “It’s been encouraging to see more young families and workers take an interest in their financial futures,” says Carr. “We feel like this age group is often overlooked by financial firms, and they might need the help and guidance more than anyone.” The planners recognize that financial prepping isn’t something that comes naturally to most people, which is why they invite anyone to stop by for a

Young Enough to Use New Ideas

complimentary consultation. “Our speciality is getting to know our clients and giving them a comprehensive plan,” says Letarte. “People are scared to start, but it’s important to just talk to a financial planner because it will only benefit you in the end.” Looking forward to 2022, Carr and Letarte hope to integrate themselves into the Orange

community and connect with their neighbors. They’ve started reaching out to local businesses to help with financial education and aim to do seminars at Orange Senior Center. “I’ve been doing this for almost 10 years, and having people cry happy tears in your office after you made a massive impact on them is something that will never get old,” says Carr.

Modern Wealth Design 134 South Glassell St. / 949-439-8116 www.modernwealthdesign.com

Old Enough to Have Profited by Experience

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Serving the

City of Orange

Orange Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Elizabeth Holloman stands in front of the organization’s new offices in the Plaza. This year marks the Chamber’s 100th anniversary, and Holloman led a ribbon cutting ceremony last August to celebrate the new office space.

CONT. FROM PAGE 11

/ PHOTO BY KRISTIN SMETONA

This past June, the Orange Chamber of Commerce welcomed Elizabeth Holloman as its newest Executive Director. The Chamber also celebrated its 100th anniversary this year. Holloman is looking forward to continuing to build off the momentum from the past century. “I’m so inspired by the people that I work with on a daily basis at the Chamber,” she says. “I’m always reminded of how bright, capable and civic-minded they are.” Holloman originally got started with the Chamber after planning the 2019 revival of the Orange May Parade, which had not been active for almost 30 years. She grew up in Orange and says her memories of the parade would always come back to her. “The May Parade left a big imprint on my mind as a connection to the city and how important it was as a child to feel that connection to where I grew up,” she says. Before joining the Chamber, Holloman explored several career industries that give her the expertise to be a voice for the city’s business community. She interned as a journalist at CNN, taught math and science for 20 years and served as a middle school director.

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Elizabeth Holloman Orange Chamber of Commerce

“Being a director and a teacher gave me a lot of good training ground for being in charge of the Chamber,” she says. When Holloman retired as a teacher, she expanded her business experience to a new undertaking: Bissie’s Garden, a homemade jam

and jelly company. “I love to cook and garden, so I started making jams and selling them at boutiques,” she says. “At my peak, I was making about 800 to 1000 jams a year.”

Now that she’s been leading the Chamber for half a year, Holloman can directly see how her experience can be used to better the businesses within Orange. “Once I started Bissie’s Garden, I was able to see the ins and outs of having a business and how to manage it,” she says. “Now I’m focused on serving the business community in a way that helps them, as well as the entire city.” As she heads into her first full year as the Executive Director, Holloman is enthusiastic about new partnerships and strategies. Her next venture is promoting a joint tourism project with the Anaheim Chamber of Commerce. “Elizabeth has a deep love for her Orange community, and she knows how to turn her great ideas into reality,” says Vice Chair Pat Buttress. “She has brought new life to our Chamber.”

Orange Chamber of Commerce 34 Plaza Square / 714-538-3581 / www.orangechamber.com

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NEW TO THE NEIGHBORHOOD

/ PHOTO BY KRISTIN SMETONA

Whether you’re in the mood for a chocolate milkshake or just a nostalgic diner feeling, stop by Ruby’s Diner & Streamliner Lounge in Orange, which reopened last year under new management. After the eatery shut down in early 2020 due to the pandemic, David Saighani, who’s worked at different Ruby’s locations for more than 20 years, stepped in to purchase the franchise. He and his business partner, Max Mirbaz, have revamped the establishment to get it ready for new customers. “Prior to being in the Ruby’s franchise business, I managed a few other restaurants but I never owned one,” says Saighani. “It’s been my dream to own a restaurant, so now was a great opportunity for us to take over.” The Ruby’s Diner chain originated in 1982 at Balboa Pier, but since then the business has grown to 20 locations in four states, with the bulk in Southern California. The menu is known for its classic burgers, shakes and sandwiches, and Saighani says a goal for 2022 is to update the menu. “When I tell people about Ruby’s, the first thing they say is that we have the best shakes,” says Saighani. “We want to step it up a notch, so we’re working on a new menu that will roll out in January.”

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Ruby’s Diner & Streamliner Lounge

In the new year, the Ruby’s team is also hoping to invite more of the Orange community to enjoy the food and event space at the location. “We’re trying to become a staple here in Orange, so we do a lot of school fundraisers,” says General Manager Cristen Astbury. “We take on as much as we can with special projects just to help out the community.” To further support Old Towne, the Ruby’s team is offering free event space for their private banquet room at the Streamliner Lounge, a full-service bar connected to the

Pictured here showing off some of the restaurant’s most popular dishes are (from left) Ruby’s Diner Orange Owner David Saighani, General Manager Cristen Astbury and Owner Max Mirbaz. Before working in Ruby’s franchise locations for more than 20 years, Saighani gained experience through managing restaurants like Red Robin and Coco’s Bakery.

Under the new management, restaurant. The lounge has happy Ruby’s Diner is also gearing its hour and private party options eatery toward including more and a new menu that will also be kids and families as customers. adjusted in the new year. “I really enjoy seeing kids “We have bands playing on celebrating and just enjoying an Fridays and Saturdays, and I love evening out,” says Mirbaz. “That’s seeing the regulars who come in,” why I joined the business, and I says Saighani. “The pandemic want to keep growing it and serving hasn’t helped us, but I strive to people here in Orange.” make sure our guests come back and enjoy themselves.” Ruby’s Diner & Streamliner Lounge 186 North Atchison St. / 714-639-7829 / www.rubys.com

Happy

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KNOW THE NEIGHBORS by Yuki Klotz-Burwell

Spreading the

Love

For years, Orange has maintained its noble status as the antique capital of Southern California. The vintage community within Old Towne is filled with dedicated members who spread a love for antiques. The three shop owners featured here, Steve Molina, Dan Riley and Debbie Watts, showcase the entrepreneurial spirit that truly pushes Old Towne to be a leader in the vintage space.

Steve Molina’s Collectibles

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SmetonaPhoto.com

“There’s never a dull moment in this job,” says Molina. “It’s all about making your work fun, and it’s easy to do that here.” While some career paths have an obvious divide between work and play, Molina and Davey say their job feels like their main hobby. “We love to travel, but even when we go on vacation, we end up finding somewhere to shop for antiques,” says Molina. “The job just goes hand in hand with what we like to do.” The pair end up traveling for work intentionally, too. The antique scene within Southern California is rich with opportunities, and Molina and Davey try to take advantage of the space they have. “I really like the freedom we have to just get up and drive somewhere, especially if we have a lead on an item,” says Davey. Like any business owner, Molina has had ups and downs. Whenever he feels uninspired, he reminds himself why he does the work he loves. “Even when I want to call it quits, I remember how fun this job is and how we have something unique to offer everyone,” he says. “I encourage people to come in and just feel the nostalgia everywhere.”

PHOTO BY KRISTIN SMETONA

When antique store booth owner Steve Molina of Steve Molina’s Collectibles sold an art easel on eBay in 2010, he never imagined that it would spiral into a full-time shop less than a decade later. After he made his first sale, Molina realized he had the drive to start selling antique and thrift items as a side hobby. He was working in special events at Disneyland, and soon teamed up with a coworker to learn everything he could about the trade. “We started doing storage auctions together, and then it snowballed from there,” says Molina. “I developed an appreciation for the antique realm, and it’s blossomed since then.” Now, Molina offers antique items, wartime memorabilia, vintage clothing and more at his store inside the Orange Circle Antique Mall. He set up shop in 2013 and has stayed committed to bringing relics to the community. “The store is a sentimental spot for me because of the people I’ve met and the relationships I have in the Plaza,” he says. “Orange is home to me.” In 2019, Molina met his fiancée, Gretchen Davey, another Disneyland employee. The pair hit it off quickly and realized that they were both passionate about the antiques industry, so they made the jump to full-time antiquers.

Steve Molina and his fiancé, Gretchen Davey, pose inside of their booth at Orange Circle Antique Mall. When they aren’t traveling in search of new pieces, the pair love watching old movies, cementing their devotion to all things vintage.

Steve Molina’s Collectibles Orange Circle Antique Mall 118 South Glassell St. 714-538-8160

We Sincerely “Thank You” Our Amazing Customers for Your Loyal Suppor t!

www. B y b l o s O r a n ge .com

129 West Chapman Ave. / 714.538.7180 Open Wed - Sat: 8 am - 9 pm

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Spreading the Love

KNOW THE NEIGHBORS

CONT. FROM PAGE 15

/ PHOTO BY KRISTIN SMETONA

On Dan Riley’s first day of work at Riley’s Jewelry Services, he made his first ring sale within an hour. For the past 26 years, he’s kept up that success by providing Old Towne with jewelry buying, selling, trading and repairing needs through his store inside Antique Station. “I get to repair people’s jewelry and make them happy,” he says. “It’s very rewarding.” Riley discovered his passion for jewelry and gems when he was young, and almost immediately fell into the industry. When he was 12, a neighbor he had a crush on showed him a jewelry project gone awry, and he wanted to understand the mechanics of the issue. “I was always fascinated by pirate treasure as a kid,” he says. “I took a class to see what my neighbor was talking about, and then I never stopped.” In the past year, Riley’s business has seen a non-stop flow of happy customers. With the opening of the Paseo, he says he’s had an unparalleled amount of growth in new clients. A portion of that comes from the consistent flow of consumers in Old Towne, but Riley also focuses on wordof-mouth promotions instead of traditional advertising.

SmetonaPhoto.com

Dan Riley Riley’s Jewelery Services

Dan Riley and his stepdaughter, Andrea Eisnaugle, show off noteworthy rings for sale at Riley’s Jewelry Services. When he’s not repairing Old Towne neighbors’ jewelry, Riley loves playing the guitar and airs electric background music at his store.

“He’s really great with customers because he’s talented and honest,” says Andrea Eisnaugle, Riley’s stepdaughter, who has worked with him for the past

A portion of Riley’s customers are more than just referrals, too— they’re family. He’s seen generations of clients come through his store, and he spends time to really get to know his customers as individuals. “When I first opened this store, I didn’t think that 25 years later I’d be selling jewelry to the babies of my first customers,” he says. “It’s been a joy to make people happy.” While much of the Plaza’s foot traffic leads to customers seeking jewelry repair services, Riley also offers some custom-made jewelry work. Eisnaugle herself received a ring from his services, and she remembers the care her stepfather put into casting the jewelry. Her husband bought a vintage 1920s engagement ring from the shop, and Riley took the time to create a custom band specifically for the piece. “He says he does limited custom work, but I believe he can do anything,” she says. “Customers keep coming back to him, and it seems like they have a twinkle in their eyes when they talk to him.”

seven years. “People come back and refer their friends to him because he actually listens to the Riley’s Jewelry Service customers.” Antique Station 178 South Glassell St. / 714-538-7000

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F i n d o u t W h a t ’s H a p p e n i n g i n t o w n e a t :


Antique shop booth owner Debbie Watts displays a few vintage items available for sale at her space. Before entering the antiques industry, Watts graduated from interior design school and realized she was passionate about being creative and artistic.

/ PHOTO BY KRISTIN SMETONA

No matter what business venture she’s taking on, antique seller Deborah Watts, owner of Blossoms ~Vintage Chic Living located in Country Roads Antiques, finds a way to practice creativity. Although she’s now focused on curating antiques, she previously worked in the interior design and floristry industries. “What I’ve always wanted to do from the beginning was to design and furnish any place,” says Watts. “With all the antiques I sell, it feels so good that they’ve been lived and loved, and it’s an honor to pass them along.” For the past 10 years, Watts has set up shop at Country Roads with multiple booths, including the window display and a garden space. She’s no stranger to flora— before entering the antiques business, Watts owned the flower shop, Blossoms, Flowers & Furnishings, for 25 years. Although her shop was small, her prime location across from Costa Mesa’s South Coast Plaza shopping center connected her with many mall clients looking for floral window displays. As Watts started to explore more antique shops and flea markets on her hunt for storefront decor, she met with the late Country Roads founder Sue Jackson.

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Debbie Watts Blossoms~Vintage Chic Living

“Sue encouraged me to come join and make my own space,” she says. “Meeting her really opened my eyes to a new journey.” As Watts continued to expand her booths at Country Roads, her friendship with Sue and the rest of the team grew to be her favorite part of the job.

“Sue created a beautiful environment at the store,” says Watts. “She was such a special part of my growth in the industry, and it warms my heart to be at a place like that.”

Since Sue’s passing, her children continue to run Country Roads, and Watts has played a big role in helping keep Sue’s traditions and spirit. “For the past ten years, Debbie and her late husband, Larry, have been like our family,” says Sue’s daughter Katie Jackson. “She’s so talented at what she does, and so humble.” Though Watts faced the loss of her mother, husband and Sue in the past two years, she finds solace in selling antique goods and looks forward to getting more involved with Country Roads in the new year. She says she’s found her true passion and comes home happy every day from her antique shopping expeditions. “I have such a love for this business, and I find joy in what I curate every day,” says Watts. “It’s a constant hunt, but it’s so rewarding.”

Debbie Watts Blossoms~Vintage Chic Living Country Roads Antiques & Gardens 216 West Chapman Ave. / 714-532-3041

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The 1910 California Craftsman bungalow features a 111-year-old solid wood front door, original windows, antique brick path and rare long-shingle-pattern siding.

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maintaining a timeless style that is light, bright and airy. They installed custom Shaker-style cabinets with brass accents, plus quartz counters that reveal eyecatching brown-and-gold veining. Additionally, they added a beautiful black faucet they found at a shop in the Plaza that goes great with their brand-new cast-iron enameled sink. They also updated the cabinet doors on the kitchen’s original hutch, which is unusually deep and offers lots of storage. The exposed brick in the kitchen is actually part of the chimney of the former fireplace on the other side of the wall. An accomplished cook, Nataly

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enjoys making such dishes as handmade dumplings, spring rolls, Korean barbecue and Japanese-style shabu-shabu, to name a few. She inherited her culinary skills from her father who owned the legendary Tai Buu Paris Restaurant in Garden Grove. “I was raised at the restaurant,” says Nataly. “My dad is a chef who trained at Le Cordon Bleu culinary school in Paris, France. Just like my parents did when I was growing up, I enjoy hostessing. We love having friends visit, and we want this house to feel like home for anyone who comes over. By design, our kitchen is

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upgrading the air-conditioning. The biggest project facing them, however, was the kitchen, which needed an entire remodel and update. “I like to cook anything and everything, so I spend a lot of time in the kitchen,” says Nataly. “We remodeled this kitchen so that it’s modernized and easy to maintain. It has a clean palette that looks like it’s out of WilliamsSonoma, yet it’s still in keeping with the era of the house.” For the kitchen remodel, Matt enlisted the help of his best friend, a licensed contractor. Together they worked on transforming the entire space while

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When Matt and Nataly Thompson purchased their historic Craftsman bungalow in Old Towne earlier this year, little did they know just how perfect the house and neighborhood would be for their growing family. Working from home while raising their two-year-old son, Phillipe, the creative couple has infused their own style into the circa-1910 property, located just around the corner from the Plaza. Although much of the home was in relatively good shape before they moved in, there were some inevitable repairs and improvements that had to be made, including replacing the roof and

Fresh Air

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Matt, Nataly and Phillipe stand under the entry to the dining room, where period-inspired wood floors showcase ornamental wood-inlay borders. Abundant natural light streams through the entire home.

Midcentury modern-style furnishings bring timeless accents to the living room. The stonework on the far wall once housed a wood-burning stove that was the main source of heat for the house at one time.

Written by Karen Anderson Photos by Kristin Smetona: www.smetonaphoto.com

perfect for entertaining. Luckily, the previous owner put in an amazing grill on the back deck just outside the kitchen door. I can sous-vide a steak in the kitchen and then finish it on the grill outside on the deck.” According to Matt, the original property once shared the carriage

house with the Royer Mansion next door. Today, there is a newer structure in the same location where the carriage house once stood. At one point in its history, the home was owned by the Hitchcock family, who had a furniture store in town. Although the house had been a rental for the last 20 years, the

previous owner took excellent care of it, says Matt. “We got to meet the seller,” he says. “He showed us an indentation in the curb where his son got his boot stuck in the wet concrete. We could tell how much he loved the house, and that he had put so much love and care into the home.

He built a loft area inside, and also redid the hardwood floors, which have these beautiful, dark borders. There’s also a finished basement that’s not original to the house.” One of their favorite spots in the house, the front porch is a great place to watch the sunset, CONTINUED ON PAGE 20

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Pocket doors are hidden within the wall and can divide the space whenever needed. Nataly’s workspace occupies a sunlit spot in the dining room.

The newly remodeled kitchen sits within the original kitchen’s footprint. The hutch on the left is original to the home and has been updated with new doors and hardware.

A Breath of

Fresh Air

share a glass of wine and wave to neighbors as they walk down the street. With abundant light streaming inside, their formal dining area features a gorgeous mid-century table they found at an antique shop in the Plaza. There

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The couple purchased the 1960s dining table and chairs from an antique mall in the Plaza. The original hutch displays handmade stoneware from their friend Beth Bowman of Bowman Ceramics. The small black window was a 1920s addition designed to create natural airflow. CONT. FROM PAGE 19

are two small transom windows in the dining room that allow the breeze to flow. “One of our favorite features of the home are the pocket doors in the living room,” says Matt. “They harken back to the concept

of a speakeasy. They are hung on the original brackets and still retain the original brass pulls.” As creative professionals who work from home, Matt and Nataly also feel right at home in Old Towne. Having specialized in

advertising and marketing, Matt had previously launched several online platforms focused on commercial real estate. He currently does financial analysis for a cloud computing company. Nataly is a producer for Bravo

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The rug in the nursery was a gift from their good friend Lily of May Martin Jewelry. The Joshua Tree print recalls camping trips taken by the couple, while the print of Yosemite National Park conjures memories of their engagement photo shoot.

TV’s hit “Below Deck” franchises, working with a team of producers to build out storylines for each episode. She has also worked on shows for the Discovery Channel. In their spare time, Nataly and Matt continue to make improve-

T OWNE

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The block wall in the backyard marks the original location of a carriage house once shared with previous homeowners and the Royer Mansion. The sunroom adjacent to the deck looks out onto the backyard.

ments to their home, adding artwork and framed photos throughout. Polaroid photos are sprinkled around the house that conjure up fun memories. “We like to infuse a little bit of humor into our daily lives,” says Nataly. “Our

house is a collection of things that mean a lot to us over time.” For Matt and Nataly, living in Old Towne is a breath of fresh air. They appreciate the convenient proximity to shops, restaurants, parks, services and more. “We go

to the farmers market every Saturday,” says Nataly. “We enjoy being so close to the Plaza and getting to know our neighbors. Old Towne is a really special place. It just feels like its own little world.”

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J OHNNYE

M ERLE’S

G ARDENS

Planting an

Making

TALK OF THE

TOWNE

Changes ! Eco-Minded Garden

Water retention Though drought tolerance should be the number one consideration for most Southern California gardeners, when planning your garden, it’s also important to think about ways to make the most of and to collect rainwater when we do get it. This can be achieved in a variety of ways. Rain barrels are a great mechanism to capture water to use later (and rain chains are fun, too!) Also think in terms of maximizing the water that hits the ground by using water-retentive materials like coconut coir and peat moss in your soil mixes and compost. This will ensure the water that is used—whether it comes from the sky or your hose—gets as much use as possible and doesn’t dry or evaporate too quickly. Olla irrigation is another great way to maximize water use. In essence, an olla is a clay vessel—wide at the bottom with a narrow “bottle style” opening at the top—that is buried in a planter with only the top inch or so remaining above ground. Once filled, water slowly dissipates into the surrounding soil, a process that also promotes healthy root growth. It works particularly well for vegetable gardens but is good for all sorts of other types of gardens, too. Mini versions of this are available for potted plants as well. Compost California is mandating composting beginning in 2022, but you don’t have to rely on the bins provided by your local municipality to do it. Composting is quite easy and can provide a lot of benefits to your garden! You can build a “compost corner” in your yard using cinder blocks or buy a pre-made compost bin. They have really come down in price in recent years, and some models are quite small and compact. Add in some worms, and you’ll have a fun new title of “worm farmer” to add to your resume! Birds and the Bees Always think about our flying friends! Planting native bloomers, like milkweed, helps our bees and butterfly populations. Remember to cut back your milkweed each winter to prevent fungal growth and other diseases that can harm caterpillars later in the year. The new growth should be healthy and fine if you cut back. Don’t forget that many species of birds also benefit from your “tubular” style blooms. A water feature or two—even the humble yet refined birdbath—can go a long way to helping wildlife in the dryer months, too. In addition to milkweed, pop some native California poppies in the ground. Winter is the time to plant them. Add some salvias and yarrow, and you’ll have yourself a drought tolerant, native, wildlife friendly garden in no time! With just a few small steps, you can make your garden even greener than it already is!

Since opening the doors to his seafood restaurant concept, O SEA, in Old Towne Orange on June 1, proprietor Mike Flynn has listened to his guests. “The way I was trained, all the answers you need to run your business and build the restaurant can be found by talking to guests,” says Flynn. “They’ll tell you what they like and what they don’t like.” The original vision for the concept was to open a seafood restaurant “of time and place” reflective of the community in which it is located. In model and price point, because seafood is often more expensive, Flynn and his team worked to create a high quality, elevated product in a beautiful space but served at a better value to the guest. To accomplish that, O SEA opened in a counter-service model. “To date, we have not been a full-service restaurant,” says Flynn. “When a guest comes in, they receive a menu tour up front at the ordering counter. We call it ‘fine casual.’” Responding to the feedback they have received from guests, Flynn is continuing to change and evolve the concept. “The community really seems to enjoy our food. The only consistent constructive piece of feedback we’ve received relates to the ordering counter,” says Flynn.

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Spring is near(ish) and it’s a great time of year to start thinking about ways to make your “green time in the garden” even greener in this new year. With a few easy adjustments, you can maximize both the pretty factor of your garden and eco-friendliness, too!

PHOTO BY KRISTIN SMETONA

by Brande Jackson

SmetonaPhoto.com

by Sheri Ledbetter

“For first time visitors, when they arrive, the menu is explained and recommendations are given as to what is in season, etc. We then take the order right there at the front counter, provide a number and water glasses and invite you to sit in the dining room wherever you like.” It was a model built for a more approachable price point and efficiency. The feedback is: "It’s a comfy space. We like the food and want to stay longer and have another glass of wine, so give us the opportunity to do so.” “So, we are doing that,” says Flynn. “We are going to eliminate the ordering counter from the restaurant.”

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Brande Jackson is the owner of Johnnye Merle’s Gardens, located in Country Roads at 216 West Chapman Ave in Old Towne Orange. www.purtyplants.com. She can be reached at www.brande@johnnyemerles.com. She is also a teacher, and leads classes on art, creativity and gardening as well as walking tours of downtown Los Angeles. 22

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118 South Glassell St

Old Towne Orange, CA 92866

714-538-6305

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“You can’t have a re-introduction of the restaurant without at least a couple new items, right?” says Flynn. O SEA will introduce a large format ‘build your own fish taco’ concept featuring a grilled whole fish with tortillas, condiments and sides. They are also creating a cioppino, a classic seafood stew with O SEA’s unique, fun take on it. And they are working on a chowder recipe, which they have not yet offered. “Everyone likes chowder,” says Flynn. “I love chowder. We’ll still put our take on it, so it fits within the philosophy of the restaurant. We want this to be a West Coast Southern Californiacentric seafood restaurant.”

O SEA 109 South Glassell St / 714-363-3309 / EatOSEA.com

w w w. O r a n g e R e v i e w . c o m / e v e n t s

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Mike Flynn

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“Guests are welcome to bring their own bottle of wine, but if you do, you must share one glass with someone in the dining room.”

What does that mean for chowder? Guests will find out in January. They will also have lunch and dinner menu pricing and will slightly increase the portion size of fish, proteins, salads and entrée plates. Part three is the introduction of a new executive chef, Carla Arce. The OC native has been the sous chef since the restaurant’s opening. All the new menu items are her creations. The layout of the restaurant will change modestly with the addition of a wine bar up front where guests can have a glass of wine and some oysters and just relax. Fun fact: Guests are welcome to bring their own bottle of wine, but if you do, you must share one glass with someone in the dining room. (Check the website for details at https://eatosea.com) “On busier nights when we have a few guests bring in a couple bottles of wine, there’s people sharing wine in the dining room and getting to know everybody. It’s really fun,” says Flynn. Flynn shares that an attraction of being in the Plaza is its legacy as a community gathering place for a number of generations. “The community has welcomed us so openly,” says Flynn. “We couldn’t be happier to be here. It feels like we have lifelong friends with so many of our neighbors. This is the restaurant that our guests seem to be asking for, so we are going to give it to them.”

PHOTO BY KRISTIN SMETONA

Debuting in January, the phase two roll out of O SEA contains three key parts: a service model transition, new menu items and a new executive chef. The first part is to begin operating as what would traditionally be considered a full-service restaurant. Guests will be able to make reservations for lunch or dinner, and there will be traditional waiter service. The second part is a redesign of the entire menu format. New items will be added.

Building Character a t

CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY

Alisa Driscoll by Julie Bawden-Davis

For Alisa Driscoll, Chapman University’s Vice President of Community Relations, giving back is a lifelong endeavor. From a young age, the Orange County native has participated in a wide variety volunteer activities. “It’s incredibly important to me to help people improve their quality of life and make the community better for everyone,” says Driscoll, who joined Chapman in 2015. “That mindset is the cornerstone of who I am.” In her work at Chapman, Driscoll wears a variety of hats—all geared toward creating open lines of communication between the community and university. “My aim is to show residents and community groups that Chapman is here to be a good neighbor and an active partner. The university has a plethora of resources that contribute to the community. It’s my job to make those amenities known.” Local Beginnings Driscoll grew up in Cypress in the late 1980s and 1990s, the oldest of two children. “My father installed live plants within shopping centers, and my mother worked in healthcare. In addition to showing me the value of hard work and education, they instilled in me how important it is to give back and be grateful.” Neither of Driscoll’s parents went to a university, but they encouraged her to do so. “My dad earned his GED and used to say to me, ‘I hope you grow up to be smarter than me.’ That stuck with me. I was the first person in my family to earn a bachelor’s degree.” She studied Classical Civilization at the University of California, Irvine, earning a Bachelor of Arts in the subject while working 50 hours a week to put herself through school. After she graduated in 2010, Driscoll had the opportunity to work at an independent publishing company. CONTINUED ON PAGE 24

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Alisa Driscoll

TALK OF THE TOWNE CONT. FROM PAGE 23

“I love to read, so I was thrilled to get a fulltime position as a book editor,” she says. “I discovered that though I love books, I am a social creature and needed more connection. After six years in publishing, I decided to get a job that would allow me to give back to the community.” Taking a substantial pay cut, Driscoll went to work in the nonprofit sector. Her first position was at Girls Inc. of Orange County, an organization dedicated to giving girls the necessary skills to become confident, successful and independent women. “Inspiring girls to be strong, smart and bold really resonated with me,” she says. Driscoll started at Girls Inc. as a volunteer and operations associate. She was promoted twice, including her final position as Assistant Director of Development. After two years with the organization, she took a position as Associate Development Director at Boys Town, a nonprofit focused on treating children’s behavioral, emotional and physical problems. She worked there for a little more than a year until Chapman recruited her in 2015. Coming to Chapman “I started at Chapman working as Project Specialist under Executive Vice President and COO Harold Hewitt,” she says. “In addition to working with a variety of regional and national organizations on behalf of Chapman, I worked on a variety of other projects. This included answering calls from community members on what was known at the time as the neighborhood hotline.” In January 2016, then President Jim Doti and Chancellor and now President Daniele Struppa decided there should be a dedicated single point of contact for neighbors and community members to easily get in touch with the university. As a result, the Office of Community Relations was formed. Driscoll worked in the new office as Communications and Operations Manager from May 2016 to May 2020, at which point the former Vice President and her boss, Jack Raubolt, retired. She was then appointed Interim Vice President of Community Relations, and the title was made official in June 2020. “I learned a great deal working with Jack, who is a wonderful mentor,” says Driscoll. “When he left, there was a great deal of concern surrounding COVID and the campus. I’m grateful to Chapman’s executive team for putting together a solid plan for dealing with the pandemic. That enabled me to focus on building trust and creating a dialogue with members of the community to reassure them regarding their concerns.” Chapman University President Daniele Struppa feels that Driscoll has done a superb job of becoming a trusted liaison between the university and community of Orange. “Alisa stepped into a delicate situation, given the great relationships that Jack, our previous VP, had established. She was very smart in taking things slow and making sure she could build trust through her actions,” he says. “I now believe she is a major asset to our institution and sits in one of the most important roles at the university. She is respected and well regarded and can be that bridge that is so important as we continue to strengthen our friendship and partnership with the beautiful town of Orange. Those collaborations, those informal moments of mutual support, are key to the success of the university, and of the city.” Those in charge of community organizations with which the Office of Community Relations collaborates agree with Struppa’s assessment. This includes Megan Penn, Co-Founder and Executive Director of the Orange Home Grown Foundation (OHG), which runs the Farmers & Artisans Market and the Education Farm. “Alisa is genuine and kind and treats everyone with respect,” says Penn. “She really cares about the Orange community and Chapman University. The farmers market operates partially on university property donated to OHG. Alisa has also supported our efforts with the annual OHG Farmer’s Market to Table Dinner that takes place on Chapman’s campus. This is our orga-

Chapman Celebrates

After being sidelined for two years because of COVID-19, Chapman Celebrates, the annual fundraising event and Broadwaystyled production, is more than ready to welcome a live audience again. “Our students love being on the stage. To say that we are excited to be back in person is an understatement,” says Giulio Ongaro, Dean of the College of Performing Arts at Chapman University. He has co-produced Chapman Celebrates since 2017. While the scope will not be too different from past shows, retrospective segments and videos are scheduled to look back at highlights from the last four decades instead of honoring special donors or people. “The main emphasis will be to celebrate our resilience, our Chapman family and its togetherness, and give a message of hope,” he explains. The show will include examples that illustrate ways the school’s performing arts stayed alive over the last two years by rethinking activities and going online. Upwards of 150 students will be involved in the production (around 100 onstage; the remainder being tasked with various backstage roles). “The songs come from a variety of sources; some musical theatre (both newer and traditional) and some pop hits,” Ongaro confirms. Considering the show’s themes, “most of the songs have texts that address that. I think the audience will love the mix. There will be the usual larger dance numbers and more intimate song and dance numbers to showcase a variety of styles, including tap.” One of Ongaro’s favorite past

gala show segments revolved around the Peggy Lee-popularized tune “Fever,” performed “like you were in a cabaret with a small group of dancers that were doing just amazing technical stuff. They were making it look easy, but it was a very complex and sophisticated dance number,” he says. “The music was wonderful.”

“The main emphasis will be to celebrate our resilience, our Chapman family and its togetherness, and give a message of hope.” Dean Giulio Ongaro

Chloe Boulard, a senior theatre studies major at Chapman who has performed at three previous galas, says she particularly enjoys seeing students from other arts disciplines, since they usually don’t mix on campus. “Because we’re all in so many different numbers, you basically get to meet everybody in the huge cast. It establishes great connections while you’re at school and in the future.” Rehearsing for the event at Musco Center for the Arts is always memorable for Boulard. “All of the sudden, you’re on the stage with lights, sound, makeup and costumes. To look out onto the empty house and have the Musco to yourself and share that with fellow students is an amazing experience. “What I’m most looking forward to this year is the vocal music rehearsals, where all of us hang out in the choir room, go over the music together and learn it all at once,” continues Boulard. “I haven’t

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Alisa Driscoll

marks its 40th Anniversary!

sung in a big group like that in multiple years. I am so excited to get back in that room and hear everybody’s voices altogether instead of through Zoom or after in a video that’s been mixed in post-production.” Proceeds from Chapman Celebrates—the biggest fundraiser of the year—go toward the Chapman Scholarship Fund. More than 80 percent of the school’s students receive financial support. Boulard obtained a talent scholarship, so she knows how valuable it is to have such money available. “Adding that on top of academic scholarships makes Chapman more accessible to students who are really thankful to be here,” she says. “It makes such a difference in an arts education to have money and makes us feel like we were actively chosen.” Rachael Samimi, Director of

University Events at Chapman, notes, “In 40 years, we’ve raised well over $40 million, which is pretty spectacular. Hundreds of students have benefited from this event in terms of scholarship.” Samimi emphasized the scholarships are for all students. For Samimi, the best part of Chapman Celebrates is “seeing students so excited to be part of the event. It’s an opportunity for them to say thank you to the donors, and it’s a really special gift to be able to perform.” Opening night is 7:30 pm Feb. 11, with 6 pm pre-show reception, tickets are $78-$403; Gala night is 6:30 pm Feb. 12, with 5 pm preshow cocktail reception, sponsorship tickets are $2,000-$10,000. Musco Center for the Arts, Chapman University, 415 North Glassell St. More information: 714-997-6812 or chapman.edu/ events/chapman-celebrates.

CONT. FROM PAGE 24

nization’s biggest fundraiser, and we heavily rely on the university’s support to make this event possible.” Driscoll sits on several boards, including the Rotary Club of Orange and the Executive Board of the Orange Chamber of Commerce. “Alisa is one of the Chamber’s most valued executive committee members,” says Elizabeth Holloman, Executive Director of the Orange Chamber of Commerce. “She is warm, caring, trustworthy, empathetic and contributes great ideas and counsel. She also never hesitates to jump in to lead a committee or do the work necessary to get something done. It was under her leadership that the Chamber’s recent State of the City was such a success.” Community Service Passion Projects In addition to her “day job,” Driscoll is involved in a variety of projects and organizations close to her heart. This includes serving on the board of the Mariposa Women & Family Center, which offers free and low-cost mental healthcare to those in need and on the board of the Youth Centers of Orange, which provides programming and mentoring for local youth. At Chapman, she is also involved with diversity and inclusion initiatives, including the Chapman Diversity Project, designed to help ensure that everyone’s voice is heard and respected. “I strive to be the kind of leader who is authentic and can be trusted,” says Driscoll, who received her Master’s in Leadership Development from Chapman in 2019. “My goal is to inspire and lead by example while creating fair and equitable spaces for all voices to be heard. We’re all continuing to learn. It’s a process; not a destination.”

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Old Towne Orange Est. 2001 Located between the famous Orange Traffic Circle & Chapman University, in a historic turn-of-the century home built in 1915.

264 North Glassell St. 714-633-3260 Tue - Wed: 10:30 am - 5 pm Thu - Sat: 10:30 am - 8 pm Ruta’s Old Town Inn Orange

Bright flowers dance on the page, the tendrils of their vines entwining around colorful birds, butterflies and other creatures, ranging from lions to deer to roosters. A large, elaborate initial letter, itself entwined with branches and flowers, takes the center stage, framing an elegantly painted Biblical scene. Gracefully calligraphed text flows as if organically growing among the scenes of nature and faith. These are the illuminated manuscript pages designed by Capio Lumen—Latin for “capture the light”—a pseudonym used by Orange-based artist Michael Johnson when creating his complex digital-collage artworks. His works are currently on exhibition at the Hilbert Museum of California Art at Chapman University, through May 7. “We thought Michael’s works were exquisitely beautiful and like nothing we’d ever seen

before in the digital-art realm,” says Mary Platt, Director of the Hilbert Museum. “He’d never had a museum exhibition before, and we had never shown a digital-art exhibition before, so we thought the time was right to bring his work to a wider audience and to expand our own horizons.” Johnson, a professor emeritus in the Media Arts Design department at Cypress College, was finally able to create his pieces full-time in his Old Towne Orange studio/home after 38 years of college teaching. His master’s degree is in painting and drawing, and he has studied various historical forms of art, including paintings and illuminated manuscripts created during the medieval and Renaissance eras. “Back in 1991, I worked for the computer software imaging company ULead Systems, which had the first true color image editing software, PhotoStyler,

This charming bed & breakfast is located in the Old Towne Orange historic district, one block from Chapman University, and offers tranquility in a quaint Victorian setting.

274 North Glassell St. 714-628-1818 E-mail: info@rutasoldtowninn.com

Old Town Tustin Est. 1978 Housed in one of Old Town Tustin’s oldest buildings, on the corner of Main & C streets in historic Old Town Tustin.

158 West Main St. 714-731-9807 Mon - Sat: 11 am - 8 pm Sun: 11 am - 3 pm Downtown Fullerton Est. 1970 The first of three historic locations that have become favorites for the health conscience, and offering something for everyone.

211 North Pomona Ave. 714-738-9339 Mon - Sat: 10:30 am - 8:30 pm

Where It All Began, 52 Years Ago! W W W. RUTABEGORZ .COM 26

O l d To w n e O r a n g e P L A Z A R E V I E W

F i n d o u t W h a t ’s H a p p e n i n g i n t o w n e a t :


sold through Aldus software, which eventually merged into Adobe,” says Johnson. “I modified a book cover I did for them to create Christmas cards, and that started a yearly tradition.” That tradition now has grown to include religious-themed works of digital fine art that can be enjoyed throughout the year. He describes himself as an “Irish Catholic rebel” and is a longtime member of Holy Family Cathedral in Orange. He feels

very strongly about his faith because “it gives me a connection to a greater purpose in life, making me keenly aware that what is beautiful reflects that which is transcendent.” Why would a 21st-century artist develop a passion for illuminated manuscripts? Why did Michael Johnson choose that venerable art form—and why did he choose to reflect it via the modern digital tool kit? Manuscript illumination in Europe began in the Middle Ages and was once the province of dedicated monks who meticulously painted the complex designs by hand on vellum (calfskin), applying precious gold leaf and painstakingly inking the text. “Illumination” comes from the Latin word “illuminare,” to light up, and refers to the elaborate use of gold and silver leaf, brilliant pigments and dazzlingly complicated illustrations that bring these handmade books to life. The results were Bibles, prayer books and books of hours that were both sublime works of art and private devotionals, and often also practical teaching tools in an era before the printing press was

invented. “Medieval illuminated manuscripts were one of the first forms of mass education and communication using the design elements of drawing and painting, calligraphy and graphic design,” Johnson says. Translating this ancient form of art with the new artistic tools of the computer is what makes Johnson’s manuscript pages exciting and different, yet still firmly part of the old tradition. “The tools may be new, but the intent is the same,” he says. Johnson’s artworks are digital paintings mixed with digital collages, using historical images from ancient manuscripts. Often there are more than 1,000 layers used in a single work as he “paints” on the screen in Corel Painter. “I will grab a flower or butterfly from a photographic source, or a vine for the border from an old manuscript, and then flip it and manipulate it,” he says. “A sky, birds, animals and fields go behind and around the main figures. I am always trying to use design elements like color and scale to move the eye around within the composition.” The final image is then color-

corrected and printed on Johnson’s large-scale Epson P-6000 printer with archival inks and paper. Often, he will create two images of a finished design, one with text in Latin and the other in English. Inspiration for his work, Johnson says, often comes while reflecting on Sunday readings in church, often corresponding with personal daily topics, or reflecting upon events on a global scale. “Once a chosen prayer or Gospel passage leads to an image in my imagination, I spend hours on the Internet researching source material from libraries and academic institutions. I’m like a kid with a pair of scissors and an oversupply of magazine photos to build a collage with.” The exhibition “Capio Lumen/ Capture the Light: Michael Johnson’s Digital Illuminated Manuscripts” is on view at the Hilbert Museum of California Art at Chapman University through May 7, 2022. The museum is located at 167 North Atchison St., Orange, across from the train station. Museum hours are Tues-Sat, 11 am to 5 pm, and admission is free. Call 714-516-5880 or visit www.hilbertmuseum.org.

OPEN STUDIO! Every Saturday from 2 to 5 pm or by appointment New Paintings by M. Welman inspired by powerful waves scattering brilliant sunlight, creating a fantastic light show... The magic and beauty of the Ocean in action! See it all at:

Welman Art Studio 2402 North Glassell St. #A Orange, CA 92865 MarinusWelman.com marinuswelman@gmail.com

714 998-8662 “Smiles of the Earth and the Sparkling Sea” 20” x 24” / Oil on canvas w w w. O r a n g e R e v i e w . c o m / e v e n t s

Januar y / Februar y

2022

27


Circle in the Square by Kirk Sivertsen /

www.OrangeReview .com/archive/circle-in-the-square

COUNTRY ROADS ANTIQUES & GARDENS

The World According to Bowls? Really? Yes, this is an article about bowls. Keep reading. We have a theory about collecting vintage things, and that theory is that you can figure out a lot about a person by the type of bowls that they collect or use in their home. Below are some common styles that are collected, and our completely unscientific, speculative theories about the personality associated with their collectors. Plus, a little history lesson, too. ☺ Fiesta and Bauer Spicy and colorful, this collector wants their collection to be seen and remembered! A style of pottery known for its art deco aesthetic, people who

. . . Bowls by Brande Jackson

collect Fiestaware and Bauer often like midcentury modern looks, as well. Fiesta was first launched in 1936 and is still made in Newell, West Virginia. Bauer is older, first launched as a pottery line in 1895 in Kentucky, and later manufactured primarily in Los Angeles, specifically in the Lincoln Heights neighborhood. Both brands are known for their bold colors and distinctive lines and subtle patterns. Yellowware Yellowware is a classic: stately and refined, yet also simple

in its beauty. These collectors tend to have a style that leans towards really old, primitive furniture and dark woods. Yellowware originated in England and found its way to America with some of the earliest colonies on the East Coast. Production ramped up in the 1820s, with a lot of Yellowware being made in New Jersey, and later, in Ohio. Yellowware can be quite old—among the oldest type of pottery or bowls one will find in a typical antique

store today. It can be tricky to accurately date or appraise, and it is still being manufactured in the present day. Ironstone and Restaurant Ware This collector likes function and might have a taste for vintage advertising and graphic design. Ironstone is heavy and durable, which is where the name comes from. There is no iron in the pieces. The name is a reference to the weight and durability. The pottery, like Yellowware,

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Ten Years Ago in Old Towne Orange: “2012” Editions: on-line at https://OrangeReview.com/digitalpress/48

HAPPY HOURS: TUE-SAT 11-8 / SUN 11-5 / FREE WI-FI

117 North Glassell Street • 714-289-1683

Old Towne Plaza Map

January / February 2012

Property: Artists in Orange

“News for the Neighborhood” #50

www. TPCCUPCAKERY.com / FACEBOOK 11-7 / TUE-SAT 11-8 / SUN 11-5 / FREE WI-FI

HAPPY HOURS: MON

March / April 2012

Inside Back Cover What’s Happening

Property: Meet Dale & Gayle

. . . . . pg 5

New to the Neighborhood Three for Three . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 8

New: Integrating Old Towne Orange Talent: eXene

Know the Neighbors Celebrating Orange . . . . . . . pg 12 Old Towne Talent Sign Painter Patrick

. . . . . . pg

Know: Celebrating Orange

15

Talk of the Towne Foundation Games . . . . . . . .pg 27

Talent: Patrick G. Smith

Neighborhood Spotlight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 28 Old Towne Property

Talk: An Antique Affair to Remember

Meet Dale & Gayle . pg

Talk: CFO Foundation Games

16

www.OrangeReview.com

Talk: A Brighter Economic Forecast

Resident Old Towne Specialist

Talk: OPLF Library Legacy Gala

Resident Old Towne Specialist

Seen: The Birthplace of Orange

Notes: The Playground Since 1949

Notes: David Hockney

Since 1949

Orange’s #1 Home Seller Serving

Orange Since 1949

714- 997-0050 x 101 OldTowneOrange .com OrangeRealty .com

www.OrangeReview.com w w w. f a c e b o o k . c o m / O r a n g e R e v i e w

28

O l d To w n e O r a n g e P L A Z A R E V I E W

Inside Art: SHAG

Orange’s #1 Home Seller Serving

Orange Since 1949

714- 997-0050 x 101 OldTowneOrange .com OrangeRealty .com w w w. f a c e b o o k . c o m / O r a n g e R e v i e w

F i n d o u t W h a t ’s H a p p e n i n g i n t o w n e a t :


WIN $50.00 OFF ANY PURCHASE from any Plaza Review advertiser featured in this issue. NAME PHONE NUMBER E-MAIL COMMENTS, ETC. Mail to:

fashion! Wooden and metal bowls never were not in style, but they have really come back in a big way in recent years. This collector is often into rustic looks with a touch of the bohemian. Wood and metal pieces are incredibly adaptable when it comes to styles. They blend in nicely with a variety of looks and aesthetics. Regardless of if you have one bowl or 100, it just might say something about your tastes! Having been in the vintage business for more than 30 years, we have seen trends come and go, but a good collection is always in style.

www.CountryRoadsAntiques .com

714-532-3041 Open Daily 10 am - 5 pm

2 1 6 W E S T C H A P M A N AV E . /

STARBUCKS

®

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OLD TOWNE ORANGE

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714.628.0633

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in Old Towne Orange!”

M ay / J u n e

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“Striving to bring an exceptional experience to life . . .

Winner is selected randomly by an advertiser of the Old Towne Orange PLAZA REVIEW.

Entries must be postmarked by February 15, 2022

COUPON WINNER

Believing in Blaze When Jori Stringer and her family relocated from Missouri to California in 2016, they searched for a place to call home, soon finding the perfect nesting ground in Orange. “We’ve moved a lot, which has exposed us to different cultures and impacted our perspective,” says Stringer, a home-school teacher/stay-at-home mother of three daughters, whose husband, Collin, is an evangelist preacher at the Tustin Church of Christ. “We related to Old Towne Orange’s small-town feel. The community is similar to where we lived back east. Since settling down here, we’ve met friendly people and encountered good experiences.” Stringer’s life revolves around her faith and connection with family and extended families formed through friendship. “I like to help people,” she says. “For instance, Collin and I sometimes babysit for parents who appreciate a night out.” Stringer chose Blaze Pizza for her coupon. “We like ordering individual pizzas and sharing in the pizzeria’s friendly atmosphere,”

2012

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117 North Glassell Street • 714-289-1683

“News for the Neighborhood” #51

117 North Glassell Street • 714-289-1683

www. OrangeReview .com

May / June 2012

Property: Moderne Family

What’s Happening Around Towne . . . . . . . pg 5

Taste our

Cupcakes

What’s Happening

. . . . pg 4

New to the Neighborhood

. . pg 9

★ July / August 2012 ★

Made from Scratch, Baked with Love!

www. TPCCUPCAKERY.com / FACEBOOK 11-7 / TUE-SAT 11-8 / SUN 11-5 / FREE WI-FI

HAPPY HOURS: MON

“News for the Neighborhood” #52

Property: Joe’s Home

Old Towne Talent . . . . . . . . pg 11

New: Smiling in Old Towne

Old Towne

Plaza Map

2012

Winning SweetVictory 165 N . G LASSELL ST . / O RANGE / 714- 997-CAKE

www. TPCCUPCAKERY.com / FACEBOOK 11-7 / TUE-SAT 11-8 / SUN 11-5 / FREE WI-FI

HAPPY HOURS: MON

www. OrangeReview .com

Open Daily 11 am - 11 pm

Old Towne Orange / 11 am - 9 pm

714.628.0633

by Marianne Lauren

she says. “We find it fun to sit by the window and watch the passersby.” Joined by her husband and teenage daughter when redeeming her coupon, Stringer ordered her favorite—pepperoni with extra cheese. “After dinner, we strolled around the Plaza and enjoyed passing by the quaint establishments.”

July / August

Buy 1 yogurt (10 oz or more), get one (up to 10 oz) free. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other offers or discounts. Offer expires 8/31/12.

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121 North Lemon St

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SweetVictory Taste our

Best Hole in the Wall 2011

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originated in England. In the early 1800s, the potter Charles James Mason patented it there. Restaurant Ware, which is sometimes referred to as “hotel china,” is often made of Ironstone and is basically a catchall term for vintage dishes that once had commercial uses and are collected for the old designs and labels and logos that adorn them. A well curated but mixed and matched Restaurant Ware collection is one of our favorite things to encounter! Wooden, Brass and Silver Bowls This is a person who knows their look will never go out of

Old Towne Orange Plaza Review 134 South Glassell St. #C, Orange CA 92866

. . . pg 31

Know the Neighbors . . . . . pg 12 Talk of the Towne . . . . . . . . pg 21

New: A Welcoming Calm

Plaza Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 31

Know: Building a Better Orange

Know: The Kids are Alright!

New to the Neighorhood . . . . pg 8

Know

Character: Dr. Daniele Struppa

the Neighbors . . . . . . . pg 12

Talk of the Towne

. pg

15

Joe’s Home

Talent: Rocking with Miss O.C.

Resident Old Towne Specialist

★ ★ ★

Resident Old Towne Specialist

Since 1949

OrangeRealty . c o m OldTowneOrange . c o m

714- 997-0050 x 101 •••

Moderne oderne MFamily Family

w w w. O r a n g e R e v i e w . c o m / e v e n t s

pg 16

Seen: Orange Intermediate School

Talk: Leadership Orange Talk: Love Dissemination

Talk: Orange Farmers Market Turns One Orange’s #1 Home Seller

Character: Dr. Tom Campbell

Old Towne Property . . . . pg 15

Talent and More . . .

Since 1949

Orange’s #1 Home Seller

Notes: Back to Natives

OrangeRealty . c o m OldTowneOr ange . c o m

714- 997-0050 x 101

Januar y / Februar y

2022

29


O RANGE P LAZA R EVIEW A DVERTISER I NDEX & MAP PG

ADVERTISER / ADDRESS / PHONE

MAP

ANTIQUES & COLLECTABLES: 12 Antique Depot . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 155 South Glassell St (714) 516-1731 12 Antique Station . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 178 South Glassell St (714) 633-3934 28 Country Roads Antiques . . . . . 39 204 West Chapman (714) 532-3041 12 Golden Bear Antiques . . . . . . . 23 208 East Chapman Ave (714) 363-3996 29 Orange Circle Antique Mall . . . 35 118 South Glassell St (714) 538-8160 17 Summerhill Ltd . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 110 South Glassell St (714) 771-7782 ARTS & CULTURE: 23 Clyde San Juan - Art Classes CityOfOrange.org/OrangeRec 5 Hilbert Museum of Calif Art . . . 2 167 North Atchison St (714) 516-5880 27 Marinus Welman - Artist . . . . . . D 2402 North Glassell St (714) 998-8662 26 Naranjita Flamenco . . . . . . . . . . E 301 East Katella Ave (714) 400-2939 25 Pacific Conservatory . . . . . . . . . F 1311 East Katella Ave (714) 545-1217 AUTOMOTIVE: 16 Titan Automotive . . . . . . . . . . . . K 939 West Chapman Ave (714) 997-2311 32 Villa Ford of Orange . . . . . . . . . G 2550 North Tustin St (877) 585-3090

9

DINING & PUBS: 1886 Brewing Company . . . . . . 8 114 North Glassell St (714) 922-8130

PG

ADVERTISER / ADDRESS / PHONE

3

15

1

12

20

11

26

9

1

29

20

MAP

DINING & PUBS: Blaze Pizza 101 South Glassell St . . . . . . . . 25 (714) 783-9845 2139 North Tustin St . . . . . . . . . . H (714) 408-7361 Byblos Cafe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 129 West Chapman Ave (714) 538-7180 O Sea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 109 South Glassell St (714) 362-3309 O’Hara’s Pub . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 150 North Glassell St (714) 532-9264 Paris in a Cup - Tea Salon . . . . 27 119 South Glassell St (714) 538-9413 Ruby’s Diner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 186 Atchison St (714) 639-7829 Rutabegorz Restaurant . . . . . . 15 264 North Glassell St (714) 633-3260 Smoqued BBQ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 128 North Glassell St (714) 633-7427 Taco Adobe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 121 North Lemon St (714) 628-0633 Starbucks Coffee . . . . . . . . . . . 38 44 Plaza Square (714) 288-9754 Zito’s New York Style Pizza . . . 13 156 North Glassell St (714) 771-2222

EVENTS / ORGANIZATIONS: Chapman University . . . . . . . . 17 One University Dr Events.Chapman.edu 21 Orange Chamber . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Orange May Parade 34 Plaza Square (714) 538-3581 21 Orange Farmers Market . . . . . . 1 303 West Palm Ave www.OrangeHomegrown.org 6

PG

ADVERTISER / ADDRESS / PHONE

MAP

HEALTH, FITNESS & BEAUTY: 25 Anchored Performance . . . . . . . C (714) 932-7066 AnchoredPerformance@gmail.com 16 Circle City Barbers . . . . . . . . . . 5 133 West Chapman (714) 453-9765 1 Orange Circle Optometry . . . . . 20 227 East Chapman Ave (714) 538-6424 17 Skin Care by Christina . . . . . 230 369 South Glassell St (174) 450-2878 1 Smiles of Orange . . . . . . . . . . . . L 743 East Chapman Ave (714) 997-5495 JEWELRY 22 Rambling Rose Jewelry . . . . . 34 118 South Glassell St (714) 538-6305 13 Renée Jewelers . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 138 NorthGlassell St (714) 538-1956 REAL ESTATE: 10 Caliber Real Estate Group . . . . 33 134 South Glassell St (714) 988-6339 1 Orange Realty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . N 1537 East Chapman Ave (714) 997-0050 19 Real Estate Establishment . . . 21 550 East Chapman Ave (714) 744-5711 4 Willits Real Estate Group . . . . 18 229 North Glassell St (714) 315-8120 8 Woman’s Club Event Center . . . 22 121 South Center St (714) 605-3753 SERVICES: 14 Bonham Construction . . . . . . . 24 (949) 532-6274 19 Bear Flag Construction (949) 795-6812 BearFlagOC.com

PG

ADVERTISER / ADDRESS / PHONE

MAP

SERVICES: 13 Guardian Roofs . . . . . . . . . . . . . J 1010 North Batavia St (714) 633-3619 7 Jadtec Security Services . . . . . A 1520 West Yale Ave (714) 282-0828 11 Knox General Insurance . . . . . 31 226 South Glassell St (714) 744-6537 14 Old Towne Plumbing . . . . . . . . 24 (714) 213-5211 18 Shafer Plumbing Contractors . . B 1307 West Trenton Ave (714) 974-9448 16 Shannon Family Mortuary . . . . M 1005 East Chapman Ave (714) 771-1000 15 Sign Painter - Patrick Smith (714) 282-7097 pgsmithdesign.com 18 State Farm - Adam Guss . . . . . 7 60 Plaza Square (714) 978-4200 SPECIALTY RETAIL: 13 Army Navy Store . . . . . . . . . . . 28 131 South Glassell St (714) 639-7910 1 Dragonfly Shops & Gardens . . 14 260 North Glassell St (714) 289-4689 22 Johnnye Merle Gardens . . . . . 39 204 West Chapman Ave (714) 532-3041 9 Laurenly Boutique . . . . . . . . . . 11 142 North Glassell St (714) 538-7567 23 Matoska Trading Company . . . 19 123 North Glassell St (714) 516-9940 TOURISM: 22 Orangeland RV Park . . . . . . . . . . I 1600 West Struck Ave (714) 633-0414 20 Ruta’s Old Town Inn . . . . . . . . 16 274 North Glassell St (714) 628-1818

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2012

OPEN:

Mon - Fri: Noon - 11 Sat - Sun: 11 - 11

121 North Lemon St Old Towne Orange / 11 am - 9 pm

714.628.0633

September / October

Buy 1 yogurt (10 oz or more), get one (up to 10 oz) free. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other offers or discounts. Offer expires 10/31/12.

“The True Taste of Baja”

TACO ADOBE

“The True Taste of Baja” Enjoy a made-to-order meal featuring fresh produce, USDA premium Ranchero meats & the season’s freshest shrimp & fish.

Visit us at:

FINAL NOTICE

Buy 1 yogurt (10 oz or more), get one (up to 10 oz) free. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other offers or discounts. Offer expires 12/31/12.

Orange’s Solar Program Closes November 5, 2012

OPEN:

Old Towne Orange / 11 am - 9 pm

714.628.0633

FREE YOGURT!

Mon - Fri: Noon - 11 Sat - Sun: 11 - 11

121 North Lemon St

OLD TOWNE ORANGE

www.

Best Hole in the Wall 2012

coupon code B111

Best Hole in the Wall 2011

TACO ADOBE

coupon code B111

Ten Years Ago in Old Towne Orange: “2012” Editions: on-line at https://OrangeReview.com/digitalpress/48

OLD TOWNE ORANGE

www.

2012

CALL NOW TO SIGN UP

1.800.785.5482

Visit us at:

.net

November / December

ATTENTION ORANGE & VILLA PARK RESIDENTS Get Paid to Go Solar by Participating in this Community Program

.net

OrangeSolarProgram.org C10-839077

117 North Glassell Street • 714-289-1683

117 North Glassell Street • 714-289-1683

News for the Neighborhood #53

September / October 2012

News for the Neighborhood #54

OrangeReview .com

November / December 2012

OrangeReview .com

Property: Home with the Imbodens

Property: The Wonderful World of Jenkins Winning SweetVictory Taste our

Cupcakes

Made from Scratch, Baked with Love!

165 N . G LASSELL ST . / O RANGE / 714- 997-CAKE

New: They Bear Gifts

www. TPCCUPCAKERY.com / FACEBOOK 11-7 / TUE-SAT 11-8 / SUN 11-5 / FREE WI-FI

What’s Happening . . . . . pg 3

New: Smoke’n in Old Towne

HAPPY HOURS: MON

New to the Neighborhood What’s Happening . . . . . pg 4

New to the Neighborhood

. . pg 9

Know: For Our Well Being

★ ★ ★

The Wonderful World of Jenkins 15

Property

. . . . . . pg

Talent: Daniel Alfred Wachs

At Home with Property

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pg 13

the Imbodens

. . . . . . . . pg 31

Seen: Orange May Festival

Resident Old Towne Specialist

Old Towne Map

. . . . . . . . pg 31

Character: Doy Henley

Since 1949

Orange’s #1 Home Seller

Talk: Musco Center for the Arts

Art: Photographer Jeanine Hill

Since 1949

Orange’s #1 Home Seller

OrangeRealty . c o m OldTowneOr ange . c o m

OrangeRealty . c o m OldTowneOrange . c o m

714- 997-0050 x 101

714- 997-0050 x 101

O l d To w n e O r a n g e P L A Z A R E V I E W

Talent: Steve Soest

Resident Old Towne Specialist

Garden: Urban Chickens

30

Know: Helping Out

Talk of the Towne . . . . . . . . pg 18

★ ★ Old Towne Map

. . pg 6

Old Towne Talent . . . . . . . . . pg 9

Seen: The Hotel Palmyra

F i n d o u t W h a t ’s H a p p e n i n g i n t o w n e a t :


to 91 FREEWAY

Orange Farmers Market

1

PALM

Ruta’s Old Town Inn

16

Rutabegorz

15

The Dragonfly Shops

14

17

C HAPMAN U NIVERSITY College of Performing Arts

AVENUE

18 Willits Real Estate Group

Hilbert Museum of California Art

MAPLE

8

Summerhill Ltd.

36

Orange Circle Antique Mall

35

Rambling Rose Jewelry

34

Caliber Real Estate

33

2

28 Army-Navy Store PLAZA REVIEW Advertisers outside the PLAZA SQUARE RETAIL DISTRICT.

29 Antique Depot LINCOLN

32

Y

OL

w w w. O r a n g e R e v i e w . c o m / e v e n t s

ORANGEWOOD

LA VETA AVENUE

SA

AVE

WALNUT

AVE

Titan Automotive ST

30

Skin Care by Christina

(5 )

K CHAPMAN

GARDEN

FW

E

KATELLA

H Blaze Pizza

F

J

Orangeland RV Park

( 57) FWY

(55) FWY

Anchored Preformance

G

Pacific Conservatory

Guardian Roofs

I

Knox General Insurance

Villa Ford of Orange

Naranjito Flamenco

C

31

D

AVE

Welman Art Studio

B

MAIN

FW

Shafer Plumbing

AVENUE

ORANGE

N O RT H

GARDEN GROVE (22) FWY

ALMOND

to 22 FREEWAY

D

TO

(5 )

N E W P O RT B E AC H

STREET GLASSELL

ORAN GE (57) FWY

b et W

A

ty

AVENUE

C ou n

SA

A N

oTo

Woman’s Club Events Center

A ge

CH A PMA N

22

3 HOUR PUBLIC 27 Paris in a Cup PARKING

Jadtec Security

ra n

we

ARTESIA / RIVERSIDE (91) FWY

N TA

Antique Station

Real Estate Establishment

26 O Sea

fO

en

e

5,

7 & 91 Fr e ew a y s , i nt 5, 5 he He ar

24

21

Orange City Hall

Golden Bear Antiques

Old Towne Plumbing

to

th

3 HOUR PUBLIC PARKING 5 2,

25 Blaze Pizza

37

to 55 FREEWAY

Orange Realty

Orange Chamber of Commerce

23

Bonham Construction

38

CHAPMAN

Shannon Family Mortuary

3 HOUR PUBLIC PARKING

OLIVE STREET

LEMON STREET

CYPRESS STREET

Country Roads Antiques Johnnye Merle Gardens

EAST

Smiles of Orange

Starbucks Coffee

39

Orange Main Library & History Center

20

ST

Old Towne Post Office

Wells Fargo Bank

PLAZA PLAZA PARK PARK

CHAPMAN

SOUTH GLASSELL

WEST

Orange Circle Optometry

7

6

5 to 5 & 57 FREEWAY

Citizens Business Bank

L

M

N

AVE GLASSELL

Byblos Cafe

Circle City Barbers

Adam Guss State Farm

NEWPORT BEACH (55) FWY

1886 Brewing Co

19 Matoska Trading Company

CENTER STREET

9

ST

Smoqued BBQ

TUSTIN

10

GRAND STREET

Reneé Jewelers

ORANGE STREET

11

3 HOUR PUBLIC PARKING

Laurenly

4 Taco Adobe

12

O’Hara’s Pub

NORTH GLASSELL

13 NY Pizza

3 HOUR PUBLIC PARKING

FREE ALL ALL DAY DAY PARKING PARKING FREE

Ruby’s Diner

3

N G E i s ce nt e re d

DIGITAL ON-LINE PLAZA MAP

Zito’s

2

O RA NE

AVENUE

GROVE (22) FWY

Y

Januar y / Februar y

2022

31


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